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Sample records for affects striatal drd2

  1. DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism modulates the effect of ventral striatal activation on working memory performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W;

    2014-01-01

    study found an interaction between intrinsic motivation and the DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism (rs1800497), suggesting that A-carriers of rs1800497 are significantly more sensitive to motivation in order to improve during working memory (WM) training. Using data from the two large-scale imaging genetic data...... sets, IMAGEN (n=1080, age 13-15 years) and BrainChild (n∼300, age 6-27), we investigated whether rs1800497 is associated with WM. In the IMAGEN data set, we tested whether VS/caudate activation during reward anticipation was associated with WM performance and whether rs1800497 and VS/caudate activation...... interact to affect WM performance. We found that rs1800497 was associated with WM performance in IMAGEN and BrainChild. Higher VS and caudate activation during reward processing were significantly associated with higher WM performance (p<0.0001). An interaction was found between the DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism...

  2. Prefronto-striatal physiology is associated with schizotypy and is modulated by a functional variant of DRD2

    OpenAIRE

    Taurisano, Paolo; Romano, Raffaella; MANCINI, Marina; Giorgio, Annabella Di; Antonucci, Linda A.; Fazio, Leonardo; Rampino, Antonio; Quarto, Tiziana; Gelao, Barbara; Porcelli, Annamaria; Papazacharias, Apostolos; Ursini, Gianluca; Caforio, Grazia; Masellis, Rita; Niccoli-Asabella, Artor

    2014-01-01

    “Schizotypy” is a latent organization of personality related to the genetic risk for schizophrenia. Some evidence suggests that schizophrenia and schizotypy share some biological features, including a link to dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling. A polymorphism in the D2 gene (DRD2 rs1076560, guanine > thymine (G > T)) has been associated with the D2 short/long isoform expression ratio, as well as striatal dopamine signaling and prefrontal cortical activity during different cognitive operations...

  3. Prefronto-striatal physiology is associated with schizotypy and is modulated by a functional variant of DRD2

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo eTaurisano; Raffaella eRomano; Marina eMancini; Annabella eDi Giorgio; Linda Antonella Antonucci; Leonardo eFazio; Antonio eRampino; Tiziana eQuarto; Barbara eGelao; Annamaria ePorcelli; Apostolos ePapazacharias; Gianluca eUrsini; Grazia eCaforio; Rita eMasellis; Artor eNiccoli Asabella

    2014-01-01

    Schizotypy is a latent organization of personality related to the genetic risk for schizophrenia. Some evidence suggests that schizophrenia and schizotypy share some biological features, including a link to dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling. A polymorphism in the D2 gene (DRD2 rs1076560, G>T) has been associated with the D2 short/long isoform expression ratio, as well as with striatal dopamine signaling and prefrontal cortical activity during different cognitive operations, which are measure...

  4. Prefronto-striatal physiology is associated with schizotypy and is modulated by a functional variant of DRD2

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    Paolo eTaurisano

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizotypy is a latent organization of personality related to the genetic risk for schizophrenia. Some evidence suggests that schizophrenia and schizotypy share some biological features, including a link to dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling. A polymorphism in the D2 gene (DRD2 rs1076560, G>T has been associated with the D2 short/long isoform expression ratio, as well as with striatal dopamine signaling and prefrontal cortical activity during different cognitive operations, which are measures that are altered in patients with schizophrenia. Here, our Our aim is to determine the association of schizotypy scores with the DRD2 rs1076560 genotype in healthy individuals, as well as and their interaction on with prefrontal activity during attention and D2 striatal signaling. A total of 83 healthy subjects were genotyped for DRD2 rs1076560 and completed the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ. Twenty-six 26 participants underwent SPECT with [123I]IBZM D2 receptor radiotracer, while 68 performed an attentional control task during fMRI. We found that rs1076560 GT subjects had greater SPQ scores than GG individuals. Moreover, the interaction between schizotypy and the GT genotype predicted prefrontal activity and related attentional behavior, as well as striatal binding of IBZM. No interaction was found in GG individuals.These individuals. These results suggest that rs1076560 GT healthy individuals are prone to higher levels higher levels of schizotypy, and that the interaction between rs1076560 and schizotypy scores modulates phenotypes related to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, like such as prefrontal activity and striatal dopamine signaling. These results provide systems-level qualitative evidence for mapping the construct of schizotypy in healthy individuals onto the schizophrenia continuum.

  5. Prediction of striatal D2 receptor binding by DRD2/ANKK1 TaqIA allele status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Sarah A; Bogdan, Ryan; Love-Gregory, Latisha; Corral-Frías, Nadia S; Koller, Jonathan M; Black, Kevin J; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S; Barch, Deanna M; Hershey, Tamara

    2016-10-01

    In humans, the A1 (T) allele of the dopamine (DA) D2 receptor/ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1 (DRD2/ANKK1) TaqIA (rs1800497) single nucleotide polymorphism has been associated with reduced striatal DA D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R) availability. However, radioligands used to estimate D2/D3R are displaceable by endogenous DA and are nonselective for D2R, leaving the relationship between TaqIA genotype and D2R specific binding uncertain. Using the positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand, (N-[(11) C]methyl)benperidol ([(11) C]NMB), which is highly selective for D2R over D3R and is not displaceable by endogenous DA, the current study examined whether DRD2/ANKK1 TaqIA genotype predicts D2R specific binding in two independent samples. Sample 1 (n = 39) was composed of obese and nonobese adults; sample 2 (n = 18) was composed of healthy controls, unmedicated individuals with schizophrenia, and siblings of individuals with schizophrenia. Across both samples, A1 allele carriers (A1+) had 5 to 12% less striatal D2R specific binding relative to individuals homozygous for the A2 allele (A1-), regardless of body mass index or diagnostic group. This reduction is comparable to previous PET studies of D2/D3R availability (10-14%). The pooled effect size for the difference in total striatal D2R binding between A1+ and A1- was large (0.84). In summary, in line with studies using displaceable D2/D3R radioligands, our results indicate that DRD2/ANKK1 TaqIA allele status predicts striatal D2R specific binding as measured by D2R-selective [(11) C]NMB. These findings support the hypothesis that DRD2/ANKK1 TaqIA allele status may modify D2R, perhaps conferring risk for certain disease states. PMID:27241797

  6. DRD2 and PPP1R1B (DARPP-32) polymorphisms independently confer increased risk for autism spectrum disorders and additively predict affected status in male-only affected sib-pair families

    OpenAIRE

    Hettinger Joe A; Liu Xudong; Hudson Melissa L; Lee Alana; Cohen Ira L; Michaelis Ron C; Schwartz Charles E; Lewis Suzanne ME; Holden Jeanette JA

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) modulates executive functions, learning, and emotional processing, all of which are impaired in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Our previous findings suggest a role for dopamine-related genes in families with only affected males. Methods We examined two additional genes which affect DA function, the DRD2 and PPP1R1B (DARPP-32) genes, in a cohort of 112 male-only affected sib-pair families. Selected polymorphisms spannin...

  7. Contrasting changes in DRD1 and DRD2 splice variant expression in schizophrenia and affective disorders, and associations with SNPs in postmortem brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaalund, S S; Newburn, E N; Ye, Tuo;

    2014-01-01

    working memory that relies on normal dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) function. To better understand the association of dopamine receptors with SCZ, we studied the expression of three DRD2 splice variants and the DRD1 transcript in DLPFC, hippocampus and caudate nucleus in a large cohort of subjects......Dopamine 2 receptor (DRD2) is of major interest to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SCZ) both as a target for antipsychotic drug action as well as a SCZ-associated risk gene. The dopamine 1 receptor (DRD1) is thought to mediate some of the cognitive deficits in SCZ, including impairment of...

  8. DRD2 and PPP1R1B (DARPP-32 polymorphisms independently confer increased risk for autism spectrum disorders and additively predict affected status in male-only affected sib-pair families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hettinger Joe A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA modulates executive functions, learning, and emotional processing, all of which are impaired in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. Our previous findings suggest a role for dopamine-related genes in families with only affected males. Methods We examined two additional genes which affect DA function, the DRD2 and PPP1R1B (DARPP-32 genes, in a cohort of 112 male-only affected sib-pair families. Selected polymorphisms spanning these genes were genotyped and both family-based and population-based tests were carried out for association analysis. General discriminant analysis was used to examine the gene-gene interactions in predicting autism susceptibility. Results There was a significantly increased frequency of the DRD2 rs1800498TT genotype (P = 0.007 in affected males compared to the comparison group, apparently due to over-transmission of the T allele (P = 0.0003. The frequency of the PPP1R1B rs1495099CC genotype in affected males was also higher than that in the comparison group (P = 0.002 due to preferential transmission of the C allele from parents to affected children (P = 0.0009. Alleles rs1800498T and rs1495099C were associated with more severe problems in social interaction (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.0016, respectively and communication (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0046, and increased stereotypic behaviours (P = 0.0021 and P = 0.00072. General discriminant analysis found that the DRD2 and PPP1R1B genes additively predicted ASDs (P = 0.00011; Canonical R = 0.26 and explain ~7% of the variance in our families. All findings remained significant following corrections for multiple testing. Conclusion Our findings support a role for the DRD2 and PPP1R1B genes in conferring risk for autism in families with only affected males and show an additive effect of these genes towards prediction of affected status in our families.

  9. Linguistic grammar learning and DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism.

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    Patrick C M Wong

    Full Text Available As research into the neurobiology of language has focused primarily on the systems level, fewer studies have examined the link between molecular genetics and normal variations in language functions. Because the ability to learn a language varies in adults and our genetic codes also vary, research linking the two provides a unique window into the molecular neurobiology of language. We consider a candidate association between the dopamine receptor D2 gene (DRD2 and linguistic grammar learning. DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism (rs1800497 is associated with dopamine receptor D2 distribution and dopamine impact in the human striatum, such that A1 allele carriers show reduction in D2 receptor binding relative to carriers who are homozygous for the A2 allele. The individual differences in grammatical rule learning that are particularly prevalent in adulthood are also associated with striatal function and its role in domain-general procedural memory. Therefore, we reasoned that procedurally-based grammar learning could be associated with DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism. Here, English-speaking adults learned artificial concatenative and analogical grammars, which have been respectively associated with procedural and declarative memory. Language learning capabilities were tested while learners' neural hemodynamic responses were simultaneously measured by fMRI. Behavioral learning and brain activation data were subsequently compared with the learners' DRD2 (rs1800497 genotype. Learners who were homozygous for the A2 allele were better at concatenative (but not analogical grammar learning and had higher striatal responses relative to those who have at least one A1 allele. These results provide preliminary evidence for the neurogenetic basis of normal variations in linguistic grammar learning and its link to domain-general functions.

  10. Cannabinoid, melanocortin and opioid receptor expression on DRD1 and DRD2 subpopulations in rat striatum

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    Ralph J Oude-Ophuis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The striatum harbors two neuronal populations that enable action selection. One population represents the striatonigral pathway, expresses the dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1 and promotes the execution of motor programs, while the other population represents the striatopallidal pathway, expresses the dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2 and suppresses voluntary activity. The two populations integrate distinct sensorimotor, cognitive and emotional information streams and their combined activity enables the selection of adaptive behaviors. Characterization of these populations is critical to the understanding of their role in action selection, because it aids the identification of the molecular mechanisms that separate them. To that end, we used fluorescent in-situ hybridization to quantify the percentage of striatal cells that (coexpress dopaminergic receptors and receptors of the cannabinoid, melanocortin or opioid neurotransmitters systems. Our main findings are that the cannabinoid 1 receptor is equally expressed on both populations with a gradient from dorsal to ventral striatum, that the opioid receptors have a preference for expression with either the DRD1 or DRD2 and that the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R is predominantly expressed in ventral parts of the striatum. In addition, we find that the level of MC4R expression determines its localization to either the DRD1 or the DRD2 population. Thereby, we provide insight into the sensitivity of the two dopaminoceptive populations to these neurotransmitters and progress the understanding of the mechanisms that enable action selection.

  11. Potentiation of latent inhibition by haloperidol and clozapine is attenuated in Dopamine D2 receptor (Drd-2)-deficient mice: do antipsychotics influence learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli via both Drd-2 and non-Drd-2 mechanisms?

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    O'Callaghan, Matthew J; Bay-Richter, Cecilie; O'Tuathaigh, Colm Mp; Heery, David M; Waddington, John L; Moran, Paula M

    2014-10-01

    Whether the dopamine Drd-2 receptor is necessary for the behavioural action of antipsychotic drugs is an important question, as Drd-2 antagonism is responsible for their debilitating motor side effects. Using Drd-2 null mice (Drd2 -/-) it has previously been shown that Drd-2 is not necessary for antipsychotic drugs to reverse D-amphetamine disruption of latent inhibition (LI), a behavioural measure of learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli. Weiner's 'two-headed' model indicates that antipsychotics not only reverse LI disruption, 'disrupted LI', but also potentiate LI when low/absent in controls, 'persistent' LI. We investigated whether antipsychotic drugs haloperidol or clozapine potentiated LI in wild-type controls or Drd2 -/-. Both drugs potentiated LI in wild-type but not in Drd2 -/- mice, suggesting moderation of this effect of antipsychotics in the absence of Drd-2. Haloperidol potentiated LI similarly in both Drd1 -/- and wild-type mice, indicating no such moderation in Drd1 -/-. These data suggest that antipsychotic drugs can have either Drd-2 or non-Drd-2 effects on learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli, depending on how the abnormality is produced. Identification of the non-Drd-2 mechanism may help to identify novel non-Drd2 based therapeutic strategies for psychosis. PMID:25122042

  12. Nicotinergic Modulation of Attention-Related Neural Activity Differentiates Polymorphisms of DRD2 and CHRNA4 Receptor Genes

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    Breckel, Thomas P. K.; Giessing, Carsten; Gieseler, Anja; Reuter, Martin; Thiel, Christiane M.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive and neuronal effects of nicotine show high interindividual variability. Recent findings indicate that genetic variations that affect the cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmitter system impact performance in cognitive tasks and effects of nicotine. The current pharmacogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study aimed to investigate epistasis effects of CHRNA4/DRD2 variations on behavioural and neural correlates of visuospatial attention after nicotine challenge using a data driven partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) approach. Fifty young healthy non-smokers were genotyped for CHRNA4 (rs1044396) and DRD2 (rs6277). They received either 7 mg transdermal nicotine or a matched placebo in a double blind within subject design prior to performing a cued target detection task with valid and invalid trials. On behavioural level, the strongest benefits of nicotine in invalid trials were observed in participants carrying both, the DRD2 T- and CHRNA4 C+ variant. Neurally, we were able to demonstrate that different DRD2/CHRNA4 groups can be decoded from the pattern of brain activity in invalid trials under nicotine. Neural substrates of interindividual variability were found in a network of attention-related brain regions comprising the pulvinar, the striatum, the middle and superior frontal gyri, the insula, the left precuneus, and the right middle temporal gyrus. Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in the CHRNA4 and DRD2 genes are a relevant source of individual variability in pharmacological studies with nicotine. PMID:26079805

  13. Investigating the structural impact of S311C mutation in DRD2 receptor by molecular dynamics & docking studies.

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    Podder, Avijit; Pandey, Deeksha; Latha, N

    2016-04-01

    Dopamine receptors (DR) are neuronal cell surface proteins that mediate the action of neurotransmitter dopamine in brain. Dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) that belongs to G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) family is a major therapeutic target for of various neurological and psychiatric disorders in human. The third inter cellular loop (ICL3) in DRD2 is essential for coupling G proteins and several signaling scaffold proteins. A mutation in ICL3 can interfere with this binding interface, thereby altering the DRD2 signaling. In this study we have examined the deleterious effect of serine to cysteine mutation at position 311 (S311C) in the ICL3 region that is implicated in diseases like schizophrenia and alcoholism. An in silico structure modeling approach was employed to determine the wild type (WT) and mutant S311C structures of DRD2, scaffold proteins - Gαi/o and NEB2. Protein-ligand docking protocol was exercised to predict the interactions of natural agonist dopamine with both the WT and mutant structures of DRD2. Besides, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to provide insights into essential dynamics of the systems-unbound and dopamine bound DRD2 (WT and mutant) and three independent simulations for Gαi, Gαo and NEB2 systems. To provide information on intra-molecular arrangement of the structures, a comprehensive residue interactions network of both dopamine bound WT and mutant DRD2 protein were studied. We also employed a protein-protein docking strategy to find the interactions of scaffold proteins - Gαi/o and NEB2 with both dopamine bound WT and mutant structures of DRD2. We observed a marginal effect of the mutation in dopamine binding mechanism on the trajectories analyzed. However, we noticed a significant structural alteration of the mutant receptor which affects Gαi/o and NEB2 binding that can be causal for malfunctioning in cAMP-dependent signaling and Ca(+) homeostasis in the brain dopaminergic system leading to

  14. Linkage disequilibria at the D[sub 2] dopamine receptor locus (DRD2) in alcoholics and controls

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    Suarez, B.K.; Parsian, A.; Hampe, C.L.; Todd, R.D.; Reich, T.; Cloninger, C.R. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Because of its central role in the neuromodulation of appetitive behaviors, the D[sub 2] dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) has received considerable scrutiny as a possible candidate that may affect susceptibility to addictive behaviors--especially alcoholism. Association studies that compare the frequencies of anonymous restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in alcoholics and controls have yielded equivocal results, suggesting that any role played by this receptor will account for only part of the variation. Since these RFLPs are not located in coding regions, the hypothesis has been advanced that the association seen in some studies results from linkage disequilibrium between these markers and one or more functional DRD2 alleles that affect susceptibility. To test this hypothesis, the authors have assayed four DRD2 RFLPs that span coding regions as well as a 3[prime] flanking RFLP in an expanded sample of 88 unrelated Caucasian alcoholics and 89 unrelated race-matched controls. No significant difference for any RFLP frequency between these samples was observed, although for one marker (phD2-244), the alcoholic sample showed a significant departure from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The pattern of pairwise composite disequilibrium coefficients is broadly similar in the two samples, although when the five-marker haplotype frequencies are compared, a significant difference is revealed. This difference appears to be due to greater linkage disequilibrium of the control sample. These results do not support the involvement of the DRD2 region in the etiology of alcoholism. 64 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Regulation of drugs affecting striatal cholinergic activity by corticostriatal projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research demonstrates that the chronic degeneration of the corticostriatal excitatory pathway makes the cholinergic neurons of the striatum insensitive to the neuropharmacological action of a number of different drugs. Female rats were used; they were killed and after the i.v. infusion of tritium-choline precursor, choline acetyltransferase activity was measured. Striatal noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin content was measured by electrochemical detection coupled with high pressure liquid chromatography. Uptake of tritium-glutamic acid was estimated. The data were analyzed statistically. It is shown that there is evidence that the effects of a number of drugs capable of depressing cholinergic activity through receptor-mediated responses are operative only if the corticostriatal pathway is integral. Neuropharmacological responses in the brain appear to be the result of an interaction between several major neurotransmitter systems

  16. Association of COMT and COMT-DRD2 interaction with creative potential

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    Shun eZhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that genes involved in dopamine (DA transmission may contribute to creativity. Among these genes, the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT and the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2 are the most promising candidates. Our previous study has revealed evidence for the involvement of DRD2 in creative potential. The present study extended our previous study by systematically exploring the association of COMT with creative potential as well as the interaction between COMT and DRD2. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs covering COMT were genotyped in 543 healthy Chinese college students whose creative potentials were assessed by divergent thinking tests. Single SNP analysis showed that rs174697 was nominally associated with verbal originality, two SNPs (rs737865 and rs5993883 were nominally associated with figural fluency, and two SNPs (rs737865 and rs4680 were nominally associated with figural originality. Haplotype analysis showed that, the TCT and CCT haplotype (rs737865-rs174675-rs5993882 were nominally associated with figural originality, and the TATGCAG and CGCGGGA haplotype (rs4646312-rs6269-rs4633-rs6267-rs4818-rs4680-rs769224 were nominally associated with figural originality and verbal flexibility, respectively. However, none of these nominal findings survived correction for multiple testing. Gene-gene interaction analysis identified one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs174697 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4436578 (DRD2 on verbal fluency, one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs4818 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on verbal flexibility, and one significant three-way interaction of rs5993883 (COMT, rs4648319 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on figural flexibility. In conclusion, the present study provides nominal evidence for the involvement of COMT in creative potential and suggests that DA related genes may act in coordination to contribute to creativity.

  17. Association between the traditional Chinese medicine pathological factors of opioid addiction and DRD2/ANKK1 TaqIA polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Meimei; Su, Zhiyang; Zou, Hong; Zhang, Qin; Shen, Jianying; Zhang, Lingyuan; Wang, Teng; Yang, Zhaoyang; Li, Candong

    2015-01-01

    Background As we known, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) helps to prevent the relapse of drug addiction. However, the scientific basis of TCM remains unclear because of limitations of current reductionist approaches. We aimed to explore the possible mechanism of how ANKK1 TaqIA (A1/A2) [rs1800497(T/C)] affects the relapse of opioid addiction on the perspective of Chinese traditional medicine. Methods The ANKK1 TaqIA (A1/A2) [rs1800497(T/C)] of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) polymorphisms w...

  18. DRD2/ANKK1 TaqI polymorphism and smoking behavior of Egyptian male cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Ghada N; El-Setouhy, Maged; Mohamed, Mostafa K; Hamid, Mohamed Abdel; Azem, Salwa Abdel; Kamel, Omima; Israel, Ebenezer; Loffredo, Christopher A

    2007-12-01

    Little is known about the genetic contribution to cigarette smoking and nicotine addiction in Egypt. The dopamine D2 receptor gene contains a TaqI repeat fragment length polymorphism creating two alleles with functional significance, DRD2*A1 and DRD2*A2. We investigated the relationship between these alleles and tobacco use in a study of 389 Egyptian male current smokers (mean age = 40 years; SD = 12). Participants were interviewed in 2004 on their smoking behaviors and quit attempts, and were given the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Blood samples were obtained and genotyped for DRD2 A1and A2 alleles. The frequencies of A1/A2, A1/A2, and A2/A2 genotypes were 6%, 29%, and 65%, respectively. We found no statistically significant association between genotype and age at onset of smoking, years of smoking, FTND score, or average number of cigarettes smoked per day. DRD2 genotype was associated with the number of cigarettes smoked in the past 48 hr (42.2 in A1 carriers vs. 37.6 in A2, p = .03), the previous quit duration (28% in A1 vs. 40% in A2 quit for more than 1 month, p = .05), and the depth of inhalation (82% in A1 vs. 72% in A2 inhaled the smoke deeply, p = .03). Logistic regression analysis including DRD2 genotype, FTND score, age at smoking initiation, marital status, and education as predictors showed that maximum duration of quit time was associated with FTND score (p = .003), DRD2 genotype (p = .01), marital status (p = .03), and age at smoking initiation (p = .04). These findings suggest a modest association between DRD2 genotype and quitting behavior in male cigarette smokers in Egypt. PMID:18058350

  19. Interaction Between Functional Genetic Variation of DRD2 and Cannabis Use on Risk of Psychosis.

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    Colizzi, Marco; Iyegbe, Conrad; Powell, John; Ursini, Gianluca; Porcelli, Annamaria; Bonvino, Aurora; Taurisano, Paolo; Romano, Raffaella; Masellis, Rita; Blasi, Giuseppe; Morgan, Craig; Aitchison, Katherine; Mondelli, Valeria; Luzi, Sonija; Kolliakou, Anna; David, Anthony; Murray, Robin M; Bertolino, Alessandro; Di Forti, Marta

    2015-09-01

    Both cannabis use and the dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene have been associated with schizophrenia, psychosis-like experiences, and cognition. However, there are no published data investigating whether genetically determined variation in DRD2 dopaminergic signaling might play a role in individual susceptibility to cannabis-associated psychosis. We genotyped (1) a case-control study of 272 patients with their first episode of psychosis and 234 controls, and also from (2) a sample of 252 healthy subjects, for functional variation in DRD2, rs1076560. Data on history of cannabis use were collected on all the studied subjects by administering the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire. In the healthy subjects' sample, we also collected data on schizotypy and cognitive performance using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and the N-back working memory task. In the case-control study, we found a significant interaction between the rs1076560 DRD2 genotype and cannabis use in influencing the likelihood of a psychotic disorder. Among cannabis users, carriers of the DRD2, rs1076560, T allele showed a 3-fold increased probability to suffer a psychotic disorder compared with GG carriers (OR = 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-7.63). Among daily users, T carrying subjects showed a 5-fold increase in the odds of psychosis compared to GG carriers (OR = 4.82; 95% CI: 1.39-16.71). Among the healthy subjects, T carrying cannabis users had increased schizotypy compared with T carrying cannabis-naïve subjects, GG cannabis users, and GG cannabis-naïve subjects (all P ≤ .025). T carrying cannabis users had reduced working memory accuracy compared with the other groups (all P ≤ .008). Thus, variation of the DRD2, rs1076560, genotype may modulate the psychosis-inducing effect of cannabis use. PMID:25829376

  20. Common variants in DRD2 are associated with sleep duration: the CARe consortium.

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    Cade, Brian E; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Lauderdale, Diane S; Bennett, David A; Buchman, Aron S; Buxbaum, Sarah G; De Jager, Philip L; Evans, Daniel S; Fülöp, Tibor; Gharib, Sina A; Johnson, W Craig; Kim, Hyun; Larkin, Emma K; Lee, Seung Ku; Lim, Andrew S; Punjabi, Naresh M; Shin, Chol; Stone, Katie L; Tranah, Gregory J; Weng, Jia; Yaffe, Kristine; Zee, Phyllis C; Patel, Sanjay R; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Redline, Susan; Saxena, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Sleep duration is implicated in the etiologies of chronic diseases and premature mortality. However, the genetic basis for sleep duration is poorly defined. We sought to identify novel genetic components influencing sleep duration in a multi-ethnic sample. Meta-analyses were conducted of genetic associations with self-reported, habitual sleep duration from seven Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) cohorts of over 25 000 individuals of African, Asian, European and Hispanic American ancestry. All individuals were genotyped for ∼50 000 SNPs from 2000 candidate heart, lung, blood and sleep genes. African-Americans had additional genome-wide genotypes. Four cohorts provided replication. A SNP (rs17601612) in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) was significantly associated with sleep duration (P = 9.8 × 10(-7)). Conditional analysis identified a second DRD2 signal with opposite effects on sleep duration. In exploratory analysis, suggestive association was observed for rs17601612 with polysomnographically determined sleep latency (P = 0.002). The lead DRD2 signal was recently identified in a schizophrenia GWAS, and a genetic risk score of 11 additional schizophrenia GWAS loci genotyped on the IBC array was also associated with longer sleep duration (P = 0.03). These findings support a role for DRD2 in influencing sleep duration. Our work motivates future pharmocogenetics research on alerting agents such as caffeine and modafinil that interact with the dopaminergic pathway and further investigation of genetic overlap between sleep and neuro-psychiatric traits. PMID:26464489

  1. An association study of DRD2 and COMT polymorphisms with novelty seeking and harm avoidance scores, in two independent samples of depressed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frampton Christopher MA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was recently reported that an interaction of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2 and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT influences the behavioural approach system – as measured using Carver and White's Behavioural Inhibition and Behavioural Approach System (BIS/BAS scales – in a sample of healthy German subjects. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI, in particular the novelty seeking (NS and harm avoidance (HA scales, correlates moderately with the BIS/BAS measure. This study aimed to examine support for an association of DRD2 and COMT with behavioural activation, using the TCI within two independent samples of depressed outpatients (for both samples n = 146. Methods Two clinical samples of depressed patients were ascertained to assess the efficacy of two different pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy treatments. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to analyse NS and HA scale and subscale scores with respect to gene loci within each clinical sample. Analysis of covariance were undertaken to examine the association of age and gender with NS and HA scores. An association of age group or gender with gene loci were explored using chi-squared tests, in each sample. Results No significant effect of DRD2 or COMT, either independently or as an interaction, on NS or HA scores was observed, within either sample. Whilst age was significantly negatively associated with NS scores, including age in the two- and three-way interactions did not affect the significance of the association of personality with gene loci. Conclusion This study suggests that the COMT-DRD2 Equilibrium Model of Positive Emotionality recently proposed by Reuter and his colleagues is not applicable amongst currently depressed individuals, whose behavioural approach and inhibition tendencies have been assessed using the TCI.

  2. Effects of l-Tyrosine on working memory and inhibitory control are determined by DRD2 genotypes: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Arning, Larissa; Beste, Christian

    2016-09-01

    l-Tyrosine (TYR), the precursor of dopamine (DA), has been shown to enhance facets of cognitive control in situations with high cognitive demands. However some previous outcomes were mixed: some studies reported significant improvements, while other did not. Given that TYR increases DA level in the brain, we investigated, in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design, whether the C957T genotypes of a functional synonymous polymorphism in the human dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene (rs6277) contribute to individual differences in the reactivity to TYR administration and whether this factor predicts the magnitude of TYR-induced performance differences on inhibiting behavioral responses in a stop-signal task and working memory (WM) updating in a N-back task. Our findings show that T/T homozygotes (i.e., individuals potentially associated with lower striatal DA level) showed larger beneficial effects of TYR supplementation than C/C homozygotes (i.e., individuals potentially associated with higher striatal DA level), suggesting that genetically determined differences in DA function may explain inter-individual differences in response to TYR supplementation. These findings reinforce the idea that genetic predisposition modulates the effect of TYR in its role as cognitive enhancer. PMID:27403851

  3. Genetic contributions to avoidance-based decisions: striatal D2 receptor polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M J; Hutchison, K

    2009-11-24

    Individuals differ in their tendencies to seek positive decision outcomes or to avoid negative ones. At the neurobiological level, our model suggests that phasic changes in dopamine support learning to reinforce good decisions via striatal D1 receptors, and to avoid maladaptive choices via striatal D2 receptors. Accordingly, in a previous study individual differences in positive and negative learning were strongly modulated by two genetic polymorphisms factors related to striatal D1 and D2 function, respectively. Nevertheless, whereas the role for dopamine in positive learning is relatively well accepted, that in learning to avoid negative outcomes is more controversial. Here we further explore D2-receptor-related genetic contributions to probabilistic avoidance in humans, in light of recent data showing that particular DRD2 polymorphisms are associated with functional modulation of receptor expression [Zhang Y, Bertolino A, Fazio L, Blasi G, Rampino A, Romano R, Lee M-LT, Xiao T, Papp A, Wang D, Sadée W (2007) Polymorphisms in human dopamine d2 receptor gene affect gene expression, splicing, and neuronal activity during working memory. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(51):20552-20557]. We find that a promoter polymorphism rs12364283 associated with transcription and D2 receptor density was strongly and selectively predictive of avoidance-based decisions. Two further polymorphisms (rs2283265 and rs1076560) associated with relatively reduced presynaptic relative to postsynaptic D2 receptor expression were predictive of relative impairments in negative compared to positive decisions. These previously undocumented effects of DRD2 polymorphisms were largely independent of those we reported previously for the C957T polymorphism (rs6277) associated with striatal D2 density. In contrast, effects of the commonly studied Taq1A polymorphism on reinforcement-based decisions were due to indirect association with C957T. Taken together these findings suggest multiple D2-dependent

  4. Commonly-occurring polymorphisms in the COMT, DRD1 and DRD2 genes influence different aspects of motor sequence learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baetu, Irina; Burns, Nicholas R; Urry, Kristi; Barbante, Girolamo Giovanni; Pitcher, Julia B

    2015-11-01

    Performing sequences of movements is a ubiquitous skill that involves dopamine transmission. However, it is unclear which components of the dopamine system contribute to which aspects of motor sequence learning. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the relationship between different components of the dopamine system and specific aspects of sequence learning in humans. In particular, we investigated variations in genes that code for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme, the dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine D1 and D2 receptors (DRD1 and DRD2). COMT and the DAT regulate dopamine availability in the prefrontal cortex and the striatum, respectively, two key regions recruited during learning, whereas dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are thought to be involved in long-term potentiation and depression, respectively. We show that polymorphisms in the COMT, DRD1 and DRD2 genes differentially affect behavioral performance on a sequence learning task in 161 Caucasian participants. The DRD1 polymorphism predicted the ability to learn new sequences, the DRD2 polymorphism predicted the ability to perform a previously learnt sequence after performing interfering random movements, whereas the COMT polymorphism predicted the ability to switch flexibly between two sequences. We used computer simulations to explore potential mechanisms underlying these effects, which revealed that the DRD1 and DRD2 effects are possibly related to neuroplasticity. Our prediction-error algorithm estimated faster rates of connection strengthening in genotype groups with presumably higher D1 receptor densities, and faster rates of connection weakening in genotype groups with presumably higher D2 receptor densities. Consistent with current dopamine theories, these simulations suggest that D1-mediated neuroplasticity contributes to learning to select appropriate actions, whereas D2-mediated neuroplasticity is involved in learning to inhibit incorrect action plans. However, the

  5. Sequence analysis of Drd2, Drd4, and Dat1 in SHR and WKY rat strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mill Jonathan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR shows a number of behaviours that closely parallel those seen in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. These include motor hyperactivity, excessive responses under a fixed-interval/extinction schedule, difficulty in acquiring operant tasks and increased sensitivity to immediate behavioural reinforcement. As in children with ADHD, the behavioural and cognitive deficits in the SHR are responsive to stimulants, including d-amphetamine and d,l-methylphenidate. The non-hyperactive Wistar Kyoto (WKY rat strain is often used as a control in behavioural studies of the SHR, and WKY itself has been suggested to be a useful animal model of depression. Numerous studies have shown that dopaminergic neurotransmission is altered between the two strains. Human genetic studies have found associations between several dopaminergic genes and both ADHD and depression. Methods We sequenced three candidate dopaminergic genes (Drd2, Drd4, and Dat1 in the SHR and WKY to identify between-strain sequence differences. Results No between-strain sequence differences were found in either Drd2 or Drd4, but several variations were found in the Dat1 gene that encodes the dopamine transporter. Conclusion It is plausible that DNA sequence changes in the Dat1 gene account for some of the behavioural differences observed between the SHR and WKY strains. Future work will focus on elucidating the functional effects of the observed polymorphisms.

  6. DRD2 A1 allele and P300 abnormalities in obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, K. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)]|[PATH Foundation, Princeton, NJ (United States); Wood, R.; Sheridan, L.P.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous and prevalent disorder having both inheritable and environmental components. The role of the dopamine system in P300 has been implicated. We genotyped 193 neuropsychiatrically ill patients with and without comorbid drug and alcohol/abuse/dependence and obesity for the prevalence of the A1 allele of the DRD2 gene. We found a significant linear trend ({chi}{sup 2} = 40.4, df=1, p<0.00001) where the percent prevalence of the A1 increased with increasing polysubstance abuse. Where the A1 allele was found in 44% of 40 obese subjects, the A1 allele prevalence was found in as much as 91% of 11 obese subjects with comorbid polysubstance abuse. 53 obese subjects having a mean body weight (BMI) of 34.6{+-}8.2 were mapped for brain electrical activity and compared with 15 controls with a BMI of 22.3{+-}3.0 (P<.001). The P3 amplitude was significantly different (two tailed; t=3.24, df=16.2, P = 0.005), whereas P3 latency was not significant. Preliminarily, we found a significant decreased P3 amplitude correlated with parental polysubstance abuse (p=0.4) with prolongation of P3 latency correlated with the three risk factors of parental substance abuse, chemical dependency and carbohydrate bingeing (P<0.02). Finally, in a small sample, the A1 allele was present in 25% of probands having 0 risk compared to 66% in those obese subjects with any risk. This work represents the first electrophysiological data to implicate P3 abnormalities in a subset of obesity and further confirms an association of the DRD2 gene and a electrophysiological marker previously indicated to have predictive value in vulnerability to addictive behaviors.

  7. Argument within a Scientific Debate: The Case of the DRD2 A1 Allele as a Gene for Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastyn, Ronald O.; Wastyn, M. Linda

    1997-01-01

    Investigates how opposing parties advanced arguments to the scientific community about the validity of DRD2 A1 allele as a gene causing alcoholism. Demonstrates to what extent scientists debate each other in journals by advancing opposing viewpoints with rigor and insight. Reveals what it means when scientists label a discovery in terms of finding…

  8. Haplotype frequencies at the DRD2 locus in populations of the East European Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Alexey I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was demonstrated previously that the three-locus RFLP haplotype, TaqI B-TaqI D-TaqI A (B-D-A, at the DRD2 locus constitutes a powerful genetic marker and probably reflects the most ancient dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Results We investigated TaqI B, BclI, MboI, TaqI D, and TaqI A RFLPs in 17 contemporary populations of the East European Plain and Siberia. Most of these populations belong to the Indo-European or Uralic language families. We identified three common haplotypes, which occurred in more than 90% of chromosomes investigated. The frequencies of the haplotypes differed according to linguistic and geographical affiliation. Conclusion Populations in the northwestern (Byelorussians from Mjadel', northern (Russians from Mezen' and Oshevensk, and eastern (Russians from Puchezh parts of the East European Plain had relatively high frequencies of haplotype B2-D2-A2, which may reflect admixture with Uralic-speaking populations that inhabited all of these regions in the Early Middle Ages.

  9. Association Between Polymorphisms of DRD2, COMT, DBH, and MAO-A Genes and Migraine Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hu; Ji, Chun-Xue; Zhao, Lian-Li; Kong, Xiang-Jun; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2015-11-01

    Some epidemiological studies have investigated the relationship between genetic polymorphisms of DRD2, COMT, DBH, and MAO-A and migraine susceptibility, but the results are still inconsistent. Thus, our aim was to further assess the association through a meta-analysis.We examined 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4 genes, including DRD2 rs1799732 and rs6275, DBH rs7239728, MAI-A-VNTR, and COMT rs4680, and performed a meta-analysis of 11 published case-control studies including 3138 cases and 4126 controls. Odd ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to evaluate the association between the 5 genetic polymorphisms and migraine susceptibility.There was no significant relationship between migraine susceptibility and 4 genetic polymorphisms of DRD2 rs1799732 and rs6275, DBH rs7239728, and MAO-A-VNTR. Nevertheless, decreased risk of migraine was observed to be in association with COMT rs4680 polymorphism in overall analysis (AA vs. GG + GA: OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60-0.97, PHet > 0.642, I = 0), and in Caucasian group after subgroup analysis (AA vs. GG + GA: OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.58-0.96, PHet > 0.433, I = 0).Studied polymorphisms of DRD2, DBH, and MAO-A genes may not be associated with migraine susceptibility. However, COMT rs4680 polymorphism may decrease the risk of migraine, especially in Caucasians. The failure to evaluate environmental influence and provide adjusted effect size estimates highlights the need for additional studies in a large number to take these factors into consideration, thus better elucidating the role of the genes tested in migraine. PMID:26632697

  10. The A1 allele of the DRD2 TaqA1/A2 polymorphism as risk factor for PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Rady

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Dopaminergic neurotransmission is implicated in stress responses. The dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2 has been studied by the authors to assess its possible role as a predictor of those who are at a higher risk to develop PTSD after major psychological trauma. Methods: Over one year period 75 children and adolescents 6-18 yrs of age who had been exposed to moderate to severe burns were recruited from the burn unit at the Alexandria University Hospital for the study. Patients and their family were interviewed within the first 10 days of exposure. After signing a written consent form a 2 ml blood sample was obtained for genetic studies of the TaqA1/A2 polymorphism site of the DRD2 gene. Patients were reevaluated three and six months later for assessment of PTSD. Results: Among the 75 children recruited in the study, 26 died due to their burn injury, 19 dropped out as parents refused follow up and 30 continued the study follow up visits. Fourteen carried the A1A2 genotype. Of these 11 (78.6% developed PTSD. Sixteen carried the A2A2 genotype. Of these only one child (6.3% developed PTSD. The results were significant at p < 0.001 with a relative risk 12.5. Conclusions: Following exposure to severe stress, the presence of the Taq A1 allele of the DRD2 gene results in a significant increase in the risk of developing PTSD.

  11. HIV-related cognitive impairment shows bi-directional association with dopamine receptor DRD1 and DRD2 polymorphisms in substance-dependent and substance-independent populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michelle M; Murray, Jacinta; Byrd, Desiree A; Hurd, Yasmin L; Morgello, Susan

    2013-10-01

    It has been postulated that drugs of abuse act synergistically with HIV, leading to increased neurotoxicity and neurocognitive impairment. The CNS impacts of HIV and drug use converge on the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which contains two main receptor subtypes: dopamine receptors 1 (DRD1) and 2 (DRD2). DRD1 and DRD2 have been linked to substance dependence; whether they predict HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is unclear. Using an advanced-stage HIV+ population, we sought to determine if drug dependence impacts the contribution of DA receptor polymorphisms on neurocognition. We observed that both DRD1 and DRD2 polymorphisms were associated with opiate and cocaine dependence (P cocaine dependency. In the Motor domain, we observed an association for two DRD2 polymorphisms (P dopaminergic systems, as the neurobiological substrates of cognition in HIV populations may vary with tonic alterations secondary to chronic substance exposures. PMID:24078558

  12. HIV-related cognitive impairment shows bi-directional association with dopamine receptor DRD1 and DRD2 polymorphisms in substance dependent and independent populations

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Michelle M.; Murray, Jacinta; Byrd, Desiree A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.; Morgello, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been postulated that drugs of abuse act synergistically with HIV, leading to increased neurotoxicity and neurocognitive impairment. The CNS impacts of HIV and drug use converge on the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which contains two main receptor subtypes: dopamine receptor 1 and 2. (DRD1, DRD2). DRD1 and DRD2 have been linked to substance dependence; whether they predict HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is unclear. Using an advanced-stage HIV+ population, we sou...

  13. Varenicline increases in vivo striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor binding: an ultra-high-resolution pinhole [123I]IBZM SPECT study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Ex vivo storage phosphor imaging rat studies reported increased brain dopamine D2/3 receptor (DRD2/3) availability following treatment with varenicline, a nicotinergic drug. However, ex vivo studies can only be performed using cross-sectional designs. Small-animal imaging offers the opportunity to perform serial assessments. We evaluated whether high-resolution pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in rats was able to reproduce previous ex vivo findings. Methods: Rats were imaged for baseline striatal DRD2/3 availability using ultra-high-resolution pinhole SPECT (U-SPECT-II) and [123I]IBZM as a radiotracer, and randomized to varenicline (n=7; 2 mg/kg) or saline (n=7). Following 2 weeks of treatment, a second scan was acquired. Results: Significantly increased striatal DRD2/3 availability was found following varenicline treatment compared to saline (time⁎treatment effect): posttreatment difference in binding potential between groups corrected for initial baseline differences was 2.039 (P=.022), indicating a large effect size (d=1.48). Conclusions: Ultra-high-resolution pinhole SPECT can be used to assess varenicline-induced changes in DRD2/3 availability in small laboratory animals over time. Future small-animal studies should include imaging techniques to enable repeated within-subjects measurements and reduce the amount of animals.

  14. The relationship between DRD2 gene polymorphisms (C957T and C939T) and schizophrenia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Fan, Dazhi; Ding, Ning; Hu, Yanting; Cai, Guoqi; Wang, Li; Xin, Lihong; Xia, Qin; Li, Xiaona; Xu, Shengqian; Xu, Jianhua; Yang, Xiao; Zou, Yanfeng; Pan, Faming

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, complex multi-factorial psychiatric disorder. Many studies have reported associations between the C957T and C939T polymorphisms in Dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene and schizophrenia, but results are inconsistent. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis was conducted to systematically summarize the possibility. We included 13 articles involving 3079 schizophrenia cases and 3851 healthy controls. Positive associations were found between C957T polymorphism and schizophrenia risk in C vs. T (OR=1.26, 95% CI=1.09-1.46, Praw=0.002, PFDR=0.005) and CC+CT vs. TT (OR=1.47, 95% CI=1.25-1.73, PrawPFDR<0.001). When stratified by race, a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia was observed in Caucasians, but not in Asians. No association between C939T polymorphism and schizophrenia was found in overall or Asian population. Our study suggested that C957T of DRD2 gene polymorphism is likely to be a risk factor for schizophrenia, especially in Caucasian. PMID:25240594

  15. DRD2 and DRD4 in relation to regular alcohol and cannabis use among adolescents: Does parenting modify the impact of genetic vulnerability? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.E. Creemers (Hanneke); Z. Harakeh (Zeena); D.M. van Dick; J. Meyers; W.A.M. Vollebergh (Wilma); J. Ormel (Johan Hans); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); A.C. Huizink (Anja)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAims: The aims of the present study were to determine the direct effect of DRD2 and DRD4, as well as their interaction with parenting (i.e. rejection, overprotection and emotional warmth), on the development of regular alcohol and cannabis use in 1192 Dutch adolescents from the general p

  16. DRD2 and DRD4 in relation to regular alcohol and cannabis use among adolescents: does parenting modify the impact of genetic vulnerability? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.E. Creemers; Z. Harakeh; D.M. Dick; J. Meyers; W.A.M. Vollebergh; J. Ormel; F.C. Verhulst; A.C. Huizink

    2011-01-01

    Aims The aims of the present study were to determine the direct effect of DRD2 and DRD4, as well as their interaction with parenting (i.e. rejection, overprotection and emotional warmth), on the development of regular alcohol and cannabis use in 1192 Dutch adolescents from the general population. Me

  17. DRD2 and DRD4 in relation to regular alcohol and cannabis use among adolescents : Does parenting modify the impact of genetic vulnerability? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, H.E.; Harakeh, Z.; Dick, D.M.; Meyers, J.; Vollebergh, W.A.; Ormel, J.; Verhulst, F.C.; Huizink, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aims of the present study were to determine the direct effect of DRD2 and DRD4, as well as their interaction with parenting (i.e. rejection, overprotection and emotional warmth), on the development of regular alcohol and cannabis use in 1192 Dutch adolescents from the general population. M

  18. drd2-cre:ribotag mouse line unravels the possible diversity of dopamine d2 receptor-expressing cells of the dorsal mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puighermanal, Emma; Biever, Anne; Espallergues, Julie; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; De Bundel, Dimitri; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2015-07-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that dopamine facilitates the encoding of novel memories by the hippocampus. However, the role of dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in such regulations remains elusive due to the lack of the precise identification of hippocampal D2R-expressing cells. To address this issue, mice expressing the ribosomal protein Rpl22 tagged with the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope were crossed with Drd2-Cre mice allowing the selective expression of HA in D2R-containing cells (Drd2-Cre:RiboTag mice). This new transgenic model revealed a more widespread pattern of D2R-expressing cells identified by HA immunoreactivity than the one initially reported in Drd2-EGFP mice, in which the hilar mossy cells were the main neuronal population detectable. In Drd2-Cre:RiboTag mice, scattered HA/GAD67-positive neurons were detected throughout the CA1/CA3 subfields, being preferentially localized in stratum oriens and stratum lacunosum-moleculare. At the cellular level, HA-labeled cells located in CA1/CA3 subfields co-localized with calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin), neuropeptides (neuropeptide Y, somatostatin), and other markers (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, mGluR1α, reelin, coupTFII, and potassium channel-interacting protein 1). These results suggest that in addition to the glutamatergic hilar mossy cells, D2R-expressing cells constitute a subpopulation of GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. PMID:25545461

  19. Dopamine Genes (DRD2/ANKK1-TaqA1 and DRD4-7R) and Executive Function: Their Interaction with Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Mar; Garolera, Maite; Jurado, Maria Angeles; Garcia-Garcia, Isabel; Hernan, Imma; Sánchez-Garre, Consuelo; Vernet-Vernet, Maria; Sender-Palacios, Maria Jose; Marques-Iturria, Idoia; Pueyo, Roser; Segura, Barbara; Narberhaus, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction between genotype and environment, and it is considered to be a type of addictive alteration. The A1 allele of the DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIA gene has been associated with addictive disorders, with obesity and with the performance in executive functions. The 7 repeat allele of the DRD4 gene has likewise been associated with the performance in executive functions, as well as with addictive behaviors and impulsivity. Participants were included in the obesity group (N = 42) if their body mass index (BMI) was equal to or above 30, and in the lean group (N = 42) if their BMI was below 25. The DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIA and DRD4 VNTR polymorphisms were obtained. All subjects underwent neuropsychological assessment. Eating behavior traits were evaluated. The ‘DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIA A1-allele status’ had a significant effect on almost all the executive variables, but no significant ‘DRD4 7R-allele status’ effects were observed for any of the executive variables analyzed. There was a significant ‘group’ x ‘DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIA A1-allele status’ interaction effect on LN and ‘group’ x ‘DRD4 7R-allele status’ interaction effect on TMT B-A score. Being obese and a carrier of the A1 allele of DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIA or the 7R allele of DRD4 VNTR polymorphisms could confer a weakness as regards the performance of executive functions. PMID:22848508

  20. Association between ADORA2A and DRD2 Polymorphisms and Caffeine-Induced Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Childs, Emma; Hohoff, Christa; Deckert, Jürgen; Xu, Ke; Badner, Judith,; de Wit, Harriet

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine produces mild psychostimulant and sometimes anxiogenic effects by antagonizing adenosine at A1 and A2A receptors, and perhaps through interactions with other transmitter systems. Adenosine receptors are colocalized and functionally interact with dopamine receptors in the brain. Thus, functional polymorphisms in the genes for either adenosine or dopamine receptors may affect responses to caffeine. In this study, we examined associations between self-reported anxiogenic effects of caff...

  1. Increased prevalence of the Taq I A1 allele of the dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) in obesity with comorbid substance use disorder: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, K; Braverman, E R; Wood, R C; Gill, J; Li, C; Chen, T J; Taub, M; Montgomery, A R; Sheridan, P J; Cull, J G

    1996-08-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of the Taq I A1 allele of the dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) in obesity with and without comorbid substance use disorder, a total of 40 patients, from an outpatient neuropsychiatric clinic in Princeton, New Jersey, were genotyped for presence or absence of the Taq I DRD2 A1 allele. The primary inclusion criterion for 40 obese subjects was a body mass index (BMI) equal to or over 25 (uncharacterized); 11 obese subjects had severe substance use disorder; 20 controls had a BMI below 25; and, 33 substance use disorder (less severe) patients had a BMI below 25. The data were statistically compared with three different sets of controls divided into three separate groups (Group I, n = 20; Group II, n = 286; Group III, n = 714). They differed according to screening criteria (drug, alcohol, nicotine abuse/dependence, BMI below 25 and other related behaviours including parental history of alcoholism or drug abuse and DSM IV, Axis I and Axis II diagnoses). Groups II and III were population controls derived from the literature. The prevalence of the Taq I A1D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) alleles was determined in 40 Caucasian obese females and males. In this sample with a mean BMI of 32.35 +/- 1.02, the A1 allele of the DRD2 gene was present in 52.5% of these obese subjects. Furthermore, we found that in the 23 obese subjects possessing comorbid substance use disorder, the prevalence of the DRD2 A1 allele significantly increased compared to the 17 obese subjects without comorbid substance use disorder. The DRD2 A1 allele was present in 73.9% of the obese subjects with comorbid substance use disorder compared to 23.5% in obese subjects without comorbid substance use disorder. Moreover, when we assessed severity of substance usage (alcoholism, cocaine dependence, etc.) increasing severity of drug use increased the prevalence of the Taq I DRD2 A1 allele; where 66.67% (8/12) of less severe probands possessed the A1 allele compared to 82% (9

  2. Suicidal Behavior and Haplotypes of the Dopamine Receptor Gene (DRD2) and ANKK1 Gene Polymorphisms in Patients with Alcohol Dependence – Preliminary Report

    OpenAIRE

    Jasiewicz, Andrzej; Samochowiec, Agnieszka; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Małecka, Iwona; Suchanecka, Aleksandra; Grzywacz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is a significant public health issue and a major cause of death throughout the world. According to WHO it accounts for almost 2% of deaths worldwide. The etiology of suicidal behavior is complex but the results of many studies suggest that genetic determinants are of significant importance. In our study,- we have analyzed selected SNPs polymorphisms in the DRD2 and ANKK1 genes in patients with alcohol dependence syndrome (169 Caucasian subjects) including a subgroup of individuals (n ...

  3. A gene × gene interaction between DRD2 and DRD4 is associated with conduct disorder and antisocial behavior in males

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn Michael G; Walsh Anthony; DeLisi Matt; Wright John; Beaver Kevin M; Boisvert Danielle; Vaske Jamie

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Antisocial behaviors are complex polygenic phenotypes that are due to a multifactorial arrangement of genetic polymorphisms. Little empirical research, however, has been undertaken that examines gene × gene interactions in the etiology of conduct disorder and antisocial behavior. This study examined whether adolescent conduct disorder and adult antisocial behavior were related to the dopamine D2 receptor polymorphism (DRD2) and the dopamine D4 receptor polymorphism (DRD4)....

  4. Disruption of the ErbB signaling in adolescence increases striatal dopamine levels and affects learning and hedonic-like behavior in the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golani, Idit; Tadmor, Hagar; Buonanno, Andres; Kremer, Ilana; Shamir, Alon

    2014-11-01

    The ErbB signaling pathway has been genetically and functionally implicated in schizophrenia. Numerous findings support the dysregulation of Neuregulin (NRG) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in schizophrenia. However, it is unclear whether alterations of these pathways in the adult brain or during development are involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Herein we characterized the behavioral profile and molecular changes resulting from pharmacologically blocking the ErbB signaling pathway during a critical period in the development of decision making, planning, judgments, emotions, social cognition and cognitive skills, namely adolescence. We demonstrate that chronic administration of the pan-ErbB kinase inhibitor JNJ-28871063 (JNJ) to adolescent mice elevated striatal dopamine levels and reduced preference for sucrose without affecting locomotor activity and exploratory behavior. In adulthood, adolescent JNJ-treated mice continue to consume less sucrose and needed significantly more correct-response trials to reach the learning criterion during the discrimination phase of the T-maze reversal learning task than their saline-injected controls. In addition, JNJ mice exhibited deficit in reference memory but not in working memory as measured in the radial arm maze. Inhibition of the pathway during adolescence did not affect exploratory behavior and locomotor activity in the open field, social interaction, social memory, and reversal learning in adult mice. Our data suggest that alteration of ErbB signaling during adolescence resulted in changes in the dopaminergic systems that emerge in pathological learning and hedonic behavior in adulthood, and pinpoints the possible role of the pathway in the development of cognitive skills and motivated behavior. PMID:25451700

  5. Interaction of DRD2TaqI, COMT, and ALDH2 genes associated with bipolar II disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders in Han Chinese in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming-Chuan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Chen-Lin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-06-01

    It is hypothesized that dopaminergic genes-dopamine type-2 receptor (DRD2), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-are associated with bipolar disorder (BP) and anxiety disorder (AD). Bipolar II (BP-II) is reported to be highly comorbid with AD. We examined whether interactions among these three genes are susceptibility factors in BP-II with AD (BP-II(+AD)) and without AD (BP-II(-AD)). In this study, we hypothesize that the interaction of the dopaminergic genes between BP-II(+AD) and BP-II(-AD) is significant different. We recruited 1260 participants: 495 with BP-II(-AD), 170 with BP-II(+AD), and 595 healthy controls without BP-II or AD. Genotyping was done using polymerase chain reactions plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Genotypic frequencies of the DRD2TaqIA, COMT, and ALDH2 polymorphisms between the two BP-II groups were nonsignificant. In logistic regression, the ALDH2 and DRD2TaqIA genes showed a main effect that was protective against BP-II(-AD) (odds ratio [OR] = 0.497, p = 0.010, and OR = 0.415, p = 0.017, respectively). The interaction of DRD2TaqIA A1/A1 and ALDH2*1/*1 had a significant risk effect on the BP-II(-AD) group (OR = 7.177, p II(-AD) (OR = 0.205, p = 0.047). All of the significant results described above are found only in BP-II(-AD). This study supports the hypothesis the interaction of the dopaminergic genes between BP-II(+AD) and BP-II(-AD) is significant different,, and provides additional evidence that the DRD2TaqIA A1/A1, ALDH2*1/*1 and COMT genes interact in BP-II(-AD) but not in BP-II(+AD). PMID:25430946

  6. Examining impulsivity as an endophenotype using a behavioral approach: a DRD2 TaqI A and DRD4 48-bp VNTR association study

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    Beauchemin Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the genetic basis for impulsivity has revealed an array of ambiguous findings. This may be a result of limitations to self-report assessments of impulsivity. Behavioral measures that assess more narrowly defined aspects of impulsivity may clarify genetic influences. This study examined the relationship between possession of the DRD2 TaqI A and DRD4 48 bp VNTR genetic polymorphisms and performance on a behavioral measure of impulsivity, the delay discounting task (DDT, and three traditional self-report measures. Methods 195 individuals (42% male were recruited from a university campus and were assessed in small group sessions using personal computers. Genotyping was conducted using previously established protocols. For the DRD2 TaqI A locus, individuals were designated as possessing at least one copy of the A1 allele (A1+ or not (A1-, and for the DRD4 48-bp VNTR locus, individuals were designated as having at least one long allele (7 repeats or longer, L+ or not (L-. Principal analyses used multiple univariate factorial 2 (A1+/A1- × 2 (L+/L- analyses of variance. Results A significant main effect of A1+ status on DDT performance was evident (p = .006 as well as a significant interaction effect (p = .006 between both genes. No other significant effects were evident on the self-report measures, with the exception of a trend toward an interaction effect on the Sensation Seeking Scale. Exploratory analyses suggested that the significant effects were not a function of population stratification or gender. Discussion These data suggest that the DRD2 TaqI A and DRD4 VNTR polymorphisms influence impulsivity as measured with a delay discounting task. Specifically, these findings suggest that an interaction between the functional effects of the two unlinked genotypes results in significant difference in the balance of mesolimbic dopaminergic activation relative to frontal-parietal activation. However, these findings are also

  7. The Association of DRD2 Gene TaqI Polymorphism with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder a Population Sample of Iranian Azeri-children

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    Leila Mehdizadeh Fanid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a multi-factorial disorder that has defined by hyperactivity, impulsivity and attention deficits. Various neurotransmitters such as dopamine can play a role in its pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to examine the association of two common single nucleotide polymorphisms in DRD2 gene, Taq I A (T/C and Taq I B (G/A, with ADHA risk among Iranian-Azeri population. Materials and Methods A study of case–control association was performed with 89 samples with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and 96 healthy subjects. Peripheral blood samples were used for Genomic DNA extraction by salting-out method. SNP genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP technique. The collected data were analyzed through javastant online statistics software, using Chi-square, with a significance level of 0.05. Results There was not a significant difference in the allele and genotype frequencies between ADHD and Taq1B polymorphism in cases and controls (P>0.05. In the Taq IA of DRD2 gene, TT homozygous dominants and CC homozygous recessives were more frequent in case group than in control group but significant difference was not observed (P>0.05. Also, T/C heterozygotes were more frequent among the control group than the case group, and difference was significant (P

  8. Dopamine receptor D2 and catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphisms associated with anorexia nervosa in Chinese Han population: DRD2 and COMT gene polymorphisms were associated with AN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sufang; Yu, Shunying; Wang, Qian; Kang, Qing; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhang, Ran; Jiang, Wenhui; Qian, Yiping; Zhang, Haiyin; Zhang, Mingdao; Xiao, Zeping; Chen, Jue

    2016-03-11

    Dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) are important in dopamine system which is proved to be associated with food-anticipatory behavior, food restriction, reward and motivation. This has made them good candidates for anorexia nervosa (AN). The aim of this work is to explore the roles of DRD2 (rs1800497) and COMT (rs4680, rs4633, rs4818) gene polymorphisms in the susceptibility of AN within the Chinese Han population. We recruited 260AN patients with DSM-IV diagnosis criteria, and 247 unrelated, normal weight controls. DRD2 (rs1800497) and COMT (rs4680, rs4633, rs4818) were genotyped in all subjects. We found rs1800497 and rs4633 were associated with the susceptibility of AN within the Chinese Han sample, and allele C of rs1800497 was a protective factor. There was a gene-gene interaction between rs1800497 of DRD2 gene and rs4633 of COMT gene. We concluded that rs1800497 and rs4633 play important roles in the AN susceptibility with respect to the Chinese Han population. The gene-gene interaction between DRD2 and COMT contributes to the risk of AN. PMID:26808641

  9. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

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    Sean Austin Lim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh. Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI, which comprises only about 1-2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction.

  10. Analysis of ANKKI (rs1800497) and DRD2 (rs1079597, rs1800498) variants in five ethnic groups from Punjab, North-West India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gagandeep; Talwar, Indu; Sharma, Rubina; Sandhu, Harkirat Singh; Matharoo, Kawaljit; Bhanwer, A J S

    2016-06-10

    Dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) is one of the essential neurotransmitters in the brain studied extensively in the field of psychiatric disorders, alcoholic behaviors and Pharmacology. It is also a promising gene for studying the evolutionary and genetic variation among populations. The present study was an attempt to understand the extent of genetic variation among five different ethnic groups (Bania, Brahmin, Jat Sikh, Khatri and Scheduled caste) of Punjab (North West India). A total of 1012 individuals belonging to the above mentioned groups were analyzed for three TaqI Polymorphic loci of DRD2 and ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1 (ANKKI) using the allele frequencies and haplotype frequency distribution pattern. All the three loci were found to be polymorphic among the studied populations. The average heterozygosity for all loci in these ethnic groups was fairly substantial ranging from 0.3936 to 0.4986. The genetic differentiation among the population was observed to be in order of 0.0053.Among of the eight studied haplotypes, only six were shared by all the ethnic groups. TaqID and TaqIB loci were reported to be in significantly higher linkage disequilibrium (LD) in Scheduled Caste only, whereas TaqIA and TaqID showed modest LD in Brahmin, Jat Sikh and Khatri. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that the studied ethnic groups formed a close cluster, suggesting similar genetic structure of these populations which are in close proximity with other Indo European speaking North Indian and western Indian population groups. Overall this study highlights the genomic uniformity among the ethnic groups of Punjab (North-West India) owing to their common ancestral history and geographical closeness. PMID:26970175

  11. The Moderating Effect of Alcohol-Specific Parental Rule-Setting on the Relation between the Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene (DRD2), the Mu-Opioid Receptor Gene (OPRM1) and Alcohol Use in Young Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Pieters; C.S. van der Zwaluw; H. van der Vorst; R.W. Wiers; H. Smeets; E. Lambrichs; W.J. Burk; R.C.M.E. Engels

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The main aim of the study was to test the moderating effect of two genetic polymorphisms, one in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) and one in the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), on the link between parental rule-setting and adolescent alcohol use. Methods: A total of 214 adolescents (Mage

  12. Epistatic interactions involving DRD2, DRD4, and COMT polymorphisms and risk of substance abuse in women with binge-purge eating disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Howard; Thaler, Lea; Gauvin, Lise; Joober, Ridha; Labbe, Aurelie; Israel, Mimi; Kucer, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Substance abuse is common in individuals with bulimia-spectrum (binge-purge) eating disturbances, a co-occurrence that has been attributed to shared neurobiological substrates--notably alterations in dopaminergic activity. We examined the implications of variations of selected, dopamine-relevant polymorphisms (DRD2 Taq1A, DRD4 7R, and COMT) for risk of substance abuse in women with binge-purge eating syndromes. We genotyped 183 women (66.1% showing full-threshold BN and 33.9% showing sub-syndromic variants), and assessed lifetime presence of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, and stimulant abuse or dependence using structured interviews. Tests for main and interaction effects of various allele combinations revealed that individuals who carried high function COMT and low-function DRD4 7R alleles (a combination expected to be associated with higher risk) did indeed show more lifetime substance abuse and, specifically, more cannabis abuse. Our findings suggest that a gene combination that, in theory, codes for low levels of dopaminergic neurotransmission coincides with sensitivity to substance abuse in a sample displaying binge-purge eating-disorder variants. PMID:26950642

  13. Suicidal behavior and haplotypes of the dopamine receptor gene (DRD2 and ANKK1 gene polymorphisms in patients with alcohol dependence--preliminary report.

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    Andrzej Jasiewicz

    Full Text Available Suicide is a significant public health issue and a major cause of death throughout the world. According to WHO it accounts for almost 2% of deaths worldwide. The etiology of suicidal behavior is complex but the results of many studies suggest that genetic determinants are of significant importance. In our study,--we have analyzed selected SNPs polymorphisms in the DRD2 and ANKK1 genes in patients with alcohol dependence syndrome (169 Caucasian subjects including a subgroup of individuals (n = 61 who have experienced at least one suicide attempt. The aim of the study was to verify if various haplotypes of selected genes, comprising Taq1A, Taq1B, and Taq1D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, play any role in the development of alcohol dependence and suicidal behavior. The control group comprised 157 unrelated individuals matched for ethnicity, gender,- and age and included no individuals with mental disorders. All subjects were recruited in the North West region of Poland. The study showed that alcohol dependent subjects with a history of at least one suicidal attempt were characterized by a significantly higher frequency of the T-G-A2 haplotype when compared to individuals in whom alcohol dependence was not associated with suicidal behavior (p = 0.006. It appears that studies based on identifying correlation between SNPs is the future for research on genetic risk factors that contribute to the development of alcohol addiction and other associated disorders. To sum up, there is a necessity to perform further research to explain dependencies between the dopaminergic system, alcohol use disorders and suicidal behavior.

  14. The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the interplay between the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the striatum has become the highlight of several theories of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Using in vivo brain imaging in humans, alterations in dopamine and glutamate concentrations have been observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear a priori how alterations in striatal dopamine should modulate glutamate concentrations in the basal ganglia. In this selective mini-review, we examine the consequence of reducing striatal dopamine functioning on glutamate concentrations in the striatum and cortex; regions of interest heavily examined in the human brain imaging studies. We examine the predictions of the classical model of the basal ganglia, and contrast it with findings in humans and animals. The review concludes that chronic dopamine depletion (>4months) produces decreases in striatal glutamate levels which are consistent with the classical model of the basal ganglia. However, acute alterations in striatal dopamine functioning, specifically at the D2 receptors, may produce opposite affects. This has important implications for models of the basal ganglia and theorizing about neurochemical alterations in neuropsychiatric diseases. Moreover, these findings may help guide a priori hypotheses for (1)H-MRS studies measuring glutamate changes given alterations in dopaminergic functioning in humans. PMID:26334687

  15. Huntington's Disease and Striatal Signaling

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    Emmanuel eRoze

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s Disease (HD is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of polyglutamines (CAG. The main clinical manifestations of HD are chorea, cognitive impairment and psychiatric disorders. The transmission of HD is autosomal dominant with a complete penetrance. HD has a single genetic cause, a well-defined neuropathology, and informative pre-manifest genetic testing of the disease is available. Striatal atrophy begins as early as 15 years before disease onset and continues throughout the period of manifest illness. Therefore, patients could theoretically benefit from therapy at early stages of the disease. One important characteristic of HD is the striatal vulnerability to neurodegeneration, despite similar expression of the protein in other brain areas. Aggregation of the mutated Huntingtin (HTT, impaired axonal transport, excitotoxicity, transcriptional dysregulation as well as mitochondrial dysfunction and energy deficits, are all part of the cellular events that underlie neuronal dysfunction and striatal death. Among these non-exclusive mechanisms, an alteration of striatal signaling is thought to orchestrate the downstream events involved in the cascade of striatal dysfunction.

  16. Association between Dopamine Receptor D2 (DRD2) Variations rs6277 and rs1800497 and Cognitive Performance According to Risk Type for Psychosis: A Nested Case Control Study in a Finnish Population Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Hugh; Barnett, Jennifer H.; Miettunen, Jouko; Mukkala, Sari; Mäki, Pirjo; Liuhanen, Johanna; Murray, Graham K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ollila, Hanna; Paunio, Tiina; Veijola, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited research regarding the association between genes and cognitive intermediate phenotypes in those at risk for psychotic disorders. Methods We measured the association between established psychosis risk variants in dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and cognitive performance in individuals at age 23 years and explored if associations between cognition and these variants differed according to the presence of familial or clinical risk for psychosis. The subjects of the Oulu Brain and Mind Study were drawn from the general population-based Northern Finland 1986 Birth Cohort (NFBC 1986). Using linear regression, we compared the associations between cognitive performance and two candidate DRD2 polymorphisms (rs6277 and rs1800497) between subjects having familial (n=61) and clinical (n=45) risk for psychosis and a random sample of participating NFBC 1986 controls (n=74). Cognitive performance was evaluated using a comprehensive battery of tests at follow-up. Results Principal components factor analysis supported a three-factor model for cognitive measures. The minor allele of rs6277 was associated with poorer performance on a verbal factor (p=0.003) but this did not significantly interact with familial or clinical risk for psychosis. The minor allele of rs1800497 was associated with poorer performance on a psychomotor factor (p=0.038), though only in those at familial risk for psychotic disorders (interaction p=0.049). Conclusion The effect of two DRD2 SNPs on cognitive performance may differ according to risk type for psychosis, suggesting that cognitive intermediate phenotypes differ according to the type (familial or clinical) risk for psychosis. PMID:26114663

  17. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: beyond segregated cortico-striatal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milad, Mohammed R; Rauch, Scott L

    2012-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects approximately 2-3% of the population and is characterized by recurrent intrusive thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors or mental acts (compulsions), typically performed in response to obsessions or related anxiety. In the past few decades, the prevailing models of OCD pathophysiology have focused on cortico-striatal circuitry. More recent neuroimaging evidence, however, points to critical involvement of the lateral and medial orbitofrontal cortices, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and amygdalo-cortical circuitry, in addition to cortico-striatal circuitry, in the pathophysiology of the disorder. In this review, we elaborate proposed features of OCD pathophysiology beyond the classic parallel cortico-striatal pathways and argue that this evidence suggests that fear extinction, in addition to behavioral inhibition, is impaired in OCD. PMID:22138231

  18. Convergent cortical innervation of striatal projection neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kress, Geraldine J.; Yamawaki, Naoki; Wokosin, David L.; Wickersham, Ian R.; Gordon M. G Shepherd; Surmeier, D. James

    2013-01-01

    Anatomical studies have led to the assertion that intratelencephalic (IT) and pyramidal tract (PT) cortical neurons innervate different striatal projection neurons. To test this hypothesis, the responses of mouse striatal neurons to optogenetic activation of IT and PT axons were measured. Contrary to expectation, direct and indirect pathway striatal spiny projection neurons (SPNs) responded to both IT and PT activation, arguing that these cortical networks innervate both striatal projection n...

  19. An Information Theoretical Study of the Epistasis Between the CNR1 1359 G/A Polymorphism and the Taq1A and Taq1B DRD2 Polymorphisms: Assessing the Susceptibility to Cannabis Addiction in a Turkish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isir, Aysun Baransel; Baransel, Cesur; Nacak, Muradiye

    2016-04-01

    Addiction is a complex, multi-factorial disease, and thus, analyzing genetic variants at multiple loci and gene-gene interactions among them (epistasis) can provide crucial clues about causative factors of addiction which cannot be detected with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association studies. In this study, we discuss the interaction between the 1359 G/A polymorphism of the CNR1 gene and the DRD2 gene polymorphisms and the net effect of any possible epistasis on the cannabis addiction phenotype in a Turkish population. Using bivariate synergy and mutual information concepts as a means of capturing the magnitude of interaction between marker pairs, the present study not only confirms the A1 marker allele as a risk factor but also reveals a finer-grained association between A and B markers which manifests itself both as a preventive and a risk factor. Our results indicate that the increased phenotype of cases require an individual to be either heterozygous at both loci or homozygous at locus B with homozygous risk factor A1A1 present. We hypothesize that overlapping expressions of CB1 and D2R is the cause of CB1-D2R interactions in cases of substance abuse and the different polymorphisms of CNR1 and DRD2 genes may have decisive roles in the nature of these interactions in terms of promoting or alleviating the cannabis addiction risk factor of the individual. PMID:26833047

  20. Striatal dopamine release induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: effect of aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously demonstrated dopamine (DA) release in the bilateral striatal regions following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in young subjects. Several lines of evidence support substantial age-related changes in human dopaminergic neurotransmission. One possible explanation is alteration of cortico striatal neural connection with aging. Therefore, we investigated how frontal activation by rTMS influences striatal DA release in the elderly with SPECT measurements of striatal binding of [123I]iodobenzamide (lBZM), a DA D2 receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous DA. Five healthy elderly male subjects (age, 64 3 y) were studied with brain [123I]IBZM SPECT under three conditions (resting, sham stimulation, and active rTMS over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)), while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of [123I]IBZM. rTMS session consisted of three blocks. In each block, 15 trains of 2 sec duration were delivered with 10 Hz stimulation frequency and 100% motor threshold. Striatal V3', calculated as (striatal - occipital)/occipital radioactivity, was measured under equilibrium condition at baseline and after sham and active rTMS. Sham stimulation did not affect striatal V3'. rTMS over left DLPFC induced no significant change in V3' in the right striatum compared with baseline condition (0.91 0.25 vs. 0.96 0.25, P = NS). Interestingly, left striatal V3' showed a significant increase after rTMS over left DLPFC compared with sham condition (1.09 0.33 vs. 0.93 0.27, P < 0.05; 17.0 11.1% increase). These results are discrepant from previous ones from young subjects, who showed frontal rTMS-induced reduction of striatal V3', indicating rTMS-induced striatal DA release. We found no significant striatal DA release induced by rTMS over DLPFC in healthy elderly subjects using in vivo binding competition techniques. These results may support an altered cortico striatal circuit in normal aging

  1. BDNF signaling and survival of striatal neurons

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    Baoji Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The striatum, a major component of the basal ganglia, performs multiple functions including control of movement, reward, and addiction. Dysfunction and death of striatal neurons are the main causes for the motor disorders associated with Huntington’s disease (HD. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a member of the neurotrophin family, is among factors that promote survival and proper function of this neuronal population. Here, we review recent studies showing that BDNF determines the size of the striatum by supporting survival of the immature striatal neurons at their origin, promotes maturation of striatal neurons, and facilitates establishment of striatal connections during brain development. We also examine the role of BDNF in maintaining proper function of the striatum during adulthood, summarize the mechanisms that lead to a deficiency in BDNF signaling and subsequently striatal degeneration in HD, and highlight a potential role of BDNF as a therapeutic target for HD treatment.

  2. Significance of input correlations in striatal function.

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    Man Yi Yim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is the main input station of the basal ganglia and is strongly associated with motor and cognitive functions. Anatomical evidence suggests that individual striatal neurons are unlikely to share their inputs from the cortex. Using a biologically realistic large-scale network model of striatum and cortico-striatal projections, we provide a functional interpretation of the special anatomical structure of these projections. Specifically, we show that weak pairwise correlation within the pool of inputs to individual striatal neurons enhances the saliency of signal representation in the striatum. By contrast, correlations among the input pools of different striatal neurons render the signal representation less distinct from background activity. We suggest that for the network architecture of the striatum, there is a preferred cortico-striatal input configuration for optimal signal representation. It is further enhanced by the low-rate asynchronous background activity in striatum, supported by the balance between feedforward and feedback inhibitions in the striatal network. Thus, an appropriate combination of rates and correlations in the striatal input sets the stage for action selection presumably implemented in the basal ganglia.

  3. Chronic escalating cocaine exposure, abstinence/withdrawal, and chronic re-exposure: effects on striatal dopamine and opioid systems in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Schlussman, Stefan D; Rabkin, Jacqui; Butelman, Eduardo R; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-04-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic relapsing disease with periods of chronic escalating self-exposure, separated by periods of abstinence/withdrawal of varying duration. Few studies compare such cycles in preclinical models. This study models an "addiction-like cycle" in mice to determine neurochemical/molecular alterations that underlie the chronic, relapsing nature of this disease. Groups of male C57BL/6J mice received acute cocaine exposure (14-day saline/14-day withdrawal/13-day saline + 1-day cocaine), chronic cocaine exposure (14 day cocaine) or chronic re-exposure (14-day cocaine/14-day withdrawal/14-day cocaine). Escalating-dose binge cocaine (15-30 mg/kg/injection × 3/day, i.p. at hourly intervals) or saline (14-day saline) was administered, modeling initial exposure. In "re-exposure" groups, after a 14-day injection-free period (modeling abstinence/withdrawal), mice that had received cocaine were re-injected with 14-day escalating-dose binge cocaine, whereas controls received saline. Microdialysis was conducted on the 14th day of exposure or re-exposure to determine striatal dopamine content. Messenger RNA levels of preprodynorphin (Pdyn), dopamine D1 (Drd1) and D2 (Drd2) in the caudate putamen were determined by real-time PCR. Basal striatal dopamine levels were lower in mice after 14-day escalating exposure or re-exposure than in those in the acute cocaine group and controls. Pdyn mRNA levels were higher in the cocaine groups than in controls. Long-term adaptation was observed across the stages of this addiction-like cycle, in that the effects of cocaine on dopamine levels were increased after re-exposure compared to exposure. Changes in striatal dopaminergic responses across chronic escalating cocaine exposure and re-exposure are a central feature of the neurobiology of relapsing addictive states. PMID:23164614

  4. Polygenic inheritance of Tourette syndrome, stuttering, attention deficit hyperactivity, conduct, and oppositional defiant disorder: The additive and subtractive effect of the three dopaminergic genes - DRD2, D{beta}H, and DAT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comings, D.E.; Wu, S.; Chiu, C.; Ring, R.H.; Gade, R.; Ahn, C.; Dietz, G.; Muhleman, D. [Hope Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-31

    Polymorphisms of three different dopaminergic genes, dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (DRD2), dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase (D{beta}H), and dopamine transporter (DAT1), were examined in Tourette syndrome (TS) probands, their relatives, and controls. Each gene individually showed a significant correlation with various behavioral variables in these subjects. The additive and subtractive effects of the three genes were examined by genotyping all three genes in the same set of subjects. For 9 of 20 TS associated comorbid behaviors there was a significant linear association between the degree of loading for markers of three genes and the mean behavior scores. The behavior variables showing the significant associations were, in order, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), stuttering, oppositional defiant, tics, conduct, obsessive-compulsive, mania, alcohol abuse, and general anxiety - behaviors that constitute the most overt clinical aspects of TS. For 16 of the 20 behavior scores there was a linear progressive decrease in the mean score with progressively lesser loading for the three gene markers. These results suggest that TS, ADHD, stuttering, oppositional defiant and conduct disorder, and other behaviors associated with TS, are polygenic, due in part to these three dopaminergic genes, and that the genetics of other polygenic psychiatric disorders may be deciphered using this technique. 144 refs., 2 figs., 13 tabs.

  5. Encoding network states by striatal cell assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Tapia, Dagoberto; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Galarraga, Elvira; Drucker-Colin, René; Bargas, José

    2008-03-01

    Correlated activity in cortico-basal ganglia circuits plays a key role in the encoding of movement, associative learning and procedural memory. How correlated activity is assembled by striatal microcircuits is not understood. Calcium imaging of striatal neuronal populations, with single-cell resolution, reveals sporadic and asynchronous activity under control conditions. However, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) application induces bistability and correlated activity in striatal neurons. Widespread neurons within the field of observation present burst firing. Sets of neurons exhibit episodes of recurrent and synchronized bursting. Dimensionality reduction of network dynamics reveals functional states defined by cell assemblies that alternate their activity and display spatiotemporal pattern generation. Recurrent synchronous activity travels from one cell assembly to the other often returning to the original assembly; suggesting a robust structure. An initial search into the factors that sustain correlated activity of neuronal assemblies showed a critical dependence on both intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms: blockage of fast glutamatergic transmission annihilates all correlated firing, whereas blockage of GABAergic transmission locked the network into a single dominant state that eliminates assembly diversity. Reduction of L-type Ca(2+)-current restrains synchronization. Each cell assembly comprised different cells, but a small set of neurons was shared by different assemblies. A great proportion of the shared neurons was local interneurons with pacemaking properties. The network dynamics set into action by NMDA in the striatal network may reveal important properties of striatal microcircuits under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:18184883

  6. Striatal dopamine release codes uncertainty in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Mouridsen, Kim; Peterson, Ericka;

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of midbrain and striatal dopaminergic projections may be involved in pathological gambling: hypersensitivity to reward and sustained activation toward uncertainty. The midbrain—striatal dopamine system distinctly codes reward and uncertainty, where dopaminergic activation is a linear...

  7. Striatal dopamine release codes uncertainty in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Mouridsen, Kim; Peterson, Ericka;

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of midbrain and striatal dopaminergic projections may be involved in pathological gambling: hypersensitivity to reward and sustained activation toward uncertainty. The midbrain-striatal dopamine system distinctly codes reward and uncertainty, where dopaminergic activation is a linear...

  8. Striatal Sensitivity during Reward Processing in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloyelis, Yannis; Mehta, Mitul A.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip; Kuntsi, Jonna

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been linked to deficits in the dopaminergic reward-processing circuitry; yet, existing evidence is limited, and the influence of genetic variation affecting dopamine signaling remains unknown. We investigated striatal responsivity to rewards in ADHD combined type (ADHD-CT) using…

  9. Physiology and pharmacology of striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2009-01-01

    The basal ganglia occupy the core of the forebrain and consist of evolutionarily conserved motor nuclei that form recurrent circuits critical for motivation and motor planning. The striatum is the main input nucleus of the basal ganglia and a key neural substrate for procedural learning and memory. The vast majority of striatal neurons are spiny GABAergic projection neurons, which exhibit slow but temporally precise spiking in vivo. Contributing to this precision are several different types of interneurons that constitute only a small fraction of total neuron number but play a critical role in regulating striatal output. This review examines the cellular physiology and modulation of striatal neurons that give rise to their unique properties and function. PMID:19400717

  10. Dopamine D-like receptors play only a minor role in the increase of striatal dopamine induced by striatally applied SKF38393.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekino, R.; Saigusa, T.; Aono, Y.; Uchida, T.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effects of the intra-striatal infusion of Ca(2+)-free medium on the intra-striatal injection of 0.5 mug SKF38393-induced striatal dopamine efflux. It is discussed that the amount of extracellular, striatal dopamine seen after striatally applied SKF38393, is the overall result of the (

  11. Cortical ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism protects against methamphetamine-induced striatal neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N B; Duncker, P C; Marshall, J F

    2011-12-29

    Binge administration of the psychostimulant drug, methamphetamine (mAMPH), produces long-lasting structural and functional abnormalities in the striatum. mAMPH binges produce nonexocytotic release of dopamine (DA), and mAMPH-induced activation of excitatory afferent inputs to cortex and striatum is evidenced by elevated extracellular glutamate (GLU) in both regions. The mAMPH-induced increases in DA and GLU neurotransmission are thought to combine to injure striatal DA nerve terminals of mAMPH-exposed brains. Systemic pretreatment with either competitive or noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonists protects against mAMPH-induced striatal DA terminal damage, but the locus of these antagonists' effects has not been determined. Here, we applied either the NMDA receptor antagonist, (dl)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5), or the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), directly to the dura mater over frontoparietal cortex to assess their effects on mAMPH-induced cortical and striatal immediate-early gene (c-fos) expression. In a separate experiment we applied AP5 or DNQX epidurally in the same cortical location of rats during a binge regimen of mAMPH and assessed mAMPH-induced striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) depletions 1 week later. Our results indicate that both ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists reduced the mAMPH-induced Fos expression in cerebral cortex regions near the site of epidural application and reduced Fos immunoreactivity in striatal regions innervated by the affected cortical regions. Also, epidural application of the same concentration of either antagonist during a binge mAMPH regimen blunted the mAMPH-induced striatal DAT depletions with a topography similar to its effects on Fos expression. These findings demonstrate that mAMPH-induced dopaminergic injury depends upon cortical NMDA and AMPA receptor activation and suggest the involvement of the

  12. Effects of cholecystokinin octapeptide on striatal dopamine metabolism and on apomorphine-induced stereotyped cage-climbing in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of sulfated (CCK-8-SE) and non-sulfated (CCK-8-NS) cholecystokinin octapeptide on striatal dopamine (DA) metabolism have been investigated on mice. CCK-8-NS facilitated the disappearance of striatal DA, measured after synthesis inhibition with 350 mg/kg of α-methyl-p-tyrosine. CCK-8-SE did not affect DA disappearance. In vitro uptake of [3H]DA by striatal slices was affected by neither CCK-8-SE, nor CCK-8-NS (10-5 M). Potassium-induced in vitro release of [3H]DA from striatal slices was significantly increased by 10-5 M CCK-8-NS: however, CCK-8-SE likewise increased DA release in this model system. Apomorphine-induced (1.0 mg/kg) stereotyped cage-climbing behavior was not affected by CCK-8-SE but was enhanced by CCK-8-NS. This effect could be antagonized by haloperidol, but not by naloxone. The data suggest that CCK-8-NS affects striatal DA release, disappearance and receptor sensitivity in the mouse. Dopaminergic mechanisms should therefore be regarded as a possible mode of action of CCK-8-NS on brain functions. (Auth.)

  13. Behavioral sensitivity of temporally modulated striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Portugal

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations into the neural mechanisms that underlie temporal perception have revealed that the striatum is an important contributor to interval timing processes, and electrophysiological recording studies have shown that the firing rates of striatal neurons are modulated by the time in a trial at which an operant response is made. However, it remains unclear whether striatal firing rate modulations are related to the passage of time alone (i.e., whether temporal information is represented in an “abstract” manner independent of other attributes of biological importance, or whether this temporal information is embedded within striatal activity related to co-occurring contextual information, such as motor behaviors. This study evaluated these two hypotheses by recording from striatal neurons while rats performed a temporal production task. Rats were trained to respond at different nosepoke apertures for food reward under two simultaneously active reinforcement schedules: a variable-interval (VI-15 sec schedule and a fixed-interval (FI-15 sec schedule of reinforcement. Responding during a trial occurred in a sequential manner composing 3 phases; VI responding, FI responding, VI responding. The vast majority of task-sensitive striatal neurons (95% varied their firing rates associated with equivalent behaviors (e.g., periods in which their snout was held within the nosepoke across these behavioral phases, and 96% of cells varied their firing rates for the same behavior within a phase, thereby demonstrating their sensitivity to time. However, in a direct test of the abstract timing hypothesis, 91% of temporally modulated “hold” cells were further modulated by the overt motor behaviors associated with transitioning between nosepokes. As such, these data are inconsistent with the striatum representing time in an “abstract’ manner, but support the hypothesis that temporal information is embedded within contextual and motor functions

  14. Selective deletion of PTEN in dopamine neurons leads to trophic effects and adaptation of striatal medium spiny projecting neurons.

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    Oscar Diaz-Ruiz

    Full Text Available The widespread distribution of the tumor suppressor PTEN in the nervous system suggests a role in a broad range of brain functions. PTEN negatively regulates the signaling pathways initiated by protein kinase B (Akt thereby regulating signals for growth, proliferation and cell survival. Pten deletion in the mouse brain has revealed its role in controlling cell size and number. In this study, we used Cre-loxP technology to specifically inactivate Pten in dopamine (DA neurons (Pten KO mice. The resulting mutant mice showed neuronal hypertrophy, and an increased number of dopaminergic neurons and fibers in the ventral mesencephalon. Interestingly, quantitative microdialysis studies in Pten KO mice revealed no alterations in basal DA extracellular levels or evoked DA release in the dorsal striatum, despite a significant increase in total DA tissue levels. Striatal dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1 and prodynorphin (PDyn mRNA levels were significantly elevated in KO animals, suggesting an enhancement in neuronal activity associated with the striatonigral projection pathway, while dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2 and preproenkephalin (PPE mRNA levels remained unchanged. In addition, PTEN inactivation protected DA neurons and significantly enhanced DA-dependent behavioral functions in KO mice after a progressive 6OHDA lesion. These results provide further evidence about the role of PTEN in the brain and suggest that manipulation of the PTEN/Akt signaling pathway during development may alter the basal state of dopaminergic neurotransmission and could provide a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Huntington’s Disease and Striatal Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Roze, Emmanuel; Cahill, Emma; Martin, Elodie; Bonnet, Cecilia; Vanhoutte, Peter; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of polyglutamines (CAG). The main clinical manifestations of HD are chorea, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric disorders. The transmission of HD is autosomal dominant with a complete penetrance. HD has a single genetic cause, a well-defined neuropathology, and informative pre-manifest genetic testing of the disease is available. Striatal atrophy begins as early as 15 years before disease onset a...

  16. Striatal Cholinergic Neurotransmission Requires VGLUT3

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Bussert, Timothy G.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Seal, Rebecca P.

    2014-01-01

    It is now clear that many neuronal populations release more than one classical neurotransmitter, yet in most cases the functional role of corelease is unknown. Striatal cholinergic interneurons release both glutamate and acetylcholine, and vesicular loading of glutamate has been shown to enhance acetylcholine content. Using a combination of optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in mice, we now provide physiological evidence that optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic interneurons triggers mo...

  17. Striatal plasticity and basal ganglia circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Malenka, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal striatum, which consists of the caudate and putamen, is the gateway to the basal ganglia. It receives convergent excitatory afferents from cortex and thalamus and forms the origin of the direct and indirect pathways—distinct basal ganglia circuits involved in motor control. It is also a major site of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Striatal plasticity alters the transfer of information throughout basal ganglia circuits and may represent a key neural substrate for adaptive m...

  18. Striatal cholinergic neurotransmission requires VGLUT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alexandra B; Bussert, Timothy G; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Seal, Rebecca P

    2014-06-25

    It is now clear that many neuronal populations release more than one classical neurotransmitter, yet in most cases the functional role of corelease is unknown. Striatal cholinergic interneurons release both glutamate and acetylcholine, and vesicular loading of glutamate has been shown to enhance acetylcholine content. Using a combination of optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in mice, we now provide physiological evidence that optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic interneurons triggers monosynaptic glutamate- and acetylcholine-mediated currents in striatal fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), both of which depend on the expression of the vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3). In contrast to corticostriatal glutamatergic inputs onto FSIs, which are mediated primarily by AMPA-type glutamate receptors, glutamate release by cholinergic interneurons activates both AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, suggesting a unique role for these inputs in the modulation of FSI activity. Importantly, we find that the loss of VGLUT3 not only markedly attenuates glutamatergic and cholinergic inputs on FSIs, but also significantly decreases disynaptic GABAergic input onto medium spiny neurons (MSNs), the major output neurons of the striatum. Our data demonstrate that VGLUT3 is required for normal cholinergic signaling onto FSIs, as well as for acetylcholine-dependent disynaptic inhibition of MSNs. Thus, by supporting fast glutamatergic transmission as well as by modulating the strength of cholinergic signaling, VGLUT3 has the capacity to exert widespread influence on the striatal network. PMID:24966377

  19. Molecular Regulation of Striatal Development: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is composed of the brain and the spinal cord. The brain is a complex organ that processes and coordinates activities of the body in bilaterian, higher-order animals. The development of the brain mirrors its complex function as it requires intricate genetic signalling at specific times, and deviations from this can lead to brain malformations such as anencephaly. Research into how the CNS is specified and patterned has been studied extensively in chick, fish, frog, and mice, but findings from the latter will be emphasised here as higher-order mammals show most similarity to the human brain. Specifically, we will focus on the embryonic development of an important forebrain structure, the striatum (also known as the dorsal striatum or neostriatum. Over the past decade, research on striatal development in mice has led to an influx of new information about the genes involved, but the precise orchestration between the genes, signalling molecules, and transcription factors remains unanswered. We aim to summarise what is known to date about the tightly controlled network of interacting genes that control striatal development. This paper will discuss early telencephalon patterning and dorsal ventral patterning with specific reference to the genes involved in striatal development.

  20. Striatal plasticity and basal ganglia circuit function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Anatol C; Malenka, Robert C

    2008-11-26

    The dorsal striatum, which consists of the caudate and putamen, is the gateway to the basal ganglia. It receives convergent excitatory afferents from cortex and thalamus and forms the origin of the direct and indirect pathways, which are distinct basal ganglia circuits involved in motor control. It is also a major site of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Striatal plasticity alters the transfer of information throughout basal ganglia circuits and may represent a key neural substrate for adaptive motor control and procedural memory. Here, we review current understanding of synaptic plasticity in the striatum and its role in the physiology and pathophysiology of basal ganglia function. PMID:19038213

  1. Overeating Behavior and Striatal Dopamine with 6-[18F]-Fluoro-L--Tyrosine PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Wilcox

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating behavior may be affected by dopamine synthesis capacity. In this study, 6-[18F]-fluoro-L--tyrosine (FMT positron emission tomography (PET uptake in striatal subregions was correlated with BMI (kg/m2 and an estimate of the frequency of prior weight loss attempts in 15 healthy subjects. BMI was negatively correlated with FMT uptake in the dorsal caudate. Although the association between BMI and FMT uptake in the dorsal caudate was not significant upon correction for age and sex, the association fell within the range of a statistical trend. Weight loss attempts divided by years trying was also negatively correlated with FMT uptake in the dorsal putamen (=.05. These results suggest an association between low dorsal striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis capacity and overeating behavior.

  2. Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Control Motor Behavior and Basal Ganglia Function in Experimental Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Nicolas; Liberge, Martine; Jaouen, Florence; Ztaou, Samira; Hanini, Marwa; Camon, Jeremy; Deisseroth, Karl; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Beurrier, Corinne

    2015-10-27

    Despite evidence showing that anticholinergic drugs are of clinical relevance in Parkinson's disease (PD), the causal role of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) in PD pathophysiology remains elusive. Here, we show that optogenetic inhibition of CINs alleviates motor deficits in PD mouse models, providing direct demonstration for their implication in parkinsonian motor dysfunctions. As neural correlates, CIN inhibition in parkinsonian mice differentially impacts the excitability of striatal D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons, normalizes pathological bursting activity in the main basal ganglia output structure, and increases the functional weight of the direct striatonigral pathway in cortical information processing. By contrast, CIN inhibition in non-lesioned mice does not affect locomotor activity, equally modulates medium spiny neuron excitability, and does not modify spontaneous or cortically driven activity in the basal ganglia output, suggesting that the role of these interneurons in motor function is highly dependent on dopamine tone. PMID:26489458

  3. Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Control Motor Behavior and Basal Ganglia Function in Experimental Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Maurice

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite evidence showing that anticholinergic drugs are of clinical relevance in Parkinson’s disease (PD, the causal role of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs in PD pathophysiology remains elusive. Here, we show that optogenetic inhibition of CINs alleviates motor deficits in PD mouse models, providing direct demonstration for their implication in parkinsonian motor dysfunctions. As neural correlates, CIN inhibition in parkinsonian mice differentially impacts the excitability of striatal D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons, normalizes pathological bursting activity in the main basal ganglia output structure, and increases the functional weight of the direct striatonigral pathway in cortical information processing. By contrast, CIN inhibition in non-lesioned mice does not affect locomotor activity, equally modulates medium spiny neuron excitability, and does not modify spontaneous or cortically driven activity in the basal ganglia output, suggesting that the role of these interneurons in motor function is highly dependent on dopamine tone.

  4. Neonatal astrocyte damage is sufficient to trigger progressive striatal degeneration in a rat model of glutaric acidemia-I.

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    Silvia Olivera-Bravo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have investigated whether an acute metabolic damage to astrocytes during the neonatal period may critically disrupt subsequent brain development, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders. Astrocytes are vulnerable to glutaric acid (GA, a dicarboxylic acid that accumulates in millimolar concentrations in Glutaric Acidemia I (GA-I, an inherited neurometabolic childhood disease characterized by degeneration of striatal neurons. While GA induces astrocyte mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and subsequent increased proliferation, it is presently unknown whether such astrocytic dysfunction is sufficient to trigger striatal neuronal loss. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A single intracerebroventricular dose of GA was administered to rat pups at postnatal day 0 (P0 to induce an acute, transient rise of GA levels in the central nervous system (CNS. GA administration potently elicited proliferation of astrocytes expressing S100β followed by GFAP astrocytosis and nitrotyrosine staining lasting until P45. Remarkably, GA did not induce acute neuronal loss assessed by FluoroJade C and NeuN cell count. Instead, neuronal death appeared several days after GA treatment and progressively increased until P45, suggesting a delayed onset of striatal degeneration. The axonal bundles perforating the striatum were disorganized following GA administration. In cell cultures, GA did not affect survival of either striatal astrocytes or neurons, even at high concentrations. However, astrocytes activated by a short exposure to GA caused neuronal death through the production of soluble factors. Iron porphyrin antioxidants prevented GA-induced astrocyte proliferation and striatal degeneration in vivo, as well as astrocyte-mediated neuronal loss in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results indicate that a transient metabolic insult with GA induces long lasting phenotypic changes in astrocytes that cause them to promote striatal

  5. Altered striatal intrinsic functional connectivity in pediatric anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Julia; Benson, Brenda; Farber, Madeline; Pine, Daniel; Ernst, Monique

    2016-05-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders of adolescence. Behavioral and task-based imaging studies implicate altered reward system function, including striatal dysfunction, in adolescent anxiety. However, no study has yet examined alterations of the striatal intrinsic functional connectivity in adolescent anxiety disorders. The current study examines striatal intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC), using six bilateral striatal seeds, among 35 adolescents with anxiety disorders and 36 healthy comparisons. Anxiety is associated with abnormally low iFC within the striatum (e.g., between nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus), and between the striatum and prefrontal regions, including subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, posterior insula and supplementary motor area. The current findings extend prior behavioral and task-based imaging research, and provide novel data implicating decreased striatal iFC in adolescent anxiety. Alterations of striatal neurocircuitry identified in this study may contribute to the perturbations in the processing of motivational, emotional, interoceptive, and motor information seen in pediatric anxiety disorders. This pattern of the striatal iFC perturbations can guide future research on specific mechanisms underlying anxiety. PMID:27004799

  6. Striatal astrocytes act as a reservoir for L-DOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Murakami, Shinki; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J; Ogawa, Norio

    2014-01-01

    L-DOPA is therapeutically efficacious in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), although dopamine (DA) neurons are severely degenerated. Since cortical astrocytes express neutral amino acid transporter (LAT) and DA transporter (DAT), the uptake and metabolism of L-DOPA and DA in striatal astrocytes may influence their availability in the dopaminergic system of PD. To assess possible L-DOPA- and DA-uptake and metabolic properties of striatal astrocytes, we examined the expression of L-DOPA, DA and DAT in striatal astrocytes of hemi-parkinsonian model rats after repeated L-DOPA administration, and measured the contents of L-DOPA, DA and their metabolite in primary cultured striatal astrocytes after L-DOPA/DA treatment. Repeated injections of L-DOPA induced apparent L-DOPA- and DA-immunoreactivities and marked expression of DAT in reactive astrocytes on the lesioned side of the striatum in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Exposure to DA for 4h significantly increased the levels of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in cultured striatal astrocytes. L-DOPA was also markedly increased in cultured striatal astrocytes after 4-h L-DOPA exposure, but DA was not detected 4 or 8h after L-DOPA treatment, despite the expression of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase in astrocytes. Furthermore, the intracellular level of L-DOPA in cultured striatal astrocytes decreased rapidly after removal of extracellular L-DOPA. The results suggest that DA uptaken into striatal astrocytes is rapidly metabolized and that striatal astrocytes act as a reservoir of L-DOPA that govern the uptake or release of L-DOPA depending on extracellular L-DOPA concentration, but are less capable of converting L-DOPA to DA. PMID:25188235

  7. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

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    Tanara Vieira Peres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3 in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain.

  8. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Pedro, Daniela Zótico; de Cordova, Fabiano Mendes; Lopes, Mark William; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Walz, Roger; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old). The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM) caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3) in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain. PMID:24324973

  9. Differential striatal spine pathology in Parkinson's disease and cocaine addiction: a key role of dopamine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, R M; Smith, Y

    2013-10-22

    In the striatum, the dendritic tree of the two main populations of projection neurons, called "medium spiny neurons (MSNs)", are covered with spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the cerebral cortex and thalamus. In Parkinson's disease (PD), striatal MSNs undergo an important loss of dendritic spines, whereas aberrant overgrowth of striatal spines occurs following chronic cocaine exposure. This review examines the possibility that opposite dopamine dysregulation is one of the key factors that underlies these structural changes. In PD, nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration results in a significant loss of dendritic spines in the dorsal striatum, while rodents chronically exposed to cocaine and other psychostimulants, display an increase in the density of "thin and immature" spines in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In rodent models of PD, there is evidence that D2 dopamine receptor-containing MSNs are preferentially affected, while D1-positive cells are the main targets of increased spine density in models of addiction. However, such specificity remains to be established in primates. Although the link between the extent of striatal spine changes and the behavioral deficits associated with these disorders remains controversial, there is unequivocal evidence that glutamatergic synaptic transmission is significantly altered in both diseased conditions. Recent studies have suggested that opposite calcium-mediated regulation of the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) function induces these structural defects. In conclusion, there is strong evidence that dopamine is a major, but not the sole, regulator of striatal spine pathology in PD and addiction to psychostimulants. Further studies of the role of glutamate and other genes associated with spine plasticity in mediating these effects are warranted. PMID:23867772

  10. Striatal dysfunction in attention deficit and hyperkinetic disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, H.C.; Henriksen, L.; Bruhn, P.; Borner, H.; Nielsen, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    We have previously reported that periventricular structures are hypoperfused in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study has expanded the number of patients, who were divided into two groups: six patients with pure ADHD, and 13 patients with ADHD in combination with other neurologic symptoms. By using xenon 133 inhalation and emission tomography, the regional cerebral blood flow distribution was determined and compared with a control group. Striatal regions were found to be hypoperfused and, by inference, hypofunctional in both groups. This hypoperfusion was statistically significant in the right striatum in ADHD, and in both striatal regions in ADHD with other neuropsychologic and neurologic symptoms. The primary sensory and sensorimotor cortical regions were highly perfused. Methylphenidate increased flow to striatal and posterior periventricular regions, and tended to decrease flow to primary sensory regions. Low striatal activity, partially reversible with methylphenidate, appears to be a cardinal feature in ADHD.

  11. Striatal dysfunction in attention deficit and hyperkinetic disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously reported that periventricular structures are hypoperfused in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study has expanded the number of patients, who were divided into two groups: six patients with pure ADHD, and 13 patients with ADHD in combination with other neurologic symptoms. By using xenon 133 inhalation and emission tomography, the regional cerebral blood flow distribution was determined and compared with a control group. Striatal regions were found to be hypoperfused and, by inference, hypofunctional in both groups. This hypoperfusion was statistically significant in the right striatum in ADHD, and in both striatal regions in ADHD with other neuropsychologic and neurologic symptoms. The primary sensory and sensorimotor cortical regions were highly perfused. Methylphenidate increased flow to striatal and posterior periventricular regions, and tended to decrease flow to primary sensory regions. Low striatal activity, partially reversible with methylphenidate, appears to be a cardinal feature in ADHD

  12. Neuroinflammation alters voltage-dependent conductance in striatal astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Karpuk, Nikolay; Burkovetskaya, Maria; Kielian, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has the capacity to alter normal central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis and function. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of an inflammatory milieu on the electrophysiological properties of striatal astrocyte subpopulations with a mouse bacterial brain abscess model. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ astrocytes neighboring abscesses at postinfection ...

  13. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miville-Godbout, Edith; Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Al-Sweidi, Sara; Smith, Tara; Mochizuki, Asuka; Senanayake, Vijitha; Jayasinghe, Dushmanthi; Wang, Li; Goodenowe, Dayan; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treated for 10 days with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-plasmalogen precursor PPI-1011 (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg). On day 5 mice received MPTP and were killed on day 11. Next, in a post-treatment study, male mice were treated with MPTP and then received daily for 5 days PPI-1011 (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg). MPTP treatment reduced serum plasmalogen levels, striatal contents of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, serotonin, DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). Pre-treatment with PPI-1011 (10 and 50 mg/kg) prevented all MPTP-induced effects. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding. Post-treatment with PPI-1011 prevented all MPTP-induced effects at 50 mg/kg but not at lower doses. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding in the post-treatment experiment. PPI-1011 treatment (10 days at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg) of intact mice left unchanged striatal biogenic amine contents. These data demonstrate that treatment with a plasmalogen precursor is capable of protecting striatal dopamine markers in an animal model of PD. PMID:26959819

  14. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Miville-Godbout

    Full Text Available Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson's disease (PD patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treated for 10 days with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA-plasmalogen precursor PPI-1011 (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg. On day 5 mice received MPTP and were killed on day 11. Next, in a post-treatment study, male mice were treated with MPTP and then received daily for 5 days PPI-1011 (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg. MPTP treatment reduced serum plasmalogen levels, striatal contents of dopamine (DA and its metabolites, serotonin, DA transporter (DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2. Pre-treatment with PPI-1011 (10 and 50 mg/kg prevented all MPTP-induced effects. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding. Post-treatment with PPI-1011 prevented all MPTP-induced effects at 50 mg/kg but not at lower doses. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding in the post-treatment experiment. PPI-1011 treatment (10 days at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg of intact mice left unchanged striatal biogenic amine contents. These data demonstrate that treatment with a plasmalogen precursor is capable of protecting striatal dopamine markers in an animal model of PD.

  15. Striatal Astrocytes Act as a Reservoir for L-DOPA

    OpenAIRE

    Masato Asanuma; Ikuko Miyazaki; Shinki Murakami; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J.; Norio Ogawa

    2014-01-01

    L-DOPA is therapeutically efficacious in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), although dopamine (DA) neurons are severely degenerated. Since cortical astrocytes express neutral amino acid transporter (LAT) and DA transporter (DAT), the uptake and metabolism of L-DOPA and DA in striatal astrocytes may influence their availability in the dopaminergic system of PD. To assess possible L-DOPA- and DA-uptake and metabolic properties of striatal astrocytes, we examined the expression of L-DOPA, D...

  16. Striatal neurodevelopment is dysregulated in purine metabolism deficiency and impacts DARPP-32, BDNF/TrkB expression and signaling: new insights on the molecular and cellular basis of Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiabe-Henri Guibinga

    Full Text Available Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome (LNS is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT. This syndrome is characterized by an array of severe neurological impairments that in part originate from striatal dysfunctions. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these dysfunctions remain largely unidentified. In this report, we demonstrate that HPRT-deficiency causes dysregulated expression of key genes essential for striatal patterning, most notably the striatally-enriched transcription factor B-cell leukemia 11b (Bcl11b. The data also reveal that the down-regulated expression of Bcl11b in HPRT-deficient immortalized mouse striatal (STHdh neural stem cells is accompanied by aberrant expression of some of its transcriptional partners and other striatally-enriched genes, including the gene encoding dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32, (DARPP-32. Furthermore, we demonstrate that components of the BDNF/TrkB signaling, a known activator of DARPP-32 striatal expression and effector of Bcl11b transcriptional activation are markedly increased in HPRT-deficient cells and in the striatum of HPRT knockout mouse. Consequently, the HPRT-deficient cells display superior protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated cell death upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that the purine metabolic defect caused by HPRT-deficiency, while it may provide neuroprotection to striatal neurons, affects key genes and signaling pathways that may underlie the neuropathogenesis of LNS.

  17. The extended fronto-striatal model of obsessive compulsive disorder: convergence from event-related potentials, neuropsychology and neuroimaging

    OpenAIRE

    Margherita eMelloni; Claudia eUrbistondo; Lucas eSedeño; Carlos eGelormini; Rafael eKichic; Agustin eIbanez

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored convergent evidence supporting the fronto-striatal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (FSMOCD) and the contribution of event-related potential (ERP) studies to this model. First, we considered minor modifications to the FSMOCD model based on neuroimaging and neuropsychological data. We noted the brain areas most affected in this disorder -anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basal ganglia (BG), and orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) and their related cognitive functions, su...

  18. De Novo Mutations in PDE10A Cause Childhood-Onset Chorea with Bilateral Striatal Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencacci, Niccolò E; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Nakashima, Kosuke; R'Bibo, Lea; Lynch, David S; Balint, Bettina; Willemsen, Michèl A A P; Adams, Matthew E; Wiethoff, Sarah; Suzuki, Kazunori; Davies, Ceri H; Ng, Joanne; Meyer, Esther; Veneziano, Liana; Giunti, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Raymond, F Lucy; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Barzaghi, Chiara; Garavaglia, Barbara; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Houlden, Henry; Kurian, Manju A; Kimura, Haruhide; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Wood, Nicholas W; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2016-04-01

    Chorea is a hyperkinetic movement disorder resulting from dysfunction of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which form the main output projections from the basal ganglia. Here, we used whole-exome sequencing to unravel the underlying genetic cause in three unrelated individuals with a very similar and unique clinical presentation of childhood-onset chorea and characteristic brain MRI showing symmetrical bilateral striatal lesions. All individuals were identified to carry a de novo heterozygous mutation in PDE10A (c.898T>C [p.Phe300Leu] in two individuals and c.1000T>C [p.Phe334Leu] in one individual), encoding a phosphodiesterase highly and selectively present in MSNs. PDE10A contributes to the regulation of the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Both substitutions affect highly conserved amino acids located in the regulatory GAF-B domain, which, by binding to cAMP, stimulates the activity of the PDE10A catalytic domain. In silico modeling showed that the altered residues are located deep in the binding pocket, where they are likely to alter cAMP binding properties. In vitro functional studies showed that neither substitution affects the basal PDE10A activity, but they severely disrupt the stimulatory effect mediated by cAMP binding to the GAF-B domain. The identification of PDE10A mutations as a cause of chorea further motivates the study of cAMP signaling in MSNs and highlights the crucial role of striatal cAMP signaling in the regulation of basal ganglia circuitry. Pharmacological modulation of this pathway could offer promising etiologically targeted treatments for chorea and other hyperkinetic movement disorders. PMID:27058447

  19. Shifts in striatal responsivity evoked by chronic stimulation of dopamine and glutamate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, J J; Capper-Loup, C; Hu, D; Choe, E S; Upadhyay, U; Graybiel, A M

    2002-10-01

    Dopamine and glutamate are key neurotransmitters in cortico-basal ganglia loops affecting motor and cognitive function. To examine functional convergence of dopamine and glutamate neurotransmitter systems in the basal ganglia, we evaluated the long-term effects of chronic stimulation of each of these systems on striatal responses to stimulation of the other. First we exposed rats to chronic intermittent cocaine and used early-gene assays to test the responsivity of the striatum to subsequent acute motor cortex stimulation by application of the GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid alpha subunit) receptor antagonist, picrotoxin. Reciprocally, we studied the effects of chronic intermittent motor cortex stimulation on the capacity for subsequent acute dopaminergic treatments to induce early-gene activation in the striatum. Prior treatment with chronic intermittent cocaine induced motor sensitization and significantly potentiated the striatal expression of Fos-family early genes in response to stimulation of the motor cortex. Contrary to this, chronic intermittent stimulation of the motor cortex down-regulated cocaine-induced gene expression in the striatum, but enhanced striatal gene expression induced by a full D1 receptor agonist (SKF 81297) and did not change the early-gene response elicited by a D2 receptor antagonist (haloperidol). These findings suggests that repeated dopaminergic stimulation produces long-term enhancement of corticostriatal signalling from the motor cortex, amplifying cortically evoked modulation of the basal ganglia. By contrast, persistent stimulation of the motor cortex inhibits cocaine-stimulated signalling in the striatum, but not signalling mediated by individual dopamine receptor sites, suggesting that chronic cortical hyperexcitability produces long-term impairment of dopaminergic activity and compensation at the receptor level. These findings prompt a model of the basal ganglia function as being regulated by opposing homeostatic dopamine

  20. Striatal signal transduction and drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Philibin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug

  1. Striatal Signal Transduction and Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibin, Scott D.; Hernandez, Adan; Self, David W.; Bibb, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug addiction. PMID

  2. Human t-DARPP is induced during striatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straccia, Marco; Carrere, Jordi; Rosser, Anne E; Canals, Josep M

    2016-10-01

    Human Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of molecular weight 32kDa (DARPP-32, also known as PPP1R1B) gene codes for different transcripts that are mainly translated into two DARPP-32 protein isoforms, full length (fl)-DARPP-32 and truncated (t)-DARPP. The t-DARPP lacks the first 36 residues at the N-terminal, which alters its function. In the central nervous system, fl-DARPP-32 is highly expressed in GABAergic striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), where it integrates dopaminergic and glutamatergic input signaling. However, no information about human DARPP-32 isoform expression during MSNs maturation is available. In this study, our aim is to determine the expression of the two DARPP-32 isoforms in human fetal and adult striatal samples. We show that DARPP-32 isoform expression is differentially regulated during human striatal development, with the t-DARPP isoform being virtually absent from whole ganglionic eminence (WGE) and highly induced in the adult striatum (in both caudate and putamen). We next compared the four most common anti-DARPP-32 antibodies used in human specimens, to study their recognition of the two isoforms in fetal and adult human striatal samples by western blot and immunohistochemistry. The four antibodies specifically identify the fl-DARPP-32 in both fetal and adult samples, while t-DARPP form was only detected in adult striatal samples. In addition, the lack of t-DARPP recognition in human adult striatum by the antibody generated against the full-length domain produces in turn different efficacy by immunohistochemical analysis. In conclusion, our results show that expression of human DARPP-32 protein isoforms depends on the striatal neurodevelopmental stage with t-DARPP being specific for the human adult striatum. PMID:27475250

  3. KV7 Channels Regulate Firing during Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Striatal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Belén Pérez-Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal projection neurons (SPNs process motor and cognitive information. Their activity is affected by Parkinson’s disease, in which dopamine concentration is decreased and acetylcholine concentration is increased. Acetylcholine activates muscarinic receptors in SPNs. Its main source is the cholinergic interneuron that responds with a briefer latency than SPNs during a cortical command. Therefore, an important question is whether muscarinic G-protein coupled receptors and their signaling cascades are fast enough to intervene during synaptic responses to regulate synaptic integration and firing. One of the most known voltage dependent channels regulated by muscarinic receptors is the KV7/KCNQ channel. It is not known whether these channels regulate the integration of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses. Here, we study the impact of cholinergic muscarinic modulation on the synaptic response of SPNs by regulating KV7 channels. We found that KV7 channels regulate corticostriatal synaptic integration and that this modulation occurs in the dendritic/spines compartment. In contrast, it is negligible in the somatic compartment. This modulation occurs on sub- and suprathreshold responses and lasts during the whole duration of the responses, hundreds of milliseconds, greatly altering SPNs firing properties. This modulation affected the behavior of the striatal microcircuit.

  4. Altered cingulo-striatal function underlies reward drive deficits in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il Ho; Chun, Ji Won; Park, Hae-Jeong; Koo, Min-Seong; Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Seok-Hyeong; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2015-02-01

    Amotivation in schizophrenia is assumed to involve dysfunctional dopaminergic signaling of reward prediction or anticipation. It is unclear, however, whether the translation of neural representation of reward value to behavioral drive is affected in schizophrenia. In order to examine how abnormal neural processing of response valuation and initiation affects incentive motivation in schizophrenia, we conducted functional MRI using a deterministic reinforcement learning task with variable intervals of contingency reversals in 20 clinically stable patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. Behaviorally, the advantage of positive over negative reinforcer in reinforcement-related responsiveness was not observed in patients. Patients showed altered response valuation and initiation-related striatal activity and deficient rostro-ventral anterior cingulate cortex activation during reward approach initiation. Among these neural abnormalities, rostro-ventral anterior cingulate cortex activation was correlated with positive reinforcement-related responsiveness in controls and social anhedonia and social amotivation subdomain scores in patients. Our findings indicate that the central role of the anterior cingulate cortex is in translating action value into driving force of action, and underscore the role of the cingulo-striatal network in amotivation in schizophrenia. PMID:25468177

  5. The presence of cortical neurons in striatal-cortical co-cultures alters the effects of dopamine and BDNF on Medium Spiny Neuron dendritic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel D Penrod

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Medium spiny neurons (MSNs are the major striatal neuron and receive synaptic input from both glutamatergic and dopaminergic afferents. These synapses are made on MSN dendritic spines, which undergo density and morphology changes in association with numerous disease and experience-dependent states. Despite wide interest in the structure and function of mature MSNs, relatively little is known about MSN development. Furthermore, most in vitro studies of MSN development have been done in simple striatal cultures that lack any type of non-autologous synaptic input, leaving open the question of how MSN development is affected by a complex environment that includes other types of neurons, glia, and accompanying secreted and cell-associated cues. Here we characterize the development of MSNs in striatal-cortical co-culture, including quantitative morphological analysis of dendritic arborization and spine development, describing progressive changes in density and morphology of developing spines. Overall, MSN growth is much more robust in the striatal-cortical co-culture compared to striatal mono-culture. Inclusion of dopamine in the co-culture further enhances MSN dendritic arborization and spine density, but the effects of dopamine on dendritic branching are only significant at later times in development. In contrast, exogenous Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF has only a minimal effect on MSN development in the co-culture, but significantly enhances MSN dendritic arborization in striatal mono-culture. Importantly, inhibition of NMDA receptors in the co-culture significantly enhances the effect of exogenous BDNF, suggesting that the efficacy of BDNF depends on the cellular environment. Combined, these studies identify specific periods of MSN development that may be particularly sensitive to perturbation by external factors and demonstrate the importance of studying MSN development in a complex signaling environment.

  6. Chronic amphetamine treatment increases striatal calmodulin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay was developed to measure calmodulin in striatum from rats treated with one dose or repeated injections of amphetamine. Chronic, but not acute, amphetamine treatment resulted in a significant increase in total calmodulin levels in striatal homogenates. This effect may be linked to the behavioral sensitization which develops after chronic amphetamine treatments. (Auth.)

  7. Prefrontal cortex and striatal activation by feedback in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keitz, Martijn; Koerts, Janneke; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2008-01-01

    Positive feedbacks reinforce goal-directed behavior and evoke pleasure. in Parkinson's disease (PD) the striatal dysfunction impairs motor performance, but also may lead to decreased positive feedback (reward) processing. This study investigates two types of positive feedback processing (monetary fe

  8. Morphological and cellular changes within embryonic striatal grafts associated with enriched environment and involuntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döbrössy, Máté D; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2006-12-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) and exercise have been implicated in influencing behaviour and altering neuronal processes associated with cellular morphology in both 'normal' and injured states of the CNS. Using a rodent model of Huntington's disease, we investigated whether prolonged EE or involuntary exercise can induce morphological and cellular changes within embryonic striatal transplants. Adult rats were trained on the Staircase test--requiring fine motor control to reach and collect reward pellets--prior to being lesioned unilaterally in the dorsal neostriatum with quinolinic acid. The lesioned animals received E15 whole ganglionic eminence cell suspension grafts followed by housing in EE or standard cages. Half of the animals in standard cages received daily forced exercise on a treadmill. The grafted animals showed significant functional recovery on both the Staircase test and in drug-induced rotation. Neither the housing conditions nor the training had an impact on the behaviour, with the exception of the treadmill reducing the ipsilateral drug-induced rotation observed amongst the lesioned animals. However, the animals housed in the EE had significantly increased striatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, and graft neurons in these animals exhibited both greater spine densities and larger cell volumes. Animals on forced exercise regime had reduced BDNF levels and grafted cells with sparser spines. The study suggests that the context of the animal can affect the plasticity of transplanted cells. Appropriately exploiting the underlying, and yet unknown, mechanisms could lead the way to improved anatomical and potentially functional integration of the graft. PMID:17156383

  9. D1 dopamine receptor-induced cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation and potentiation of striatal glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, C J; Kim, P; Raymond, L A

    1999-12-01

    Dopamine receptor activation regulates cyclic AMP levels and is critically involved in modulating neurotransmission in the striatum. Others have shown that alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)-type glutamate receptor-mediated current is potentiated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activation. We made whole-cell patch clamp recordings from cultured striatal neurons and tested whether D1-type dopamine receptor activation affected AMPA receptor-mediated currents. After a 5-min exposure to the D1 agonist SKF 81297 (1 microM), kainate-evoked current amplitude was enhanced in approximately 75% of cells to 121+/-2.5% of that recorded prior to addition of drug. This response was inhibited by the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and mimicked by activators of PKA. Moreover, by western blot analysis using an antibody specific for the phosphorylated PKA site Ser845 of GluR1, we observed a marked increase in phosphorylated GluR1 following a 10-min exposure of striatal neurons to 1 microM SKF 81297. Our data demonstrate that activation of D1-type dopamine receptors on striatal neurons promotes phosphorylation of AMPA receptors by PKA as well as potentiation of current amplitude. These results elucidate one mechanism by which dopamine can modulate neurotransmission in the striatum. PMID:10582604

  10. Differential Striatal Spine Pathology in Parkinson’s disease and Cocaine Addiction: A Key Role of Dopamine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Rosa M.; Smith, Yoland

    2013-01-01

    In the striatum, the dendritic tree of the two main populations of projection neurons, called “Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs)”, are covered with spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the cerebral cortex and thalamus. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), striatal MSNs undergo an important loss of dendritic spines, whereas aberrant overgrowth of striatal spines occurs following chronic cocaine exposure. This review examines the possibility that opposite dopamine dysregulation is one of the key factors that underlies these structural changes. In PD, nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration results in a significant loss of dendritic spines in the dorsal striatum, while rodents chronically exposed to cocaine and other psychostimulants, display an increase in the density of “thin and immature” spines in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In rodent models of PD, there is evidence that D2 dopamine receptor-containing MSNs are preferentially affected, while D1-positive cells are the main targets of increased spine density in models of addiction. However, such specificity remains to be established in primates. Although the link between the extent of striatal spine changes and the behavioral deficits associated with these disorders remains controversial, there is unequivocal evidence that glutamatergic synaptic transmission is significantly altered in both diseased conditions. Recent studies have suggested that opposite calcium-mediated regulation of the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) function induces these structural defects. In conclusion, there is strong evidence that dopamine is a major, but not the sole, regulator of striatal spine pathology in PD and addiction to psychostimulants. Further studies of the role of glutamate and other genes associated with spine plasticity in mediating these effects are warranted. PMID:23867772

  11. In vivo evaluation of striatal dopamine reuptake sites using 11C-nomifensine and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro nomifensine demonstrates high affinity and specificity for dopamine reuptake sites in the brain. In the present study 11C-nomifensine was administered i.v. in trace amounts (10-50 μg) to ketamine anaesthetized Rhesus monkeys (6-10 kg b.w.) and the timecourse of radioactivity within different brain regions was measured by positron emission tomography (PET). Six base-line experiments lasting for 60-80 min were performed. The procedure was repeated after pretreatment with nomifensine (2-6 mg/kg i.v.), another reuptake inhibitor, mazindol (0.3 mg/kg i.v.), desipramine (0.5 mg/kg i.v.) or spiperone (0.3 mg/kg i.v.) before the administration of a second 11C-nomifensine dose. The highest radioactivity uptake was found in the dopamine innervated striatum and the lowest in a region containing the cerebellum, known to be almost devoid of dopaminergic neurons. The difference between striatal and cerebellar uptake of 11C-nomifensine derived radioactivity was markedly reduced after nomifensine and mazindol but not after desipramine and spiperone. These results indicate that in vivo the striatal uptake of 11C-nomifensine, as measured with PET, involves specific binding with the dopamine reuptake sites. In the first human applications of 11C-nomifensine and PET in a healthy volunteer, the regional uptake of radioactivity was similar to that in base-line experiments with Rhesus monkeys. In the healthy subject the striatal/cerebellar ratio was 1.6, 50 min after the injection of 11C-nomifensine. In a hemi-parkinsonian patient this ratio was 1.1 contralaterally and 1.3 ipsilaterally to the affected side. 11C-nomifensine and PET seems to be an auspicious method to measure the striatal dopaminergic nerve terminals of man in vivo. (author)

  12. Linkage results on 11q21-22 in Eastern Quebec pedigrees densely affected by schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziade, M.; Raymond, V.; Cliche, D. [Universite Laval Robert Giffard, Beauport, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    The 11q21-22 region is of interest for schizophrenia because several candidate genes are located in this section of the genome. The 11q21-22 region, including DRD2, was surveyed by linkage analysis in a sample (N = 242) made of four large multigenerational pedigrees densely affected by schizophrenia (SZ) and eight others by bipolar disorder (BP). These pedigrees were ascertained in a large area of Eastern Quebec and Northern New Brunswick and are still being extended. Family members were administered a {open_quotes}consensus best-estimate diagnosis procedure{close_quotes} (DSM-III-R criteria) blind to probands and relatives` diagnosis and to pedigree assignment (SZ or BP). For linkage analysis, 11 microsatellite polymorphism (CA repeat) markers, located at 11q21-22, and comprising DRD2, were genotyped. Results show no evidence of a major gene for schizophrenia. However, a maximum lod score of 3.41 at the D11S35 locus was observed in an affected-only analysis of one large SZ family, pedigree 255. Whether or not the positive linkage trend in pedigree 255 reflects a true linkage for a small proportion of SZ needs to be confirmed through the extension of this kindred and through replication. 36 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. An Exploratory Study on DRD2 and Creative Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shun; Zhang, Muzi; Zhang, Jinghuan

    2014-01-01

    One critical step toward to a better understanding of creativity is to unveil its underlying genetic architectures. Recently, several studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) related genetic polymorphisms on creativity. Among DA related genes, dopamine D2 receptor gene…

  14. Striatal grafts in a rat model of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzman, R; Meyer, M; Lövblad, K O;

    1999-01-01

    Survival and integration into the host brain of grafted tissue are crucial factors in neurotransplantation approaches. The present study explored the feasibility of using a clinical MR scanner to study striatal graft development in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Rat fetal lateral ganglionic......-induced striatal degeneration caused a progressive ventricle enlargement, which was significantly different from controls at 21 days posttransplantation. Seven days posttransplantation, T1-weighted images revealed a defined liquid-isointense signal surrounded by a hyperintense rim at the site of graft placement......, which was found unaltered for the first 21 days posttransplantation, whereas a hypointense graft signal was detected at 99 days posttransplantation. At 2 days posttransplantation, T2-weighted images showed the graft region as a hyperintense area surrounded by a rim of low signal intensity but at later...

  15. The Cognitive Architecture of Spatial Navigation: Hippocampal and Striatal Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, Fabian; Burgess, Neil

    2015-10-01

    Spatial navigation can serve as a model system in cognitive neuroscience, in which specific neural representations, learning rules, and control strategies can be inferred from the vast experimental literature that exists across many species, including humans. Here, we review this literature, focusing on the contributions of hippocampal and striatal systems, and attempt to outline a minimal cognitive architecture that is consistent with the experimental literature and that synthesizes previous related computational modeling. The resulting architecture includes striatal reinforcement learning based on egocentric representations of sensory states and actions, incidental Hebbian association of sensory information with allocentric state representations in the hippocampus, and arbitration of the outputs of both systems based on confidence/uncertainty in medial prefrontal cortex. We discuss the relationship between this architecture and learning in model-free and model-based systems, episodic memory, imagery, and planning, including some open questions and directions for further experiments. PMID:26447573

  16. Endocannabinoid-dopamine interactions in striatal synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Neil Mathur

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is implicated in action control and learning. A large body of work has focused on the contribution of this system to modulation of the corticostriatal synapse, the predominant synapse type in the striatum. Signaling through the D2 dopamine receptor is necessary for endocannabinoid-mediated depression of corticostriatal glutamate release. Here we review the known details of this mechanism and discuss newly discovered signaling pathways interacting with this system that ultimately exert dynamic control of cortical input to the striatum and striatal output. This topic is timely with respect to Parkinson’s disease given recent data indicating changes in the striatal endocannabinoid system in patients with this disorder.

  17. Striatal dopamine, reward, and decision making in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Elevated striatal dopamine function is one of the best-established findings in schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss causes and consequences of this striata! dopamine alteration. We first summarize earlier findings regarding striatal reward processing and anticipation using functional neuroimaging. Secondly, we present a series of recent studies that are exemplary for a particular research approach: a combination of theory-driven reinforcement learning and decision-making tasks in combination with computational modeling and functional neuroimaging. We discuss why this approach represents a promising tool to understand underlying mechanisms of symptom dimensions by dissecting the contribution of multiple behavioral control systems working in parallel. We also discuss how it can advance our understanding of the neurobiological implementation of such functions. Thirdly, we review evidence regarding the topography of dopamine dysfunction within the striatum. Finally, we present conclusions and outline important aspects to be considered in future studies. PMID:27069382

  18. Motor tics evoked by striatal disinhibition in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya eBronfeld

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor tics are sudden, brief, repetitive movements that constitute the main symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS. Multiple lines of evidence suggest the involvement of the cortico-basal ganglia system, and in particular the basal ganglia input structure – the striatum in tic formation. The striatum receives somatotopically organized cortical projections and contains an internal GABAergic network of interneurons and projection neurons collaterals. Disruption of local striatal GABAergic connectivity has been associated with TS and was found to induce abnormal movements in model animals. We have previously described the behavioral and neurophysiological characteristics of motor tics induced in monkeys by local striatal microinjections of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline. In the current study we explored the abnormal movements induced by a similar manipulation in freely moving rats. We targeted microinjections to different parts of the dorsal striatum, and examined the effects of this manipulation on the induced tic properties, such as latency, duration and somatic localization. Tics induced by striatal disinhibition in monkeys and rats shared multiple properties: tics began within several minutes after microinjection, were expressed solely in the contralateral side, and waxed and waned around a mean inter-tic interval of 1-4 s. A clear somatotopic organization was observed only in rats, where injections to the anterior or posterior striatum led to tics in the forelimb or hindlimb areas, respectively. These results suggest that striatal disinhibition in the rat may be used to model motor tics such as observed in TS. Establishing this reliable and accessible animal model could facilitate the study of the neural mechanisms underlying motor tics, and the testing of potential therapies for tic disorders.

  19. Striatal neuropeptides associated with L- DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    OpenAIRE

    Moheimen, Jamil

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Striatal neuropeptides associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia 2012-02-14 Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, with approximately 6 million sufferers in the world. The patients are usually diagnosed between the ages 50-70 years and as the disease progress more symptoms may occur. The cause of the disease is unknown, but the characteristic of PD is that it is a selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which leads to a...

  20. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, Paul; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael Ap; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R.; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR ...

  1. Regulation of dendritic calcium release in striatal spiny projection neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Plotkin, Joshua L.; Shen, Weixing; Rafalovich, Igor; Sebel, Luke E.; Day, Michelle; Chan, C. Savio; Surmeier, D. James

    2013-01-01

    The induction of corticostriatal long-term depression (LTD) in striatal spiny projection neurons (SPNs) requires coactivation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and L-type Ca2+ channels. This combination leads to the postsynaptic production of endocannabinoids that act presynaptically to reduce glutamate release. Although the necessity of coactivation is agreed upon, why it is necessary in physiologically meaningful settings is not. The studies described here attempt to answ...

  2. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Edith Miville-Godbout; Mélanie Bourque; Marc Morissette; Sara Al-Sweidi; Tara Smith; Asuka Mochizuki; Vijitha Senanayake; Dushmanthi Jayasinghe; Li Wang; Dayan Goodenowe; Thérèse Di Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treat...

  3. Investigating Striatal Function through Cell-Type-Specific Manipulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    The striatum integrates convergent input from the cortex, thalamus, and midbrain, and has a powerful influence over motivated behavior via outputs to downstream basal ganglia nuclei. Although the anatomy and physiology of distinct classes of striatal neurons has been intensively studied, the specific functions of these cell subpopulations have been more difficult to address. Recently, application of new methodologies for perturbing activity and signaling in different cell types in vivo has be...

  4. Dorsal Striatal Dopamine, Food Preference and Health Perception in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [18F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related decision-making, as well as body mass index (BMI) in 16 healthy-weight to moderately obese individuals. We find that lower PET FMT dopamine synthesis binding potential correlates with higher BMI, gr...

  5. Dorsal striatal dopamine, food preference and health perception in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, D L; Aarts, E.; Dang, L.C.; Greer, S.M.; Jagust, W.J.; D'Esposito, M.

    2014-01-01

    To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(18)F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related decision-making, as well as body mass index (BMI) in 16 healthy-weight to moderately obese individuals. We find that lower PET FMT dopamine synthesis binding potential correlates with higher BMI, ...

  6. Transient and steady-state selection in the striatal microcircuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Tomkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the basal ganglia have been widely studied and implicated in signal processing and action selection, little information is known about the active role the striatal microcircuit plays in action selection in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. To address this knowledge gap we use a large scale three dimensional spiking model of the striatum, combined with a rate coded model of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop, to asses the computational role the striatum plays in action selection. We identify a robust transient phenomena generated by the striatal microcircuit, which temporarily enhances the difference between two competing cortical inputs. We show that this transient is sufficient to modulate decision making in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit. We also find that the transient selection originates from a novel adaptation effect in single striatal projection neurons, which is amenable to experimental testing. Finally, we compared transient selection with models implementing classical steady-state selection. We challenged both forms of model to account for recent reports of paradoxically enhanced response selection in Huntington's Disease patients. We found that steady-state selection was uniformly impaired under all simulated Huntington's conditions, but transient selection was enhanced given a sufficient Huntington's-like increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity. Thus our models provide an intriguing hypothesis for the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical cognitive improvements in manifest Huntington's patients.

  7. Goals and task difficulty expectations modulate striatal responses to feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasque Swanson, Samantha; Tricomi, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    The striatum plays a critical role in learning from reward, and it has been implicated in learning from performance-related feedback as well. Positive and negative performance-related feedback is known to engage the striatum during learning by eliciting a response similar to the reinforcement signal for extrinsic rewards and punishments. Feedback is an important tool used to teach new skills and promote healthful lifestyle changes, so it is important to understand how motivational contexts can modulate its effectiveness at promoting learning. While it is known that striatal responses scale with subjective factors influencing the desirability of rewards, it is less clear how expectations and goals might modulate the striatal responses to cognitive feedback during learning. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the effects of task difficulty expectations and achievement goals on feedback processing during learning. We found that individuals who scored high in normative goals, which reflect a desire to outperform other students academically, showed the strongest effects of our manipulation. High levels of normative goals were associated with greater performance gains and exaggerated striatal sensitivity to positive versus negative feedback during blocks that were expected to be more difficult. Our findings suggest that normative goals may enhance performance when difficulty expectations are high, while at the same time modulating the subjective value of feedback as processed in the striatum. PMID:24638235

  8. Task-dependent encoding of space and events by striatal neurons is dependent on neural subtype

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitzer-Torbert, Neil C.; Redish, A. David

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a critical role in procedural learning and memory. Current models of basal ganglia assume that striatal neurons and circuitry are critical for the execution of over-learned, habitual sequences of action. However, less is known about how the striatum encodes task information that guides the performance of actions in procedural tasks. To explore the striatal encoding of task information, we compared the behavioral correlates of striatal neurons tested in two tasks: a M...

  9. Habit and Skill Learning in Schizophrenia: Evidence of Normal Striatal Processing With Abnormal Cortical Input

    OpenAIRE

    Weickert, Thomas W.; Terrazas, Alejandro; Bigelow, Llewellyn B.; Malley, James D.; Hyde, Thomas; Egan, Michael F.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Goldberg, Terry E.

    2002-01-01

    Different forms of nondeclarative learning involve regionally specific striatal circuits. The motor circuit (involving the putamen) has been associated with motor–skill learning and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) circuit (involving the caudate) has been associated with cognitive–habit learning. Efforts to differentiate functional striatal circuits within patient samples have been limited. Previous studies have provided mixed results regarding striatal-dependent nondeclarative lear...

  10. Genetic Contributions to Avoidance-Based Decisions: Striatal D2 receptor Polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Michael J.; Hutchison, Kent

    2009-01-01

    Individuals differ in their tendencies to seek positive decision outcomes or to avoid negative ones. At the neurobiological level, our model suggests that phasic changes in dopamine support learning to reinforce good decisions via striatal D1 receptors, and to avoid maladaptive choices via striatal D2 receptors. Accordingly, in a previous study individual differences in positive and negative learning were strongly modulated by two genetic polymorphisms factors related to striatal D1 and D2 fu...

  11. Increased extracellular dopamine concentrations and FosB/DeltaFosB expression in striatal brain areas of heterozygous GDNF knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airavaara, Mikko; Planken, Anu; Gäddnäs, Helena; Piepponen, Timo Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Ahtee, Liisa

    2004-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of striatal dopaminergic neurons. To study whether reduced levels of endogenous GDNF affect the striatal dopaminergic transmission we estimated the basal extracellular levels of dopamine in vivo, the basal expression of FosB-related proteins in striatal brain areas as well as the effects of acute and repeated cocaine on locomotor activity and dopamine output in mice lacking one GDNF allele (heterozygous GDNF+/- mice). As expected the striatal GDNF protein content was found to be smaller in the GDNF+/- mice than in their wild-type littermates. Unexpectedly the extracellular dopamine concentration in the GDNF+/- mice in the dorsal striatum (CPu) was 2.0-fold, and in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) 1.6-fold the concentration found in the wild-type littermates. Also FosB/DeltaFosB-like immunoreactivity was found to be elevated in the CPu as well as in the core and in the shell of NAc of the GDNF+/- mice as compared with the wild-type mice. This suggests chronic postsynaptic activation of these brain areas and is in line with elevated extracellular dopamine concentrations. Cocaine's effects acutely and after repeated treatment on locomotor activity were similar in the GDNF+/- and the wild-type mice. Neither did cocaine's acute effects on dopamine output differ between the mice of the two strains. Our findings demonstrate that reduced levels of endogenous GDNF induce alterations in dorsal striatal and accumbal dopaminergic transmission, and stress the importance of endogenous GDNF in the regulation of the dopaminergic neurons. PMID:15525275

  12. Lipopolysaccharide mitagates methamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine depletion via modulating local TNF-alpha and dopamine transporter expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Ting; Tsai, Yen-Ping N; Cherng, Chianfang G; Ke, Jing-Jer; Ho, Ming-Che; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Yu, Lung

    2009-04-01

    Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment may affect methamphetamine (MA)-induced nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) depletion. This study was undertaken to determine the critical time window for the protective effects of LPS treatment and the underlying mechanisms. An LPS injection (1 mg/kg) 72 h before or 2 h after MA treatment [three consecutive, subcutaneous injections of MA (10 mg/kg each) at 2-h intervals] diminished the MA-induced DA depletion in mouse striatum. Such an LPS-associated effect was independent of MA-produced hyperthermia. TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 expressions were all elevated in striatal tissues following a systemic injection with LPS, indicating that peripheral LPS treatment affected striatal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Striatal TNF-alpha expression was dramatically increased at 72 and 96 h after the MA treatment, while such TNF-alpha elevation was abolished by the LPS pretreatment protocol. Moreover, MA-produced activation of nuclear NFkappaB, a transcription factor following TNF-alpha activation, in striatum was abolished by the LPS (1 mg/kg) pretreatment. Furthermore, thalidomide, a TNF-alpha antagonist, treatment abolished the LPS pretreatment-associated protective effects. Pretreatment with mouse recombinant TNF-alpha in striatum diminished the MA-produced DA depletion. Finally, single LPS treatment caused a rapid down-regulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) in striatum. Taken together, we conclude that peripheral LPS treatment protects nigrostriatal DA neurons against MA-induced toxicity, in part, by reversing elevated TNF-alpha expression and subsequent signaling cascade and causing a rapid DAT down-regulation in striatum. PMID:19271121

  13. 3-Nitropropionic acid neurotoxicity in organotypic striatal and corticostriatal slice cultures is dependent on glucose and glutamate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, J; Kornblit, B T; Zimmer, J;

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial inhibition by 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) causes striatal degeneration reminiscent of Huntington's disease. We studied 3-NPA neurotoxicity and possible indirect excitotoxicity in organotypic striatal and corticostriatal slice cultures. Neurotoxicity was quantified by assay of lact...

  14. Rasd2 Modulates Prefronto-Striatal Phenotypes in Humans and 'Schizophrenia-Like Behaviors' in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitucci, Daniela; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Napolitano, Francesco; Pelosi, Barbara; Blasi, Giuseppe; Errico, Francesco; Attrotto, Maria Teresa; Gelao, Barbara; Fazio, Leonardo; Taurisano, Paolo; Di Maio, Anna; Marsili, Valentina; Pasqualetti, Massimo; Bertolino, Alessandro; Usiello, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    Rasd2 is a thyroid hormone target gene, which encodes for a GTP-binding protein enriched in the striatum where, among other functions, it modulates dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here we report that human RASD2 mRNA is abundant in putamen, but it also occurs in the cerebral cortex, with a distinctive expression pattern that differs from that present in rodents. Consistent with its localization, we found that a genetic variation in RASD2 (rs6518956) affects postmortem prefrontal mRNA expression in healthy humans and is associated with phenotypes of relevance to schizophrenia, including prefrontal and striatal grey matter volume and physiology during working memory, as measured with magnetic resonance imaging. Interestingly, quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that RASD2 mRNA is slightly reduced in postmortem prefrontal cortex of patients with schizophrenia. In the attempt to uncover the neurobiological substrates associated with Rasd2 activity, we used knockout mice to analyze the in vivo influence of this G-protein on the prepulse inhibition of the startle response and psychotomimetic drug-related behavioral response. Data showed that Rasd2 mutants display deficits in basal prepulse inhibition that, in turn, exacerbate gating disruption under psychotomimetic drug challenge. Furthermore, we documented that lack of Rasd2 strikingly enhances the behavioral sensitivity to motor stimulation elicited by amphetamine and phencyclidine. Based on animal model data, along with the finding that RASD2 influences prefronto-striatal phenotypes in healthy humans, we suggest that genetic mutation or reduced levels of this G-protein might have a role in cerebral circuitry dysfunction underpinning exaggerated psychotomimetic drugs responses and development of specific biological phenotypes linked to schizophrenia. PMID:26228524

  15. Optogenetic activation of striatal cholinergic interneurons regulates L-dopa-induced dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordia, Tanuja; Perez, Xiomara A; Heiss, Jaime E; Zhang, Danhui; Quik, Maryka

    2016-07-01

    L-dopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) are a serious complication of L-dopa therapy for Parkinson's disease. Emerging evidence indicates that the nicotinic cholinergic system plays a role in LIDs, although the pathways and mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we used optogenetics to investigate the role of striatal cholinergic interneurons in LIDs. Mice expressing cre-recombinase under the control of the choline acetyltransferase promoter (ChAT-Cre) were lesioned by unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine. AAV5-ChR2-eYFP or AAV5-control-eYFP was injected into the dorsolateral striatum, and optical fibers implanted. After stable virus expression, mice were treated with L-dopa. They were then subjected to various stimulation protocols for 2h and LIDs rated. Continuous stimulation with a short duration optical pulse (1-5ms) enhanced LIDs. This effect was blocked by the general muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist atropine indicating it was mAChR-mediated. By contrast, continuous stimulation with a longer duration optical pulse (20ms to 1s) reduced LIDs to a similar extent as nicotine treatment (~50%). The general nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine blocked the decline in LIDs with longer optical pulses showing it was nAChR-mediated. None of the stimulation regimens altered LIDs in control-eYFP mice. Lesion-induced motor impairment was not affected by optical stimulation indicating that cholinergic transmission selectively regulates LIDs. Longer pulse stimulation increased the number of c-Fos expressing ChAT neurons, suggesting that changes in this immediate early gene may be involved. These results demonstrate that striatal cholinergic interneurons play a critical role in LIDs and support the idea that nicotine treatment reduces LIDs via nAChR desensitization. PMID:26921469

  16. Decreased striatal and enhanced thalamic dopaminergic responsivity in detoxified cocaine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that cocaine addiction could result from decreased brain dopamine (DA) function. However, little is known about changes in (DA) neurotransmission in human cocaine addiction. We used PET and [C-11]raclopride, a DA D2 receptor ligand sensitive to competition with endogenous DA, to measure relative changes in extracellular DA induced by methylphenidate (MP) in 20 cocaine abusers (3-6 weeks after cocaine discontinuation) and 23 controls. MP did not affect the transport of [C-11]raclopride from blood to brain (K1); however it induced a significant reduction in DA D2 receptor availability (Bmax/Kd) in striatum. The magnitude of ND-induced changes in striatal [C-11]raclopride binding were significantly larger in controls (21 + 13% change from baseline) than in cocaine abusers (9 {+-} 13 %) (ANOVA p < 0.005). In cocaine abusers, but not in controls, MP also decreased Bmax/Kd values in thalamus (29 {+-} 35 %) (ANOVA p < 0.005). There were no differences in plasma MP concentration between the groups. In striatum MP-induced changes in Bmax/Kd were significantly correlated with MP-induced changes in self reports of restlessness (r = 0.49, df 42, p < 0.002). In thalamus MP-induced changes in Bmax/Kd were significantly correlated with ND-induced changes in self reports of cocaine craving (r = 0.57, df 42, p < 0.0001). These results are compatible with a decrease in striatal DA brain function in cocaine abusers. They also suggest a participation of thalamic DA pathways in cocaine addiction.

  17. Neuroligin 1 Modulates Striatal Glutamatergic Neurotransmission in a Pathway and NMDAR Subunit-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Espinosa

    2015-07-01

    Together with its presynaptic partner Neurexin 1 (Nxn1, Neuroligin 1 (NL1 participates in synapse specification and synapse maintenance. We and others have shown that NL1 can also modulate glutamatergic synaptic function in the central nervous system of rodent models. These molecular/cellular changes can translate into altered animal behaviors that are thought to be analogous to symptomatology of neuropsychiatric disorders. For example, in dorsal striatum of NL1 deletion mice, we previously reported that the ratio N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR mediated synaptic currents to α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR mediated synaptic currents (NMDA/AMPA is reduced in medium spiny neurons. Importantly, this reduction in NMDA/AMPA ratio correlated with increased repetitive grooming. The striatum is the input nucleus of the basal ganglia. Classical models of this circuitry imply that there are two principal pathways that render distinct and somewhat opposite striatal outputs critical to the function of these nuclei in modulating motor behavior. Thus, we set out to better characterize the effects of NL1 deletion on direct and indirect pathways of the dorsal striatum by genetically labeling medium spiny neurons participating in the direct and indirect pathways. We demonstrate that a decrease in NMDAR-mediated currents is limited to medium spiny neurons of the direct pathway. Furthermore, the decrease in NMDAR-mediated currents is largely due to a reduction in function of NMDARs containing the GluN2A subunit. In contrast, indirect pathway medium spiny neurons in NL1 KO mice showed a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory neurotransmission not observed in the direct pathway. Thus, NL1 deletion differentially affects direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons in dorsal striatum. These findings have potential implications for striatal function in NL1 KO mice.

  18. GABAERGIC MODULATION OF STRIATAL CHOLINERGIC INTERNEURONS - AN IN-VIVO MICRODIALYSIS STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, P; WESTERINK, BHC

    1994-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons have been shown to receive input from striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell elements. GABA is known to act on two different types of receptors, the GABA(A) and the GABA(B) receptor. Using in vivo microdialysis, we have studied the effect of intrast

  19. Developmental Alterations of Frontal-Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kate Dimond; Welsh, Robert C.; Stern, Emily R.; Angstadt, Mike; Hanna, Gregory L.; Abelson, James L.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by abnormalities of frontal-striatal-thalamic circuitry that appear near illness onset and persist over its course. Distinct frontal-striatal-thalamic loops through cortical centers for cognitive control (anterior cingulate cortex) and emotion processing (ventral medial frontal…

  20. Prenatal and perinatal striatal injury: a hypothetical cause of attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P.B.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data indicate a particular vulnerability of striatal neurons in the developing brain, and together with the idea that the striatum is important for context recognition and behavior, these data have led the author to search for subtle striatal lesions, in the form of biochemical changes...

  1. Motivational salience and genetic variability of dopamine D2 receptor expression interact in the modulation of interference processing

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Richter; Adriana Barman; Marieke Klein; Schott, Björn H.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine has been implicated in the fine-tuning of complex cognitive and motor function and also in the anticipation of future rewards. This dual function of dopamine suggests that dopamine might be involved in the generation of active motivated behavior. The DRD2 TaqIA polymorphism of the dopamine D2 receptor gene (rs1800497) has previously been suggested to affect striatal function with carriers of the less common A1 allele exhibiting reduced striatal D2 receptor density and increased risk ...

  2. Cortical and striatal neurone number in Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heinsen, Helmut; Strik, M; Luther, K.; Ulmar, G.; Gangnus, D.; Jungkunz, G.; Eisenmenger, W.; Götz, M; Bauer, M

    2011-01-01

    The total cortical and striatal neurone and glial numbers were estimated in five cases of Huntington's disease (three males, two females) and five ageand sex-matched control cases. Serial 500-l-lm-thick gallocyanin-stained frontal sections through the left hemisphere were analysed using Cavalieri's principle for volume and the optical disector for cell density estimations. The average cortical neurone number of five controls (mean age 53±13 years, range 36-72 years) was 5.97x 109±320x 106 , t...

  3. Feeding-associated alterations in striatal neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acworth, I. N.; Ressler, K.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Published evidence suggests a role for dopaminergic (DA) brain pathways in feeding-associated behaviors. Using the novel technique of brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid (ECF) as an index of DA release, Church et al. described increases in levels of DA when animals had limited access to pellets, but not with free access. Dopamine release from the nucleus accumbens did increase with free access to pellets post starvation or after food reward. We used permanently implanted microdialysis probes to measure ECF levels of DA, DOPAC, HVA, and large neutral amino acids (LNAA) for up to 72 hours after implantation among rats experiencing different dietary regimens.

  4. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  5. Analysis of striatal transcriptome in mice overexpressing human wild-type alpha-synuclein supports synaptic dysfunction and suggests mechanisms of neuroprotection for striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabeza-Arvelaiz Yofre

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha synuclein (SNCA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases (synucleinopathies that include Parkinson's disease (PD. Although the primary neurodegeneration in PD involves nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, more extensive yet regionally selective neurodegeneration is observed in other synucleinopathies. Furthermore, SNCA is ubiquitously expressed in neurons and numerous neuronal systems are dysfunctional in PD. Therefore it is of interest to understand how overexpression of SNCA affects neuronal function in regions not directly targeted for neurodegeneration in PD. Results The present study investigated the consequences of SNCA overexpression on cellular processes and functions in the striatum of mice overexpressing wild-type, human SNCA under the Thy1 promoter (Thy1-aSyn mice by transcriptome analysis. The analysis revealed alterations in multiple biological processes in the striatum of Thy1-aSyn mice, including synaptic plasticity, signaling, transcription, apoptosis, and neurogenesis. Conclusion The results support a key role for SNCA in synaptic function and revealed an apoptotic signature in Thy1-aSyn mice, which together with specific alterations of neuroprotective genes suggest the activation of adaptive compensatory mechanisms that may protect striatal neurons in conditions of neuronal overexpression of SNCA.

  6. Pyrethroid insecticides evoke neurotransmitter release from rabbit striatal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the synthetic pyrethroid insecticide fenvalerate ([R,S]-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl[R,S]-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3- methylbutyrate) on neurotransmitter release in rabbit brain slices were investigated. Fenvalerate evoked a calcium-dependent release of [3H]dopamine and [3H]acetylcholine from rabbit striatal slices that was concentration-dependent and specific for the toxic stereoisomer of the insecticide. The release of [3H]dopamine and [3H]acetylcholine by fenvalerate was modulated by D2 dopamine receptor activation and antagonized completely by the sodium channel blocker, tetrodotoxin. These findings are consistent with an action of fenvalerate on the voltage-dependent sodium channels of the presynaptic membrane resulting in membrane depolarization, and the release of dopamine and acetylcholine by a calcium-dependent exocytotic process. In contrast to results obtained in striatal slices, fenvalerate did not elicit the release of [3H]norepinephrine or [3H]acetylcholine from rabbit hippocampal slices indicative of regional differences in sensitivity to type II pyrethroid actions

  7. Measurement of striatal dopamine metabolism with 6-[18F]-fluoro-L-dopa and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Striatal dopamine metabolism was studied with 6-[18F]-fluoro-L-dopa (18F-DOPA) and PET. The subjects were normal controls, and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), parkinsonism, multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD) and other cerebral disorders. Cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRGlc) was also measured in these patients. Striatal dopamine metabolism was evaluated by the relative striatal uptake of 18F-DOPA referring cerebellum (S/C ratio). In normal controls, the S/C ratio was 2.82 ± 0.32 (n = 6, mean ± SD) at 120 min after injection of 18F-DOPA. The S/C ratio was low in patients with PD, parkinsonism, MSA and PSP compared to the normal controls and thus coincident with the symptoms of parkinsonism due to decrease in striatal dopamine concentration. The decrease in the striatal CMRGlc was also observed in patients with parkinsonism and PSP, and it was preserved in patients with PD, thus representing that more neurons were damaged in patients with parkinsonism and PSP than in patients with PD. A patient with AD having symptoms of parkinsonism also showed a decrease in S/C ratio. In a patient with HD, the striatal CMRGlc sharply decreased, but the S/C ratio was normal. The measurements of striatal dopamine and glucose metabolism with PET may be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanism in patients with cerebral disorders. (author)

  8. Cortical and striatal neurone number in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsen, H; Strik, M; Bauer, M; Luther, K; Ulmar, G; Gangnus, D; Jungkunz, G; Eisenmenger, W; Götz, M

    1994-01-01

    The total cortical and striatal neurone and glial numbers were estimated in five cases of Huntington's disease (three males, two females) and five age- and sex-matched control cases. Serial 500-microns-thick gallocyanin-stained frontal sections through the left hemisphere were analysed using Cavalieri's principle for volume and the optical disector for cell density estimations. The average cortical neurone number of five controls (mean age 53 +/- 13 years, range 36-72 years) was 5.97 x 10(9) +/- 320 x 10(6), the average number of small striatal neurones was 82 x 10(6) +/- 15.8 x 10(6). The left striatum (caudatum, putamen, and accumbens) contained a mean of 273 x 10(6) +/- 53 x 10(6) glial cells (oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and unclassifiable glial profiles). The mean cortical neurone number in Huntington's disease patients (mean age 49 +/- 14 years, range 36-75 years) was diminished by about 33% to 3.99 x 10(9) +/- 218 x 10(6) nerve cells (P < or = 0.012, Mann-Whitney U-test). The mean number of small striatal neurones decreased tremendously to 9.72 x 10(6) +/- 3.64 x 10(6) (-88%). The decrease in total glial cells was less pronounced (193 x 10(6) +/- 26 x 10(6)) but the mean glial index, the numerical ratio of glial cells per neurone, increased from 3.35 to 22.59 in Huntington's disease. Qualitatively, neuronal loss was most pronounced in supragranular layers of primary sensory areas (Brodmann's areae 3,1,2; area 17, area 41). Layer IIIc pyramidal cells were preferentially lost in association areas of the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes, whereas spared layer IV granule cells formed a conspicuous band between layer III and V in these fields. Methodological issues are discussed in context with previous investigations and similarities and differences of laminar and lobar nerve cell loss in Huntington's disease are compared with nerve cell degeneration in other neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:7839825

  9. Impaired striatal Akt signaling disrupts dopamine homeostasis and increases feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Speed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically worldwide. The obesity epidemic begs for novel concepts and therapeutic targets that cohesively address "food-abuse" disorders. We demonstrate a molecular link between impairment of a central kinase (Akt involved in insulin signaling induced by exposure to a high-fat (HF diet and dysregulation of higher order circuitry involved in feeding. Dopamine (DA rich brain structures, such as striatum, provide motivation stimuli for feeding. In these central circuitries, DA dysfunction is posited to contribute to obesity pathogenesis. We identified a mechanistic link between metabolic dysregulation and the maladaptive behaviors that potentiate weight gain. Insulin, a hormone in the periphery, also acts centrally to regulate both homeostatic and reward-based HF feeding. It regulates DA homeostasis, in part, by controlling a key element in DA clearance, the DA transporter (DAT. Upon HF feeding, nigro-striatal neurons rapidly develop insulin signaling deficiencies, causing increased HF calorie intake. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that consumption of fat-rich food impairs striatal activation of the insulin-activated signaling kinase, Akt. HF-induced Akt impairment, in turn, reduces DAT cell surface expression and function, thereby decreasing DA homeostasis and amphetamine (AMPH-induced DA efflux. In addition, HF-mediated dysregulation of Akt signaling impairs DA-related behaviors such as (AMPH-induced locomotion and increased caloric intake. We restored nigro-striatal Akt phosphorylation using recombinant viral vector expression technology. We observed a rescue of DAT expression in HF fed rats, which was associated with a return of locomotor responses to AMPH and normalization of HF diet-induced hyperphagia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Acquired disruption of brain insulin action may confer risk for and/or underlie "food-abuse" disorders and the recalcitrance of obesity. This molecular

  10. LRRK2 overexpression alters glutamatergic presynaptic plasticity, striatal dopamine tone, postsynaptic signal transduction, motor activity and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne A; Volta, Mattia; Munsie, Lise N; Paschall, Sarah A; Tatarnikov, Igor; Co, Kimberley; Chou, Patrick; Cao, Li-Ping; Bergeron, Sabrina; Mitchell, Emma; Han, Heather; Melrose, Heather L; Tapia, Lucia; Raymond, Lynn A; Farrer, Matthew J; Milnerwood, Austen J

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrrk2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder affecting 1-2% of those >65 years old. The neurophysiology of LRRK2 remains largely elusive, although protein loss suggests a role in glutamatergic synapse transmission and overexpression studies show altered dopamine release in aged mice. We show that glutamate transmission is unaltered onto striatal projection neurons (SPNs) of adult LRRK2 knockout mice and that adult animals exhibit no detectable cognitive or motor deficits. Basal synaptic transmission is also unaltered in SPNs of LRRK2 overexpressing mice, but they do exhibit clear alterations to D2-receptor-mediated short-term synaptic plasticity, behavioral hypoactivity and impaired recognition memory. These phenomena are associated with decreased striatal dopamine tone and abnormal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32 kDa signal integration. The data suggest that LRRK2 acts at the nexus of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the adult striatum, where it regulates dopamine levels, presynaptic glutamate release via D2-dependent synaptic plasticity and dopamine-receptor signal transduction. PMID:25343991

  11. Pathway-Specific Striatal Substrates for Habitual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Justin K; Ade, Kristen K; Sukharnikova, Tatyana; Van Hooser, Stephen D; Palmeri, Mark L; Yin, Henry H; Calakos, Nicole

    2016-02-01

    The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is implicated in habit formation. However, the DLS circuit mechanisms underlying habit remain unclear. A key role for DLS is to transform sensorimotor cortical input into firing of output neurons that project to the mutually antagonistic direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways. Here we examine whether habit alters this input-output function. By imaging cortically evoked firing in large populations of pathway-defined striatal projection neurons (SPNs), we identify features that strongly correlate with habitual behavior on a subject-by-subject basis. Habitual behavior correlated with strengthened DLS output to both pathways as well as a tendency for action-promoting direct pathway SPNs to fire before indirect pathway SPNs. In contrast, habit suppression correlated solely with a weakened direct pathway output. Surprisingly, all effects were broadly distributed in space. Together, these findings indicate that the striatum imposes broad, pathway-specific modulations of incoming activity to render learned motor behaviors habitual. PMID:26804995

  12. Striatal dopamine and the interface between motivation and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther eAarts

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain dopamine has long been known to be implicated in the domains of appetitive motivation and cognition. Recent work indicates that dopamine also plays a role in the interaction between appetitive motivation and cognition. Here we review this work. Animal work has revealed an arrangement of spiraling connections between the midbrain and the striatum that subserves a mechanism by which dopamine can direct information flow from ventromedial to more dorsal regions in the striatum. In line with current knowledge about dopamine’s effects on cognition, we hypothesize that these striato-nigro-striatal connections provide the basis for functionally specific effects of appetitive motivation on cognition. One implication of this hypothesis is that appetitive motivation can induce cognitive improvement or impairment depending on task demands.

  13. Subventricular zone neural progenitors protect striatal neurons from glutamatergic excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butti, Erica; Bacigaluppi, Marco; Rossi, Silvia; Cambiaghi, Marco; Bari, Monica; Cebrian Silla, Arantxa; Brambilla, Elena; Musella, Alessandra; De Ceglia, Roberta; Teneud, Luis; De Chiara, Valentina; D'Adamo, Patrizia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Comi, Giancarlo; Muzio, Luca; Quattrini, Angelo; Leocani, Letizia; Maccarrone, Mauro; Centonze, Diego; Martino, Gianvito

    2012-11-01

    The functional significance of adult neural stem and progenitor cells in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory has been well documented. Although adult neural stem and progenitor cells in the subventricular zone are known to migrate to, maintain and reorganize the olfactory bulb, it is less clear whether they are functionally required for other processes. Using a conditional transgenic mouse model, selective ablation of adult neural stem and progenitor cells in the subventricular zone induced a dramatic increase in morbidity and mortality of central nervous system disorders characterized by excitotoxicity-induced cell death accompanied by reactive inflammation, such as 4-aminopyridine-induced epilepsy and ischaemic stroke. To test the role of subventricular zone adult neural stem and progenitor cells in protecting central nervous system tissue from glutamatergic excitotoxicity, neurophysiological recordings of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents from single medium spiny striatal neurons were measured on acute brain slices. Indeed, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated, but not unstimulated, subventricular zone adult neural stem and progenitor cells reverted the increased frequency and duration of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents by secreting the endocannabinod arachidonoyl ethanolamide, a molecule that regulates glutamatergic tone through type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB(1)) binding. In vivo restoration of cannabinoid levels, either by administration of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 or the inhibitor of the principal catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase, URB597, completely reverted the increased morbidity and mortality of adult neural stem and progenitor cell-ablated mice suffering from epilepsy and ischaemic stroke. Our results provide the first evidence that adult neural stem and progenitor cells located within the subventricular zone exert an 'innate' homeostatic regulatory role by protecting striatal neurons from glutamate

  14. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Conveys Familial Risk of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder through Striatal Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durston, Sarah; Fossella, John A.; Mulder, Martijn J.; Casey B. J.; Ziermans, Tim B.; Vessaz, M. Nathalie; Van Engeland, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the effect of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) genotype in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The results confirm that DAT1 translates the genetic risk of ADHD through striatal activation.

  15. Striatal Dopamine Transporter Binding Does Not Correlate with Clinical Severity in Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Andersen, Birgitte B; Pinborg, Lars H;

    2013-01-01

    Patients who have dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) show both clinical and histopathologic overlap with Alzheimer disease patients and Parkinson disease patients. In this study, we correlated the core features of DLB (dementia, parkinsonism, hallucinations, and fluctuations) with striatal dopamine...

  16. Striatal Dopamine D-2/3 Receptor Availability in Treatment Resistant Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kwaasteniet, Bart P.; Pinto, Chedwa; Ruhe, Eric H. G.; van Wingen, Guido A.; Booij, Jan; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated improvement of depressive symptoms in treatment resistant depression (TRD) after administering dopamine agonists which suggest abnormal dopaminergic neurotransmission in TRD. However, the role of dopaminergic signaling through measurement of striatal dopamine D-2/3 recep

  17. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa;

    2008-01-01

    differentiation, we co-cultured cells from a human neural forebrain-derived stem cell line (hNS1) with rat striatal brain slices. In brief, coronal slices of neonatal rat striatum were cultured on semiporous membrane inserts placed in six-well trays overlying monolayers of hNS1 cells. After 12 days of co......-induced areas. The presence of dopamine in the conditioned culture medium was confirmed by HPLC analysis. Interestingly, not all striatal slice cultures induced TH-expression in underlying hNS1 cells. Common to TH-inductive cultures was, however, the presence of degenerating, necrotic areas, suggesting that...... factors released during striatal degeneration were responsible for the dopaminergic induction of the hNS1 cells. Ongoing experiments aim to identify such factors by comparing protein profiles of media conditioned by degenerating (necrotic) versus healthy striatal slice cultures....

  18. Striatal and extra-striatal dopamine transporter in cannabis and tobacco addiction: a high resolution PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopamine (DA) system is known to be involved in the reward and dependence mechanisms of addiction. However, modifications in dopaminergic neurotransmission associated with long-term tobacco and cannabis use have been poorly documented in vivo. In order to assess striatal and extra-striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in tobacco and cannabis addiction, three groups of male age-matched subjects were compared: 11 healthy non-smoker subjects, 14 tobacco-dependent smokers (17.6 ± 5.3 cigarettes/day for 12.1 ± 8.5 years) and 13 cannabis and tobacco smokers (CTS) (4.8 ± 5.3 cannabis joints/day for 8.7 ± 3.9 years). DAT availability was examined in positron emission tomography (HRRT) with a high resolution research tomograph after injection of [11C]PE2I, a selective DAT radioligand. Region of interest and voxel-by-voxel approaches using a simplified reference tissue model were performed for the between-group comparison of DAT availability. Measurements in the dorsal striatum from both analyses were concordant and showed a mean 20% lower DAT availability in drug users compared with controls. Whole-brain analysis also revealed lower DAT availability in the ventral striatum, the midbrain, the middle cingulate and the thalamus (ranging from -15 to -30%). The DAT availability was slightly lower in all regions in CTS than in subjects who smoke tobacco only, but the difference does not reach a significant level. These results support the existence of a decrease in DAT availability associated with tobacco and cannabis addictions involving all dopaminergic brain circuits. These findings are consistent with the idea of a global decrease in cerebral DA activity in dependent subjects. (authors)

  19. Motor Deficits and Altered Striatal Gene Expression in aphakia(ak) Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Bhupinder; Wilson, Jean H.; Vasavada, Hema H; Guo, Zhenchao; Allore, Heather G.; Zeiss, Caroline J.

    2007-01-01

    Like humans with Parkinsons disease (PD), the ak mouse lacks the majority of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and experiences striatal denervation. The purpose of this study was to test whether motor abnormalities in the ak mouse progress over time, and whether motor function could be associated with temporal alterations in the striatal transcriptome. Ak and wt mice (28 to 180 days old) were tested using paradigms sensitive to nigrostriatal dysfunction. Results were analyzed using a l...

  20. Opposite Effects of Stimulant and Antipsychotic Drugs on Striatal Fast-Spiking Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Wiltschko, Alexander B.; Pettibone, Jeffrey R; Berke, Joshua D.

    2010-01-01

    Psychomotor stimulants and typical antipsychotic drugs have powerful but opposite effects on mood and behavior, largely through alterations in striatal dopamine signaling. Exactly how these drug actions lead to behavioral change is not well understood, as previous electrophysiological studies have found highly heterogeneous changes in striatal neuron firing. In this study, we examined whether part of this heterogeneity reflects the mixture of distinct cell types present in the striatum, by di...

  1. Abnormal Striatal Circuitry and Intensified Novelty Seeking Among Adolescents that Abuse Methamphetamine and Cannabis

    OpenAIRE

    Churchwell, John C.; Carey, Paul D.; Ferrett, Helen L.; Stein, Dan J; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that changes in striatal-mediated dopamine modulation during adolescence may increase risk for initiating substance abuse as a result of its fundamental role in arbitrating reward sensitivity and motivation during learning and decision making. However, substance abuse during adolescence may also significantly modify striatal structure and function and concomitantly alter reward sensitivity and action control while this brain region is undergoing remodeling. In the pre...

  2. FACS identifies unique cocaine-induced gene regulation in selectively activated adult striatal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Guez-Barber, Danielle; Fanous, Sanya; Golden, Sam A.; Schrama, Regina; Koya, Eisuke; Stern, Anna L.; Bossert, Jennifer M; Harvey, Brandon K.; Picciotto, Marina R.; Hope, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies with the neural activity marker Fos indicate that cocaine activates only a small proportion of sparsely distributed striatal neurons. Until now, efficient methods were not available to assess neuroadaptations induced specifically within these activated neurons. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to purify striatal neurons activated during cocaine-induced locomotion in naïve and cocaine-sensitized cfos-lacZ transgenic rats. Activated neurons were labeled with a...

  3. Striatal Presynaptic Dopamine in Schizophrenia, Part I: Meta-Analysis of Dopamine Active Transporter (DAT) Density

    OpenAIRE

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background: Striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission has been postulated to be fundamental to the emergence of key symptoms of schizophrenia, such as psychotic symptoms, and is targeted by currently available dopaminergic drugs. A specific marker of the integrity of presynaptic dopamine neurons in the striatum, the density of striatal dopamine terminals, can be quantified through molecular neuroimaging of the dopamine active transporter (DAT). However, the currently available results using thi...

  4. A simple ordering of neocortical areas established by the compartmental organization of their striatal projections.

    OpenAIRE

    Ragsdale, C W; Graybiel, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The compartmental organization of corticostriatal projections from the fronto-orbito-insular cortex was studied in the cat. Cortical areas in this field were found to have a highly organized projection to the striatum, selectively innervating striosomes dorsally and predominantly avoiding them ventrally within their striatal fields of termination. These observations have two important implications for striatal processing. First, some cortical areas preferentially terminate in different compar...

  5. Genetic disruption of Met signaling impairs GABAergic striatal development and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Gabriela J.; Shahrokh, Mondona; Powell, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The largest structure of the basal ganglia, the striatum, modulates motor activity and cognitive function and is composed of GABAergic projection neurons and interneurons. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the development of the striatal neurons and their assembly into functional circuits, we used a mouse with a targeted conditional Met mutation in post-mitotic cells of the ventral telencephalon. Characterization of the ontogeny of the striatal neuronal populations demonstrated t...

  6. Cortico-Striatal Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity After Activation of Subcortical Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Jan M.; Redgrave, Peter; Reynolds, John N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP) were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicuculline...

  7. Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity after activation of subcortical pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Redgrave; Reynolds, John N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP) were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicucullin...

  8. Anatomical connection strength predicts dopaminergic drug effects on fronto-striatal function

    OpenAIRE

    van Schouwenburg, Martine R.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; van der Schaaf, Marieke E.; Geurts, Dirk E M; Arnt F.A. Schellekens; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verkes, Robbert J.; Cools, Roshan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The neurotransmitter dopamine plays a key role in cognitive functions that are associated with fronto-striatal circuitry and has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. However, there is a large variability in the direction and extent of dopaminergic drug effects across individuals. Objectives We investigated whether individual differences in dopaminergic drug effects on human fronto-striatal functioning are associated with individual differences in white matter tracts. ...

  9. Local infusion of interleukin-6 attenuates the neurotoxic effects of NMDA on rat striatal cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulmond, S; Vige, X; Fage, D; Benavides, J

    1992-09-14

    The potential neuroprotective effects of IL-6 against the excitotoxic neuronal loss induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) have been studied. Infusion into the rat striatum of excitotoxic amounts (250 nmol) of NMDA resulted in a 45% decrease in striatal choline acetyl transferase activity (ChAT; a marker of cholinergic neurons) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, a marker of GABAergic neurons) at 2 days post-injection. Co-infusion of 10 U of IL-6 reduced the loss of ChAT activity to 21% but failed to prevent the loss of GAD activity. IL-6 per se, up to the dose of 500 U, failed to affect ChAT or GAD activities. The in vivo effects of IL-6 are not mediated by a direct antagonism of NMDA toxicity, since IL-6 (up to a concentration of 500 and 5000 U/ml, respectively) did not antagonize either the increase in cyclic GMP levels resulting from NMDA receptor activation in cerebellar slices or the glutamate-induced release of lactate dehydrogenase, an index of neurotoxicity, by cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that the increase in IL-6 levels observed in experimental brain lesions may play a role in the protection and regeneration of cholinergic neurons. PMID:1331914

  10. Maternal obesity caused by overnutrition exposure leads to reversal learning deficits and striatal disturbance in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wu

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity caused by overnutrition during pregnancy increases susceptibility to metabolic risks in adulthood, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes; however, whether and how it affects the cognitive system associated with the brain remains elusive. Here, we report that pregnant obesity induced by exposure to excessive high fatty or highly palatable food specifically impaired reversal learning, a kind of adaptive behavior, while leaving serum metabolic metrics intact in the offspring of rats, suggesting a much earlier functional and structural defects possibly occurred in the central nervous system than in the metabolic system in the offspring born in unfavorable intrauterine nutritional environment. Mechanically, we found that above mentioned cognitive inflexibility might be associated with significant striatal disturbance including impaired dopamine homeostasis and disrupted leptin signaling in the adult offspring. These collective data add a novel perspective of understanding the adverse postnatal sequelae in central nervous system induced by developmental programming and the related molecular mechanism through which priming of risk for developmental disorders may occur during early life.

  11. A tribute to Charlie Chaplin: induced positive affect improves reward-based decision-learning in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    K RichardRidderinkhof; NellekeC.Van Wouwe; ScottA.Wylie; StefanVan Der Stigchel

    2012-01-01

    Reward-based decision-learning refers to the process of learning to select those actions that lead to rewards while avoiding actions that lead to punishments. This process, known to rely on dopaminergic activity in striatal brain regions, is compromised in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We hypothesized that such decision-learning deficits are alleviated by induced positive affect, which is thought to incur transient boosts in midbrain and striatal dopaminergic activity. Computational measures of p...

  12. BDNF and Huntingtin protein modifications by Manganese: Implications for striatal medium spiny neuron pathology in manganese neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Bichell, Terry Jo; Bowman, Aaron B.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of manganese (Mn) exposure decreases striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) dendritic length and spine density, but the mechanism(s) are not known. The Huntingtin (HTT) gene has been functionally linked to cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) support of striatal MSNs via phosphorylation at serine 421 (S421). In Huntington's disease, pathogenic CAG-repeat expansions of HTT decrease synthesis and disrupt transport of cortical-striatal BDNF contributing to disease, and Mn is...

  13. Striatal Presynaptic Dopamine in Schizophrenia, Part II: Meta-Analysis of [18F/11C]-DOPA PET Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background: Alterations in striatal dopamine neurotransmission are central to the emergence of psychotic symptoms and to the mechanism of action of antipsychotics. Although the functional integrity of the presynaptic system can be assessed by measuring striatal dopamine synthesis capacity (DSC), no quantitative meta-analysis is available. Methods: Eleven striatal (caudate and putamen) [11C/18F]-DOPA positron emission tomography studies comparing 113 patients with schizophrenia and 131 healthy...

  14. Striatal [11C]-N-methyl-spiperone binding in patients with focal dystonia (torticollis) using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific binding of [11C]-N-methyl-spiperone to striatal dopamine D2 receptors was assessed using positron emission tomography (PET) in 6 patients with adult-onset focal dystonia (predominantly spasmodic torticollis) and in 5 healthy subjects. No significant difference in average specific striatal tracer uptake between patients and healthy subjects was found. However, in the 5 patients showing lateralisation of clinical signs a trend to higher striatal tracer uptake in the contralateral hemisphere was observed. (authors)

  15. A new framework for cortico-striatal plasticity: behavioural theory meets in vitro data at the reinforcement-action interface

    OpenAIRE

    Gurney, Kevin; Mark D Humphries; Redgrave, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Operant learning requires that reinforcement signals interact with action representations at a suitable neural interface. Much evidence suggests that this occurs when phasic dopamine, acting as a reinforcement prediction error, gates plasticity at cortico-striatal synapses, and thereby changes the future likelihood of selecting the action(s) coded by striatal neurons. But this hypothesis faces serious challenges. First, cortico-striatal plasticity is inexplicably complex, depending on spike t...

  16. Keep focussing: striatal dopamine multiple functions resolved in a single mechanism tested in a simulated humanoid robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Vincenzo G; Sperati, Valerio; Mannella, Francesco; Mirolli, Marco; Gurney, Kevin; Friston, Karl; Dolan, Raymond J; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    The effects of striatal dopamine (DA) on behavior have been widely investigated over the past decades, with "phasic" burst firings considered as the key expression of a reward prediction error responsible for reinforcement learning. Less well studied is "tonic" DA, where putative functions include the idea that it is a regulator of vigor, incentive salience, disposition to exert an effort and a modulator of approach strategies. We present a model combining tonic and phasic DA to show how different outflows triggered by either intrinsically or extrinsically motivating stimuli dynamically affect the basal ganglia by impacting on a selection process this system performs on its cortical input. The model, which has been tested on the simulated humanoid robot iCub interacting with a mechatronic board, shows the putative functions ascribed to DA emerging from the combination of a standard computational mechanism coupled to a differential sensitivity to the presence of DA across the striatum. PMID:24600422

  17. Free radical production induced by methamphetamine in rat striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pro-oxidative effect of methamphetamine (METH) in dopamine terminals was studied in rat striatal synaptosomes. Flow cytometry analysis showed increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in METH-treated synaptosomes, without reduction in the density of dopamine transporters. In synaptosomes from dopamine (DA)-depleted animals, METH did not induce ROS production. Reserpine, in vitro, completely inhibited METH-induced ROS production. These results point to endogenous DA as the main source of ROS induced by METH. Antioxidants and inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and protein kinase C (PKC) prevented the METH-induced oxidative effect. EGTA and the specific antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA, 50 μM) prevented METH-induced ROS production, thus implicating calcium and α7 nicotinic receptors in such effect. Higher concentrations of MLA (>100 μM) showed nonspecific antioxidant effect. Preincubation of synaptosomes with METH (1 μM) for 30 min reduced [3H]DA uptake by 60%. The METH effect was attenuated by MLA and EGTA and potentiated by nicotine, indicating that activation of α7 nicotinic receptors and Ca2+ entry are necessary and take place before DAT inhibition. From these findings, it can be postulated that, in our model, METH induces DA release from synaptic vesicles to the cytosol. Simultaneously, METH activates α7 nicotinic receptors, probably inducing depolarization and an increase in intrasynaptosomal Ca2+. This would lead to DAT inhibition and NOS and PKC activation, initiating oxidation of cytosolic DA

  18. Striatal Associative Learning Signals Are Tuned to In-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Katherine E; Somerville, Leah H; Kelley, William M; Heatherton, Todd F

    2016-09-01

    An important feature of adaptive social behavior is the ability to flexibly modify future actions based on the successes or failures of past experiences. The ventral striatum (VS) occupies a central role in shaping behavior by using feedback to evaluate actions and guide learning. The current studies tested whether feedback indicating the need to update social knowledge would engage the VS, thereby facilitating subsequent learning. We also examined the sensitivity of these striatal signals to the value associated with social group membership. Across two fMRI studies, participants answered questions testing their knowledge about the preferences of personally relevant social groups who were high (in-group) or low (out-group) in social value. Participants received feedback indicating whether their responses were correct or incorrect on a trial-by-trial basis. After scanning, participants were given a surprise memory test examining memory for the different types of feedback. VS activity in response to social feedback correlated with subsequent memory, specifying a role for the VS in encoding and updating social knowledge. This effect was more robust in response to in-group than out-group feedback, indicating that the VS tracks variations in social value. These results provide novel evidence of a neurobiological mechanism adaptively tuned to the motivational relevance of the surrounding social environment that focuses learning efforts on the most valuable social outcomes and triggers adjustments in behavior when necessary. PMID:27082044

  19. Role of Striatal-Enriched Tyrosine Phosphatase in Neuronal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamceva, Marija; Benedict, Jessie; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a CNS-enriched protein implicated in multiple neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. STEP regulates key signaling proteins required for synaptic strengthening as well as NMDA and AMPA receptor trafficking. Both high and low levels of STEP disrupt synaptic function and contribute to learning and behavioral deficits. High levels of STEP are present in human postmortem samples and animal models of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia and in animal models of fragile X syndrome. Low levels of STEP activity are present in additional disorders that include ischemia, Huntington's chorea, alcohol abuse, and stress disorders. Thus the current model of STEP is that optimal levels are required for optimal synaptic function. Here we focus on the role of STEP in Alzheimer's disease and the mechanisms by which STEP activity is increased in this illness. Both genetic lowering of STEP levels and pharmacological inhibition of STEP activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease reverse the biochemical and cognitive abnormalities that are present. These findings suggest that STEP is an important point for modulation of proteins required for synaptic plasticity. PMID:27190655

  20. Striatal function in normal aging: Implications for Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central to several current theories of the etiology of Parkinson's disease is the premise that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system degenerates with normal aging. Much of the evidence for this assertion has come from postmortem neurochemical studies. We have used L-6-[18F] fluoro-Dopa and positron emission tomography in 26 healthy volunteers (age range, 27-76 years) to examine striatal and frontal cortical tracer uptake. Data have been analyzed by using a graphical approach to calculate an influx constant (Ki) for L-6-[18F]fluoro-Dopa uptake into the caudate, putamen, and medial frontal cortex of each subject. In the population studied, there was no decline in Ki with age for any of these structures. A series of physiological measurements made on the older subjects also showed few significant changes with age. The positron emission tomographic findings demonstrate preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in normal aging. The pathological process causing Parkinson's disease may operate closer to the time of presentation than has been suggested

  1. Reduced Striatal Dopamine Transporters in People with Internet Addiction Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, internet addiction disorder (IAD has become more prevalent worldwide and the recognition of its devastating impact on the users and society has rapidly increased. However, the neurobiological mechanism of IAD has not bee fully expressed. The present study was designed to determine if the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT levels measured by T99mc-TRODAT-1 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT brain scans were altered in individuals with IAD. SPECT brain scans were acquired on 5 male IAD subjects and 9 healthy age-matched controls. The volume (V and weight (W of bilateral corpus striatum as well as the T99mc-TRODAT-1 uptake ratio of corpus striatum/the whole brain (Ra were calculated using mathematical models. It was displayed that DAT expression level of striatum was significantly decreased and the V, W, and Ra were greatly reduced in the individuals with IAD compared to controls. Taken together, these results suggest that IAD may cause serious damages to the brain and the neuroimaging findings further illustrate IAD is associated with dysfunctions in the dopaminergic brain systems. Our findings also support the claim that IAD may share similar neurobiological abnormalities with other addictive disorders.

  2. Limbic-striatal memory systems and drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, T W; Everitt, B J

    2002-11-01

    Drug addiction can be understood as a pathological subversion of normal brain learning and memory processes strengthened by the motivational impact of drug-associated stimuli, leading to the establishment of compulsive drug-seeking habits. Such habits evolve through a cascade of complex associative processes with Pavlovian and instrumental components that may depend on the integration and coordination of output from several somewhat independent neural systems of learning and memory, each contributing to behavioral performance. Data are reviewed that help to define the influences of conditioned Pavlovian stimuli on goal-directed behavior via sign-tracking, motivational arousal, and conditioned reinforcement. Such influences are mediated via defined corticolimbic-striatal systems converging on the ventral striatum and driving habit-based learning that may depend on the dorsal striatum. These systems include separate and overlapping influences from the amygdala, hippocampus, and cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex on drug-seeking as well as drug-taking behavior, including the propensity to relapse. PMID:12559840

  3. Striatal dopamine influences the default mode network to affect shifting between object features

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Linh C.; Donde, Aneesh; Madison, Cindee,; O'Neil, James P.; Jagust, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive flexibility, or the ability to change behavior in response to external cues, is conceptualized as two processes: one for shifting between perceptual features of objects and another for shifting between the abstract rules governing the selection of these objects. Object and rule shifts are believed to engage distinct anatomical structures and functional processes. Dopamine activity has been associated with cognitive flexibility, but patients with dopaminergic deficits are not impaire...

  4. Neuroprotective changes of striatal degeneration-related gene expression by acupuncture in an MPTP mouse model of Parkinsonism: microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeong-Gon; Yeo, Sujung; Hong, Yeon-Mi; Lim, Sabina

    2011-04-01

    Acupuncture at acupoints GB34 and LR3 has been reported to inhibit nigrostriatal degeneration in Parkinsonism models, yet the genes related to this preventive effect of acupuncture on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system remain elusive. This study investigated gene expression profile changes in the striatal region of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinsonism models after acupuncture at the acupoints GB34 and LR3 using a whole transcript genechip microarray (Affymetrix genechip mouse gene 1.0 ST array). It was confirmed that acupuncture at these acupoints could inhibit the decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter in the nigrostriatal region of the MPTP model while acupuncture at the non-acupoints could not counteract this decrease. Genechip gene array analysis (fold change cutoff 1.3 and P < 0.05) showed that 12 of the 69 probes up-regulated in MPTP when compared to the control were down-regulated by acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 12 probes, 11 probes (nine annotated genes) were exclusively down-regulated by acupuncture only at the acupoints; the Gfral gene was excluded because it was commonly down-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. In addition, 28 of the 189 probes down-regulated in MPTP when compared to the control were up-regulated by acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 28 probes, 19 probes (seven annotated genes) were exclusively up-regulated by acupuncture only at the acupoints while nine probes were commonly up-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. The regulation patterns of representative genes in real-time RT-PCR correlated with those of the genes in the microarray. These results suggest that the 30 probes (16 annotated genes), which are affected by MPTP and acupuncture only at the acupoints, are responsible for exerting in the striatal regions the inhibitory effect of acupuncture at the acupoints on MPTP-induced striatal

  5. Methamphetamine-induced dopamine-independent alterations in striatal gene expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine hemiparkinsonian rats.

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    Jean Lud Cadet

    Full Text Available Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle are used extensively as a model of Parkinson's disease. The present experiments sought to identify genes that were affected in the dopamine (DA-denervated striatum after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the rat. We also examined whether a single injection of methamphetamine (METH (2.5 mg/kg known to cause changes in gene expression in the normally DA-innervated striatum could still influence striatal gene expression in the absence of DA. Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle resulted in METH-induced rotational behaviors ipsilateral to the lesioned side and total striatal DA depletion on the lesioned side. This injection also caused decrease in striatal serotonin (5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA levels. DA depletion was associated with increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios that were potentiated by the METH injection. Microarray analyses revealed changes (±1.7-fold, p<0.025 in the expression of 67 genes on the lesioned side in comparison to the intact side of the saline-treated hemiparkinsonian animals. These include follistatin, neuromedin U, and tachykinin 2 which were up-regulated. METH administration caused increases in the expression of c-fos, Egr1, and Nor-1 on the intact side. On the DA-depleted side, METH administration also increased the expression of 61 genes including Pdgf-d and Cox-2. There were METH-induced changes in 16 genes that were common in the DA-innervated and DA-depleted sides. These include c-fos and Nor-1 which show greater changes on the normal DA side. Thus, the present study documents, for the first time, that METH mediated DA-independent changes in the levels of transcripts of several genes in the DA-denervated striatum. Our results also implicate 5-HT as a potential player in these METH-induced alterations in gene expression because the METH injection

  6. Novel aspects of striatal plasticity associated with long-term levo-dopa administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busceti, Carla Letizia; Biagioni, Francesca; Calierno, Maria Teresa; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Ruggieri, Stefano; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    "Striatal plasticity" is a term describing a variety of morphological and functional changes occurring both at pre- and post-synaptic level within the basal ganglia. In most cases striatal plasticity occurs when a loss of dopamine (DA) fibers in the striatum, in the course of Parkinsonism takes place. Plastic events include early pre-synaptic and long-term post-synaptic changes. In the context of long-term changes associated with striatal plasticity the role of intrinsic striatal catecholamine cells is emerging. This neuronal population expresses both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DA transporter (DAT). These TH-positive cells are normally resident within the human caudate putamen but they dramatically increase during parkinsonism reaching an amount roughly corresponding to 50% of nigrostriatal neurons counted in control brains. This evidence led to hypothesize fascinating mechanisms bridging these neurons either with compensatory changes or the onset of aberrant behavioral activity. Very recently  the occurrence of these neurons was described during DA replacement therapy in parkinsonism, thus suggesting that these cells may represent the anatomical basis for plastic phenomena.  Thus, the present article, in the attempt to describe novel mechanisms generating striatal plasticity, details these cells in development and adult life and their potential role in maturation phenomena occurring in parkinsonism. PMID:24873927

  7. Regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in striatal and prefrontal cortical brain slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Brain slices were used to investigate the role of nerve terminal autoreceptors in modulating dopamine (DA) synthesis and release in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Accumulation of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) was used as an index of tyrosine hydroxylation in vitro. Nomifensine, a DA uptake blocker, inhibited DOPA synthesis in striatal but not prefrontal slices. This effect was reversed by the DA antagonist sulpiride, suggesting it involved activation of DA receptors by elevated synaptic levels of DA. The autoreceptor-selective agonist EMD-23-448 also inhibited striatal but not prefrontal DOPA synthesis. DOPA synthesis was stimulated in both brain regions by elevated K/sup +/, however only striatal synthesis could be further enhanced by sulpiride. DA release was measured by following the efflux of radioactivity from brain slices prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)-DA. EMD-23-448 and apomorphine inhibited, while sulpiride enhanced, the K/sup +/-evoked overflow of radioactivity from both striatal and prefrontal cortical slices. These findings suggest that striatal DA nerve terminals possess autoreceptors which modulate tyrosine hydroxylation as well as autoreceptors which modulate release. Alternatively, one site may be coupled to both functions through distinct transduction mechanisms. In contrast, autoreceptors on prefrontal cortical terminals appear to regulate DA release but not DA synthesis.

  8. Genetic disruption of Met signaling impairs GABAergic striatal development and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, G J; Shahrokh, M; Powell, E M

    2011-03-10

    The largest structure of the basal ganglia, the striatum, modulates motor activity and cognitive function and is composed of GABAergic projection neurons and interneurons. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the development of the striatal neurons and their assembly into functional circuits, we used a mouse with a targeted conditional Met mutation in post-mitotic cells of the ventral telencephalon. Characterization of the ontogeny of the striatal neuronal populations demonstrated that disruption of Met signaling specifically altered the GABAergic interneurons. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and cholinergic interneurons were largely unaffected. Mice lacking Met signaling have increased numbers of striatal GABAergic interneurons in the lateral sensorimotor areas with distinct behavioral deficits. Motor function and memory formation and consolidation appeared intact, but procedural learning on the cued task of the Morris water maze was delayed. MET is a susceptibility gene in Tourette syndrome and autism, which are human disorders with impaired procedural learning. This study reveals how a striatal targeted disruption in Met signaling after generation of striatal neurons produces behavioral phenotypes shared by Tourette syndrome and autism, linking the human genetics with the mechanism underlying the disorders. PMID:21195751

  9. Gender Differences in Age-Related Striatal Dopamine Depletion in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Jung Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective Gender differences are a well-known clinical characteristic of Parkinson’s disease (PD. In-vivo imaging studies demonstrated that women have greater striatal dopamine transporter (DAT activity than do men, both in the normal population and in PD patients. We hypothesize that women exhibit more rapid aging-related striatal DAT reduction than do men, as the potential neuroprotective effect of estrogen wanes with age. Methods This study included 307 de novo PD patients (152 men and 155 women who underwent DAT scans for an initial diagnostic work-up. Gender differences in age-related DAT decline were assessed in striatal sub-regions using linear regression analysis. Results Female patients exhibited greater DAT activity compared with male patients in all striatal sub-regions. The linear regression analysis revealed that age-related DAT decline was greater in the anterior and posterior caudate, and the anterior putamen in women compared with men; we did not observe this difference in other sub-regions. Conclusions This study demonstrated the presence of gender differences in age-related DAT decline in striatal sub-regions, particularly in the antero-dorsal striatum, in patients with PD, presumably due to aging-related decrease in estrogen. Because this difference was not observed in the sensorimotor striatum, this finding also suggests that women may not have a greater capacity to tolerate PD pathogenesis than do men.

  10. Altered resting state cortico-striatal connectivity in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngbin Kwak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by dopamine depletion in the striatum. One consistent pathophysiological hallmark of PD is an increase in spontaneous oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical networks. We evaluated these effects using resting state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s patients on and off L-DOPA and age-matched controls using six different striatal seed regions. We observed an overall increase in the strength of cortico-striatal functional connectivity in PD patients off L-DOPA compared to controls. This enhanced connectivity was down-regulated by L-DOPA as shown by an overall decrease in connectivity strength, particularly within motor cortical regions. We also performed a frequency content analysis of the BOLD signal time course extracted from the six striatal seed regions. PD off L-DOPA exhibited increased power in the frequency band 0.02 – 0.05 Hz compared to controls and to PD on L-DOPA. The L-DOPA associated decrease in the power of this frequency range modulated the L-DOPA associated decrease in connectivity strength between striatal seeds and the thalamus. In addition, the L-DOPA associated decrease in power in this frequency band also correlated with the L-DOPA associated improvement in cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that PD and L-DOPA modulate striatal resting state BOLD signal oscillations and corticostriatal network coherence.

  11. Age-associated striatal dopaminergic denervation and falls in community-dwelling subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Muller, Martijn L. T. M.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Cham, Rakié; Constantine, Gregory M.; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Older adults have a high prevalence of gait and balance disturbances and falls. Normal aging is associated with significant striatal dopaminergic denervation, which might be a previously unrecognized additional contributor to geriatric falls. This study investigated the relationship between the severity of age-associated striatal dopaminergic denervation (AASDD) and falls in community-dwelling subjects. Community-dwelling subjects who did not have a clinical diagnosis to explain falls (n = 77: 43 female, 34 male; mean age 61.4 +/− 16.4; range 20–85) completed clinical assessment and brain dopamine transporter (DAT) [11C]beta-CFT (2-beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane) positron emission tomography imaging followed by 6 months of prospective fall monitoring using diaries. Results showed a significant inverse relationship between striatal DAT activity and age (r = −0.82, p < 0.001). A total of 26 subjects (33.8%) reported at least one fall, with 5 subjects (6.5%) reporting two or more falls. While no significant difference was noted in striatal DAT activity between nonfallers (n = 51) and fallers (n = 26; f = 0.02, not significant), striatal DAT activity was modestly reduced in the small subgroup of recurrent fallers compared with the other subjects (f = 5.07, p < 0.05). Findings indicate that AASDD does not explain isolated self-reported falls in community-dwelling subjects. However, it may be a contributing factor in the small subgroup of subjects with recurrent falls. PMID:20157861

  12. Conditional targeting of medium spiny neurons in the striatal matrix

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    Björn eReinius

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The striatum serves as the main input to the basal ganglia, and is key for the regulation of motor behaviors, compulsion, addiction, and various cognitive and emotional states. Its deterioration is associated with degenerative disorders such as Huntington’s diseases. Despite its apparent anatomical uniformity, it consists of intermingled cell populations, which have precluded straightforward anatomical sub-classifications adhering to functional dissections. Approximately 95% of the striatal neurons are inhibitory projection neurons termed medium spiny neurons (MSNs. They are commonly classified according to their expression of either dopamine receptor D1 or D2, which also determines their axonal projection patterns constituting the direct and indirect pathway in the basal ganglia. Immunohistochemical patterns have further indicated compartmentalization of the striatum to the striosomes and the surrounding matrix, which integrate MSNs of both the D1 and D2 type. Here, we present a transgenic mouse line, Gpr101-Cre, with Cre recombinase activity localized to matrix D1 and D2 MSNs. Using two Gpr101-Cre founder lines with different degrees of expression in the striatum, we conditionally deleted the vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VIAAT, responsible for storage of GABA and glycine in synaptic vesicles. Partial ablation of VIAAT (in ~36% of MSNs resulted in elevated locomotor activity compared to control mice, when provoked with the monoamine reuptake inhibitor cocaine. Near complete targeting of matrix MSNs led to profoundly changed motor behaviors, which increased in severity as the mice aged. Moreover, these mice had exaggerated muscle rigidity, retarded growth, increased rate of spontaneous deaths, and defective memory. Therefore, our data provide a link between dysfunctional GABA signaling of matrix MSNs to specific behavioral alterations, which are similar to the symptoms of Huntington’s disease.

  13. Adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Bruner, Robert C; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-09-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Numerous studies have indicated a role for A1 receptors (A1R) in acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination, while A2A receptors (A2AR) mainly regulate the rewarding effect of ethanol in mice. Recent findings have demonstrated that dampened A2AR-mediated signaling in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) promotes ethanol-seeking behaviors. Moreover, decreased A2AR function is associated with decreased CREB activity in the DMS, which enhances goal-oriented behaviors and contributes to excessive ethanol drinking in mice. Interestingly, caffeine, the most commonly used psychoactive substance, is known to inhibit both the A1R and A2AR. This dampened adenosine receptor function may mask some of the acute intoxicating effects of ethanol. Furthermore, based on the fact that A2AR activity plays a role in goal-directed behavior, caffeine may also promote ethanol-seeking behavior. The A2AR is enriched in the striatum and exclusively expressed in striatopallidal neurons, which may be responsible for the regulation of inhibitory behavioral control over drug rewarding processes through the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuit. Furthermore, the antagonistic interactions between adenosine and dopamine receptors in the striatum also play an integral role in alcoholism and addiction-related disorders. This review focuses on regulation of adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and the possible implication of caffeine in goal-directed behaviors and addiction. PMID:23912595

  14. Sex differences, learning flexibility, and striatal dopamine D1 and D2 following adolescent drug exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Pozos, Hilda; Torre, Adrianna De La; DeShields, Simone; Cevallos, James; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Stolyarova, Alexandra

    2016-07-15

    Corticostriatal circuitry supports flexible reward learning and emotional behavior from the critical neurodevelopmental stage of adolescence through adulthood. It is still poorly understood how prescription drug exposure in adolescence may impact these outcomes in the long-term. We studied adolescent methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) exposure in rats and their impact on learning and emotion in adulthood. In Experiment 1, male and female rats were administered MPH, FLX, or saline (SAL), and compared with methamphetamine (mAMPH) treatment beginning in postnatal day (PND) 37. The rats were then tested on discrimination and reversal learning in adulthood. In Experiment 2, animals were administered MPH or SAL also beginning in PND 37 and later tested in adulthood for anxiety levels. In Experiment 3, we analyzed striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptor expression in adulthood following either extensive learning (after Experiment 1) or more brief emotional measures (after Experiment 2). We found sex differences in discrimination learning and attenuated reversal learning after MPH and only sex differences in adulthood anxiety. In learners, there was enhanced striatal D1, but not D2, after either adolescent MPH or mAMPH. Lastly, also in learners, there was a sex x treatment group interaction for D2, but not D1, driven by the MPH-pretreated females, who expressed significantly higher D2 levels compared to SAL. These results show enduring effects of adolescent MPH on reversal learning in rats. Developmental psychostimulant exposure may interact with learning to enhance D1 expression in adulthood, and affect D2 expression in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:27091300

  15. Clinical deficits in Huntington disease correlate with reduced striatal uptake on iodine-123 epidepride single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie, W.D.; Abrams, D.N.; Hobson, D. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Dept. of Medicine, St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg (Canada); Greenberg, C.R. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is characterized by severe abnormalities in neurotransmitter concentrations and neuroreceptor density. Quantitative changes in dopamine D{sub 2} receptors occur in the early stages of HD and may be detectable with functional neuroimaging techniques. The aim of this study was to determine whether dopamine D{sub 2} receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) identifies preclinical abnormalities in HD. The study population comprised 32 subjects from families affected by HD: 11 were genetically normal while 21 were genetically positive for HD (seven asymptomatic, six early, three moderate and five advanced findings). Disease severity was determined using a standardized quantitative neurological examination (QNE) and the mini-mental status examination (MMSE). Subjects underwent brain SPET imaging 120 min following intravenous injection of iodine-123 epidepride. Ratios of target (striatal) to nontarget (occipital or whole-brain) uptake were calculated from the reconstructed image data. Striatum to occiput and striatum to whole-brain count ratios correlated negatively with disease stage (P=0.002 and P=0.0002) and QNE (P<0.002 and P=0.0002), and positively with the MMSE (P=0.001 and P<0.001). Uptake was significantly reduced in the moderate-advanced subjects but was still normal for the asymptomatic and early symptomatic stages. It is concluded that reductions in striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptor density can be detected with {sup 123}I epidepride at moderate or advanced stages of HD. In contrast to other reports, we could not identify abnormalities in clinically unaffected or early stages of HD. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of striatal oxidative stress in patients with Parkinson's disease using [{sup 62}Cu]ATSM PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikawa, Masamichi [Second Department of Internal Medicine (Neurology), Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Eiheiji-cho, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko; Kudo, Takashi [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji-cho, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Kuriyama, Masaru [Second Department of Internal Medicine (Neurology), Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Eiheiji-cho, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji-cho, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yoneda, Makoto, E-mail: myoneda@u-fukui.ac.jp [Second Department of Internal Medicine (Neurology), Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Eiheiji-cho, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: To clarify the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) in living patients, positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 62}Cu]diacetyl-bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazone) ([{sup 62}Cu]ATSM) was applied to functional imaging of oxidative stress mainly due to mitochondrial dysfunction in the striata of patients with PD. Methods: Fifteen PD patients who presented with lateral dominant symptoms at onset and six healthy controls underwent [{sup 62}Cu]ATSM PET. Dynamic PET data acquisition was performed, and standardized uptake values (SUVs) were obtained from the delayed phase of dynamic data by means of region of interest analysis. The striatum-to-cerebellum SUV ratio (S/C ratio) was calculated from the SUV in all subjects of the striatum and the cerebellar cortex. Results: The mean S/C ratio of the bilateral striata of the patients (1.15{+-}0.10) was significantly increased compared with that of the controls (1.08{+-}0.02) (P<.05). In the patients, the S/C ratio of the bilateral striata showed a positive correlation with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) rating (r=0.52, P<.05), and the S/C ratio of the striatum contralateral to the initially affected body side showed a strong positive correlation with the UPDRS rating (r=0.62, P<.05). Conclusions: [{sup 62}Cu]ATSM PET imaging demonstrated that striatal oxidative stress was enhanced in PD patients compared with the controls and increased with the progression of disease severity, particularly in the contralateral striatum. These findings indicated that oxidative stress associates with striatal neurodegeneration in PD.

  17. Membrane properties of striatal direct and indirect pathway neurons in mouse and rat slices and their modulation by dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Planert

    Full Text Available D1 and D2 receptor expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs are ascribed to striatonigral ("direct" and striatopallidal ("indirect" pathways, respectively, that are believed to function antagonistically in motor control. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto the two types is differentially affected by Dopamine (DA, however, less is known about the effects on MSN intrinsic electrical properties. Using patch clamp recordings, we comprehensively characterized the two pathways in rats and mice, and investigated their DA modulation. We identified the direct pathway by retrograde labeling in rats, and in mice we used transgenic animals in which EGFP is expressed in D1 MSNs. MSNs were subjected to a series of current injections to pinpoint differences between the populations, and in mice also following bath application of DA. In both animal models, most electrical properties were similar, however, membrane excitability as measured by step and ramp current injections consistently differed, with direct pathway MSNs being less excitable than their counterparts. DA had opposite effects on excitability of D1 and D2 MSNs, counteracting the initial differences. Pronounced changes in AP shape were seen in D2 MSNs. In direct pathway MSNs, excitability increased across experimental conditions and parameters, and also when applying DA or the D1 agonist SKF-81297 in presence of blockers of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic receptors. Thus, DA induced changes in excitability were D1 R mediated and intrinsic to direct pathway MSNs, and not a secondary network effect of altered synaptic transmission. DAergic modulation of intrinsic properties therefore acts in a synergistic manner with previously reported effects of DA on afferent synaptic transmission and dendritic processing, supporting the antagonistic model for direct vs. indirect striatal pathway function.

  18. Sex differences, learning flexibility, and striatal dopamine D1 and D2 following adolescent drug exposure in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Pozos, Hilda; De La Torre, Adrianna; DeShields, Simone; Cevallos, James; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Stolyarova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal circuitry supports flexible reward learning and emotional behavior from the critical neurodevelopmental stage of adolescence through adulthood. It is still poorly understood how prescription drug exposure in adolescence may impact these outcomes in the long-term. We studied adolescent methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) exposure in rats and their impact on learning and emotion in adulthood. In Experiment 1, male and female rats were administered MPH, FLX, or saline (SAL), and compared with methamphetamine (mAMPH) treatment beginning in postnatal day (PND) 37. The rats were then tested on discrimination and reversal learning in adulthood. In Experiment 2, animals were administered MPH or SAL also beginning in PND 37 and later tested in adulthood for anxiety levels. In Experiment 3, we analyzed striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptor expression in adulthood following either extensive learning (after Experiment 1) or more brief emotional measures (after Experiment 2). We found sex differences in discrimination learning and attenuated reversal learning after MPH and only sex differences in adulthood anxiety. In learners, there was enhanced striatal D1, but not D2, after either adolescent MPH or mAMPH. Lastly, also in learners, there was a sex x treatment group interaction for D2, but not D1, driven by the MPH-pretreated females, who expressed significantly higher D2 levels compared to SAL. These results show enduring effects of adolescent MPH on reversal learning in rats. Developmental psychostimulant exposure may interact with learning to enhance D1 expression in adulthood, and affect D2 expression in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:27091300

  19. Correlation between automated writing movements and striatal dopaminergic innervation in patients with Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Wieland; Eggers, Birk; Barthel, Henryk; Clark, Daniel; Villmann, Thomas; Hesse, Swen; Grahmann, Friedrich; Kühn, Hans-Jürgen; Sabri, Osama; Wagner, Armin

    2002-08-01

    Handwriting defects are an early sign of motor impairment in patients with Wilson's disease. The basal ganglia being the primary site of copper accumulation in the brain suggests a correlation with lesions in the nigrostiatal dopaminergic system. We have analysed and correlated striatal dopaminergic innervation using [(123)I]beta-CIT-SPECT and automated handwriting movements in 37 patients with Wilson's disease. There was a significant correlation of putaminal dopaminergic innervation with fine motor ability (p < 0,05 for NIV [number of inversion in velocity], NIA [number of inversion in acceleration], frequency). These data suggest that loss of dorsolateral striatal dopaminergic innervation has a pathophysiological function for decreased automated motor control in Wilson's disease. Furthermore analysis of automated handwriting movements could be useful for therapy monitoring and evaluation of striatal dopaminergic innervation. PMID:12195459

  20. Decreased spontaneous eye blink rates in chronic cannabis users: evidence for striatal cannabinoid-dopamine interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael A Kowal

    Full Text Available Chronic cannabis use has been shown to block long-term depression of GABA-glutamate synapses in the striatum, which is likely to reduce the extent to which endogenous cannabinoids modulate GABA- and glutamate-related neuronal activity. The current study aimed at investigating the effect of this process on striatal dopamine levels by studying the spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR, a clinical marker of dopamine level in the striatum. 25 adult regular cannabis users and 25 non-user controls matched for age, gender, race, and IQ were compared. Results show a significant reduction in EBR in chronic users as compared to non-users, suggesting an indirect detrimental effect of chronic cannabis use on striatal dopaminergic functioning. Additionally, EBR correlated negatively with years of cannabis exposure, monthly peak cannabis consumption, and lifetime cannabis consumption, pointing to a relationship between the degree of impairment of striatal dopaminergic transmission and cannabis consumption history.

  1. Differential Resting-State Functional Connectivity of Striatal Subregions in Bipolar Depression and Hypomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay, Murat I; Hulvershorn, Leslie A; Karne, Harish; Beall, Erik B; Anand, Amit

    2016-04-01

    Bipolar disorder (BP) is characterized by periods of depression (BPD) and (hypo)mania (BPM), but the underlying state-related brain circuit abnormalities are not fully understood. Striatal functional activation and connectivity abnormalities have been noted in BP, but consistent findings have not been reported. To further elucidate striatal abnormalities in different BP states, this study investigated differences in resting-state functional connectivity of six striatal subregions in BPD, BPM, and healthy control (HC) subjects. Ninety medication-free subjects (30 BPD, 30 BPM, and 30 HC), closely matched for age and gender, were scanned using 3T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquired at resting state. Correlations of low-frequency blood oxygen level dependent signal fluctuations for six previously described striatal subregions were used to obtain connectivity maps of each subregion. Using a factorial design, main effects for differences between groups were obtained and post hoc pairwise group comparisons performed. BPD showed increased connectivity of the dorsal caudal putamen with somatosensory areas such as the insula and temporal gyrus. BPM group showed unique increased connectivity between left dorsal caudate and midbrain regions, as well as increased connectivity between ventral striatum inferior and thalamus. In addition, both BPD and BPM exhibited widespread functional connectivity abnormalities between striatal subregions and frontal cortices, limbic regions, and midbrain structures. In summary, BPD exhibited connectivity abnormalities of associative and somatosensory subregions of the putamen, while BPM exhibited connectivity abnormalities of associative and limbic caudate. Most other striatal subregion connectivity abnormalities were common to both groups and may be trait related. PMID:26824737

  2. Drug predictive cues activate aversion-sensitive striatal neurons that encode drug seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Robble, Mykel A; Hebron, Emily M; Dupont, Matthew J; Ebben, Amanda L; Wheeler, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Drug-associated cues have profound effects on an addict's emotional state and drug-seeking behavior. Although this influence must involve the motivational neural system that initiates and encodes the drug-seeking act, surprisingly little is known about the nature of such physiological events and their motivational consequences. Three experiments investigated the effect of a cocaine-predictive stimulus on dopamine signaling, neuronal activity, and reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In all experiments, rats were divided into two groups (paired and unpaired), and trained to self-administer cocaine in the presence of a tone that signaled the immediate availability of the drug. For rats in the paired group, self-administration sessions were preceded by a taste cue that signaled delayed drug availability. Assessments of hedonic responses indicated that this delay cue became aversive during training. Both the self-administration behavior and the immediate cue were subsequently extinguished in the absence of cocaine. After extinction of self-administration behavior, the presentation of the aversive delay cue reinstated drug seeking. In vivo electrophysiology and voltammetry recordings in the nucleus accumbens measured the neural responses to both the delay and immediate drug cues after extinction. Interestingly, the presentation of the delay cue simultaneously decreased dopamine signaling and increased excitatory encoding of the immediate cue. Most importantly, the delay cue selectively enhanced the baseline activity of neurons that would later encode drug seeking. Together these observations reveal how cocaine cues can modulate not only affective state, but also the neurochemical and downstream neurophysiological environment of striatal circuits in a manner that promotes drug seeking. PMID:25948270

  3. Neurodevelopmental disruption of cortico-striatal function caused by degeneration of habenula neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-A Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The habenula plays an important role on cognitive and affective functions by regulating monoamines transmission such as the dopamine and serotonin, such that its dysfunction is thought to underlie a number of psychiatric conditions. Given that the monoamine systems are highly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental insults, damages in the habenula during early neurodevelopment may cause devastating effects on the wide-spread brain areas targeted by monoamine innervations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a battery of behavioral, anatomical, and biochemical assays, we examined the impacts of neonatal damage in the habenula on neurodevelopmental sequelae of the prefrontal cortex (PFC and nucleus accumbens (NAcc and associated behavioral deficits in rodents. Neonatal lesion of the medial and lateral habenula by ibotenic acid produced an assortment of behavioral manifestations consisting of hyper-locomotion, impulsivity, and attention deficit, with hyper-locomotion and impulsivity being observed only in the juvenile period, whereas attention deficit was sustained up until adulthood. Moreover, these behavioral alterations were also improved by amphetamine. Our study further revealed that impulsivity and attention deficit were associated with disruption of PFC volume and dopamine (DA receptor expression, respectively. In contrast, hyper-locomotion was associated with decreased DA transporter expression in the NAcc. We also found that neonatal administration of nicotine into the habenula of neonatal brains produced selective lesion of the medial habenula. Behavioral deficits with neonatal nicotine administration were similar to those caused by ibotenic acid lesion of both medial and lateral habenula during the juvenile period, whereas they were different in adulthood. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because of similarity between behavioral and brain alterations caused by neonatal insults in the habenula and the symptoms and suggested neuropathology

  4. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability increases after long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaal, Esther M; de Weijer, Barbara A; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke M; Janssen, Ignace; Berends, Frits J; van de Laar, Arnold; Ackermans, Mariette T; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Booij, Jan; Serlie, Mireille J

    2016-07-01

    In several studies reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability was reported in obese subjects compared to lean controls. Whether this is a reversible phenomenon remained uncertain. We previously determined the short-term effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on striatal D2/3R availability (using [(123)I]IBZM SPECT) in 20 morbidly obese women. Striatal D2/3R availability was lower compared to controls at baseline, and remained unaltered after 6 weeks, despite significant weight loss. To determine whether long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss normalizes striatal D2/3R binding, we repeated striatal D2/3R binding measurements at least 2 years after RYGB in 14 subjects of the original cohort. In addition, we assessed long-term changes in body composition, eating behavior and fasting plasma levels of leptin, ghrelin, insulin and glucose. Mean body mass index declined from 46±7kg/m(2) to 32±6kg/m(2), which was accompanied by a significant increase in striatal D2/3R availability (p=0.031). Striatal D2/3R availability remained significantly reduced compared to the age-matched controls (BMI 22±2kg/m(2); p=0.01). Changes in striatal D2/3R availability did not correlate with changes in body weight/fat, insulin sensitivity, ghrelin or leptin levels. Scores on eating behavior questionnaires improved and changes in the General Food Craving Questionnaire-State showed a borderline significant correlation with changes in striatal D2/3R availability. These findings show that striatal D2/3R availability increases after long-term bariatric-surgery induced weight loss, suggesting that reduced D2/3R availability in obesity is a reversible phenomenon. PMID:27184782

  5. Sex-related differences in striatal dopaminergic system after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiupeng; Cao, Shengwu; Chao, Honglu; Liu, Yinlong; Ji, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated alterations in the dopamine (DA) system after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Additionally, the existence of significant sex-related differences in the dopaminergic system has long been recognized. Accordingly, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether TBI would differentially alter, in female and male mice, the expression and the function of the striatal vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2), an important DA transporter. After controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, female mice showed significantly lower striatal DA concentrations and K(+)-evoked DA output. By contrast, no significant sex-related differences were observed in the mRNA and protein levels of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) and VMAT-2 and the methamphetamine (MA)-evoked DA output. These results demonstrated clear sex-related differences in striatal VMAT-2 function in response to TBI and suggested that female mice may be more sensitive to the TBI-induced inhibition of the VMAT-2 function, as indicated by the greater degree of deficits observed when the VMAT-2 DA-storage function was inhibited by TBI. Moreover, the TBI-induced suppression of locomotion was more pronounced than female mice. Such findings highlight the need for sex-specific considerations when examining differences among brain injury conditions. PMID:27210290

  6. Fronto-striatal dysfunction during reward processing in unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Max; Kahn, René S; Vink, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder that is associated with impaired functioning of the fronto-striatal network, in particular during reward processing. However, it is unclear whether this dysfunction is related to the illness itself or whether it reflects a genetic vulnerability to develop schi

  7. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  8. Changes in striatal dopamine release associated with human motor-skill acquisition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Kawashima

    Full Text Available The acquisition of new motor skills is essential throughout daily life and involves the processes of learning new motor sequence and encoding elementary aspects of new movement. Although previous animal studies have suggested a functional importance for striatal dopamine release in the learning of new motor sequence, its role in encoding elementary aspects of new movement has not yet been investigated. To elucidate this, we investigated changes in striatal dopamine levels during initial skill-training (Day 1 compared with acquired conditions (Day 2 using (11C-raclopride positron-emission tomography. Ten volunteers learned to perform brisk contractions using their non-dominant left thumbs with the aid of visual feedback. On Day 1, the mean acceleration of each session was improved through repeated training sessions until performance neared asymptotic levels, while improved motor performance was retained from the beginning on Day 2. The (11C-raclopride binding potential (BP in the right putamen was reduced during initial skill-training compared with under acquired conditions. Moreover, voxel-wise analysis revealed that (11C-raclopride BP was particularly reduced in the right antero-dorsal to the lateral part of the putamen. Based on findings from previous fMRI studies that show a gradual shift of activation within the striatum during the initial processing of motor learning, striatal dopamine may play a role in the dynamic cortico-striatal activation during encoding of new motor memory in skill acquisition.

  9. Diversity in Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity at Inhibitory Synapses of Striatal Spiny Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Mendoza, Ernesto; Hernandez, Ricardo; Aceves, Jose J.; Ibanez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Procedural memories and habits are posited to be stored in the basal ganglia, whose intrinsic circuitries possess important inhibitory connections arising from striatal spiny neurons. However, no information about long-term plasticity at these synapses is available. Therefore, this work describes a novel postsynaptically dependent long-term…

  10. Protective Effect of Oral Hesperetin Against Unilateral Striatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Damage in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). PD finally leads to incapacitating symptoms including motor and cognitive deficits. This study was undertaken to assess protective effect of the flavanone hesperetin against striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion and to explore in more detail some underlying mechanisms including apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this research study, intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats received hesperetin (50 mg/kg/day) for 1 week. Hesperetin reduced apomorphine-induced rotational asymmetry and decreased the latency to initiate and the total time on the narrow beam task. It also attenuated striatal malondialdehyde and enhanced striatal catalase activity and GSH content, lowered striatal level of glial fibrillary acidic protein as an index of astrogliosis and increased Bcl2 with no significant change of the nuclear factor NF-kB as a marker of inflammation. Hesperetin treatment was also capable to mitigate nigral DNA fragmentation as an index of apoptosis and to prevent loss of SNC dopaminergic neurons. This study indicated the protective effect of hesperetin in an early model of PD via attenuation of apoptosis, astrogliosis marker and oxidative stress and it may be helpful as an adjuvant therapy for management of PD at its early stages. PMID:26700436

  11. Repeated cocaine administration results in supersensitivity of striatal D-2 dopamine autoreceptors to pergolide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groups of rats administered cocaine-HCl (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline either acutely or once daily for 8 or 14 days were killed 24 hrs after the last dose. In striatal slices prelabelled with [3H]DA, modulation of [3H]-overflow by pergolide was used to measure D-2 autoreceptor activity. Compared to the contemporaneous control group pergolide produced a greater inhibition only in striatal slices from rats treated repeatedly with cocaine. In radioligand binding studies using striatal membranes from control rats, pergolide had a 500-fold greater affinity for the D-2, as opposed to the D-1, dopamine (DA) receptor subtype. These results indicate that repeated treatment with cocaine produces supersensitive striatal D-2 release-modulating autoreceptors consistent with a compensatory change to diminish the effect of elevated synaptic concentrations of DA produced by cocaine. In contrast, supersensitivity of D-2 receptors was not detected in [3H]spiperone binding assays. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  12. Dynamics of the Parkinsonian striatal microcircuit: entrainment into a dominant network state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáidar, Omar; Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Hernández, Adán; Drucker-Colín, René; Bargas, José; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo

    2010-08-25

    Neuronal synchronization in basal ganglia circuits plays a key role in the encoding of movement, procedural memory storage and habit formation. Striatal dopamine (DA) depletion during Parkinsonism causes abnormal synchronization in corticobasal ganglia loops resulting in motor dysfunction. However, the dynamics of the striatal microcircuit underlying abnormal synchronization in Parkinsonism is poorly understood. Here we used targeted whole-cell recordings, calcium imaging allowing the recording from dozens of cells simultaneously and analytical approaches, to describe the striking alterations in network dynamics that the striatal microcircuit undergoes following DA depletion in a rat model of Parkinson disease (PD): In addition to a significant enhancement of basal neuronal activity frequent periods of spontaneous synchronization were observed. Multidimensional reduction techniques of vectorized network dynamics revealed that increased synchronization resulted from a dominant network state that absorbed most spontaneously active cells. Abnormal synchronous activity can be virtually abolished by glutamatergic antagonists, while blockade of GABAergic transmission facilitates the engagement of striatal cell assemblies in the dominant state. Finally, a dopaminergic receptor agonist was capable of uncoupling neurons from the dominant state. Abnormal synchronization and "locking" into a dominant state may represent the basic neuronal mechanism that underlies movement disorders at the microcircuit level. PMID:20739553

  13. Opposing actions of chronic stress and chronic nicotine on striatal function in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Salas, Ramiro; De Biasi, Mariella

    2008-01-01

    Stress is a major risk factor in drug addiction development and relapse. Virtually all drugs of abuse act by increasing extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum. To gain an understanding of the interaction between stress and drug exposure, we studied the effects of concomitant chronic nicotine and chronic stress exposure on mouse striatal dopamine levels.

  14. Impaired selenoprotein expression in brain triggers striatal neuronal loss leading to coordination defects in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeher, Sandra; Carlson, Bradley A.; Miniard, Angela C.; Wirth, Eva K.; Mahdi, Yassin; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Driscoll, Donna M.; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence (SECIS)-Binding Protein 2 (Secisbp2) binds to SECIS elements located in the 3′-untranslated region of eukaryotic selenoprotein mRNAs. It facilitates incorporation of the rare amino acid selenocysteine in response to UGA codons. Inactivation of Secisbp2 in hepatocytes greatly reduced selenoprotein levels. Neuron-specific inactivation of Secisbp2 (CamK-Cre; Secisbp2fl/fl) reduced cerebral expression of selenoproteins to a lesser extent than inactivation of tRNA[Ser]Sec. This allowed us to study the development of cortical parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, which are completely lost in tRNA[Ser]Sec mutants. PV+ interneuron density was reduced in the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. In situ-hybridization for Gad67 confirmed the reduction of GABAergic interneurons. Because of the obvious movement phenotype involving a broad, dystonic gait, we suspected basal ganglia dysfunction. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was normal in substantia nigra neurons and their striatal terminals. However the densities of striatal PV+ and Gad67+ neurons were decreased by 65% and 49%, respectively. Likewise, the density of striatal cholinergic neurons was reduced by 68%. Our observations demonstrate that several classes of striatal interneurons depend on selenoprotein expression. These findings may offer an explanation for the movement phenotype of selenoprotein P-deficient mice and the movement disorder and mental retardation described in a patient carrying SECISBP2 mutations. PMID:24844465

  15. Striatal structure and function predict individual biases in learning to avoid pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldar, Eran; Hauser, Tobias U.; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Pain is an elemental inducer of avoidance. Here, we demonstrate that people differ in how they learn to avoid pain, with some individuals refraining from actions that resulted in painful outcomes, whereas others favor actions that helped prevent pain. These individual biases were best explained by differences in learning from outcome prediction errors and were associated with distinct forms of striatal responses to painful outcomes. Specifically, striatal responses to pain were modulated in a manner consistent with an aversive prediction error in individuals who learned predominantly from pain, whereas in individuals who learned predominantly from success in preventing pain, modulation was consistent with an appetitive prediction error. In contrast, striatal responses to success in preventing pain were consistent with an appetitive prediction error in both groups. Furthermore, variation in striatal structure, encompassing the region where pain prediction errors were expressed, predicted participants’ predominant mode of learning, suggesting the observed learning biases may reflect stable individual traits. These results reveal functional and structural neural components underlying individual differences in avoidance learning, which may be important contributors to psychiatric disorders involving pathological harm avoidance behavior. PMID:27071092

  16. Functional connectivity modeling of consistent cortico-striatal degeneration in Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imis Dogan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a complex neuropsychiatric phenotype. In a recent meta-analysis we identified core regions of consistent neurodegeneration in premanifest HD in the striatum and middle occipital gyrus (MOG. For early manifest HD convergent evidence of atrophy was most prominent in the striatum, motor cortex (M1 and inferior frontal junction (IFJ. The aim of the present study was to functionally characterize this topography of brain atrophy and to investigate differential connectivity patterns formed by consistent cortico-striatal atrophy regions in HD. Using areas of striatal and cortical atrophy at different disease stages as seeds, we performed task-free resting-state and task-based meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM. MACM utilizes the large data source of the BrainMap database and identifies significant areas of above-chance co-activation with the seed-region via the activation-likelihood-estimation approach. In order to delineate functional networks formed by cortical as well as striatal atrophy regions we computed the conjunction between the co-activation profiles of striatal and cortical seeds in the premanifest and manifest stages of HD, respectively. Functional characterization of the seeds was obtained using the behavioral meta-data of BrainMap. Cortico-striatal atrophy seeds of the premanifest stage of HD showed common co-activation with a rather cognitive network including the striatum, anterior insula, lateral prefrontal, premotor, supplementary motor and parietal regions. A similar but more pronounced co-activation pattern, additionally including the medial prefrontal cortex and thalamic nuclei was found with striatal and IFJ seeds at the manifest HD stage. The striatum and M1 were functionally connected mainly to premotor and sensorimotor areas, posterior insula, putamen and thalamus. Behavioral characterization of the seeds confirmed that experiments

  17. Task-dependent encoding of space and events by striatal neurons is dependent on neural subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitzer-Torbert, N C; Redish, A D

    2008-05-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a critical role in procedural learning and memory. Current models of basal ganglia assume that striatal neurons and circuitry are critical for the execution of overlearned, habitual sequences of action. However, less is known about how the striatum encodes task information that guides the performance of actions in procedural tasks. To explore the striatal encoding of task information, we compared the behavioral correlates of striatal neurons tested in two tasks: a multiple T-maze task in which reward delivery was entirely predictable based on spatial cues (the Multiple-T task), and a task in which rats ran on a rectangular track, but food delivery depended on the distance traveled on the track and was not dependent solely on spatial location (the Take-5 task). Striatal cells recorded on these tasks were divisible into three cell types: phasic-firing neurons (PFNs), tonically firing neurons (TFNs), and high-firing neurons (HFNs) and similar proportions of each cell type were found in each task. However, the behavioral correlates of each cell type were differentially sensitive to the type of task rats were performing. PFNs were responsive to specific task-parameters on each task. TFNs showed reliable burst-and-pause responses following food delivery and other events that were consistent with tonically active neurons (TANs) on the Take-5 (non-spatial) task but not on the Multiple-T (spatial) task. HFNs showed spatial oscillations on the Multiple-T (spatial) task but not the Take-5 (non-spatial) task. Reconstruction of the rats' position on the maze was highly accurate when using striatal ensembles recorded on the Multiple-T (spatial) task, but not when using ensembles recorded on the Take-5 (non-spatial) task. In contrast, reconstruction of time following food delivery was successful in both tasks. The results indicated a strong task dependency of the quality of the spatial, but not the reward-related, striatal representations on these tasks

  18. Striatal kinetics of [11C]-(+)-nomifensine and 6-[18F]fluoro-L-dopa in Parkinson's disease measured with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics in brain of the dopamine reuptake blocking agent [11C]-(+)-nomifensine and the L-dopa analogue 6-[18F]fluoro-L-dopa were compared in 3 patients with idopathic Parkinson's disease and agematched healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography. Regional uptake was analyzed and quantified according to a 3-compartment model. Retention of both tracers in striatal regions of the parkinsonian patients were reduced compared with the healthy volunteers mainly in the putamen, while the caudate nuclleus was only mildly affected. The reductions were considerably less than the decrease previously reported postmortem for striatal dopamine content in the basal ganglia of patients with Parkinson's disease. A fairly constant ratio between 6-[18F]fluoro-L-dopa utilization and [11C]-(+)-nomifensine binding in the caudate nucleus and the putamen were found in both groups unrelated to the size of the estimated parameters. This indicates that a limiting factor for the utilization of exogenous levodopa in Parkinsons's disease may be a reduced transport capacity for the amino acid into the dopaminergic terminals. (author)

  19. COMT Val(158) met genotype and striatal D(2/3) receptor binding in adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boot, Erik

    2011-09-01

    Although catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity evidently affects dopamine function in prefrontal cortex, the contribution is assumed less significant in striatum. We studied whether a functional polymorphism in the COMT gene (Val(158) Met) influences striatal D(2\\/3) R binding ratios (D(2\\/3) R BP(ND) ) in 15 adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome and hemizygous for this gene, using single photon emission computed tomography and the selective D(2\\/3) radioligand [(123) I]IBZM. Met hemizygotes had significantly lower mean D(2\\/3) R BPND than Val hemizygotes. These preliminary data suggest that low COMT activity may affect dopamine levels in striatum in humans and this may have implications for understanding the contribution of COMT activity to psychiatric disorders.

  20. Fully Automated Quantification of the Striatal Uptake Ratio of [99mTc]-TRODAT with SPECT Imaging: Evaluation of the Diagnostic Performance in Parkinson’s Disease and the Temporal Regression of Striatal Tracer Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Hua Dean Fang; Shao-Chieh Chiu; Chin-Song Lu; Tzu-Chen Yen; Yi-Hsin Weng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed at improving the existing methods for the fully automatic quantification of striatal uptake of [99mTc]-TRODAT with SPECT imaging. Procedures. A normal [99mTc]-TRODAT template was first formed based on 28 healthy controls. Images from PD patients (n = 365) and nPD subjects (28 healthy controls and 33 essential tremor patients) were spatially normalized to the normal template. We performed an inverse transform on the predefined striatal and reference volumes of interest (VOIs)...

  1. Dopaminergic Genetic Polymorphisms Predict Rule-based Category Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Kaileigh A; Davis, Tyler; Worthy, Darrell A

    2016-07-01

    Dopaminergic genes play an important role in cognitive function. DRD2 and DARPP-32 dopamine receptor gene polymorphisms affect striatal dopamine binding potential, and the Val158Met single-nucleotide polymorphism of the COMT gene moderates dopamine availability in the pFC. Our study assesses the role of these gene polymorphisms on performance in two rule-based category learning tasks. Participants completed unidimensional and conjunctive rule-based tasks. In the unidimensional task, a rule along a single stimulus dimension can be used to distinguish category members. In contrast, a conjunctive rule utilizes a combination of two dimensions to distinguish category members. DRD2 C957T TT homozygotes outperformed C allele carriers on both tasks, and DARPP-32 AA homozygotes outperformed G allele carriers on both tasks. However, we found an interaction between COMT and task type where Met allele carriers outperformed Val homozygotes in the conjunctive rule task, but both groups performed equally well in the unidimensional task. Thus, striatal dopamine binding may play a critical role in both types of rule-based tasks, whereas prefrontal dopamine binding is important for learning more complex conjunctive rule tasks. Modeling results suggest that striatal dopaminergic genes influence selective attention processes whereas cortical genes mediate the ability to update complex rule representations. PMID:26918585

  2. Striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding in pathological gambling is correlated with mood-related impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Luke; Stokes, Paul R; Wu, Kit; Michalczuk, Rosanna; Benecke, Aaf; Watson, Ben J; Egerton, Alice; Piccini, Paola; Nutt, David J; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2012-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is a behavioural addiction associated with elevated impulsivity and suspected dopamine dysregulation. Reduced striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability has been reported in drug addiction, and may constitute a premorbid vulnerability marker for addictive disorders. The aim of the present study was to assess striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in PG, and its association with trait impulsivity. Males with PG (n = 9) and male healthy controls (n = 9) unde...

  3. Differential Striatal Spine Pathology in Parkinson’s disease and Cocaine Addiction: A Key Role of Dopamine?

    OpenAIRE

    Villalba, Rosa M.; Smith, Yoland

    2013-01-01

    In the striatum, the dendritic tree of the two main populations of projection neurons, called “Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs)”, are covered with spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the cerebral cortex and thalamus. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), striatal MSNs undergo an important loss of dendritic spines, whereas aberrant overgrowth of striatal spines occurs following chronic cocaine exposure. This review examines the possibility that opposite dopamine dysregulation is one of the key fac...

  4. Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability is Reduced in Methamphetamine Dependence and is Linked to Impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Buyean; London, Edythe D.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Farahi, Judah; Nacca, Angelo; Monterosso, John R.; Mumford, Jeanette A.; Bokarius, Andrew V.; Dahlbom, Magnus; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Robert M Bilder; Brody, Arthur L.; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    While methamphetamine addiction has been associated with both impulsivity and striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor deficits, human studies have not directly linked the latter two entities. We therefore compared methamphetamine-dependent and healthy control subjects using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (version 11, BIS-11) and positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride to measure striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability. The methamphetamine-dependent subjects reported recent use of th...

  5. A new framework for cortico-striatal plasticity: behavioural theory meets in vitro data at the reinforcement-action interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin N Gurney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Operant learning requires that reinforcement signals interact with action representations at a suitable neural interface. Much evidence suggests that this occurs when phasic dopamine, acting as a reinforcement prediction error, gates plasticity at cortico-striatal synapses, and thereby changes the future likelihood of selecting the action(s coded by striatal neurons. But this hypothesis faces serious challenges. First, cortico-striatal plasticity is inexplicably complex, depending on spike timing, dopamine level, and dopamine receptor type. Second, there is a credit assignment problem-action selection signals occur long before the consequent dopamine reinforcement signal. Third, the two types of striatal output neuron have apparently opposite effects on action selection. Whether these factors rule out the interface hypothesis and how they interact to produce reinforcement learning is unknown. We present a computational framework that addresses these challenges. We first predict the expected activity changes over an operant task for both types of action-coding striatal neuron, and show they co-operate to promote action selection in learning and compete to promote action suppression in extinction. Separately, we derive a complete model of dopamine and spike-timing dependent cortico-striatal plasticity from in vitro data. We then show this model produces the predicted activity changes necessary for learning and extinction in an operant task, a remarkable convergence of a bottom-up data-driven plasticity model with the top-down behavioural requirements of learning theory. Moreover, we show the complex dependencies of cortico-striatal plasticity are not only sufficient but necessary for learning and extinction. Validating the model, we show it can account for behavioural data describing extinction, renewal, and reacquisition, and replicate in vitro experimental data on cortico-striatal plasticity. By bridging the levels between the single synapse and

  6. Singing-Related Neural Activity Distinguishes Four Classes of Putative Striatal Neurons in the Songbird Basal Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Jesse H.; Fee, Michale S

    2010-01-01

    The striatum—the primary input nucleus of the basal ganglia—plays a major role in motor control and learning. Four main classes of striatal neuron are thought to be essential for normal striatal function: medium spiny neurons, fast-spiking interneurons, cholinergic tonically active neurons, and low-threshold spiking interneurons. However, the nature of the interaction of these neurons during behavior is poorly understood. The songbird area X is a specialized striato-pallidal basal ganglia nuc...

  7. Putative cortical dopamine levels affect cortical recruitment during planning ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Fallon, S.J.; Hampshire, A.; Williams-Gray, C.H.; Barker, R A; Owen, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Planning, the decomposition of an ultimate goal into a number of sub-goals is critically dependent upon fronto-striatal dopamine (DA) levels. Here, we examined the extent to which the val158met polymorphism in the catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, which is thought to primarily alter cortical DA levels, affects performance and fronto-parietal activity during a planning task (Tower of London). COMT genotype was found to modulate activity in the left superior posterior parietal cortex (S...

  8. Immunization with DAT fragments is associated with long-term striatal impairment, hyperactivity and reduced cognitive flexibility in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriani Walter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Possible interactions between nervous and immune systems in neuro-psychiatric disorders remain elusive. Levels of brain dopamine transporter (DAT have been implicated in several impulse-control disorders, like attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Here, we assessed the interplay between DAT auto-immunity and behavioural / neurochemical phenotype. Methods Male CD-1 mice were immunized with DAT peptide fragments (DAT-i, or vehicle alone (VEH, to generate elevated circulating levels of DAT auto-antibodies (aAbs. Using an operant delay-of-reward task (20 min daily sessions; timeout 25 sec, mice had a choice between either an immediate small amount of food (SS, or a larger amount of food after a delay (LL, which increased progressively across sessions (from 0 to 150 sec. Results DAT-i mice exhibited spontaneous hyperactivity (2 h-longer wake-up peak; a wake-up attempt during rest. Two sub-populations differing in behavioural flexibility were identified in the VEH control group: they showed either a clear-cut decision to select LL or clear-cut shifting towards SS, as expected. Compared to VEH controls, choice-behaviour profile of DAT-i mice was markedly disturbed, together with long-lasting alterations of the striatal monoamines. Enhanced levels of DA metabolite HVA in DAT-i mice came along with slower acquisition of basal preferences and with impaired shifting; elevation also in DOPAC levels was associated with incapacity to change a rigid selection strategy. This scarce flexibility of performance is indicative of a poor adaptation to task contingencies. Conclusions Hyperactivity and reduced cognitive flexibility are patterns of behaviour consistent with enduring functional impairment of striatal regions. It is yet unclear how anti-DAT antibodies could enter or otherwise affect these brain areas, and which alterations in DAT activity exactly occurred after immunization

  9. Spontaneous Synaptic Activation of Muscarinic Receptors by Striatal Cholinergic Neuron Firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaligas, Aphroditi A; Ford, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Cholinergic interneurons (CHIs) play a major role in motor and learning functions of the striatum. As acetylcholine does not directly evoke postsynaptic events at most striatal synapses, it remains unclear how postsynaptic cholinergic receptors encode the firing patterns of CHIs in the striatum. To examine the dynamics of acetylcholine release, we used optogenetics and paired recordings from CHIs and medium spiny neurons (MSNs) virally overexpressing G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels. Due to the efficient coupling between endogenous muscarinic receptors and GIRK channels, we found that firing of individual CHIs resulted in monosynaptic spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in MSNs. Paired CHI-MSN recordings revealed that the high probability of acetylcholine release at these synapses allowed muscarinic receptors to faithfully encode physiological activity patterns from individual CHIs without failure. These results indicate that muscarinic receptors in striatal output neurons reliably decode CHI firing. PMID:27373830

  10. Striatal Reward Activity and Antipsychotic-Associated Weight Change in Patients With Schizophrenia Undergoing Initial Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Wulff, Sanne;

    2016-01-01

    associated with an increase in mean (SD) reward activity in the same region during treatment (0.28 [0.74]; F37,1 = 4.48; P = .04). Conclusions and Relevance: Activity in striatal regions of the reward system appears to be associated with the individual variability in the predisposition for antipsychotic......-associated weight gain. Moreover, pharmacologic modulation of the reward system may play a role in antipsychotic-associated weight gain.......Importance: Weight gain is a common and serious adverse effect of antipsychotic treatment. A variable individual predisposition to development of metabolic disturbances calls for predictive biological markers. Objectives: To investigate whether attenuated striatal activity during reward...

  11. Hemichorea with unilateral MRI striatal hyperintensity in a Saudi patient with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W; Assaedi, Ekhlas S

    2016-01-01

    Hemichorea is a disorder characterized by abnormal, continuous, nonrhythmic, jerky, and distal movement involving one side of the body. It may result from cerebrovascular insult to basal ganglia, or from other causes including neoplasm, infection, and non-ketotic hyperglycemia. We report the clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data with treatment response of a Saudi woman who has diabetes with left side hemichorea, involving the face, and upper and lower extremities, with unilateral right striatal hyperintense signal changes in T1 weighted MRI, and a hyperglycemic state of longstanding uncontrolled diabetes. Literature review suggested a syndrome with a triad of symptoms: non-ketotic hyperglycemia, hemichorea, and T1 MRI striatal hyperintensities. As the number of internationally reported cases is still modest, reporting more patients will highlight aspects pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. We present a patient who had a sustained therapeutic result from haloperidol and clonazepam. PMID:26818169

  12. Clinical deficits in Huntington disease correlate with reduced striatal uptake on iodine-123 epidepride single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington disease (HD) is characterized by severe abnormalities in neurotransmitter concentrations and neuroreceptor density. Quantitative changes in dopamine D2 receptors occur in the early stages of HD and may be detectable with functional neuroimaging techniques. The aim of this study was to determine whether dopamine D2 receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) identifies preclinical abnormalities in HD. The study population comprised 32 subjects from families affected by HD: 11 were genetically normal while 21 were genetically positive for HD (seven asymptomatic, six early, three moderate and five advanced findings). Disease severity was determined using a standardized quantitative neurological examination (QNE) and the mini-mental status examination (MMSE). Subjects underwent brain SPET imaging 120 min following intravenous injection of iodine-123 epidepride. Ratios of target (striatal) to nontarget (occipital or whole-brain) uptake were calculated from the reconstructed image data. Striatum to occiput and striatum to whole-brain count ratios correlated negatively with disease stage (P=0.002 and P=0.0002) and QNE (P2 receptor density can be detected with 123I epidepride at moderate or advanced stages of HD. In contrast to other reports, we could not identify abnormalities in clinically unaffected or early stages of HD. (orig.)

  13. Clinical deficits in Huntington disease correlate with reduced striatal uptake on iodine-123 epidepride single-photon emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, W D; Greenberg, C R; Abrams, D N; Hobson, D

    1999-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is characterized by severe abnormalities in neurotransmitter concentrations and neuroreceptor density. Quantitative changes in dopamine D(2) receptors occur in the early stages of HD and may be detectable with functional neuroimaging techniques. The aim of this study was to determine whether dopamine D(2) receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) identifies preclinical abnormalities in HD. The study population comprised 32 subjects from families affected by HD: 11 were genetically normal while 21 were genetically positive for HD (seven asymptomatic, six early, three moderate and five advanced findings). Disease severity was determined using a standardized quantitative neurological examination (QNE) and the mini-mental status examination (MMSE). Subjects underwent brain SPET imaging 120 min following intravenous injection of iodine-123 epidepride. Ratios of target (striatal) to nontarget (occipital or whole-brain) uptake were calculated from the reconstructed image data. Striatum to occiput and striatum to whole-brain count ratios correlated negatively with disease stage (P=0.002 and P=0.0002) and QNE (Pepidepride at moderate or advanced stages of HD. In contrast to other reports, we could not identify abnormalities in clinically unaffected or early stages of HD. PMID:10552088

  14. Keep focussing: striatal dopamine multiple functions resolved in a single mechanism tested in a simulated humanoid robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo G. Fiore

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of striatal dopamine (DA on behavior have been widely investigated over the past decades, with ``phasic'' burst firings considered as the key expression of a reward prediction error responsible for reinforcement learning. Less well studied is tonic DA, where putative functions include the idea that it is a regulator of vigor, incentive salience, disposition to exert an effort and a modulator of approach strategies. We present a preliminary model combining tonic and phasic DA to show how different outflows triggered by either intrinsically or extrinsically motivating stimuli dynamically affect the basal ganglia by impacting on a selection process that this system performs on the inputs provided by the targeted cortex.The model, which has been tested on the simulated humanoid robot iCub in the interaction with a mechatronic board, shows the putative functions ascribed to DA emerging from the combination of a standard computational mechanism coupled to a differential sensitivity to the presence of DA across the striatum.

  15. MeCP2-mediated alterations of striatal features accompany psychomotor deficits in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Fang-Chi; Su, San-Hua; Carlson, Gregory C; Liao, Wenlin

    2015-01-01

    Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Affected individuals develop motor deficits including stereotypic hand movements, impaired motor learning and difficulties with movement. To understand the neural mechanisms of motor deficits in RTT, we characterized the molecular and cellular phenotypes in the striatum, the major input nucleus of the basal ganglia that controls psychomotor function, in mice carrying a null allele of Mecp2. These mice showed significant hypoactivity associated with impaired motor coordination and motor skill learning. We found that dopamine content was significantly reduced in the striatum of Mecp2 null mice. Reduced dopamine was accompanied by down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase and up-regulation of dopamine D2 receptors, particularly in the rostral striatum. We also observed that loss of MeCP2 induced compartment-specific alterations in the striatum, including reduced expression of μ-opioid receptors in the striosomes and increased number of calbindin-positive neurons in the striatal matrix. The total number of parvalbumin-positive interneurons and their dendritic arborization were also significantly increased in the striatum of Mecp2 null mice. Together, our findings support that MeCP2 regulates a unique set of genes critical for modulating motor output of the striatum, and that aberrant structure and function of the striatum due to MeCP2 deficiency may underlie the motor deficits in RTT. PMID:24218106

  16. Abnormal Striatal BOLD Responses to Reward Anticipation and Reward Delivery in ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, Emi; Bado, Patricia; Tripp, Gail; Mattos, Paulo; Wickens, Jeff R; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Alsop, Brent; Ferreira, Fernanda Meireles; Lima, Debora; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Moll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Altered reward processing has been proposed to contribute to the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The neurobiological mechanism underlying this alteration remains unclear. We hypothesize that the transfer of dopamine release from reward to reward-predicting cues, as normally observed in animal studies, may be deficient in ADHD. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate striatal responses to reward-predicting cues and reward delivery in a ...

  17. Differences in striatal dopamine transporter density between tremor dominant and non-tremor Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can manifest with a tremor-dominant or a non-tremor (akinetic-rigid) phenotype. Although the tremor-dominant subtype may show a better prognosis, there is limited information on the phenotypic differences regarding the level of striatal dopamine transmission. The present study investigated striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding characteristics in a large sample of patients with and without tremor. [123I]FP-CIT SPECT scans of 231 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PD and abnormal FP-CIT binding (157 with tremor, 74 without tremor) and 230 control patients with normal FP-CIT binding (148 with tremor, 82 without tremor) were analysed using an automated region-of-interest analysis of the scans (BRASS). Specific striatal binding ratios were compared between phenotypes and groups using age, sex, and symptom duration, predominant side of symptoms, dopaminergic medications and scanner as covariates. Patients with PD had 28.1 - 65.0 % lower binding in all striatal regions compared to controls (p < 0.001). The mean FP-CIT caudate nucleus uptake and the left caudate nucleus uptake were higher in PD patients with tremor than in PD patients without tremor (mean 9.0 % higher, left 10.5 % higher; p < 0.05), whereas there were no differences between tremor and non-tremor control patients. No significant effects of tremor on DAT binding were observed in the anterior or posterior putamen. The motor phenotype is associated with the extent of caudate dopamine terminal loss in PD, as dopamine function is relatively more preserved in tremor patients. Symptom type is related to caudate dopamine function only in association with Parkinsonian dopaminergic degeneration, not in intact dopamine systems in patients with non-PD tremor. (orig.)

  18. Low or High Cocaine Responding Rats Differ in Striatal Extracellular Dopamine Levels and Dopamine Transporter Number

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Anna M.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2009-01-01

    Both humans and animals exhibit marked individual differences in cocaine responsiveness. By using the median split of cocaine-induced locomotor activity, we have classified outbred male Sprague-Dawley rats as either low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively). LCR/HCR classification predicts differences in cocaine inhibition of striatal dopamine (DA) transporters (DATs), cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, cocaine-conditioned place preference, and motivation to self-admin...

  19. Concomitant Appearance of Pisa Syndrome and Striatal Hand in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pisa syndrome is (PS usually seen in patients receiving antipsychotic drugs and characterised by lateral flexion of trunk and axial dystonia. It is believed that antipsychotic drugs lead to dopamine blockage causing PS. We describe a Parkinson’s disease patient who was doing well with levodopa/carbidopa for 3 years and developed lateral flexion of trunk. His abnormal posture used to completely improve upon lying down position. He also had striatal hand deformity suggestive of focal dystonia.

  20. Ketamine Suppresses the Ventral Striatal Response to Reward Anticipation: A Cross-Species Translational Neuroimaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Jennifer; Grimm, Oliver; Schwarz, Adam J; Schweiger, Janina; Haller, Leila; Risterucci, Celine; Böhringer, Andreas; Zang, Zhenxiang; Tost, Heike; Gilmour, Gary; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Convergent evidence implicates regional neural responses to reward anticipation in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, where blunted ventral striatal responses to positive reward are observed in patients and at-risk populations. In vivo oxygen amperometry measurements in the ventral striatum in awake, behaving rats reveal reward-related tissue oxygen changes that closely parallel blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes observed in human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), suggesting that a cross-species approach targeting this mechanism might be feasible in psychopharmacology. The present study explored modulatory effects of acute, subanaesthetic doses of ketamine-a pharmacological model widely used in psychopharmacological research, both preclinically and clinically-on ventral striatum activity during performance of a reward anticipation task in both species, using fMRI in humans and in vivo oxygen amperometry in rats. In a region-of-interest analysis conducted following a cross-over placebo and ketamine study in human subjects, an attenuated ventral striatal response during reward anticipation was observed following ketamine relative to placebo during performance of a monetary incentive delay task. In rats, a comparable attenuation of ventral striatal signal was found after ketamine challenge, relative to vehicle, in response to a conditioned stimulus that predicted delivery of reward. This study provides the first data in both species demonstrating an attenuating effect of acute ketamine on reward-related ventral striatal (O2) and fMRI signals. These findings may help elucidate a deeper mechanistic understanding of the potential role of ketamine as a model for psychosis, show that cross-species pharmacological experiments targeting reward signaling are feasible, and suggest this phenotype as a promising translational biomarker for the development of novel compounds, assessment of disease status, and

  1. Sweet Dopamine: Sucrose Preferences Relate Differentially to Striatal D2 Receptor Binding and Age in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, Marta Y; Eisenstein, Sarah A; Bischoff, Allison N; Klein, Samuel; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S; Black, Kevin J; Hershey, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    Alterations in dopaminergic circuitry play a critical role in food reward and may contribute to susceptibility to obesity. Ingestion of sweets releases dopamine in striatum, and both sweet preferences and striatal D2 receptors (D2R) decline with age and may be altered in obesity. Understanding the relationships between these variables and the impact of obesity on these relationships may reveal insight into the neurobiological basis of sweet preferences. We evaluated sucrose preferences, perception of sweetness intensity, and striatal D2R binding potential (D2R BPND) using positron emission tomography with a D2R-selective radioligand insensitive to endogenous dopamine, (N-[(11)C] methyl)benperidol, in 20 subjects without obesity (BMI 22.5 ± 2.4 kg/m(2); age 28.3 ± 5.4 years) and 24 subjects with obesity (BMI 40.3 ± 5.0 kg/m(2); age 31.2 ± 6.3 years). The groups had similar sucrose preferences, sweetness intensity perception, striatal D2R BPND, and age-related D2R BPND declines. However, both striatal D2R BPND and age correlated with sucrose preferences in subjects without obesity, explaining 52% of their variance in sucrose preference. In contrast, these associations were absent in the obese group. In conclusion, the age-related decline in D2R was not linked to the age-related decline in sweetness preferences, suggesting that other, as-yet-unknown mechanisms play a role and that these mechanisms are disrupted in obesity. PMID:27307220

  2. Ventral striatal dopamine synthesis capacity predicts financial extravagance in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew David Lawrence

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Impulse control disorders (ICDs, including disordered gambling, can occur in a significant number of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD receiving dopaminergic therapy. The neurobiology underlying susceptibility to such problems is unclear, but risk likely results from an interaction between dopaminergic medication and a pre-existing trait vulnerability. Impulse control and addictive disorders form part of a broader psychopathological spectrum of disorders, which share a common underlying genetic vulnerability, referred to as externalizing. The broad externalizing risk factor is a continuously varying trait reflecting vulnerability to various impulse control problems, manifested at the overt level by disinhibitory symptoms and at the personality level by antecedent traits such as impulsivity and novelty/sensation seeking. Trait ‘disinhibition’ is thus a core endophenotype of ICDs, and a key target for neurobiological investigation. The ventral striatal dopamine system has been hypothesized to underlie individual variation in behavioural disinhibition. Here, we examined whether individual differences in ventral striatal dopamine synthesis capacity predicted individual variation in disinhibitory temperament traits in individuals with PD. Eighteen early-stage male PD patients underwent 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA positron emission tomography (PET scanning to measure striatal dopamine synthesis capacity, and completed a measure of disinhibited personality. Consistent with our predictions, we found that levels of ventral, but not dorsal, striatal dopamine synthesis capacity predicted disinhibited personality, particularly a propensity for financial extravagance. Our results are consistent with recent preclinical models of vulnerability to behavioural disinhibition and addiction proneness, and provide novel insights into the neurobiology of potential vulnerability to impulse control problems in PD and other disorders.

  3. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Protects Striatal Neurons against Excitotoxicity by Enhancing Glial Glutamate Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Beurrier, Corinne; Faideau, Mathilde; Bennouar, Khaled-Ezaheir; Escartin, Carole; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Bonvento, Gilles; Gubellini, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs) could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA) was significantly reduced (by ∼75%) in CNTF-treated anima...

  4. Extrasynaptic neurotransmission in the modulation of brain function. Focus on the striatal neuronal-glial networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal

  5. Linking cocaine to endoplasmic reticulum in striatal neurons: role of glutamate receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Eun Sang; Ahn, Sung Min; Yang, Ju Hwan; Go, Bok Soon; WANG, John Q.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) controls protein folding. Accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER triggers an ER stress response to accelerate normal protein folding or if failed to cause apoptosis. The ER stress response is a conserved cellular response in mammalian cells and is sensitive to various physiological or pathophysiological stimuli. Recent studies unravel that this response in striatal neurons is subject to the tight modulation by psychostimulants. Cocaine and amp...

  6. DISC1 and striatal volume: a potential risk phenotype for mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mallar eChakravarty

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 was originally discovered in a large Scottish family with abnormally high rates of severe mental illness, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression. An accumulating body of evidence from genetic, postmortem, and animal data supports a role for DISC1 in different forms of mental illness. DISC1 may play an important role in determining structure and function of several brain regions. One brain region of particular importance for several mental disorders is the striatum, and DISC1 mutant mice have demonstrated an increase in dopamine (D2 receptors in this structure. However, association between DISC1 functional polymorphisms and striatal structure have not been examined in humans to our knowledge. We, therefore hypothesized that there would be a relationship between human striatal volume and DISC1 genotype, specifically in the Leu607Phe (rs6675281 and Ser704Cys (rs821618 single nucleotide polymorphisms. We tested our hypothesis by automatically identifying the striatum in fifty-four healthy volunteers recruited for this study. We also performed an exploratory analysis of cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and structure volume. Our results demonstrate that Phe allele carriers have larger striatal volume bilaterally (left striatum: p=0.017; right striatum: p=0.016. From the exploratory analyses we found that Phe carriers also had larger right hemisphere volumes and right occipital lobe surface area (p=0.014 compared to LeuLeu homozygotes (p=0.0074. However, these exploratory findings do not survive a conservative correction for multiple comparisons. Our findings demonstrate that a functional DISC1 variant influences striatal volumes. Taken together with animal data that this gene influences D2 receptor levels in striatum, a key risk pathway for mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may be conferred via DISC1’s effects on the striatum .

  7. Increased Impulsivity Retards the Transition to Dorsolateral Striatal Dopamine Control of Cocaine Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Jennifer E.; Dilleen, Ruth; Pelloux, Yann; Economidou, Daina; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of maladaptive drug-seeking habits occurs in conjunction with a ventral-to-dorsal striatal shift in dopaminergic control over behavior. Although these habits readily develop as drug use continues, high impulsivity predicts loss of control over drug seeking and taking. However, whether impulsivity facilitates the transition to dorsolateral striatum (DLS) dopamine-dependent cocaine-seeking habits or whether impulsivity and cocaine-induced intrastriatal shifts are additive...

  8. Cortical–striatal gene expression in neonatal hippocampal lesion (NVHL)-amplified cocaine sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, R. A.; McClintick, J. N.; Sentir, A. M.; Berg, S. A.; Runyan, M.; Choi, K. H.; Edenberg, H J

    2013-01-01

    Cortical–striatal circuit dysfunction in mental illness may enhance addiction vulnerability. Neonatal ventral hippocampal lesions (NVHL) model this dual diagnosis causality by producing a schizophrenia syndrome with enhanced responsiveness to addictive drugs. Rat genome-wide microarrays containing >24 000 probesets were used to examine separate and co-occurring effects of NVHLs and cocaine sensitization (15 mg/kg/day × 5 days) on gene expression within medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), nucleus...

  9. Alterations in striatal synaptic transmission are consistent across genetic mouse models of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  10. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Wetsel, William C.; Caron, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. While it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, an understanding of the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum is not well understood. Here we use knockout (KO) mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal ERK1/2 signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of canna...

  11. Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity after activation of subcortical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jan M; Redgrave, Peter; Reynolds, John N J

    2010-01-01

    Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP) were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicuculline (BIC) was ejected into the superior colliculus (SC) to disinhibit visual pathways to the dopamine cells and striatum. Repetitive cortical stimulation (∼60; 0.2 Hz) was then paired with postsynaptic spike discharge induced by an intracellular current pulse, with each pairing followed 250 ms later by a light flash to the contralateral eye (n = 13). Changes in PSPs, measured as the maximal slope normalized to 5-min pre, ranged from potentiation (∼120%) to depression (∼80%). The determining factor was the relative timing between PSP components and spike: PSP components coinciding or closely following the spike tended towards potentiation, whereas PSP components preceding the spike were depressed. Importantly, STDP was only seen in experiments with successful BIC-mediated disinhibition (n = 10). Cortico-striatal high-frequency stimulation (50 pulses at 100 Hz) followed 100 ms later by a light flash did not induce more robust synaptic plasticity (n = 9). However, an elevated post-light spike rate correlated with depression across plasticity protocols (R(2) = 0.55, p = 0.009, n = 11 active neurons). These results confirm that the direction of cortico-striatal plasticity is determined by the timing of pre- and postsynaptic activity and that synaptic modification is dependent on the activation of additional subcortical inputs. PMID:21423509

  12. Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity after activation of subcortical pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan M Schulz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cortico-striatal spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP is modulated by dopamine in vitro. The present study investigated STDP in vivo using alternative procedures for modulating dopaminergic inputs. Postsynaptic potentials (PSP were evoked in intracellularly recorded spiny neurons by electrical stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. PSPs often consisted of up to three distinct components, likely representing distinct cortico-striatal pathways. After baseline recording, bicuculline (BIC was ejected into the superior colliculus (SC to disinhibit visual pathways to the dopamine cells and striatum. Repetitive cortical stimulation (~60; 0.2 Hz was then paired with postsynaptic spike discharge induced by an intracellular current pulse, with each pairing followed 250 ms later by a light flash to the contralateral eye (n=13. Changes in PSPs, measured as the maximal slope normalised to 5 min pre, ranged from potentiation (~120% to depression (~80%. The determining factor was the relative timing between PSP components and spike: PSP components coinciding or closely following the spike tended towards potentiation, whereas PSP components preceding the spike were depressed. Importantly, STDP was only seen in experiments with successful BIC-mediated disinhibition (n=10. Cortico-striatal high-frequency stimulation (50 pulses at 100 Hz followed 100 ms later by a light flash did not induce more robust synaptic plasticity (n=9. However, an elevated post-light spike rate correlated with depression across plasticity protocols (R2=0.55, p=0.009, n=11 active neurons. These results confirm that the direction of cortico-striatal plasticity is determined by the timing of pre- and postsynaptic activity and that synaptic modification is dependent on the activation of additional subcortical inputs.

  13. Large-Scale Brain Systems in ADHD: Beyond the Prefrontal-Striatal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Castellanos, F. Xavier; Proal, Erika

    2011-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has long been thought to reflect dysfunction of prefrontal-striatal circuitry, with involvement of other circuits largely ignored. Recent advances in systems neuroscience-based approaches to brain dysfunction enable the development of models of ADHD pathophysiology that encompass a number of different large-scale “resting state” networks. Here we review progress in delineating large-scale neural systems and illustrate their relevance to ADHD. We...

  14. Striatal connectivity changes following gambling wins and near-misses: Associations with gambling severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth J. van Holst

    2014-01-01

    These findings corroborate the ‘non-categorical’ nature of reward processing in gambling: near-misses and full-misses are objectively identical outcomes that are processed differentially. Ventral striatal connectivity with the insula correlated positively with gambling severity in the illusion of control contrast, which could be a risk factor for the cognitive distortions and loss-chasing that are characteristic of problem gambling.

  15. STRIATAL-ENRICHED PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE (STEP) KNOCKOUT MICE HAVE ENHANCED HIPPOCAMPAL MEMORY

    OpenAIRE

    Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Moura, Paula J.; Picciotto, Marina R.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    STEP is a brain-specific phosphatase that opposes synaptic strengthening by the regulation of key synaptic signaling proteins. Previous studies suggest a possible role for STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) in learning and memory. To demonstrate the functional importance of STEP in learning and memory, we generated STEP knockout (KO) mice and examined the effect of deletion of STEP on behavioral performance, as well as the phosphorylation and expression of its substrates. H...

  16. Cortical ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism protects against methamphetamine-induced striatal neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Noah B.; Duncker, Patrick C.; Marshall, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Binge administration of the psychostimulant drug, methamphetamine (mAMPH), produces long-lasting structural and functional abnormalities in the striatum. mAMPH binges produce non-exocytotic release of dopamine (DA), and mAMPH-induced activation of excitatory afferent inputs to cortex and striatum is evidenced by elevated extracellular glutamate (GLU) in both regions. The mAMPH-induced increases in DA and GLU neurotransmission are thought to combine to injure striatal DA nerve terminals of mAM...

  17. Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Control Motor Behavior and Basal Ganglia Function in Experimental Parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Maurice; Martine Liberge; Florence Jaouen; Samira Ztaou; Marwa Hanini; Jeremy Camon; Karl Deisseroth; Marianne Amalric; Lydia Kerkerian-Le Goff; Corinne Beurrier

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence showing that anticholinergic drugs are of clinical relevance in Parkinson’s disease (PD), the causal role of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) in PD pathophysiology remains elusive. Here, we show that optogenetic inhibition of CINs alleviates motor deficits in PD mouse models, providing direct demonstration for their implication in parkinsonian motor dysfunctions. As neural correlates, CIN inhibition in parkinsonian mice differentially impacts the excitability of stria...

  18. Age related changes in striatal resting state functional connectivity in autism

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    Aarthi ePadmanabhan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the nature of developmental change is critical to understanding the mechanisms that are impaired in complex neurodevelopment disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD and, pragmatically, may allow us to pinpoint periods of plasticity when interventions are particularly useful. Although aberrant brain development has long been theorized as a characteristic feature of ASD, the neural substrates have been difficult to characterize, in part due to a lack of developmental data and to performance confounds. To address these issues, we examined the development of intrinsic functional connectivity with resting state fMRI from late childhood to early adulthood (8-36 years, using a seed based functional connectivity method with the striatum. Overall, we found that both groups show decreases in cortico-striatal circuits over age. However, when controlling for age, ASD participants showed increased connectivity with parietal cortex and decreased connectivity with prefrontal cortex relative to TD participants. In addition, ASD participants showed aberrant age-related changes in connectivity with anterior aspects of cerebellum, and posterior temporal regions (e.g. fusiform gyrus, inferior and superior temporal gyri. In sum, we found prominent differences in the development of striatal connectivity in ASD, most notably, atypical development of connectivity in striatal networks that may underlie cognitive and social reward processing. Our findings highlight the need to identify the biological mechanisms of perturbations in brain reorganization over development, which also may help clarify discrepant findings in the literature.

  19. Increased coherence among striatal regions in the theta range during attentive wakefulness

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    G. Lepski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The striatum, the largest component of the basal ganglia, is usually subdivided into associative, motor and limbic components. However, the electrophysiological interactions between these three subsystems during behavior remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that the striatum might be particularly active during exploratory behavior, which is presumably associated with increased attention. We investigated the modulation of local field potentials (LFPs in the striatum during attentive wakefulness in freely moving rats. To this end, we implanted microelectrodes into different parts of the striatum of Wistar rats, as well as into the motor, associative and limbic cortices. We then used electromyograms to identify motor activity and analyzed the instantaneous frequency, power spectra and partial directed coherence during exploratory behavior. We observed fine modulation in the theta frequency range of striatal LFPs in 92.5 ± 2.5% of all epochs of exploratory behavior. Concomitantly, the theta power spectrum increased in all striatal channels (P 0.7 between the primary motor cortex and the rostral part of the caudatoputamen nucleus, as well as among all striatal channels (P < 0.001. Conclusively, we observed a pattern of strong theta band activation in the entire striatum during attentive wakefulness, as well as a strong coherence between the motor cortex and the entire striatum. We suggest that this activation reflects the integration of motor, cognitive and limbic systems during attentive wakefulness.

  20. Prefrontal cortical thinning in HIV infection is associated with impaired striatal functioning.

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    du Plessis, Stéfan; Vink, Matthijs; Joska, John A; Koutsilieri, Eleni; Bagadia, Asif; Stein, Dan J; Emsley, Robin

    2016-06-01

    While cortical thinning has been associated with HIV infection, it is unclear whether this reflects a direct effect of the virus, whether it is related to disruption of subcortical function or whether it is better explained by epiphenomena, such as drug abuse or comorbid medical conditions. The present study investigated the relationship between cortical thickness and subcortical function in HIV+ patients. Specifically, we examined the relationship between prefrontal cortical thickness and striatal function. Twenty-three largely treatment naïve, non-substance abusing HIV+ participants and 19 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and educational status were included. Cortical morphometry was performed using FreeSurfer software analysis. Striatal function was measured during an fMRI stop-signal anticipation task known to engage the striatum. Any cortical regions showing significant thinning were entered as dependent variables into a single linear regression model which included subcortical function, age, CD4 count, and a measure of global cognitive performance as independent predictors. The only cortical region that was significantly reduced after correction for multiple comparisons was the right superior frontal gyrus. Striatal activity was found to independently predict superior frontal gyral cortical thickness. While cortical thinning in HIV infection is likely multifactorial, viral induced subcortical dysfunction appears to play a role. PMID:27173383

  1. Abstinence duration modulates striatal functioning during monetary reward processing in cocaine patients.

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    Bustamante, Juan-Carlos; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Costumero, Víctor; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Llopis, Juan-José; Ávila, César

    2014-09-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical studies in cocaine addiction highlight alterations in the striatal dopaminergic reward system that subserve maintenance of cocaine use. Using an instrumental conditioning paradigm with monetary reinforcement, we studied striatal functional alterations in long-term abstinent cocaine-dependent patients and striatal functioning as a function of abstinence and treatment duration. Eighteen patients and 20 controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a Monetary Incentive Delay task. Region of interest analyses based on masks of the dorsal and ventral striatum were conducted to test between-group differences and the functional effects in the cocaine group of time (in months) with no more than two lapses from the first time patients visited the clinical service to seek treatment at the scanning time (duration of treatment), and the functional effects of the number of months with no lapses or relapses at the scanning session time (length of abstinence). We applied a voxel-wise and a cluster-wise FWE-corrected level (pFWE) at a threshold of P cocaine addiction, which can be modulated by treatment success. PMID:23445167

  2. Parallel striatal and hippocampal systems for landmarks and boundaries in spatial memory.

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    Doeller, Christian F; King, John A; Burgess, Neil

    2008-04-15

    How the memory systems centered on the hippocampus and dorsal striatum interact to support behavior remains controversial. We used functional MRI while people learned the locations of objects by collecting and replacing them over multiple trials within a virtual environment comprising a landmark, a circular boundary, and distant cues for orientation. The relative location of landmark and boundary was occasionally changed, with specific objects paired with one or other cue, allowing dissociation of learning and performance relative to either cue. Right posterior hippocampal activation reflected learning and remembering of boundary-related locations, whereas right dorsal striatal activation reflected learning and remembering of landmark-related locations. Within the right hippocampus, anterior processing of environmental change (spatial novelty) was dissociated from posterior processing of location. Behavioral studies show that landmark-related learning obeys associative reinforcement, whereas boundary-related learning is incidental [Doeller CF, Burgess N (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:5909-5914]. The distinct incidental hippocampal processing of boundaries is suggestive of a "geometric module" or "cognitive map" and may explain the hippocampal support of incidental/observational learning in "declarative" or "episodic" memory versus the striatal support of trial-and-error learning in "procedural" memory. Finally, the hippocampal and striatal systems appear to combine "bottom-up," simply influencing behavior proportional to their activations, without direct interaction, with "top-down" ventromedial prefrontal involvement when both are similarly active. PMID:18408152

  3. REM sleep deprivation promotes a dopaminergic influence in the striatal MT2 anxiolytic-like effects.

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    Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Lais S; Aurich, Mariana F; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anxiolytic-like effects of striatal MT2 activation, and its counteraction induced by the selective blockade of this receptor. Furthermore, we analyzed this condition under the paradigm of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) and the animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by rotenone. Male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12 μg/μL), and 7 days later were subjected to 24 h of REMSD. Afterwards the rats underwent striatal micro-infusions of selective melatonin MT2 receptor agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10 μg/μL) or selective melatonin MT2 receptor antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5 μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, the animals were tested in the open-field (OP) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Results indicated that the activation of MT2 receptors produced anxiolytic-like effects. In opposite, the MT2 blockade did not show an anxiogenic-like effect. Besides, REMSD induced anxiolytic-like effects similar to 8-M-PDOT. MT2 activation generated a prevalent locomotor increase compared to MT2 blockade in the context of REMSD. Together, these results suggest a striatal MT2 modulation associated to the REMSD-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity causing a possible dopaminergic influence in the MT2 anxiolytic-like effects in the intranigral rotenone model of PD. PMID:27226821

  4. Postural & striatal deformities in Parkinson`s disease: Are these rare?

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    Sanjay Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson`s disease (PD is the most common neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia. Diagnosis is clinical in the majority of the patients. Patients with PD may have stooped posture but some of them develop different types of postural and striatal deformities. Usually these deformities are more common in atypical parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy and multisystem atrophy. But in many studies it has been highlighted that these may also be present in approximately one third of PD patients leading to severe disability. These include antecollis or dropped head, camptocormia, p0 isa syndrome, scoliosis, striatal hands and striatal toes. The pathogenesis of these deformities is a complex combination of central and peripheral influences such as rigidity, dystonia and degenerative skeletal changes. Duration of parkinsonism symptoms is an important risk factor and in majority of the patients these deformities are seen in advanced statge of the disease. The patients with such symptoms may initially respond to dopaminergic medications but if not intervened they may become fixed and difficult to treat. Pain and restriction of movement are most common clinical manifestations and these may mimick symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Early diagnosis is important as the patients may respond to adjustment in dopaminergic medications. Recent advances such as deep brain stimulation (DBS and ultrasound guided botulinum toxin injection are helpful in management of these deformities in patients with PD.

  5. Reduced amygdala and ventral striatal activity to happy faces in PTSD is associated with emotional numbing.

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    Kim L Felmingham

    Full Text Available There has been a growing recognition of the importance of reward processing in PTSD, yet little is known of the underlying neural networks. This study tested the predictions that (1 individuals with PTSD would display reduced responses to happy facial expressions in ventral striatal reward networks, and (2 that this reduction would be associated with emotional numbing symptoms. 23 treatment-seeking patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder were recruited from the treatment clinic at the Centre for Traumatic Stress Studies, Westmead Hospital, and 20 trauma-exposed controls were recruited from a community sample. We examined functional magnetic resonance imaging responses during the presentation of happy and neutral facial expressions in a passive viewing task. PTSD participants rated happy facial expression as less intense than trauma-exposed controls. Relative to controls, PTSD participants revealed lower activation to happy (-neutral faces in ventral striatum and and a trend for reduced activation in left amygdala. A significant negative correlation was found between emotional numbing symptoms in PTSD and right ventral striatal regions after controlling for depression, anxiety and PTSD severity. This study provides initial evidence that individuals with PTSD have lower reactivity to happy facial expressions, and that lower activation in ventral striatal-limbic reward networks may be associated with symptoms of emotional numbing.

  6. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in treatment resistant depression.

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    Bart P de Kwaasteniet

    Full Text Available Several studies demonstrated improvement of depressive symptoms in treatment resistant depression (TRD after administering dopamine agonists which suggest abnormal dopaminergic neurotransmission in TRD. However, the role of dopaminergic signaling through measurement of striatal dopamine D(2/3 receptor (D2/3R binding has not been investigated in TRD subjects. We used [(123I]IBZM single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT to investigate striatal D2/3R binding in TRD. We included 6 severe TRD patients, 11 severe TRD patients on antipsychotics (TRD AP group and 15 matched healthy controls. Results showed no significant difference (p = 0.75 in striatal D2/3R availability was found between TRD patients and healthy controls. In the TRD AP group D2/3R availability was significantly decreased (reflecting occupancy of D2/3Rs by antipsychotics relative to TRD patients and healthy controls (p<0.001 but there were no differences in clinical symptoms between TRD AP and TRD patients. This preliminary study therefore does not provide evidence for large differences in D2/3 availability in severe TRD patients and suggests this TRD subgroup is not characterized by altered dopaminergic transmission. Atypical antipsychotics appear to have no clinical benefit in severe TRD patients who remain depressed, despite their strong occupancy of D2/3Rs.

  7. Striatal vessels receive phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase-rich innervation from midbrain dopaminergic neurons

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    Sonia Garcia-Hernandez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is assumed that besides its roles in neuronal processing, dopamine (DA is also involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow. However, studies on the hemodynamic actions of DA have been mainly focused on the cerebral cortex, but the possibility that vessels in deeper brain structures receive dopaminergic axons and the origin of these axons have not been investigated. Bearing in mind the evidence of changes in the blood flow of basal ganglia in Parkinson’s disease, and the pivotal role of the dopaminergic mesostriatal pathway in the pathophysiology of this disease, here we studied whether striatal vessels receive inputs from midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The injection of an anterograde neuronal tracer in combination with immunohistochemistry for dopaminergic, vascular and astroglial markers, and dopaminergic lesions, revealed that midbrain dopaminergic axons are in close apposition to striatal vessels and perivascular astrocytes. These axons form dense perivascular plexuses restricted to striatal regions in rats and monkeys. Interestingly, they are intensely immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH phosphorylated at Ser19 and Ser40 residues. The presence of phosphorylated TH in vessel terminals indicates they are probably the main source of basal TH activity in the striatum, and that after activation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, DA release onto vessels precedes that onto neurons. Furthermore, the relative weight of this “vascular component” within the mesostriatal pathway suggests that it plays a relevant role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease.

  8. Reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

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    Vulink, Nienke C; Planting, Robin S; Figee, Martijn; Booij, Jan; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-02-01

    Though the dopaminergic system is implicated in Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders (OCRD), the dopaminergic system has never been investigated in-vivo in Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). In line with consistent findings of reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), we hypothesized that the dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in the striatum will be lower in patients with BDD in comparison to healthy subjects. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor Binding Potential (BPND) was examined in 12 drug-free BDD patients and 12 control subjects pairwise matched by age, sex, and handedness using [(123)I]iodobenzamide Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT; bolus/constant infusion technique). Regions of interest were the caudate nucleus and the putamen. BPND was calculated as the ratio of specific striatal to binding in the occipital cortex (representing nonspecific binding). Compared to controls, dopamine D2/3 receptor BPND was significantly lower in BDD, both in the putamen (p=0.017) and caudate nucleus (p=0.022). This study provides the first evidence of a disturbed dopaminergic system in BDD patients. Although previously BDD was classified as a separate disorder (somatoform disorder), our findings give pathophysiological support for the recent reclassification of BDD to the OCRD in DSM-5. PMID:26711686

  9. Pathophysiological signatures of functional connectomics in parkinsonian and dyskinetic striatal microcircuits.

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    Pérez-Ortega, Jesús; Duhne, Mariana; Lara-González, Esther; Plata, Victor; Gasca, Deisy; Galarraga, Elvira; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Bargas, José

    2016-07-01

    A challenge in neuroscience is to integrate the cellular and system levels. For instance, we still do not know how a few dozen neurons organize their activity and relations in a microcircuit or module of histological scale. By using network theory and Ca(2+) imaging with single-neuron resolution we studied the way in which striatal microcircuits of dozens of cells orchestrate their activity. In addition, control and diseased striatal tissues were compared in rats. In the control tissue, functional connectomics revealed small-world, scale-free and hierarchical network properties. These properties were lost during pathological conditions in ways that could be quantitatively analyzed. Decorticated striatal circuits disclosed that corticostriatal interactions depend on privileged connections with a set of highly connected neurons or "hubs". In the 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease there was a decrease in hubs number; but the ones that remained were linked to dominant network states. l-DOPA induced dyskinesia provoked a loss in the hierarchical structure of the circuit. All these conditions conferred distinct temporal sequences to circuit activity. Temporal sequences appeared as particular signatures of disease process thus bringing the possibility of a future quantitative pathophysiology at a histological scale. PMID:26951948

  10. A framework for understanding the emerging role of corticolimbic-ventral striatal networks in OCD-associated repetitive behaviors

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    Jesse Wood

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant interest in the mechanistic underpinnings of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD has fueled research on the neural origins of compulsive behaviors. Converging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that abnormal repetitive behaviors are driven by dysfunction in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical (CSTC circuits. These findings suggest that compulsive behaviors arise, in part, from aberrant communication between lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC and dorsal striatum. An important body of work focused on the role of this network in OCD has been instrumental to progress in the field. Disease models focused primarily on these regions, however, fail to capture an important aspect of the disorder: affective dysregulation. High levels of anxiety are extremely prevalent in OCD, as is comorbidity with major depressive disorder. Furthermore, deficits in processing rewards and abnormalities in processing emotional stimuli are suggestive of aberrant encoding of affective information. Accordingly, OCD can be partially characterized as a disease in which behavioral selection is corrupted by exaggerated or dysregulated emotional states. This suggests that the networks producing OCD symptoms likely expand beyond traditional lateral OFC and dorsal striatum circuit models, and highlights the need to cast a wider net in our investigation of the circuits involved in generating and sustaining OCD symptoms. Here, we address the emerging role of medial OFC, amygdala, and ventral tegmental area projections to the ventral striatum (VS in OCD pathophysiology. The VS receives strong innervation from these affect and reward processing regions, and is therefore poised to integrate information crucial to the generation of compulsive behaviors. Though it complements functions of dorsal striatum and lateral OFC, this corticolimbic-VS network is less commonly explored as a potential source of the pathology underlying OCD. In this review we discuss this network

  11. A simple algorithm for subregional striatal uptake analysis with partial volume correction in dopaminergic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In positron emission tomography (PET) of the dopaminergic system, quantitative measurements of nigrostriatal dopamine function are useful for differential diagnosis. A subregional analysis of striatal uptake enables the diagnostic performance to be more powerful. However, the partial volume effect (PVE) induces an underestimation of the true radioactivity concentration in small structures. This work proposes a simple algorithm for subregional analysis of striatal uptake with partial volume correction (PVC) in dopaminergic PET imaging. The PVC algorithm analyzes the separate striatal subregions and takes into account the PVE based on the recovery coefficient (RC). The RC is defined as the ratio of the PVE-uncorrected to PVE-corrected radioactivity concentration, and is derived from a combination of the traditional volume of interest (VOI) analysis and the large VOI technique. The clinical studies, comprising 11 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 6 healthy subjects, were used to assess the impact of PVC on the quantitative measurements. Simulations on a numerical phantom that mimicked realistic healthy and neurodegenerative situations were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed PVC algorithm. In both the clinical and the simulation studies, the striatal-to-occipital ratio (SOR) values for the entire striatum and its subregions were calculated with and without PVC. In the clinical studies, the SOR values in each structure (caudate, anterior putamen, posterior putamen, putamen, and striatum) were significantly higher by using PVC in contrast to those without. Among the PD patients, the SOR values in each structure and quantitative disease severity ratings were shown to be significantly related only when PVC was used. For the simulation studies, the average absolute percentage error of the SOR estimates before and after PVC were 22.74% and 1.54% in the healthy situation, respectively; those in the neurodegenerative situation were 20.69% and 2

  12. Effect of Exercise Training on Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Methamphetamine Users during Behavioral Treatment.

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    Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa J; Rawson, Richard A; Dolezal, Brett A; Cooper, Christopher B; Brown, Amira K; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine use disorder is associated with striatal dopaminergic deficits that have been linked to poor treatment outcomes, identifying these deficits as an important therapeutic target. Exercise attenuates methamphetamine-induced neurochemical damage in the rat brain, and a preliminary observation suggests that exercise increases striatal D2/D3 receptor availability (measured as nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND)) in patients with Parkinson's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether adding an exercise training program to an inpatient behavioral intervention for methamphetamine use disorder reverses deficits in striatal D2/D3 receptors. Participants were adult men and women who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence and were enrolled in a residential facility, where they maintained abstinence from illicit drugs of abuse and received behavioral therapy for their addiction. They were randomized to a group that received 1 h supervised exercise training (n=10) or one that received equal-time health education training (n=9), 3 days/week for 8 weeks. They came to an academic research center for positron emission tomography (PET) using [(18)F]fallypride to determine the effects of the 8-week interventions on striatal D2/D3 receptor BPND. At baseline, striatal D2/D3 BPND did not differ between groups. However, after 8 weeks, participants in the exercise group displayed a significant increase in striatal D2/D3 BPND, whereas those in the education group did not. There were no changes in D2/D3 BPND in extrastriatal regions in either group. These findings suggest that structured exercise training can ameliorate striatal D2/D3 receptor deficits in methamphetamine users, and warrants further evaluation as an adjunctive treatment for stimulant dependence. PMID:26503310

  13. Putative role of monoamines in the antidepressant-like mechanism induced by striatal MT2 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Rodrigues, Lais S; Targa, Adriano D S; Aurich, Mariana F; Vital, Maria A B F; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2014-12-15

    It has been observed that the secretion pattern of melatonin is modified in Parkinson's disease (PD). Hence, it is hypothesized that dysregulations of melatonin MT2 receptors may be involved in the installation of depression in PD patients. Together with recent evidence based on the use of the intranigral rotenone model of PD, have led to the hypothesis that modulating the striatal MT2 receptor could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the antidepressant properties triggered. To further investigate this issue, male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12μg/μL) and seven days later subjected to a rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REMSD) for 24h. After, we injected within the striatum the MT2 selective agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10μg/μL), the MT2 selective antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, they were tested in the forced swimming test and were allowed to perform the sleep rebound (REB). Then, the rats were re-tested, and the striatum, hippocampus and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) were collected for neurochemical purposes. Results indicated substantial antidepressant effects promoted by the blockade of striatal MT2 receptors that were potentiated by REMSD. MT2 activation increased DA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, while MT2 blockade increase DA in the SNpc. 4-P-PDOT treatment of the rotenone REMSD group generated a decrement in 5-HT levels within the striatum, hippocampus and SNpc. However, increased 5-HT turnover was observed among these structures. Therefore, we demonstrated the neurochemical antidepressant effect induced by striatal MT2 blockage associated with REMSD in the rotenone model of PD. PMID:25218873

  14. Striatal fast-spiking interneurons: from firing patterns to postsynaptic impact

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    Andreas eKlaus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the striatal microcircuit, fast-spiking (FS interneurons have an important role in mediating inhibition onto neighboring medium spiny (MS projection neurons. In this study, we combined computational modeling with in vitro and in vivo electrophysiological measurements to investigate FS cells in terms of their discharge properties and their synaptic efficacies onto MS neurons. In vivo firing of striatal FS interneurons is characterized by a high firing variability. It is not known, however, if this variability results from the input that FS cells receive, or if it is promoted by the stuttering spike behavior of these neurons. Both our model and measurements in vitro show that FS neurons that exhibit random stuttering discharge in response to steady depolarization, do not show the typical stuttering behavior when they receive fluctuating input. Importantly, our model predicts that electrically coupled FS cells show substantial spike synchronization only when they are in the stuttering regime. Therefore, together with the lack of synchronized firing of striatal FS interneurons that has been reported in vivo, these results suggest that neighboring FS neurons are not in the stuttering regime simultaneously and that in vivo FS firing variability is more likely determined by the input fluctuations. Furthermore, the variability in FS firing is translated to variability in the postsynaptic amplitudes in MS neurons due to the strong synaptic depression of the FS-to-MS synapse. Our results support the idea that these synapses operate over a wide range from strongly depressed to almost fully recovered. The strong inhibitory effects that FS cells can impose on their postsynaptic targets, and the fact that the FS-to-MS synapse model showed substantial depression over extended periods of time might indicate the importance of cooperative effects of multiple presynaptic FS interneurons and the precise orchestration of their activity.

  15. Effects of acute amphetamine (AMPH) treatment on rat striatal dopamine (DA) receptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon administration of AMPH rats display a complex series of dose and time dependent behaviors and changes in dopaminergic activity. They found a decrease in D1 DA receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase (DA-AC) activity in rat striatal membranes after acute in vivo AMPH at a dose and time of intense stereotyped behavior. The Ka for D1-AC activity increased and the Vmax decreased in striatal membranes from rats given 7.5 mg/kg AMPH i.p. and killed 1 hr later as compared to saline (SAL) controls. They examined whether the decrease of DA-AC was due to a change in receptor number or activation of GTP-binding protein, Ns. Female Holtzman rats were injected with SAL or 7.5 mg/kg AMPH and killed 1 hr later. A 27,000 x g striatal particulate fraction was prepared for AC assay or [3H]DA binding with 10 nM spiroperidol. They found no difference in stimulation of AC by NaF, GTP or GppNHp at any dose tested in membranes from SAL- and AMPH-treated rats. Calmodulin-stimulated AC was also unchanged after AMPH. Specific binding at a saturating concentration of [3H]DA was 191 +/- 31 and 117 +/- 14 fmol/mg prot in membranes from SAL- and AMPH-treated rats, respectively. This suggests an alteration is occurring at the level of the D1 receptor rather than at coupling of Ns with the AC catalytic subunit

  16. Homeostatic regulation of excitatory synapses on striatal medium spiny neurons expressing the D2 dopamine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Dominic; Giguère, Nicolas; Loustalot, Fabien; Bourque, Marie-Josée; Ducrot, Charles; El Mestikawy, Salah; Trudeau, Louis-Éric

    2016-05-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are contacted by glutamatergic axon terminals originating from cortex, thalamus and other regions. The striatum is also innervated by dopaminergic (DAergic) terminals, some of which release glutamate as a co-transmitter. Despite evidence for functional DA release at birth in the striatum, the role of DA in the establishment of striatal circuitry is unclear. In light of recent work suggesting activity-dependent homeostatic regulation of glutamatergic terminals on MSNs expressing the D2 DA receptor (D2-MSNs), we used primary co-cultures to test the hypothesis that stimulation of DA and glutamate receptors regulates the homeostasis of glutamatergic synapses on MSNs. Co-culture of D2-MSNs with mesencephalic DA neurons or with cortical neurons produced an increase in spines and functional glutamate synapses expressing VGLUT2 or VGLUT1, respectively. The density of VGLUT2-positive terminals was reduced by the conditional knockout of this gene from DA neurons. In the presence of both mesencephalic and cortical neurons, the density of synapses reached the same total, compatible with the possibility of a homeostatic mechanism capping excitatory synaptic density. Blockade of D2 receptors increased the density of cortical and mesencephalic glutamatergic terminals, without changing MSN spine density or mEPSC frequency. Combined blockade of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors increased the density of cortical terminals and decreased that of mesencephalic VGLUT2-positive terminals, with no net change in total excitatory terminal density or in mEPSC frequency. These results suggest that DA and glutamate signaling regulate excitatory inputs to striatal D2-MSNs at both the pre- and postsynaptic level, under the influence of a homeostatic mechanism controlling functional output of the circuit. PMID:25782435

  17. Touchscreen tasks in mice to demonstrate differences between hippocampal and striatal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delotterie, David F; Mathis, Chantal; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Rosenbrock, Holger; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia; Marti, Anelise

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, hippocampal and striatal regions are engaged in separable cognitive processes usually assessed through species-specific paradigms. To reconcile cognitive testing among species, translational advantages of the touchscreen-based automated method have been recently promoted. However, it remains undetermined whether similar neural substrates would be involved in such behavioral tasks both in humans and rodents. To address this question, the effects of hippocampal or dorso-striatal fiber-sparing lesions were first assessed in mice through a battery of tasks (experiment A) comprising the acquisition of two touchscreen paradigms, the Paired Associates Learning (dPAL) and Visuo-Motor Conditional Learning (VMCL) tasks, and a more classical T-maze alternation task. Additionally, we sought to determine whether post-acquisition hippocampal lesions would alter memory retrieval in the dPAL task (experiment B). Pre-training lesions of dorsal striatum caused major impairments in all paradigms. In contrast, pre-training hippocampal lesions disrupted the performance of animals trained in the T-maze assay, but spared the acquisition in touchscreen tasks. Nonetheless, post-training hippocampal lesions severely impacted the recall of the previously learned dPAL task. Altogether, our data show that, after having demonstrated their potential in genetically modified mice, touchscreens also reveal perfectly adapted to taxing functional implications of brain structures in mice by means of lesion approaches. Unlike its human counterpart requiring an intact hippocampus, the acquisition of the dPAL task requires the integrity of the dorsal striatum in mice. The hippocampus only later intervenes, when acquired information needs to be retrieved. Touchscreen assays may therefore be suited to study striatal- or hippocampal-dependent forms of learnings in mice. PMID:25687692

  18. Amplified Striatal Responses to Near-Miss Outcomes in Pathological Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sescousse, Guillaume; Janssen, Lieneke K; Hashemi, Mahur M; Timmer, Monique H M; Geurts, Dirk E M; Ter Huurne, Niels P; Clark, Luke; Cools, Roshan

    2016-09-01

    Near-misses in gambling games are losing events that come close to a win. Near-misses were previously shown to recruit reward-related brain regions including the ventral striatum, and to invigorate gambling behavior, supposedly by fostering an illusion of control. Given that pathological gamblers are particularly vulnerable to such cognitive illusions, their persistent gambling behavior might result from an amplified striatal sensitivity to near-misses. In addition, animal studies have shown that behavioral responses to near-miss-like events are sensitive to dopamine, but this dopaminergic influence has not been tested in humans. To investigate these hypotheses, we recruited 22 pathological gamblers and 22 healthy controls who played a slot machine task delivering wins, near-misses and full-misses, inside an fMRI scanner. Each participant played the task twice, once under placebo and once under a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (sulpiride 400 mg), in a double-blind, counter-balanced design. Participants were asked about their motivation to continue gambling throughout the task. Across all participants, near-misses elicited higher motivation to continue gambling and increased striatal responses compared with full-misses. Crucially, pathological gamblers showed amplified striatal responses to near-misses compared with controls. These group differences were not observed following win outcomes. In contrast to our hypothesis, sulpiride did not induce any reliable modulation of brain responses to near-misses. Together, our results demonstrate that pathological gamblers have amplified brain responses to near-misses, which likely contribute to their persistent gambling behavior. However, there is no evidence that these responses are influenced by dopamine. These results have implications for treatment and gambling regulation. PMID:27006113

  19. Convergence of dopamine and glutamate signalling onto striatal ERK activation in response to drugs of abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JocelyneCaboche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite their distinct targets, all addictive drugs commonly abused by humans evoke increases in dopamine (DA concentration within the striatum. The main DA G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs expressed by medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs of the striatum are the D1R and D2R, which are positively and negatively coupled to cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA signalling, respectively. These two DA GPCRs are largely segregated into distinct neuronal populations, where they are co-expressed with glutamate receptors in dendritic spines. Direct and indirect interactions between DA GPCRs and glutamate receptors are the molecular basis by which DA modulates glutamate transmission and controls striatal plasticity and behaviour induced by drugs of abuse. A major downstream target of striatal D1R is the Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK kinase pathway. ERK activation by drugs of abuse behaves as a key integrator of D1R and glutamate NMDAR signalling. Once activated, ERK can trigger chromatin remodelling and induce gene expression that permits long-term cellular alterations and drug-induced morphological and behavioural changes. Besides the classical cAMP/PKA pathway, downstream of D1R, recent evidence implicates a cAMP-independent crosstalk mechanism by which the D1R potentiates NMDAR-mediated calcium influx and ERK activation. The mounting evidence of reciprocal modulation of DA and glutamate receptors adds further intricacy to striatal synaptic signalling and is liable to prove relevant for addictive drug-induced signalling, plasticity and behaviour. Herein, we review the evidence that built our understanding of the consequences of this synergistic signalling for the actions of drugs of abuse.

  20. Automated striatal uptake analysis of 18F-FDOPA PET images applied to Parkinson's disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) is a radiopharmaceutical valuable for assessing the presynaptic dopaminergic function when used with positron emission tomography (PET). More specifically, the striatal-to-occipital ratio (SOR) of FDOPA uptake images has been extensively used as a quantitative parameter in these PET studies. Our aim was to develop an easy, automated method capable of performing objective analysis of SOR in FDOPA PET images of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Brain images from FDOPA PET studies of 21 patients with PD and 6 healthy subjects were included in our automated striatal analyses. Images of each individual were spatially normalized into an FDOPA template. Subsequently, the image slice with the highest level of basal ganglia activity was chosen among the series of normalized images. Also, the immediate preceding and following slices of the chosen image were then selected. Finally, the summation of these three images was used to quantify and calculate the SOR values. The results obtained by automated analysis were compared with manual analysis by a trained and experienced image processing technologist. The SOR values obtained from the automated analysis had a good agreement and high correlation with manual analysis. The differences in caudate, putamen, and striatum were -0.023, -0.029, and -0.025, respectively; correlation coefficients 0.961, 0.957, and 0.972, respectively. We have successfully developed a method for automated striatal uptake analysis of FDOPA PET images. There was no significant difference between the SOR values obtained from this method and using manual analysis. Yet it is an unbiased time-saving and cost-effective program and easy to implement on a personal computer. (author)

  1. Loss of extra-striatal phosphodiesterase 10A expression in early premanifest Huntington's disease gene carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather; Niccolini, Flavia; Haider, Salman; Marques, Tiago Reis; Pagano, Gennaro; Coello, Christopher; Natesan, Sridhar; Kapur, Shitij; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Gunn, Roger N; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Politis, Marios

    2016-09-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a monogenic neurodegenerative disorder with an underlying pathology involving the toxic effect of mutant huntingtin protein primarily in striatal and cortical neurons. Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) regulates intracellular signalling cascades, thus having a key role in promoting neuronal survival. Using positron emission tomography (PET) with [(11)C]IMA107, we investigated the in vivo extra-striatal expression of PDE10A in 12 early premanifest HD gene carriers. Image processing and kinetic modelling was performed using MIAKAT™. Parametric images of [(11)C]IMA107 non-displaceable binding potential (BPND) were generated from the dynamic [(11)C]IMA107 scans using the simplified reference tissue model with the cerebellum as the reference tissue for nonspecific binding. We set a threshold criterion for meaningful quantification of [(11)C]IMA107 BPND at 0.30 in healthy control data; regions meeting this criterion were designated as regions of interest (ROIs). MRI-based volumetric analysis showed no atrophy in ROIs. We found significant differences in mean ROIs [(11)C]IMA107 BPND between HD gene carriers and healthy controls. HD gene carriers had significant loss of PDE10A within the insular cortex and occipital fusiform gyrus compared to healthy controls. Insula and occipital fusiform gyrus are important brain areas for the regulation of cognitive and limbic function that is impaired in HD. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of PDE10A-mediated intracellular signalling could be an early phenomenon in the course of HD with relevance also for extra-striatal brain areas. PMID:27538642

  2. Striatal Volume Increases in Active Methamphetamine-Dependent Individuals and Correlation with Cognitive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob R. Kydd

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of methamphetamine (MA dependence on the structure of the human brain has not been extensively studied, especially in active users. Previous studies reported cortical deficits and striatal gains in grey matter (GM volume of abstinent MA abusers compared with control participants. This study aimed to investigate structural GM changes in the brains of 17 active MA-dependent participants compared with 20 control participants aged 18–46 years using voxel-based morphometry and region of interest volumetric analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging data, and whether these changes might be associated with cognitive performance. Significant volume increases were observed in the right and left putamen and left nucleus accumbens of MA-dependent compared to control participants. The volumetric gain in the right putamen remained significant after Bonferroni correction, and was inversely correlated with the number of errors (standardised z-scores on the Go/No-go task. MA-dependent participants exhibited cortical GM deficits in the left superior frontal and precentral gyri in comparison to control participants, although these findings did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, consistent with findings from previous studies of abstinent users, active chronic MA-dependent participants showed significant striatal enlargement which was associated with improved performance on the Go/No-go, a cognitive task of response inhibition and impulsivity. Striatal enlargement may reflect the involvement of neurotrophic effects, inflammation or microgliosis. However, since it was associated with improved cognitive function, it is likely to reflect a compensatory response to MA-induced neurotoxicity in the striatum, in order to maintain cognitive function. Follow-up studies are recommended to ascertain whether this effect continues to be present following abstinence. Several factors may have contributed to the lack of more

  3. No difference in striatal dopamine transporter availability between active smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers using (123I)FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, G; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Jensen, PS;

    2013-01-01

    -smokers (p = 0.34). Further, we could not demonstrate a significant association between striatal DAT and the number of cigarettes per day or total lifetime cigarette packages in smokers and ex-smokers. CONCLUSION: Our results do not support the hypothesis that large differences in striatal DAT availability...

  4. Functional polymorphisms in PRODH are associated with risk and protection for schizophrenia and fronto-striatal structure and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Kempf

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available PRODH, encoding proline oxidase (POX, has been associated with schizophrenia through linkage, association, and the 22q11 deletion syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome. Here, we show in a family-based sample that functional polymorphisms in PRODH are associated with schizophrenia, with protective and risk alleles having opposite effects on POX activity. Using a multimodal imaging genetics approach, we demonstrate that haplotypes constructed from these risk and protective functional polymorphisms have dissociable correlations with structure, function, and connectivity of striatum and prefrontal cortex, impacting critical circuitry implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Specifically, the schizophrenia risk haplotype was associated with decreased striatal volume and increased striatal-frontal functional connectivity, while the protective haplotype was associated with decreased striatal-frontal functional connectivity. Our findings suggest a role for functional genetic variation in POX on neostriatal-frontal circuits mediating risk and protection for schizophrenia.

  5. PET demonstrates different behaviour of striatal dopamine D-1 and D-2 receptors in early Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Striatal dopamine D-1 receptor binding was investigated in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) in five patients with early Parkinson's disease using 11C-SCH 23390. All patients had predominantly unilateral symptoms and showed a significant reduction in the accumulation of 18F-6-F-DOPA in the striatum contralateral to the symptoms. None of the patients had received any antiparkinsonian medication. The striatal and cerebellar radioactivity was measured and corresponding striatum/cerebellum ratios were counted. The mean striatum/cerebellum ratio of 11C-SCH 23390 binding was symmetric between the hemispheres. By contrast, the striatum/cerebellum ratio of [11C]raclopride binding, labelling dopamine D-2 receptors, was increased significantly in the hemisphere contralateral to the symptoms as compared with the opposite hemisphere. Thus, the present results show that the behaviour of striatal D-1 and D-2 receptors is different in early Parkinson's disease

  6. TESTING THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF STRIATAL DOPAMINE LOSS TO THE GENESIS OF PARKINSONIAN SIGNS

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Vanessa; Turner, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    The diverse and independently-varying signs of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are often attributed to one simple mechanism: degeneration of the dopaminergic innervation of the posterolateral striatum. However, growing recognition of the dopamine (DA) loss and other pathology in extra-striatal brain regions has led to uncertainty whether loss of DA in the striatum is sufficient to cause parkinsonian signs. We tested this hypothesis by infusing cis-flupenthixol (cis-flu; a broad-spectrum D1/D2 recept...

  7. microRNA-Seq reveals cocaine-regulated expression of striatal microRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Eipper-Mains, Jodi E.; Kiraly, Drew D.; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A.; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that modulate gene expression by binding target mRNAs. The hundreds of miRNAs expressed in the brain are critical for synaptic development and plasticity. Drugs of abuse cause lasting changes in the limbic regions of the brain that process reward, and addiction is viewed as a form of aberrant neuroplasticity. Using next-generation sequencing, we cataloged miRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens and at striatal synapses in control and chronically cocaine-tre...

  8. Studio della trasmissione dopaminergica e del metabolismo energetico striatale in modelli animali di Parkinson

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzu, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s desease (PD) is characterized by a selective loss of neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and a significant reduction of neostriatal content of dopamine (DA) and its major acidic metabolites DOPAC and homovanillic acid. MPTP is known to cause parkinsonism in human and this fact is a major incentive for using this toxin as an animal model of PD. In this study C57BL/6 mice were given MPTP in a sub-acute regimen, that induce tissue striatal DA depletion and...

  9. Neuronal-like differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells induced by striatal extracts from a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Qin; Wang Han; Zhigang Yu

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of Parkinson's disease was established by 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the medial forebrain bundle. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated from the femur and tibia, and were co-cultured with 10% and 60% lesioned or intact striatal extracts. The results showed that when exposed to lesioned striatal extracts, BMSCs developed bipolar or multi-polar morphologies, and there was an increase in the percentage of cells that expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin and neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Moreover, the percentage of NSE-positive cells increased with increasing concentrations of lesioned striatal extracts. However, intact striatal extracts only increased the percentage of GFAP-positive cells. The findings suggest that striatal extracts from Parkinson's disease rats induce BMSCs to differentiate into neuronal-like cells in vitro.

  10. L-Dopa Modulates Functional Connectivity in Striatal Cognitive and Motor Networks: A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Clare; de Zubicaray, Greig; Di Martino, Adriana; Copland, David A.; Reiss, Philip T.; Klein, Donald F.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.; McMahon, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Functional connectivity (FC) analyses of resting-state fMRI data allow for the mapping of large-scale functional networks, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic challenge. Here, using a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, we examined the effect of L-dopa, a dopamine precursor, on striatal resting-state FC in 19 healthy young adults. We examined the FC of 6 striatal regions-of-interest previously shown to elicit networks known to be associated with motivational...

  11. Motivational salience and genetic variability of dopamine D2 receptor expression interact in the modulation of interference processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Anni; Richter, Sylvia; Barman, Adriana; Soch, Joram; Klein, Marieke; Assmann, Anne; Libeau, Catherine; Behnisch, Gusalija; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Schott, Björn H

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine has been implicated in the fine-tuning of complex cognitive and motor function and also in the anticipation of future rewards. This dual function of dopamine suggests that dopamine might be involved in the generation of active motivated behavior. The DRD2 TaqIA polymorphism of the dopamine D2 receptor gene (rs1800497) has previously been suggested to affect striatal function with carriers of the less common A1 allele exhibiting reduced striatal D2 receptor density and increased risk for addiction. Here we aimed to investigate the influences of DRD2 TaqIA genotype on the modulation of interference processing by reward and punishment. Forty-six young, healthy volunteers participated in a behavioral experiment, and 32 underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants performed a flanker task with a motivation manipulation (monetary reward, monetary loss, neither, or both). Reaction times (RTs) were shorter in motivated flanker trials, irrespective of congruency. In the fMRI experiment motivation was associated with reduced prefrontal activation during incongruent vs. congruent flanker trials, possibly reflecting increased processing efficiency. DRD2 TaqIA genotype did not affect overall RTs, but interacted with motivation on the congruency-related RT differences, with A1 carriers showing smaller interference effects to reward alone and A2 homozygotes exhibiting a specific interference reduction during combined reward (REW) and punishment trials (PUN). In fMRI, anterior cingulate activity showed a similar pattern of genotype-related modulation. Additionally, A1 carriers showed increased anterior insula activation relative to A2 homozygotes. Our results point to a role for genetic variations of the dopaminergic system in individual differences of cognition-motivation interaction. PMID:23760450

  12. Motivational salience and genetic variability of dopamine D2 receptor expression interact in the modulation of interference processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Richter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine has been implicated in the fine-tuning of complex cognitive and motor function and also in the anticipation of future rewards. This dual function of dopamine suggests that dopamine might be involved in the generation of active motivated behavior. The DRD2 TaqIA polymorphism of the dopamine D2 receptor gene (rs1800497 has previously been suggested to affect striatal function with carriers of the less common A1 allele exhibiting reduced striatal D2 receptor density and increased risk for addiction. Here we aimed to investigate the influences of DRD2 TaqIA genotype on the modulation of interference processing by reward and punishment. 46 young, healthy volunteers participated in a behavioral experiment, and 32 underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Participants performed a flanker task with a motivation manipulation (monetary reward, monetary loss, neither, or both. Reaction times (RTs were shorter in motivated flanker trials, irrespective of congruency. In the fMRI experiment motivation was associated with reduced prefrontal activation during incongruent versus congruent flanker trials, possibly reflecting increased processing efficiency. DRD2 TaqIA genotype did not affect overall RTs, but interacted with motivation on the congruency-related RT differences, with A1 carriers showing smaller interference effects to reward alone and A2 homozygotes exhibiting a specific interference reduction during combined reward and punishment trials. In fMRI, anterior cingulate activity showed a similar pattern of genotype-related modulation. Additionally, A1 carriers showed increased anterior insula activation relative to A2 homozygotes. Our results point to a role for genetic variations of the dopaminergic system in individual differences of cognition-motivation interaction.

  13. The Extended Fronto-Striatal Model of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Convergence from Event-Related Potentials, Neuropsychology and Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita eMelloni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we explored convergent evidence supporting the fronto-striatal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (FSMOCD and the contribution of event-related potential (ERP studies to this model. First, we considered minor modifications to the FSMOCD model based on neuroimaging and neuropsychological data. We noted the brain areas most affected in this disorder -anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, basal ganglia (BG and orbito-frontal cortex (OFC- and their related cognitive functions, such as monitoring and inhibition. Then, we assessed the ERPs that are directly related to the FSMOCD, including the error-related negativity (ERN, N200 and P600. Several OCD studies present enhanced ERN and N2 responses during conflict tasks as well as an enhanced P600 during working memory tasks. Evidence from ERP studies (especially regarding ERN and N200 amplitude enhancement, neuroimaging and neuropsychological findings suggests abnormal activity in the OFC, ACC and BG in OCD patients. Moreover, additional findings from these analyses suggest dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal cortex involvement, which might be related to executive function deficits. Thus, these convergent results suggest the existence of a self-monitoring imbalance involving inhibitory deficits and executive dysfunctions. OCD patients present an impaired ability to monitor, control, and inhibit intrusive thoughts, urges, feelings and behaviors. In the current model, this imbalance is triggered by an excitatory role of the BG (associated with cognitive or motor actions without volitional control and inhibitory activity of the OFC as well as excessive monitoring of the ACC to block excitatory impulses. This imbalance would interact with the reduced activation of the parietal-DLPC network, leading to executive dysfunction. ERP research may provide further insight regarding the temporal dynamics of action monitoring and executive functioning in OCD.

  14. The extended fronto-striatal model of obsessive compulsive disorder: convergence from event-related potentials, neuropsychology and neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloni, Margherita; Urbistondo, Claudia; Sedeño, Lucas; Gelormini, Carlos; Kichic, Rafael; Ibanez, Agustin

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored convergent evidence supporting the fronto-striatal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (FSMOCD) and the contribution of event-related potential (ERP) studies to this model. First, we considered minor modifications to the FSMOCD model based on neuroimaging and neuropsychological data. We noted the brain areas most affected in this disorder -anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), basal ganglia (BG), and orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) and their related cognitive functions, such as monitoring and inhibition. Then, we assessed the ERPs that are directly related to the FSMOCD, including the error-related negativity (ERN), N200, and P600. Several OCD studies present enhanced ERN and N2 responses during conflict tasks as well as an enhanced P600 during working memory (WM) tasks. Evidence from ERP studies (especially regarding ERN and N200 amplitude enhancement), neuroimaging and neuropsychological findings suggests abnormal activity in the OFC, ACC, and BG in OCD patients. Moreover, additional findings from these analyses suggest dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal cortex involvement, which might be related to executive function (EF) deficits. Thus, these convergent results suggest the existence of a self-monitoring imbalance involving inhibitory deficits and executive dysfunctions. OCD patients present an impaired ability to monitor, control, and inhibit intrusive thoughts, urges, feelings, and behaviors. In the current model, this imbalance is triggered by an excitatory role of the BG (associated with cognitive or motor actions without volitional control) and inhibitory activity of the OFC as well as excessive monitoring of the ACC to block excitatory impulses. This imbalance would interact with the reduced activation of the parietal-DLPC network, leading to executive dysfunction. ERP research may provide further insight regarding the temporal dynamics of action monitoring and executive functioning in OCD. PMID:23015786

  15. Toward an affective neuroscience account of financial risk taking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene C. Wu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To explain human financial risk taking, economic and finance theories typically refer to the mathematical properties of financial options, whereas psychological theories have emphasized the influence of emotion and cognition on choice. From a neuroscience perspective, choice emanates from a dynamic multicomponential process. Recent technological advances in neuroimaging have made it possible for researchers to separately visualize perceptual input, intermediate processing, and motor output. An affective neuroscience account of financial risk taking thus might illuminate affective mediators that bridge the gap between statistical input and choice output. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a quantitative meta-analysis (via activation likelihood estimate or ALE of functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments that focused on neural responses to financial options with varying statistical moments (i.e., mean, variance, skewness. Results suggested that different statistical moments elicit both common and distinct patterns of neural activity. Across studies, high versus low mean had the highest probability of increasing ventral striatal activity, but high versus low variance had the highest probability of increasing anterior insula activity. Further, high versus low skewness had the highest probability of increasing ventral striatal activity. Since ventral striatal activity has been associated with positive aroused affect (e.g. excitement, whereas anterior insular activity has been associated with negative aroused affect (e.g. anxiety or general arousal, these findings are consistent with the notion that statistical input influences choice output by eliciting anticipatory affect. The findings also imply that neural activity can be used to predict financial risk taking – both when it conforms to and violates traditional models of choice.

  16. Abnormal Striatal BOLD Responses to Reward Anticipation and Reward Delivery in ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Emi; Bado, Patricia; Tripp, Gail; Mattos, Paulo; Wickens, Jeff R.; Bramati, Ivanei E.; Alsop, Brent; Ferreira, Fernanda Meireles; Lima, Debora; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Moll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Altered reward processing has been proposed to contribute to the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The neurobiological mechanism underlying this alteration remains unclear. We hypothesize that the transfer of dopamine release from reward to reward-predicting cues, as normally observed in animal studies, may be deficient in ADHD. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate striatal responses to reward-predicting cues and reward delivery in a classical conditioning paradigm. Data from 14 high-functioning and stimulant-naïve young adults with elevated lifetime symptoms of ADHD (8 males, 6 females) and 15 well-matched controls (8 males, 7 females) were included in the analyses. During reward anticipation, increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses in the right ventral and left dorsal striatum were observed in controls, but not in the ADHD group. The opposite pattern was observed in response to reward delivery; the ADHD group demonstrated significantly greater BOLD responses in the ventral striatum bilaterally and the left dorsal striatum relative to controls. In the ADHD group, the number of current hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms was inversely related to ventral striatal responses during reward anticipation and positively associated with responses to reward. The BOLD response patterns observed in the striatum are consistent with impaired predictive dopamine signaling in ADHD, which may explain altered reward-contingent behaviors and symptoms of ADHD. PMID:24586543

  17. Loss of estrogen-related receptor alpha disrupts ventral-striatal synaptic function in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Lu, Yuan; Anderson, Rachel M; Khan, Michael Z; Nath, Varun; McDaniel, Latisha; Lutter, Michael; Radley, Jason J; Pieper, Andrew A; Cui, Huxing

    2016-08-01

    Eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-ED, are mental illnesses characterized by high morbidity and mortality. While several studies have identified neural deficits in patients with EDs, the cellular and molecular basis of the underlying dysfunction has remained poorly understood. We previously identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) associated with development of EDs. Because ventral-striatal signaling is related to the reward and motivation circuitry thought to underlie EDs, we performed functional and structural analysis of ventral-striatal synapses in Esrra-null mice. Esrra-null female, but not male, mice exhibit altered miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the ventral striatum, including increased frequency, increased amplitude, and decreased paired pulse ratio. These electrophysiological measures are associated with structural and molecular changes in synapses of MSNs in the ventral striatum, including fewer pre-synaptic glutamatergic vesicles and enhanced GluR1 function. Neuronal Esrra is thus required for maintaining normal synaptic function in the ventral striatum, which may offer mechanistic insights into the behavioral deficits observed in Esrra-null mice. PMID:27155145

  18. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27181061

  19. Reduced striatal volumes in Parkinson’s disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitcher Toni L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence and extent of structural changes in the brain as a consequence of Parkinson’s disease (PD is still poorly understood. Methods High-resolution 3-tesla T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance images in sixty-five PD and 27 age-matched healthy control participants were examined. Putamen, caudate, and intracranial volumes were manually traced in the axial plane of 3D reconstructed images. Striatal nuclei volumes were normalized to intracranial volume for statistical comparison. Disease status was assessed using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Hoehn and Yahr scale. Cognitive status was assessed using global status tests and detailed neuropsychological testing. Results Both caudate and putamen volumes were smaller in PD brains compared to controls after adjusting for age and gender. Caudate volumes were reduced by 11% (p = 0.001 and putamen volumes by 8.1% (p = 0.025. PD striatal volumes were not found to be significantly correlated with cognitive or motor decline. Conclusion Small, but significant reductions in the volume of both the caudate and putamen occur in PD brains. These reductions are independent of the effects of age and gender, however the relation of these reductions to the functional loss of dopamine, which is characteristic of PD, remains unclear.

  20. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  1. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with 3H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 μM. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table

  2. Cortico-limbic-striatal contribution after response and reversal learning: a metabolic mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, Camino; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, Héctor; Arias, J L

    2011-01-12

    Learning of arbitrary stimulus-response associations is an adaptive behavior essential for species survival in an ever-changing environment. Particular subdivisions of the striatum have been shown to be critical for both motor-response learning and reversal learning. However, recent evidence suggests that different cortical and subcortical brain regions may be involved in response learning, a kind of learning more complex than previously thought. In fact, many brain regions subserving response learning seem to be also related to reversal learning, traditionally ascribed to the prefrontal cortex. The present study examined the role of different subdivisions of the rat prefrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala and the ventral tegmental area on both response and reversal learning evaluated in the water T-maze. Increased neuronal metabolic activity, as measured by cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry, was found in most brain regions after training rats in a response learning task as compared to yoked controls. Reversal learning was associated with a return to baseline CO activity levels except for the orbitofrontal cortex and the ventral tegmental area. Analysis of functional connectivity among brain regions showed significant correlations in CO activity between particular cortical and striatal subdivisions in the reversal learning group. These findings suggest that the interaction of specific frontal and subcortical regions is required for reversal but not for response learning. However, our findings support the involvement of a cortico-limbic-striatal circuit in both types of learning. PMID:21036158

  3. Effects of isomers of apomorphines on dopamine receptors in striatal and limbic tissue of rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kula, N.S.; Baldessarini, R.J.; Bromley, S.; Neumeyer, J.L.

    1985-09-16

    The optical isomers of apomorphine (APO) and N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) were interacted with three biochemical indices of dopamine (Da) receptors in extrapyramidal and limbic preparations of rat brain tissues. There were consistent isomeric preferences for the R(-) configuration of both DA analogs in stimulation adenylate cyclase (D-1 sites) and in competing for high affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (D-2 sites) and of /sup 3/H-ADTN (DA agonist binding sites) in striatal tissue, with lesser isomeric differences in the limbic tissue. The S(+) apomorphines did not inhibit stimulation of adenylate cyclase by DA. The tendency for greater activity of higher apparent affinity of R(-) apomorphines in striatum may reflect the evidently greater abundance of receptor sites in that region. There were only small regional differences in interactions of the apomorphine isomers with all three receptor sites, except for a strong preference of (-)NPA for striatal D-2 sites. These results do not parallel our recent observations indicating potent and selective antidopaminergic actions of S(+) apomorphines in the rat limbic system. They suggest caution in assuming close parallels between current biochemical functional, especially behavioral, methods of evaluating dopamine receptors of mammalian brain.

  4. Muscarinic enhancement of persistent sodium current synchronizes striatal medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Vautrelle, Nicolas; Hernández, Adán; Vergara, Ramiro; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2009-08-01

    Network dynamics denoted by synchronous firing of neuronal pools rely on synaptic interactions and intrinsic properties. In striatal medium spiny neurons, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation endows neurons with nonlinear capabilities by inducing a negative-slope conductance region (NSCR) in the current-voltage relationship. Nonlinearities underlie associative learning, procedural memory, and the sequential organization of behavior in basal ganglia nuclei. The cholinergic system modulates the function of medium spiny projection neurons through the activation of muscarinic receptors, increasing the NMDA-induced NSCR. This enhancement is reflected as a change in the NMDA-induced network dynamics, making it more synchronous. Nevertheless, little is known about the contribution of intrinsic properties that promote this activity. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the cholinergic modulation of bistable behavior in the striatum, we used whole cell and calcium-imaging techniques. A persistent sodium current modulated by muscarinic receptor activation participated in the enhancement of the NSCR and the increased network synchrony. These experiments provide evidence that persistent sodium current generates bistable behavior in striatal neurons and contributes to the regulation of synchronous network activity. The neuromodulation of bistable properties could represent a cellular and network mechanism for cholinergic actions in the striatum. PMID:19474176

  5. Lithium prevents parkinsonian behavioral and striatal phenotypes in an aged parkin mutant transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Christopher A; Dewey, Colleen M; Chinta, Shankar J; Rane, Anand; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Batir, Sean; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Andersen, Julie K

    2014-12-01

    Lithium has long been used as a treatment for the psychiatric disease bipolar disorder. However, previous studies suggest that lithium provides neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. The exact mechanism by which lithium exerts these effects still remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose lithium treatment in an aged mouse model expressing a parkin mutation within dopaminergic neurons. We found that low-dose lithium treatment prevented motor impairment as demonstrated by the open field test, pole test, and rearing behavior. Furthermore, lithium prevented dopaminergic striatal degeneration in parkin animals. We also found that parkin-induced striatal astrogliosis and microglial activation were prevented by lithium treatment. Our results further corroborate the use of this parkin mutant transgenic mouse line as a model for PD for testing novel therapeutics. The findings of the present study also provide further validation that lithium could be re-purposed as a therapy for PD and suggest that anti-inflammatory effects may contribute to its neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:25452026

  6. Decreased striatal D2 receptor density associated with severe behavioral abnormality in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since patients manifesting behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are a burden for their families and caregivers, the underlying neurobiological mechanism of this condition should be clarified. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we previously reported that wandering behavior in dementia was associated with a disturbed dopaminergic neuron system. We herein investigated the relationship between the severity of BPSD and the striatal D2 receptor density in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ten patients with probable AD as per the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke (NINCDS) and the AD and Related Disorders Association (ADRDA) criteria and five normal subjects were examined with PET. The tracer used was [11C]raclopride (D2 antagonist). The uptake of [11C]raclopride was calculated as the estimation of binding potential (BP) of the striatum to the cerebellum. The AD patients were institutionalized in multiple nursing homes, and their BPSD were evaluated by the Behavioral Pathology in AD Frequency Weighted Severity Scale (BEHAVE-AD-FW) scale (Reisberg). There was a significant inverse Spearman's correlation between BEHAVE-AD-FW score and the BP, especially between the score of the behavioral domain and the BP values. The BP was found to be lower in severer BPSD patients. Patients with AD who manifest severe BPSD may have some dysfunction of striatal dopamine metabolism compared with those without BPSD. (author)

  7. Evaluation of striatal oxidative stress in patients with Parkinson's disease using [62Cu]ATSM PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To clarify the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) in living patients, positron emission tomography (PET) with [62Cu]diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) ([62Cu]ATSM) was applied to functional imaging of oxidative stress mainly due to mitochondrial dysfunction in the striata of patients with PD. Methods: Fifteen PD patients who presented with lateral dominant symptoms at onset and six healthy controls underwent [62Cu]ATSM PET. Dynamic PET data acquisition was performed, and standardized uptake values (SUVs) were obtained from the delayed phase of dynamic data by means of region of interest analysis. The striatum-to-cerebellum SUV ratio (S/C ratio) was calculated from the SUV in all subjects of the striatum and the cerebellar cortex. Results: The mean S/C ratio of the bilateral striata of the patients (1.15±0.10) was significantly increased compared with that of the controls (1.08±0.02) (P62Cu]ATSM PET imaging demonstrated that striatal oxidative stress was enhanced in PD patients compared with the controls and increased with the progression of disease severity, particularly in the contralateral striatum. These findings indicated that oxidative stress associates with striatal neurodegeneration in PD.

  8. Clinical report on and CT findings in two siblings with bilateral striatal necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two siblings, a 13-year-old girl and a 9-year-old boy, presented a similar progressive extrapyramidal disorder. The onsets were at the age of 4 years and at that of 2 1/2 years respectively, and a certain febrile illness had preceded it for two or three months in both cases. The major clinical features were progressive gait disturbance, dysarthria, and dystonia; they were associated with secondary skeletal deformities in the sister and with abnormal ocular movements in the brother. The CT findings, essentially similar in both cases, were characterized by symmetrical hypodensity lesions and an atrophy of the corpora striata, namely, the putamen and the caudate nucleus. Based on the clinical features and the CT findings, and on a comparison with the previous clinico-pathological reports in the literature, the present cases were diagnosed as bilateral striatal necrosis. The disorder termed ''bilateral striatal necrosis'' has not been widely known; this report stresses the great usefulness of CT examination in the clinical diagnosis of this rare disorder. (author)

  9. Somatostatin regulates dopamine release in rat striatal slices and cat caudate nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of somatostatin on the release of tritiated dopamine (DA) formed continuously from tritiated tyrosine were studied in vitro in superfused striatal slices and in vivo in both caudate nuclei and both substantiae nigrae of halothane-anesthetized cats using a push-pull cannula technique. Somatostatin (3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-7) M) increased the spontaneous tritiated dopamine release from rat striatal slices. This effect was dose dependent and was completely prevented by tetrodotoxin (5 X 10(-7) M). When applied for 30 min in one cat caudate nucleus, somatostatin (10(-7) M) immediately increased the local release of tritiated DA, while a gradual inhibition of the tritiated amine's efflux was observed in the contralateral caudate nucleus. No changes in tritiated dopamine were seen in either substantia nigra during or after the peptide's application in the caudate nucleus. These results suggest that somatostatin in the striatum may play a role in the local and the distal control of dopamine release from the terminals of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons

  10. Neonatal astrocyte damage is sufficient to trigger progressive striatal degeneration in a rat model of glutaric acidemia-I.

    OpenAIRE

    Olivera-Bravo, Silvia; Fernández, Anabel; Sarlabós, María Noel; Rosillo, Juan Carlos; Casanova, Gabriela; Jiménez, Marcie; Barbeito, Luis

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have investigated whether an acute metabolic damage to astrocytes during the neonatal period may critically disrupt subsequent brain development, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders. Astrocytes are vulnerable to glutaric acid (GA), a dicarboxylic acid that accumulates in millimolar concentrations in Glutaric Acidemia I (GA-I), an inherited neurometabolic childhood disease characterized by degeneration of striatal neurons. While GA induces astrocyte mitochondrial dysfunction...

  11. Accumbal core: Essential link in feed-forward spiraling striato-nigro-striatal in series connected loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikeda, H.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to establish the behavioral role of the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) core in the feed-forward spiraling striato-nigro-striatal circuitry that transmits information from the Nacc shell toward the dorsal subregion of the neostriatum (DS) in freely moving rats. Unilateral

  12. A C-terminal PDZ domain-binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar;

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling dopamine transporter levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. The dopamine transporters contain a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain-binding sequenc...

  13. Reward modulation of cognitive function in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study on the role of striatal dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Esther; van Holstein, Mieke; Hoogman, Martine; Onnink, Marten; Kan, Cornelis; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Cools, Roshan

    2015-02-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is accompanied by impairments in cognitive control, such as task-switching deficits. We investigated whether such problems, and their remediation by medication, reflect abnormal reward motivation and associated striatal dopamine transmission in ADHD. We used functional genetic neuroimaging to assess the effects of dopaminergic medication and reward motivation on task-switching and striatal BOLD signal in 23 adults with ADHD, ON and OFF methylphenidate, and 26 healthy controls. Critically, we took into account interindividual variability in striatal dopamine by exploiting a common genetic polymorphism (3'-UTR VNTR) in the DAT1 gene coding for the dopamine transporter. The results showed a highly significant group by genotype interaction in the striatum. This was because a subgroup of patients with ADHD showed markedly exaggerated effects of reward on the striatal BOLD signal during task-switching when they were OFF their dopaminergic medication. Specifically, patients carrying the 9R allele showed a greater striatal signal than healthy controls carrying this allele, whereas no effect of diagnosis was observed in 10R homozygotes. Aberrant striatal responses were normalized when 9R-carrying patients with ADHD were ON medication. These pilot data indicate an important role for aberrant reward motivation, striatal dopamine and interindividual genetic differences in cognitive processes in adult ADHD. PMID:25485641

  14. Adenosine A₂A receptors in striatal glutamatergic terminals and GABAergic neurons oppositely modulate psychostimulant action and DARPP-32 phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ying Shen

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are located postsynaptically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons, antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor functions, and are also located presynaptically at corticostriatal terminals, facilitating glutamate release. To address the hypothesis that these two A2AR populations differently control the action of psychostimulants, we characterized A2AR modulation of cocaine-induced effects at the level of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75, c-Fos expression, and psychomotor activity using two lines of cell-type selective A2AR knockout (KO mice with selective A2AR deletion in GABAergic neurons (striatum-A2AR-KO mice, or with A2AR deletion in both striatal GABAergic neurons and projecting cortical glutamatergic neurons (forebrain-A2AR-KO mice. We demonstrated that striatum-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs exclusively in striatal GABAergic terminals whereas forebrain-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs in both striatal GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals leading to a blunted A2AR-mediated facilitation of synaptosomal glutamate release. The inactivation of A2ARs in GABAergic neurons reduced striatal DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and increased its phosphorylation at Thr-75. Conversely, the additional deletion of corticostriatal glutamatergic A2ARs produced opposite effects on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75. This distinct modulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation was associated with opposite responses to cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression and psychomotor activity in striatum-A2AR KO (enhanced and forebrain-A2AR KO mice (reduced. Thus, A2ARs in glutamatergic corticostriatal terminals and in GABAergic striatal neurons modulate the action of psychostimulants and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in opposite ways. We conclude that A2ARs in glutamatergic terminals prominently control the action of psychostimulants and define a novel mechanism by which A2ARs fine-tune striatal activity by integrating GABAergic, dopaminergic and

  15. MicroRNA Profiling Reveals Unique miRNA Signatures in IGF-1 Treated Embryonic Striatal Stem Cell Fate Decisions in Striatal Neurogenesis In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Pati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is considered to be the central processing unit of the basal ganglia in locomotor activity and cognitive function of the brain. IGF-1 could act as a control switch for the long-term proliferation and survival of EGF + bFGF-responsive cultured embryonic striatal stem cell (ESSC, while LIF imposes a negative impact on cell proliferation. The IGF-1-treated ESSCs also showed elevated hTERT expression with demonstration of self-renewal and trilineage commitment (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. In order to decipher the underlying regulatory microRNA (miRNAs in IGF-1/LIF-treated ESSC-derived neurogenesis, we performed in-depth miRNA profiling at 12 days in vitro and analyzed the candidates using the Partek Genome Suite software. The annotated miRNA fingerprints delineated the differential expressions of miR-143, miR-433, and miR-503 specific to IGF-1 treatment. Similarly, the LIF-treated ESSCs demonstrated specific expression of miR-326, miR-181, and miR-22, as they were nonsignificant in IGF-treated ESSCs. To elucidate the possible downstream pathways, we performed in silico mapping of the said miRNAs into ingenuity pathway analysis. Our findings revealed the important mRNA targets of the miRNAs and suggested specific interactomes. The above studies introduced a new genre of miRNAs for ESSC-based neuroregenerative therapeutic applications.

  16. Differences in number and distribution of striatal calbindin medium spiny neurons between a vocal-learner (Melopsittacus undulatus and a non-vocal learner bird (Colinus virginianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eGarcia-Calero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Striatal projecting neurons, known as medium spiny neurons (MSNs, segregate into two compartments called matrix and striosome in the mammalian striatum. The matrix domain is characterized by the presence of calbindin immunopositive (CB+ MSNs, not observed in the striosome subdivision. The existence of a similar CB+ MSN population has recently been described in two striatal structures in male zebra finch (a vocal learner bird: the striatal capsule and the Area X, a nucleus implicated in song learning. Female zebra finches show a similar pattern of CB+ MSNs than males in the developing striatum but loose these cells in juveniles and adult stages. In the present work we analyzed the existence and allocation of CB+MSNs in the striatal domain of the vocal learner bird budgerigar (representative of psittaciformes order and the non-vocal learner bird quail (representative of galliformes order. We studied the co-localization of CB protein with FoxP1, a transcription factor expressed in vertebrate striatal MSNs. We observed CB+ MSNs in the medial striatal domain of adult male and female budgerigars, although this cell type was missing in the potentially homologous nucleus for Area X in budgerigar. In quail, we observed CB+ cells in the striatal domain at developmental and adult stages but they did not co-localize with the MSN marker FoxP1. We also described the existence of the CB+ striatal capsule in budgerigar and quail and compared these results with the CB+ striatal capsule observed in juvenile zebra finches. Together, these results point out important differences in CB+MSN distribution between two representative species of vocal learner and non-vocal learner avian orders (respectively the budgerigar and the quail, but also between close vocal learner bird families.

  17. Striatal pre- and postsynaptic profile of adenosine A(2A receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orru

    Full Text Available Striatal adenosine A(2A receptors (A(2ARs are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D(2 receptors (D(2Rs. A(2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A(1 receptors (A(1Rs. It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A(2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A(2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A(2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A(2AR-D(2R and A(1R-A(2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A(2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A(2AR when co-expressed with D(2R than with A(1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A(2AR co-expressed with D(2R than co-expressed with A(1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile

  18. Striatal dopamine transporter function in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare parkinsonian features and loss of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) function in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease (PD), matched for age and disease duration. Twenty patients with DLB, 24 PD patients and 10 matched controls were examined with SPET using a dual-head camera and the dopamine-transporter ligand 123I-β-CIT (148 MBq). Moreover, in a subgroup of patients (16 DLB and 20 PD patients), subscores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) - motor examination (ME) subscale were obtained during ''practical off'', i.e. 12 h following withdrawal of antiparkinsonian therapy. Compared with controls, striatal/cerebellar (S/C) ratios of DAT binding were significantly reduced in both DLB and PD, deficits being more marked in DLB patients (controls 7.2±1.2, DLB 3.3±1, PD 4.2±1.4; means±SD). The side-to-side differences in the S/C ratios were lower in the DLB group and the controls than in PD patients (0.4±0.4, 0.2±0.2 and 0.6±0.3, respectively, P<0.05). The total UPDRS-ME scores during practical-off were significantly higher in the DLB than in the PD group (41.2±12.7 vs 26.6±15.3, P<0.01). The side-to-side differences of the summed UPDRS extremity subscores were smaller in the DLB than in the PD group (2.2±2.3 vs 7.4±3.9, P<0.0001). Our findings suggest that parkinsonism evolves largely symmetrically and progresses more rapidly with more severe loss of striatal dopamine transporter function in DLB compared to PD. Whether these findings are helpful in the differential diagnosis of DLB and PD needs to be examined in further studies. (orig.)

  19. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil); Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya [Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pessoa-Pureur, Regina, E-mail: rpureur@ufrgs.br [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative

  20. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to 32P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca2+/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca2+ quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights:

  1. Mitochondrial impairment induced by 3-nitropropionic acid is enhanced by endogenous metalloprotease activity inhibition in cultured rat striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oca Balderas, Pavel Montes; Ospina, Gabriel Gutiérrez; Del Ángel, Abel Santamaría

    2013-06-24

    Metalloproteases from the metzincin family mediate molecule processing at the cell membrane termed ectodomain shedding (ES). This mechanism enables the generation of intracellular and extracellular fragments from cell membrane molecules that exert additional functions involved in cell processes including cell death, beyond those of full length molecules. Micotoxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induces striatal neuronal degeneration in vivo and in vitro through mitochondrial complex II inhibition. In this study, we hypothesized that metalloproteases regulate mitochondrial activity in cultured rat striatal neurons undergoing degeneration. To test this idea, striatal neuronal cultures characterized by NeuN and GAD-67 expression were treated with 3-NP together with the metalloprotease inhibitor GM6001 and their mitochondrial activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Our results showed that metalloprotease inhibition potentiated mitochondrial activity impairment induced by 3-NP whereas the inhibitor alone had no effect. These results indicate that metalloproteases regulate and promote mitochondrial functionality in striatal neurons undergoing degeneration induced by 3-NP. Since NMDA receptor is involved in the excitotoxic neuronal death triggered by 3-NP and is known to undergo ES, we analyzed NMDAR subunit NR1 phenotypic distribution by immunofluorescence. 3-NP and GM6001 induced abnormal perinuclear NR1 accumulation that was not observed with 3-NP or GM6001 alone. This observation suggests that metalloproteases are involved in NR1 cellular reorganization induced by 3-NP, and that their inhibition results in abnormal NR1 distribution. Together results indicate that endogenous metalloproteases are activated during striatal neurodegeneration induced by 3-NP eliciting an adaptative or compensatory response that protects mitochondrial functionality. PMID:23643981

  2. Amphetamine-induced sensitization has little effect on multiple learning paradigms and fails to rescue mice with a striatal learning defect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiara C Eldred

    Full Text Available Behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants such as amphetamine (AMPH is associated with synaptic modifications that are thought to underlie learning and memory. Because AMPH enhances extracellular dopamine in the striatum where dopamine and glutamate signaling are essential for learning, one might expect that the molecular and morphological changes that occur in the striatum in response to AMPH, including changes in synaptic plasticity, would affect learning. To ascertain whether AMPH sensitization affects learning, we tested wild-type mice and mice lacking NMDA receptor signaling in striatal medium spiny neurons in several different learning tests (motor learning, Pavlovian association, U-maze escape test with strategy shifting with or without prior sensitization to AMPH. Prior sensitization had minimal effect on learning in any of these paradigms in wild-type mice and failed to restore learning in mutant mice, despite the fact that the mutant mice became sensitized by the AMPH treatment. We conclude that the changes in synaptic plasticity and many other signaling events that occur in response to AMPH sensitization are dissociable from those involved in learning the tasks used in our experiments.

  3. Diverse Short-Term Dynamics of Inhibitory Synapses Converging on Striatal Projection Neurons: Differential Changes in a Rodent Model of Parkinson’s Disease

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    Janet Barroso-Flores

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most neurons in the striatum are projection neurons (SPNs which make synapses with each other within distances of approximately 100 µm. About 5% of striatal neurons are GABAergic interneurons whose axons expand hundreds of microns. Short-term synaptic plasticity (STSP between fast-spiking (FS interneurons and SPNs and between SPNs has been described with electrophysiological and optogenetic techniques. It is difficult to obtain pair recordings from some classes of interneurons and due to limitations of actual techniques, no other types of STSP have been described on SPNs. Diverse STSPs may reflect differences in presynaptic release machineries. Therefore, we focused the present work on answering two questions: Are there different identifiable classes of STSP between GABAergic synapses on SPNs? And, if so, are synapses exhibiting different classes of STSP differentially affected by dopamine depletion? Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings on SPNs revealed three classes of STSPs: depressing, facilitating, and biphasic (facilitating-depressing, in response to stimulation trains at 20 Hz, in a constant ionic environment. We then used the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA rodent model of Parkinson’s disease to show that synapses with different STSPs are differentially affected by dopamine depletion. We propose a general model of STSP that fits all the dynamics found in our recordings.

  4. Effects of postnatal anoxia on striatal dopamine metabolism and prepulse inhibition in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Andersen, Maibritt B; Sager, Thomas N; Werge, Thomas; Scheel-Krüger, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Various evidence indicate that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder. Epidemiological observations point to oxygen deficiencies during delivery as one of the early risk factors for developing schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of postnatal anoxia in rats....... Anoxia was experimentally induced by placing 9-day-old rat pups for 6 min in a chamber saturated with 100% nitrogen (N(2)). Exposure to anoxia on postnatal day (PND) 9 resulted in significantly reduced subcortical dopamine metabolism and turnover, as measured by striatal 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid...... schizophrenic patients. There was no effect of postnatal anoxia on either baseline or d-amphetamine-induced deficit in the prepulse inhibition (PPI) paradigm in adulthood. Accordingly, although oxygen deficiency early in life has been discussed as vulnerability factor in developing schizophrenia, exposure to...

  5. Metaphit irreversibly inhibits (/sup 3/H)threo-(+/-)-methylphenidate binding to rat striatal tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweri, M.M.; Jacobson, A.E.; Lessor, R.A.; Rice, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    Metaphit (1-(1-(3-isothiocyanatophenyl)cyclohexyl)-piperidine), a derivative of phencyclidine that contains an isothiocyanate group on the meta position of the aromatic ring, resembles its parent compound (phencyclidine) in its ability to inhibit the binding of the stimulant drug (/sup 3/H)threo-(+/-)-methylphenidate to crude synaptosomal membranes from rat striatal tissue (IC50 = 1.4 and 6.2 microM for phencyclidine and Metaphit, respectively). Unlike phencyclidine, however, Metaphit appears to inhibit binding of the radiolabeled stimulant in an irreversible manner, as the degree of inhibition of binding of the stimulant does not diminish when the Metaphit-treated tissue is subjected to repeated washings before determination of the binding of (/sup 3/H)threo-(+/-)-methylphenidate. This finding suggests that Metaphit may be a useful tool in the study of the molecular basis of stimulant action.

  6. Reappraising striatal D1- and D2-neurons in reward and aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Cunha, Carina; Coimbra, Barbara; Sousa, Nuno; Rodrigues, Ana J

    2016-09-01

    The striatum has been involved in complex behaviors such as motor control, learning, decision-making, reward and aversion. The striatum is mainly composed of medium spiny neurons (MSNs), typically divided into those expressing dopamine receptor D1, forming the so-called direct pathway, and those expressing D2 receptor (indirect pathway). For decades it has been proposed that these two populations exhibit opposing control over motor output, and recently, the same dichotomy has been proposed for valenced behaviors. Whereas D1-MSNs mediate reinforcement and reward, D2-MSNs have been associated with punishment and aversion. In this review we will discuss pharmacological, genetic and optogenetic studies that indicate that there is still controversy to what concerns the role of striatal D1- and D2-MSNs in this type of behaviors, highlighting the need to reconsider the early view that they mediate solely opposing aspects of valenced behaviour. PMID:27235078

  7. Reward system and temporal pole contributions to affective evaluation during a first person shooter video game

    OpenAIRE

    Weber René; Klasen Martin; Mathiak Krystyna A; Ackermann Hermann; Shergill Sukhwinder S; Mathiak Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Violent content in video games evokes many concerns but there is little research concerning its rewarding aspects. It was demonstrated that playing a video game leads to striatal dopamine release. It is unclear, however, which aspects of the game cause this reward system activation and if violent content contributes to it. We combined functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) with individual affect measures to address the neuronal correlates of violence in a video game....

  8. Capturing dopaminergic modulation and bimodal membrane behaviour of striatal medium spiny neurons in accurate, reduced models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Humphries

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Loss of dopamine from the striatum can cause both profound motor deficits, as in Parkinsons's disease, and disrupt learning. Yet the effect of dopamine on striatal neurons remains a complex and controversial topic, and is in need of a comprehensive framework. We extend a reduced model of the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN to account for dopaminergic modulation of its intrinsic ion channels and synaptic inputs. We tune our D1 and D2 receptor MSN models using data from a recent large-scale compartmental model. The new models capture the input-output relationships for both current injection and spiking input with remarkable accuracy, despite the order of magnitude decrease in system size. They also capture the paired pulse facilitation shown by MSNs. Our dopamine models predict that synaptic effects dominate intrinsic effects for all levels of D1 and D2 receptor activation. We analytically derive a full set of equilibrium points and their stability for the original and dopamine modulated forms of the MSN model. We find that the stability types are not changed by dopamine activation, and our models predict that the MSN is never bistable. Nonetheless, the MSN models can produce a spontaneously bimodal membrane potential similar to that recently observed in vitro following application of NMDA agonists. We demonstrate that this bimodality is created by modelling the agonist effects as slow, irregular and massive jumps in NMDA conductance and, rather than a form of bistability, is due to the voltage-dependent blockade of NMDA receptors. Our models also predict a more pronounced membrane potential bimodality following D1 receptor activation. This work thus establishes reduced yet accurate dopamine-modulated models of MSNs, suitable for use in large-scale models of the striatum. More importantly, these provide a tractable framework for further study of dopamine's effects on computation by individual neurons.

  9. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception. PMID:26270590

  10. Ventral striatal hypoactivation is associated with apathy but not diminished expression in patients with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Matthias; Hager, Oliver M.; Bischof, Martin; Hartmann, Matthias N.; Kluge, Agne; Seifritz, Erich; Tobler, Philippe N.; Kaiser, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Negative symptoms of schizophrenia can be grouped in 2 dimensions: apathy and diminished expression. Increasing evidence suggests that negative symptoms are associated with altered neural activity of subcortical and cortical regions in the brain reward system. However, the neurobiological basis of the distinct symptom dimensions within negative symptoms is still poorly understood. The primary aim of our study was to examine the neural correlates of the negative symptom dimensions apathy and diminished expression during a reward processing task. Methods Patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls underwent event-related fMRI while performing a variant of the Monetary Incentive Delay Task. We assessed negative symptom dimensions using the Brief Negative Symptom Scale. Results We included 27 patients and 25 controls in our study. Both groups showed neural activation indicated by blood oxygen–level dependent signal in the ventral striatum during reward anticipation. Ventral striatal activation during reward anticipation showed a strong negative correlation with apathy. Importantly, this effect was not driven by cognitive ability, medication, depressive or positive symptoms. In contrast, no significant correlation with the diminished expression dimension was observed. Limitations Although the results remain significant when controlling for chlorpromazine equivalents, we cannot fully exclude potential confounding effects of medication with atypical antipsychotics. Conclusion The specific correlation of ventral striatal hypoactivation during reward anticipation with apathy demonstrates a differentiation of apathy and diminished expression on a neurobiological level and provides strong evidence for different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these 2 negative symptom dimensions. Our findings contribute to a multilevel framework in which apathy and motivational impairment in patients with schizophrenia can be described on psychopathological

  11. Quantification of striatal vesicular monoamine transporters in the human brain with [18F]AV133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text:Background: Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) imaging with 11C-DTBZ has proven useful for the evaluation of monoaminergic terminals in vivo with PET. However, the 20 min half-life of C-11 restricts the use of 11C-DTBZ to PET centres with on-site cyclotron. The aim of this study was to assess 18F-AV133, a novel VMAT2 binding ligand, in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, age-matched healthy controls (HC), as well as in dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: Twenty-two participants (10 PD; 7 HC, 4 DLB and 1 AD) underwent PET imaging after iv injection of 250 MBq of 18F-AV133. Distribution volume ratios (DVR) were calculated through graphical analysis using a reference tissue model with the primary visual cortex as input function. Results: Significantly lower striatal DVRs were observed in PD (1.74±0.46) when compared with HC (3.0±0.20; p<0.001, effect size = 5.7). VMAT2 reductions were greatest in posterior putamen (-55%) than in anterior putamen (-45%) or caudate nuclei (-25%). Similar reductions were observed in DLB patients. Both HC and AD scans were clearly distinguishable from PD subjects. Conclusions: Our results show that striatal VMAT2 can be quantified in vivo with 18F-AV133. The longer half-life of F-18 will allow for wider application of monoaminergic imaging with PET in a variety of neurodegenerative and neurotoxic conditions, allowing better differential diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  12. Reduced Levels of Proteasome Products in a Mouse Striatal Cell Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayani Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is the result of a long polyglutamine tract in the gene encoding huntingtin protein, which in turn causes a large number of cellular changes and ultimately results in neurodegeneration of striatal neurons. Although many theories have been proposed, the precise mechanism by which the polyglutamine expansion causes cellular changes is not certain. Some evidence supports the hypothesis that the long polyglutamine tract inhibits the proteasome, a multiprotein complex involved in protein degradation. However, other studies report normal proteasome function in cells expressing long polyglutamine tracts. The controversy may be due to the methods used to examine proteasome activity in each of the previous studies. In the present study, we measured proteasome function by examining levels of endogenous peptides that are products of proteasome cleavage. Peptide levels were compared among mouse striatal cell lines expressing either 7 glutamines (STHdhQ7/Q7 or 111 glutamines in the huntingtin protein, either heterozygous (STHdhQ7/Q111 or homozygous (STHdhQ111/Q111. Both of the cell lines expressing huntingtin with 111 glutamines showed a large reduction in nearly all of the peptides detected in the cells, relative to levels of these peptides in cells homozygous for 7 glutamines. Treatment of STHdhQ7/Q7 cells with proteasome inhibitors epoxomicin or bortezomib also caused a large reduction in most of these peptides, suggesting that they are products of proteasome-mediated cleavage of cellular proteins. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that proteasome function is impaired by the expression of huntingtin protein containing long polyglutamine tracts.

  13. Onset of Pup Locomotion Coincides with Loss of NR2C/D-mediated Cortico-striatal EPSCs and Dampening of Striatal Network Immature Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Rotrou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult motor coordination requires strong coincident cortical excitatory input to hyperpolarized Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs, the dominant neuronal population of the striatum. However, cortical and subcortical neurons generate during development large ongoing patterns required for activity-dependent construction of networks. This raises the question of whether immature MSNs have adult features from early stages or whether they generate immature patterns that are timely silenced to enable locomotion. Using a wide range of techniques including dynamic two photon imaging, whole-cell or single channel patch clamp recording in slices from Nkx2.1-GFP mice, we now report a silencing of MSNs that timely coincides with locomotion. At embryonic stage (as early as E16 and during early postnatal days, genetically identified MSNs have a depolarized resting membrane potential, a high input resistance and lack both inward rectifying (IKIR and early slowly decaying (ID potassium currents. They generate intrinsic voltage-gated clustered calcium activity without synaptic components. From postnatal days 5 to 7, the striatal network transiently generates synapse-driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs when activation of cortical inputs evokes long lasting EPSCs in MSNs. Both are mediated by NR2C/D-receptors. These immature features are abruptly replaced by adult ones before P10: MSNs express IKIR and ID and generate short lasting, time-locked corticostriatal AMPA/NMDA EPSCs with no NR2C/D component. This shift parallels the onset of quadruped motion by the pup. Therefore, MSNs generate immature patterns that are timely shut off to enable the coordination of motor programs.

  14. A Pontine Region is a Neural Correlate of the Human Affective Processing Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatia M.C. Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The in vivo neural activity of the pons during the perception of affective stimuli has not been studied despite the strong implications of its role in affective processing. To examine the activity of the pons during the viewing of affective stimuli, and to verify its functional and structural connectivity with other affective neural correlates, a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging methodology was employed in this study. We observed the in vivo activity of the pons when viewing affective stimuli. Furthermore, small-world connectivity indicated that the functional connectivity (FC between the pons and the cortico-limbic affective regions was meaningful, with the coefficient λ being positively associated with self-reported emotional reactivity. The FC between the pons and the cortico-limbic-striatal areas was related to self-reported negative affect. Corroborating this finding was the observation that the tract passing through the pons and the left hippocampus was negatively related to self-reported positive affect and positively correlated with emotional reactivity. Our findings support the framework that the pons works conjunctively with the distributed cortico-limbic-striatal systems in shaping individuals' affective states and reactivity. Our work paves the path for future research on the contribution of the pons to the precipitation and maintenance of affective disorders.

  15. Genetic diversity and striatal gene networks: focus on the heterogeneous stock-collaborative cross (HS-CC mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belknap John

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study focused on the extent genetic diversity within a species (Mus musculus affects gene co-expression network structure. To examine this issue, we have created a new mouse resource, a heterogeneous stock (HS formed from the same eight inbred strains that have been used to create the collaborative cross (CC. The eight inbred strains capture > 90% of the genetic diversity available within the species. For contrast with the HS-CC, a C57BL/6J (B6 × DBA/2J (D2 F2 intercross and the HS4, derived from crossing the B6, D2, BALB/cJ and LP/J strains, were used. Brain (striatum gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina Mouse WG 6.1 array, and the data sets were interrogated using a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA. Results Genes reliably detected as expressed were similar in all three data sets as was the variability of expression. As measured by the WGCNA, the modular structure of the transcriptome networks was also preserved both on the basis of module assignment and from the perspective of the topological overlap maps. Details of the HS-CC gene modules are provided; essentially identical results were obtained for the HS4 and F2 modules. Gene ontology annotation of the modules revealed a significant overrepresentation in some modules for neuronal processes, e.g., central nervous system development. Integration with known protein-protein interactions data indicated significant enrichment among co-expressed genes. We also noted significant overlap with markers of central nervous system cell types (neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Using the Allen Brain Atlas, we found evidence of spatial co-localization within the striatum for several modules. Finally, for some modules it was possible to detect an enrichment of transcription binding sites. The binding site for Wt1, which is associated with neurodegeneration, was the most significantly overrepresented. Conclusions Despite the marked

  16. Impaired TrkB Signaling Underlies Reduced BDNF-Mediated Trophic Support of Striatal Neurons in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh Q; Rymar, Vladimir V; Sadikot, Abbas F

    2016-01-01

    The principal projection neurons of the striatum are critically dependent on an afferent supply of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for neurotrophic support. These neurons express TrkB, the cognate receptor for BDNF, which activates signaling pathways associated with neuronal survival and phenotypic maintenance. Impairment of the BDNF-TrkB pathway is suspected to underlie the early dysfunction and prominent degeneration of striatal neurons in Huntington disease (HD). Some studies in HD models indicate that BDNF supply is reduced, while others suggest that TrkB signaling is impaired earlier in disease progression. It remains important to determine whether a primary defect in TrkB signaling underlies reduced neurotrophic support and the early vulnerability of striatal neurons in HD. Using the transgenic R6/2 mouse model of HD we found that prior to striatal degeneration there are early deficits in striatal protein levels of activated phospho-TrkB and the downstream-regulated protein DARPP-32. In contrast, total-TrkB and BDNF protein levels remained normal. Primary neurons cultured from R6/2 striatum exhibited reduced survival in response to exogenous BDNF applications. Moreover, BDNF activation of phospho-TrkB and downstream signal transduction was attenuated in R6/2 striatal cultures. These results suggest that neurotrophic support of striatal neurons is attenuated early in disease progression due to defects in TrkB signal transduction in the R6/2 model of HD. PMID:27013968

  17. Fully Automated Quantification of the Striatal Uptake Ratio of [99mTc]-TRODAT with SPECT Imaging: Evaluation of the Diagnostic Performance in Parkinson’s Disease and the Temporal Regression of Striatal Tracer Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Dean Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We aimed at improving the existing methods for the fully automatic quantification of striatal uptake of [Tc99m]-TRODAT with SPECT imaging. Procedures. A normal [Tc99m]-TRODAT template was first formed based on 28 healthy controls. Images from PD patients (n=365 and nPD subjects (28 healthy controls and 33 essential tremor patients were spatially normalized to the normal template. We performed an inverse transform on the predefined striatal and reference volumes of interest (VOIs and applied the transformed VOIs to the original image data to calculate the striatal-to-reference ratio (SRR. The diagnostic performance of the SRR was determined through receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results. The SRR measured with our new and automatic method demonstrated excellent diagnostic performance with 92% sensitivity, 90% specificity, 92% accuracy, and an area under the curve (AUC of 0.94. For the evaluation of the mean SRR and the clinical duration, a quadratic function fit the data with R2=0.84. Conclusions. We developed and validated a fully automatic method for the quantification of the SRR in a large study sample. This method has an excellent diagnostic performance and exhibits a strong correlation between the mean SRR and the clinical duration in PD patients.

  18. Segregation and crosstalk of D1 receptor-mediated activation of ERK in striatal medium spiny neurons upon acute administration of psychostimulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren

    2014-01-01

    The convergence of corticostriatal glutamate and dopamine from the midbrain in the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN) triggers synaptic plasticity that underlies reinforcement learning and pathological conditions such as psychostimulant addiction. The increase in striatal dopamine produced by the acute administration of psychostimulants has been found to activate not only effectors of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade such as GluR1, but also effectors of the NMDAR/Ca(2+)/RAS cascade such as ERK. The dopamine-triggered effects on both these cascades are mediated by D1R coupled to Golf but while the phosphorylation of GluR1 is affected by reductions in the available amount of Golf but not of D1R, the activation of ERK follows the opposite pattern. This segregation is puzzling considering that D1R-induced Golf activation monotonically increases with DA and that there is crosstalk from the AC5/cAMP/PKA cascade to the NMDAR/Ca(2+)/RAS cascade via a STEP (a tyrosine phosphatase). In this work, we developed a signaling model which accounts for this segregation based on the assumption that a common pool of D1R and Golf is distributed in two D1R/Golf signaling compartments. This model integrates a relatively large amount of experimental data for neurons in vivo and in vitro. We used it to explore the crosstalk topologies under which the sensitivities of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade to reductions in D1R or Golf are transferred or not to the activation of ERK. We found that the sequestration of STEP by its substrate ERK together with the insensitivity of STEP activity on targets upstream of ERK (i.e. Fyn and NR2B) to PKA phosphorylation are able to explain the experimentally observed segregation. This model provides a quantitative framework for simulation based experiments to study signaling required for long term potentiation in MSNs. PMID:24499932

  19. Selective increase of auditory cortico-striatal coherence during auditory-cued Go/NoGo discrimination learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas L. Schulz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal directed behavior and associated learning processes are tightly linked to neuronal activity in the ventral striatum. Mechanisms that integrate task relevant sensory information into striatal processing during decision making and learning are implicitly assumed in current reinforcementmodels, yet they are still weakly understood. To identify the functional activation of cortico-striatal subpopulations of connections during auditory discrimination learning, we trained Mongolian gerbils in a two-way active avoidance task in a shuttlebox to discriminate between falling and rising frequency modulated tones with identical spectral properties. We assessed functional coupling by analyzing the field-field coherence between the auditory cortex and the ventral striatum of animals performing the task. During the course of training, we observed a selective increase of functionalcoupling during Go-stimulus presentations. These results suggest that the auditory cortex functionally interacts with the ventral striatum during auditory learning and that the strengthening of these functional connections is selectively goal-directed.

  20. Opponent actor learning (OpAL): modeling interactive effects of striatal dopamine on reinforcement learning and choice incentive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anne G E; Frank, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The striatal dopaminergic system has been implicated in reinforcement learning (RL), motor performance, and incentive motivation. Various computational models have been proposed to account for each of these effects individually, but a formal analysis of their interactions is lacking. Here we present a novel algorithmic model expanding the classical actor-critic architecture to include fundamental interactive properties of neural circuit models, incorporating both incentive and learning effects into a single theoretical framework. The standard actor is replaced by a dual opponent actor system representing distinct striatal populations, which come to differentially specialize in discriminating positive and negative action values. Dopamine modulates the degree to which each actor component contributes to both learning and choice discriminations. In contrast to standard frameworks, this model simultaneously captures documented effects of dopamine on both learning and choice incentive-and their interactions-across a variety of studies, including probabilistic RL, effort-based choice, and motor skill learning. PMID:25090423

  1. Control of neuronal excitability by calcium binding proteins: a new mathematical model for striatal fast-spiking interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischop, D P; Orduz, D; Lambot, L; Schiffmann, S N; Gall, D

    2012-01-01

    Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin (PV), are abundantly expressed in distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly understood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, where PV is only expressed in the fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. FS interneurons form an inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN). So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS neurons did not allow the study of the coupling between PV concentration and electrical activity. In the present paper, we propose a new mathematical model for the striatal FS interneurons that includes apamin-sensitive small conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels (SK) and the presence of a calcium buffer. Our results show that a variation in the concentration of PV can modulate substantially the intrinsic excitability of the FS interneurons and therefore may be involved in the information processing at the striatal level. PMID:22787441

  2. Control of neuronal excitability by calcium binding proteins : a new mathematical model for striatal fast-spiking interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Patrick Bischop

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium binding proteins, such as parvalbumin, are abundantly expressed in very distinctive patterns in the central nervous system but their physiological function remains poorly understood. Notably, at the level of the striatum, parvalbumin is only expressed in the fast spiking (FS interneurons, which form a inhibitory network modulating the output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN. So far the existing conductance-based computational models for FS neurons did not allow the study of the the coupling between parvalbumin concentration and electrical activity. In the present paper, we propose a new mathematical model for the striatal FS interneurons that includes apamin-sensitive small conductance \\ca -dependent \\kk channels (SK and takes into account the presence of a calcium buffer. Our results demonstrate that a variation in the concentration of parvalbumin can modulate substantially the intrinsic excitability of the FS interneurons and therefore may be involved in the information processing at the striatal level.

  3. Absence of the GPR37/PAEL receptor impairs striatal Akt and ERK2 phosphorylation, DeltaFosB expression, and conditioned place preference to amphetamine and cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Daniela; Di Pietro, Chiara; Mandillo, Silvia; Golini, Elisabetta; Matteoni, Rafaele; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P

    2011-06-01

    The orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) colocalizes with the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) in mouse nigrostriatal presynaptic membranes, and its genetic ablation in homozygous null-mutant (GPR37-KO) mice provokes the marked increase of plasma membrane expression of DAT, alteration of psychostimulant-induced locomotor activity, and reduction of catalepsy induced by DA-receptor antagonists. We report that extracts from GPR37-KO mice displayed biochemical alterations of the nigrostriatal signaling pathways mediated by D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors. Null-mutant mice showed an increase of the basal phosphorylation level of the D2-regulated Akt kinase. The basal phosphorylation of the D1-activated ERK2 kinase was not altered, but acute treatments with amphetamine or cocaine failed to produce its specific increase, as detected in samples from wild-type littermates. Furthermore, the chronic administration of cocaine to GPR37-KO mice did not increase the expression of the ΔFosB transcription factor isoforms. Consistently, behavioral analysis showed that null-mutant animals did not respond to the incentive properties of amphetamine or cocaine, in conditioned place preference tests. Thus, the lack of GPR37 affects both ERK2- and Akt-mediated striatal signaling pathways, impairing the biochemical and behavioral responses typically induced by acute and chronic administration of psychostimulant drugs. PMID:21372109

  4. The NO/cGMP pathway inhibits transient cAMP signals through the activation of PDE2 in striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina ePolito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The NO-cGMP signaling plays an important role in the regulation of striatal function although the mechanisms of action of cGMP specifically in medium spiny neurons (MSNs remain unclear. Using genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, including a novel Epac-based sensor (EPAC-SH150 with increased sensitivity for cAMP, we analyze the cGMP response to NO and whether it affected cAMP/PKA signaling in MSNs. The Cygnet2 sensor for cGMP reported large responses to NO donors in both striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, and this cGMP signal was controlled partially by PDE2. At the level of cAMP brief forskolin stimulations produced transient cAMP signals which differed between D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons. NO inhibited these cAMP transients through cGMP-dependent PDE2 activation, an effect that was translated and magnified downstream of cAMP, at the level of PKA. PDE2 thus appears as a critical effector of NO which modulates the post-synaptic response of MSNs to dopaminergic transmission.

  5. The Effect of Oxytocin on Social and Non-Social Behaviour and Striatal Protein Expression in C57BL/6N Mice.

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    Xiaofan Zhang

    Full Text Available Oxytocin has been suggested as a promising new treatment for neurodevelopmental disorders. However, important gaps remain in our understanding of its mode of action, in particular, to what extent oxytocin modulates social and non-social behaviours and whether its effects are generalizable across both sexes. Here we investigated the effects of a range of oxytocin doses on social and non-social behaviours in C57BL/6N mice of both sexes. As the striatum modulates social and non-social behaviours, and is implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, we also conducted a pilot exploration of changes in striatal protein expression elicited by oxytocin. Oxytocin increased prepulse inhibition of startle but attenuated the recognition memory in male C57BL/6N mice. It increased social interaction time and suppressed the amphetamine locomotor response in both sexes. The striatum proteome following oxytocin exposure could be clearly discriminated from saline controls. With the caveat that these results are preliminary, oxytocin appeared to alter individual protein expression in directions similar to conventional anti-psychotics. The proteins affected by oxytocin could be broadly categorized as those that modulate glutamatergic, GABAergic or dopaminergic signalling and those that mediate cytoskeleton dynamics. Our results here encourage further research into the clinical application of this peptide hormone, which may potentially extend treatment options across a spectrum of neurodevelopmental conditions.

  6. Evaluation of iterative reconstruction method and attenuation correction on brain dopamine transporter SPECT using anthropomorphic striatal phantom

    OpenAIRE

    Akira Maebatake; Ayaka Imamura; Yui Kodera; Yasuo Yamashita; Kazuhiko Himuro; Shingo Baba; Kenta Miwa; Masayuki Sasaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to determine the optimal reconstruction parameters for iterative reconstruction in different devices and collimators for dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The results were compared between filtered back projection (FBP) and different attenuation correction (AC) methods.Methods: An anthropomorphic striatal phantom was filled with 123I solutions at different striatum-to-background radioactivity ratios. Data wer...

  7. Developmental Profile of the Aberrant Dopamine D2 Receptor Response in Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons in DYT1 Dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Sciamanna; Annalisa Tassone; Giuseppina Martella; Georgia Mandolesi; Francesca Puglisi; Dario Cuomo; Grazia Madeo; Giulia Ponterio; David George Standaert; Paola Bonsi; Antonio Pisani

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DYT1 dystonia, a severe form of genetically determined human dystonia, exhibits reduced penetrance among carriers and begins usually during adolescence. The reasons for such age dependence and variability remain unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: We characterized the alterations in D2 dopamine receptor (D2R) signalling in striatal cholinergic interneurons at different ages in mice overexpressing human mutant torsinA (hMT). An abnormal excitatory response to the D2R agonist quinpirole w...

  8. Striatal Alterations of Secretogranin-1, Somatostatin, Prodynorphin, and Cholecystokinin Peptides in an Experimental Mouse Model of Parkinson Disease*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Anna; Fälth, Maria; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Kultima, Kim; Sköld, Karl; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E.

    2009-01-01

    The principal causative pathology of Parkinson disease is the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta projecting to the striatum in the brain. The information regarding the expression of neuropeptides in parkinsonism is very limited. Here we have elucidated striatal neuropeptide mechanisms in experimental parkinsonism using the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine model to degenerate dopamine neurons. A thoroughly controlled sample preparation technique ...

  9. Contribution of different classes of glutamate receptors in the corticostriatal polysynaptic responses from striatal direct and indirect projection neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Vizcarra-Chacón, Bianca J.; Arias-García, Mario A.; Pérez-Ramírez, Maria B; Flores-Barrera, Edén; Tapia, Dagoberto; Drucker-Colin, Rene; Bargas, José; Galarraga, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous work showed differences in the polysynaptic activation of GABAergic synapses during corticostriatal suprathreshold responses in direct and indirect striatal projection neurons (dSPNs and iSPNs). Here, we now show differences and similarities in the polysynaptic activation of cortical glutamatergic synapses on the same responses. Corticostriatal contacts have been extensively studied. However, several questions remain unanswered, e.g.: what are the differences and similarit...

  10. mTORC2/rictor signaling disrupts dopamine-dependent behaviors via defects in striatal dopamine neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadalko, Olga I; Siuta, Michael; Poe, Amanda; Erreger, Kevin; Matthies, Heinrich J G; Niswender, Kevin; Galli, Aurelio

    2015-06-10

    Disrupted neuronal protein kinase B (Akt) signaling has been associated with dopamine (DA)-related neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, a devastating mental illness. We hypothesize that proper DA neurotransmission is therefore dependent upon intact neuronal Akt function. Akt is activated by phosphorylation of two key residues: Thr308 and Ser473. Blunted Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 (pAkt-473) has been observed in lymphocytes and postmortem brains of schizophrenia patients, and psychosis-prone normal individuals. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2) is a multiprotein complex that is responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 (pAkt-473). We demonstrate that mice with disrupted mTORC2 signaling in brain exhibit altered striatal DA-dependent behaviors, such as increased basal locomotion, stereotypic counts, and exaggerated response to the psychomotor effects of amphetamine (AMPH). Combining in vivo and ex vivo pharmacological, electrophysiological, and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that the changes in striatal DA neurotransmission and associated behaviors are caused, at least in part, by elevated D2 DA receptor (D2R) expression and upregulated ERK1/2 activation. Haloperidol, a typical antipsychotic and D2R blocker, reduced AMPH hypersensitivity and elevated pERK1/2 to the levels of control animals. By viral gene delivery, we downregulated mTORC2 solely in the dorsal striatum of adult wild-type mice, demonstrating that striatal mTORC2 regulates AMPH-stimulated behaviors. Our findings implicate mTORC2 signaling as a novel pathway regulating striatal DA tone and D2R signaling. PMID:26063917

  11. Impaired Timing Precision Produced by Striatal D2 Receptor Overexpression is Mediated by Cognitive and Motivational Deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Ryan D; Kellendonk, Christoph; Simpson, Eleanor H.; Lipatova, Olga; Drew, Michael R.; Fairhurst, Stephen; Kandel, Eric R.; Balsam, Peter D

    2009-01-01

    Increased striatal dopamine D2 receptor activity is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. To model this condition in mice, Kellendonk et al. (2006) generated transgenic mice which selectively overexpress the D2 receptor in striatum (D2OE). Drew et al. (2007) reported that D2OE mice display deficits in interval timing and motivation. The present study further explored the impaired timing in D2OE mice. Experiment 1 assessed the role of motivation in producing timing def...

  12. Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback can reduce striatal cue-reactivity to alcohol stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Martina; Gruber, Isabella; Ruf, Matthias; Kiefer, Falk; Kirsch, Peter

    2016-07-01

    It has been shown that in alcoholic patients, alcohol-related cues produce increased activation of reward-related brain regions like the ventral striatum (VS), which has been proposed as neurobiological basis of craving. Modulating this activation might be a promising option in the treatment of alcohol addiction. One approach might be real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback (rtfMRI NF). This study was set up to implement and evaluate a rtfMRI approach in a group of non-addicted heavy social drinkers. Thirty-eight heavy drinking students were assigned to a real feedback group (rFB, n = 13), a yoke feedback group (yFB, n = 13) and a passive control group (noFB, n = 12). After conducting a reward task as functional localizer to identify ventral striatal regions, the participants viewed alcohol cues during three NF training blocks in a 3 T MRI scanner. The rFB group received feedback from their own and the yFB from another participants' VS. The noFB group received no feedback. The rFB and the yFB groups were instructed to downregulate the displayed activation. Activation of the VS and prefrontal control regions was compared between the groups. We found significant downregulation of striatal regions specifically in the rFB group. While the rFB and the yFB groups showed significant activation of prefrontal regions during feedback, this activation was only correlated to the reduction of striatal activation in the rFB group. We conclude that rtfMRI NF is a suitable method to reduce striatal activation to alcohol cues. It might be a promising supplement to the treatment of alcoholic patients. PMID:26096546

  13. Differences in striatal dopamine transporter density between tremor dominant and non-tremor Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Kinos, Maija; Joutsa, Juho [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku (Finland); University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Seppaenen, Marko [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku (Finland); Noponen, Tommi [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can manifest with a tremor-dominant or a non-tremor (akinetic-rigid) phenotype. Although the tremor-dominant subtype may show a better prognosis, there is limited information on the phenotypic differences regarding the level of striatal dopamine transmission. The present study investigated striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding characteristics in a large sample of patients with and without tremor. [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT scans of 231 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PD and abnormal FP-CIT binding (157 with tremor, 74 without tremor) and 230 control patients with normal FP-CIT binding (148 with tremor, 82 without tremor) were analysed using an automated region-of-interest analysis of the scans (BRASS). Specific striatal binding ratios were compared between phenotypes and groups using age, sex, and symptom duration, predominant side of symptoms, dopaminergic medications and scanner as covariates. Patients with PD had 28.1 - 65.0 % lower binding in all striatal regions compared to controls (p < 0.001). The mean FP-CIT caudate nucleus uptake and the left caudate nucleus uptake were higher in PD patients with tremor than in PD patients without tremor (mean 9.0 % higher, left 10.5 % higher; p < 0.05), whereas there were no differences between tremor and non-tremor control patients. No significant effects of tremor on DAT binding were observed in the anterior or posterior putamen. The motor phenotype is associated with the extent of caudate dopamine terminal loss in PD, as dopamine function is relatively more preserved in tremor patients. Symptom type is related to caudate dopamine function only in association with Parkinsonian dopaminergic degeneration, not in intact dopamine systems in patients with non-PD tremor. (orig.)

  14. Cystamine and cysteamine prevent 3-NP-induced mitochondrial depolarization of Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhengkuan; Choo, Yeun Su; Lesort, Mathieu

    2006-04-01

    Abstract Cystamine significantly improved motor deficits and extended survival in mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD); however, the precise mechanism(s) by which cystamine and the related compound cysteamine are beneficial remain to be elucidated. Using clonal striatal cell lines from wild-type (STHdhQ7/HdhQ7) and mutant huntingtin knock-in (STHdhQ111/HdhQ111) mice, we have tested the hypothesis that cystamine and cysteamine could be beneficial by preventing the depolarization of mitochondria in cell cultures. Treatment with 3-nitroproprionic acid (3-NP), a mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, induces mitochondrial depolarization and cell death of mutant HD striatal cells but not of wild-type cells. The 3-NP-mediated decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential was attenuated by 50 microm cystamine and completely inhibited by 250 microm cystamine. Similar results were obtained using cysteamine (50-500 microm). In addition, both cystamine and cysteamine significantly attenuated the 3-NP-induced cell death. Treatment of mutant HD striatal cells with 3-NP resulted in a robust decrease in the cellular and mitochondrial levels of glutathione (GSH) compared with cells exposed to the vehicle alone. Pre-treatment of the cells with cystamine and cysteamine completely prevented the 3-NP-mediated decrease in cellular and mitochondrial GSH levels. Incubation with L-buthionine (S,R) sulfoximine (BSO) 250 microm in combination with cystamine (250 microm) or cysteamine (250 microm) prior to being treated with 3-NP completely prevented the beneficial effects of cystamine and cysteamine on the 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial depolarization. These results demonstrate that cystamine and cysteamine prevent the 3-NP-induced mitochondrial depolarization of HD striatal cell cultures. PMID:16623826

  15. A C-terminal PDZ domain binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Rickhag, Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar; Strandfelt, Kristine Nørgaard; Andresen, Bjørn; Gotfryd, Kamil; Madsen, Kenneth L; Vestergaard-Klewe, Ib; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Eriksen, Jacob; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gomeza, Jesus; Woldbye, David P.D.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling DAT levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. DAT contains a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain binding sequence believed to bind synaptic scaffolding proteins, but its functional significance is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that two different DAT knock-in mice with disrupted PDZ-binding motifs (DAT-AAA and DAT+Ala) are characterized by dr...

  16. Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability Is Associated with Executive Function in Healthy Controls but Not Methamphetamine Users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Ballard

    Full Text Available Dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the striatum has been linked with executive function in healthy individuals, and is below control levels among drug addicts, possibly contributing to diminished executive function in the latter group. This study tested for an association of striatal D2/D3 receptor availability with a measure of executive function among research participants who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence.Methamphetamine users and non-user controls (n = 18 per group completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride.The methamphetamine users displayed significantly lower striatal D2/D3 receptor availability on average than controls after controlling for age and education (p = 0.008, but they did not register greater proportions of either perseverative or non-perseverative errors when controlling for education (both ps ≥ 0.622. The proportion of non-perseverative, but not perseverative, errors was negatively correlated with striatal D2/D3 receptor availability among controls (r = -0.588, p = 0.010, but not methamphetamine users (r = 0.281, p = 0.258, and the group-wise interaction was significant (p = 0.030.These results suggest that cognitive flexibility, as measured by perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, is not determined by signaling through striatal D2/D3 receptors in healthy controls, and that in stimulant abusers, who have lower D2/D3 receptor availability, compensation can effectively maintain other executive functions, which are associated with D2/D3 receptor signaling in controls.

  17. BDNF and Huntingtin protein modifications by manganese: implications for striatal medium spiny neuron pathology in manganese neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Kirstie H; Bichell, Terry Jo; Bowman, Aaron B; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2014-12-01

    High levels of manganese (Mn) exposure decrease striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) dendritic length and spine density, but the mechanism(s) are not known. The Huntingtin (HTT) gene has been functionally linked to cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) support of striatal MSNs via phosphorylation at serine 421. In Huntington's disease, pathogenic CAG repeat expansions of HTT decrease synthesis and disrupt transport of cortical-striatal BDNF, which may contribute to disease, and Mn is a putative environmental modifier of Huntington's disease pathology. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that changes in MSN dendritic morphology Mn due to exposure are associated with decreased BDNF levels and alterations in Htt protein. We report that BDNF levels are decreased in the striatum of Mn-exposed non-human primates and in the cerebral cortex and striatum of mice exposed to Mn. Furthermore, proBDNF and mature BDNF concentrations in primary cortical and hippocampal neuron cultures were decreased by exposure to Mn confirming the in vivo findings. Mn exposure decreased serine 421 phosphorylation of Htt in cortical and hippocampal neurons and increased total Htt levels. These data strongly support the hypothesis that Mn-exposure-related MSN pathology is associated with decreased BDNF trophic support via alterations in Htt. PMID:25099302

  18. Increased ventral-striatal activity during monetary decision making is a marker of problem poker gambling severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevers, Damien; Noël, Xavier; He, Qinghua; Melrose, James A; Bechara, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of different neural systems on monetary decision making in frequent poker gamblers, who vary in their degree of problem gambling. Fifteen frequent poker players, ranging from non-problem to high-problem gambling, and 15 non-gambler controls were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). During IGT deck selection, between-group fMRI analyses showed that frequent poker gamblers exhibited higher ventral-striatal but lower dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal activations as compared with controls. Moreover, using functional connectivity analyses, we observed higher ventral-striatal connectivity in poker players, and in regions involved in attentional/motor control (posterior cingulate), visual (occipital gyrus) and auditory (temporal gyrus) processing. In poker gamblers, scores of problem gambling severity were positively associated with ventral-striatal activations and with the connectivity between the ventral-striatum seed and the occipital fusiform gyrus and the middle temporal gyrus. Present results are consistent with findings from recent brain imaging studies showing that gambling disorder is associated with heightened motivational-reward processes during monetary decision making, which may hamper one's ability to moderate his level of monetary risk taking. PMID:25781641

  19. Role of DARPP-32 and ARPP-21 in the Emergence of Temporal Constraints on Striatal Calcium and Dopamine Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anu G; Bhalla, Upinder S; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2016-09-01

    In reward learning, the integration of NMDA-dependent calcium and dopamine by striatal projection neurons leads to potentiation of corticostriatal synapses through CaMKII/PP1 signaling. In order to elicit the CaMKII/PP1-dependent response, the calcium and dopamine inputs should arrive in temporal proximity and must follow a specific (dopamine after calcium) order. However, little is known about the cellular mechanism which enforces these temporal constraints on the signal integration. In this computational study, we propose that these temporal requirements emerge as a result of the coordinated signaling via two striatal phosphoproteins, DARPP-32 and ARPP-21. Specifically, DARPP-32-mediated signaling could implement an input-interval dependent gating function, via transient PP1 inhibition, thus enforcing the requirement for temporal proximity. Furthermore, ARPP-21 signaling could impose the additional input-order requirement of calcium and dopamine, due to its Ca2+/calmodulin sequestering property when dopamine arrives first. This highlights the possible role of phosphoproteins in the temporal aspects of striatal signal transduction. PMID:27584878

  20. Correlation between striatal binding of I-123 IPT and clinical feature of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed this study to find out whether I-123 IPT SPECT can distinguish between normal and patient(pt)s with early Parkinson's Disease (PD), and whether I-123 IPT SPECT findings correlate with clinical parameters of PD. Seventy seven pts with PD (age 56.4±12 yr, Hoehn-Yahr (HY) stage I: n=20, II: n=42, III: n=10, IV: n=5) and 14 healthy controls (age 39.1±12 yr) underwent SPECT imaging 2 hours after injection of 250 MBq of I-123 IPT using a 3-head gamma camera. We calculated the ratio of striatum to background (S/B ratio). For analysis of uptake pattern, 4 rectangular ROIs were linearly placed within each striatum and uptake ratios of putamen to caudate (P/C ratio) were obtained. PD pts showed significantly decreased S/B ratio compared with controls (1.63±0.69 vs 4.00±0.77, p<0.001). In hemiparkinsonian pts with early stage (HY I), ipsilateral S/B ratio (2.27±0.77) as well as contralateral side (1.68±0.72) were markedly decreased. S/B ratio was significantly correlated with HY stage (r=0.5, p<0.001). Asymmetry of S/B ratio was concordant with asymmetry of symptom in 100% of pts with HY I. P/C ratios (contralateral: 0.7±0.8, ipsilateral: 0.65±0.2) were significantly reduced in PD pts compared with controls (1.12±0.12, p<0.001), but not correlated with HY stage. I-123 IPT SPECT can clearly separate pts with PD from healthy controls as specific striatal binding is markedly reduced even in early PD, especially in putamen. There is close correlation between specific striatal binding of I-123 IPT and clinical parameters including asymmetry. I-123 IPT SPECT is useful for early diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of PD

  1. Cellular and behavioral outcomes of dorsal striatonigral neuron ablation: new insights into striatal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révy, Delphine; Jaouen, Florence; Salin, Pascal; Melon, Christophe; Chabbert, Dorian; Tafi, Elisiana; Concetta, Lena; Langa, Francina; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Marie, Hélène; Beurrier, Corinne

    2014-10-01

    The striatum is the input structure of the basal ganglia network that contains heterogeneous neuronal populations, including two populations of projecting neurons called the medium spiny neurons (MSNs), and different types of interneurons. We developed a transgenic mouse model enabling inducible ablation of the striatonigral MSNs constituting the direct pathway by expressing the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor under the control of the Slc35d3 gene promoter, a gene enriched in striatonigral MSNs. DT injection into the striatum triggered selective elimination of the majority of striatonigral MSNs. DT-mediated ablation of striatonigral MSNs caused selective loss of cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum but not in the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens), suggesting a region-specific critical role of the direct pathway in striatal cholinergic neuron homeostasis. Mice with DT injection into the dorsal striatum showed altered basal and cocaine-induced locomotion and dramatic reduction of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the parkinsonian condition. In addition, these mice exhibited reduced anxiety, revealing a role of the dorsal striatum in the modulation of behaviors involving an emotional component, behaviors generally associated with limbic structures. Altogether, these results highlight the implication of the direct striatonigral pathway in the regulation of heterogeneous functions from cell survival to regulation of motor and emotion-associated behaviors. PMID:24903652

  2. Linking cocaine to endoplasmic reticulum in striatal neurons: role of glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Eun Sang; Ahn, Sung Min; Yang, Ju Hwan; Go, Bok Soon; Wang, John Q

    2011-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) controls protein folding. Accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER triggers an ER stress response to accelerate normal protein folding or if failed to cause apoptosis. The ER stress response is a conserved cellular response in mammalian cells and is sensitive to various physiological or pathophysiological stimuli. Recent studies unravel that this response in striatal neurons is subject to the tight modulation by psychostimulants. Cocaine and amphetamines markedly increased expression of multiple ER stress reporter proteins in the dorsal striatum (caudate putamen) and other basal ganglia sites. This evoked ER stress response is mediated by activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Converging Ca(2+) signals derived from activation of these receptors activate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway to evoke ER stress responses. The discovery of robust ER stress responses to stimulant exposure establishes a previously unrecognized stimulant-ER coupling. This inducible coupling seems to contribute to neurotoxicity of stimulants related to various neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative illnesses. Elucidating cellular mechanisms linking cocaine and other stimulants to ER is therefore important for the development of therapeutic agents for treating neurological disorders resulted from stimulant toxicity. PMID:21808746

  3. Age differences in striatal delay sensitivity during intertemporal choice in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Samanez-Larkin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Intertemporal choices are a ubiquitous class of decisions that involve selecting between outcomes available at different times in the future. We investigated the neural systems supporting intertemporal decisions in healthy younger and older adults. Using functional neuroimaging, we find that aging is associated with a shift in the brain areas that respond to delayed rewards. Although we replicate findings that brain regions associated with the mesolimbic dopamine system respond preferentially to immediate rewards, we find a separate region in the ventral striatum with very modest time dependence in older adults. Activation in this striatal region was relatively insensitive to delay in older but not younger adults. Since the dopamine system is believed to support associative learning about future rewards over time, our observed transfer of function may be due to greater experience with delayed rewards as people age. Identifying differences in the neural systems underlying these decisions may contribute to a more comprehensive model of age-related change in intertemporal choice.

  4. Reduced striatal ecto-nucleotidase activity in schizophrenia patients supports the "adenosine hypothesis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliagas, Elisabet; Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Sévigny, Jean; Roca, Mercedes; Romeu, Miriam; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Barrachina, Marta

    2013-12-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a major chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by a hyperdopaminergic state. The hypoadenosinergic hypothesis proposes that reduced extracellular adenosine levels contribute to dopamine D2 receptor hyperactivity. ATP, through the action of ecto-nucleotidases, constitutes a main source of extracellular adenosine. In the present study, we examined the activity of ecto-nucleotidases (NTPDases, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and alkaline phosphatase) in the postmortem putamen of SZ patients (n = 13) compared with aged-matched controls (n = 10). We firstly demonstrated, by means of artificial postmortem delay experiments, that ecto-nucleotidase activity in human brains was stable up to 24 h, indicating the reliability of this tissue for these enzyme determinations. Remarkably, NTPDase-attributable activity (both ATPase and ADPase) was found to be reduced in SZ patients, while ecto-5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphatase activity remained unchanged. In the present study, we also describe the localization of these ecto-enzymes in human putamen control samples, showing differential expression in blood vessels, neurons, and glial cells. In conclusion, reduced striatal NTPDase activity may contribute to the pathophysiology of SZ, and it represents a potential mechanism of adenosine signalling impairment in this illness. PMID:23771238

  5. Activity of striatal neurons reflects dynamic encoding and recoding of procedural memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Terra D; Kubota, Yasuo; Hu, Dan; Jin, Dezhe Z; Graybiel, Ann M

    2005-10-20

    Learning to perform a behavioural procedure as a well-ingrained habit requires extensive repetition of the behavioural sequence, and learning not to perform such behaviours is notoriously difficult. Yet regaining a habit can occur quickly, with even one or a few exposures to cues previously triggering the behaviour. To identify neural mechanisms that might underlie such learning dynamics, we made long-term recordings from multiple neurons in the sensorimotor striatum, a basal ganglia structure implicated in habit formation, in rats successively trained on a reward-based procedural task, given extinction training and then given reacquisition training. The spike activity of striatal output neurons, nodal points in cortico-basal ganglia circuits, changed markedly across multiple dimensions during each of these phases of learning. First, new patterns of task-related ensemble firing successively formed, reversed and then re-emerged. Second, task-irrelevant firing was suppressed, then rebounded, and then was suppressed again. These changing spike activity patterns were highly correlated with changes in behavioural performance. We propose that these changes in task representation in cortico-basal ganglia circuits represent neural equivalents of the explore-exploit behaviour characteristic of habit learning. PMID:16237445

  6. Ethanol Disinhibits Dorsolateral Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Through Activation of A Presynaptic Delta Opioid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Mary H; Roberts, Bradley M; Lovinger, David M; Mathur, Brian N

    2016-06-01

    The dorsolateral striatum mediates habit formation, which is expedited by exposure to alcohol. Across species, alcohol exposure disinhibits the DLS by dampening GABAergic transmission onto this structure's principal medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs), providing a potential mechanistic basis for habitual alcohol drinking. However, the molecular and circuit components underlying this disinhibition remain unknown. To examine this, we used a combination of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and optogenetics to demonstrate that ethanol potently depresses both MSN- and fast-spiking interneuron (FSI)-MSN GABAergic synaptic transmission in the DLS. Concentrating on the powerfully inhibitory FSI-MSN synapse, we further show that acute exposure of ethanol (50 mM) to striatal slices activates delta opioid receptors that reside on FSI axon terminals and negatively couple to adenylyl cyclase to induce a long-term depression of GABA release onto both direct and indirect pathway MSNs. These findings elucidate a mechanism through which ethanol may globally disinhibit the DLS. PMID:26758662

  7. Evidence that conditioned avoidance responses are reinforced by positive prediction errors signaled by tonic striatal dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Patricia A; Maia, Tiago V; Boschen, Suelen L; Bortolanza, Mariza; Wendler, Etieli; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Brandão, Marcus Lira; Winn, Philip; Blaha, Charles D; Da Cunha, Claudio

    2013-03-15

    We conducted an experiment in which hedonia, salience and prediction error hypotheses predicted different patterns of dopamine (DA) release in the striatum during learning of conditioned avoidance responses (CARs). The data strongly favor the latter hypothesis. It predicts that during learning of the 2-way active avoidance CAR task, positive prediction errors generated when rats do not receive an anticipated footshock (which is better than expected) cause DA release that reinforces the instrumental avoidance action. In vivo microdialysis in the rat striatum showed that extracellular DA concentration increased during early CAR learning and decreased throughout training returning to baseline once the response was well learned. In addition, avoidance learning was proportional to the degree of DA release. Critically, exposure of rats to the same stimuli but in an unpredictable, unavoidable, and inescapable manner, did not produce alterations from baseline DA levels as predicted by the prediction error but not hedonic or salience hypotheses. In addition, rats with a partial lesion of substantia nigra DA neurons, which did not show increased DA levels during learning, failed to learn this task. These data represent clear and unambiguous evidence that it was the factor positive prediction error, and not hedonia or salience, which caused increase in the tonic level of striatal DA and which reinforced learning of the instrumental avoidance response. PMID:22771418

  8. Common Variation in the DOPA Decarboxylase (DDC) Gene and Human Striatal DDC Activity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Daniel P; Kohn, Philip D; Hegarty, Catherine E; Ianni, Angela M; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Gregory, Michael D; Masdeu, Joseph C; Berman, Karen F

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of multiple amine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and trace amines, relies in part on DOPA decarboxylase (DDC, AADC), an enzyme that is required for normative neural operations. Because rare, loss-of-function mutations in the DDC gene result in severe enzymatic deficiency and devastating autonomic, motor, and cognitive impairment, DDC common genetic polymorphisms have been proposed as a source of more moderate, but clinically important, alterations in DDC function that may contribute to risk, course, or treatment response in complex, heritable neuropsychiatric illnesses. However, a direct link between common genetic variation in DDC and DDC activity in the living human brain has never been established. We therefore tested for this association by conducting extensive genotyping across the DDC gene in a large cohort of 120 healthy individuals, for whom DDC activity was then quantified with [(18)F]-FDOPA positron emission tomography (PET). The specific uptake constant, Ki, a measure of DDC activity, was estimated for striatal regions of interest and found to be predicted by one of five tested haplotypes, particularly in the ventral striatum. These data provide evidence for cis-acting, functional common polymorphisms in the DDC gene and support future work to determine whether such variation might meaningfully contribute to DDC-mediated neural processes relevant to neuropsychiatric illness and treatment. PMID:26924680

  9. Baclofen reestablishes striatal and cortical dopamine concentrations during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Silvina L; Kemmling, Alma K; Balerio, Graciela N

    2003-03-01

    The present study analyzes the effects of baclofen (BAC) on mice brain neurochemical alterations during the morphine (MOR) withdrawal syndrome. Male Swiss-Webster albino mice (27-33 g) were rendered dependent by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of MOR (2mg/kg), twice daily for 9 days. On day 10, the dependent animals were divided into two groups: one receiving naloxone (NAL; 6 mg/kg i.p.) to precipitate the withdrawal syndrome 60 min after the last dose of MOR and the other received BAC (2mg/kg, i.p.) followed by NAL (6 mg/kg, i.p.), injected 30 and 60 min after the last dose of MOR, respectively. Ten minutes after these treatments, mice were killed by decapitation and the striatum, cortex and hippocampus were dissected to determine endogenous concentrations of dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and their metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Striatal DA, dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations as well as cortical DA concentrations of the withdrawal groups decreased significantly with respect to the control groups. BAC attenuated the decrease in DA and DOPAC concentrations observed during the withdrawal, without modifying per se the control DA concentrations. No changes on 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations were observed during the MOR abstinence syndrome. The prevention caused by BAC on the decreased concentrations of DA induced by MOR withdrawal could have a therapeutic interest for the management of withdrawal syndrome. PMID:12470702

  10. Dorsal striatal dopamine depletion impairs both allocentric and egocentric navigation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Amanda A; Graham, Devon L; Schaefer, Tori L; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Successful navigation requires interactions among multiple but overlapping neural pathways mediating distinct capabilities, including egocentric (self-oriented, route-based) and allocentric (spatial, map-based) learning. Route-based navigation has been shown to be impaired following acute exposure to the dopaminergic (DA) drugs (+)-methamphetamine and (+)-amphetamine, but not the serotoninergic (5-HT) drugs (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or (±)-fenfluramine. The dopaminergic-rich neostriatum is involved in both allocentric and egocentric navigation. This experiment tested whether dorsal striatal DA loss using bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injections impaired one or both types of navigation. Two weeks following 6-OHDA injections, rats began testing in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) followed by the Morris water maze (MWM) for route-based and spatial navigation, respectively. 6-OHDA treatment significantly increased latency and errors in the CWM and path length, latency, and cumulative distance in the MWM with no difference on cued MWM trials. Neostriatal DA levels were reduced by 80% at 2 and 7 weeks post-treatment. In addition, 6-OHDA increased DA turnover and decreased norepinephrine (NE) levels. 6-OHDA injections did not alter monoamine levels in the prefrontal cortex. The data support that neostriatal DA modulates both types of navigation. PMID:22465436

  11. Analysis of the mechanisms by which amphetamine releases dopamine from striatal dopaminergic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of the studies were (1) to determine the intraneuronal transmitter pools that contribute to the efflux of dopamine (DA) elicited by amphetamine (AMPH) and (2) to determine the biochemical mechanism by which AMPH increases DA efflux from dopaminergic neurons. AMPH increased the efflux of endogenous DA and decreased the electrically-evoked overflow of [3H] acetylcholine (ACh) from superfused rabbit striatal slices. These effects were most pronounced when both vesicular DA stores and DA synthesis were intact. Therefore, extravesicular, newly synthesized DA and vesicular stores of DA contribute to AMPH-induced DA efflux. Simultaneous inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) and neuronal DA uptake did not increase the efflux of endogenous DA or inhibit the electrically-evoked overflow of [3H]ACh to the same extent as AMPH. Hence, inhibition of MAO and neuronal DA uptake are probably not the major mechanisms by which AMPH increases DA efflux. The AMPH-induced efflux of endogenous or [3H]DA was blocked by inhibitors of neuronal DA uptake

  12. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  13. Effects of the D3 preferring dopamine agonist pramipexole on sleep and waking, locomotor activity and striatal dopamine release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, P; Scorza, C; Monti, J M; Jantos, H; Reyes-Parada, M; Silveira, R; Ponzoni, A

    1998-05-01

    Quantitation of 2 h sessions after administration of the D3 preferring dopamine (DA) agonist pramipexole (10-500 microg/kg) showed dose-related effects on wakefulness (W), slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep in rats. The 30 microg/kg dose of the DA agonist increased SWS and REM sleep and reduced W during the first recording hour, while the 500 microg/kg dose augmented W. On the other hand, W was increased while SWS and REMS were decreased after the 500 microg/kg dose during the second recording hour. The mixed D2- and D3 receptor antagonist YM-09151-2 (30-500 microg/kg), which per se affected sleep variables prevented the increase of REMS induced by pramipexole. Furthermore, the highest doses (500-1000 microg/kg) of the DA antagonist effectively antagonized the increase of W and reduction of SWS induced by the 500 microg/kg dose of the DA agonist. Pramipexole (30-100 microg/kg) induced a decrease of locomotor activity during the 2 h recording period. In addition, the 500 microg/kg dose gave rise to an initial reduction of motor behavior which was reverted 2 h later. Pramipexole (30 and 500 microg/kg) did not significantly affect striatal DA release during the first two hours following drug administration, as measured by microdialysis. It is tentatively suggested that D3 receptor could be involved in the pramipexole-induced increase of sleep and reduction of locomotor activity. On the other hand, the increase of W and of motor behavior after relatively high doses could be related to activation of postsynaptic D2 receptor. PMID:9619689

  14. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Manfred J; Schulz, Jan M; Kelsch, Wolfgang; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Reynolds, John N J

    2015-01-01

    Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarization (AHP) underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS) of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD) of postsynaptic potentials (PSP) in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg(2+)-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg(2+)-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:25914618

  15. Striatal morphology correlates with sensory abnormalities in unaffected relatives of cervical dystonia patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Richard A

    2012-02-01

    Structural grey matter abnormalities have been described in adult-onset primary torsion dystonia (AOPTD). Altered spatial discrimination thresholds are found in familial and sporadic AOPTD and in some unaffected relatives who may be non-manifesting gene carriers. Our hypothesis was that a subset of unaffected relatives with abnormal spatial acuity would have associated structural abnormalities. Twenty-eight unaffected relatives of patients with familial cervical dystonia, 24 relatives of patients with sporadic cervical dystonia and 27 control subjects were recruited. Spatial discrimination thresholds (SDTs) were determined using a grating orientation task. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images (1.5 T) were analysed using voxel-based morphometry. Unaffected familial relatives with abnormal SDTs had reduced caudate grey matter volume (GMV) bilaterally relative to those with normal SDTs (right Z = 3.45, left Z = 3.81), where there was a negative correlation between SDTs and GMV (r = -0.76, r(2) = 0.58, p < 0.0001). Familial relatives also had bilateral sensory cortical expansion relative to unrelated controls (right Z = 4.02, left Z = 3.79). Unaffected relatives of patients with sporadic cervical dystonia who had abnormal SDTs had reduced putaminal GMV bilaterally compared with those with normal SDTs (right Z = 3.96, left Z = 3.45). Sensory abnormalities in some unaffected relatives correlate with a striatal substrate and may be a marker of genetic susceptibility in these individuals. Further investigation of grey matter changes as a candidate endophenotype may assist future genetic studies of dystonia.

  16. Alpha-asarone improves striatal cholinergic function and locomotor hyperactivity in Fmr1 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guozhen; Chen, Shengqiang; Guo, Jialing; Wu, Jie; Yi, Yong-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Hyperactivity is a symptom found in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Fragile X syndrome (FXS). The animal model of FXS, fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, exhibits robust locomotor hyperactivity. Alpha (α)-asarone, a major bioactive component isolated from Acorus gramineus, has been shown in previous studies to improve various disease conditions including central nervous system disorders. In this study, we show that treatment with α-asarone alleviates locomotor hyperactivity in Fmr1 KO mice. To elucidate the mechanism underlying this improvement, we evaluated the expressions of various cholinergic markers, as well as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and acetylcholine (ACh) levels, in the striatum of Fmr1 KO mice. We also analyzed the AChE-inhibitory activity of α-asarone. Striatal samples from Fmr1 KO mice showed decreased m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m1 mAChR) expression, increased AChE activity, and reduced ACh levels. Treatment with α-asarone improved m1 mAChR expression and ACh levels, and attenuated the increased AChE activity. In addition, α-asarone dose-dependently inhibited AChE activity in vitro. These results indicate that direct inhibition of AChE activity and up-regulation of m1 mAChR expression in the striatum might contribute to the beneficial effects of α-asarone on locomotor hyperactivity in Fmr1 KO mice. These findings might improve understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for locomotor hyperactivity. PMID:27316341

  17. Personality disorder symptomatology is associated with anomalies in striatal and prefrontal morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris E Payer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Personality disorder symptomatology (PD-Sx can result in personal distress and impaired interpersonal functioning, even in the absence of a clinical diagnosis, and is frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders such as substance use, mood, and anxiety disorders; however, they often remain untreated, and are not taken into account in clinical studies. To investigate brain morphological correlates of PD-Sx, we measured subcortical volume and shape, and cortical thickness / surface area, based on structural magnetic resonance images. We investigated 37 subjects who reported PD-Sx exceeding DSM-IV Axis-II screening thresholds, and 35 age, sex, and smoking status-matched control subjects. Subjects reporting PD-Sx were then grouped into symptom-based clusters: N=20 into Cluster B (reporting Antisocial, Borderline, Histrionic, or Narcissistic PD-Sx and N=28 into Cluster C (reporting Obsessive-Compulsive, Avoidant, or Dependent PD-Sx; N=11 subjects reported PD-Sx from both clusters, and none reported Cluster A (Paranoid, Schizoid, or Schizotypal PD-Sx. Compared to control, Cluster C PD-Sx was associated with greater striatal surface area localized to the caudate tail, smaller ventral striatum volumes, and greater cortical thickness in right prefrontal cortex. Both Cluster B and C PD-Sx groups also showed trends toward greater posterior caudate volumes and orbitofrontal surface area anomalies, but these findings did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. The results point to morphological abnormalities that could contribute to Cluster C PD-Sx. In addition, the observations parallel those in substance use disorders, pointing to the importance of considering PD-Sx when interpreting findings in often-comorbid psychiatric disorders.

  18. Fronto-striatal dysregulation in drug addiction and pathological gambling: Consistent inconsistencies?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbrick-Oldfield, Eve H.; van Holst, Ruth J.; Clark, Luke

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in appetitive processing are central to the major psychological theories of addiction, with differential predictions made by the reward deficiency, incentive salience, and impulsivity hypotheses. Functional MRI has become the chief means of testing these predictions, with experiments reliably highlighting disturbances at the level of the striatum, medial prefrontal cortex, and affiliated regions. However, demonstrations of hypo-reactivity and hyper-reactivity of this circuitry in drug addicted groups are reported in approximately equal measure. Similar findings are echoed in the emergent neuroimaging literature on pathological gambling, which has recently witnessed a coming of age. The first aim of this article is to consider some of the methodological aspects of these experiments that could influence the observed direction of group-level effects, including the baseline condition, trial structure and timing, and the nature of the appetitive cues (drug-related, monetary, or primary rewards). The second aim is to highlight the conceptual traction that is offered by pathological gambling, as a model of a ‘toxicity free’ addiction and an illness where tasks of monetary reinforcement afford a more direct mapping to the abused commodity. Our conclusion is that relatively subtle decisions in task design appear capable of driving group differences in fronto-striatal circuitry in entirely opposing directions, even with tasks and task variants that look ostensibly similar. Differentiation between the psychological theories of addiction will require a greater breadth of experimental designs, with more research needed on processing of primary appetitive cues, aversive processing, and in vulnerable/at-risk groups. PMID:24179792

  19. Duration differences of corticostriatal responses in striatal projection neurons depend on calcium activated potassium currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Alberto Arias-García

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The firing of striatal projection neurons (SPNs exhibits afterhyperpolarizing potentials (AHPs that determine discharge frequency. They are in part generated by Ca2+-activated K+-currents involving BK and SK components. It has previously been shown that suprathreshold corticostriatal responses are more prolonged and evoke more action potentials in direct pathway SPNs (dSPNs than in indirect pathway SPNs (iSPNs. In contrast, iSPNs generate dendritic autoregenerative responses. Using whole cell recordings in brain slices, we asked whether the participation of Ca2+-activated K+-currents plays a role in these responses. Secondly, we asked if these currents may explain some differences in synaptic integration between dSPNs and iSPNs. Neurons obtained from BAC D1 and D2 GFP mice were recorded. We used charybdotoxin and apamin to block BK and SK channels, respectively. Both antagonists increased the depolarization and delayed the repolarization of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses in both neuron classes. We also used NS 1619 and NS 309 (CyPPA, to enhance BK and SK channels, respectively. Current enhancers hyperpolarized and accelerated the repolarization of corticostriatal responses in both neuron classes. These drugs made evident that the contribution of Ca2+-activated K+-currents was different in dSPNs as compared to iSPNs: in dSPNs their activation was slower as though calcium took a diffusion delay to activate them. In contrast, their activation was fast and then sustained in iSPNs as though calcium flux activates them at the moment of entry. The blockade of Ca2+-activated K+-currents made iSPNs to look as dSPNs. Conversely, their enhancement made dSPNs to look as iSPNs. It is concluded that Ca2+-activated K+-currents are a main intrinsic determinant causing the differences in synaptic integration between corticostriatal polysynaptic responses between dSPNs and iSPNs.

  20. Distinct roles of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in striatal inhibition dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixi eLuo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Striatonigral and striatopallidal projecting medium spiny neurons (MSNs express dopamine D1 (D1+ and D2 receptors (D2+, respectively. Both classes receive extensive GABAergic input via expression of synaptic, perisynaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. The activation patterns of different presynaptic GABAergic neurons produce transient and sustained GABAA receptor-mediated conductance that fulfill distinct physiological roles. We performed single and dual whole cell recordings from striatal neurons in mice expressing fluorescent proteins in interneurons and MSNs. We report specific inhibitory dynamics produced by distinct activation patterns of presynaptic GABAergic neurons as source of synaptic, perisynaptic and extrasynaptic inhibition. Synaptic GABAA receptors in MSNs contain the α2, γ2 and a β subunit. In addition, there is evidence for the developmental increase of the α1 subunit that contributes to faster inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC. Tonic GABAergic currents in MSNs from adult mice are carried by extrasynaptic receptors containing the α4 and δ subunit, while in younger mice this current is mediated by receptors that contain the α5 subunit. Both forms of tonic currents are differentially expressed in D1+ and D2+ MSNs. This study extends these findings by relating presynaptic activation with pharmacological analysis of inhibitory conductance in mice where the β3 subunit is conditionally removed in fluorescently labeled D2+ MSNs and in mice with global deletion of the δ subunit. Our results show that responses to low doses of gaboxadol (2μM, a GABAA receptor agonist with preference to δ subunit, are abolished in the δ but not the β3 subunit knock out mice. This suggests that the β3 subunit is not a component of the adult extrasynaptic receptor pool, in contrast to what has been shown for tonic current in young mice. Deletion of the β3 subunit from D2+ MSNs however, removed slow spontaneous IPSCs, implicating its

  1. Modeling effects of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards on the competition between striatal learning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedecker, Joschka; Lampe, Thomas; Riedmiller, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A common assumption in psychology, economics, and other fields holds that higher performance will result if extrinsic rewards (such as money) are offered as an incentive. While this principle seems to work well for tasks that require the execution of the same sequence of steps over and over, with little uncertainty about the process, in other cases, especially where creative problem solving is required due to the difficulty in finding the optimal sequence of actions, external rewards can actually be detrimental to task performance. Furthermore, they have the potential to undermine intrinsic motivation to do an otherwise interesting activity. In this work, we extend a computational model of the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatal reinforcement learning systems to account for the effects of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards. The model assumes that the brain employs both a goal-directed and a habitual learning system, and competition between both is based on the trade-off between the cost of the reasoning process and value of information. The goal-directed system elicits internal rewards when its models of the environment improve, while the habitual system, being model-free, does not. Our results account for the phenomena that initial extrinsic reward leads to reduced activity after extinction compared to the case without any initial extrinsic rewards, and that performance in complex task settings drops when higher external rewards are promised. We also test the hypothesis that external rewards bias the competition in favor of the computationally efficient, but cruder and less flexible habitual system, which can negatively influence intrinsic motivation and task performance in the class of tasks we consider. PMID:24137146

  2. Modeling effects of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards on the competition between striatal learning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joschka eBoedecker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A common assumption in psychology, economics, and other fields holds that higher performance will result if extrinsic rewards (such as money are offered as an incentive. While this principle seems to work well for tasks that require the execution of the same sequence of steps over and over, with little uncertainty about the process, in other cases, especially where creative problem solving is required due to the difficulty in finding the optimal sequence of actions, external rewards can actually be detrimental to task performance. Furthermore, they have the potential to undermine intrinsic motivation to do an otherwise interesting activity. In this work, we extend a computational model of the prefrontal and dorsolateral striatal reinforcement learning systems to account for the effects of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards. The model assumes that the brain employs both a goal-directed and a habitual learning system, and competition between both is based on the trade-off between the cost of the reasoning process and value of information. The goal-directed system elicits internal rewards when its models of the environment improve, while the habitual system, being model-free, does not. Our results account for the phenomena that initial extrinsic reward leads to reduced activity after extinction compared to the case without any initial extrinsic rewards, and that performance in complex task settings drops when higher external rewards are promised. We also test the hypothesis that external rewards bias the competition in favor of the computationally efficient, but cruder and less flexible habitual system, which can negatively influence intrinsic motivation and task performance in the class of tasks we consider.

  3. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parenta...

  4. Acute L: -DOPA effect on hydroxyl radical- and DOPAC-levels in striatal microdialysates of parkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Przemysław; Kostrzewa, Rose Anna; Skaba, Dariusz; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2010-04-01

    The object of the current study was to determine the effect of L: -3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L: -DOPA) on the in vivo striatal microdialysate levels of the respective dopamine and serotonin metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenlalanine (DOPAC) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and hydroxyl radical level (HO(*); 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA) in adult rats made parkinsonian by treatment at 3 days after birth with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 66.7 microg, base form, on each side; desipramine pretreatment, 1 h). Using HPLC/ED we found that in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats the basal striatal extraneuronal level of DOPAC was dramatically reduced and constituted only approximately 4.5% of referenced value (intact rats). Conversely, the striatal microdialysate level of 5-HIAA was elevated 2-fold in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Acute L: -DOPA (60 mg/kg i.p.; S-carbidopa pretreatment, 12.5 mg/kg i.p., 30 min) produced a rapid rise in the extraneuronal DOPAC in both tested groups but to a much greater extent in intact rats (P DOPA did not enhance HO(*) production; acute 6-OHDOPA treatment (60 mg/kg i.p.) also did not alter HO(*) production. In summary, L: -DOPA, an effective drug in ameliorating PD symptoms, did not acutely pose a risk for HO(*) generation in parkinsonian rats. We conclude that L: -DOPA is not likely to generate reactive oxygen species in humans nor is L: -DOPA likely to accelerate PD in humans. PMID:19760476

  5. The CB₁ cannabinoid receptor signals striatal neuroprotection via a PI3K/Akt/mTORC1/BDNF pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, C; Chiarlone, A; Bellocchio, L; Resel, E; Pruunsild, P; García-Rincón, D; Sendtner, M; Timmusk, T; Lutz, B; Galve-Roperh, I; Guzmán, M

    2015-10-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor, the main molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is the most abundant G protein-coupled receptor in the mammalian brain. In particular, the CB1 receptor is highly expressed in the basal ganglia, mostly on terminals of medium-sized spiny neurons, where it plays a key neuromodulatory function. The CB1 receptor also confers neuroprotection in various experimental models of striatal damage. However, the assessment of the physiological relevance and therapeutic potential of the CB1 receptor in basal ganglia-related diseases is hampered, at least in part, by the lack of knowledge of the precise mechanism of CB1 receptor neuroprotective activity. Here, by using an array of pharmacological, genetic and pharmacogenetic (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug) approaches, we show that (1) CB1 receptor engagement protects striatal cells from excitotoxic death via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway, which, in turn, (2) induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression through the selective activation of BDNF gene promoter IV, an effect that is mediated by multiple transcription factors. To assess the possible functional impact of the CB1/BDNF axis in a neurodegenerative-disease context in vivo, we conducted experiments in the R6/2 mouse, a well-established model of Huntington's disease, in which the CB1 receptor and BDNF are known to be severely downregulated in the dorsolateral striatum. Adeno-associated viral vector-enforced re-expression of the CB1 receptor in the dorsolateral striatum of R6/2 mice allowed the re-expression of BDNF and the concerted rescue of the neuropathological deficits in these animals. Collectively, these findings unravel a molecular link between CB1 receptor activation and BDNF expression, and support the relevance of the CB1/BDNF axis in promoting striatal neuron survival. PMID:25698444

  6. Adenosine A2A receptors and A2A receptor heteromers as key players in striatal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi eFerre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A very significant density of adenosine adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs is present in the striatum, where they are preferentially localized postsynaptically in striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. In this localization A2ARs establish reciprocal antagonistic interactions with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs. In one type of interaction, A2AR and D2R are forming heteromers and, by means of an allosteric interaction, A2AR counteracts D2R-mediated inhibitory modulation of the effects of NMDA receptor stimulation in the striato-pallidal neuron. This interaction is probably mostly responsible for the locomotor depressant and activating effects of A2AR agonist and antagonists, respectively. The second type of interaction involves A2AR and D2R that do not form heteromers and takes place at the level of adenylyl-cyclase (AC. Due to a strong tonic effect of endogenous dopamine on striatal D2R, this interaction keeps A2AR from signaling through AC. However, under conditions of dopamine depletion or with blockade of D2R, A2AR-mediated AC activation is unleashed with an increased gene expression and activity of the striato-pallidal neuron and with a consequent motor depression. This interaction is probably the main mechanism responsible for the locomotor depression induced by D2R antagonists. Finally, striatal A2ARs are also localized presynaptically, in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that contact the striato-nigral MSN. These presynaptic A2ARs heteromerize with A1 receptors (A1Rs and their activation facilitates glutamate release. These three different types of A2ARs can be pharmacologically dissected by their ability to bind ligands with different affinity and can therefore provide selective targets for drug development in different basal ganglia disorders.

  7. Sex-Dependent Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transport in Preadolescent Rats Exposed Prenatally and/or Postnatally to Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirova, Jana; Kristofikova, Zdenka; Vrajova, Monika; Fujakova-Lipski, Michaela; Ripova, Daniela; Klaschka, Jan; Slamberova, Romana

    2016-08-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is the most commonly used psychostimulant drug, the chronic abuse of which leads to neurodegenerative changes in the brain. The global use of MA is increasing, including in pregnant women. Since MA can cross both placental and haematoencephalic barriers and is also present in maternal milk, children of chronically abused mothers are exposed prenatally as well as postnatally. Women seem to be more vulnerable to some aspects of MA abuse than men. MA is thought to exert its effects among others via direct interactions with dopamine transporters (DATs) in the brain tissue. Sexual dimorphism of the DAT system could be a base of sex-dependent actions of MA observed in behavioural and neurochemical studies. Possible sex differences in the DATs of preadolescent offspring exposed to MA prenatally and/or postnatally have not yet been evaluated. We examined the striatal synaptosomal DATs (the activity and density of surface expressed DATs and total DAT expression) in preadolescent male and female Wistar rats (31-35-day old animals) exposed prenatally and/or postnatally to MA (daily 5 mg/kg, s.c. to mothers during pregnancy and lactation). To distinguish between specific and nonspecific effects of MA on DATs, we also evaluated the in vitro effects of lipophilic MA on the fluidity of striatal membranes isolated from preadolescent and young adult rats of both sexes. We observed similar changes in the DATs of preadolescent rats exposed prenatally or postnatally (MA-mediated drop in the reserve pool but no alterations in surface-expressed DATs). However, prenatal exposure evoked significant changes in males and postnatal exposure in females. A significant decrease in the activity of surface-expressed DATs was found only in postnatally exposed females sensitized to MA via prenatal exposure. MA applied in vitro increased the fluidity of striatal membranes of preadolescent female but not male rats. In summary, DATs of preadolescent males are more sensitive to

  8. Regulation by cAMP and vasoactive intestinal peptide of phosphorylation of specific proteins in striatal cells in culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Girault, J A; Shalaby, I A; Rosen, N L; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied three low molecular weight phosphoproteins, ARPP-16, ARPP-19, and ARPP-21 (cAMP-regulated phosphoproteins of Mr 16,000, 19,000, and 21,000, respectively) in reaggregate cultures from various regions of fetal mouse brain. ARPP-16 and ARPP-21 were detected only in striatal and cortical cultures. In contrast, ARP-19, which is structurally related to ARPP-16, was also present in reaggregate cultures prepared from thalamus and ventral and dorsal mesencephalon, as well as in monolay...

  9. Aberrant neural signatures of decision-making: Pathological gamblers display cortico-striatal hypersensitivity to extreme gambles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelskov, Sofie V.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Ramsøy, Thomas Z.;

    2016-01-01

    such as the ventral striatum. However, previous studies have produced contradictory results regarding the implication of this network, revealing either hypo- or hypersensitivity to monetary gains and losses. One possible explanation is that the gambling brain might be misrepresenting the benefits and costs when...... bets in an executive cortico-striatal network including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and caudate nucleus. This network is concerned with the evaluation of action-outcome contingencies, monitoring recent actions and anticipating their consequences. The dysregulation of this specific network...

  10. Trehalose rescues glial cell dysfunction in striatal cultures from HD R6/1 mice at early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucho, Juan; Gómez, Ana; Muñoz, María Paz; de Yébenes, Justo García; Mena, María Ángeles; Casarejos, María José

    2016-07-01

    The pathological hallmark of Huntington disease (HD) is the intracellular aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) in striatal neurons and glia associated with the selective loss of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons. Up to the present, the role of glia in HD is poorly understood and has been classically considered secondary to neuronal disorder. Trehalose is a disaccharide known to possess many pharmacological properties, acting as an antioxidant, a chemical chaperone, and an inducer of autophagy. In this study, we analyzed at an early postnatal development stage the abnormalities observed in striatal glial cell cultures of postnatal R6/1 mice (HD glia), under baseline and stressing conditions and the protective effects of trehalose. Our data demonstrate that glial HD alterations already occur at early stages of postnatal development. After 20 postnatal days in vitro, striatal HD glia cultures showed more reactive astrocytes with increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) but with less replication capacity, less A2B5(+) glial progenitors and more microglia than wild-type (WT) cultures. HD glia had lower levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH) and was more susceptible to H2O2 and epoxomicin insults. The amount of expressed GDNF and secreted mature-BDNF by HD astrocytes were much lower than by WT astrocytes. In addition, HD glial cultures showed a deregulation of the major proteolytic systems, the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS), and the autophagic pathway. This produces a defective protein quality control, indicated by the elevated levels of ubiquitination and p62 protein. Interestingly, we show that trehalose, through its capacity to induce autophagy, inhibited p62/SQSTM1 accumulation and facilitated the degradation of cytoplasmic aggregates from mHTT and α-synuclein proteins. Trehalose also reduced microglia activation and reversed the disrupted cytoskeleton of astrocytes accompanied with an increase in the replication capacity. In

  11. Altered cortico-striatal-thalamic connectivity in relation to spatial working memory capacity in children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KathrynL.Mills

    2012-01-01

    Results/Conclusions: Using these thalamic regions, we found atypical rs-fcMRI between specific thalamic groupings with the basal ganglia. To identify the thalamic connections that relate to spatial working memory in ADHD, only connections identified in both the correlational and comparative analyses were considered. Multiple connections between the thalamus and basal ganglia, particularly between medial and anterior dorsal thalamus and the putamen, were related to spatial working memory and also altered in ADHD. These thalamo-striatal disruptions may be one of multiple atypical neural and cognitive mechanisms that relate to the ADHD clinical phenotype.

  12. Temporal changes of striatal dopamine release during and after a video game with a monetary reward: a PET study with [{sup 11}C]raclopride continuous infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. E. [Sungkyunkwon University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, S. S.; Choe, Y. S.; Lee, S. Y.; Kang, E.; Kim, B. T. [Seoul National University hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    In an attempt to understand the neurochemical changes associated with rewarded motor learning in human brain, we investigated the temporal changes of striatal dopamine (DA) release during and after a goal-directed psychomotor task (a video game) with a monetary incentive using [{sup 11}C]raclopride PET. Seven healthy, right-handed, nonsmokers were studied with PET for 120 min (50 min resting followed by 40 min video game and another 30 min resting) while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of the DA D2 receptor radioligand [{sup 11}C]raclopride. During the video game (from 50 to 90 min postinjection), subjects played Tetris, which involved learning of joystick movement to fit falling jigsaw blocks, and periodically rewarded with unpredictable amount monetary incentives for improved performance. Striatal V3', calculated as striatal-cerebellar/cerebellar activity ratio, was measured under equilibrium condition, at baseline and during and after the video game. Striatal V3' was significantly reduced during the video game compared with baseline levels, indicating increased DA release in this region (caudate, -15{+-}6%; putamen, -30{+-}10%). During the 30 min after the game ended, striatal [{sup 11}C]raclopride binding was gradually increased and the V3' approached baseline levels. There was a significant correlation between the reduction in striatal V3' and the task performance during the video game. These results demonstrate DA release in the human striatum during a psychomotor task with a monetary reward and to our knowledge for the first time a gradual DA restoration to baseline levels following the offset of stimulation. They also illustrate that acute fluctuations of synaptic DA can be measured in vivo using [{sup 11}C]raclopride PET.

  13. Temporal changes of striatal dopamine release during and after a video game with a monetary reward: a PET study with [11C] raclopride continuous infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In an attempt to understand the neurochemical changes associated with rewarded motor learning in human brain, we investigated the temporal changes of striatal dopamine (DA) release during and after a goal-directed psychomotor task (a video game) with a monetary incentive using [11C] raclopride PET. Methods: Seven healthy, right-handed, nonsmokers were studied with PET for 120 min (50 min resting followed by 40 min video game and another 30 min resting) while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of the DA D2 receptor radioligand [11C] raclopride. During the video game (from 50 to 90 min postinjection), subjects played Tetris, which involved learning of joystick movement to fit falling jigsaw blocks, and periodically rewarded with unpredictable amount monetary incentives for improved performance. Striatal V3', calculated as striatal-cerebellar/cerebellar activity ratio, was measured under equilibrium condition, at baseline and during and after the video game. Results: Striatal V3' was significantly reduced during the video game compared with baseline levels, indicating increased DA release in this region (caudate, -15±6%; putamen, -30±10%). During the 30 min after the game ended, striatal [11C] raclopride binding was gradually increased and the V3' approached baseline levels. There was a significant correlation between the reduction in striatal V3' and the task performance during the video game. Conclusions: These results demonstrate DA release in the human striatum during a psychomotor task with a monetary reward and to our knowledge for the first time a gradual DA restoration to baseline levels following the offset of stimulation. They also illustrate that acute fluctuations of synaptic DA can be measured in vivo using [11C] raclopride PET. (authors)

  14. Temporal changes of striatal dopamine release during and after a video game with a monetary reward: a PET study with [11C]raclopride continuous infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to understand the neurochemical changes associated with rewarded motor learning in human brain, we investigated the temporal changes of striatal dopamine (DA) release during and after a goal-directed psychomotor task (a video game) with a monetary incentive using [11C]raclopride PET. Seven healthy, right-handed, nonsmokers were studied with PET for 120 min (50 min resting followed by 40 min video game and another 30 min resting) while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of the DA D2 receptor radioligand [11C]raclopride. During the video game (from 50 to 90 min postinjection), subjects played Tetris, which involved learning of joystick movement to fit falling jigsaw blocks, and periodically rewarded with unpredictable amount monetary incentives for improved performance. Striatal V3', calculated as striatal-cerebellar/cerebellar activity ratio, was measured under equilibrium condition, at baseline and during and after the video game. Striatal V3' was significantly reduced during the video game compared with baseline levels, indicating increased DA release in this region (caudate, -15±6%; putamen, -30±10%). During the 30 min after the game ended, striatal [11C]raclopride binding was gradually increased and the V3' approached baseline levels. There was a significant correlation between the reduction in striatal V3' and the task performance during the video game. These results demonstrate DA release in the human striatum during a psychomotor task with a monetary reward and to our knowledge for the first time a gradual DA restoration to baseline levels following the offset of stimulation. They also illustrate that acute fluctuations of synaptic DA can be measured in vivo using [11C]raclopride PET

  15. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    , experience and consumption are all strategic design tools applied by planners and architects. Whereas urban design in former modernist planning served merely functional or political means, urban design has increasingly become an aesthetical mediator of ideologies embedded in the urban field of life forces...... capitalism not only changes urban life and its means of production, it specifically influences the way the city is designed and how it unfolds as events (Anderson & Harrison 2010) and affective, emotional production (Pile 2009). Through examples of urban design and events in the Carlsberg City in Copenhagen...... and The High Line in Chelsea, New York, the paper sets out to define and question these affective modes of production. Whether these productions are socio-material practices consisting of ludic designs (Stevens 2007), temporary architecture or art installations or evental practices consisting of...

  16. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Spence, Katie G; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2015-11-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory. PMID

  17. Increased cortico-striatal connectivity during motor practice contributes to the consolidation of motor memory in writer's cramp patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gallea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor representations of movements are created in the sensorimotor network through repeated practice to support successful and effortless performance. Writer's cramp (WC is a disorder acquired through extensive practice of finger movements, and it is likely associated with the abnormal acquisition of sensorimotor representations. We investigated (i the activation and connectivity changes in the brain network supporting the acquisition of sensorimotor representations of finger sequences in patients with WC and (ii the link between these changes and consolidation of motor performance 24 h after the initial practice. Twenty-two patients with WC and 22 age-matched healthy volunteers practiced a complex sequence with the right (pathological hand during functional MRI recording. Speed and accuracy were measured immediately before and after practice (day 1 and 24 h after practice (day 2. The two groups reached equivalent motor performance on day 1 and day 2. During motor practice, patients with WC had (i reduced hippocampal activation and hippocampal–striatal functional connectivity; and (ii overactivation of premotor–striatal areas, whose connectivity correlated with motor performance after consolidation. These results suggest that patients with WC use alternative networks to reach equiperformance in the acquisition of new motor memories.

  18. Quantitative high-throughput gene expression profiling of human striatal development to screen stem cell-derived medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straccia, Marco; Garcia-Diaz Barriga, Gerardo; Sanders, Phil; Bombau, Georgina; Carrere, Jordi; Mairal, Pedro Belio; Vinh, Ngoc-Nga; Yung, Sun; Kelly, Claire M; Svendsen, Clive N; Kemp, Paul J; Arjomand, Jamshid; Schoenfeld, Ryan C; Alberch, Jordi; Allen, Nicholas D; Rosser, Anne E; Canals, Josep M

    2015-01-01

    A systematic characterization of the spatio-temporal gene expression during human neurodevelopment is essential to understand brain function in both physiological and pathological conditions. In recent years, stem cell technology has provided an in vitro tool to recapitulate human development, permitting also the generation of human models for many diseases. The correct differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) into specific cell types should be evaluated by comparison with specific cells/tissue profiles from the equivalent adult in vivo organ. Here, we define by a quantitative high-throughput gene expression analysis the subset of specific genes of the whole ganglionic eminence (WGE) and adult human striatum. Our results demonstrate that not only the number of specific genes is crucial but also their relative expression levels between brain areas. We next used these gene profiles to characterize the differentiation of hPSCs. Our findings demonstrate a temporal progression of gene expression during striatal differentiation of hPSCs from a WGE toward an adult striatum identity. Present results establish a gene expression profile to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the telencephalic hPSC-derived progenitors eventually used for transplantation and mature striatal neurons for disease modeling and drug-screening. PMID:26417608

  19. Quantitative high-throughput gene expression profiling of human striatal development to screen stem cell–derived medium spiny neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straccia, Marco; Garcia-Diaz Barriga, Gerardo; Sanders, Phil; Bombau, Georgina; Carrere, Jordi; Mairal, Pedro Belio; Vinh, Ngoc-Nga; Yung, Sun; Kelly, Claire M; Svendsen, Clive N; Kemp, Paul J; Arjomand, Jamshid; Schoenfeld, Ryan C; Alberch, Jordi; Allen, Nicholas D; Rosser, Anne E; Canals, Josep M

    2015-01-01

    A systematic characterization of the spatio-temporal gene expression during human neurodevelopment is essential to understand brain function in both physiological and pathological conditions. In recent years, stem cell technology has provided an in vitro tool to recapitulate human development, permitting also the generation of human models for many diseases. The correct differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) into specific cell types should be evaluated by comparison with specific cells/tissue profiles from the equivalent adult in vivo organ. Here, we define by a quantitative high-throughput gene expression analysis the subset of specific genes of the whole ganglionic eminence (WGE) and adult human striatum. Our results demonstrate that not only the number of specific genes is crucial but also their relative expression levels between brain areas. We next used these gene profiles to characterize the differentiation of hPSCs. Our findings demonstrate a temporal progression of gene expression during striatal differentiation of hPSCs from a WGE toward an adult striatum identity. Present results establish a gene expression profile to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the telencephalic hPSC-derived progenitors eventually used for transplantation and mature striatal neurons for disease modeling and drug-screening. PMID:26417608

  20. Cysteamine and pantethine effects on passive avoidance behavior, shuttle box learning, open-field activity, striatal catecholamines and somatostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vécsei, L; Widerlöv, E; Ekman, R; Alling, C

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cysteamine and pantethine were compared on different behavioral tests and neurochemical parameters in rats. Cysteamine, administered in high dose (3.90 mM/kg s.c.), decreased the locomotor and rearing activities of rats, while it slightly but not significantly increased the avoidance latency in a passive avoidance test. Pantethine, 24 hr after its administration, significantly increased the dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) levels in the striatum. Cysteamine slightly reduced the DOPAC level without influencing the catecholamine levels in this brain area. The striatal somatostatin concentration was reduced 24 hr after the administration of cysteamine, while pantethine did not influence it. After repeated daily injections of pantethine, the drug facilitated the shuttle box learning process and increased the intertrial and open-field activities of the animals. Cysteamine only slightly increased the locomotion and rearing and did not influence the shuttle box learning. Both pantethine and cysteamine slowed the rate of the "body weight increase" of the animals when compared to a saline-treated group. These findings suggest that the locomotor activation induced by pantethine 24 hr after its administration plays an important role in its behavioral effects. It might be that the striatal dopaminergic transmission, modified by administration of pantethine, plays some role in the higher locomotor activity induced by the substance. PMID:2570553

  1. Developmental profile of the aberrant dopamine D2 receptor response in striatal cholinergic interneurons in DYT1 dystonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sciamanna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DYT1 dystonia, a severe form of genetically determined human dystonia, exhibits reduced penetrance among carriers and begins usually during adolescence. The reasons for such age dependence and variability remain unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: We characterized the alterations in D2 dopamine receptor (D2R signalling in striatal cholinergic interneurons at different ages in mice overexpressing human mutant torsinA (hMT. An abnormal excitatory response to the D2R agonist quinpirole was recorded at postnatal day 14, consisting of a membrane depolarization coupled to an increase in spiking frequency, and persisted unchanged at 3 and 9 months in hMT mice, compared to mice expressing wild-type human torsinA and non-transgenic mice. This response was blocked by the D2R antagonist sulpiride and depended upon G-proteins, as it was prevented by intrapipette GDP-β-S. Patch-clamp recordings from dissociated interneurons revealed a significant increase in the Cav2.2-mediated current fraction at all ages examined. Consistently, chelation of intracellular calcium abolished the paradoxical response to quinpirole. Finally, no gross morphological changes were observed during development. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that an imbalanced striatal dopaminergic/cholinergic signaling occurs early in DYT1 dystonia and persists along development, representing a susceptibility factor for symptom generation.

  2. Striatal disorders dissociate mechanisms of enhanced and impaired response selection — Evidence from cognitive neurophysiology and computational modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Beste

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paradoxically enhanced cognitive processes in neurological disorders provide vital clues to understanding neural function. However, what determines whether the neurological damage is impairing or enhancing is unclear. Here we use the performance of patients with two disorders of the striatum to dissociate mechanisms underlying cognitive enhancement and impairment resulting from damage to the same system. In a two-choice decision task, Huntington's disease patients were faster and less error prone than controls, yet a patient with the rare condition of benign hereditary chorea (BHC was both slower and more error prone. EEG recordings confirmed significant differences in neural processing between the groups. Analysis of a computational model revealed that the common loss of connectivity between striatal neurons in BHC and Huntington's disease impairs response selection, but the increased sensitivity of NMDA receptors in Huntington's disease potentially enhances response selection. Crucially the model shows that there is a critical threshold for increased sensitivity: below that threshold, impaired response selection results. Our data and model thus predict that specific striatal malfunctions can contribute to either impaired or enhanced selection, and provide clues to solving the paradox of how Huntington's disease can lead to both impaired and enhanced cognitive processes.

  3. Leptin Increases Striatal Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding in Leptin-Deficient Obese (ob/ob) Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaffly, J.; Michaelides, M.; Wang, G-J.; Pessin, J.E.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-06-01

    Peripheral and central leptin administration have been shown to mediate central dopamine (DA) signaling. Leptin-receptor deficient rodents show decreased DA D2 receptor (D2R) binding in striatum and unique DA profiles compared to controls. Leptin-deficient mice show increased DA activity in reward-related brain regions. The objective of this study was to examine whether basal D2R-binding differences contribute to the phenotypic behaviors of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, and whether D2R binding is altered in response to peripheral leptin treatment in these mice. Leptin decreased body weight, food intake, and plasma insulin concentration in ob/ob mice but not in wild-type mice. Basal striatal D2R binding (measured with autoradiography [{sup 3}H] spiperone) did not differ between ob/ob and wild-type mice but the response to leptin did. In wild-type mice, leptin decreased striatal D2R binding, whereas, in ob/ob mice, leptin increased D2R binding. Our findings provide further evidence that leptin modulates D2R expression in striatum and that these effects are genotype/phenotype dependent.

  4. Learning-related coordination of striatal and hippocampal theta rhythms during acquisition of a procedural maze task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoteau, William E; Thorn, Catherine; Gibson, Daniel J; Courtemanche, Richard; Mitra, Partha; Kubota, Yasuo; Graybiel, Ann M

    2007-03-27

    The striatum and hippocampus are conventionally viewed as complementary learning and memory systems, with the hippocampus specialized for fact-based episodic memory and the striatum for procedural learning and memory. Here we directly tested whether these two systems exhibit independent or coordinated activity patterns during procedural learning. We trained rats on a conditional T-maze task requiring navigational and cue-based associative learning. We recorded local field potential (LFP) activity with tetrodes chronically implanted in the caudoputamen and the CA1 field of the dorsal hippocampus during 6-25 days of training. We show that simultaneously recorded striatal and hippocampal theta rhythms are modulated differently as the rats learned to perform the T-maze task but nevertheless become highly coherent during the choice period of the maze runs in rats that successfully learned the task. Moreover, in the rats that acquired the task, the phase of the striatal-hippocampal theta coherence was modified toward a consistent antiphase relationship, and these changes occurred in proportion to the levels of learning achieved. We suggest that rhythmic oscillations, including theta-band activity, could influence not only neural processing in cortico-basal ganglia circuits but also dynamic interactions between basal ganglia-based and hippocampus-based forebrain circuits during the acquisition and performance of learned behaviors. Experience-dependent changes in coordination of oscillatory activity across brain structures thus may parallel the well known plasticity of spike activity that occurs as a function of experience. PMID:17372196

  5. Reward-related dorsal striatal activity differences between former and current cocaine dependent individuals during an interactive competitive game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Christopher J; Assaf, Michal; Muska, Christine E; Rosen, Rivkah I; Thomas, Andre D; Johnson, Matthew R; Hylton, Jennifer L; Andrews, Melissa M; Reynolds, Brady A; Krystal, John H; Potenza, Marc N; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by impulsivity, impaired social relationships, and abnormal mesocorticolimbic reward processing, but their interrelationships relative to stages of cocaine addiction are unclear. We assessed blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in ventral and dorsal striatum during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in current (CCD; n = 30) and former (FCD; n = 28) cocaine dependent subjects as well as healthy control (HC; n = 31) subjects while playing an interactive competitive Domino game involving risk-taking and reward/punishment processing. Out-of-scanner impulsivity-related measures were also collected. Although both FCD and CCD subjects scored significantly higher on impulsivity-related measures than did HC subjects, only FCD subjects had differences in striatal activation, specifically showing hypoactivation during their response to gains versus losses in right dorsal caudate, a brain region linked to habituation, cocaine craving and addiction maintenance. Right caudate activity in FCD subjects also correlated negatively with impulsivity-related measures of self-reported compulsivity and sensitivity to reward. These findings suggest that remitted cocaine dependence is associated with striatal dysfunction during social reward processing in a manner linked to compulsivity and reward sensitivity measures. Future research should investigate the extent to which such differences might reflect underlying vulnerabilities linked to cocaine-using propensities (e.g., relapses). PMID:22606228

  6. Hydrogen sulfide functions as a neuromodulator to regulate striatal neurotransmission in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Zhu, Jun; Pan, Yang; Dong, Jingde; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Li

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gasotransmitter, has been considered a neuromodulator to enhance hippocampal long-term potentiation and exerts neuroprotective effects against neurotoxin-induced neurodegeneration in rodent models of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether H2S can function as a neuromodulator to regulate the levels of nigrostriatal neurotransmitters and then impact the vulnerability of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in response to neurotoxins remains unknown. For this study, we prepared a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine plus probenecid (MPTP/p)-induced mouse subacute model of PD to explore the modulatory effect of H2S on monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters in the striatum of MPTP-treated mice. This study shows that NaHS (an H2S donor, 5.6 mg/kg/day, i.p.) administration improves the survival rate and significantly ameliorates the weight loss of MPTP-treated mice. NaHS treatment attenuated MPTP-induced neuronal damage, restored the diminution of DA neurons, and suppressed the overactivation of astrocytes in the mouse striatum. Additionally, NaHS upregulated striatal serotonin levels and modulated the balance of excitatory glutamate and the inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid system in response to MPTP challenge. The current study indicates that H2S may function as an effective neuromodulator to regulate striatal neurotransmission and provides insight into the potential of H2S for PD therapy. PMID:25388401

  7. Reward-related dorsal striatal activity differences between former and current cocaine dependent individuals during an interactive competitive game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hyatt

    Full Text Available Cocaine addiction is characterized by impulsivity, impaired social relationships, and abnormal mesocorticolimbic reward processing, but their interrelationships relative to stages of cocaine addiction are unclear. We assessed blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD signal in ventral and dorsal striatum during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in current (CCD; n = 30 and former (FCD; n = 28 cocaine dependent subjects as well as healthy control (HC; n = 31 subjects while playing an interactive competitive Domino game involving risk-taking and reward/punishment processing. Out-of-scanner impulsivity-related measures were also collected. Although both FCD and CCD subjects scored significantly higher on impulsivity-related measures than did HC subjects, only FCD subjects had differences in striatal activation, specifically showing hypoactivation during their response to gains versus losses in right dorsal caudate, a brain region linked to habituation, cocaine craving and addiction maintenance. Right caudate activity in FCD subjects also correlated negatively with impulsivity-related measures of self-reported compulsivity and sensitivity to reward. These findings suggest that remitted cocaine dependence is associated with striatal dysfunction during social reward processing in a manner linked to compulsivity and reward sensitivity measures. Future research should investigate the extent to which such differences might reflect underlying vulnerabilities linked to cocaine-using propensities (e.g., relapses.

  8. Relationship between striatal [123I]β-CIT binding and four major clinical signs in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the correlation between clinical severity and striatal [123I]β-CIT binding in 12 patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD: 6 men and 6 women, age: 65±7 years, Hoehn-Yahr stage: 1 to 3). The clinical severity of PD patients was measured with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) after withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication at least 12 hours before assessment. [123I]β-CIT binding in the caudate and putamen was measured at 3 hours [V''3 (day 1)], and at 24 hours [V''3 (day 2)] after tracer injection with small square ROIs. The specific striatal uptake index (day 2) was calculated with large square ROIs that encompassed the whole striatum. The best correlation (r=-0.82, p3 (day 2) and the motor UPDRS scores. When the motor UPDRS scores were divided into four subscales, bradykinesia was the only sign that correlated significantly with putamenal V''3 (day 2) (r=-0.81, p123I]β-CIT SPECT is a useful marker of disease severity in PD with potential utility in the serial monitoring of disease progression. (author)

  9. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    Recently, in human geography there has been a considerable attention paid to retheorising maps; less as a product and more as practice. This refers to the notion that rather than reading maps as fixed representations, digital mapping is by nature a dynamic, performative, and participatory practice....... In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology...

  10. Distinct Effects of Chronic Dopaminergic Stimulation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Striatal Doublecortin Expression in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Rachele; Steigleder, Tobias; Schlachetzki, Johannes C. M.; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Schwab, Stefan; Winner, Beate; Winkler, Jürgen; Kohl, Zacharias

    2016-01-01

    While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ), recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g., the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA) receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX), and Ropinirole (ROP), on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg) were applied intraperitoneally within 12 h after a 14-days-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg) applied at the beginning of 14-days DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX) in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX+ neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active

  11. Distinct effects of chronic dopaminergic stimulation on hippocampal neurogenesis and striatal doublecortin expression in adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele eSalvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ, recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g. the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX and Ropinirole (ROP, on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg were applied intraperitoneally within 12 hours after a 14-day-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and NeuN 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg applied at the beginning of 14-day DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX+ neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active and

  12. Distinct Effects of Chronic Dopaminergic Stimulation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Striatal Doublecortin Expression in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Rachele; Steigleder, Tobias; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Schwab, Stefan; Winner, Beate; Winkler, Jürgen; Kohl, Zacharias

    2016-01-01

    While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ), recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g., the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA) receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX), and Ropinirole (ROP), on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg) were applied intraperitoneally within 12 h after a 14-days-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg) applied at the beginning of 14-days DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX) in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX(+) neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active

  13. Associative processes in addiction and reward. The role of amygdala-ventral striatal subsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, B J; Parkinson, J A; Olmstead, M C; Arroyo, M; Robledo, P; Robbins, T W

    1999-06-29

    our analytic techniques for understanding complex motivated behavior has been evident for some time. However, the crucial point is that we are now able to map these components with increasing certainty onto discrete amygdaloid, and other limbic cortical-ventral striatal subsystems. The neural dissection of these mechanisms also serves an important theoretical purpose in helping to validate the various hypothetical constructs and further developing theory. Major challenges remain, not the least of which is an understanding of the operation of the ventral striatum together with its dopaminergic innervation and its interactions with the basolateral amygdala, hippocampal formation, and prefrontal cortex at a more mechanistic, neuronal level. PMID:10415662

  14. Phorbol esters potentiate rapid dopamine release from median eminence and striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we investigated the ability of phorbol esters to potentiate Ca2+-dependent depolarization-induced release of tritium-labeled dopamine ([3H]DA) from median eminence and striatal synaptosomes. Phorbol esters potentiated [3H]DA release in a concentration-dependent manner in both kinds of dopaminergic nerve terminals and with a potency series similar to that reported for stimulation of protein kinase-C (PKC) activity in other cell systems. Evoked [3H]DA release was increased by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-7) M) after 1, 3, 5, and 10 sec of depolarization. The effect of TPA was suppressed by sphingosine, a PKC inhibitor. TPA enhanced [3H]DA release evoked by high K+, veratridine or the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Phorbol ester potentiation was found to be depolarization dependent, as it was present from 30-75 mM, but not at 5-20 mM external K+. Potentiation was seen at all external Ca2+ concentrations studied between 0.01-3 mM. However, in the absence of external free Ca2+ (i.e. with 0.1 mM EGTA), the phorbol effect was not present. These data indicate that an increase in intrasynaptosomal Ca2+ concentration is necessary for the enhancement of [3H]DA release by phorbol esters to occur. The combination of TPA and the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 does not show the marked synergism observed in some other systems, that is maximal release was not reinstated. This suggests that in dopaminergic nerve terminals, activation of PKC has a modulatory, rather than a mediating, effect on release. Recently, we have shown that hyperprolactinemia stimulated [3H]DA release from median eminence synaptosomes by an external Ca2+-independent mechanism which might involve the PKC pathway. However, in the present work we found that the TPA and PRL effects on evoked [3H]DA release were additive, suggesting that two independent mechanisms are involved

  15. Phorbol esters potentiate rapid dopamine release from median eminence and striatal synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, C.; Selmanoff, M.

    1988-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the ability of phorbol esters to potentiate Ca2+-dependent depolarization-induced release of tritium-labeled dopamine ((3H)DA) from median eminence and striatal synaptosomes. Phorbol esters potentiated (3H)DA release in a concentration-dependent manner in both kinds of dopaminergic nerve terminals and with a potency series similar to that reported for stimulation of protein kinase-C (PKC) activity in other cell systems. Evoked (3H)DA release was increased by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-7) M) after 1, 3, 5, and 10 sec of depolarization. The effect of TPA was suppressed by sphingosine, a PKC inhibitor. TPA enhanced (3H)DA release evoked by high K+, veratridine or the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Phorbol ester potentiation was found to be depolarization dependent, as it was present from 30-75 mM, but not at 5-20 mM external K+. Potentiation was seen at all external Ca2+ concentrations studied between 0.01-3 mM. However, in the absence of external free Ca2+ (i.e. with 0.1 mM EGTA), the phorbol effect was not present. These data indicate that an increase in intrasynaptosomal Ca2+ concentration is necessary for the enhancement of (3H)DA release by phorbol esters to occur. The combination of TPA and the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 does not show the marked synergism observed in some other systems, that is maximal release was not reinstated. This suggests that in dopaminergic nerve terminals, activation of PKC has a modulatory, rather than a mediating, effect on release. Recently, we have shown that hyperprolactinemia stimulated (3H)DA release from median eminence synaptosomes by an external Ca2+-independent mechanism which might involve the PKC pathway. However, in the present work we found that the TPA and PRL effects on evoked (3H)DA release were additive, suggesting that two independent mechanisms are involved.

  16. Behavioral Abnormalities and Circuit Defects in the Basal Ganglia of a Mouse Model of 16p11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Portmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A deletion on human chromosome 16p11.2 is associated with autism spectrum disorders. We deleted the syntenic region on mouse chromosome 7F3. MRI and high-throughput single-cell transcriptomics revealed anatomical and cellular abnormalities, particularly in cortex and striatum of juvenile mutant mice (16p11+/−. We found elevated numbers of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs expressing the dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2+ and fewer dopamine-sensitive (Drd1+ neurons in deep layers of cortex. Electrophysiological recordings of Drd2+ MSN revealed synaptic defects, suggesting abnormal basal ganglia circuitry function in 16p11+/− mice. This is further supported by behavioral experiments showing hyperactivity, circling, and deficits in movement control. Strikingly, 16p11+/− mice showed a complete lack of habituation reminiscent of what is observed in some autistic individuals. Our findings unveil a fundamental role of genes affected by the 16p11.2 deletion in establishing the basal ganglia circuitry and provide insights in the pathophysiology of autism.

  17. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  18. Decreased striatal RGS2 expression is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease (HD and exemplifies a compensatory aspect of HD-induced gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Seredenina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The molecular phenotype of Huntington's disease (HD is known to comprise highly reproducible changes in gene expression involving striatal signaling genes. Here we test whether individual changes in striatal gene expression are capable of mitigating HD-related neurotoxicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used protein-encoding and shRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors to evaluate the effects of RGS2, RASD2, STEP and NNAT downregulation in HD. Of these four genes, only RGS2 and RASD2 modified mutant htt fragment toxicity in cultured rat primary striatal neurons. In both cases, disease modulation was in the opposite of the predicted direction: whereas decreased expression of RGS2 and RASD2 was associated with the HD condition, restoring expression enhanced degeneration of striatal cells. Conversely, silencing of RGS2 or RASD2 enhanced disease-related changes in gene expression and resulted in significant neuroprotection. These results indicate that RGS2 and RASD2 downregulation comprises a compensatory response that allows neurons to better tolerate huntingtin toxicity. Assessment of the possible mechanism of RGS2-mediated neuroprotection showed that RGS2 downregulation enhanced ERK activation. These results establish a novel link between the inhibition of RGS2 and neuroprotective modulation of ERK activity. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings both identify RGS2 downregulation as a novel compensatory response in HD neurons and suggest that RGS2 inhibition might be considered as an innovative target for neuroprotective drug development.

  19. 1-METHYL-4-PHENYL-1,2,3,6-TETRAHYDROPYRIDINE (MPTP)-INDUCED DAMAGE OF STRIATAL DOPAMINERGIC FIBERS ATTENUATES SUBSEQUENT ASTROCYTE RESPONSE TO MPTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute administration of the dopaminergic neurotoxicant, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to the C57B1/6 mouse caused a rapid decrease in the amount of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a marker of dopaminergic neurons, followed by a large increase in the astr...

  20. Loss of striatal 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (Rsk) is a key factor for motor, synaptic and transcription dysfunction in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada-Huguet, Marta; Giralt, Albert; Rué, Laura; Alberch, Jordi; Xifró, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by motor dysfunction due to the expression of mutant huntingtin that promotes degeneration of striatal GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons. Here we explore the role of the 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (Rsk) in the physiopathology of HD. First, we show a reduction of Rsk1 and 2 protein levels in the striatum of two HD mouse models, R6/1 and Hdh(Q7/Q111) knock-in mice, at ages when they suffer from motor disturbances. Interestingly, the analysis of post-mortem samples from HD patients revealed a significant reduction of both Rsk forms in the putamen and caudate, but not in the cortex. Rsk1 and 2 levels were also reduced in the striatum of BDNF heterozygous mice, and upon BDNF neutralization in striatal cultures, suggesting that striatal loss of BDNF could be involved in the decrease of Rsk levels. Finally, we injected recombinant adeno-associated-virus (AAV5)-Rsk in the striatum of R6/1 mice at the onset of motor symptoms. Four weeks later, we found higher Rsk levels in the striatum accompanied by improvements in motor coordination, enhanced expression of synaptic markers and increased expression of genes related to synaptic plasticity, such as cfos and egr1. Altogether, we identified Rsk as a key factor in striatal alterations associated with motor deficits in HD. PMID:27063456

  1. Genetic triple dissociation reveals multiple roles for dopamine in reinforcement learning

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Michael J.; Ahmed A. Moustafa; Haughey, Heather M.; Curran, Tim; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2007-01-01

    What are the genetic and neural components that support adaptive learning from positive and negative outcomes? Here, we show with genetic analyses that three independent dopaminergic mechanisms contribute to reward and avoidance learning in humans. A polymorphism in the DARPP-32 gene, associated with striatal dopamine function, predicted relatively better probabilistic reward learning. Conversely, the C957T polymorphism of the DRD2 gene, associated with striatal D2 receptor function, predicte...

  2. Associations of Prenatal Nicotine Exposure and the Dopamine Related Genes ANKK1 and DRD2 to Verbal Language

    OpenAIRE

    Eicher, John D.; Powers, Natalie R.; Cho, Kelly; Miller, Laura L.; Mueller, Kathryn L.; Ring, Susan M.; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Language impairment (LI) and reading disability (RD) are common pediatric neurobehavioral disorders that frequently co-occur, suggesting they share etiological determinants. Recently, our group identified prenatal nicotine exposure as a factor for RD and poor reading performance. Using smoking questionnaire and language data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, we first determined if this risk could be expanded to other communication disorders by evaluating whether prenat...

  3. The role of COMT, DAT and DRD2 polymorphisms on brain mechanisms of involuntary attention and cognitive control

    OpenAIRE

    García García, Manuel Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Our genetic background plays a role in the way we face environmental changes and adapt our behavior adequately to the requirements of everyday life. The present research focuses on the role of three genes related to dopamine (DA) transmission on relevant cognitive processes, such as shifting attention when required by the environmental demands or processing of unexpected but potentially relevant events. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum dopamine activity seem to play different roles in att...

  4. Gene-Environment Interactions across Development: Exploring DRD2 Genotype and Prenatal Smoking Effects on Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Sandra A.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Stopp, Christian; Respass, Jennifer; Stewart, Peter; Jameson, Travis R.; Gilbert, David G.; Huggenvik, Jodi I.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic factors dynamically interact with both pre- and postnatal environmental influences to shape development. Considerable attention has been devoted to gene-environment interactions (G x E) on important outcomes (A. Caspi & T. E. Moffitt, 2006). It is also important to consider the possibility that these G x E effects may vary across…

  5. ADHD Candidate Gene Study in a Population-Based Birth Cohort: Association with DBH and DRD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Emma S.; Ogdie, Matthew N.; Loukola, Anu; Varilo, Teppo; Taanila, Anja; Hurtig, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma K.; Loo, Sandra K.; McGough, James J.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Smalley, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the genetic contribution if any to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The results confirm the hypothesis and the association of dopamine [beta]-hydroxylase and dopamine receptor D2 genes with ADHD.

  6. Effects of L-Dopa on circadian rhythms of 6-OHDA striatal lesioned rats: a radiotelemetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulamery, Audrey; Simon, Nicolas; Vidal, Johanna; Bruguerolle, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Temporal variation in the motor function of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients suggests the potential importance of a chronobiological and chronopharmacological approach in its clinical management. We previously documented the effects of striatal injection of 6-OHDA (as an animal model of PD) on the circadian rhythms of temperature (T), heart rate (HR), and locomotor activity (A). The present work assessed the possible influence of L-Dopa on these same rhythms in the 6-OHDA animal model of PD. The study began after a four-week recovery period following surgical implantation of telemetric devices to monitor the study variables and/or anaesthesia. The study was divided into an initial one-week control period (W1) for baseline measurement of T, HR, and A rhythms. Thereafter, stereotaxic 6-OHDA lesioning was done. and a second monitoring for two weeks followed (W2, W3). Rats were then randomly divided into two groups: eight control rats received, via a mini-osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously, the excipient saline; the other eight rats received L-Dopa (100 mg/kg SC/day). After a seven-day period (W4), the pumps were removed and the T, HR, and A rhythms were monitored for two weeks (W5 and W6). To control for 6-OHDA striatal dopamine-induced depletion, 12 other rats were injected by identical methods (eight rats with 6-OHDA and four controls with saline) and sacrificed at W1, W3, and W5 for dopamine striatal content determination. To verify the delivery of levodopa from the osmotic pumps, plasma levels of levodopa and its main metabolites 3-OMD, DOPAC, and HVA were determined on separate group of rats receiving the drug under the same experimental conditions (osmotic pumps delivering continuously 10 microl/h for seven days, 100 mg/kg/subcutaneously). Our results agree with previously reported rhythmic changes induced by 6-OHDA--loss of circadian rhythmicity or changes in the main parameters of the registered rhythms. When circadian rhythmicity was abolished, L

  7. Sex-specific effects of naturally occurring variants in the dopamine receptor D2 locus on insulin secretion and Type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guigas, B; de Leeuw van Weenen, J E; van Leeuwen, N;

    2014-01-01

    functional variants in the coding region of the DRD2/ANKK1 locus (rs1079597, rs6275, rs6277, rs1800497) were genotyped and analysed for Type 2 diabetes susceptibility in up to 25 000 people (8148 with Type 2 diabetes and 17687 control subjects) from two large independent Dutch cohorts and one Danish cohort......AIMS: Modulation of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) activity affects insulin secretion in both rodents and isolated pancreatic β-cells. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the DRD2/ANKK1 locus may affect susceptibility to Type 2 diabetes in humans. METHODS: Four potentially....... In addition, 340 Dutch subjects underwent a 2-h hyperglycaemic clamp to investigate insulin secretion. Since sexual dimorphic associations related to DRD2 polymorphisms have been previously reported, we also performed a gender-stratified analysis. RESULTS: rs1800497 at the DRD2/ANKK1 locus was...

  8. How does real affect affect affect recognition in speech?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, Khiet Phuong

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was to develop speech-based affect recognition systems that can deal with spontaneous (‘real’) affect instead of acted affect. Several affect recognition experiments with spontaneous affective speech data were carried out to investigate what combinati

  9. Familial Risk for Major Depression is Associated with Lower Striatal 5-HT4 Receptor Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Torstensen, Eva; Holst, Klaus Kähler;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 5-HT4 receptor provides a novel potential target for antidepressant treatment. No studies exist to elucidate the 5-HT4 receptor's in vivo distribution in the depressed state or in populations that may display trait markers for major depression disorder (MDD). The aim of this study...... was to determine whether familial risk for MDD is associated with cerebral 5-HT4 receptor binding as measured with [(11)C]SB207145 brain PET imaging. Familial risk is the most potent risk factor of MDD. METHODS: We studied 57 healthy individuals (mean age 36 yrs, range 20-86; 21 women), 26 of which...... depression, and that lower striatal 5-HT4 receptor binding is associated with increased risk for developing MDD. The finding is intriguing considering that the 5-HT4 receptor has been suggested to be an effective target for antidepressant treatment....

  10. Differences in the time course of haloperidol-induced up-regulation of rat striatal and mesolimbic dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional differences in the onset and persistence of increased dopamine D2 receptor density in rat brain were studied following daily injections of haloperidol for 3, 7, 14, or 28 days. Striatal [3H]-spiroperidol Bmax values were significantly increased following 3 - 28 days of haloperidol treatment, as compared to saline controls. Olfactory tubercle Bmax values were significantly increased only after 14 or 28 days of haloperidol treatment. Nucleus accumbens Bmax values were significantly increased only in the 14-day drug treatment group, suggesting that dopamine D2 receptor up-regulation in nucleus accumbens may reverse during ongoing neuroleptic treatment. These findings suggest that important differences in adaptive responses to chronic dopamine blockade may exist between dopaminergic synapses located in various rat brain regions

  11. Effects of the NMDA receptor antagonists on deltamethrin-induced striatal dopamine release in conscious unrestrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takuya; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2009-08-01

    To better understand the neurotoxicity caused by the pyrethroid pesticide, we examined the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists MK-801, a non-competitive cation channel blocker, and 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), a competitive Na(+) channel blocker, on extracellular dopamine levels in male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving the type II pyrethroid deltamethrin using an in vivo microdialysis system. Deltamethrin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) evidently increased striatal dopamine levels with a peak time of 120 min, and the local infusion (i.c.) of either MK-801(650 muM) or APV (500 muM) completely blocked these actions. The fluctuation in the dopamine metabolite 3-MT also resembled that in dopamine. Our results suggest that dopamine-releasing neurons would be modulated via the NMDA receptor by the excitatory glutamatergic neurons after deltamethrin treatment. PMID:19721373

  12. Methamphetamine self-administration is associated with persistent biochemical alterations in striatal and cortical dopaminergic terminals in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N Krasnova

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (meth is an illicit psychostimulant that is abused throughout the world. Repeated passive injections of the drug given in a single day or over a few days cause significant and long-term depletion of dopamine and serotonin in the mammalian brain. Because meth self-administration may better mimic some aspects of human drug-taking behaviors, we examined to what extent this pattern of drug treatment might also result in damage to monoaminergic systems in the brain. Rats were allowed to intravenously self-administer meth (yoked control rats received vehicle 15 hours per day for 8 days before being euthanized at either 24 hours or at 7 and 14 days after cessation of drug taking. Meth self-administration by the rats was associated with a progressive escalation of daily drug intake to 14 mg/kg per day. Animals that self-administered meth exhibited dose-dependent decreases in striatal dopamine levels during the period of observation. In addition, there were significant reductions in the levels of striatal dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase proteins. There were also significant decreases in the levels of dopamine, dopamine transporter, and tyrosine hydroxylase in the cortex. In contrast, meth self-administration caused only transient decreases in norepinephrine and serotonin levels in the two brain regions, with these values returning to normal at seven days after cessation of drug taking. Importantly, meth self-administration was associated with significant dose-dependent increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein in both striatum and cortex, with these changes being of greater magnitude in the striatum. These results suggest that meth self-administration by rats is associated with long-term biochemical changes that are reminiscent of those observed in post-mortem brain tissues of chronic meth abusers.

  13. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike J F; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-08-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or 'wanting'). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened 'wanting' was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact ('liking') of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal 'hot-spots' that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation. PMID:25761571

  14. Modeling pharmacological clock and memory patterns of interval timing in a striatal beat-frequency model with realistic, noisy neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorinel A. Oprisan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In most species, the capability of perceiving and using the passage of time in the seconds-to-minutes range (interval timing is not only accurate but also scalar: errors in time estimation are linearly related to the estimated duration. The ubiquity of scalar timing extends over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, in mammals, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, scalar change in the perceived time (clock pattern, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in perceived time (memory pattern. How do these properties emerge from unreliable, noisy neurons firing in the milliseconds range? Neurobiological information relative to the brain circuits involved in interval timing provide support for an Striatal Beat Frequency (SBF model, in which time is coded by the coincidental activation of striatal spiny neurons by cortical neural oscillators. While biologically plausible, the impracticality of perfect oscillators, or their lack thereof, questions this mechanism in a brain with noisy neurons. We explored the computational mechanisms required for the clock and memory patterns in an SBF model with biophysically realistic and noisy Morris-Lecar neurons (SBF-ML. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing frequency of cortical oscillators, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that our SBF-ML model can reproduce the pharmacological clock and memory patterns observed in the literature. Numerical results also indicate that parameter variability (noise – which is ubiquitous in the form of small fluctuations in the intrinsic frequencies of neural oscillators within and between trails, and in the errors in recording/retrieving stored information related to criterion time – seems to be critical for the time-scale invariance of the clock and memory patterns.

  15. Motor deficits associated with Huntington's disease occur in the absence of striatal degeneration in BACHD transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Susanna; Gordon, Richard; Li, Rui; Christie, Daniel C; Kumar, Vinod; Woodruff, Trent M

    2016-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an incurable neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive motor and cognitive dysfunction, and depletion of neurons in the striatum. Recently, BACHD transgenic mice expressing the full-length human huntingtin gene have been generated, which recapitulate some of the motor and cognitive deficits seen in HD. In this study, we carried out a series of extensive behavioural and neuropathological tests on BACHD mice, to validate this mouse for preclinical research. Transgenic C57BL/6J BACHD and litter-matched wild-type mice were examined in a battery of motor and cognitive function tests at regular intervals up to 12 months of age. Brains from these mice were also analysed for signs of neurodegeneration and striatal and cortical volume sizes compared using anatomic 16.4T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans. BACHD mice showed progressive motor impairments on rotarod and balance beam tests starting from 3 months of age, were hypoactive in the open field tests starting from 6 months of age, however, showed no alterations in gait and grip strength at any age. Surprisingly, despite these distinct motor deficits, no signs of neuronal loss, gliosis or blood-brain barrier degeneration were observed in the striatum of 12-month-old mice. MRI brain scans confirmed no reduction in striatal or cortical volumes at 12 months of age, and BACHD mice had a normal lifespan. These results demonstrate that classical Huntington's-like motor impairments seen in this transgenic model, do not occur due to degeneration of the striatum, and thus caution against the use of this model for preclinical studies into HD. PMID:26908618

  16. Global resting-state fMRI analysis identifies frontal cortex, striatal, and cerebellar dysconnectivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevic, Alan; Hu, Sien; Zhang, Sheng; Savic, Aleksandar; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Repovs, Grega; Cole, Michael W.; Bednarski, Sarah; Krystal, John H.; Bloch, Michael H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with regional hyperactivity in cortico-striatal circuits. However, the large-scale patterns of abnormal neural connectivity remain uncharacterized. Resting-state functional connectivity (rs-fcMRI) studies have shown altered connectivity within the implicated circuitry, but they have used seed-driven approaches wherein a circuit of interest is defined a priori. This limits their ability to identify network abnormalities beyond the prevailing framework. This limitation is particularly problematic within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is large and heterogeneous and where a priori specification of seeds is therefore difficult. A hypothesis-neutral data-driven approach to the analysis of connectivity is vital. Method We analyzed rs-fcMRI data collected at 3T in 27 OCD patients and 66 matched controls using a recently developed data-driven global brain connectivity (GBC) method, both within the PFC and across the whole brain. Results We found clusters of decreased connectivity in the left lateral PFC in both whole-brain and PFC-restricted analyses. Increased GBC was found in the right putamen and left cerebellar cortex. Within ROIs in the basal ganglia and thalamus, we identified increased GBC in dorsal striatum and anterior thalamus, which was reduced in patients on medication. The ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens exhibited decreased global connectivity, but increased connectivity specifically with the ventral anterior cingulate cortex in subjects with OCD. Conclusion These findings identify previously uncharacterized PFC and basal ganglia dysconnectivity in OCD and reveal differentially altered GBC in dorsal and ventral striatum. Results highlight complex disturbances in PFC networks, which could contribute to disrupted cortical-striatal-cerebellar circuits in OCD. PMID:24314349

  17. Differing patterns of striatal 18F-dopa uptake in Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied regional striatal 18F-dopa uptake in 16 patients with L-dopa-responsive Parkinson's disease (PD), 18 patients with multiple system atrophy, and 10 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. Results were compared with those of 30 age-matched normal volunteers. The patients with PD showed significantly reduced mean uptake of 18F-dopa in the caudate and putamen compared to controls, but while function in the posterior part of the putamen was severely impaired (45% of normal), function in the anterior part of the putamen and in the caudate was relatively spared (62% and 84% of normal). Mean 18F-dopa uptake in the posterior putamen was depressed to similar levels in all patients. Unlike patients with PD, the patients with progressive supranuclear palsy showed equally severe impairment of mean 18F-dopa uptake in the anterior and posterior putamen. Caudate 18F-dopa uptake was also significantly lower in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy than in patients with PD, being depressed to the same level as that in the putamen. Mean 18F-dopa uptake values in the anterior putamen and caudate in patients with multiple system atrophy lay between PD and progressive supranuclear palsy levels. Locomotor disability of individual patients with PD or multiple system atrophy correlated with decline in striatal 18F-dopa uptake, but this was not the case for the patients with progressive supranuclear palsy. We conclude that patients with PD have selective nigral pathological features with relative preservation of the dopaminergic function in the anterior putamen and caudate, whereas there is progressively more extensive nigral involvement in multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy

  18. A53T-alpha-synuclein overexpression impairs dopamine signaling and striatal synaptic plasticity in old mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kurz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD, the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder at old age, can be caused by elevated expression or the A53T missense mutation of the presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein (SNCA. PD is characterized pathologically by the preferential vulnerability of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal projection neurons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we used two mouse lines overexpressing human A53T-SNCA and studied striatal dysfunction in the absence of neurodegeneration to understand early disease mechanisms. To characterize the progression, we employed young adult as well as old mice. Analysis of striatal neurotransmitter content demonstrated that dopamine (DA levels correlated directly with the level of expression of SNCA, an observation also made in SNCA-deficient (knockout, KO mice. However, the elevated DA levels in the striatum of old A53T-SNCA overexpressing mice may not be transmitted appropriately, in view of three observations. First, a transcriptional downregulation of the extraneural DA degradation enzyme catechol-ortho-methytransferase (COMT was found. Second, an upregulation of DA receptors was detected by immunoblots and autoradiography. Third, extensive transcriptome studies via microarrays and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR of altered transcript levels of the DA-inducible genes Atf2, Cb1, Freq, Homer1 and Pde7b indicated a progressive and genotype-dependent reduction in the postsynaptic DA response. As a functional consequence, long term depression (LTD was absent in corticostriatal slices from old transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, the dysfunctional neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity seen in the A53T-SNCA overexpressing mice reflect early changes within the basal ganglia prior to frank neurodegeneration. As a model of preclinical stages of PD, such insights may help to develop neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  19. Environmental neurotoxic challenge of conditional alpha-synuclein transgenic mice predicts a dopaminergic olfactory-striatal interplay in early PD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuber, Silke; Tadros, Daniel; Fields, Jerel; Overk, Cassia Rose; Ettle, Benjamin; Kosberg, Kori; Mante, Michael; Rockenstein, Edward; Trejo, Margarita; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-04-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is one of the first brain regions in Parkinson's disease (PD) to contain alpha-synuclein (α-syn) inclusions, possibly associated with nonmotor symptoms. Mechanisms underlying olfactory synucleinopathy, its contribution to progressive aggregation pathology and nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss observed at later stages, remain unclear. A second hit, such as environmental toxins, is suggestive for α-syn aggregation in olfactory neurons, potentially triggering disease progression. To address the possible pathogenic role of olfactory α-syn accumulation in early PD, we exposed mice with site-specific and inducible overexpression of familial PD-linked mutant α-syn in OB neurons to a low dose of the herbicide paraquat. Here, we found that olfactory α-syn per se elicited structural and behavioral abnormalities, characteristic of an early time point in models with widespread α-syn expression, including hyperactivity and increased striatal dopaminergic marker. Suppression of α-syn reversed the dopaminergic phenotype. In contrast, paraquat treatment synergistically induced degeneration of olfactory dopaminergic cells and opposed the higher reactive phenotype. Neither neurodegeneration nor behavioral abnormalities were detected in paraquat-treated mice with suppressed α-syn expression. By increasing calpain activity, paraquat induced a pathological cascade leading to inhibition of autophagy clearance and accumulation of calpain-cleaved truncated and insoluble α-syn, recapitulating biochemical and structural changes in human PD. Thus our results underscore the primary role of proteolytic failure in aggregation pathology. In addition, we provide novel evidence that olfactory dopaminergic neurons display an increased vulnerability toward neurotoxins in dependence to presence of human α-syn, possibly mediating an olfactory-striatal dopaminergic network dysfunction in mouse models and early PD. PMID:24509835

  20. Partial volume effect correction in SPECT for striatal uptake measurements in patients with neurodegenerative diseases: impact upon patient classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the dopaminergic system, measurements of striatal uptake are useful for diagnosis and patient follow-up but are strongly biased by the partial volume effect (PVE). We studied whether PVE correction might improve patient classification based on binding potential (BP) measurements. Patients with a probable diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, 10 patients) or Alzheimer's disease (AD, 13 patients) were studied by 123I-FP-CIT SPECT. SPECT images were reconstructed with and without PVE correction. Each patient SPECT scan was also simulated to obtain SPECT data whose characteristics were fully known. In addition, 17 SPECT scans were simulated with striatal uptake values mimicking pre-symptomatic cases of DLB. Without PVE correction, mean putamen BP values were 2.9±0.4 and 0.9±0.2 for AD and DLB patients respectively, while with PVE correction, they were 8.6±1.5 and 1.9±0.5 respectively. All patients were properly identified as having AD or DLB when considering mean putamen BP measured on their real or simulated SPECT scan, with and without PVE correction. All 30 simulations mimicking pre-symptomatic DLB and AD patients were accurately classified with PVE correction, but without PVE correction 15 mean putamen BP values were in a range where AD and DLB could not be distinguished. We conclude that putamen BP values measured without PVE correction can be used to differentiate probable DLB and AD due to the already severe reduction in dopamine transporter levels. PVE correction appeared useful for accurate differential diagnosis between AD and pre-symptomatic DLB. (orig.)

  1. I.v. cocaine induces rapid, transient excitation of striatal neurons via its action on peripheral neural elements: single-cell, iontophoretic study in awake and anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, E A; Brown, P L

    2007-09-21

    Cocaine's (COC) direct interaction with the dopamine (DA) transporter is usually considered the most important action underlying the psychomotor stimulant and reinforcing effects of this drug. However, some physiological, behavioral and psycho-emotional effects of COC are very rapid and brief and they remain intact during DA receptor blockade, suggesting possible involvement of peripheral non-DA neural mechanisms. To assess this issue, single-unit recording with microiontophoresis was used to examine changes in impulse activity of dorsal and ventral striatal neurons to i.v. COC (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) in the same rats under two conditions: awake with DA receptor blockade and anesthetized with urethane. In the awake preparation approximately 70% striatal neurons showed rapid and transient (latency approximately 6 s, duration approximately 15 s) COC-induced excitations. These effects were stronger in ventral than dorsal striatum. During anesthesia, these phasic effects were fully blocked and COC slowly decreased neuronal discharge rate. Cocaine-methiodide (COC-M), a derivative that cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, also caused phasic excitations in the awake, but not anesthetized condition. In contrast to regular COC, COC-M had no tonic effect on discharge rate in either preparation. Most striatal neurons that were phasically excited by both COC forms also showed short-latency excitations during tail-touch and tail-pinch in the awake preparation, an effect strongly attenuated during anesthesia. Finally, most striatal neurons that in awake conditions were phasically excited by somato-sensory stimuli and COC salts were also excited by iontophoretic glutamate (GLU). Although striatal neurons were sensitive to GLU in both preparations, the response magnitude at the same GLU current was higher in awake than anesthetized conditions. These data suggest that in awake animals i.v. COC, like somato-sensory stimuli, transiently excites striatal neurons via its action on peripheral

  2. Modification of the striatal dopaminergic neuron system by carbon monoxide exposure in free-moving rats, as determined by in vivo brain microdialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Shuichi; Kurosaki, Kunihiko; Kuriiwa, Fumi; Endo, Takahiko [Department of Forensic Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8402 (Japan); Mukai, Toshiji [Department of Legal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-0015 (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    Acute carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication in humans results in motor deficits, which resemble those in Parkinson's disease, suggesting possible disturbance of the central dopaminergic (DAergic) neuronal system by CO exposure. In the present study, therefore, we explored the effects of CO exposure on the DAergic neuronal system in the striatum of freely moving rats by means of in vivo brain microdialysis. Exposure of rats to CO (up to 0.3%) for 40 min caused an increase in extracellular dopamine (DA) levels and a decrease in extracellular levels of its major metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the striatum depending on the CO concentration. Reoxygenation following termination of the CO exposure resulted in a decline of DA to the control level and an overshoot in the recovery of DOPAC and HVA to levels higher than the control. A monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) inhibitor, clorgyline, significantly potentiated the CO-induced increase in DA and completely abolished the subsequent overshoot in the recovery of DOPAC and HVA. Tetrodotoxin, a Na{sup +} channel blocker, completely abolished both the CO-induced increase in DA and the overshoot of DOPAC and HVA. A DA uptake inhibitor, nomifensine, strongly potentiated the CO-induced increase in DA without affecting the subsequent overshoot of DOPAC and HVA. Clorgyline further potentiated the effect of nomifensine on the CO-induced increase in DA, although a slight overshoot of DOPAC and HVA appeared. These findings suggest that (1) CO exposure may stimulate Na{sup +}-dependent DA release in addition to suppressing DA metabolism, resulting in a marked increase in extracellular DA in rat striatum, and (2) CO withdrawal and subsequent reoxygenation may enhance the oxidative metabolism, preferentially mediated by MAO-A, of the increased extracellular DA. In the light of the neurotoxicity of DA per se and reactive substances, such as quinones and activated oxygen species

  3. Imaging the pre- and postsynaptic side of striatal dopaminergic synapses in idiopathic cervical dystonia: a SPECT study using [123I] epidepride and [123I] beta-CIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, M; Pirker, W; Reiners, K; Lange, K W; Becker, G; Brücke, T

    1998-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that a dysfunction of the dopaminergic system may be involved in the pathogenesis of idiopathic dystonia. To visualize possible alterations of the pre- and postsynaptic side of striatal dopaminergic synapses, SPECT studies using the radiotracers [123I] epidepride and [123I] beta-CIT were performed in 10 patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia. Eleven age- and sex-matched subjects served as controls. [123I] Epidepride is a new highly affine marker of D2 receptors, and [123I] beta-CIT binds to dopamine transporters on dopaminergic nerve endings. [123I] Epidepride binding was significantly reduced in both striata of dystonia patients compared with controls (p < 0.05). In contrast, striatal [123I beta-CIT uptake did not differ from controls. We conclude that dopaminergic dysfunction in idiopathic focal dystonia mainly involves postsynaptic mechanisms and suggest a disturbance of the indirect pathway of the motor circuit resulting in a disinhibited thalamocortical stimulation. PMID:9539347

  4. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 2. [125I]epidepride, a potent and specific radioligand for the characterization of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidepride, (S)-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-5-iodo-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide, the iodine analogue of isoremoxipride (FLB 457), was found to be a very potent dopamine D2 receptor antagonist. Optimal in vitro binding required incubation at 25C for 4 h at pH 7.4 in a buffer containing 120 mM NaCl, 5 mM KCl, 2 mM CaCl2 and 1 nM MgCl2. Scatchard analysis of in vitro binding to striatal, medical frontal cortical, hippocampal and cerebellar membranes revealed a KD of 24 pM in all regions, with Bmax's of 36.7, 1.04, 0.85, and 0.37 pmol/g tissue, respectively. The Hill coefficients ranged from 0.91-1.00 in all four regions. The IC50's for inhibition of [125I]epidepride binding to striatal, medial frontal cortical, and hippocampal membranes for SCH 23390, SKF 83566, serotonin, ketanserin, mianserin, naloxone, QNB, prasozin, clonidine, alprenolol, and norepinephrine ranged from 1 μM to >10 μM. Partial displacement of [125I]epidepride by nanomolar concentrations of clonidine was noted in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, but not in the striatum. Scatchard analysis of epidepride binding to α2 noradrenergic receptors in the frontal cortex and hippocampus revealed an apparent KD of 9 nM. At an epidepride concentration equal to the KD for the D2 receptor, i.e., 25 pM, no striatal α2 binding was seen and only 7% of the specific epidepride binding in the cortex or hippocampus was due to binding at the α2 site. Correlation of inhibition of [3H]spiperone and [125I]epidepride binding to striatal membranes by a variety of D2 ligands revealed a correlation coefficient of 0.99, indicating that epidepride labels a D2 site

  5. Exekutive Dysfunktionen in frühen Stadien der Huntingtonschen Erkrankung sind assoziiert mit striataler und insulärer Atrophie

    OpenAIRE

    Schuller, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    Morbus Huntington ist charakterisiert durch eine fortschreitende, ubiquitäre neuronale Atrophie. Neben motorischen Defiziten zeigen sich auch früh im Krankheitsverlauf kognitive Defizite, insbesondere exekutive Dysfunktionen. Ziel dieser Arbeit war bei 25 Patienten mit Huntingtonscher Erkrankung der Nachweis einer positiven Korrelation kognitiver Defizite und regionaler struktureller Veränderungen mittels 3D-MRT-morphometrischer Bildgebung. Es konnte eine signifikante Korrelation striataler A...

  6. Does cannabis affect dopaminergic signaling in the human brain? A systematic review of evidence to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Musa Basser; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2015-08-01

    A significant body of epidemiological evidence has linked psychotic symptoms with both acute and chronic use of cannabis. Precisely how these effects of THC are mediated at the neurochemical level is unclear. While abnormalities in multiple pathways may lead to schizophrenia, an abnormality in dopamine neurotransmission is considered to be the final common abnormality. One would thus expect cannabis use to be associated with dopamine signaling alterations. This is the first systematic review of all studies, both observational as well as experimental, examining the acute as well as chronic effect of cannabis or its main psychoactive ingredient, THC, on the dopamine system in man. We aimed to review all studies conducted in man, with any reported neurochemical outcomes related to the dopamine system after cannabis, cannabinoid or endocannabinoid administration or use. We identified 25 studies reporting outcomes on over 568 participants, of which 244 participants belonged to the cannabis/cannabinoid exposure group. In man, there is as yet little direct evidence to suggest that cannabis use affects acute striatal dopamine release or affects chronic dopamine receptor status in healthy human volunteers. However some work has suggested that acute cannabis exposure increases dopamine release in striatal and pre-frontal areas in those genetically predisposed for, or at clinical high risk of psychosis. Furthermore, recent studies are suggesting that chronic cannabis use blunts dopamine synthesis and dopamine release capacity. Further well-designed studies are required to definitively delineate the effects of cannabis use on the dopaminergic system in man. PMID:26068702

  7. Effects of hypoxic–ischemic brain injury on striatal dopamine transporter in newborn piglets: evaluation of 11C-CFT PET/CT for DAT quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Alterations of dopamine in striatal presynaptic terminals play an important role in the hypoxic–ischemic (HI) brain injury. Quantification of DAT levels in the presynaptic site using 11C-N-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-tropane (11C-CFT) with positron emission tomography (PET) was applied in studies for Parkinson's disease. The current study investigated the changes in striatal DAT following HI brain injury in newborn piglets using 11C-CFT PET. Methods: Newborn piglets were subjected to occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries for 30 min and simultaneous peripheral hypoxia. Brain DAT imaging was performed using PET/CT with 11C-CFT as the probe in each group (including the control group and HI insult groups). Brain tissues were collected for DAT immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis at each time point post the PET/CT procedure. Sham controls had some operation without HI procedure. Results: A few minutes after intravenous injection of 11C-CFT, radioactive signals for DAT clearly appeared in the cortical area, striatum and cerebellum of newborn piglets of sham control group and HI insult groups. HI brain insult markedly increased striatal DAT at an early period (P11C-CFT PET imaging data and IHC DAT staining data were highly correlated (r=0.844, P11C-CFT PET/CT imaging data reflected the dynamic changes of DAT in the striatum in vivo.

  8. Striatal and extrastriatal imaging of dopamine D{sub 2}receptors in the living human brain with [ {sup 123}I]epidepride single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuikka, J.T. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Aakerman, K.K. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Hiltunen, J. [MAP Medical Technologies Inc., Tikkakoski (Finland); Bergstroem, K.A. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Raesaenen, P. [Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Vanninen, E. [Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Halldin, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tiihonen, J. [Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio (Finland)

    1997-05-01

    The iodine-123 labelled ligand benzamide epidepride was evaluated as a probe for in vivo imaging of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D{sub 2}receptor sites in the human brain. Four healthy males were imaged with a high-resolution single-photon emission tomography scanner. Striatal radioactivity peaked at 3 h after injection. The specific binding in the striatum was 0.91 {+-}0.03 at 3 h and this ratio steadily increased with time. Extrastriatal radioactivity was highest in the thalamus, in the midbrain and in the temporal cortex, and peaked at 45-60 min after injection of tracer. A smaller amount of radioactivity was found in the parietal, frontal and occipital cortices. Two radioactive metabolites were observed, of which one was more lipophilic than the parent compound. The radiation burden to the patient was 0.035 mSv/MBq (effective dose equivalent). The preliminary results showed that [ {sup 123}I]epidepride can be used for imaging striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D {sub 2}receptor sites in the living human brain. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Striatal and extrastriatal imaging of dopamine D2 receptors in the living human brain with [123I]epidepride single-photon emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuikka, J T; Akerman, K K; Hiltunen, J; Bergström, K A; Räsänen, P; Vanninen, E; Halldin, C; Tiihonen, J

    1997-05-01

    The iodine-123 labelled ligand benzamide epidepride was evaluated as a probe for in vivo imaging of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptor sites in the human brain. Four healthy males were imaged with a high-resolution single-photon emission tomography scanner. Striatal radioactivity peaked at 3 h after injection. The specific binding in the striatum was 0.91+/-0.03 at 3 h and this ratio steadily increased with time. Extrastriatal radioactivity was highest in the thalamus, in the midbrain and in the temporal cortex, and peaked at 45-60 min after injection of tracer. A smaller amount of radioactivity was found in the parietal, frontal and occipital cortices. Two radioactive metabolites were observed, of which one was more lipophilic than the parent compound. The radiation burden to the patient was 0.035 mSv/MBq (effective dose equivalent). The preliminary results showed that [123I]epidepride can be used for imaging striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptor sites in the living human brain. PMID:9142727

  10. Striatal and extrastriatal imaging of dopamine D2receptors in the living human brain with [ 123I[epidepride single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iodine-123 labelled ligand benzamide epidepride was evaluated as a probe for in vivo imaging of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2receptor sites in the human brain. Four healthy males were imaged with a high-resolution single-photon emission tomography scanner. Striatal radioactivity peaked at 3 h after injection. The specific binding in the striatum was 0.91 ±0.03 at 3 h and this ratio steadily increased with time. Extrastriatal radioactivity was highest in the thalamus, in the midbrain and in the temporal cortex, and peaked at 45-60 min after injection of tracer. A smaller amount of radioactivity was found in the parietal, frontal and occipital cortices. Two radioactive metabolites were observed, of which one was more lipophilic than the parent compound. The radiation burden to the patient was 0.035 mSv/MBq (effective dose equivalent). The preliminary results showed that [ 123I[epidepride can be used for imaging striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D 2receptor sites in the living human brain. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. Susceptibility of striatal neurons to excitotoxic injury correlates with basal levels of Bcl-2 and the induction of P53 and c-Myc immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhong-Qin; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Yumei; Chuang, De-Maw; DiFiglia, Marian; Chase, Thomas N; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2005-11-01

    The present studies evaluated the potential contribution of Bcl-2, p53, and c-Myc to the differential vulnerability of striatal neurons to the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA). In normal rat striatum, Bcl-2 immunoreactivity (Bcl-2-i) was most intense in large aspiny interneurons including choline acetyltransferase positive (CAT+) and parvalbumin positive (PARV+) neurons, but low in a majority of medium-sized neurons. In human brain, intense Bcl-2-i was seen in large striatal neurons but not in medium-sized spiny projection neurons. QA produced degeneration of numerous medium-sized neurons, but not those enriched in Bcl-2-i. Many Bcl-2-i-enriched interneurons including those with CAT+ and PARV+ survived QA injection, while medium-sized neurons labeled for calbindin D-28K (CAL D-28+) did not. In addition, proapoptotic proteins p53-i and c-Myc-i were robustly induced in medium-sized neurons, but not in most large neurons. The selective vulnerability of striatal medium spiny neurons to degeneration in a rodent model of Huntington's disease appears to correlate with their low levels of Bcl-2-i and high levels of induced p53-i and c-Myc-i. PMID:15922606

  12. PET/CT imaging of striatal dopamine transporters in a newborn piglet model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate changes of striatal DAT following hypoxic ischemic (HI) brain injury in newborn piglets using 11C-N-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-tropane (CFT) PET/CT, and to evaluate the value of 11C-CFT PET/CT in brain injury. Methods: Newborn piglets with HI brain injury (n=20) were taken as a model group,and five piglets were used as a control group. Radioligand 11C-CFT (55.5-74.0 MBq) was injected through the jugular vein, and PET/CT imaging was performed to observe the changes of striatal DAT in newborn piglets. The ST/occipital lobe (OC) ratio was calculated. Model group was divided into 0-6 h, 20-24 h, 44-48 h and 68-72 h sub-groups after HI in accordance with the imaging time. The piglets were sacrificed immediately after 11C-CFT PET/CT scanning, and then the brains were removed for pathological analysis. Data analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance and Pearson linear correlation analysis. Results: After intravenous injection of 11C-CFT, the radioactivity accumulation in cortical, striatum, and cerebellum was shown clearly in the control and model groups. The radioactivity accumulation was lower in the white matter. The radioactivity in cortical and cerebellum exhibited decreased with time, while the striatum was still clear. After HI, the ST/OC activity ratio in the striatum was initially increased, and the ratio of 0-6 h group (1.34 ± 0.04) was statistically significant compared with that of the control group (1.18 ± 0.06; F=4.658, P<0.05), followed by a gradual decrease. ST/OC ratios of other HI subgroups were 1.27 ±0.01, 1.27 ±0.10 and 1.18 ±0.05, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the number of DAT positive neurons ((13 ± 3), (13 ± 4), (8 ±3) and (4 ±4)/high power field) and 11C-CFT ST/OC activity ratios (r=0.844, P<0.05). Conclusion: 11C-CFT PET/CT study can accurately reflect the changes of DAT in the striatum, and the amount of DAT is related to the severity of the ischemic insult in a

  13. Calcyon mRNA expression in the frontal-striatal circuitry and its relationship to vesicular processes and ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellanos F Xavier

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcyon is a single transmembrane protein predominantly expressed in the brain. Very recently, calcyon has been implicated in clathrin mediated endocytosis, a critical component of synaptic plasticity. At the genetic level, preliminary evidence supports an association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and polymorphisms in the calcyon gene. As little is known about the potential role of calcyon in ADHD, animal models may provide important insights into this issue. Methods We examined calcyon mRNA expression in the frontal-striatal circuitry of three-, five-, and ten-week-old Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR, the most commonly used animal model of ADHD, and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY; the strain from which SHR were derived. As a complement, we performed a co-expression network analysis using a database of mRNA gene expression profiles of multiple brain regions in order to explore potential functional links of calcyon to other genes. Results In all age groups, SHR expressed significantly more calcyon mRNA in the medial prefrontal and orbital frontal cortices than WKY rats. In contrast, in the motor cortex, dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens, calcyon mRNA expression was only significantly elevated in SHR in younger animals. In both strains, calcyon mRNA levels decreased significantly with age in all regions studied. In the co-expression network analysis, we found a cluster of genes (many of them poorly studied so far strongly connected to calcyon, which may help elucidate its role in the brain. The pair-wise relations of calcyon with other genes support its involvement in clathrin mediated endocytosis and, potentially, some other membrane/vesicular processes. Interestingly, no link was found between calcyon and the dopamine D1 receptor, which was previously shown to interact with the C-terminal of calcyon. Conclusion The results indicate an alteration in calcyon expression within the frontal-striatal circuitry

  14. Níveis dos neurotransmissores estriatais durante o estado epiléptico Striatal monoamines levels during status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivelilson Mendes de Freitas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo foi verificar os níveis dos neurotransmissores estriatais de ratas adultas durante o estado epiléptico induzido pela pilocarpina. Ratas wistar foram tratadas com uma única dose de pilocarpina (400 mg/kg por via subcutânea (S.C.; P400 e os controles receberam salina. A concentração dos neurotransmissores foi determinada através do HPLC eletroquímico, no corpo estriado de ratas que no período de observação de 1 hora desencadearam estado epiléptico e que sobreviveram à fase aguda do quadro convulsivo. Foi observada redução nos níveis de dopamina, serotonina, ácido diidroxifenilacético e aumento na concentração do ácido 5-hidroxiindolacético. Nenhuma alteração foi observada no 4-hidroxi-3-metoxi-fenilacético. Os resultados sugerem que a ativação do sistema colinérgico pode interagir com os sistemas dopaminérgico e serotonérgico nos mecanismos referentes à fase aguda do processo convulsivo no corpo estriado de ratos desenvolvidos.The purpose of the present work to investigate the striatal neurotransmissors level in adult rats after status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine. Wistar rats were treated with a single dose of pilocarpine (400 mg/kg; s.c.; P400 and the controls received saline. Adult animals were closed observed for behavioural changes during 1h. In this period, the animals that developed status epilepticus and survive this acute phase of seizures had the brains removed and striatal neurotransmissors level determiden by HPLC. The concentration of dopamine, serotonine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was reduced and an concentration increase in 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid. Didn't observed alteration in 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenylacetic acid. These results suggest that cholinergic activation can interage with dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in acute phase of the convulsive process in rat mature striatum.

  15. Antagonism of Dopamine Receptor 2 Long Affects Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Signaling in a Cell Culture Model of Striatal Medium Spiny Projection Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagher, Amina M; Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2016-06-01

    Activation of dopamine receptor 2 long (D2L) switches the signaling of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) from Gαi to Gαs, a process thought to be mediated through CB1-D2L heteromerization. Given the clinical importance of D2 antagonists, the goal of this study was to determine if D2 antagonists could modulate CB1 signaling. Interactions between CB1 and D2L, Gαi, Gαs, and β-arrestin1 were studied using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer 2 (BRET(2)) in STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells. CB1-dependent extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, CREB phosphorylation, and CB1 internalization following cotreatment of CB1 agonist and D2 antagonist were quantified. Preassembled CB1-Gαi complexes were detected by BRET(2) Arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a selective CB1 agonist, caused a rapid and transient increase in BRET efficiency (BRETEff) between Gαi-Rluc and CB1-green fluorescent protein 2 (GFP(2)), and a Gαi-dependent increase in ERK phosphorylation. Physical interactions between CB1 and D2L were observed using BRET(2) Cotreatment of STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells with ACEA and haloperidol, a D2 antagonist, inhibited BRETEff signals between Gαi-Rluc and CB1-GFP(2) and reduced the EMax and pEC50 of ACEA-mediated Gαi-dependent ERK phosphorylation. ACEA and haloperidol cotreatments produced a delayed and sustained increase in BRETEff between Gαs-Rluc and CB1-GFP(2) and increased the EMax and pEC50 of ACEA-induced Gαs-dependent cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation. In cells expressing CB1 and D2L treated with ACEA, binding of haloperidol to D2 receptors switched CB1 coupling from Gαi to Gαs In addition, haloperidol treatment reduced ACEA-induced β-arrestin1 recruitment to CB1 and CB1 internalization. D2 antagonists allosterically modulate cannabinoid-induced CB1 coupling, signaling, and β-arrestin1 recruitment through binding to CB1-D2L heteromers. These findings indicate that D2 antagonism, like D2 agonists, change agonist-mediated CB1 coupling and signaling. PMID:27053685

  16. Prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide enriched butanolic residue from Senecio brasiliensis affects behavior and striatal neurotransmitter levels of rats in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandini, Thaísa M; Udo, Mariana S B; Reis-Silva, Thiago M; Sanches, Daniel; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Flório, Jorge Camilo; Spinosa, Helenice de S

    2015-12-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are toxins that are exclusively biosynthesized by plants and are commonly present in foods and herbs. PAs are usually associated with poisoning events in livestock and human beings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of prenatal exposure to PA integerrimine N-oxide of rats in adulthood. Pregnant Wistar rats received integerrimine N-oxide from the butanolic residue of Senecio brasiliensis by gavage on gestational days 6-20 at doses of 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg. During adulthood of the offspring, the following behavioral tests were performed: open-field, plus-maze, forced swimming, catalepsy and stereotypy. Histological analyses and monoamine levels were measured. Male offspring from dams that were exposed to 9 mg/kg showed an increase in locomotion in the open-field test, an increased frequency of entries and time spent in open arms in elevated plus-maze test, as well as decreased swimming time. In the female offspring from dams that were exposed to 9 mg/kg, there was an increased time of climbing in forced swimming and intensity of stereotyped behavior. The histological study indicates an increase in the number of multinucleated cells in the liver (6 and 9 mg/kg). In neurotransmitter analysis, specifically in the striatum, we observed change in dopamine and serotonin levels in the middle dose. Thus, our results indicate that prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide changed behavior in adulthood and neurotransmitter levels in the striatum. Our results agree with previous studies, which showed that integerrimine N-oxide impaired physical and neurobehavioral development in childhood that can persist until adulthood. PMID:26416213

  17. [The Influence of Puberty on Neural Systems Subserving Emotion Regulation: Implications for Understanding Risk for Affective Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, Cecile D

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence, with the onset of puberty, represents a developmental period that, in the context of adverse events, renders youth vulnerable to the onset of psychopathology such as affective disorders. It is also a time when fronto-striatal-limbic systems supporting the processing and regulation of emotion and reward undergo important neuromaturational changes. Despite evidence from epidemiological research suggesting that, particularly in girls, the increase in the rate of depression is more strongly associated with pubertal development than maturational age, researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface regarding the specific influence of puberty on the development of fronto-striatal-limbic systems implicated in the pathophysiology of affective disorders. The goal of this review is to a) summarize findings from human neuroimaging studies focusing on the specific influence of puberty or sex hormones on the neurodevelopment of emotional processes, b) highlight the need for a better understanding of neurodevelopmental changes during puberty and how such changes could contribute to developmental trajectories toward the onset of an affective disorder and, c) discuss the potential value of investigating how these changes may contribute to unique opportunities for developing intervention strategies for affective disorders in adolescence. PMID:27570951

  18. The effects of donor stage on the survival and function of embryonic striatal grafts in the adult rat brain; II. Correlation between positron emission tomography and reaching behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grafts of embryonic striatal primordia are able to elicit behavioural recovery in rats which have received an excitotoxic lesion to the striatum, and it is believed that the P zones or striatal-like tissue within the transplants play a crucial role in these functional effects. We performed this study to compare the effects of different donor stage of embryonic tissue on both the morphology (see accompanying paper) and function of striatal transplants. Both the medial and lateral ganglionic eminence was dissected from rat embryos of either 10 mm, 15 mm, 19 mm, or 23 mm crown-rump length, and implanted as a cell suspension into adult rats which had received an ibotenic acid lesion 10 days prior to transplantation. After four months the animals were tested on the 'staircase task' of skilled forelimb use. At 10-14 months rats from the groups which had received grafts from 10 mm or 15 mm donor embryos were taken for positron emission tomography scanning in a small diameter postiron emission tomography scanner, using ligands to the dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, [11C]SCH 23390 and [11C]raclopride, respectively. A lesion-alone group was also scanned with the same ligands for comparison. Animals which had received transplants from the 10 mm donors showed a significant recovery with their contralateral paw on the 'staircase test'. No other groups showed recovery on this task. Similarly, the animals with grafts from the youngest donors showed a significant increase in D1 and D2 receptor binding when compared to the lesion-alone group. No increase in signal was observed with either ligand in the group which had received grafts from 15 mm donors. Success in paw reaching showed a strong correlation to both the positron emission tomography signal obtained and the P zone volume of the grafts.These results suggest that striatal grafts from younger donors (10 mm CRL) give greater behavioural recovery than grafts prepared from older embryos. This recovery is due to both the increased

  19. Pharmacological treatment with L-DOPA may reduce striatal dopamine transporter binding in in vivo imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaus, S; Antke, C; Hautzel, H; Mueller, H-W

    2016-01-01

    Numerous neurologic and psychiatric conditions are treated with pharmacological compounds, which lead to an increase of synaptic dopamine (DA) levels. One example is the DA precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), which is converted to DA in the presynaptic terminal. If the increase of DA concentrations in the synaptic cleft leads to competition with exogenous radioligands for presynaptic binding sites, this may have implications for DA transporter (DAT) imaging studies in patients under DAergic medication. This paper gives an overview on those findings, which, so far, have been obtained on DAT binding in human Parkinson's disease after treatment with L-DOPA. Findings, moreover, are related to results obtained on rats, mice or non-human primates. Results indicate that DAT imaging may be reduced in the striata of healthy animals, in the unlesioned striata of animal models of unilateral Parkinson's disease and in less severly impaired striata of Parkinsonian patients, if animal or human subjects are under acute or subchronic treatment with L-DOPA. If also striatal DAT binding is susceptible to alterations of synaptic DA levels, this may allow to quantify DA reuptake in analogy to DA release by assessing the competition between endogenous DA and the administered exogenous DAT radioligand. PMID:26642370

  20. Endogenous cortisol levels are associated with an imbalanced striatal sensitivity to monetary versus non-monetary cues in pathological gamblers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansong eLi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathological gambling is a behavioral addiction characterized by a chronic failure to resist the urge to gamble. It shares many similarities with drug addiction. Glucocorticoid hormones including cortisol are thought to play a key role in the vulnerability to addictive behaviors, by acting on the mesolimbic reward pathway. Based on our previous report of an imbalanced sensitivity to monetary versus non-monetary incentives in the ventral striatum of pathological gamblers (PGs, we investigated whether this imbalance was mediated by individual differences in endogenous cortisol levels. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and examined the relationship between cortisol levels and the neural responses to monetary versus non-monetary cues, while PGs and healthy controls were engaged in an incentive delay task manipulating both monetary and erotic rewards. We found a positive correlation between cortisol levels and ventral striatal responses to monetary versus erotic cues in PGs, but not in healthy controls. This indicates that the ventral striatum is a key region where cortisol modulates incentive motivation for gambling versus non-gambling related stimuli in PGs. Our results extend the proposed role of glucocorticoid hormones in drug addiction to behavioral addiction, and help understand the impact of cortisol on reward incentive processing in PGs.

  1. High-intensity physical exercise disrupts implicit memory in mice: involvement of the striatal glutathione antioxidant system and intracellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, A S; Boemer, G; Rial, D; Cordova, F M; Mancini, G; Walz, R; de Bem, A F; Latini, A; Leal, R B; Pinho, R A; Prediger, R D S

    2010-12-29

    Physical exercise is a widely accepted behavioral strategy to enhance overall health, including mental function. However, there is controversial evidence showing brain mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage and decreased neurotrophin levels after high-intensity exercise, which presumably worsens cognitive performance. Here we investigated learning and memory performance dependent on different brain regions, glutathione antioxidant system, and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), serine/threonine protein kinase (AKT), cAMP response element binding (CREB) and dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP)-32 signaling in adult Swiss mice submitted to 9 weeks of high-intensity exercise. The exercise did not alter the animals' performance in the reference and working memory versions of the water maze task. On the other hand, we observed a significant impairment in the procedural memory (an implicit memory that depends on basal ganglia) accompanied by a reduced antioxidant capacity and ERK1/2 and CREB signaling in this region. In addition, we found increased striatal DARPP-32-Thr-75 phosphorylation in trained mice. These findings indicate an increased vulnerability of the striatum to high-intensity exercise associated with the disruption of implicit memory in mice and accompanied by alteration of signaling proteins involved in the plasticity of this brain structure. PMID:20888397

  2. Changes in striatal procedural memory coding correlate with learning deficits in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayzac, Sebastien; Delcasso, Sebastien; Paz, Vietminh; Jeantet, Yannick; Cho, Yoon H

    2011-05-31

    In hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington disease (HD), early cognitive impairments before motor deficits have been hypothesized to result from dysfunction in the striatum and cortex before degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the firing properties of single cells and local field activity in the striatum and cortex of pre-motor-symptomatic R6/1 transgenic mice while they were engaged in a procedural learning task, the performance on which typically depends on the integrity of striatum and basal ganglia. Here, we report that a dramatically diminished recruitment of the vulnerable striatal projection cells, but not local interneurons, of R6/1 mice in coding for the task, compared with WT littermates, is associated with severe deficits in procedural learning. In addition, both the striatum and cortex in these mice showed a unique oscillation at high γ-frequency. These data provide crucial information on the in vivo cellular processes in the corticostriatal pathway through which the HD mutation exerts its effects on cognitive abilities in early HD. PMID:21576479

  3. Genomic Analysis Reveals Disruption of Striatal Neuronal Development and Therapeutic Targets in Human Huntington’s Disease Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Ring

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We utilized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from Huntington’s disease (HD patients as a human model of HD and determined that the disease phenotypes only manifest in the differentiated neural stem cell (NSC stage, not in iPSCs. To understand the molecular basis for the CAG repeat expansion-dependent disease phenotypes in NSCs, we performed transcriptomic analysis of HD iPSCs and HD NSCs compared to isogenic controls. Differential gene expression and pathway analysis pointed to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and netrin-1 as the top dysregulated pathways. Using data-driven gene coexpression network analysis, we identified seven distinct coexpression modules and focused on two that were correlated with changes in gene expression due to the CAG expansion. Our HD NSC model revealed the dysregulation of genes involved in neuronal development and the formation of the dorsal striatum. The striatal and neuronal networks disrupted could be modulated to correct HD phenotypes and provide therapeutic targets.

  4. The effect of nicotine on striatal dopamine release in man: A [11C]raclopride PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Andrew J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Egerton, Alice; Nutt, David J; Grasby, Paul M

    2007-08-01

    In common with many addictive substances and behaviors nicotine activates the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Brain microdialysis studies in rodents have consistently shown increases in extrasynaptic DA levels in the striatum after administration of nicotine but PET experiments in primates have given contradicting results. A recent PET study assessing the effect of smoking in humans showed no change in [(11)C]raclopride binding in the brain, but did find that "hedonia" correlated with a reduction in [(11)C]raclopride binding suggesting that DA may mediate the positive reinforcing effects of nicotine. In this experiment we measured the effect of nicotine, administered via a nasal spray, on DA release using [(11)C]raclopride PET, in 10 regular smokers. There was no overall change in [(11)C]raclopride binding after nicotine administration in any of the striatal regions examined. However, the individual change in [(11)C]raclopride binding correlated with change in subjective measures of "amused" and "happiness" in the associative striatum (AST) and sensorimotor striatum (SMST). Nicotine concentration correlated negatively with change in BP in the limbic striatum. Nicotine had significant effects on cardiovascular measures including pulse rate, systolic blood pressure (BPr), and diastolic BPr. Baseline [(11)C]raclopride binding potential (BP) in the AST correlated negatively with the Fagerström score, an index of nicotine dependence. These results support a role for the DA system in nicotine addiction, but reveal a more complex relationship than suggested by studies in animals. PMID:17492764

  5. Age-related striatal BOLD changes without changes in behavioral loss aversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans C Breiter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Loss aversion (LA, the idea that negative valuations have a higher psychological impact than positive ones, is considered an important variable in consumer research. The literature on aging and behavior suggests older individuals may show more LA, although it is not clear if this is an effect of aging in general (as in the continuum from age 20 and 50 years, or of the state of older age (e.g., past age 65 years. We also have not yet identified the potential biological effects of aging on the neural processing of LA. In the current study we used a cohort of subjects with a 30 year range of ages, and performed whole brain functional MRI (fMRI to examine the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAc response during a passive viewing of affective faces with model-based fMRI analysis incorporating behavioral data from a validated approach/avoidance task with the same stimuli. Our a priori focus on the VS/NAc was based on (1 the VS/NAc being a central region for reward/aversion processing, (2 its activation to both positive and negative stimuli, (3 its reported involvement with tracking LA. LA from approach/avoidance to affective faces showed excellent fidelity to published measures of LA. Imaging results were then compared to the behavioral measure of LA using the same affective faces. Although there was no relationship between age and LA, we observed increasing neural differential sensitivity (NDS of the VS/NAc to avoidance responses (negative valuations relative to approach responses (positive valuations with increasing age. These findings suggest that a central region for reward/aversion processing changes with age, and may require more activation to produce the same LA behavior as in younger individuals, consistent with the idea of neural efficiency observed with high IQ individuals showing less brain activation to complete the same task.

  6. Reacquisition of cocaine conditioned place preference and its inhibition by previous social interaction preferentially affect D1-medium spiny neurons in the accumbens corridor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Maria Prast

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated if counterconditioning with dyadic (i.e., one-to-one social interaction, a strong inhibitor of the subsequent reacquisition of cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP, differentially modulates the activity of the diverse brain regions oriented along a mediolateral corridor reaching from the interhemispheric sulcus to the anterior commissure, i.e., the nucleus of the vertical limb of the diagonal band, the medial septal nucleus, the major island of Calleja, the intermediate part of the lateral septal nucleus, and the medial accumbens shell and core. We also investigated the involvement of the lateral accumbens core and the dorsal caudate putamen. The anterior cingulate 1 (Cg1 region served as a negative control. Contrary to our expectations, we found that all regions of the accumbens corridor showed increased expression of the early growth response protein 1 (EGR1, Zif268 in rats 2 h after reacquisition of CPP for cocaine after a history of cocaine CPP acquisition and extinction. Previous counterconditioning with dyadic social interaction inhibited both the reacquisition of cocaine CPP and the activation of the whole accumbens corridor. EGR1 activation was predominantly found in dynorphin-labeled cells, i.e., presumably D1 receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs, with D2-MSNs (immunolabeled with an anti-DRD2 antibody being less affected. Cholinergic interneurons or GABAergic interneurons positive for parvalbumin, neuropeptide Y or calretinin were not involved in these CPP-related EGR1 changes. Glial cells did not show any EGR1 expression either. The present findings could be of relevance for the therapy of impaired social interaction in substance use disorders, depression, psychosis, and autism spectrum disorders.

  7. Acute caffeine treatment increases extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis from rat striatal and hippocampal synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Lara, Diogo Rizzato; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2003-08-01

    The psychostimulant caffeine promotes behavioral effects such as hyperlocomotion, anxiety, and disruption of sleep by blockade of adenosine receptors. The availability of extracellular adenosine depends on its release by transporters or by the extracellular ATP catabolism performed by the ecto-nucleotidase pathway. This study verified the effect of caffeine on NTPDase 1 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) and 5'-nucleotidase of synaptosomes from hippocampus and striatum of rats. Caffeine and theophylline tested in vitro were unable to modify nucleotide hydrolysis. Caffeine chronically administered in the drinking water at 0.3 g/L or 1 g/L for 14 days failed to affect nucleotide hydrolysis. However, acute administration of caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an enhancement of ATP (50%) and ADP (32%) hydrolysis in synaptosomes of hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This activation of ATP and ADP hydrolysis after acute treatment suggests a compensatory effect to increase adenosine levels and counteract the antagonist action of caffeine. PMID:12834266

  8. Experiencing affective interactive art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2010-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on the integration of a framework for affective move

  9. Establishment of a Parkinson's disease model in rats via striatal one-site double injection Feasibility observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Liu; Li Ma; Yulong Shi; Boli Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, many 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat models have been established by injecting 6-OHDA into two or more sites in the substantia nigra pars compacta, striatum or median forebrain bundle. The success rate of models established by this method is satisfactory, but it can raise the death rate, and is elaborate and tedious to perform.OBJECTIVE: To observe the difference between injections of 6-OHDA into the striatum from one site and two sites, and to explore the feasibility of establishing Parkinson's disease rat models via striatal one-site double injection.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled animal experiment based on a modeling comparison was performed at the Pharmacology Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine between August 2005 and April 2006.MATERIALS: A total of 46 male Wistar rats were purchased from Beijing Weitong Lihua Experimental Animal Technical Co., Ltd., China. 6-OHDA hydrogen bromide was sourced from Sigma Co., Ltd., USA.METHODS: All 46 rats were randomized to three groups: one-site injection (n = 18), two-site injection (n = 18), and control (n = 10). Lesions in rat brains were established by infusing 5 p g 6-OHDA into the striatum at the following coordinates: anteroposterior (AP) 1.0 ram, mediolateral (ML) 2.7 mm,dorsoventral (DV) -5.2 or -6.0 mm for the one-site injection group, and AP 1.0 mm, ML 2.5 ram, DV -4.5 mm/AP -0.4 ram, ML 3.5 mm, DV -4.5 mm for the two-site injection group, respectively. Rats in the control group were injected with the same volume of 0.01% ascorbic acid as above.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons were detected by immunohistochemistry. Success rates of PD models established by one-site and two-site injection techniques were examined.RESULTS: One rat died in the one-site injection group and four in the two-site injection group. Thus behavioral testing was

  10. Looking for reward in all the wrong places: dopamine receptor gene polymorphisms indirectly affect aggression through sensation-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, David S; DeWall, C Nathan; Derefinko, Karen J; Estus, Steven; Lynam, Donald R; Peters, Jessica R; Jiang, Yang

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with genotypes that code for reduced dopaminergic brain activity often exhibit a predisposition toward aggression. However, it remains largely unknown how dopaminergic genotypes may increase aggression. Lower-functioning dopamine systems motivate individuals to seek reward from external sources such as illicit drugs and other risky experiences. Based on emerging evidence that aggression is a rewarding experience, we predicted that the effect of lower-functioning dopaminergic functioning on aggression would be mediated by tendencies to seek the environment for rewards. Caucasian female and male undergraduates (N = 277) were genotyped for five polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene; they reported their previous history of aggression and their dispositional reward-seeking. Lower-functioning DRD2 profiles were associated with greater sensation-seeking, which then predicted greater aggression. Our findings suggest that lower-functioning dopaminergic activity puts individuals at risk for violence because it motivates them to experience aggression's hedonically rewarding qualities. PMID:26592425

  11. Carbon-11 epidepride: a suitable radioligand for PET investigation of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, O; Halldin, C; Dollé, F; Swahn, C G; Olsson, H; Karlsson, P; Hall, H; Sandell, J; Lundkvist, C; Vaufrey, F; Loc'h, C; Crouzel, C; Mazière, B; Farde, L

    1999-07-01

    Epidepride [(S)-(-)-N-([1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl]methyl)-5-iodo-2,3-dimethoxybenza mide] binds with a picomolar affinity (Ki = 24 pM) to the dopamine D2 receptor. Iodine-123-labeled epidepride has been used previously to study striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptors with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Our aim was to label epidepride with carbon-11 for comparative quantitative studies between positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT. Epidepride was synthesized from its bromo-analogue FLB 457 via the corresponding trimethyl-tin derivative. In an alternative synthetic pathway, the corresponding substituted benzoic acid was reacted with the optically pure aminomethylpyrrolidine-derivative. Demethylation of epidepride gave the desmethyl-derivative, which was reacted with [11C]methyl triflate. Total radiochemical yield was 40-50% within a total synthesis time of 30 min. The specific radioactivity at the end of synthesis was 37-111 GBq/micromol (1,000-3,000 Ci/mmol). Human postmortem whole-hemisphere autoradiography demonstrated dense binding in the caudate putamen, and also in extrastriatal areas such as the thalamus and the neocortex. The binding was inhibited by unlabeled raclopride. PET studies in a cynomolgus monkey demonstrated high uptake in the striatum and in several extrastriatal regions. At 90 min after injection, uptake in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex was about 11, 4, and 2 times higher than in the cerebellum, respectively. Pretreatment experiment with unlabeled raclopride (1 mg/kg) inhibited 50-70% of [11C]epidepride binding. The fraction of unchanged [11C]epidepride in monkey plasma determined by a gradient high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was about 30% of the total radioactivity at 30 min after injection of [11C]epidepride. The availability of [11C]epidepride allows the PET-verification of the data obtained from quantitation studies with SPECT. PMID:10473189

  12. Carbon-11 epidepride: a suitable radioligand for PET investigation of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidepride {(S)-(-)-N-([1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl]methyl)-5-iodo-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide} binds with a picomolar affinity (Ki=24 pM) to the dopamine D2 receptor. Iodine-123-labeled epidepride has been used previously to study striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptors with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Our aim was to label epidepride with carbon-11 for comparative quantitative studies between positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT. Epidepride was synthesized from its bromo-analogue FLB 457 via the corresponding trimethyl-tin derivative. In an alternative synthetic pathway, the corresponding substituted benzoic acid was reacted with the optically pure aminomethylpyrrolidine-derivative. Demethylation of epidepride gave the desmethyl-derivative, which was reacted with [11C]methyl triflate. Total radiochemical yield was 40-50% within a total synthesis time of 30 min. The specific radioactivity at the end of synthesis was 37-111 GBq/μmol (1,000-3,000 Ci/mmol). Human postmortem whole-hemisphere autoradiography demonstrated dense binding in the caudate putamen, and also in extrastriatal areas such as the thalamus and the neocortex. The binding was inhibited by unlabeled raclopride. PET studies in a cynomolgus monkey demonstrated high uptake in the striatum and in several extrastriatal regions. At 90 min after injection, uptake in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex was about 11, 4, and 2 times higher than in the cerebellum, respectively. Pretreatment experiment with unlabeled raclopride (1 mg/kg) inhibited 50-70% of [11C]epidepride binding. The fraction of unchanged [11C]epidepride in monkey plasma determined by a gradient high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was about 30% of the total radioactivity at 30 min after injection of [11C]epidepride. The availability of [11C]epidepride allows the PET-verification of the data obtained from quantitation studies with SPECT.

  13. Differences in rat dorsal striatal NMDA and AMPA receptors following acute and repeated cocaine-induced locomotor activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy J Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Sprague-Dawley rats can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively based on their locomotor activity induced by an acute low dose of cocaine. Upon repeated cocaine exposure, LCRs display greater locomotor sensitization, reward, and reinforcement than HCRs. Altered glutamate receptor expression in the brain reward pathway has been linked to locomotor sensitization and addiction. To determine if such changes contribute to the differential development of locomotor sensitization, we examined protein levels of total, phosphorylated, and cell surface glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA receptors (Rs following acute or repeated cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p. in LCRs, HCRs and saline controls. Three areas involved in the development and expression of locomotor sensitization were investigated: the ventral tegmental area (VTA, nucleus accumbens (NAc and dorsal striatum (dSTR. Our results revealed differences only in the dSTR, where we found that after acute cocaine, GluN2B(Tyr-1472 phosphorylation was significantly greater in LCRs, compared to HCRs and controls. Additionally in dSTR, after repeated cocaine, we observed significant increases in total GluA1, phosphorylated GluA1(Ser-845, and cell surface GluA1 in all cocaine-treated animals vs. controls. The acute cocaine-induced increases in NMDARs in dSTR of LCRs may help to explain the more ready development of locomotor sensitization and susceptibility to addiction-like behaviors in rats that initially exhibit little or no cocaine-induced activation, whereas the AMPAR increases after repeated cocaine may relate to recruitment of more dorsal striatal circuits and maintenance of the marked cocaine-induced locomotor activation observed in all of the rats.

  14. Neuroimaging evidence of altered fronto-cortical and striatal function after prolonged cocaine self-administration in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzi, Alessandro; Tessari, Michela; Dacome, Lisa; Agosta, Federica; Lepore, Stefano; Lanzoni, Anna; Cristofori, Patrizia; Pich, Emilio M; Corsi, Mauro; Bifone, Angelo

    2011-11-01

    Cocaine addiction is often modeled in experimental paradigms where rodents learn to self-administer (SA) the drug. However, the extent to which these models replicate the functional alterations observed in clinical neuroimaging studies of cocaine addiction remains unknown. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess basal and evoked brain function in rats subjected to a prolonged, extended-access cocaine SA scheme. Specifically, we measured basal cerebral blood volume (bCBV), an established correlate of basal metabolism, and assessed the reactivity of the dopaminergic system by mapping the pharmacological MRI (phMRI) response evoked by the dopamine-releaser amphetamine. Cocaine-exposed subjects exhibited reduced bCBV in fronto-cortical areas, nucleus accumbens, ventral hippocampus, and thalamus. The cocaine group also showed an attenuated functional response to amphetamine in ventrostriatal areas, an effect that was significantly correlated with total cocaine intake. An inverse relationship between bCBV in the reticular thalamus and the frontal response elicited by amphetamine was found in control subjects but not in the cocaine group, suggesting that the inhibitory interplay within this attentional circuit may be compromised by the drug. Importantly, histopathological analysis did not reveal significant alterations of the microvascular bed in the brain of cocaine-exposed subjects, suggesting that the imaging findings cannot be merely ascribed to cocaine-induced vascular damage. These results document that chronic, extended-access cocaine SA in the rat produces focal fronto-cortical and striatal alterations that serve as plausible neurobiological substrate for the behavioral expression of compulsive drug intake in laboratory animals. PMID:21775976

  15. Reduced tonic inhibition in striatal output neurons from Huntington mice due to loss of astrocytic GABA release through GAT-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Wójtowicz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of the two main neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA is low but not negligible which enables a number of tonic actions. The effects of ambient GABA vary in a region-, cell-type and age-dependent manner and can serve as indicators of disease-related alterations. Here we explored the tonic inhibitory actions of GABA in Huntington's disease (HD. HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gene. Whole cell patch clamp recordings from striatal output neurons (SONs in slices from adult wild type mice and two mouse models of HD (Z_Q175_KI homozygotes or R6/2 heterozygotes revealed an HD-related reduction of the GABA(A receptor-mediated tonic chloride current (ITonic(GABA along with signs of reduced GABA(B receptor-mediated presynaptic depression of synaptic GABA release. About half of ITonic(GABA depended on tetrodotoxin-sensitive synaptic GABA release, but the remaining current was still lower in HD. Both in WT and HD, ITonic(GABA was more prominent during the first four hours after preparing the slices, when astrocytes but not neurons exhibited a transient depolarization. All further tests were performed within 1 to 4 h in vitro. Experiments with SNAP5114, a blocker of the astrocytic GABA transporter GAT-3, suggest that in WT but not HD GAT-3 operated in the releasing mode. Application of a transportable substrate for glutamate transporters (D-aspartate 0.1 - 1 mM restored the non-synaptic GABA release in slices from HD mice. ITonic(GABA was also rescued by applying the hyperagonist gaboxadol (0.33 µM. The results lead to the hypothesis that lesion-induced astrocyte depolarization facilitates nonsynaptic release of GABA through GAT-3. However, the capacity of depolarized astrocytes to provide GABA for tonic inhibition is strongly reduced in HD.

  16. Altered Striatal Synaptic Function and Abnormal Behaviour in Shank3 Exon4-9 Deletion Mouse Model of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Thomas C; Speed, Haley E; Xuan, Zhong; Reimers, Jeremy M; Liu, Shunan; Powell, Craig M

    2016-03-01

    Shank3 is a multi-domain, synaptic scaffolding protein that organizes proteins in the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses. Clinical studies suggest that ∼0.5% of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cases may involve SHANK3 mutation/deletion. Patients with SHANK3 mutations exhibit deficits in cognition along with delayed/impaired speech/language and repetitive and obsessive/compulsive-like (OCD-like) behaviors. To examine how mutation/deletion of SHANK3 might alter brain function leading to ASD, we have independently created mice with deletion of Shank3 exons 4-9, a region implicated in ASD patients. We find that homozygous deletion of exons 4-9 (Shank3(e4-9) KO) results in loss of the two highest molecular weight isoforms of Shank3 and a significant reduction in other isoforms. Behaviorally, both Shank3(e4-9) heterozygous (HET) and Shank3(e4-9) KO mice display increased repetitive grooming, deficits in novel and spatial object recognition learning and memory, and abnormal ultrasonic vocalizations. Shank3(e4-9) KO mice also display abnormal social interaction when paired with one another. Analysis of synaptosome fractions from striata of Shank3(e4-9) KO mice reveals decreased Homer1b/c, GluA2, and GluA3 expression. Both Shank3(e4-9) HET and KO demonstrated a significant reduction in NMDA/AMPA ratio at excitatory synapses onto striatal medium spiny neurons. Furthermore, Shank3(e4-9) KO mice displayed reduced hippocampal LTP despite normal baseline synaptic transmission. Collectively these behavioral, biochemical and physiological changes suggest Shank3 isoforms have region-specific roles in regulation of AMPAR subunit localization and NMDAR function in the Shank3(e4-9) mutant mouse model of autism. Autism Res 2016, 9: 350-375. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26559786

  17. Role of fronto-striatal tract and frontal aslant tract in movement and speech: an axonal mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Masashi; de Champfleur, Nicolas Menjot; Deverdun, Jeremy; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Herbet, Guillaume; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-11-01

    Despite a better understanding of their anatomy, the functional role of frontal pathways, i.e., the fronto-striatal tract (FST) and frontal aslant tract (FAT), remains obscure. We studied 19 patients who underwent awake surgery for a frontal glioma (14 left, 5 right) by performing intraoperative electrical mapping of both fascicles during motor and language tasks. Furthermore, we evaluated the relationship between these tracts and the eventual onset of transient postoperative disorders. We also performed post-surgical tract-specific measurements on probabilistic tractography. All patients but one experienced intraoperative inhibition of movement and/or speech during subcortical electrostimulation. On postoperative tractography, the subcortical distribution of stimulated sites corresponded to the spatial course of the FST and/or FAT. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between postoperative worsening and distances between these tracts and resection cavity. A resection close to the (right or left) FST was correlated with transitory motor initiation disorders (p = 0.026), while a resection close to the left FAT was associated with transient speech initiation disorders (p = 0.003). Moreover, the measurements of average distances between resection cavity and left FAT showed a positive correlation with verbal fluency in both semantic (p = 0.019) and phonemic scores (p = 0.017), while average distances between surgical cavity and left FST showed a positive correlation with verbal fluency scores in both semantic (p = 0.0003) and phonemic modalities (p = 0.037). We suggest that FST and FAT would cooperatively play a role in self-initiated movement and speech, as a part of "negative motor network" involving the pre-supplementary motor area, left inferior frontal gyrus and caudate nucleus. PMID:25086832

  18. Relationship of striatal 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 specific uptake and motor's severity in patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the relationship of striatal 99Tcm-2β-((N, N'-bis (2-mercap-toethyl) ethylene diamino) methyl), 3β-(4-chlorophenyl) tropane, (99Tcm-TRODAT-1) specific uptake values (SUVs) and motor's severity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: 35 patients with PD were examined by 99Tcm-TRODAT-1 SPECT dopamine transporter brain imaging. The SUVs of the striatum and its subregions, including the putamen and caudate nucleus, were calculated by semi-quantity region of interest (ROI) technique with the radiation ratios of target/cerebellum. Motor's severity of PD was measured by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Motor UPDRS scores were divided into four subscales, bradykinesia scores, rigidity scores, postural instability scores and tremor scores. Results: SUVs of putamen correlated best with the motor UPDRS scores(r=-0.846, P<0.001), followed by that of striatum and caudate nucleus. Among the four major clinical signs of PD, the bradykinesia scores (X1) correlated best with SUVs of putamen(r=-0.858, P<0.001), followed by rigidity scores (X2) and postural instability scores. There was no significant correlation between tremor scores and SUVs of putamen (Y). A regression equation (Y=2.345-0.0418 X1-0.0580 X2) was founded by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Conclusions: The SUVs of striatum (especially SUVs of putamen) was a useful marker to evaluate the motor's severity of PD and monitor the progression of PD. (authors)

  19. Just watching the game ain’t enough: Striatal fMRI reward responses to successes and failures in a video game during active and vicarious playing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari eKätsyri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the multimodal stimulation provided by modern audiovisual video games is pleasing by itself, the rewarding nature of video game playing depends critically also on the players’ active engagement in the gameplay. The extent to which active engagement influences dopaminergic brain reward circuit responses remains unsettled. Here we show that striatal reward circuit responses elicited by successes (wins and failures (losses in a video game are stronger during active than vicarious gameplay. Eleven healthy males both played a competitive first-person tank shooter game (active playing and watched a pre-recorded gameplay video (vicarious playing while their hemodynamic brain activation was measured with 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Wins and losses were paired with symmetrical monetary rewards and punishments during active and vicarious playing so that the external reward context remained identical during both conditions. Brain activation was stronger in the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex (omPFC during winning than losing, both during active and vicarious playing conditions. In contrast, both wins and losses suppressed activations in the midbrain and striatum during active playing; however, the striatal suppression, particularly in the anterior putamen, was more pronounced during loss than win events. Sensorimotor confounds related to joystick movements did not account for the results. Self-ratings indicated losing to be more unpleasant during active than vicarious playing. Our findings demonstrate striatum to be selectively sensitive to self-acquired rewards, in contrast to frontal components of the reward circuit that process both self-acquired and passively received rewards. We propose that the striatal responses to repeated acquisition of rewards that are contingent on game related successes contribute to the motivational pull of video-game playing.

  20. Chronic nicotine treatment differentially regulates striatal α6α4β2* and α6(nonα4)β2* nAChR expression and function

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Xiomara A.; Bordia, Tanuja; Mcintosh, J Michael; Grady, Sharon R.; Quik, Maryka

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine treatment has long been associated with alterations in α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expression that modify dopaminergic function. However, the influence of chronic nicotine treatment on the α6β2* nAChR, a subtype specifically localized on dopaminergic neurons, is less clear. Here we used voltammetry, as well as receptor binding studies, to identify the effects of nicotine on striatal α6β2* nAChR function and expression. Chronic nicotine via drinking water enhanced n...

  1. No Correlation Between Body Mass Index and Striatal Dopamine Transporter Availability in Healthy Volunteers Using SPECT and I-123 PE2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, G.; Ziebell, M.; Jensen, P. S.;

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dopamine plays an important role in both the rewarding and conditioning effects of food. These effects involve mesolimbic, mesocortical, and nigrostriatal pathways. In humans, the most consistent finding has been reduced striatal dopamine D-2/3 receptor availability. In striatum......, dopamine is inactivated by reuptake via the dopamine transporter (DAT). The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis of lower DAT availability in obese healthy subjects using a selective DAT radiotracer in a sample of subjects with a wide range of BMI values. Design and Methods: Thirty-three healthy...

  2. Electrically-evoked dopamine and acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices perfused without magnesium: regulation by glutamate acting on NMDA receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Shaoyu; Fredholm, Bertil B

    1997-01-01

    Rat striatal slices, preincubated with [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-choline, were continuously superfused and electrically stimulated. Electrically evoked release of [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-acetylcholine (ACh) was not significantly changed by elimination of Mg2+ from superfusion buffer, but the basal release of [3H]-dopamine was doubled.Kynurenic acid (100–800  μM) caused, in the absence but not presence of Mg2+, a concentration-dependent decrease in the evoked release of these two transmitters. T...

  3. Dopamine D2 gene expression interacts with environmental enrichment to impact lifespan and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Hamilton, John; O'Rourke, Joseph R.; Napoli, Anthony; Febo, Marcelo; Volkow, Nora D.; Blum, Kenneth; Gold, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Aging produces cellular, molecular, and behavioral changes affecting many areas of the brain. The dopamine (DA) system is known to be vulnerable to the effects of aging, which regulate behavioral functions such as locomotor activity, body weight, and reward and cognition. In particular, age-related DA D2 receptor (D2R) changes have been of particular interest given its relationship with addiction and other rewarding behavioral properties. Male and female wild-type (Drd2 +/+), heterozygous (Drd2 +/−) and knockout (Drd2 −/−) mice were reared post-weaning in either an enriched environment (EE) or a deprived environment (DE). Over the course of their lifespan, body weight and locomotor activity was assessed. While an EE was generally found to be correlated with longer lifespan, these increases were only found in mice with normal or decreased expression of the D2 gene. Drd2 +/+ EE mice lived nearly 16% longer than their DE counterparts. Drd2 +/+ and Drd2 +/− EE mice lived 22% and 21% longer than Drd2 −/− EE mice, respectively. Moreover, both body weight and locomotor activity were moderated by environmental factors. In addition, EE mice show greater behavioral variability between genotypes compared to DE mice with respect to body weight and locomotor activity. PMID:26992232

  4. A tribute to Charlie Chaplin: Induced positive affect improves reward-based decision-learning in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Richard eRidderinkhof

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reward-based decision-learning refers to the process of learning to select those actions that lead to rewards while avoiding actions that lead to punishments. This process, known to rely on dopaminergic activity in striatal brain regions, is compromised in Parkinson’s disease (PD. We hypothesized that such decision-learning deficits are alleviated by induced positive affect, which is thought to incur transient boosts in midbrain and striatal dopaminergic activity. Computational measures of probabilistic reward-based decision-learning were determined for 51 patients diagnosed with PD. Previous work has shown these measures to rely on the nucleus caudatus (outcome evaluation during the early phases of learning and the putamen (reward prediction during later phases of learning. We observed that induced positive affect facilitated learning, through its effects on reward prediction rather than outcome evaluation. Viewing a few minutes of comedy clips served to remedy dopamine-related problems in putamen-based frontostriatal circuitry and, consequently, in learning to predict which actions will yield reward.

  5. Dopaminergic genes predict individual differences in susceptibility to confirmation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Bradley B; Hutchison, Kent E; Frank, Michael J

    2011-04-20

    The striatum is critical for the incremental learning of values associated with behavioral actions. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) represents abstract rules and explicit contingencies to support rapid behavioral adaptation in the absence of cumulative experience. Here we test two alternative models of the interaction between these systems, and individual differences thereof, when human subjects are instructed with prior information about reward contingencies that may or may not be accurate. Behaviorally, subjects are overly influenced by prior instructions, at the expense of learning true reinforcement statistics. Computational analysis found that this pattern of data is best accounted for by a confirmation bias mechanism in which prior beliefs--putatively represented in PFC--influence the learning that occurs in the striatum such that reinforcement statistics are distorted. We assessed genetic variants affecting prefrontal and striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. A polymorphism in the COMT gene (rs4680), associated with prefrontal dopaminergic function, was predictive of the degree to which participants persisted in responding in accordance with prior instructions even as evidence against their veracity accumulated. Polymorphisms in genes associated with striatal dopamine function (DARPP-32, rs907094, and DRD2, rs6277) were predictive of learning from positive and negative outcomes. Notably, these same variants were predictive of the degree to which such learning was overly inflated or neglected when outcomes are consistent or inconsistent with prior instructions. These findings indicate dissociable neurocomputational and genetic mechanisms by which initial biases are strengthened by experience. PMID:21508242

  6. Differential effects of methylmercuric chloride and mercuric chloride on the L-glutamate and potassium evoked release of [3H]dopamine from mouse striatal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of CH3HgCl and HgCl2 on the evoked release of 3H from mouse striatal slices prelabelled with [3H]dopamine have been examined. CH3HgCl (10 μM) was observed to increase the L-glutamate-evoked release of [3H]dopamine, while HgCl2 (10 μM) had no effect. In contrast, CH3HgCl at concentrations up to 100 μM had no effect on the 25 mM K+-stimulated release of [3]dopamine, whereas HgCl2 (100μM) significantly reduced the 25 mM K+-stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. Thus CH3HGCl and HgCl2 have differential effects on the L-glutamate- and K+-stimulated release of [3H]dopamine from mouse striatal slices, suggesting that these compounds may have different sites and (or) mechanisms of action in altering neurotransmitter release. It is suggested that CH3HgCl may act predominantly at intracellular sites or at the level of the L-glutamate receptor, whereas the major site of action of HgCl2 may be the voltage-operated calcium channel. (author). 21 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  7. Striatal D(2/3) Binding Potential Values in Drug-Naïve First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients Correlate With Treatment Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Sanne; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Svarer, Claus; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Allerup, Peter; Bak, Nikolaj; Rasmussen, Hans; Frandsen, Erik; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    2015-01-01

    potential (BP(p)) values and treatment outcome in a cohort of antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients. Additionally, we wished to investigate associations between striatal dopamine D(2/3) receptor blockade and alterations of negative symptoms as well as functioning and subjective well......-being. Twenty-eight antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 26 controls were included in the study. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [(123)I]iodobenzamide ([(123)I]-IBZM) was used to examine striatal D(2/3) receptor BP(p). Patients were examined before and after 6 weeks of......(p) of dopamine D(2/3) receptors in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia and treatment response. Patients with a low BP(p) have a better treatment response than patients with a high BP(p). The results further suggest that functioning may decline at high levels of dopamine...

  8. Striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability predicts the thalamic and medial prefrontal responses to reward in cocaine abusers three years later

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asensio, S.; Goldstein, R.; Asensio, S.; Romero, M.J.; Romero, F.J.; Wong, C.T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Telang, F..; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-05-01

    Low levels of dopamine (DA) D2 receptor availability at a resting baseline have been previously reported in drug addicted individuals and have been associated with reduced ventral and dorsal prefrontal metabolism. The reduction in DA D2 receptor availability along with the reduced ventral frontal metabolism is thought to underlie compromised sensitivity to nondrug reward, a core characteristic of drug addiction. We therefore hypothesized that variability in DA D2 receptor availability at baseline will covary with dynamic responses to monetary reward in addicted individuals. Striatal DA D2 receptor availability was measured with [{sup 11}C]raclopride and positron emission tomography and response to monetary reward was measured (an average of three years later) with functional magnetic resonance imaging in seven cocaine-addicted individuals. Results show that low DA D2 receptor availability in the dorsal striatum was associated with decreased thalamic response to monetary reward; while low availability in ventral striatum was associated with increased medial prefrontal (Brodmann Area 6/8/32) response to monetary reward. These preliminary results, that need to be replicated in larger sample sizes and validated with healthy controls, suggest that resting striatal DA D2 receptor availability predicts variability in functional responses to a nondrug reinforcer (money) in prefrontal cortex, implicated in behavioral monitoring, and in thalamus, implicated in conditioned responses and expectation, in cocaine-addicted individuals.

  9. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: a unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J; Nelson, Anna M; Mandt, Bruce H; Larson, Gaynor A; Rorabaugh, Jacki M; Ng, Christopher M C; Barcomb, Kelsey M; Richards, Toni L; Allen, Richard M; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2013-09-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal numbers of striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) than HCRs and exhibit marginal cocaine inhibition of in vivo DAT activity and cocaine-induced increases in extracellular DA. Importantly, lower initial cocaine response predicts greater locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference and greater motivation to self-administer cocaine following low dose acquisition. Further, outbred Long-Evans rats classified as LCRs, versus HCRs, are more sensitive to cocaine's discriminative stimulus effects. Overall, results to date with the LCR/HCR model underscore the contribution of striatal DATs to individual differences in initial cocaine responsiveness and the value of assessing the influence of initial drug response on subsequent expression of addiction-like behaviors. PMID:23850581

  10. Striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability predicts the thalamic and medial prefrontal responses to reward in cocaine abusers three years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low levels of dopamine (DA) D2 receptor availability at a resting baseline have been previously reported in drug addicted individuals and have been associated with reduced ventral and dorsal prefrontal metabolism. The reduction in DA D2 receptor availability along with the reduced ventral frontal metabolism is thought to underlie compromised sensitivity to nondrug reward, a core characteristic of drug addiction. We therefore hypothesized that variability in DA D2 receptor availability at baseline will covary with dynamic responses to monetary reward in addicted individuals. Striatal DA D2 receptor availability was measured with (11C)raclopride and positron emission tomography and response to monetary reward was measured (an average of three years later) with functional magnetic resonance imaging in seven cocaine-addicted individuals. Results show that low DA D2 receptor availability in the dorsal striatum was associated with decreased thalamic response to monetary reward; while low availability in ventral striatum was associated with increased medial prefrontal (Brodmann Area 6/8/32) response to monetary reward. These preliminary results, that need to be replicated in larger sample sizes and validated with healthy controls, suggest that resting striatal DA D2 receptor availability predicts variability in functional responses to a nondrug reinforcer (money) in prefrontal cortex, implicated in behavioral monitoring, and in thalamus, implicated in conditioned responses and expectation, in cocaine-addicted individuals.

  11. Mice deficient for striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) display impaired short-term but normal long-term object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Daniel; Creighton, Samantha; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Choleris, Elena; Winters, Boyer D

    2016-09-15

    Substantial evidence implicates Acetylcholine (ACh) in the acquisition of object memories. While most research has focused on the role of the cholinergic basal forebrain and its cortical targets, there are additional cholinergic networks that may contribute to object recognition. The striatum contains an independent cholinergic network comprised of interneurons. In the current study, we investigated the role of this cholinergic signalling in object recognition using mice deficient for Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) within interneurons of the striatum. We tested whether these striatal VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice would display normal short-term (5 or 15min retention delay) and long-term (3h retention delay) object recognition memory. In a home cage object recognition task, male and female VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice were impaired selectively with a 15min retention delay. When tested on an object location task, VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice displayed intact spatial memory. Finally, when object recognition was tested in a Y-shaped apparatus, designed to minimize the influence of spatial and contextual cues, only females displayed impaired recognition with a 5min retention delay, but when males were challenged with a 15min retention delay, they were also impaired; neither males nor females were impaired with the 3h delay. The pattern of results suggests that striatal cholinergic transmission plays a role in the short-term memory for object features, but not spatial location. PMID:27233822

  12. Ratio of dopamine synthesis capacity to D2 receptor availability in ventral striatum correlates with central processing of affective stimuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienast, Thorsten; Rapp, Michael [Charite Campus Mitte, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the Charite University Medical Center, Berlin (Germany); Siessmeier, Thomas; Buchholz, Hans G.; Schreckenberger, Mathias [University of Mainz, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Mainz (Germany); Wrase, Jana; Heinz, Andreas [Charite Campus Mitte, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the Charite University Medical Center, Berlin (Germany); Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim (Germany); Braus, Dieter F. [University of Hamburg, Neuroimage Nord, Department of Psychiatry, Hamburg (Germany); Smolka, Michael N.; Mann, Karl [Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim (Germany); Roesch, Frank [University of Mainz, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Cumming, Paul [PET Center and Center for Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus (Denmark); Gruender, Gerhard [Aachen University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry of the RWTH, Mainz (Germany); Bartenstein, Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the ventral striatum may interact with limbic processing of affective stimuli, whereas dorsal striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission can affect habitual processing of emotionally salient stimuli in the pre-frontal cortex. We investigated the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the ventral and dorsal striatum with respect to central processing of affective stimuli in healthy subjects. Subjects were investigated with positron emission tomography and [{sup 18}F]DOPA for measurements of dopamine synthesis capacity and [{sup 18}F]DMFP for estimation of dopamine D2 receptor binding potential. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response to affective pictures, which was correlated with the ratio of [{sup 18}F]DOPA net influx constant K{sub in}{sup app} /[{sup 18}F]DMFP-binding potential (BP{sub N}D) in the ventral and dorsal striatum. The magnitude of the ratio in the ventral striatum was positively correlated with BOLD signal increases elicited by negative versus neutral pictures in the right medial frontal gyrus (BA10), right inferior parietal lobe and left post-central gyrus. In the dorsal striatum, the ratio was positively correlated with BOLD signal activation elicited by negative versus neutral stimuli in the left post-central gyrus. The BOLD signal elicited by positive versus neutral stimuli in the superior parietal gyrus was positively correlated with the dorsal and ventral striatal ratio. The correlations of the ratio in the ventral and dorsal striatum with processing of affective stimuli in the named cortical regions support the hypothesis that dopamine transmission in functional divisions of the striatum modulates processing of affective stimuli in specific cortical areas. (orig.)

  13. Ratio of dopamine synthesis capacity to D2 receptor availability in ventral striatum correlates with central processing of affective stimuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the ventral striatum may interact with limbic processing of affective stimuli, whereas dorsal striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission can affect habitual processing of emotionally salient stimuli in the pre-frontal cortex. We investigated the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the ventral and dorsal striatum with respect to central processing of affective stimuli in healthy subjects. Subjects were investigated with positron emission tomography and [18F]DOPA for measurements of dopamine synthesis capacity and [18F]DMFP for estimation of dopamine D2 receptor binding potential. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response to affective pictures, which was correlated with the ratio of [18F]DOPA net influx constant Kinapp /[18F]DMFP-binding potential (BPND) in the ventral and dorsal striatum. The magnitude of the ratio in the ventral striatum was positively correlated with BOLD signal increases elicited by negative versus neutral pictures in the right medial frontal gyrus (BA10), right inferior parietal lobe and left post-central gyrus. In the dorsal striatum, the ratio was positively correlated with BOLD signal activation elicited by negative versus neutral stimuli in the left post-central gyrus. The BOLD signal elicited by positive versus neutral stimuli in the superior parietal gyrus was positively correlated with the dorsal and ventral striatal ratio. The correlations of the ratio in the ventral and dorsal striatum with processing of affective stimuli in the named cortical regions support the hypothesis that dopamine transmission in functional divisions of the striatum modulates processing of affective stimuli in specific cortical areas. (orig.)

  14. Carbon-11 epidepride: a suitable radioligand for PET investigation of