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Sample records for affects myoblast fusion

  1. The intracellular domain of Dumbfounded affects myoblast fusion efficiency and interacts with Rolling pebbles and Loner.

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    Sarada Bulchand

    Full Text Available Drosophila body wall muscles are multinucleated syncytia formed by successive fusions between a founder myoblast and several fusion competent myoblasts. Initial fusion gives rise to a bi/trinucleate precursor followed by more fusion cycles forming a mature muscle. This process requires the functions of various molecules including the transmembrane myoblast attractants Dumbfounded (Duf and its paralogue Roughest (Rst, a scaffold protein Rolling pebbles (Rols and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Loner. Fusion completely fails in a duf, rst mutant, and is blocked at the bi/trinucleate stage in rols and loner single mutants. We analysed the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Duf, by mutating conserved putative signaling sites and serially deleting the intracellular domain. These were tested for their ability to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner and to rescue the fusion defect in duf, rst mutant embryos. Studying combinations of double mutants, further tested the function of Rols, Loner and other fusion molecules. Here we show that serial truncations of the Duf intracellular domain successively compromise its function to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner in addition to affecting myoblast fusion efficiency in embryos. Putative phosphorylation sites function additively while the extreme C terminus including a PDZ binding domain is dispensable for its function. We also show that fusion is completely blocked in a rols, loner double mutant and is compromised in other double mutants. These results suggest an additive function of the intracellular domain of Duf and an early function of Rols and Loner which is independent of Duf.

  2. G-protein coupled receptor BAI3 promotes myoblast fusion in vertebrates.

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    Hamoud, Noumeira; Tran, Viviane; Croteau, Louis-Philippe; Kania, Artur; Côté, Jean-François

    2014-03-11

    Muscle fibers form as a result of myoblast fusion, yet the cell surface receptors regulating this process are unknown in vertebrates. In Drosophila, myoblast fusion involves the activation of the Rac pathway by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Myoblast City and its scaffolding protein ELMO, downstream of cell-surface cell-adhesion receptors. We previously showed that the mammalian ortholog of Myoblast City, DOCK1, functions in an evolutionarily conserved manner to promote myoblast fusion in mice. In search for regulators of myoblast fusion, we identified the G-protein coupled receptor brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor (BAI3) as a cell surface protein that interacts with ELMO. In cultured cells, BAI3 or ELMO1/2 loss of function severely impaired myoblast fusion without affecting differentiation and cannot be rescued by reexpression of BAI3 mutants deficient in ELMO binding. The related BAI protein family member, BAI1, is functionally distinct from BAI3, because it cannot rescue the myoblast fusion defects caused by the loss of BAI3 function. Finally, embryonic muscle precursor expression of a BAI3 mutant unable to bind ELMO was sufficient to block myoblast fusion in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide a role for BAI3 in the relay of extracellular fusion signals to their intracellular effectors, identifying it as an essential transmembrane protein for embryonic vertebrate myoblast fusion. PMID:24567399

  3. The small G-proteins Rac1 and Cdc42 are essential for myoblast fusion in the mouse

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    Vasyutina, Elena; Martarelli, Benedetta; Brakebusch, Cord; Wende, Hagen; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Rac1 and Cdc42 are small G-proteins that regulate actin dynamics and affect plasma membrane protrusion and vesicle traffic. We used conditional mutagenesis in mice to demonstrate that Rac1 and Cdc42 are essential for myoblast fusion in vivo and in vitro. The deficit in fusion of Rac1 or Cdc42...... genetic analysis demonstrates thus that the function of Rac in myoblast fusion is evolutionarily conserved from insects to mammals and that Cdc42, a molecule hitherto not implicated in myoblast fusion, is essential for the fusion of murine myoblasts....

  4. Correction of the FSHD myoblast differentiation defect by fusion with healthy myoblasts.

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    Dib, Carla; Bou Saada, Yara; Dmitriev, Petr; Richon, Catherine; Dessen, Philippe; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Carnac, Gilles; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a neuromuscular disease with a prevalence that could reach 1 in 8,000 characterized by progressive asymmetric muscle weakness. Myoblasts isolated from FSHD muscles exhibit morphological differentiation defects and show a distinct transcription profile. These abnormalities may be linked to the muscle weakness in FSHD patients. We have tested whether fusion of FSHD myoblasts with primary myoblasts isolated from healthy individuals could correct the differentiation defects. Our results show that the number of hybrid myotubes with normal phenotype increased with the percentage of normal myoblasts initially cultured. We demonstrated that a minimum of 50% of normal nuclei is required for a phenotypic correction of the FSHD phenotype. Moreover, transcriptomic profiles of phenotypically corrected hybrid myotubes showed that the expression of deregulated genes in FSHD myotubes became almost normal. The number of deregulated pathways also decreased from 39 in FSHD myotubes to one in hybrid myotubes formed with 40% FSHD and 60% normal myoblasts. We thus propose that while phenotypical and functional correction of FSHD is feasible, it requires more than 50% of normal myoblasts, it creates limitations for cell therapy in the FSHD context. PMID:26218298

  5. 3D analysis of Founder Cell and Fusion Competent Myoblasts arrangements outlines a new model of myoblast fusion

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    Beckett, Karen; Baylies, Mary K.

    2007-01-01

    Formation of the Drosophila larval body wall muscles requires the specification, coordinated cellular behaviors and fusion of two cell types: Founder Cells (FCs) that control the identity of the individual muscle and Fusion Competent Myoblasts (FCMs) that provide mass. These two cell types come together to control the final size, shape and attachment of individual muscles. However, the spatial arrangement of these cells over time, the sequence of fusion events and the contribution of these ce...

  6. CD36 is required for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation

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    Park, Seung-Yoon [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dongguk University and Medical Institute of Dongguk University, Gyeongju 780-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Youngeun [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-San, E-mail: iskim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was induced during myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was localized in multinucleated myotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of myogenic markers is attenuated in CD36 knockdown C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of CD36 significantly inhibited myotube formation during differentiation. -- Abstract: Recently, CD36 has been found to be involved in the cytokine-induced fusion of macrophage. Myoblast fusion to form multinucleated myotubes is required for myogenesis and muscle regeneration. Because a search of gene expression database revealed the attenuation of CD36 expression in the muscles of muscular dystrophy patients, the possibility that CD36 could be required for myoblast fusion was investigated. CD36 expression was markedly up-regulated during myoblast differentiation and localized in multinucleated myotubes. Knockdown of endogenous CD36 significantly decreased the expression of myogenic markers as well as myotube formation. These results support the notion that CD36 plays an important role in cell fusion during myogenic differentiation. Our finding will aid the elucidation of the common mechanism governing cell-to-cell fusion in various fusion models.

  7. The control of chick myoblast fusion by ion channels operated by prostaglandins and acetylcholine

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Chick myoblast fusion in culture was investigated using prostanoid synthesis inhibitors to delay spontaneous fusion. During this delay myoblast fusion could be induced by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), by raising extracellular potassium and by addition of carbachol. Carbachol-induced fusion, but not PGE-induced fusion, was prevented by the acetylcholine receptor blocker alpha-bungarotoxin. Fusion induced by any of these agents was prevented by the Ca channel blockers lanthanum and D600. The thresho...

  8. Phospholipase D1 facilitates second-phase myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Shuzhi; Stegner, David; Qin CHEN; Hongu, Tsunaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Li CHEN; Kanaho, Yasunori; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Frohman, Michael A.; Huang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast differentiation and fusion is a well-orchestrated multistep process that is essential for skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has been implicated in the initiation of myoblast differentiation in vitro. However, whether PLD1 plays additional roles in myoblast fusion and exerts a function in myogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that PLD1 expression is up-regulated in myogenic cells during muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury and tha...

  9. Phospholipase D1 facilitates second-phase myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Shuzhi; Stegner, David; Chen, Qin; Hongu, Tsunaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Li; Kanaho, Yasunori; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Frohman, Michael A; Huang, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Myoblast differentiation and fusion is a well-orchestrated multistep process that is essential for skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has been implicated in the initiation of myoblast differentiation in vitro. However, whether PLD1 plays additional roles in myoblast fusion and exerts a function in myogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that PLD1 expression is up-regulated in myogenic cells during muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury and that genetic ablation of PLD1 results in delayed myofiber regeneration. Myoblasts derived from PLD1-null mice or treated with PLD1-specific inhibitor are unable to form mature myotubes, indicating defects in second-phase myoblast fusion. Concomitantly, the PLD1 product phosphatidic acid is transiently detected on the plasma membrane of differentiating myocytes, and its production is inhibited by PLD1 knockdown. Exogenous lysophosphatidylcholine, a key membrane lipid for fusion pore formation, partially rescues fusion defect resulting from PLD1 inhibition. Thus these studies demonstrate a role for PLD1 in myoblast fusion during myogenesis in which PLD1 facilitates the fusion of mononuclear myocytes with nascent myotubes. PMID:25428992

  10. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

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    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26892397

  11. Drosophila SNS, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is essential for myoblast fusion

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    Bour, Barbara A.; Chakravarti, Malabika; West, Joshua M.; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2000-01-01

    The Drosophila sticks-and-stones (sns) locus was identified on the basis of its mutant phenotype, the complete absence of body wall muscles and corresponding presence of unfused myoblasts. The genetic location of the mutation responsible for this apparent defect in myoblast fusion was determined by recombination and deficiency mapping, and the corresponding wild-type gene was isolated in a molecular walk. Identification of the SNS coding sequence revealed a putative member of the immunoglobul...

  12. Spatial Geometries of Self-Assembled Chitohexaose Monolayers Regulate Myoblast Fusion

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    Pornthida Poosala

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myoblast fusion into functionally-distinct myotubes to form in vitro skeletal muscle constructs under differentiation serum-free conditions still remains a challenge. Herein, we report that our microtopographical carbohydrate substrates composed of bioactive hexa-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc6 modulated the efficiency of myoblast fusion without requiring horse serum or any differentiation medium during cell culture. Promotion of the differentiation of dissociated mononucleated skeletal myoblasts (C2C12; a mouse myoblast cell line into robust myotubes was found only on GlcNAc6 micropatterns, whereas the myoblasts on control, non-patterned GlcNAc6 substrates or GlcNAc6-free patterns exhibited an undifferentiated form. We also examined the possible role of GlcNAc6 micropatterns with various widths in the behavior of C2C12 cells in early and late stages of myogenesis through mRNA expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms. The spontaneous contraction of myotubes was investigated via the regulation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4, which is involved in stimulating glucose uptake during cellular contraction. Narrow patterns demonstrated enhanced glucose uptake rate and generated a fast-twitch muscle fiber type, whereas the slow-twitch muscle fiber type was dominant on wider patterns. Our findings indicated that GlcNAc6-mediated integrin interactions are responsible for guiding myoblast fusion forward along with myotube formation.

  13. The Formin Diaphanous Regulates Myoblast Fusion through Actin Polymerization and Arp2/3 Regulation.

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    Su Deng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The formation of multinucleated muscle cells through cell-cell fusion is a conserved process from fruit flies to humans. Numerous studies have shown the importance of Arp2/3, its regulators, and branched actin for the formation of an actin structure, the F-actin focus, at the fusion site. This F-actin focus forms the core of an invasive podosome-like structure that is required for myoblast fusion. In this study, we find that the formin Diaphanous (Dia, which nucleates and facilitates the elongation of actin filaments, is essential for Drosophila myoblast fusion. Following cell recognition and adhesion, Dia is enriched at the myoblast fusion site, concomitant with, and having the same dynamics as, the F-actin focus. Through analysis of Dia loss-of-function conditions using mutant alleles but particularly a dominant negative Dia transgene, we demonstrate that reduction in Dia activity in myoblasts leads to a fusion block. Significantly, no actin focus is detected, and neither branched actin regulators, SCAR or WASp, accumulate at the fusion site when Dia levels are reduced. Expression of constitutively active Dia also causes a fusion block that is associated with an increase in highly dynamic filopodia, altered actin turnover rates and F-actin distribution, and mislocalization of SCAR and WASp at the fusion site. Together our data indicate that Dia plays two roles during invasive podosome formation at the fusion site: it dictates the level of linear F-actin polymerization, and it is required for appropriate branched actin polymerization via localization of SCAR and WASp. These studies provide new insight to the mechanisms of cell-cell fusion, the relationship between different regulators of actin polymerization, and invasive podosome formation that occurs in normal development and in disease.

  14. Fusion mechanism of the myoblasts in the myotome of the chick embryo

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    González Santander, R.; Toledo Lobo, M.V.; Martínez Alonso, F.J.; Martínez Cuadrado, G.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the fusion process of rnyoblasts in the mytome corresponding to H.H. stages 22, 23 and 24 from calcitonin-treated chick embryos and their untreated controls. The micrograph images of this process were studied to detect the ultrastructural changes in myoblast morphology that could be associated with the known hormonal and biochen~ical changes that take place in preparation of fusion. Once actin and myosin myofilament differentiation and sarcomero...

  15. PKC-Mediated ZYG1 Phosphorylation Induces Fusion of Myoblasts as well as of Dictyostelium Cells

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    Aiko Amagai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that a novel protein ZYG1 induces sexual cell fusion (zygote formation of Dictyostelium cells. In the process of cell fusion, involvements of signal transduction pathways via Ca2+ and PKC (protein kinase C have been suggested because zygote formation is greatly enhanced by PKC activators. In fact, there are several deduced sites phosphorylated by PKC in ZYG1 protein. Thereupon, we designed the present work to examine whether or not ZYG1 is actually phosphorylated by PKC and localized at the regions of cell-cell contacts where cell fusion occurs. These were ascertained, suggesting that ZYG1 might be the target protein for PKC. A humanized version of zyg1 cDNA (mzyg1 was introduced into myoblasts to know if ZYG1 is also effective in cell fusion of myoblasts. Quite interestingly, enforced expression of ZYG1 in myoblasts was found to induce markedly their cell fusion, thus strongly suggesting the existence of a common signaling pathway for cell fusion beyond the difference of species.

  16. Nuclei of non-muscle cells bind centrosome proteins upon fusion with differentiating myoblasts.

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    Xavier Fant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In differentiating myoblasts, the microtubule network is reorganized from a centrosome-bound, radial array into parallel fibres, aligned along the long axis of the cell. Concomitantly, proteins of the centrosome relocalize from the pericentriolar material to the outer surface of the nucleus. The mechanisms that govern this relocalization are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we perform experiments in vitro and in cell culture indicating that microtubule nucleation at the centrosome is reduced during myoblast differentiation, while nucleation at the nuclear surface increases. We show in heterologous cell fusion experiments, between cultures of differentiating mouse myoblasts and human cells of non-muscular origin, that nuclei from non-muscle cells recruit centrosome proteins once fused with the differentiating myoblasts. This recruitment still occurs in the presence of cycloheximide and thus appears to be independent of new protein biosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our data suggest that nuclei of undifferentiated cells have the dormant potential to bind centrosome proteins, and that this potential becomes activated during myoblast differentiation.

  17. Enhancing Myoblast Fusion for Therapy of Muscular Dystrophies

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    Wu, Melissa P.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a major organ comprising 30-40% of the human body mass. The coordination of processes resulting in mature muscle requires many genes, and their loss can result in debilitating muscle disorders. Of the strategies being developed to cure muscle diseases, enhancement of the natural process of muscle cell fusion in existing or introduced myogenic cells has great therapeutic potential. In this work, we determined whether a drug that stimulates proliferation and fusion of myoblas...

  18. PKCθ signaling is required for myoblast fusion by regulating the expression of caveolin-3 and β1D integrin upstream focal adhesion kinase

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    Madaro, Luca; Marrocco, Valeria; Fiore, Piera; Aulino, Paola; Smeriglio, Piera; Adamo, Sergio; Molinaro, Mario; Bouché, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Fusion of mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers is an essential phase of skeletal myogenesis, which occurs during muscle development as well as during postnatal life for muscle growth, turnover, and regeneration. Many cell adhesion proteins, including integrins, have been shown to be important for myoblast fusion in vertebrates, and recently focal adhesion kinase (FAK), has been proposed as a key mediator of myoblast fusion. Here we focused on the possible role of PKCθ, the...

  19. Culture Conditions Affect Expression of DUX4 in FSHD Myoblasts

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    Sachchida Nand Pandey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is believed to be caused by aberrant expression of double homeobox 4 (DUX4 due to epigenetic changes of the D4Z4 region at chromosome 4q35. Detecting DUX4 is challenging due to its stochastic expression pattern and low transcription level. In this study, we examined different cDNA synthesis strategies and the sensitivity for DUX4 detection. In addition, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone and knockout serum replacement (KOSR on DUX4 expression in culture. Our data showed that DUX4 was consistently detected in cDNA samples synthesized using Superscript III. The sensitivity of DUX4 detection was higher in the samples synthesized using oligo(dT primers compared to random hexamers. Adding dexamethasone to the culture media significantly suppressed DUX4 expression in immortalized (1.3 fold, p < 0.01 and primary (4.7 fold, p < 0.01 FSHD myoblasts, respectively. Culture medium with KOSR increased DUX4 expression and the response is concentration dependent. The findings suggest that detection strategies and culture conditions should be carefully considered when studying DUX4 in cultured cells.

  20. Morphological changes and spatial regulation of diacylglycerol kinase-zeta, syntrophins, and Rac1 during myoblast fusion.

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    Abramovici, Hanan; Gee, Stephen H

    2007-07-01

    The fusion of mononuclear myoblasts into multinucleated myofibers is essential for the formation and growth of skeletal muscle. Myoblast fusion follows a well-defined sequence of cellular events, from initial recognition and adhesion, to alignment, and finally plasma membrane fusion. These processes depend upon coordinated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent studies suggest diacylglycerol kinase-zeta (DGK-zeta), an enzyme that metabolizes diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, plays an important role in actin reorganization. Here, we investigated whether DGK-zeta has a role in the fusion of cultured C2C12 myoblasts. We show that DGK-zeta and syntrophins, scaffold proteins of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex that bind directly to DGK-zeta, are spatially regulated during fusion. Both proteins accumulated with the GTPase Rac1 at sites where fine filopodia mediate the initial contact between myoblasts. In addition, DGK-zeta codistributed with the Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin at nascent, but not previously established cell contacts. We provide evidence that C2 cells are pulled together at cell-cell junctions by N-cadherin-containing filopodia reminiscent of epithelial adhesion zippers, which guide the advance of lamellipodia from apposing cells. At later times, vesicles with properties of macropinosomes formed close to cell-cell junctions. Reconstruction of confocal optical sections showed these form dome-like protrusions from the dorsal surface of contacting cells. Collectively, these results suggest DGK-zeta and syntrophins play a role at multiple stages of the fusion process. Moreover, our findings provide a potential link between changes in the lipid content of the membrane bilayer and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton during myoblast fusion. PMID:17410543

  1. Live imaging provides new insights on dynamic F-actin filopodia and differential endocytosis during myoblast fusion in Drosophila.

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    Shruti Haralalka

    Full Text Available The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs, and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre and Sticks-and-stones (Sns on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and

  2. The calcium-dependent myoblast adhesion that precedes cell fusion is mediated by glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Presumptive myoblasts from explants of chick embryo pectoral muscle proliferate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myotubes. One event critical to multinucleate cell formation is the specific adhesion of myoblasts before union of their membranes. In the studies reported here five known inhibitors of myotube formation-- trifluoperazine, sodium butyrate, chloroquine, 1,10 phenanthroline, and tunicamycin--were tested for their effect on the Ca++-dependent myoblast adhesion step. The ...

  3. PKCθ signaling is required for myoblast fusion by regulating the expression of caveolin-3 and β1D integrin upstream focal adhesion kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaro, Luca; Marrocco, Valeria; Fiore, Piera; Aulino, Paola; Smeriglio, Piera; Adamo, Sergio; Molinaro, Mario; Bouché, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Fusion of mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers is an essential phase of skeletal myogenesis, which occurs during muscle development as well as during postnatal life for muscle growth, turnover, and regeneration. Many cell adhesion proteins, including integrins, have been shown to be important for myoblast fusion in vertebrates, and recently focal adhesion kinase (FAK), has been proposed as a key mediator of myoblast fusion. Here we focused on the possible role of PKCθ, the PKC isoform predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle, in myoblast fusion. We found that the expression of PKCθ is strongly up-regulated following freeze injury–induced muscle regeneration, as well as during in vitro differentiation of satellite cells (SCs; the muscle stem cells). Using both PKCθ knockout and muscle-specific PKCθ dominant-negative mutant mouse models, we observed delayed body and muscle fiber growth during the first weeks of postnatal life, when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. We also found that myofiber formation, during muscle regeneration after freeze injury, was markedly impaired in PKCθ mutant mice, as compared with WT. This phenotype was associated with reduced expression of the myogenic differentiation program executor, myogenin, but not with that of the SC marker Pax7. Indeed in vitro differentiation of primary muscle-derived SCs from PKCθ mutants resulted in the formation of thinner myotubes with reduced numbers of myonuclei and reduced fusion rate, when compared with WT cells. These effects were associated to reduced expression of the profusion genes caveolin-3 and β1D integrin and to reduced activation/phosphorylation of their up-stream regulator FAK. Indeed the exogenous expression of a constitutively active mutant form of PKCθ in muscle cells induced FAK phosphorylation. Moreover pharmacologically mediated full inhibition of FAK activity led to similar fusion defects in both WT and PKCθ-null myoblasts. We thus propose that PKC

  4. Dynamin and endocytosis are required for the fusion of osteoclasts and myoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Nah-Young; Choi, Hyewon; Neff, Lynn; Wu, Yumei; Saito, Hiroaki; Ferguson, Shawn M.; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is an evolutionarily conserved process that leads to the formation of multinucleated myofibers, syncytiotrophoblasts and osteoclasts, allowing their respective functions. Although cell–cell fusion requires the presence of fusogenic membrane proteins and actin-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization, the precise machinery allowing cells to fuse is still poorly understood. Using an inducible knockout mouse model to generate dynamin 1– and 2–deficient primary osteoclast precursors...

  5. Syncytin-1 in differentiating human myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregard, Bolette; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander;

    2014-01-01

    induced to fuse. Additionally, we have compared the localization of syncytin with the localization of caveolin-3 and of myogenin, which are also involved in myoblast fusion and maturation. Syncytin was localized to areas of the cell membrane and to filopodial structures connecting myoblasts to each other...... observed in both myogenin-positive and myogenin-negative cells. Antisense treatment downmodulated syncytin-1 expression and inhibited myoblast cell fusions. Importantly, syncytin-1 antisense significantly decreased the frequency of multinucleated myotubes demonstrating that the treatment inhibited...... secondary myoblast fusions. Thus, syncytin is involved in human myoblast fusions and is localized in areas of contact between fusing cells. Moreover, syncytin and caveolin-3 might interact at the level of the sarcolemma....

  6. In ovo L-arginine supplementation stimulates myoblast differentiation but negatively affects muscle development of broiler chicken after hatching.

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    Li, Y; Wang, Y; Willems, E; Willemsen, H; Franssens, L; Buyse, J; Decuypere, E; Everaert, N

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that in ovo feeding (IOF) of L-arginine (L-Arg) enhances nitric oxide (NO) production, stimulates the process of myogenesis, and regulates post-hatching muscle growth. Different doses of L-Arg were injected into the amnion of chicken embryos at embryonic day (ED) 16. After hatching, the body weight of individual male chickens was recorded weekly for 3 weeks. During in vitro experiments, myoblasts of the pectoralis major (PM) were extracted at ED16 and were incubated in medium containing 0.01 mm L-Arg, 0.05 mm L-Arg, and (or) 0.05 mm L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). When 25 mg/kg L-Arg/initial egg weight was injected, no difference was observed in body weight at hatch, but a significant decrease was found during the following 3 weeks compared to that of the non-injected and saline-injected control, and this also affected the growth of muscle mass. L-NAME inhibited gene expression of myogenic differentiation antigen (MyoD), myogenin, NOS, and follistatin, decreased the cell viability, and increased myostatin (MSTN) gene expression. 0.05 mm L-Arg stimulated myogenin gene expression but also depressed muscle cell viability. L-NAME blocked the effect of 0.05 mm L-Arg on myogenin mRNA levels when co-incubated with 0.05 mm L-Arg. L-Arg treatments had no significant influence on NOS mRNA gene expression, but had inhibiting effect on follistatin gene expression, while L-NAME treatments had effects on both. These results suggested that L-Arg stimulated myoblast differentiation, but the limited number of myoblasts would form less myotubes and then less myofibers, while the latter limited the growth of muscle mass. PMID:25846259

  7. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Young Woo [Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Center, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin [Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Jin [Dr. Park' s Aesthetic Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong In, E-mail: oncochem@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo, E-mail: khsmd@unitel.co.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  8. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. → Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. → hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  9. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  10. Losartan enhances the success of myoblast transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhfakh, Raouia; Lamarre, Yann; Skuk, Daniel; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a recessive X-linked genetic disease caused by dystrophin gene mutations. Cell therapy can be a potential approach aiming to introduce a functional dystrophin in the dystrophic patient myofibers. However, this strategy produced so far limited results. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle development and is responsible for limiting myogenic regeneration. The combination of TGF-β signaling inhibition with myoblast transplantation can be an effective therapeutic approach in dystrophin-deficient patients. Our aim was to verify whether the success of human myoblast transplantation in immunodeficient dystrophic mice is enhanced with losartan, a molecule that downregulates TGF-β expression. In vitro, blocking TGF-β activity with losartan increased proliferation and fusion and decreased apoptosis in human myoblasts. In vivo, human myoblasts were transplanted in mice treated with oral losartan. Immunodetection of human dystrophin in tibialis anterior cross sections 1 month posttransplantation revealed more human dystrophin-positive myofibers in these mice than in nontreated dystrophic mice. Thus, blocking the TGF-β signal with losartan treatment improved the success of myoblast transplantation probably by increasing myoblast proliferation and fusion, decreasing macrophage activation, and changing the expression of myogenic regulator factors. PMID:21535912

  11. The regulation of myoblast plasticity and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng ZHANG; Xiao-ping CHEN

    2012-01-01

    The development of skeletal muscle is a highly regulated,multi-step process in which pluripotent mesodermal cells give rise to myoblasts that subsequently withdraw from the cell cycle and differentiate into myotubes as well as myofibers.The plasticity of myoblasts plays a critical role in maintaining skeletal muscle structure and function by myoblast activation,migration,adhesion,membrane reorganization,nuclear fusion,finally forming myotubes/myofibers.Our studies demonstrate that the local hypoxic microenvironment,a great diversity of regulatory factors such as IL-6 superfamily factors (IL-6,LIF,CNTF) and TGF-β1 could regulate the myoblast plasticity.The aim of this paper is to review the previous studies focused on the regulation of myoblast plasticity and its mechanism in our laboratory.Knowledge about the microenvironment or factors involved in regulating the myoblast plasticity will help develop the prevention and cure measures of skeletal muscle diseases.

  12. Involvement of cell surface phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins in cell-cell adhesion of chick embryo myoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    During myogenesis myoblasts fuse to form multinucleate cells that express muscle-specific proteins. A specific cell-cell adhesion process precedes lipid bilayer union during myoblast fusion (Knudsen, K. A., and A. F. Horwitz. 1977. Dev. Biol. 58:328-338) and is mediated by cell surface glycoproteins (Knudsen, K. A., 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:891- 897). In this paper we show that myoblast adhesion and myotube formation are inhibited by treating fusion-competent myoblasts with phosphatidylinosito...

  13. RNA/MBNL1-containing foci in myoblast nuclei from patients affected by myotonic dystrophy type 2: an immunocytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pellicciari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2 is a dominantly inherited autosomal disease with multi-systemic clinical features and it is caused by expansion of a CCTG tetranucleotide repeat in the first intron of the zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9 gene in 3q21.The expanded-CCUG-containing transcripts are retained in the cell nucleus and accumulate in the form of focal aggregates which specifically sequester the muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1 protein, a RNA binding factor involved in the regulation of alternative splicing. The structural organization and composition of the foci are still incompletely known. In this study, the nuclear foci occurring in cultured myoblasts from DM2 patients were characterised at fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy by using a panel of antibodies recognizing transcription and processing factors of pre-mRNAs. MBNL1 proved to co-locate in the nuclear foci with snRNPs and hnRNPs, whereas no co-location was observed with RNA polymerase II, the non-RNP splicing factor SC35, the cleavage factor CStF and the PML protein. At electron microscopy the MBNL1-containing nuclear foci appeared as roundish domains showing a rather homogeneous structure and proved to contain snRNPs and hnRNPs. The sequestration of splicing factors involved in early phases of pre-mRNA processing supports the hypothesis of a general alteration in the maturation of several mRNAs, which could lead to the multiple pathological dysfunctions observed in dystrophic patients.

  14. Testosterone enables growth and hypertrophy in fusion impaired myoblasts that display myotube atrophy: deciphering the role of androgen and IGF-I receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David C; Stewart, Claire E; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Dugdale, Hannah F; Yousefian, Farzad; Lewis, Mark P; Sharples, Adam P

    2016-06-01

    We have previously highlighted the ability of testosterone (T) to improve differentiation and myotube hypertrophy in fusion impaired myoblasts that display reduced myotube hypertrophy via multiple population doublings (PD) versus their parental controls (CON); an observation which is abrogated via PI3K/Akt inhibition (Deane et al. 2013). However, whether the most predominant molecular mechanism responsible for T induced hypertrophy occurs directly via androgen receptor or indirectly via IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt pathway is currently debated. PD and CON C2C12 muscle cells were exposed to low serum conditions in the presence or absence of T (100 nM) ± inhibitors of AR (flutamide/F, 40 μm) and IGF-IR (picropodophyllin/PPP, 150 nM) for 72 h and 7 days (early/late muscle differentiation respectively). T increased AR and Akt abundance, myogenin gene expression, and myotube hypertrophy, but not ERK1/2 activity in both CON and PD cell types. Akt activity was not increased significantly in either cell type with T. Testosterone was also unable to promote early differentiation in the presence of IGF-IR inhibitor (PPP) yet still able to promote appropriate later increases in myotube hypertrophy and AR abundance despite IGF-IR inhibition. The addition of the AR inhibitor powerfully attenuated all T induced increases in differentiation and myotube hypertrophy with corresponding reductions in AR abundance, phosphorylated Akt, ERK1/2 and gene expression of IGF-IR, myoD and myogenin with increases in myostatin mRNA in both cell types. Interestingly, despite basally reduced differentiation and myotube hypertrophy, PD cells showed larger T induced increases in AR abundance vs. CON cells, a response abrogated in the presence of AR but not IGF-IR inhibitors. Furthermore, T induced increases in Akt abundance were sustained despite the presence of IGF-IR inhibition in PD cells only. Importantly, flutamide alone reduced IGF-IR mRNA in both cell types across time points, with an observed

  15. Human myoblast genome therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter K Law; Leo A Bockeria; Choong-Chin Liew; Danlin M Law; Ping Lu; Eugene KW Sim; Khawja H Haider; Lei Ye; Xun Li; Margarita N Vakhromeeva; Ilia I Berishvili

    2006-01-01

    Human Myoblast Genome Therapy (HMGT) is a platform technology of cell transplantation, nuclear transfer, and tissue engineering. Unlike stem cells, myoblasts are differentiated, immature cells destined to become muscles. Myoblasts cultured from satellite cells of adult muscle biopsies survive, develop, and function to revitalize degenerative muscles upon transplantation. Injection injury activates regeneration of host myofibers that fuse with the engrafted myoblasts, sharing their nuclei in a common gene pool of the syncytium. Thus, through nuclear transfer and complementation, the normal human genome can be transferred into muscles of patients with genetic disorders to achieve phenotype repair or disease prevention. Myoblasts are safe and efficient gene transfer vehicles endogenous to muscles that constitute 50% of body weight. Results of over 280 HMGT procedures on Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) subjects in the past 15 years demonstrated absolute safety. Myoblast-injected DMD muscles showed improved histology.Strength increase at 18 months post-operatively averaged 123%. In another application of HMGT on ischemic cardiomyopathy, the first human myoblast transfer into porcine myocardium revealed that it was safe and effective. Clinical trials on approximately 220 severe cardiomyopathy patients in 15 countries showed a <10% mortality. Most subjects received autologous cells implanted on the epicardial surface during coronory artery bypass graft, or injected on the endomyocardial surface percutaneously through guiding catheters. Significant increases in left ventricular ejection fraction, wall thickness, and wall motion have been reported, with reduction in perfusion defective areas, angina, and shortness of breath. As a new modality of treatment for disease in the skeletal muscle or myocardium, HMGT emerged as safe and effective. Large randomized multi-center trials are under way to confirm these preliminary results. The future of HMGT is bright and exciting

  16. Binding of ADAM12, a marker of skeletal muscle regeneration, to the muscle-specific actin-binding protein, alpha -actinin-2, is required for myoblast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galliano, M F; Huet, C; Frygelius, J;

    2000-01-01

    differentiation. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that the muscle-specific alpha-actinin-2 strongly binds to the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12. In vitro binding assays with GST fusion proteins confirmed the specific interaction. The major binding site for alpha-actinin-2 was mapped to a short sequence in...

  17. Mechanical strain applied to human fibroblasts differentially regulates skeletal myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael R; Cao, Thanh V; Campbell, David H; Standley, Paul R

    2012-08-01

    Cyclic short-duration stretches (CSDS) such as those resulting from repetitive motion strain increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Myofascial release is a common technique used by clinicians that applies an acyclic long-duration stretch (ALDS) to muscle fascia to repair injury. When subjected to mechanical strain, fibroblasts within muscle fascia secrete IL-6, which has been shown to induce myoblast differentiation, essential for muscle repair. We hypothesize that fibroblasts subjected to ALDS following CSDS induce myoblast differentiation through IL-6. Fibroblast conditioned media and fibroblast-myoblast cocultures were used to test fibroblasts' ability to induce myoblast differentiation. The coculture system applies strain to fibroblasts only but still allows for diffusion of potential differentiation mediators to unstrained myoblasts on coverslips. To determine the role of IL-6, we utilized myoblast unicultures ± IL-6 (0-100 ng/ml) and cocultures ± α-IL-6 (0-200 μg/ml). Untreated uniculture myoblasts served as a negative control. After 96 h, coverslips (n = 6-21) were microscopically analyzed and quantified by blinded observer for differentiation endpoints: myotubes per square millimeter (>3 nuclei/cell), nuclei/myotube, and fusion efficiency (%nuclei within myotubes). The presence of fibroblasts and fibroblast conditioned media significantly enhanced myotube number (P release after repetitive strain increases myoblast differentiation and thus may improve muscle repair in vivo. Neutralization of IL-6 in coculture significantly reduced differentiation, suggesting fibroblast-IL-6 is necessary but not sufficient in this process. PMID:22678963

  18. The critical role of myostatin in differentiation of sheep myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chenxi [College of Life Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi (China); Xinjiang Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Urumqi (China); Li, Wenrong; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhang, Ning; He, Sangang; Huang, Juncheng [Xinjiang Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Urumqi (China); Laboratory of Grass-fed Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Agriculture, Urumqi (China); Animal Biotechnological Research Center, Xinjiang Academy of Animal Science, Urumqi (China); Ge, Yubin [The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, College of Life Science, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Liu, Mingjun, E-mail: xjlmj2004@yahoo.com.cn [Xinjiang Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Urumqi (China); Laboratory of Grass-fed Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Agriculture, Urumqi (China); Animal Biotechnological Research Center, Xinjiang Academy of Animal Science, Urumqi (China)

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of the effective and specific shRNA to knockdown MSTN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of MSTN reversibly suppressed myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knockdown of endogenous MSTN promoted ovine myoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSTN inhibits myogenic differentiation through down-regulation of MyoD and Myogenin and up-regulation of Smad3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provides a promise for the generation of transgenic sheep to improve meat productivity. -- Abstract: Myostatin [MSTN, also known as growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8)], is an inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth. Blockade of MSTN function has been reported to result in increased muscle mass in mice. However, its role in myoblast differentiation in farm animals has not been determined. In the present study, we sought to determine the role of MSTN in the differentiation of primary sheep myoblasts. We found that ectopic overexpression of MSTN resulted in lower fusion index in sheep myoblasts, which indicated the repression of myoblast differentiation. This phenotypic change was reversed by shRNA knockdown of the ectopically expressed MSTN in the cells. In contrast, shRNA knockdown of the endogenous MSTN resulted in induction of myogenic differentiation. Additional studies revealed that the induction of differentiation by knocking down the ectopically or endogenously expressed MSTN was accompanied by up-regulation of MyoD and myogenin, and down-regulation of Smad3. Our results demonstrate that MSTN plays critical role in myoblast differentiation in sheep, analogous to that in mice. This study also suggests that shRNA knockdown of MSTN could be a potentially promising approach to improve sheep muscle growth, so as to increase meat productivity.

  19. The critical role of myostatin in differentiation of sheep myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Identification of the effective and specific shRNA to knockdown MSTN. ► Overexpression of MSTN reversibly suppressed myogenic differentiation. ► shRNA knockdown of endogenous MSTN promoted ovine myoblast differentiation. ► MSTN inhibits myogenic differentiation through down-regulation of MyoD and Myogenin and up-regulation of Smad3. ► Provides a promise for the generation of transgenic sheep to improve meat productivity. -- Abstract: Myostatin [MSTN, also known as growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8)], is an inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth. Blockade of MSTN function has been reported to result in increased muscle mass in mice. However, its role in myoblast differentiation in farm animals has not been determined. In the present study, we sought to determine the role of MSTN in the differentiation of primary sheep myoblasts. We found that ectopic overexpression of MSTN resulted in lower fusion index in sheep myoblasts, which indicated the repression of myoblast differentiation. This phenotypic change was reversed by shRNA knockdown of the ectopically expressed MSTN in the cells. In contrast, shRNA knockdown of the endogenous MSTN resulted in induction of myogenic differentiation. Additional studies revealed that the induction of differentiation by knocking down the ectopically or endogenously expressed MSTN was accompanied by up-regulation of MyoD and myogenin, and down-regulation of Smad3. Our results demonstrate that MSTN plays critical role in myoblast differentiation in sheep, analogous to that in mice. This study also suggests that shRNA knockdown of MSTN could be a potentially promising approach to improve sheep muscle growth, so as to increase meat productivity.

  20. Oncostatin M inhibits myoblast differentiation and regulates muscle regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Xiao; Haixia Wang; Xinrong Fu; Yanfeng Li; Kewei Ma; Luguo Sun; Xiang Gao; Zhenguo Wu

    2011-01-01

    Oncostatin M(OSM)is a cytokine of the interleukin-6 family and plays important roles during inflammation.However,its roles in myoblast differentiation and muscle regeneration remain unexplored.We show here that OSM potently inhibited myoblast differentiation mainly by activating the JAKI/STAT1/STAT3 pathway.OSM downregulated myocyte enhancer-binding factor 2A (MEF2A),upregulated the expression of Idl and Id2,and inhibited the transcriptional activity of MyoD and MEF2.In addition,OSM also enhanced the expression of STAT3 and OSM receptor,which constituted a positive feedback loop to further amplify OSM-induced signaling.Moreover,we found that STAT1 physically associated with MEF2 and repressed its transcriptional activity,which could account for the OSM-mediated repression of MEF2.Although undetectable in normal muscles in vivo,OSM was rapidly induced on muscle injury and then promptly downregulated just before the majority of myoblasts differentiate.Prolonged expression of OSM in muscles compromised the regeneration process without affecting myoblast proliferation,suggesting that OSM functions to prevent proliferating myoblasts from premature differentiation during the early phase of muscle regeneration.

  1. Chromium Picolinate did not Effect on the Proliferation and Differentiation of Myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Tsa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This experiment is conducted in vitro to investigate trivalent chromium picolinate affects the proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. A myoblasts cell line (C2C12 from rats was used in the experiment. These were randomly divided into the control group, the Pic group (50ppb picolinate and the CrPic group (50ppb chromium picolinate. The differentiation of myoblasts reveals that the number of differentiated myotubes, creatine kinase (CK activity and the aldolase (ALB activity do not differ among the three groups (P > 0.05. The activity of hexokinase in the CrPic and Pic groups clearly exceeds that in the control group (P 0.05. Myoblast proliferation was the same across the three groups (P > 0.05, and the quantity of DNA in the control group exceeded that in the Pic group (P < 0.05. The experiment indicated that 200ppb chromium picolinate did not influence the proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts.

  2. c-Myb inhibits myoblast fusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpar, Petr; Ilenčíková, Kristina; Zíková, Martina; Horvath, Ondrej; Čermák, Vladimír; Bartůněk, Petr; Strnad, Hynek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2013), e76742. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/2133 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : c-Myb * muscle cell differentiation * satellite cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  3. Enhancement of myoblast microencapsulation for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anna Aihua; Shen, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Cirone, Pasquale; Potter, Murray; Chang, Patricia L

    2006-05-01

    -microcapsules. In conclusion, enhancement of APA microcapsules with growth factors and collagen did not adversely affect their permeability property and therapeutic efficacy. However, the enhanced differentiation and viability of the encapsulated myoblasts in vivo should be advantageous for long-term delivery with this method of gene therapy. PMID:16470809

  4. Heat shock pretreatment enhances porcine myoblasts survival after autotransplantation in intact skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Myoblast transplantation (MT) is a cell-based gene therapy treatment, representing a potential treat-ment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), cardiac failure and muscle trauma. The rapid and mas-sive death of transplanted cells after MT is considered as a major hurdle which limits the efficacy of MT treatment. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are overexpressed when cells undergo various insults. HSPs have been described to protect cells in vivo and in vitro against diverse insults. The aim of our study is to investigate whether HSP overexpression could increase myoblast survival after autotransplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle. HSP expression was induced by warming the cells at 42℃ for 1 h. HSP70 expression was quantified by Western blot and flow cytometry 24 h after the treatment. To investigate the myogenic characteristics of myoblasts, desmin and CD56 were analysed by Western blot and flow cytometry; and the fusion index was measured. We also quantified cell survival after autologous transplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle and followed cell integration. Results showed that heat shock treatment of myoblasts induced a significative overexpression of the HSP70 (P < 0.01) without loss of their myogenic characteristics as assessed by FACS and fusion index. In vivo (n=7), the myoblast survival rate was not significantly different at 24 h between heat shock treated and non- treated cells (67.69% ± 8.35% versus 58.79% ± 8.35%, P > 0.05). However, the myoblast survival rate in the heat shocked cells increased by twofold at 48 h (53.32% ± 8.22% versus 28.27% ± 6.32%, P < 0.01) and more than threefold at 120 h (26.33% ± 5.54% versus 8.79% ± 2.51%, P < 0.01). Histological analy-sis showed the presence of non-heat shocked and heat shocked donor myoblasts fused with host myoblasts. These results suggested that heat shock pretreatment increased the HSP70 expression in porcine myoblasts, and improved the survival rate after autologous transplantation

  5. Heat shock pretreatment enhances porcine myoblasts survival after autotransplantation in intact skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Sheng; Thomas LAUMONIER; Jacques MENETREY

    2007-01-01

    Myoblast transplantation (MT) is a cell-based gene therapy treatment, representing a potential treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), cardiac failure and muscle trauma. The rapid and massive death of transplanted cells after MT is considered as a major hurdle which limits the efficacy of MT treatment. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are overexpressed when cells undergo various insults. HSPs have been described to protect cells in vivo and in vitro against diverse insults. The aim of our study is to investigate whether HSP overexpression could increase myoblast survival after autotransplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle. HSP expression was induced by warming the cells at 42℃ for 1 h. HSP70 expression was quantified by Western blot and flow cytometry 24 h after the treatment. To investigate the myogenic characteristics of myoblasts, desmin and CD56 were analysed by Western blot and flow cytometry; and the fusion index was measured. We also quantified cell survival after autologous transplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle and followed cell integration. Results showed that heat shock treatment of myoblasts induced a significative overexpression of the HSP70 (P<0.01) without loss of their myogenic characteristics as assessed by FACS and fusion index. In vivo (n=7), the myoblast survival rate was not significantly different at 24 h between heat shock treated and nontreated cells (67.69%±8.35% versus 58.79%±8.35%, P>0.05). However, the myoblast survival rate in the heat shocked cells increased by twofold at 48 h (53.32%±8.22% versus 28.27%±6.32%, P<0.01)and more than threefold at 120 h (26.33%±5.54% versus 8.79%±2.51%, P<0.01). Histological analysis showed the presence of non-heat shocked and heat shocked donor myoblasts fused with host myoblasts. These results suggested that heat shock pretreatment increased the HSP70 expression in porcine myoblasts, and improved the survival rate after autologous transplantation. Therefore, heat shock

  6. Myoblast transplantation can repair heart damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan Dinsmore; Nabil Dib

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration is an exciting new frontier for the treatment of heart disease. Many approaches are currently being tested. The use of autologous skeletal myoblasts has been the earliest, with over 10 years of research having been conducted.Current progress in the area of skeletal myoblasts for cardiac regeneration is presented. Reviewed is work from both pre-clinical and clinical studies. Work in this area continues to progress and definitive studies to assess efficacy of myoblasts for heart failure either have been initiated or will be initiated shortly. One result that is clear is that myoblasts can survive and form myotubes and myofibers in the area of myocardial infarction. In the early clinical trials, arrhythmia was a concern. However, further studies have shown that the risk was assumed prematurely based on limited human studies. Myoblasts, therefore, provide a highly promising treatment for heart disease. (J Geriatr Cardiol 2006;3 :168-70.)

  7. Modulation of alignment and differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by submicron ridges/grooves surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Yuan; Yu, Hung-Te; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2010-06-01

    Alignment and fusion of myoblasts into parallel arrays of multinucleated myotubes are critical in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. It is well known that contact guidance by grooves/ridges structures induces myoblasts to align and to migrate along the anisotropic direction. In this study, two series of grooved substrata with different widths (450 and 900 nm) and different depths (100, 350, and 550 nm) were studied on their effects on myoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into myotubes. We found that C2C12 cells were aligned and elongated along the direction of grooves. Groove depth was more influential on cellular morphology, proliferation, and differentiation than groove width. While cell proliferation was retarded on the grooved surfaces especially on the substrate with 900/550 nm (width/depth), differentiation was also enhanced on the patterned surfaces compared to the flat control. Our results demonstrated the potential of grooved substrata with submicron scale in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. PMID:20148416

  8. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  9. Lifestyle-Related Diseases Affect Surgical Outcomes after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Hyperlipidemia (HL) and hypertension (HT) lead to systemic atherosclerosis. Not only atherosclerosis but also bone fragility and/or low bone mineral density result from diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to examine whether these lifestyle-related diseases affected surgical outcomes after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Methods The subjects comprised 122 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF for degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The clinical results were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score before surgery and at 2 years postoperatively. The fusion status was graded as union in situ, collapsed union, or nonunion at 2 years after surgery. The abdominal aorta calcification (AAC) score was assessed using preoperative lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine. Results HL did not significantly affect the JOA score recovery rate. On the other hand, HT and CKD (stage 3 to 4) had a significant adverse effect on the recovery rate. The recovery rate was also lower in the DM group than in the non-DM group, but the difference was not significant. The AAC score was negatively correlated with the JOA score recovery rate. The fusion status was not significantly affected by HL, HT, DM, or CKD; however, the AAC score was significantly higher in the collapsed union and nonunion group than in the union in situ group. Conclusions At 2 years after PLIF, the presence of HT, CKD, and AAC was associated with significantly worse clinical outcomes, and advanced AAC significantly affected fusion status. PMID:26835195

  10. Utilization of myoblasts from transgenic mice to evaluate the efficacy of myoblast transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, I; Huard, J; Tremblay, J P

    1994-09-01

    A possible treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the injection of normal myoblasts into dystrophic muscles to induce the formation of new, healthy, and dystrophin-positive muscle fibers. To develop this therapy, it is important to identify the muscle fibers formed by the injected myoblasts in the host muscles. In this study, we used myoblasts from transgenic mice which have a gene expressing beta-galactosidase under the control of the promoter of quail fast skeletal muscle troponin I. This transgene is expressed in myotubes and muscle fibers, but not in myoblasts. Twenty-eight days after myoblast transplantation in nude and in mdx mice, muscle fibers containing of beta-galactosidase were identified by x-gal staining. In mdx mice, most of the beta-galactosidase-positive muscle fibers resulting from the myoblast transplantation were also dystrophin positive. This technique could make it possible to follow the success of myoblast transplantation even in mice that are not depleted of dystrophin. PMID:8065399

  11. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Ronzone

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  12. Ghrelin stimulates myogenic differentiation in a mouse muscle satellite cell line and in primary cultures of bovine myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Flores, D; Mora, O; Tamariz, E; González-Dávalos, L; González-Gallardo, A; Antaramian, A; Shimada, A; Varela-Echavarría, A; Romano-Muñoz, J L

    2012-08-01

    Ghrelin is an acylated hormone that influences food intake, energy metabolism and reproduction, among others. Ghrelin may also stimulate proliferating myoblast cell differentiation and multinucleated myotube fusion. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of human ghrelin (hGHRL) and human ghrelin fragment 1-18 (hGHRL1-18) on myoblast differentiation by means of mRNA expression and protein level. Two types of cells were tested, the cell line i28 obtained from mouse skeletal muscle and primary cultures of bovine myoblasts. Both ghrelin and its N-terminal fragment hGHRL1-18 were used at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nm. Treatments were applied to pre-confluent cultures and were maintained for 4 days. We determined that between 0.1 and 100 nm, hGHRL and hGRHL1-18 had similar effects on myogenic differentiation of i28 cells (p < 0.01). On the other hand, only the higher concentrations (10 and 100 nm) of hGHRL stimulated bovine myoblast differentiation. These results could be attributed to the presence, in both i28 cells and in bovine myoblasts, of the mRNA for GHS-R1a and CD36 receptors. The use of ghrelin in livestock production is still questionable because of the limited effects shown in this study, and additional research is needed in this field. PMID:21777295

  13. Smad3 signaling is required for satellite cell function and myogenic differentiation of myoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojia Ge; Ravi Kambadur; Craig McFarlane; Anuradha Vajjala; Sudarsanareddy Lokireddy; Zhi Hui Ng; Chek Kun Tan; Nguan Soon Tan; Walter Wahli; Mridula Sharma

    2011-01-01

    TGF-β and myostatin are the two most important regulators of muscle growth.Both growth factors have been shown to signal through a Smad3-dependent pathway.However to date,the role of Smad3 in muscle growth and differentiation is not investigated.Here,we demonstrate that Smad3-null mice have decreased muscle mass and pronounced skeletal muscle atrophy.Consistent with this,we also find increased protein ubiquitination and elevated levels of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MuRF1 in muscle tissue isolated from Smad3-null mice.Loss of Smad3 also led to defective satellite cell (SC) functionality.Smad3-null SCs showed reduced propensity for self-renewal,which may lead to a progressive loss of SC number.Indeed,decreased SC number was observed in skeletal muscle from Smad3- null mice showing signs of severe muscle wasting.Further in vitro analysis of primary myoblast cultures identified that Smad3-nuil myoblasts exhibit impaired proliferation,differentiation and fusion,resulting in the formation of atrophied myotubes.A search for the molecular mechanism revealed that loss of Smad3 results in increased myostatin expression in Smad3-null muscle and myoblasts.Given that myostatin is a negative regulator,we hypothesize that increased myostatin levels are responsible for the atrophic phenotype in Smad3-null mice.Consistent with this theory,inactivation of myostatin in Smad3-null mice rescues the muscle atrophy phenotype.

  14. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells. PMID:26886589

  15. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cell Secreted IGF-1 Protects Myoblasts from the Negative Effect of Myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gehmert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin, a TGF-β family member, is associated with inhibition of muscle growth and differentiation and might interact with the IGF-1 signaling pathway. Since IGF-1 is secreted at a bioactive level by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs, these cells (ASCs provide a therapeutic option for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD. But the protective effect of stem cell secreted IGF-1 on myoblast under high level of myostatin remains unclear. In the present study murine myoblasts were exposed to myostatin under presence of ASCs conditioned medium and investigated for proliferation and apoptosis. The protective effect of IGF-1 was further examined by using IGF-1 neutralizing and receptor antibodies as well as gene silencing RNAi technology. MyoD expression was detected to identify impact of IGF-1 on myoblasts differentiation when exposed to myostatin. IGF-1 was accountable for 43.6% of the antiapoptotic impact and 48.8% for the proliferative effect of ASCs conditioned medium. Furthermore, IGF-1 restored mRNA and protein MyoD expression of myoblasts under risk. Beside fusion and transdifferentiation the beneficial effect of ASCs is mediated by paracrine secreted cytokines, particularly IGF-1. The present study underlines the potential of ASCs as a therapeutic option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other dystrophic muscle diseases.

  16. A Mutation Affecting the Regulation of a Seca-Lacz Fusion Defines a New Sec Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Riggs, P. D.; Derman, A. I.; Beckwith, J

    1988-01-01

    It was shown previously that the secA gene of Escherichia coli is derepressed in cells that have a defect in protein export. Here it is demonstrated that the β-galactosidase produced by a secA-lacZ gene fusion strain is regulated in the same way. Studies on the fusion strain reveal that the promoter or a site involved in regulation of the secA gene is located considerably upstream from the structural gene. The properties of the fusion strain provide a new selection for mutants that are defect...

  17. Amino acid changes within the E protein hinge region that affect dengue virus type 2 infectivity and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen mutant dengue viruses were engineered and used to identify AAs in the molecular hinge of the envelope protein that are critical to viral infection. Substitutions at Q52, A54, or E133 reduced infectivity in mammalian cells and altered the pH threshold of fusion. Mutations at F193, G266, I270, or G281 affected viral replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, but only I270W had reduced fusion activity. T280Y affected the pH threshold for fusion and reduced replication in C6/36 cells. Three different mutations at L135 were lethal in mammalian cells. Among them, L135G abrogated fusion and reduced replication in C6/36 cells, but only slightly reduced the mosquito infection rate. Conversely, L135W replicated well in C6/36 cells, but had the lowest mosquito infection rate. Possible interactions between hinge residues 52 and 277, or among 53, 135, 170, 186, 265, and 276 required for hinge function were discovered by sequence analysis to identify compensatory mutations.

  18. Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel and skeletal muscle myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wei; Zhang Li; Sun Liang; Wang Chengyue [Jinzhou Central Hospital, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Fan Ming; Liu Shuhong, E-mail: Weiwang_Ly@yahoo.com.c [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Academy of Military Medical Science, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel (HAH) and skeletal muscle myoblasts has been investigated for the first time in the present paper. Skeletal muscle myoblasts were separated from skeletons of rats and incubated with a HAH-containing culture medium. Cell morphology, hydrophilicity and cell adhesion of the HAH scaffold were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Hoechest33258 fluorescent staining, the immunocytochemistry method and water adsorption rate measurement. It was found that at a proper concentration (around 0.5%) of hyaluronic acid, the hydrogel possessed good compatibility with skeletal muscle myoblasts. The hydrogel can create a three-dimensional structure for the growth of skeletal muscle myoblasts and benefit cell attachment to provide a novel scaffold material for the tissue engineering of skeletal muscle.

  19. Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel and skeletal muscle myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel (HAH) and skeletal muscle myoblasts has been investigated for the first time in the present paper. Skeletal muscle myoblasts were separated from skeletons of rats and incubated with a HAH-containing culture medium. Cell morphology, hydrophilicity and cell adhesion of the HAH scaffold were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Hoechest33258 fluorescent staining, the immunocytochemistry method and water adsorption rate measurement. It was found that at a proper concentration (around 0.5%) of hyaluronic acid, the hydrogel possessed good compatibility with skeletal muscle myoblasts. The hydrogel can create a three-dimensional structure for the growth of skeletal muscle myoblasts and benefit cell attachment to provide a novel scaffold material for the tissue engineering of skeletal muscle.

  20. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  1. TAK-1/p38/nNFκB signaling inhibits myoblast differentiation by increasing levels of Activin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trendelenburg Anne

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal-muscle differentiation is required for the regeneration of myofibers after injury. The differentiation capacity of satellite cells is impaired in settings of old age, which is at least one factor in the onset of sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal-muscle mass and major cause of frailty. One important cause of impaired regeneration is increased levels of transforming growth factor (TGF-β accompanied by reduced Notch signaling. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are also upregulated in aging, which led us hypothesize that they might potentially contribute to impaired regeneration in sarcopenia. Thus, in this study, we further analyzed the muscle differentiation-inhibition pathway mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human skeletal muscle cells (HuSKMCs. Methods We studied the modulation of HuSKMC differentiation by the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1α and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α The grade of differentiation was determined by either imaging (fusion index or creatine kinase (CK activity, a marker of muscle differentiation. Secretion of TGF-β proteins during differentiation was assessed by using a TGF-β-responsive reporter-gene assay and further identified by means of pharmacological and genetic inhibitors. In addition, signaling events were monitored by western blotting and reverse transcription PCR, both in HuSKMC cultures and in samples from a rat sarcopenia study. Results The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and TNF-α block differentiation of human myoblasts into myotubes. This anti-differentiation effect requires activation of TGF-β-activated kinase (TAK-1. Using pharmacological and genetic inhibitors, the TAK-1 pathway could be traced to p38 and NFκB. Surprisingly, the anti-differentiation effect of the cytokines required the transcriptional upregulation of Activin A, which in turn acted through its established signaling pathway: ActRII/ALK/SMAD. Inhibition of Activin A signaling was

  2. Isolation of human foetal myoblasts and its application for microencapsulation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Anna Aihua; Bourgeois, Jacqueline; Potter, Murray; Chang, Patricia L

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Foetal cells secrete more growth factors, generate less immune response, grow and proliferate better than adult cells. These characteristics make them desirable for recombinant modification and use in microencapsulated cellular gene therapeutics. We have established a system in vitro to obtain a pure population of primary human foetal myoblasts under several rounds of selection with non-collagen coated plates and identified by desmin staining. These primary myoblasts presented good p...

  3. Reversal of Myoblast Aging by Tocotrienol Rich Fraction Posttreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jye Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle satellite cells are heavily involved in the regeneration of skeletal muscle in response to the aging-related deterioration of the skeletal muscle mass, strength, and regenerative capacity, termed as sarcopenia. This study focused on the effect of tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF on regenerative capacity of myoblasts in stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS. The myoblasts was grouped as young control, SIPS-induced, TRF control, TRF pretreatment, and TRF posttreatment. Optimum dose of TRF, morphological observation, activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-galactosidase, and cell proliferation were determined. 50 μg/mL TRF treatment exhibited the highest cell proliferation capacity. SIPS-induced myoblasts exhibit large flattened cells and prominent intermediate filaments (senescent-like morphology. The activity of SA-β-galactosidase was significantly increased, but the proliferation capacity was significantly reduced as compared to young control. The activity of SA-β-galactosidase was significantly reduced and cell proliferation was significantly increased in the posttreatment group whereas there was no significant difference in SA-β-galactosidase activity and proliferation capacity of pretreatment group as compared to SIPS-induced myoblasts. Based on the data, we hypothesized that TRF may reverse the myoblasts aging through replenishing the regenerative capacity of the cells. However, further investigation on the mechanism of TRF in reversing the myoblast aging is needed.

  4. How Do Correlation and Variance of Base-Experts Affect Fusion in Biometric Authentication Tasks?

    OpenAIRE

    Poh, Norman; Bengio, Samy

    2005-01-01

    Combining multiple information sources such as subbands, streams (with different features) and multi modal data has shown to be a very promising trend, both in experiments and to some extend in real-life biometric authentication applications. Despite considerable efforts in fusions, there is a lack of understanding on the roles and effects of correlation and variance (of both the client and impostor scores of base-classifiers/experts). Often, scores are assumed to be independent. In this pape...

  5. Factors affecting the accurate placement of percutaneous pedicle screws during minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Moon-Chan; Chung, Hung-Tae; Cho, Jae-Lim; Kim, Dong-jun; Chung, Nam-Su

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated 488 percutaneous pedicle screws in 110 consecutive patients that had undergone minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) to determine the incidence of pedicle screw misplacement and its relevant risk factors. Screw placements were classified based on postoperative computed tomographic findings as “correct”, “cortical encroachment” or as “frank penetration”. Age, gender, body mass index, bone mineral density, diagnosis, operation time, esti...

  6. Change in viability of C2C12 myoblasts under compression, shear and oxidative challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ye; Yao, Yifei; Wong, Singwan; Bian, Liming; Mak, Arthur F T

    2016-05-24

    Skeletal and epidermal loadings can damage muscle cells and contribute to the development of deep tissue injury (DTI) - a severe kind of pressure ulcers affecting many people with disability. Important predisposing factors include the multiaxial stress and strain fields in the internal tissues, particularly the vulnerable muscles around bony prominences. A careful study of the mechanical damage thresholds for muscle cell death is critical not only to the understanding of the formation of DTI, but also to the design of various body support surfaces for prevention. In this paper, we measured the mechanical damage thresholds of C2C12 myoblasts under prescribed compressive strains (15% and 30%) and shear strains (from 0% to 100%), and studied how oxidative stress, as caused potentially by reperfusion or inflammation, may affect such damage thresholds. A flat plate was used to apply a uniform compressive strain and a radially increasing shear strain on disks of Gelatin-methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel with myoblasts encapsulated within. The percentages of cell death were estimated with propidium iodide (PI) and calcein AM staining. Results suggested that cell death depended on both the level and duration of the applied strain. There seemed to be a non-linear coupling between compression and shear. Muscle cells often need to function biomechanically in challenging oxidative environments. To study how oxidative stress may affect the mechanical damage thresholds of myoblasts, cell viability under compressive and shear strains was also studied after the cells were pre-treated for different durations (1h and 20h) with different concentrations (0.1mM and 0.5mM) of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress can either compromise or enhance the cellular resistance to shear damage, depending on the level and duration of the oxidative exposure. PMID:27017299

  7. MyoD regulates apoptosis of myoblasts through microRNA-mediated down-regulation of Pax3

    OpenAIRE

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Verma, Mayank; Watanabe, Shuichi; Tastad, Christopher; Asakura, Yoko; Asakura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    The molecules that regulate the apoptosis cascade are also involved in differentiation and syncytial fusion in skeletal muscle. MyoD is a myogenic transcription factor that plays essential roles in muscle differentiation. We noticed that MyoD−/− myoblasts display remarkable resistance to apoptosis by down-regulation of miR-1 (microRNA-1) and miR-206 and by up-regulation of Pax3. This resulted in transcriptional activation of antiapoptotic factors Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Forced MyoD expression induc...

  8. FOXO1 delays skeletal muscle regeneration and suppresses myoblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Hatazawa, Yukino; Hirose, Yuma; Ono, Yusuke; Kamei, Yasutomi

    2016-08-01

    Unloading stress, such as bed rest, inhibits the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. FOXO1 expression, which induces the upregulated expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and Gadd45α, is known to be increased in the skeletal muscle under unloading conditions. However, there is no report addressing FOXO1-induced inhibition of myoblast proliferation. Therefore, we induced muscle injury by cardiotoxin in transgenic mice overexpressing FOXO1 in the skeletal muscle (FOXO1-Tg mice) and observed regeneration delay in skeletal muscle mass and cross-sectional area in FOXO1-Tg mice. Increased p57 and Gadd45α mRNA levels, and decreased proliferation capacity were observed in C2C12 myoblasts expressing a tamoxifen-inducible active form of FOXO1. These results suggest that decreased proliferation capacity of myoblasts by FOXO1 disrupts skeletal muscle regeneration under FOXO1-increased conditions, such as unloading. PMID:27010781

  9. Concordant but Varied Phenotypes among Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient-Specific Myoblasts Derived using a Human iPSC-Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In Young; Lim, HoTae; Estrellas, Kenneth; Mula, Jyothi; Cohen, Tatiana V; Zhang, Yuanfan; Donnelly, Christopher J; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Kim, Yong Jun; Kim, Hyesoo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Hongmei Lisa; Hotta, Akitsu; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Maragakis, Nicholas; Wagner, Kathryn R; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) remains an intractable genetic disease. Althogh there are several animal models of DMD, there is no human cell model that carries patient-specific DYSTROPHIN mutations. Here, we present a human DMD model using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Our model reveals concordant disease-related phenotypes with patient-dependent variation, which are partially reversed by genetic and pharmacological approaches. Our "chemical-compound-based" strategy successfully directs hiPSCs into expandable myoblasts, which exhibit a myogenic transcriptional program, forming striated contractile myofibers and participating in muscle regeneration in vivo. DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts show disease-related phenotypes with patient-to-patient variability, including aberrant expression of inflammation or immune-response genes and collagens, increased BMP/TGFβ signaling, and reduced fusion competence. Furthermore, by genetic correction and pharmacological "dual-SMAD" inhibition, the DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts and genetically corrected isogenic myoblasts form "rescued" multi-nucleated myotubes. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a human "DMD-in-a-dish" model using hiPSC-based disease modeling. PMID:27239027

  10. Concordant but Varied Phenotypes among Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient-Specific Myoblasts Derived using a Human iPSC-Based Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD remains an intractable genetic disease. Althogh there are several animal models of DMD, there is no human cell model that carries patient-specific DYSTROPHIN mutations. Here, we present a human DMD model using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. Our model reveals concordant disease-related phenotypes with patient-dependent variation, which are partially reversed by genetic and pharmacological approaches. Our “chemical-compound-based” strategy successfully directs hiPSCs into expandable myoblasts, which exhibit a myogenic transcriptional program, forming striated contractile myofibers and participating in muscle regeneration in vivo. DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts show disease-related phenotypes with patient-to-patient variability, including aberrant expression of inflammation or immune-response genes and collagens, increased BMP/TGFβ signaling, and reduced fusion competence. Furthermore, by genetic correction and pharmacological “dual-SMAD” inhibition, the DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts and genetically corrected isogenic myoblasts form “rescued” multi-nucleated myotubes. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a human “DMD-in-a-dish” model using hiPSC-based disease modeling.

  11. File list: His.Myo.10.AllAg.Myoblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Myoblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Myoblasts hg19 All antigens Muscle Myoblasts SRX668234,SRX107284,S...RX341010,SRX1470542,SRX1470544,SRX1470545,SRX1470543,SRX107285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Myoblasts.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Myo.20.AllAg.Myoblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.AllAg.Myoblasts mm9 Histone Muscle Myoblasts SRX766229,SRX766228,SRX7662...26,SRX766225 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.20.AllAg.Myoblasts.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.Myoblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.Myoblasts mm9 TFs and others Muscle Myoblasts SRX030143,SRX497478,...4,SRX029143,SRX227233,SRX227231,SRX227229,SRX984580 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.Myoblasts.bed ...

  3. Induced Differentiation of Adipose-derived Stromal Cells into Myoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴桂珠; 郑秀; 江忠清; 王金华; 宋岩峰

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to induce the differentiation of isolated and purified adipose-derived stromal cells(ADSCs) into myoblasts,which may provide a new strategy for tissue engineering in patients with stress urinary incontinence(SUI).ADSCs,isolated and cultured ex vivo,were identified by flow cytometry and induced to differentiate into myoblasts in the presence of an induction solution consisting of DMEM supplemented with 5-azacytidine(5-aza),5% FBS,and 5% horse serum.Cellular morphology was observed under an i...

  4. Two Coiled-Coil Domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA Affect Membrane Fusion Events during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-me...

  5. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. PMID:27226547

  6. Cracking in fusion zone and heat affected zone of electron beam welded Inconel-713LC gas turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamanfar, A., E-mail: achamanfar@gmail.com [Département de Génie Mécanique, École de Technologie Supérieure, 1100 rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada); Jahazi, M. [Département de Génie Mécanique, École de Technologie Supérieure, 1100 rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada); Bonakdar, A.; Morin, E. [Siemens Canada Limited, 9545 Côte-de-Liesse, Dorval, Québec, Canada H9P 1A5 (Canada); Firoozrai, A. [Département de Génie Mécanique, École de Technologie Supérieure, 1100 rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 1K3 (Canada)

    2015-08-26

    Electron beam welding (EBW) of shrouds in Inconel-713LC low pressure gas turbine blades was associated with cracking in fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) leading to a high scrap rate in manufacturing of gas turbine blades. In this study, in order to develop a detailed map of cracks and understand the root cause of cracking, a comprehensive microstructural and numerical analysis was performed. The elemental mapping in scanning electron microscope (SEM)-energy dispersive spectral analysis revealed segregation of alloying elements in the cracked area of FZ and HAZ. In other words, one of the cracking mechanisms in FZ and HAZ was found to be segregation induced liquation and subsequent cracking due to thermal and mechanical tensile stresses generated during EBW. Cracking in FZ also occurred because of low strength of the solidifying weld metal as well as solidification contraction. As well, γ′ dissolution and reprecipitation in HAZ leading to decreased ductility and generation of contraction stresses was another mechanism for cracking in HAZ. The numerical model was capable to predict the cracking location as well as cracking orientation with respect to the weld line.

  7. Cracking in fusion zone and heat affected zone of electron beam welded Inconel-713LC gas turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam welding (EBW) of shrouds in Inconel-713LC low pressure gas turbine blades was associated with cracking in fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) leading to a high scrap rate in manufacturing of gas turbine blades. In this study, in order to develop a detailed map of cracks and understand the root cause of cracking, a comprehensive microstructural and numerical analysis was performed. The elemental mapping in scanning electron microscope (SEM)-energy dispersive spectral analysis revealed segregation of alloying elements in the cracked area of FZ and HAZ. In other words, one of the cracking mechanisms in FZ and HAZ was found to be segregation induced liquation and subsequent cracking due to thermal and mechanical tensile stresses generated during EBW. Cracking in FZ also occurred because of low strength of the solidifying weld metal as well as solidification contraction. As well, γ′ dissolution and reprecipitation in HAZ leading to decreased ductility and generation of contraction stresses was another mechanism for cracking in HAZ. The numerical model was capable to predict the cracking location as well as cracking orientation with respect to the weld line

  8. Chronic Hyperinsulinemia Increases Myoblast Proliferation in Fetal Sheep Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura D; Wesolowski, Stephanie R; Kailey, Jenai; Bourque, Stephanie; Wilson, Averi; Andrews, Sasha E; Hay, William W; Rozance, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    Insulin is an important fetal growth factor. However, chronic experimental hyperinsulinemia in the fetus fails to accelerate linear and lean mass growth beyond normal rates. Mechanisms preventing accelerated lean mass accretion during hyperinsulinemia are unknown. To address potential mechanisms, late-gestation fetal sheep were infused with iv insulin and glucose to produce euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (INS) or saline for 7-9 days. Fetal substrate uptake and protein metabolic rates were measured. INS fetuses had 1.5-fold higher insulin concentrations (P < .0001) and equivalent glucose concentrations. INS fetuses had 20% more Pax7(+) nuclei in the biceps femoris, which indicates the potential for hyperinsulinemia to increase the number of myoblasts within late-gestation fetal skeletal muscle. Additionally, the percentage of Pax7(+) myoblasts that expressed Ki-67 was 1.3-fold higher and expression of myogenic regulatory factors was 50% lower in INS fetuses (MYF5 and MYOG [myogenin], P < .005), which indicates a shift toward myoblast proliferation over differentiation. There were no differences for fetal body, organ, or muscle weights, although INS placentas weighed 28% less (P < .05). Protein synthesis and accretion rates did not change in INS fetuses, nor did fiber muscle size. Essential amino acid concentrations were lower in the INS group (P < .05) except for tryptophan. Umbilical blood flow, net total amino acids, and O2 uptakes rates did not differ between groups. Arterial O2 content was 33% lower (P < .005) and norepinephrine was 100% higher in the INS fetuses (P < .01), all of which are factors that may counteract fetal protein accretion during hyperinsulinemia despite an increase in myoblast proliferation. PMID:27049667

  9. Impaired hypertrophy in myoblasts is improved with testosterone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Colleen S; Hughes, David C; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Lewis, Mark P; Stewart, Claire E; Sharples, Adam P

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the ability of testosterone (T) to restore differentiation in multiple population doubled (PD) murine myoblasts, previously shown to have a reduced differentiation in monolayer and bioengineered skeletal muscle cultures vs. their parental controls (CON) (Sharples et al., 2011, 2012 [7,26]). Cells were exposed to low serum conditions in the presence or absence of T (100nM)±PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) for 72h and 7 days (early and late muscle differentiation respectively). Morphological analyses were performed to determine myotube number, diameter (μm) and myonuclear accretion as indices of differentiation and myotube hypertrophy. Changes in gene expression for myogenin, mTOR and myostatin were also performed. Myotube diameter in CON and PD cells increased from 17.32±2.56μm to 21.02±1.89μm and 14.58±2.66μm to 18.29±3.08μm (P≤0.05) respectively after 72h of T exposure. The increase was comparable in both PD (+25%) and CON cells (+21%) suggesting a similar intrinsic ability to respond to exogenous T administration. T treatment also significantly increased myonuclear accretion (% of myotubes expressing 5+ nuclei) in both cell types after 7 days exposure (P≤0.05). Addition of PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) in the presence of T attenuated these effects in myotube morphology (in both cell types) suggesting a role for the PI3K pathway in T stimulated hypertrophy. Finally, PD myoblasts showed reduced responsiveness to T stimulated mRNA expression of mTOR vs. CON cells and T also reduced myostatin expression in PD myoblasts only. The present study demonstrates testosterone administration improves hypertrophy in myoblasts that basally display impaired differentiation and hypertrophic capacity vs. their parental controls, the action of testosterone in this model was mediated by PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:23714396

  10. Intramuscular Transplantation of Human Postnatal Myoblasts Generates Functional Donor-Derived Satellite Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Skuk, Daniel; Paradis, Martin; Goulet, Marlyne; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Rothstein, David M.; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2010-01-01

    Myogenic cell transplantation is an experimental approach for the treatment of myopathies. In this approach, transplanted cells need to fuse with pre-existing myofibers, form new myofibers, and generate new muscle precursor cells (MPCs). The last property was fully reported following myoblast transplantation in mice but remains poorly studied with human myoblasts. In this study, we provide evidence that the intramuscular transplantation of postnatal human myoblasts in immunodeficient mice gen...

  11. Injection of porous polycaprolactone beads containing autologous myoblasts in a dog model of fecal incontinence

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Hye Seung; Lim, Jae-Young; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Sang Joon; Hong, Sa-Min; Jang, Je-Ho; Cho, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Sung-Min; Lee, Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have examined whether bioengineering can improve fecal incontinence. This study designed to determine whether injection of porous polycaprolactone beads containing autologous myoblasts improves sphincter function in a dog model of fecal incontinence. Methods The anal sphincter of dogs was injured and the dogs were observed without and with (n = 5) the injection of porous polycaprolactone beads containing autologous myoblasts into the site of injury. Autologous myoblasts pu...

  12. Nitric oxide donors, sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpencillamine, stimulate myoblast proliferation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulibarri, J. A.; Mozdziak, P. E.; Schultz, E.; Cook, C.; Best, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inter- and intracellular messenger involved in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. The effect of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and their effect on myoblast proliferation was examined. Both donors stimulated an increase in myoblast cell number over a range (1-10 microM) of donor concentrations. However, 50 microM SNAP inhibited myoblast proliferation. Cell numbers from cultures treated with degraded 10 microM SNAP were equivalent to the control. Therefore, it appears NO can stimulate as well as inhibit myoblast proliferation.

  13. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liguo; Lindsey M Hutt-Fletcher

    2007-01-01

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC-class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH reco...

  14. Efficient Restoration of the Dystrophin Gene Reading Frame and Protein Structure in DMD Myoblasts Using the CinDel Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyombe-Engembe, Jean-Paul; Ouellet, Dominique L; Barbeau, Xavier; Rousseau, Joël; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Lagüe, Patrick; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a great revolution in biology. This technology allows the modification of genes in vitro and in vivo in a wide variety of living organisms. In most Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, expression of dystrophin (DYS) protein is disrupted because exon deletions result in a frame shift. We present here the CRISPR-induced deletion (CinDel), a new promising genome-editing technology to correct the DMD gene. This strategy is based on the use of two gRNAs targeting specifically exons that precede and follow the patient deletion in the DMD gene. This pair of gRNAs induced a precise large additional deletion leading to fusion of the targeted exons. Using an adequate pair of gRNAs, the deletion of parts of these exons and the intron separating them restored the DMD reading frame in 62% of the hybrid exons in vitro in DMD myoblasts and in vivo in electroporated hDMD/mdx mice. Moreover, adequate pairs of gRNAs also restored the normal spectrin-like repeat of the dystrophin rod domain; such restoration is not obtained by exon skipping or deletion of complete exons. The expression of an internally deleted DYS protein was detected following the formation of myotubes by the unselected, treated DMD myoblasts. Given that CinDel induces permanent reparation of the DMD gene, this treatment would not have to be repeated as it is the case for exon skipping induced by oligonucleotides. PMID:26812655

  15. IGF-1 induces IP3 -dependent calcium signal involved in the regulation of myostatin gene expression mediated by NFAT during myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Juan A; Flores, Sylvia; Fuentes, Eduardo N; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Jaimovich, Enrique; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is a complex and highly regulated process characterized by cell cycle arrest, which is associated with morphological changes including myoblast alignment, elongation, and fusion into multinucleated myotubes. This is a balanced process dynamically coordinated by positive and negative signals such as the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) and myostatin (MSTN), respectively. In this study, we report that the stimulation of skeletal myoblasts during differentiation with IGF-1 induces a rapid and transient calcium increase from intracellular stores, which are principally mediated through the phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ)/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 )-dependent signaling pathways. This response was completely blocked when myoblasts were incubated with LY294002 or transfected with the dominant-negative p110 gamma, suggesting a fundamental role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in PLCγ activation. Additionally, we show that calcium released via IP3 and induced by IGF-1 stimulates NFAT-dependent gene transcription and nuclear translocation of the GFP-labeled NFATc3 isoform. This activation was independent of extracellular calcium influx and calcium release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR). Finally, we examined mstn mRNA levels and mstn promoter activity in myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents and in reporter activity, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A, 11R-VIVIT, and by inhibitors of the PI3Kγ, PLCγ, and IP3 receptor. Our results strongly suggest that IGF-1 regulates myostatin transcription through the activation of the NFAT transcription factor in an IP3 /calcium-dependent manner. This is the first study to demonstrate a role of calcium-dependent signaling pathways in the mRNA expression of myostatin. PMID:23255067

  16. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  17. Prostaglandin E2 promotes proliferation of skeletal muscle myoblasts via EP4 receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chenglin; Zhao, Ruonan; Vallejo, Julian; Igwe, Orisa; Bonewald, Lynda; Wetmore, Lori; Brotto, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that conditioned media (CM) from osteocytes enhances myogenic differentiation of myoblasts, suggesting that signaling from bone may be important for skeletal muscle myogenesis. The effect of CM was closely mimicked by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a bioactive lipid mediator in various physiological or pathological conditions. PGE2 is secreted at high levels by osteocytes and such secretion is further enhanced under loading conditions. Although four types of receptors, EP1 to EP4, mediate PGE2 signaling, it is unknown whether these receptors play a role in myogenesis. Therefore, in this study, the expression of EPs in mouse primary myoblasts was characterized, followed by examination of their roles in myoblast proliferation by treating myoblasts with PGE2 or specific agonists. All four PGE2 receptor mRNAs were detectable by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but only PGE2 and EP4 agonist CAY 10598 significantly enhance myoblast proliferation. EP1/EP3 agonist 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 (17-PT PGE2) and EP2 agonist butaprost did not have any significant effects. Moreover, treatment with EP4 antagonist L161,982 dose-dependently inhibited myoblast proliferation. These results were confirmed by cell cycle analysis and the gene expression of cell cycle regulators. Concomitant with the inhibition of myoblast proliferation, treatment with L161,982 significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Cotreatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or sodium ascorbate (SA) successfully reversed the inhibition of myoblast proliferation and ROS overproduction caused by L161,982. Therefore, PGE2 signaling via the EP4 receptor regulates myogenesis by promoting myoblast proliferation and blocking this receptor results in increased ROS production in myoblasts. PMID:25785867

  18. p75NTR-mediated signaling promotes the survival of myoblasts and influences muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddypalli, Shailaja; Roll, Kristin; Lee, Hyung-Kook; Lundell, Martha; Barea-Rodriguez, Edwin; Wheeler, Esther F

    2005-09-01

    During muscle development, the p75(NTR) is expressed transiently on myoblasts. The temporal expression pattern of the receptor raises the possibility that the receptor is influencing muscle development. To test this hypothesis, p75(NTR)-deficient mutant mice were tested for muscle strength by using a standard wire gripe strength test and were found to have significantly decreased strength relative to that of normal mice. When normal mybolasts were examined in vivo for expression of NGF receptors, p75(NTR) was detected on myoblasts but the high affinity NGF receptor, trk A, was not co-expressed with p75(NTR). In vitro, proliferating C2C12 and primary myoblasts co-expressed the p75(NTR) and MyoD, but immunofluorescent analysis of primary myoblasts and RT-PCR analysis of C2C12 mRNA revealed that myoblasts were devoid of trk A. In contrast to the cell death functions that characterize the p75(NTR) in neurons, p75(NTR)-positive primary and C2C12 myoblasts did not differentiate or undergo apoptosis in response to neurotrophins. Rather, myoblasts survived and even proliferated when grown at subconfluent densities in the presence of the neurotrophins. Furthermore, when myoblasts treated with NGF were lysed and immunoprecipitated with antibodies against phosphorylated I-kappaB and AKT, the cells contained increased levels of both phospho-proteins, both of which promote cell survival. By contrast, neurotrophin-treated myoblasts did not induce phosphorylation of Map Kinase p42/44 or p38, indicating the survival was not mediated by the trk A receptor. Taken together, the data indicate that the p75(NTR) mediates survival of myoblasts prior to differentiation and that the activity of this receptor during myogenesis is important for developing muscle. PMID:15754321

  19. Effects of 1,25(OH)2 D3 and 25(OH)D3 on C2C12 Myoblast Proliferation, Differentiation, and Myotube Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meijden, K; Bravenboer, N; Dirks, N F; Heijboer, A C; den Heijer, M; de Wit, G M J; Offringa, C; Lips, P; Jaspers, R T

    2016-11-01

    An adequate vitamin D status is essential to optimize muscle strength. However, whether vitamin D directly reduces muscle fiber atrophy or stimulates muscle fiber hypertrophy remains subject of debate. A mechanism that may affect the role of vitamin D in the regulation of muscle fiber size is the local conversion of 25(OH)D to 1,25(OH)2 D by 1α-hydroxylase. Therefore, we investigated in a murine C2C12 myoblast culture whether both 1,25(OH)2 D3 and 25(OH)D3 affect myoblast proliferation, differentiation, and myotube size and whether these cells are able to metabolize 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2 D3 . We show that myoblasts not only responded to 1,25(OH)2 D3 , but also to the precursor 25(OH)D3 by increasing their VDR mRNA expression and reducing their proliferation. In differentiating myoblasts and myotubes 1,25(OH)2 D3 as well as 25(OH)D3 stimulated VDR mRNA expression and in myotubes 1,25(OH)2 D3 also stimulated MHC mRNA expression. However, this occurred without notable effects on myotube size. Moreover, no effects on the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway as well as MyoD and myogenin mRNA levels were observed. Interestingly, both myoblasts and myotubes expressed CYP27B1 and CYP24 mRNA which are required for vitamin D3 metabolism. Although 1α-hydroxylase activity could not be shown in myotubes, after treatment with 1,25(OH)2 D3 or 25(OH)D3 myotubes showed strongly elevated CYP24 mRNA levels compared to untreated cells. Moreover, myotubes were able to convert 25(OH)D3 to 24R,25(OH)2 D3 which may play a role in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. These data suggest that skeletal muscle is not only a direct target for vitamin D3 metabolites, but is also able to metabolize 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2 D3 . J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2517-2528, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018098

  20. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kishimoto, Koshi N., E-mail: kishimoto@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Kaneko, Kazuo [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Itoi, Eiji [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  1. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. → The expression of C/EBPβ, α and PPARγ were increased under hypoxia. → Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) β, α and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) γ were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  2. Osmotic and curvature stress affect PEG-induced fusion of lipid vesicles but not mixing of their lipids.

    OpenAIRE

    Malinin, Vladimir S.; Frederik, Peter; Lentz, Barry R

    2002-01-01

    Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) in the external environment of membrane vesicles creates osmotic imbalance that leads to mechanical stress in membranes and may induce local membrane curvature. To determine the relative importance of membrane stress and curvature in promoting fusion, we monitored contents mixing (CM) and lipid mixing (LM) between different sized vesicles under a variety of osmotic conditions. CM between highly curved vesicles (SUV, 26 nm diameter) was up to 10 times greater than ...

  3. DNA replication timing is maintained genome-wide in primary human myoblasts independent of D4Z4 contraction in FSH muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Pope

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is linked to contraction of an array of tandem 3.3-kb repeats (D4Z4 at 4q35.2 from 11-100 copies to 1-10 copies. The extent to which D4Z4 contraction at 4q35.2 affects overall 4q35.2 chromatin organization remains unclear. Because DNA replication timing is highly predictive of long-range chromatin interactions, we generated genome-wide replication-timing profiles for FSHD and control myogenic precursor cells. We compared non-immortalized myoblasts from four FSHD patients and three control individuals to each other and to a variety of other human cell types. This study also represents the first genome-wide comparison of replication timing profiles in non-immortalized human cell cultures. Myoblasts from both control and FSHD individuals all shared a myoblast-specific replication profile. In contrast, male and female individuals were readily distinguished by monoallelic differences in replication timing at DXZ4 and other regions across the X chromosome affected by X inactivation. We conclude that replication timing is a robust cell-type specific feature that is unaffected by FSHD-related D4Z4 contraction.

  4. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs

  5. The effect of acute microgravity on mechanically-induced membrane damage and membrane-membrane fusion events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Feeback, D. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". Both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion characterize this response. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  6. Identification of gene expression modifications in myostatin-stimulated myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myostatin belongs to the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and has been shown to function as an inhibitor of skeletal muscle proliferation and differentiation. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of myostatin function during myogenesis, differential display reverse transcription PCR was employed to identify altered gene expressions associated with myostatin inhibitory function in chicken fetal myoblasts (CFMs). In this work, we have identified seven up-regulated and 12 down-regulated genes in myostatin stimulated CFMs. Those genes are involved in myogenic differentiation, cell architecture, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and apoptosis. The down-regulation of muscle creatine kinase B, troponin C, and myosin regulatory light chain is in agreement with the myostatin negative role in myocyte differentiation. In addition, the expression alteration of skeletal muscle-specific cardiac ankyrin repeat protein and the bcl-2 related anti-apoptotic protein Nr-13 suggests possible unique roles for myostatin in regulating myogenesis by controlling cofactors participated transcriptional regulation and apoptosis

  7. Myostatin acts as an autocrine/paracrine negative regulator in myoblast differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► iPS-derived cells express myostatin and its receptor upon myoblast differentiation. ► Myostatin inhibits myoblast differentiation by inhibiting MyoD and Myo5a induction. ► Silencing of myostatin promotes differentiation of human iPS cells into myoblasts. -- Abstract: Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor (GDF-8), regulates proliferation of muscle satellite cells, and suppresses differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes via down-regulation of key myogenic differentiation factors including MyoD. Recent advances in stem cell biology have enabled generation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells, but it remains to be clarified whether myostatin is also involved in regulation of artificial differentiation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells. Here we show that the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells that were induced to differentiate into myoblasts expressed myostatin and its receptor during the differentiation. An addition of recombinant human myostatin (rhMyostatin) suppressed induction of MyoD and Myo5a, resulting in significant suppression of myoblast differentiation. The rhMyostatin treatment also inhibited proliferation of the cells at a later phase of differentiation. RNAi-mediated silencing of myostatin promoted differentiation of human iPS-derived embryoid body (EB) cells into myoblasts. These results strongly suggest that myostatin plays an important role in regulation of myoblast differentiation from iPS cells of human origin. The present findings also have significant implications for potential regenerative medicine for muscular diseases

  8. The prelamin A pre-peptide induces cardiac and skeletal myoblast differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelamin A processing is unique amongst mammalian proteins and results in the production of a farnesylated and carboxymethylated peptide. We examined the effect of pathogenic LMNA mutations on prelamin A processing, and of the covalently modified peptide on cardiac and skeletal myoblast differentiation. Here we report a mutation associated with dilated cardiomyopathy prevents prelamin A peptide production. In addition, topical application of the covalently modified C-terminal peptide to proliferating skeletal and cardiac myoblasts induced myotube and striated tissue formation, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that skeletal and cardiac myoblasts are the first cell lines examined to contain unprocessed prelamin A, and immunostaining of peptide-treated cells revealed a previously unidentified role for prelamin A in cytoskeleton formation and intercellular organization. These results demonstrate a direct role for prelamin A in myoblast differentiation and indicate the prelamin A peptide may have therapeutic potential

  9. Glycogenome expression dynamics during mouse C2C12 myoblast differentiation suggests a sequential reorganization of membrane glycoconjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dupuy Fabrice

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several global transcriptomic and proteomic approaches have been applied in order to obtain new molecular insights on skeletal myogenesis, but none has generated any specific data on glycogenome expression, and thus on the role of glycan structures in this process, despite the involvement of glycoconjugates in various biological events including differentiation and development. In the present study, a quantitative real-time RT-PCR technology was used to profile the dynamic expression of 375 glycogenes during the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. Results Of the 276 genes expressed, 95 exhibited altered mRNA expression when C2C12 cells differentiated and 37 displayed more than 4-fold up- or down-regulations. Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Component Analysis of the expression dynamics identified three groups of coordinately and sequentially regulated genes. The first group included 12 down-regulated genes, the second group four genes with an expression peak at 24 h of differentiation, and the last 21 up-regulated genes. These genes mainly encode cell adhesion molecules and key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids (neolactoseries, lactoseries and ganglioseries, providing a clearer indication of how the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix may be modified prior to cell fusion. In particular, an increase in the quantity of ganglioside GM3 at the cell surface of myoblasts is suggestive of its potential role during the initial steps of myogenic differentiation. Conclusion For the first time, these results provide a broad description of the expression dynamics of glycogenes during C2C12 differentiation. Among the 37 highly deregulated glycogenes, 29 had never been associated with myogenesis. Their biological functions suggest new roles for glycans in skeletal myogenesis.

  10. Elastic hydrogel substrate supports robust expansion of murine myoblasts and enhances their engraftment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Ke, E-mail: dk1118@yeah.net [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital, Chengdu 610072 (China); Yang, Zhong [Department of Clinical Hematology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xu, Jian-zhong, E-mail: xjzspine@163.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Liu, Wen-ying; Zeng, Qiang; Hou, Fang [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital, Chengdu 610072 (China); Lin, Sen [Department of Anatomy and Histology & Embryology, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610500 (China)

    2015-09-10

    The application of satellite cell-derived myoblasts in regenerative medicine has been restricted by the rapid loss of stemness during in vitro cell expansion using traditional culture systems. However, studies published in the past decade have highlighted the influence of substrate elasticity on stem cell fate and revealed that culture on a soft hydrogel substrate can promote self-renewal and prolong the regenerative potential of muscle stem cells. Whether hydrogel substrates have similar effects after long-term robust expansion remains to be determined. Herein we prepared an elastic chitosan/beta-glycerophosphate/collagen hydrogel mimicking the soft microenvironment of muscle tissues for use as the substrate for satellite cell culture and investigated its influence on long-term cell expansion. After 20 passages in culture, satellite cell-derived myoblasts cultured on our hydrogel substrate exhibited significant improvements in proliferation capability, cell viability, colony forming frequency, and potential for myogenic differentiation compared to those cultured on a routine rigid culture surface. Immunochemical staining and western blot analysis both confirmed that myoblasts cultured on the hydrogel substrate expressed higher levels of several differentiation-related markers, including Pax7, Pax3, and SSEA-1, and a lower level of MyoD compared to myoblasts cultured on rigid culture plates (all p<0.05). After transplantation into the tibialis anterior of nude mice, myoblasts that had been cultured on the hydrogel substrate demonstrated a significantly greater engraftment efficacy than those cultured on the traditional surface. Collectively, these results indicate that the elastic hydrogel substrate supported robust expansion of murine myoblasts and enhanced their engraftment in vivo. - Highlights: • An elastic hydrogel was designed to mimic the pliable muscle tissue microenvironment. • Myoblasts retained their stemness in long-term culture on the elastic

  11. Elastic hydrogel substrate supports robust expansion of murine myoblasts and enhances their engraftment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of satellite cell-derived myoblasts in regenerative medicine has been restricted by the rapid loss of stemness during in vitro cell expansion using traditional culture systems. However, studies published in the past decade have highlighted the influence of substrate elasticity on stem cell fate and revealed that culture on a soft hydrogel substrate can promote self-renewal and prolong the regenerative potential of muscle stem cells. Whether hydrogel substrates have similar effects after long-term robust expansion remains to be determined. Herein we prepared an elastic chitosan/beta-glycerophosphate/collagen hydrogel mimicking the soft microenvironment of muscle tissues for use as the substrate for satellite cell culture and investigated its influence on long-term cell expansion. After 20 passages in culture, satellite cell-derived myoblasts cultured on our hydrogel substrate exhibited significant improvements in proliferation capability, cell viability, colony forming frequency, and potential for myogenic differentiation compared to those cultured on a routine rigid culture surface. Immunochemical staining and western blot analysis both confirmed that myoblasts cultured on the hydrogel substrate expressed higher levels of several differentiation-related markers, including Pax7, Pax3, and SSEA-1, and a lower level of MyoD compared to myoblasts cultured on rigid culture plates (all p<0.05). After transplantation into the tibialis anterior of nude mice, myoblasts that had been cultured on the hydrogel substrate demonstrated a significantly greater engraftment efficacy than those cultured on the traditional surface. Collectively, these results indicate that the elastic hydrogel substrate supported robust expansion of murine myoblasts and enhanced their engraftment in vivo. - Highlights: • An elastic hydrogel was designed to mimic the pliable muscle tissue microenvironment. • Myoblasts retained their stemness in long-term culture on the elastic

  12. High efficiency of muscle regeneration after human myoblast clone transplantation in SCID mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Huard, J.; Verreault, S; Roy, R; Tremblay, M; Tremblay, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    SCID mouse tibialis anterior muscles were first irradiated to prevent regeneration by host myoblasts and injected with notexin to damage the muscle fibers and trigger regeneration. The muscles were then injected with roughly 5 million human myoblasts. 1 mo later, 16-33% of the normal number of muscle fibers were present in the injected muscle, because of incomplete regeneration. However, > 90% of these muscle fibers contained human dystrophin. Some newly formed muscle fibers had an accumulati...

  13. Development of Approaches to Improve Cell Survival in Myoblast Transfer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Zhuqing; Balkir, Levent; Judith C T van Deutekom; Robbins, Paul D.; Pruchnic, Ryan; Huard, Johnny

    1998-01-01

    Myoblast transplantation has been extensively studied as a gene complementation approach for genetic diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. This approach has been found capable of delivering dystrophin, the product missing in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy muscle, and leading to an increase of strength in the dystrophic muscle. This approach, however, has been hindered by numerous limitations, including immunological problems, and low spread and poor survival of the injected myoblasts. We...

  14. Restoration of anal sphincter function after myoblast cell therapy in incontinent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Aurélie; Fréret, Manuel; Drouot, Laurent; Jean, Laetitia; Le Corre, Stéphanie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Doucet, Christelle; Michot, Francis; Boyer, Olivier; Lamacz, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) remains a socially isolating condition with profound impact on quality of life for which autologous myoblast cell therapy represents an attractive treatment option. We developed an animal model of FI and investigated the possibility of improving sphincter function by intrasphincteric injection of syngeneic myoblasts. Several types of anal cryoinjuries were evaluated on anesthetized Fischer rats receiving analgesics. The minimal lesion yielding sustainable anal sphincter deficiency was a 90° cryoinjury of the sphincter, repeated after a 24-h interval. Anal sphincter pressure was evaluated longitudinally by anorectal manometry under local electrostimulation. Myoblasts were prepared using a protocol mimicking a clinical-grade process and further transduced with a GFP-encoding lentiviral vector before intrasphincteric injection. Experimental groups were uninjured controls, cryoinjured + PBS, and cryoinjured + myoblasts (different doses or injection site). Myoblast injection was well tolerated. Transferred myoblasts expressing GFP integrated into the sphincter and differentiated in situ into dystrophin-positive mature myofibers. Posttreatment sphincter pressures increased over time. At day 60, pressures in the treated group were significantly higher than those of PBS-injected controls and not significantly different from those of normal rats. Longitudinal follow-up showed stability of the therapeutic effect on sphincter function over a period of 6 months. Intrasphincteric myoblast injections at the lesion borders were equally as effective as intralesion administration, but an injection opposite to the lesion was not. These results provide proof of principle for myoblast cell therapy to treat FI in a rat model. This strategy is currently being evaluated in humans in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. PMID:24143883

  15. MicroRNA-27a promotes myoblast proliferation by targeting myostatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We identified a myogenic role for miR-27a and a new target, myostatin. ► The miR-27a was confirmed to target myostatin 3′UTR. ► miR-27a is upregulated and myostatin is downregulated during myoblast proliferation. ► miR-27a promotes myoblast proliferation by reducing the expression of myostatin. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in skeletal muscle development as well as in regulation of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the role of miRNAs in myoblast proliferation remains poorly understood. Here we found that the expression of miR-27a was increased during proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts. Moreover, overexpression of miR-27a in C2C12 cells promoted myoblast proliferation by reducing the expression of myostatin, a critical inhibitor of skeletal myogenesis. In addition, the miR-27a was confirmed to target myostatin 3′UTR by a luciferase reporter analysis. Together, these results suggest that miR-27a promotes myoblast proliferation through targeting myostatin.

  16. FSHD myoblasts fail to downregulate intermediate filament protein vimentin during myogenic differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipinski M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal dominant hereditary neuromuscular disorder. The clinical features of FSHD include weakness of the facial and shoulder girdle muscles followed by wasting of skeletal muscles of the pelvic girdle and lower extremities. Although FSHD myoblasts grown in vitro can be induced to differentiate into myotubes by serum starvation, the resulting FSHD myotubes have been shown previously to be morphologically abnormal. Aim. In order to find the cause of morphological anomalies of FSHD myotubes we compared in vitro myogenic differentiation of normal and FSHD myoblasts at the protein level. Methods. We induced myogenic differentiation of normal and FSHD myoblasts by serum starvation. We then compared protein extracts from proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes using SDS-PAGE followed by mass spectrometry identification of differentially expressed proteins. Results. We demonstrated that the expression of vimentin was elevated at the protein and mRNA levels in FSHD myotubes as compared to normal myotubes. Conclusions. We demonstrate for the first time that in contrast to normal myoblasts, FSHD myoblasts fail to downregulate vimentin after induction of in vitro myogenic differentiation. We suggest that vimentin could be an easily detectable marker of FSHD myotubes

  17. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signals through SHP2 to regulate primary mouse myoblast proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niche localized HGF plays an integral role in G0 exit and the return to mitotic activity of adult skeletal muscle satellite cells. HGF actions are regulated by MET initiated intracellular signaling events that include recruitment of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The importance of SHP2 in HGF-mediated signaling was examined in myoblasts and primary cultures of satellite cells. Myoblasts stably expressing SHP2 (23A2-SHP2) demonstrate increased proliferation rates by comparison to controls or myoblasts expressing a phosphatase-deficient SHP2 (23A2-SHP2DN). By comparison to 23A2 myoblasts, treatment of 23A2-SHP2 cells with HGF does not further increase proliferation rates and 23A2-SHP2DN myoblasts are unresponsive to HGF. Importantly, the effects of SHP2 are independent of downstream ERK1/2 activity as inclusion of PD98059 does not blunt the HGF-induced proliferative response. SHP2 function was further evaluated in primary satellite cell cultures. Ectopic expression of SHP2 in satellite cells tends to decrease proliferation rates and siSHP2 causes an increase the percentage of dividing myogenic cells. Interestingly, treatment of satellite cells with high concentrations of HGF (50 ng/ml) inhibits proliferation, which can be overcome by knockdown of SHP2. From these results, we conclude that HGF signals through SHP2 in myoblasts and satellite cells to directly alter proliferation rates.

  18. Chromatin plasticity as a differentiation index during muscle differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Change in the epigenetic landscape during myogenesis was optically investigated. ► Mobility of nuclear proteins was used to state the epigenetic status of the cell. ► Mobility of nuclear proteins decreased as myogenesis progressed in C2C12. ► Differentiation state diagram was developed using parameters obtained. -- Abstract: Skeletal muscle undergoes complicated differentiation steps that include cell-cycle arrest, cell fusion, and maturation, which are controlled through sequential expression of transcription factors. During muscle differentiation, remodeling of the epigenetic landscape is also known to take place on a large scale, determining cell fate. In an attempt to determine the extent of epigenetic remodeling during muscle differentiation, we characterized the plasticity of the chromatin structure using C2C12 myoblasts. Differentiation of C2C12 cells was induced by lowering the serum concentration after they had reached full confluence, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated myotubes. Upon induction of differentiation, the nucleus size decreased whereas the aspect ratio increased, indicating the presence of force on the nucleus during differentiation. Movement of the nucleus was also suppressed when differentiation was induced, indicating that the plasticity of chromatin changed upon differentiation. To evaluate the histone dynamics during differentiation, FRAP experiment was performed, which showed an increase in the immobile fraction of histone proteins when differentiation was induced. To further evaluate the change in the histone dynamics during differentiation, FCS was performed, which showed a decrease in histone mobility on differentiation. We here show that the plasticity of chromatin decreases upon differentiation, which takes place in a stepwise manner, and that it can be used as an index for the differentiation stage during myogenesis using the state diagram developed with the parameters obtained in this study.

  19. Chromatin plasticity as a differentiation index during muscle differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M. [Laboratory for Comprehensive Bioimaging, Riken Qbic, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); World Premier Initiative, iFREC, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Higuchi, Sayaka [Laboratory for Comprehensive Bioimaging, Riken Qbic, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Kawauchi, Keiko [Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ichimura, Taro [Laboratory for Comprehensive Bioimaging, Riken Qbic, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Fujita, Hideaki, E-mail: hideaki.fujita@riken.jp [Laboratory for Comprehensive Bioimaging, Riken Qbic, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Change in the epigenetic landscape during myogenesis was optically investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of nuclear proteins was used to state the epigenetic status of the cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of nuclear proteins decreased as myogenesis progressed in C2C12. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation state diagram was developed using parameters obtained. -- Abstract: Skeletal muscle undergoes complicated differentiation steps that include cell-cycle arrest, cell fusion, and maturation, which are controlled through sequential expression of transcription factors. During muscle differentiation, remodeling of the epigenetic landscape is also known to take place on a large scale, determining cell fate. In an attempt to determine the extent of epigenetic remodeling during muscle differentiation, we characterized the plasticity of the chromatin structure using C2C12 myoblasts. Differentiation of C2C12 cells was induced by lowering the serum concentration after they had reached full confluence, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated myotubes. Upon induction of differentiation, the nucleus size decreased whereas the aspect ratio increased, indicating the presence of force on the nucleus during differentiation. Movement of the nucleus was also suppressed when differentiation was induced, indicating that the plasticity of chromatin changed upon differentiation. To evaluate the histone dynamics during differentiation, FRAP experiment was performed, which showed an increase in the immobile fraction of histone proteins when differentiation was induced. To further evaluate the change in the histone dynamics during differentiation, FCS was performed, which showed a decrease in histone mobility on differentiation. We here show that the plasticity of chromatin decreases upon differentiation, which takes place in a stepwise manner, and that it can be used as an index for the differentiation stage

  20. Analysis of Microstructural Changes in the Heat-Affected Zone and Fusion Zone of a Fiber Laser Welded DP980 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianqi; Khan, Abdul; Ojo, Olanrewaju A.; Zhou, Norman; Chen, Daolun

    2015-08-01

    Dual phase (DP) steels are designed to consist of hard martensite dispersed in a relatively soft ferrite matrix, which offers a favorable combination of high strength with good deformability. Fiber laser welding (FLW) is becoming increasingly important for joining advanced materials due to its flexibility and deep penetration. In this study, the microstructure of a DP steel, DP980, welded by FLW technique was carefully analyzed. Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulation coupled with analytical transmission electron microscopy revealed that the FLW process produced significant microstructural changes in a narrow heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ), which can result in dramatic changes in mechanical properties. This is reflected in the micro-hardness profile obtained across the welded material. The salient phase transitions induced by the FLW, including the formation of new martensite grains in the upper-critical HAZ and FZ, are discussed.

  1. hHGF overexpression in myoblast sheets enhances their angiogenic potential in rat chronic heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Siltanen

    Full Text Available After severe myocardial infarction (MI, heart failure results from ischemia, fibrosis, and remodeling. A promising therapy to enhance cardiac function and induce therapeutic angiogenesis via a paracrine mechanism in MI is myoblast sheet transplantation. We hypothesized that in a rat model of MI-induced chronic heart failure, this therapy could be further improved by overexpression of the antiapoptotic, antifibrotic, and proangiogenic hepatocyte growth factor (HGF in the myoblast sheets. We studied the ability of wild type (L6-WT and human HGF-expressing (L6-HGF L6 myoblast sheet-derived paracrine factors to stimulate cardiomyocyte, endothelial cell, or smooth muscle cell migration in culture. Further, we studied the autocrine effect of hHGF-expression on myoblast gene expression profiles by use of microarray analysis. We induced MI in Wistar rats by left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD ligation and allowed heart failure to develop for 4 weeks. Thereafter, we administered L6-WT (n = 15 or L6-HGF (n = 16 myoblast sheet therapy. Control rats (n = 13 underwent LAD ligation and rethoracotomy without therapy, and five rats underwent a sham operation in both surgeries. We evaluated cardiac function with echocardiography at 2 and 4 weeks after therapy, and analyzed cardiac angiogenesis and left ventricular architecture from histological sections at 4 weeks. Paracrine mediators from L6-HGF myoblast sheets effectively induced migration of cardiac endothelial and smooth muscle cells but not cardiomyocytes. Microarray data revealed that hHGF-expression modulated myoblast gene expression. In vivo, L6-HGF sheet therapy effectively stimulated angiogenesis in the infarcted and non-infarcted areas. Both L6-WT and L6-HGF therapies enhanced cardiac function and inhibited remodeling in a similar fashion. In conclusion, L6-HGF therapy effectively induced angiogenesis in the chronically failing heart. Cardiac function, however, was not further

  2. Hot fusion, cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication of observations of nuclear fusion reactions in electrolysis experiments has led to hope that an easy way to domesticate this major source of energy had been found. In this article are recalled the classical solutions which are studied for hot fusion, the state of the art the difficulties and the perspectives, followed by the present situation concerning the experiments related to what has been called, perhaps a little too quickly, cold fusion

  3. AP-2α suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2α is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2α binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2α-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2α interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2α is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  4. Myostatin stimulates, not inihibits, C2C12 myoblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Buel D; Wiedeback, Benjamin D; Hoversten, Knut E; Jackson, Melissa F; Walker, Ryan G; Thompson, Thomas B

    2014-03-01

    The immortal C2C12 cell line originates from dystrophic mouse thigh muscle and has been used to study the endocrine control of muscle cell growth, development, and function, including those actions regulated by myostatin. Previous studies suggest that high concentrations of recombinant myostatin generated in bacteria inhibit C2C12 proliferation and differentiation. Recombinant myostatin generated in eukaryotic systems similarly inhibits the proliferation of primary myosatellite cells, but consequently initiates, rather than inhibits, their differentiation and is bioactive at far lower concentrations. Our studies indicate that 2 different sources of recombinant myostatin made in eukaryotes stimulate, not inhibit, C2C12 proliferation. This effect occurred at different cell densities and serum concentrations and in the presence of IGF-I, a potent myoblast mitogen. This stimulatory effect was comparable to that obtained with TGFβ1, a related factor that also inhibits primary myosatellite cell proliferation. Attenuating the myostatin/activin (ie, Acvr2b) and TGFβ1 receptor signaling pathways with the Alk4/5 and Alk5 inhibitors, SB431542 and SB505142, respectively, similarly attenuated proliferation induced by serum, myostatin or TGFβ1 and in a dose-dependent manner. In serum-free medium, both myostatin and TGFβ1 stimulated Smad2 phosphorylation, but not that of Smad3, and a Smad3 inhibitor (SIS3) only inhibited proliferation in cells cultured in high serum. Thus, myostatin and TGFβ1 stimulate C2C12 proliferation primarily via Smad2. These results together question the physiological relevance of the C2C12 model and previous studies using recombinant myostatin generated in bacteria. They also support the alternative use of primary myosatellite cells and recombinant myostatin generated in eukaryotes. PMID:24424069

  5. Fusion facility siting considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. A critically important consideration in this regard is site selection. The purpose of this paper is to examine major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion

  6. Modified methods for culturing myoblasts of rats: Combination of multi-enzymatic digestion and double purification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhang; Wei Wang; Ming Fan; Xiaoping Chen; Shuhong Liu; Liang Sun

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With developments of tissue engineering and genetic engineering, we aim to culture myoblasts, which are characterized by high purity, high quality and high production, for wide application in neural regeneration researches.OBJECTIVE: To modify traditional dissociation method in order to obtain myoblasts, which are characterized by high purity, high quality and high production, and explore the biological properties under in vitro culture.DESIGN: Observational study.SETTING: Basic Institute of Academy of Military Medical Sciences of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Four neonatal Wistar rats of 5 days old, both genders and mean body mass of 10 g were selected in this study. The main reagents and devices were detailed as follows: DMEM medium (Gibco Company), fetus bovine serum (FBS, Hycolne Company), collagenase Ⅱ (Sigma Company), trypsin (Sigma Company), dispase Ⅱ (Sigma Company), desmin antibody (Fuzhou Maixin Company), antibody Ⅱ and ABC kit (Wuhan Boster Biotechnology Company), desk centrifuge (KUBATO, Japan), and inverted phase contrast microscope (LEICA DMIRB, Germany).METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Basic Institute of Academy of Military Medical Sciences of Chinese PLA from June to October 2006. Neonatal rats were sacrificed under sterile condition to obtain skeletal muscles of limbs, which were washed with cold PBS (containing benzylpenicillin and estreptomicina), and muscular tissue was sheared into pieces. Then, those muscular pieces were added with mixed digestive enzyme (containing 2 g/L collagenase Ⅱ + 5 g/L dispase Ⅱ + 0.28 g/L CaCl2) as twice volume as pieces, dealt with mechanical pipetting for 5 minutes and cultured in CO2 incubator for 10 minutes.The operation was done for three times and the muscular pieces were digested for 45 minutes in total.Moreover, cells were suspended again in order to obtain myoblasts from skeletal muscle of neonatal rats. In addition, myoblasts were purified with differential attachment technique

  7. Myoblast transplantation for heart repair: A review of the state of the field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Howard J. Leonhardt; Michael Brown

    2006-01-01

    Over 200 humans have been treated with myoblast transplantation for heart muscle repair since June 2000. Bioheart sponsored percutaneous delivery studies began in May 2001 in Europe. Approximately one third of the patients have exhibited substantial improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of over 30% and two heart failure class improvements. Over 80% of the patients have exhibited one heart failure class improvement with moderate improvement of LVEF. Clinical trials seem to demonstrate a marked reduction in emergency hospitalizations in myoblast treated patients. Many years of careful studies have lead to randomized controlled studies that are enrolling patients now at numerous centers worldwide. A firm conclusion on the safety and efficacy of myoblast transplantation cannot be determined until these randomized studies are completed. Final results from randomized controlled studies should be available soon. (J Geriatr Cardiol 2006;3:165-7.)

  8. Mutations in the Amino Terminus of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 gL Can Reduce Cell-Cell Fusion without Affecting gH/gL Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wenbo; Chen, Feng; Klyachkin, Yuri; Sham, Yuk Y.; Geraghty, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The gH/gL heterodimer represents two of the four herpes simplex virus glycoproteins necessary and sufficient for membrane fusion. We generated deletions and point mutations covering gL residues 24 to 43 to investigate that region's role in gH/gL intracellular trafficking and in membrane fusion. Multiple mutants displayed a 40 to 60% reduction in cell fusion with no effect on gH/gL trafficking. The amino terminus of gL plays an important role in the gH/gL contribution to membrane fusion.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Changhoon; Lee, Taeho; Jang, Minho; Park, Mingu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite.

  11. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro, E-mail: akeita@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  12. Osteoclast Fusion is Based on Heterogeneity Between Fusion Partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolt-Pedersen, Anne-Sofie; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2014-01-01

    Bone-resorbing osteoclasts are formed through fusion of mononucleated precursors. Their choice of partners during the fusion process remains unclear. We hypothesized that osteoclasts are selective in their choice of fusion partner and that this selectivity is based on heterogeneity among the cells...... with respect to their maturation stage and their expression and cellular organization of fusion factors. Support for this hypothesis was found from immunofluorescence staining of the osteoclast fusion factors CD47, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), and syncytin-1. These stainings...... fusion steps was also suggested from experiments with a CD47 blocking antibody, which resulted in an inhibition of the fusion of small osteoclasts. Conversely, blocking of connexin 43 affected the fusion of larger osteoclasts with four or more nuclei. The suggestion that different fusion factors function...

  13. Novel lncRNAs in myogenesis: a miR-31 overlapping transcript controls myoblast differentiation.

    KAUST Repository

    Ballarino, Monica

    2014-12-15

    Transcriptome analysis allowed the identification of new long noncoding RNAs differentially expressed during murine myoblast differentiation. These transcripts were classified on the basis of their expression under proliferating versus differentiated conditions, muscle-restricted activation, and subcellular localization. Several species displayed preferential expression in dystrophic (mdx) versus wild-type muscles, indicating their possible link with regenerative processes. One of the identified transcripts, lnc-31, even if originating from the same nuclear precursor of miR-31, is produced by a pathway mutually exclusive. We show that lnc-31 and its human homologue hsa-lnc-31 are expressed in proliferating myoblasts, where they counteract differentiation. In line with this, both species are more abundant in mdx muscles and in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myoblasts, than in their normal counterparts. Altogether, these data suggest a crucial role for lnc-31 in controlling the differentiation commitment of precursor myoblasts and indicate that its function is maintained in evolution despite the poor sequence conservation with the human counterpart.

  14. Analysis of Mitochondrial Network Morphology in Cultured Myoblasts from Patients with Mitochondrial Disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládková, J.; Spáčilová, J.; Čapek, Martin; Tesařová, M.; Hansíková, H.; Honzík, T.; Martínek, J.; Zámečník, J.; Kostková, O.; Zeman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 5 (2015), s. 340-350. ISSN 0191-3123 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cristae * Fiji * image analysis * mitochondrial disorders * myoblasts * ultrastructure Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.078, year: 2014

  15. Biodistribution studies of 99mTc-labeled myoblasts in a murine model of muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to evaluate the myoblast labeling of various 99mTc complexes and to select the complex that best accomplishes this labeling, and second to evaluate the biodistribution of myoblasts labeled with this complex using mice with MDX muscular dystrophy (the murine homologue of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy). The following ligands were used to prepare the corresponding 99mTc complexes: hexakis-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI), bis(2-ethoxyethyl)diphosphinoethane (Tf), (RR,SS)-4,8-diaza-3,6,6,9-tetramethyl-undecane-2,10-dione-bisoxime (HM-PAO), bis(N-ethyl)dithiocarbamate (NEt), and bis(N-ethoxy, N-ethyl)dithiocarbamate (NOEt). One million murine myoblasts were incubated for 30-60 minutes with 5 mCi of each of the 99mTc complexes prepared from the above ligands. Viability was assessed by microscopic counting after trypan blue staining, and the radioactivity absorbed in the cells was measured after centrifugation. The compound with the highest uptake in cellular pellets was [99mTc]N-NOEt. The biodistribution of myoblasts labeled with this complex was evaluated after intraaortic injection in dystrophic mice. Such an approach has the potential of effecting widespread gene transfer through the bloodstream to muscles lacking dystrophin

  16. Two-dimensional differential adherence and alignment of C2C12 myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface microstructure is a critical parameter for scaffolds used in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. We have developed micromachined surfaces using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation-direct write (MAPLE-DW) that demonstrate differential adherence of C2C12 myoblast cells. The 60-400 μm diameter channels were micromachined onto 2% agarose surfaces using an ArF excimer laser and lined with Matrigel[reg] basement membrane matrix solution. Suspensions containing C2C12 myoblast cells were then placed on the surface of these micromachined channels. The C2C12 myoblast cells aligned themselves parallel to the 60-150 μm channels. Live/dead assays over 72 h demonstrated that cell number, cell size, and number of nuclei per cell increased within these channels. In addition, some of the myoblasts fused and differentiated into multinucleated myotubes. These results provide the basis for the development of direct-write scaffolds for skeletal muscle tissue engineering

  17. Developmental Programming in Response to Intrauterine Growth Restriction Impairs Myoblast Function and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Yates

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal adaptations to placental insufficiency alter postnatal metabolic homeostasis in skeletal muscle by reducing glucose oxidation rates, impairing insulin action, and lowering the proportion of oxidative fibers. In animal models of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, skeletal muscle fibers have less myonuclei at birth. This means that myoblasts, the sole source for myonuclei accumulation in fibers, are compromised. Fetal hypoglycemia and hypoxemia are complications that result from placental insufficiency. Hypoxemia elevates circulating catecholamines, and chronic hypercatecholaminemia has been shown to reduce fetal muscle development and growth. We have found evidence for adaptations in adrenergic receptor expression profiles in myoblasts and skeletal muscle of IUGR sheep fetuses with placental insufficiency. The relationship of β-adrenergic receptors shifts in IUGR fetuses because Adrβ2 expression levels decline and Adrβ1 expression levels are unaffected in myofibers and increased in myoblasts. This adaptive response would suppress insulin signaling, myoblast incorporation, fiber hypertrophy, and glucose oxidation. Furthermore, this β-adrenergic receptor expression profile persists for at least the first month in IUGR lambs and lowers their fatty acid mobilization. Developmental programming of skeletal muscle adrenergic receptors partially explains metabolic and endocrine differences in IUGR offspring, and the impact on metabolism may result in differential nutrient utilization.

  18. Ionizing radiation increases primary cilia incidence and induces multiciliation in C2C12 myoblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filipová, A.; Diaz-Garcia, D.; Bezrouk, A.; Čížková, D.; Havelek, R.; Vávrová, J.; Dayanithi, Govindan; Řezáčová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 8 (2015), s. 943-953. ISSN 1065-6995 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : cell line * ionizing radiation * multiple cilia * myoblast * primary cilium * serum starvation stress Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 1.933, year: 2014

  19. An integrated strategy for analyzing the unique developmental programs of different myoblast subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available An important but largely unmet challenge in understanding the mechanisms that govern the formation of specific organs is to decipher the complex and dynamic genetic programs exhibited by the diversity of cell types within the tissue of interest. Here, we use an integrated genetic, genomic, and computational strategy to comprehensively determine the molecular identities of distinct myoblast subpopulations within the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm at the time that cell fates are initially specified. A compendium of gene expression profiles was generated for primary mesodermal cells purified by flow cytometry from appropriately staged wild-type embryos and from 12 genotypes in which myogenesis was selectively and predictably perturbed. A statistical meta-analysis of these pooled datasets--based on expected trends in gene expression and on the relative contribution of each genotype to the detection of known muscle genes--provisionally assigned hundreds of differentially expressed genes to particular myoblast subtypes. Whole embryo in situ hybridizations were then used to validate the majority of these predictions, thereby enabling true-positive detection rates to be estimated for the microarray data. This combined analysis reveals that myoblasts exhibit much greater gene expression heterogeneity and overall complexity than was previously appreciated. Moreover, it implicates the involvement of large numbers of uncharacterized, differentially expressed genes in myogenic specification and subsequent morphogenesis. These findings also underscore a requirement for considerable regulatory specificity for generating diverse myoblast identities. Finally, to illustrate how the developmental functions of newly identified myoblast genes can be efficiently surveyed, a rapid RNA interference assay that can be scored in living embryos was developed and applied to selected genes. This integrated strategy for examining embryonic gene expression and function provides

  20. EMP Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    KUNTAY, Isık

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel fusion scheme, called EMP Fusion, which has the promise of achieving breakeven and realizing commercial fusion power. The method is based on harnessing the power of an electromagnetic pulse generated by the now well-developed flux compression technology. The electromagnetic pulse acts as a means of both heating up the plasma and confining the plasma, eliminating intermediate steps. The EMP Fusion device is simpler compared to other fusion devices and this reduces...

  1. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  2. Autologous Myoblast Transplantation for Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy: a Phase I/Iia Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Périé, Sophie; Trollet, Capucine; Mouly, Vincent; Vanneaux, Valérie; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Bouazza, Belaïd; Marolleau, Jean Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Chapon, Françoise; Eymard, Bruno; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Larghero, Jérome; St Guily, Jean Lacau

    2013-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant genetic disease mainly characterized by ptosis and dysphagia. We conducted a phase I/IIa clinical study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00773227) using autologous myoblast transplantation following myotomy in adult OPMD patients. This study included 12 patients with clinical diagnosis of OPMD, indication for cricopharyngeal myotomy, and confirmed genetic diagnosis. The feasibility and safety end points of both autologous myob...

  3. Caveolin-3 inhibits growth signal in cardiac myoblasts in a Ca2+-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Takayuki; Otsu, Kouji; Oshikawa, Jin; Hori, Hideaki; Kitamura, Hitoshi; Ito, Takaaki; Umemura, Satoshi; Minamisawa, Susumu; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2007-01-01

    Caveolin, a major protein component of caveolae, directly interacts with multiple signaling molecules, such as Ras and growth factor receptors, and inhibits their function. However, the role of the second messenger system in mediating this inhibition by caveolin remains poorly understood. We examined the role of Ca2+ -dependent signal in caveloin-mediated growth inhibition using a rat cardiac myoblast cell line (H9C2), in which the expression of caveolin-3, the muscle specific subtype, can be...

  4. The Msx1 Homeoprotein Recruits G9a Methyltransferase to Repressed Target Genes in Myoblast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jingqiang; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2012-01-01

    Although the significance of lysine modifications of core histones for regulating gene expression is widely appreciated, the mechanisms by which these modifications are incorporated at specific regulatory elements during cellular differentiation remains largely unknown. In our previous studies, we have shown that in developing myoblasts the Msx1 homeoprotein represses gene expression by influencing the modification status of chromatin at its target genes. We now show that genomic binding by M...

  5. Mechanical strain applied to human fibroblasts differentially regulates skeletal myoblast differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, Michael R.; Cao, Thanh V.; Campbell, David H.; Standley, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic short-duration stretches (CSDS) such as those resulting from repetitive motion strain increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Myofascial release is a common technique used by clinicians that applies an acyclic long-duration stretch (ALDS) to muscle fascia to repair injury. When subjected to mechanical strain, fibroblasts within muscle fascia secrete IL-6, which has been shown to induce myoblast differentiation, essential for muscle repair. We hypothesize that fibroblasts subjected...

  6. Effect of transient expression of fluorescent protein probes in synovial and myoblast cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Fujita, Aika; Usui, Chihiro; Watanabe, Sachiko; Kitano, Sachie; Sano, Hajime; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2012-12-01

    Here, we investigate the appropriate fluorescent proteins for use in the culture of synovial MH7A and myoblast C2C12 cells. Fluorescent signal intensities of 3 different fluorescent proteins were examined in these cell lines. The fluorescent intensity of transiently expressed AcGFP, DsRed, and mStrawberry were examined in these cell lines, and the influence of the amount of plasmid used on transfection efficiency and cell viability were investigated. PMID:23503703

  7. Low-level infrared laser modulates muscle repair and chromosome stabilization genes in myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Camila Luna; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-08-01

    Infrared laser therapy is used for skeletal muscle repair based on its biostimulative effect on satellite cells. However, shortening of telomere length limits regenerative potential in satellite cells, which occurs after each cell division cycle. Also, laser therapy could be more effective on non-physiologic tissues. This study evaluated low-level infrared laser exposure effects on mRNA expression from muscle injury repair and telomere stabilization genes in myoblasts in normal and stressful conditions. Laser fluences were those used in clinical protocols. C2C12 myoblast cultures were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) in standard or normal (10 %) and reduced (2 %) fetal bovine serum concentrations; total RNA was extracted for mRNA expression evaluation from muscle injury repair (MyoD and Pax7) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that low-level infrared laser increases the expression of MyoD and Pax7 in 10 J/cm(2) fluence, TRF1 expression in all fluences, and TRF2 expression in 70 J/cm(2) fluence in both 10 and 2 % fetal bovine serum. Low-level infrared laser increases mRNA expression from genes related to muscle repair and telomere stabilization in myoblasts in standard or normal and stressful conditions. PMID:27220530

  8. MicroRNA-16 modulates macrophage polarization leading to improved insulin sensitivity in myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talari, Malathi; Kapadia, Bandish; Kain, Vasundhara; Seshadri, Sriram; Prajapati, Bhumika; Rajput, Parth; Misra, Parimal; Parsa, Kishore V L

    2015-12-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation leads to several diseases such as insulin resistance, T2D and several types of cancers. The functional role of microRNAs in inflammation induced insulin resistance is poorly studied. MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules which mediate diverse biological processes. We here show that miR-16 expression levels are down-regulated in different inflammatory conditions such as LPS/IFNγ or palmitate treated macrophages, palmitate exposed myoblasts and insulin responsive tissues of high sucrose diet induced insulin resistant rats. Importantly, forced expression of miR-16 in macrophages impaired the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-β leading to enhanced insulin stimulated glucose uptake in co-cultured skeletal myoblasts. Further, ectopic expression of miR-16 enhanced insulin stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal myoblasts via the up-regulation of GLUT4 and MEF2A, two key players involved in insulin stimulated glucose uptake. Collectively, our data highlight the important role of miR-16 in ameliorating inflammation induced insulin resistance. PMID:26453808

  9. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    This dissertation investigates fusion rings, which are Grothendieck groups of rigid, monoidal, semisimple, abelian categories. Special interest is in rational fusion rings, i.e., fusion rings which admit a finite basis, for as commutative rings they may be presented as quotients of polynomial rings...... by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum...

  10. Fusion Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This first issue of a quarterly newsletter announces the startup of the Tokamak de Varennes, describes Canada's national fusion program, and outlines the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. A map gives the location of the eleven principal fusion centres in Canada. (L.L.)

  11. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  12. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  13. Constructing retroviral vector carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) and investigating the expression of GFP in primary rat myoblast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuling Rong; Yongxin Lu; Yuhua Liao; Xiaolin Wang; Xiaoqing Li; Jiahua Zhang; Yanli He

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To construct green fluorescent protein (GFP) retroviral vector (pLgXSN), and to investigate the expression of GFP in primary rat myoblast. Methods: GFP cDNA was subcloned into the plasmid pLgXSN, and the recombinant vector was transfected into packaging cell PT67. G418 was used to select positive colony. Myoblasts were infected by a high-titer viral supernatant. The recombinant retroviral plasmid vector was identified by restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA sequence analysis. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry were used to detect the expression of GFP. Results: The GFP cDNA sequence was identical to that of GenBank. Recombinant retroviral plasmid vector pLgGFPSN was constructed successfully. The titer of the packaged recombinant retrovirus was 1 × 106 cfu/ml. Bright green fluorescence of the transfected cells was observed under confocal microscope 48 h after transfection. The transfection rate was 33%. The effective expression of GFP in myoblast infected by recombinant retrovirus lasted for 6 weeks. Conclusion: GFP gene could be effectively and stably expressed in myoblast, which suggests that GFP could act as a marker for studies on myoblast.

  14. Fusion Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recreating the energy production process of the Sun - nuclear fusion - on Earth in a controlled fashion is one of the greatest challenges of this century. If achieved at affordable costs, energy supply security would be greatly enhanced and environmental degradation from fossil fuels greatly diminished. Fusion Physics describes the last fifty years or so of physics and research in innovative technologies to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for energy production. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been involved since its establishment in 1957 in fusion research. It has been the driving force behind the biennial conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, today known as the Fusion Energy Conference. Hosted by several Member States, this biennial conference provides a global forum for exchange of the latest achievements in fusion research against the backdrop of the requirements for a net energy producing fusion device and, eventually, a fusion power plant. The scientific and technological knowledge compiled during this series of conferences, as well as by the IAEA Nuclear Fusion journal, is immense and will surely continue to grow in the future. It has led to the establishment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which represents the biggest experiment in energy production ever envisaged by humankind.

  15. Fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs

  16. Controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last fifty years the researches on controlled thermonuclear fusion reached great performance in the magnetic confinement (tokamaks) as in the inertial confinement (lasers). But the state of the art is not in favor of the apparition of the fusion in the energy market before the second half of the 21 century. To explain this opinion the author presents the fusion reactions of light nuclei and the problems bound to the magnetic confinement. (A.L.B.)

  17. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    SNARE proteins constitute the minimal machinery needed for membrane fusion. SNAREs operate by forming a complex, which pulls the lipid bilayers into close contact and provides the mechanical force needed for lipid bilayer fusion. At the chemical synapse, SNARE-complex formation between the vesicu......SNARE proteins constitute the minimal machinery needed for membrane fusion. SNAREs operate by forming a complex, which pulls the lipid bilayers into close contact and provides the mechanical force needed for lipid bilayer fusion. At the chemical synapse, SNARE-complex formation between...

  18. Fusion Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans

  19. Dynamics of the skeletal muscle secretome during myoblast differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Jeanette; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Blagoev, Blagoy;

    2010-01-01

    During recent years, increased efforts have focused on elucidating the secretory function of skeletal muscle. Through secreted molecules, skeletal muscle affects local muscle biology in an auto/paracrine manner as well as having systemic effects on other tissues. Here we used a quantitative...... proteomics platform to investigate the factors secreted during the differentiation of murine C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Using triple encoding stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we compared the secretomes at three different time points of muscle differentiation and followed the dynamics...... of the skeletal muscle as a prominent secretory organ. In addition to previously reported molecules, we identified many secreted proteins that have not previously been shown to be released from skeletal muscle cells nor shown to be differentially released during the process of myogenesis. We found 188...

  20. Positive regulation of myoblast differentiation by medaka Neu3b sialidase through gangliosides desialylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Harasaki, Yusuke; Fukuda, Midori; Yoshinaga, Ayana; Ryuzono, Sena; Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Komatsu, Masaharu; Miyagi, Taeko

    2016-04-01

    Sialidase Neu3b is an unique enzyme conserved in medaka and tilapia, but not in mammals. Previous study revealed that medaka Neu3b is localized at cytosol and is a ganglioside-specific sialidase. Neu3b functions, however, have not been understood, while Neu3a sialidase, which is widely conserved from human to fish, is known as a regulator of neurite formation. Here, we investigated the biological function of Neu3b for C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation. Bioinformatics analysis using genome browser revealed the presence of neu3b gene in some orders of fish species such as Beloniformes, Perciformes and Cyprinodontiformes. With the treatment of 2% horse serum, Neu3b-overexpression accelerated myoblast cell differentiation to myotubes accompanied with up-regulation of myogenesis biomarkers mRNA, myod and myog. Neu3b altered ganglioside composition in C2C12 cells results showing a decrease in GM2, and the increase of Lac-Cer, while desialylation of glycoproteins were not detected. Contrary to cell differentiation, Neu3b cell proliferation was suppressed in normal growth medium. To understand the mechanism of the alteration of cell differentiation and proliferation, phosphorylation of signal molecules in EGFR/ERK pathway was investigated. Neu3b induced a decline in phosphorylation of ERK and EGFR. Surprisingly, immuno-blot and real-time PCR analysis revealed that down-regulation of egfr gene could be involved in the acceleration of cell differentiation by Neu3b. These results suggested that Neu3b sialidase is a positive regulator for myoblast differentiation, similar with mammalian cytosolic sialidase Neu2. PMID:26805383

  1. Nucleotide sequence of a region of the herpes simplex virus type 1 gB glycoprotein gene: mutations affecting rate of virus entry and cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzik, D J; Fox, B A; DeLuca, N A; Person, S

    1984-08-01

    The tsB5 isolate of herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) enters host cells more rapidly than does KOS, an independent isolate of HSV-1, and this rate-of-entry determinant is located between prototypic map coordinates 0.350 and 0.360 (1). The nucleotide sequence of strain tsB5 has now been determined between prototypic map coordinates 0.347 and 0.360. Comparison of the tsB5 sequence to the homologous KOS sequence revealed that the rate-of-entry difference between these two HSV-1 strains may be due to the single amino acid difference observed within these sequences (0.350 to 0.360). A cell fusion determinant in tsB5 is located between coordinates 0.345 and 0.355 and to the left of the rate-of-entry determinant (1). Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed a second amino acid difference between tsB5 and KOS at coordinate 0.349. The cell fusion determinant was tentatively assigned to this location. PMID:6089415

  2. A novel in vitro model for studying quiescence and activation of primary isolated human myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellathurai, Jeeva; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Dhawan, Jyotsna;

    2013-01-01

    term exponentially proliferating cultures normally used for in vitro studies. Human myoblasts cultured through many passages inevitably consist of a mixture of proliferating and non-proliferating cells, while cells activated from G0 are in a synchronously proliferating phase, and therefore may be a...... better model for in vivo proliferating satellite cells. Furthermore, the temporal propagation of proliferation in these synchronized cultures resembles the pattern seen in vivo during regeneration. We therefore present this culture model as a useful and novel condition for molecular analysis of...

  3. Cell-type specific adhesive interactions of skeletal myoblasts with thrombospondin-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, J. C.; Lawler, J

    1994-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that may play important roles in the morphogenesis and repair of skeletal muscle. To begin to explore the role of thrombospondin-1 in this tissue, we have examined the interactions of three rodent skeletal muscle cell lines, C2C12, G8, and H9c2, with platelet TSP-1. The cells secrete thrombospondin and incorporate it into the cell layer in a distribution distinct from that of fibronectin. Myoblasts attach and spread on fibronect...

  4. Human myotubes from myoblast cultures undergoing senescence exhibit defects in glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan O; Just, Marlene; Rustan, Arild C;

    2011-01-01

    Adult stem cells are known to have a finite replication potential. Muscle biopsy-derived human satellite cells (SCs) were grown at different passages and differentiated to human myotubes in culture to analyze the functional state of various carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways. As the...... number and could be explained by reduced incorporation into diacyl- and triacylglycerols. The levels of long-chain acyl-CoA esters decreased with increased passage number. Late-passage, non-proliferating, myoblast cultures showed strong senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity indicating that the...

  5. Docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide improves glucose uptake and alters endocannabinoid system gene expression in proliferating and differentiating C2C12 myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BruceAlanWatkins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a major storage site for glycogen and a focus for understanding insulin resistance and type-2-diabetes. New evidence indicates that overactivation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system (ECS in skeletal muscle diminishes insulin sensitivity. Specific n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA are precursors for the biosynthesis of ligands that bind to and activate the cannabinoid receptors. The function of the ECS and action of PUFA in skeletal muscle glucose uptake was investigated in proliferating and differentiated C2C12 myoblasts treated with either 25µM of arachidonate (AA or docosahexaenoate (DHA, 25µM of EC [anandamide (AEA, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, docosahexaenoylethanolamide (DHEA], 1µM of CB1 antagonist NESS0327, and CB2 antagonist AM630. Compared to the BSA vehicle control cell cultures in both proliferating and differentiated myoblasts those treated with DHEA, the EC derived from the n-3 PUFA DHA, had higher 24 h glucose uptake, while AEA and 2-AG, the EC derived from the n-6 PUFA AA, had lower basal glucose uptake. Adenylyl cyclase mRNA was higher in myoblasts treated with DHA in both proliferating and differentiated states while those treated with AEA or 2-AG were lower compared to the control cell cultures. Western blot and qPCR analysis showed higher expression of the cannabinoid receptors in differentiated myoblasts treated with DHA while the opposite was observed with AA. These findings indicate a compensatory effect of DHA and DHEA compared to AA-derived ligands on the ECS and associated ECS gene expression and higher glucose uptake in myoblasts.Key Words: endocannabinoid system •C2C12 myoblasts cannabinoid receptors glucose uptake gene expression DHEA • polyunsaturated fatty acids

  6. Laser-induced tobacco protoplast fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李银妹; 关力劼; 楼立人; 崔国强; 姚湲; 王浩威; 操传顺; 鲁润龙; 陈曦

    1999-01-01

    Laser tweezers can manipulate small particles, such as cells and organdies. When coupling them with laser microbeam selective fusion of two tobacco protoplasts containing some chloroplast was achieved. Physical and biological variables that affect laser trapping and laser-induced fusion were also discussed. The results show that the effect of chloroplast content and distribution on the yield of cell fusion is remarkable.

  7. Evidence for myoblast-extrinsic regulation of slow myosin heavy chain expression during muscle fiber formation in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M; Webster, S G; Blau, H M

    1993-05-01

    Vertebrate muscles are composed of an array of diverse fast and slow fiber types with different contractile properties. Differences among fibers in fast and slow MyHC expression could be due to extrinsic factors that act on the differentiated myofibers. Alternatively, the mononucleate myoblasts that fuse to form multinucleated muscle fibers could differ intrinsically due to lineage. To distinguish between these possibilities, we determined whether the changes in proportion of slow fibers were attributable to inherent differences in myoblasts. The proportion of fibers expressing slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) was found to change markedly with time during embryonic and fetal human limb development. During the first trimester, a maximum of 75% of fibers expressed slow MyHC. Thereafter, new fibers formed which did not express this MyHC, so that the proportion of fibers expressing slow MyHC dropped to approximately 3% of the total by midgestation. Several weeks later, a subset of the new fibers began to express slow MyHC and from week 30 of gestation through adulthood, approximately 50% of fibers were slow. However, each myoblast clone (n = 2,119) derived from muscle tissues at six stages of human development (weeks 7, 9, 16, and 22 of gestation, 2 mo after birth and adult) expressed slow MyHC upon differentiation. We conclude from these results that the control of slow MyHC expression in vivo during muscle fiber formation in embryonic development is largely extrinsic to the myoblast. By contrast, human myoblast clones from the same samples differed in their expression of embryonic and neonatal MyHCs, in agreement with studies in other species, and this difference was shown to be stably heritable. Even after 25 population doublings in tissue culture, embryonic stage myoblasts did not give rise to myoblasts capable of expressing MyHCs typical of neonatal stages, indicating that stage-specific differences are not under the control of a division dependent mechanism, or

  8. The Paracrine Effect of Skeletal Myoblasts Is Cardioprotective Against Oxidative Stress and Involves EGFR-ErbB4 Signaling, Cystathionase, and the Unfolded Protein Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, Antti; Nuutila, Kristo; Imanishi, Yukiko; Uenaka, Hisazumi; Mäkelä, Johanna; Pätilä, Tommi; Vento, Antti; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Harjula, Ari; Kankuri, Esko

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of skeletal myoblast transplantation into the myocardium are mediated via paracrine factors. We investigated the ability of myoblast-derived soluble mediators to protect cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress. Fetal rat cardiac cells were treated with conditioned medium from cultures of myoblasts or cardiac fibroblasts, and oxidative stress was induced with H2O2. Myoblast-derived factors effectively prevented oxidative stress-induced cardiac cell death and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. This protective effect was mediated via epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and c-Met signaling, and mimicked by neuregulin 1 but not EGF. Microarray analysis of cardiac cells treated with myoblast versus cardiac fibroblast-derived mediators revealed differential regulation of genes associated with antioxidative effects: cystathionine-γ-lyase (cst), xanthine oxidase, and thioredoxin-interacting protein as well as tribbles homolog 3 (trib3). Cardiac cell pretreatment with tunicamycin, an inducer of trib3, also protected them against H2O2-induced cell death. Epicardial transplantation of myoblast sheets in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction was used to evaluate the expression of CST and trib3 as markers of myoblasts' paracrine effect in vivo. Myoblast sheets induced expression of the CST as well as trib3 in infarcted myocardium. CST localized around blood vessels, suggesting smooth muscle cell localization. Our results provide a deeper molecular insight into the therapeutic mechanisms of myoblast-derived paracrine signaling in cardiac cells and suggest that myoblast transplantation therapy may prevent oxidative stress-induced cardiac deterioration and progression of heart failure. PMID:26021843

  9. Image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  10. AlphaB-crystallin is involved in oxidative stress protection determined by VEGF in skeletal myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercatelli, Neri; Dimauro, Ivan; Ciafré, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Caporossi, Daniela

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that the effects of VEGF-A, the prototype VEGF ligand, may extend to a variety of cell types other than endothelial cells. The expression of VEGF-A and its main receptors, Flt-1/VEGFR-1 and KDR/Flk-1/VEGFR-2, was indeed detected in several cell types, including cardiac myocytes and regenerating myotubes. In addition to its proangiogenic activity, evidence indicates that VEGF-A can sustain skeletal muscle regeneration by enhancing the survival and migration of myogenic cells and by promoting the growth of myogenic fibers. In this study, our aim was to investigate whether VEGF could protect skeletal muscle satellite cells from apoptotic cell death triggered by reactive oxygen species and to identify the main molecular mechanisms. C2C12 mouse myoblasts, cultured in vitro in the presence of exogenous VEGF or stably transfected with a plasmid vector expressing VEGF-A, were subjected to oxidative stress and analyzed for cell growth and survival, induction of apoptosis, and molecular signaling. The results of our study demonstrated that VEGF protects C2C12 myoblasts from apoptosis induced by oxidative or hypoxic-like stress. This protection did not correlate with the modulation of the expression of VEGF receptors, but is clearly linked to the phosphorylation of the KDR/Flk-1 receptor, the activation of NF-kappaB, and/or the overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein alphaB-crystallin. PMID:20441791

  11. Gene therapy for rat renal anemia with implantation of erythropoietin-transgenic myoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永学; 魏汉东; 吴祖泽; 贺福初

    1999-01-01

    To investigate whether an erythropoietin (EPO) gene-based therapy could serve as an alternative to the repeated injection of rhEPO in treatment to renal anemia, the genetically modified myoblasts of rats, named Myo/ EPO, were implanted through intramuscular injection to model rats with renal anemia. The hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (HCT) of the rats increased from (92. 5±3.0) g/L and 0.29 ±0.04 to the peak values of (103.8 ±5.0) g/L and 0. 32 ±0. 04 respectively 14 d after implantation, and sustained the pre-implantation level for 90 d. Otherwise, the control rats implanted with Myo/X, which carried the parent retroviral vector, gradually became severe in anemia. The PCR detection for hEPO cDNA in the rat muscle adjacent to injection sites indicated that the Myo/EPO cells survived for a long period in the muscle of rats. The results primarily demonstrate that myoblast gene transfer of EPO is effective for the treatment of rat renal anemia.

  12. Caveolin-3 inhibits growth signal in cardiac myoblasts in a Ca2+-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Takayuki; Otsu, Kouji; Oshikawa, Jin; Hori, Hideaki; Kitamura, Hitoshi; Ito, Takaaki; Umemura, Satoshi; Minamisawa, Susumu; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    Caveolin, a major protein component of caveolae, directly interacts with multiple signaling molecules, such as Ras and growth factor receptors, and inhibits their function. However, the role of the second messenger system in mediating this inhibition by caveolin remains poorly understood. We examined the role of Ca2+ -dependent signal in caveloin-mediated growth inhibition using a rat cardiac myoblast cell line (H9C2), in which the expression of caveolin-3, the muscle specific subtype, can be induced using the LacSwitch system. Upon induction with IPTG and serum-starvation, the expression of caveolin-3 was increased by 3.3-fold relative to that of mock-induced cells. The recombinant caveolin-3 was localized to the same subcellular fraction as endogenous caveolin-3 after sucrose gradient purification. Angiotensin II enhanced ERK phosphorylation, but this enhancement was significantly decreased in caveolin-3-induced cells in comparison to that in mock-induced cells. Similarly, when cells were stimulated with fetal calf serum, DNA synthesis, as determined by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, was significantly decreased in caveolin-3-induced cells. When cells were treated with Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA and EGTA), however, this attenuation was blunted. Calphostin (PKC inhibitor), but not cyclosporine A treatment (calcineurin inhibitor), blunted this attenuation in caveolin-3 induced cells. Our findings suggest that caveolin exhibits growth inhibition in a Ca2+-dependent manner, most likely through PKC, in cardiac myoblasts. PMID:16563233

  13. Cold fusion in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since early April a great deal of excitement has been created over the Fleischmann/Pons cold fusion experiment, which if it performs as advertised, could turn out to be mankind's best hope of heading off the energy crisis scheduled for early in the next century. Dozens of groups around the world are now attempting to duplicate the experiment to see if Fleischmann and Pons' discovery is an experimental mistake, an unknown electrochemical effect or a new kind of fusion reaction. This article puts the experiment into the perspective of today and looks at how it might affect the energy scene tomorrow if it should turn out to be commercially exploitable. (author)

  14. Peaceful fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Like other intense neutron sources fusion reactors have in principle a potential to be used for military purposes. Although the use of fissile material is usually not considered when thinking of fusion reactors (except in fusion-fission hybrid concepts) quantitative estimates about the possible production potential of future commercial fusion reactor concepts show that significant amounts of weapon grade fissile materials could be produced even with very limited amounts of source materials. In this talk detailed burnup calculations with VESTA and MCMATH using an MCNP model of the PPCS-A will be presented. We compare different irradiation positions and the isotopic vectors of the plutonium bred in different blankets of the reactor wall with the liquid lead-lithium alloy replaced by uranium. The technical, regulatory and policy challenges to manage the proliferation risks of fusion power will be addressed as well. Some of these challenges would benefit if addressed at an early stage of the research and development process. Hence, research on fusion reactor safeguards should start as early as possible and accompany the current research on experimental fusion reactors.

  15. Effect of myonuclear number and mitochondrial fusion on Drosophila indirect flight muscle organization and size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms involved in establishing the organization and numbers of fibres in a muscle are not completely understood. During Drosophila indirect flight muscle (IFM) formation, muscle growth is achieved by both incorporating hundreds of nuclei, and hypertrophy. As a result, IFMs provide a good model with which to understand the mechanisms that govern overall muscle organization and growth. We present a detailed analysis of the organization of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), a subset of the IFMs. We show that each DLM is similar to a vertebrate fascicle and consists of multiple muscle fibres. However, increased fascicle size does not necessarily change the number of constituent fibres, but does increase the number of myofibrils packed within the fibres. We also find that altering the number of myoblasts available for fusion changes DLM fascicle size and fibres are loosely packed with myofibrils. Additionally, we show that knock down of genes required for mitochondrial fusion causes a severe reduction in the size of DLM fascicles and fibres. Our results establish the organization levels of DLMs and highlight the importance of the appropriate number of nuclei and mitochondrial fusion in determining the overall organization, growth and size of DLMs. - Highlights: • Drosophila dorsal longitudinal muscles are similar to vertebrate skeletal muscles. • A threshold number of myoblasts governs the organization of a fibre and its size. • Mitochondrial fusion defect leads to abnormal fibre growth and organization

  16. Effect of myonuclear number and mitochondrial fusion on Drosophila indirect flight muscle organization and size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Mamta; Nongthomba, Upendra, E-mail: upendra@mrdg.iisc.ernet.in

    2013-10-15

    Mechanisms involved in establishing the organization and numbers of fibres in a muscle are not completely understood. During Drosophila indirect flight muscle (IFM) formation, muscle growth is achieved by both incorporating hundreds of nuclei, and hypertrophy. As a result, IFMs provide a good model with which to understand the mechanisms that govern overall muscle organization and growth. We present a detailed analysis of the organization of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), a subset of the IFMs. We show that each DLM is similar to a vertebrate fascicle and consists of multiple muscle fibres. However, increased fascicle size does not necessarily change the number of constituent fibres, but does increase the number of myofibrils packed within the fibres. We also find that altering the number of myoblasts available for fusion changes DLM fascicle size and fibres are loosely packed with myofibrils. Additionally, we show that knock down of genes required for mitochondrial fusion causes a severe reduction in the size of DLM fascicles and fibres. Our results establish the organization levels of DLMs and highlight the importance of the appropriate number of nuclei and mitochondrial fusion in determining the overall organization, growth and size of DLMs. - Highlights: • Drosophila dorsal longitudinal muscles are similar to vertebrate skeletal muscles. • A threshold number of myoblasts governs the organization of a fibre and its size. • Mitochondrial fusion defect leads to abnormal fibre growth and organization.

  17. Biodistribution studies of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled myoblasts in a murine model of muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, F.R. E-mail: colombof@policlinico.mi.it; Torrente, Y.; Casati, R.; Benti, R.; Corti, S.; Salani, S.; D' Angelo, M.G.; DeLiso, A.; Scarlato, G.; Bresolin, N.; Gerundini, P

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to evaluate the myoblast labeling of various {sup 99m}Tc complexes and to select the complex that best accomplishes this labeling, and second to evaluate the biodistribution of myoblasts labeled with this complex using mice with MDX muscular dystrophy (the murine homologue of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy). The following ligands were used to prepare the corresponding {sup 99m}Tc complexes: hexakis-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI), bis(2-ethoxyethyl)diphosphinoethane (Tf), (RR,SS)-4,8-diaza-3,6,6,9-tetramethyl-undecane-2,10-dione-bisoxime (HM-PAO), bis(N-ethyl)dithiocarbamate (NEt), and bis(N-ethoxy, N-ethyl)dithiocarbamate (NOEt). One million murine myoblasts were incubated for 30-60 minutes with 5 mCi of each of the 99mTc complexes prepared from the above ligands. Viability was assessed by microscopic counting after trypan blue staining, and the radioactivity absorbed in the cells was measured after centrifugation. The compound with the highest uptake in cellular pellets was [{sup 99m}Tc]N-NOEt. The biodistribution of myoblasts labeled with this complex was evaluated after intraaortic injection in dystrophic mice. Such an approach has the potential of effecting widespread gene transfer through the bloodstream to muscles lacking dystrophin.

  18. Effect of Low Power Laser Irradiation on the Ability of Cell Growth and Myogenic Differentiation of Myoblasts Cultured In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-Ping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a therapeutic modality, low power laser irradiation (LPLI has been used clinically in the treatment of skeletal muscle injuries and other myopathic conditions, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms attributed to this therapy were still unclear. Myoblasts are a type of myogenic stem cells quiescence in mature skeletal muscle fibers and are considered as the source cells during the regenerating process. The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effects of LPLI on the proliferation and myogenic differentiation of the cultured myoblasts and to find out the major candidates responsible for LPLI-induced muscle regeneration in vivo. In this study, primary rat myoblasts were exposed to helium-neon (He-Ne laser. Cell proliferation, differentiation, and the cellular responses to LPLI were monitored by using morphological observation and molecular biological methods. It was found that LPLI at a certain fluence could increase the cell growth potential for myoblasts and further induce more cells entering into S phase of the mitotic cycle as indicated by high levels of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation, while at the same time inhibiting their in vitro differentiation and decreasing the expression of myogenic regulatory genes to a certain extent. Taken together, these results provide experimental evidence for the clinical applications of LPLI in regenerating skeletal muscle.

  19. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladin in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro

  20. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Uyen Nhi; Liang, Vincent Roderick; Wang, Hao-Ven, E-mail: hvwang@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladin in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro.

  1. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4He, 3He, 3H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  2. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the wound or vertebral bones Damage to a spinal nerve, causing weakness, pain, loss of sensation, problems with your bowels or bladder The vertebrae above and below the fusion are more likely to wear away, leading to more problems later

  3. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  4. Dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to fusion competence of myogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research indicates that the leading edge of lamellipodia of myogenic cells (myoblasts and myotubes) contains presumptive fusion sites, yet the mechanisms that render the plasma membrane fusion-competent remain largely unknown. Here we show that dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to both cell adhesion and plasma membrane union during myogenic cell fusion. Adhesion-complex proteins including M-cadherin, β-catenin, and p120-catenin accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which contains the presumptive fusion sites of the plasma membrane, in a lipid raft-dependent fashion prior to cell contact. In addition, disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion directly prevented the membrane union of myogenic cell fusion. Time-lapse recording showed that lipid rafts were laterally dispersed from the center of the lamellipodia prior to membrane fusion. Adhesion proteins that had accumulated at lipid rafts were also removed from the presumptive fusion sites when lipid rafts were laterally dispersed. The resultant lipid raft- and adhesion complex-free area at the leading edge fused with the opposing plasma membrane. These results demonstrate a key role for dynamic clustering/dispersion of lipid rafts in establishing fusion-competent sites of the myogenic cell membrane, providing a novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of myogenic cell fusion.

  5. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efforts of the Chemical Technology Division in fusion energy include the areas of fuel handling, processing, and containment. Current studies are concerned largely with the development of vacuum pumps for fusion reactors and experiments and with development and evaluation of techniques for recovering tritium from solid or liquid breeding blankets. In addition, a small effort is devoted to support of the ORNL design of a major Tokamak experiment, The Next Step (TNS)

  6. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of eEF1A2 expression during myoblast diffrerentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vislovukh A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal development, the switch of the expression from isoform A1 to the isoform A2 of eukaryotic translation elongation factor (eEF1A is observed in neuronal and muscle tissues. The switch of the expression is a vital fundamental process, as mutant mice, with the partial EEF1A2 deletion dies on the 28th day after birth. Mechanism of the inhibition of A1 and stimulation of A2 expression during the first days of postnatal development is unknown. The existence of potential miRNA binding sites in the 3’UTR of mRNAs encoding the isoforms assumes a post-transcriptional control of abovementioned phenomenon. Aim. To check the possibility of post-transcriptional regulation of the isoforms A1 and A2 expression during differentiation of the human immortalized myoblasts cell line LHCN. Methods. The level of gene expression was quantified by qPCR, the existence of post-transcriptional regulation was demonstrated with Dual-Luciferase® Reporter Assay. Results. Using immortalized human myoblasts cell line LHCN, the induction of isoform A2 of eEF1 during differentiation of myoblasts was shown. The existence of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of the abovementioned process was confirmed. Downregulation of mir-661 and mir-744 that have binding sites in the 3’ UTR of EEF1A2 mRNA, during differentiation suggests a potential role of microRNAs in the eEF1A2 induction during myoblast differentiation. Conclusions. Induction of A2 isoform of eEF1 during differentiation of myoblasts occurs on transcriptional and post-transcriptional level.

  7. Skeletal muscle Kv7 (KCNQ) channels in myoblast differentiation and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv) are involved in myocyte proliferation and differentiation by triggering changes in membrane potential and regulating cell volume. Since Kv7 channels may participate in these events, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether skeletal muscle Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 were involved during proliferation and myogenesis. Here we report that, while myotube formation did not regulate Kv7 channels, Kv7.5 was up-regulated during cell cycle progression. Although, Kv7.1 mRNA also increased during the G1-phase, pharmacological evidence mainly involves Kv7.5 in myoblast growth. Our results indicate that the cell cycle-dependent expression of Kv7.5 is involved in skeletal muscle cell proliferation

  8. Construction and Myogenic Differentiation of 3D Myoblast Tissues Fabricated by Fibronectin-Gelatin Nanofilm Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, Varvara; Liu, Chen Yun; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a recently developed approach of coating the cells with fibronectin-gelatin nanofilms to build 3D skeletal muscle tissue models. We constructed the microtissues from C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently differentiated them to form muscle-like tissue. The thickness of the constructs could be successfully controlled by altering the number of seeded cells. We were able to build up to ~ 76 µm thick 3D constructs that formed multinucleated myotubes. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 improved myotube formation in thick constructs. Our approach makes it possible to rapidly form 3D muscle tissues and is promising for the in vitro construction of physiologically relevant human skeletal muscle tissue models. PMID:27125461

  9. Construction and myogenic differentiation of 3D myoblast tissues fabricated by fibronectin-gelatin nanofilm coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, Varvara; Liu, Chun-Yen; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we used a recently developed approach of coating the cells with fibronectin-gelatin nanofilms to build 3D skeletal muscle tissue models. We constructed the microtissues from C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently differentiated them to form muscle-like tissue. The thickness of the constructs could be successfully controlled by altering the number of seeded cells. We were able to build up to ∼76 μm thick 3D constructs that formed multinucleated myotubes. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 improved myotube formation in thick constructs. Our approach makes it possible to rapidly form 3D muscle tissues and is promising for the in vitro construction of physiologically relevant human skeletal muscle tissue models. PMID:27125461

  10. Effect of oxygen tension on bioenergetics and proteostasis in young and old myoblast precursor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konigsberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of studies using primary cultures of myoblasts, the cells are maintained at ambient oxygen tension (21% O2, despite the fact that physiological O2 at the tissue level in vivo is much lower (~1–5% O2. We hypothesized that the cellular response in presence of high oxygen concentration might be particularly important in studies comparing energetic function or oxidative stress in cells isolated from young versus old animals. To test this, we asked whether oxygen tension plays a role in mitochondrial bioenergetics (oxygen consumption, glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation or oxidative damage to proteins (protein disulfides, carbonyls and aggregates in myoblast precursor cells (MPCs isolated from young (3–4 m and old (29–30 m C57BL/6 mice. MPCs were grown under physiological (3% or ambient (21% O2 for two weeks prior to exposure to an acute oxidative insult (H2O2. Our results show significantly higher basal mitochondrial respiration in young versus old MPCs, an increase in basal respiration in young MPCs maintained at 3% O2 compared to cells maintained at 21% O2, and a shift toward glycolytic metabolism in old MPCs grown at 21% O2. H2O2 treatment significantly reduced respiration in old MPCs grown at 3% O2 but did not further repress respiration at 21% O2 in old MPCs. Oxidative damage to protein was higher in cells maintained at 21% O2 and increased in response to H2O2 in old MPCs. These data underscore the importance of understanding the effect of ambient oxygen tension in cell culture studies, in particular studies measuring oxidative damage and mitochondrial function.

  11. Effects of transplanted myoblasts transfected with human growth hormone gene on improvement of ventricular function of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Cell transplantation for myocardial repair is limited by early cell death.Gene therapy with human growth hormone(hGH)has been shown to promote angiogensis and attenuate apoptosis in the experimental animal.This study was conducted to explore the effects of myoblast-based hGH gene therapy on heart function restoration and angiogenesis after myocardial infarction,and to compare the differences between myoblast-based hGH gene therapy and myoblast therapy.Methods Myoblasts were isolated from several SD rats,cultured,purified,and transfected with plasmid pLghGHSN and pLgGFPSN.Radioimmunoassay(RIA)was used to detect the expression of hGH in these myoblasts.SD rats underwent the ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery so as to establish a heart ischemia model.Thirty surviving rats that underwent ligation were randomly divided into 3 equal groups 2 weeks after left coronary artery occlusion:pLghGHSN group received myoblast infected with hGH gene transplantation;pLgGFPSN group received myoblast infected with GFP gene transplantation;control group:received cultured medium only.Four weeks after the injection the surviving rat underwent evaluation of cardiac function by echocardiography.The rats were killed and ventricular samples were undergone immunohistochemistry with hematoxylin-eosin and factorⅧ.Cryosection was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy to examine the expression of green fluorescent protein.Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)was used to examine the mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF),bax and Bcl-2.hGH expression in myocardium was examined by Western blot.Results Myoblast can be successfully isolated,cultured and transfected.The expression of hGH in transfected myoblast was demonstrated with RIA.Four weeks after therapy,the cardiac function was improved significantly in pLghGHSN group and pLgGFPSN group.Fractional shortening(FS)and ejection fraction(EF)in pLghGHSN group were elevated

  12. Fad24, a Positive Regulator of Adipogenesis, Is Required for S Phase Re-entry of C2C12 Myoblasts Arrested in G0 Phase and Involved in p27(Kip1) Expression at the Protein Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Natsuki; Nishizuka, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    Factor for adipocyte differentiation 24 (fad24) is a positive regulator of adipogenesis. We previously found that human fad24 is abundantly expressed in skeletal muscle. However, the function of fad24 in skeletal muscle remains largely unknown. Because skeletal muscle is a highly regenerative tissue, we focused on the function of fad24 in skeletal muscle regeneration. In this paper, we investigated the role of fad24 in the cell cycle re-entry of quiescent C2C12 myoblasts-mimicked satellite cells. The expression levels of fad24 and histone acetyltransferase binding to ORC1 (hbo1), a FAD24-interacting factor, were elevated at the early phase of the regeneration process in response to cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury. The knockdown of fad24 inhibited the proliferation of quiescent myoblasts, whereas fad24 knockdown did not affect differentiation. S phase entry following serum activation is abrogated by fad24 knockdown in quiescent cells. Furthermore, fad24 knockdown cells show a marked accumulation of p27(Kip1) protein. These results suggest that fad24 may have an important role in the S phase re-entry of quiescent C2C12 cells through the regulation of p27(Kip1) at the protein level. PMID:26902224

  13. Globular adiponectin induces differentiation and fusion of skeletal muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tania Fiaschi; Domenico Cirelli; Giuseppina Comito; Stefania Gelmini; Giampietro Ramponi; Maria Serio; Paola Chiarugi

    2009-01-01

    The growing interest in skeletal muscle regeneration is associated with the opening of new therapeutic strategies for muscle injury after trauma, as well as several muscular degenerative pathologies, including dystrophies, muscu-lar atrophy, and cachexia. Studies focused on the ability of extracellular factors to promote myogenesis are therefore highly promising. We now report that an adipocyte-derived factor, globular adiponectin (gAd), is able to induce mus-cle gene expression and cell differentiation, gAd, besides its well-known ability to regulate several metabolic func-tions in muscle, including glucose uptake and consumption and fatty acid catabolism, is able to block cell cycle entry of myoblasts, to induce the expression of specific skeletal muscle markers such as myosin heavy chain or eaveolin-3, as well as to provoke cell fusion into multinucleated syneytia and, finally, muscle fibre formation, gAd exerts its pro-differentiative activity through redox-dependent activation of p38, Akt and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase path-ways. Interestingly, differentiating myoblasts are autocrine for adiponectiu, and the mimicking of pro-inflammatory settings or exposure to oxidative stress strongly increases the production of the hormone from differentiating cells. These data suggest a novel function of adiponectin, directly coordinating the myogenic differentiation program and serving an autocrine function during skeletal myogenesis.

  14. Sirtuin 1 promotes the proliferation of C2C12 myoblast cells via the myostatin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Zhang, Ting; Xi, Yongyong; Yang, Cuili; Sun, Chengcao; Li, Dejia

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Sirtuin (Sirt)1 serves a significant role in proliferation and differentiation of myoblast cells; however the signaling mechanisms involved remain to be established. Myostatin (MSTN), a member of transforming growth factor‑β family, is an vital regulator of myoblast, fibroblast growth and differentiation. To determine if MSTN is involved in the regulation of myoblast cell proliferation by Sirt1, the present study administrated the Sirt1 activator resveratrol, inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM) and MSTN inhibitor SB431542 to C2C12 myoblast cells. It was demonstrated that the Sirt1 activator, resveratrol, repressed, whereas the Sirt1 inhibitor, NAM, enhanced C2C12 myoblast cells proliferation in a Sirt1‑dependent manner. SB431542 promoted the proliferation of C2C12 myoblast cells and reversed the inhibition effect of NAM on C2C12 myoblast cell proliferation. Additionally, resveratrol upregulated the mRNA expression of MyoD, but inhibited the expression of MSTN. Additionally, NAM significantly repressed the expression of MyoD and the phosphorylation of P107 (p‑P107), but enhanced the expression of MSTN and the protein expression of P107. SB431542 significantly mitigated the effect of NAM on the expression of MyoD, P107 and p‑P107. Taken together, these results indicated that Sirt1 promotes the proliferation of C2C12 myoblast cells via the MSTN signaling pathway. PMID:27279047

  15. Stem cell antigen-1 regulates the tempo of muscle repair through effects on proliferation of α7 integrin-expressing myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal muscle repair occurs through a programmed series of events including myogenic precursor activation, myoblast proliferation, and differentiation into new myofibers. We previously identified a role for Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) in myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. We demonstrated that blocking Sca-1 expression resulted in sustained myoblast cell division. Others have since demonstrated that Sca-1-null myoblasts display a similar phenotype when cultured ex vivo. To test the importance of Sca-1 during myogenesis in vivo, we employed a myonecrotic injury model in Sca-1-/- and Sca-1+/+ mice. Our results demonstrate that Sca-1-/- myoblasts exhibit a hyperproliferative response consisting of prolonged and accelerated cell division in response to injury. This leads to delayed myogenic differentiation and muscle repair. These data provide the first in vivo evidence for Sca-1 as a regulator of myoblast proliferation during muscle regeneration. These studies also suggest that the balance between myogenic precursor proliferation and differentiation is critical to normal muscle repair

  16. Short fusion

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    French and UK researchers are perfecting a particle accelerator technique that could aid the quest for fusion energy or make X-rays that are safer and produce higher-resolution images. Led by Dr Victor Malka from the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Avancees in Paris, the team has developed a better way of accelerating electrons over short distances (1 page).

  17. Magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project

  18. Serotonin and Histamine Therapy Increases Tetanic Forces of Myoblasts, Reduces Muscle Injury, and Improves Grip Strength Performance of Dmdmdx Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gurel, Volkan; Lins, Jeremy; Lambert, Kristyn; Lazauski, Joan; Spaulding, James; McMichael, John

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked fatal disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Although several therapeutic approaches have been studied, none has led to substantial long-term effects in patients. The aim of this study was to test a serotonin and histamine (S&H) combination on human skeletal myoblasts and Dmdmdx mice for its effects on muscle strength and injury. Normal human bioartificial muscles (BAMs) were treated, and muscle tetanic forces and muscle...

  19. Six1 induces protein synthesis signaling expression in duck myoblasts mainly via up-regulation of mTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohan Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a critical transcription factor, Six1 plays an important role in the regulation of myogenesis and muscle development. However, little is known about its regulatory mechanism associated with muscular protein synthesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of overexpression ofSix1 on the expression of key protein metabolism-related genes in duck myoblasts. Through an experimental model where duck myoblasts were transfected with a pEGFP-duSix1 construct, we found that overexpression of duckSix1 could enhance cell proliferation activity and increase mRNA expression levels of key genes involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, while the expression of FOXO1, MuRF1and MAFbx was not significantly altered, indicating thatSix1 could promote protein synthesis in myoblasts through up-regulating the expression of several related genes. Additionally, in duck myoblasts treated with LY294002 and rapamycin, the specific inhibitors ofPI3K and mTOR, respectively, the overexpression of Six1 could significantly ameliorate inhibitive effects of these inhibitors on protein synthesis. Especially, the mRNA expression levels of mTOR and S6K1 were observed to undergo a visible change, and a significant increase in protein expression of S6K1 was seen. These data suggested that Six1plays an important role in protein synthesis, which may be mainly due to activation of the mTOR signaling pathway.

  20. Evidence for myoblast-extrinsic regulation of slow myosin heavy chain expression during muscle fiber formation in embryonic development

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Vertebrate muscles are composed of an array of diverse fast and slow fiber types with different contractile properties. Differences among fibers in fast and slow MyHC expression could be due to extrinsic factors that act on the differentiated myofibers. Alternatively, the mononucleate myoblasts that fuse to form multinucleated muscle fibers could differ intrinsically due to lineage. To distinguish between these possibilities, we determined whether the changes in proportion of slow fibers were...

  1. Efficient Non-Viral Reprogramming of Myoblasts to Stemness with a Single Small Molecule to Generate Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pasha, Zeeshan; Haider, Husnain Kh; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    The current protocols for generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells involve genome integrating viral vectors which may induce tumorgenesis. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize a non-viral method without genetic manipulation for reprogramming of skeletal myoblasts (SMs) using small molecules. Methods and Results SMs from young male Oct3/4-GFP+ transgenic mouse were treated with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, RG108. Two weeks later, GFP+ colonies of SM derived iP...

  2. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  3. siRNA delivery into cultured primary human myoblasts--optimization of electroporation parameters and theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lojk, Jasna; Mis, Katarina; Pirkmajer, Sergej; Pavlin, Mojca

    2015-12-01

    Introduction of genetic material into muscle tissue has been extensively researched, including isolation and in vitro expansion of primary myoblasts as a potential source of cells for skeletal and heart muscle tissue engineering applications. In this study, we optimized the electroporation protocol for introduction of short interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) against messenger RNA for Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α) into cultured primary human myoblasts. We established optimal pulsing protocol for siRNA electro transfection, and theoretically analyzed the effect of electric field and pulse duration on silencing efficiency and electrophoretic displacement of siRNA. Silencing of HIF-1α was determined with quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. The most efficient silencing (71% knockdown) was achieved with 8 × 2 ms pulses, E = 0.6 kV/cm. Viability was determined immediately, 1 h and 48 h after electroporation. In general, there was a trade-off between efficient silencing and preserved viability. Electric field and pulse duration are crucial parameters for silencing, since both increase membrane permeabilization and electrophoretic transfer of siRNA. Short-term viability showed immediate toxicity of pulses due to membrane damage, while indirect effects on cell proliferation were observed after 48 h. Presented results are important for faster optimization of electroporation parameters for ex vivo electrotransfer of short RNA molecules into primary human myoblasts. PMID:26388450

  4. Bupivacaine can enhance lysosomal activity in mouse muscle myoblasts%布比卡因增强小鼠成肌细胞溶酶体的活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊静薇; 毛雨; 李荣荣; 丁正年

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of bupivacaine on lysosomal abundance and activity in mouse muscle myoblasts.Methods Mouse myoblasts C2C12 was randomly divided into control group (without any treatment) and bupivacaine group (treated with bupivacaine 600 μ mol/L for 6 h).After then,the changes of lysosomal pH was assessed by LysoSensor pH indicator.The content of lysosomes was detected by LysoTracker probe.The expression of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) and Cathepsin B was detected by Western blot analysis.The activity of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes Cathepsin B was determined by MagicRed assay kit.Results Bupivacaine did not affect lysosomal pH.However,compared with the controls,lysosomal abundance was significantly increased 15.15% following bupivacaine treatment(P<0.01).Moreover,protein expression levels of LAMP-1 and Cathepsin B were significantly upregulated 36.41% and 35.29% respetctively by bupivacaine (P<0.01).Furthermore,the activity of Cathepsin B was significantly increased 23.74% by bupivacaine(P<0.01).Conclusions Bupivacaine increased lysosomal content and enhance lysosomal activity in mouse muscle myoblasts.%目的 探讨局部麻醉药布比卡因对小鼠成肌细胞溶酶体的影响. 方法 将体外培养的小鼠成肌细胞C2C12分为2组.对照组:不加任何药物;布比卡因组:以600μmol/L布比卡因刺激细胞6h.实验结束后,用LysoSensor探针评价溶酶体腔pH,用LysoTrackor探针检测溶酶体含量,用蛋白免疫印迹法检测溶酶体相关膜蛋白-1(LAMP-1)和溶酶体蛋白水解酶Cathepsin B的表达水平,并以MagicRed染色法测定Cathepsin B的活性.结果 布比卡因对溶酶体腔pH没有影响.但是,与对照组相比,布比卡因组溶酶体含量增加15.15% (P<0.01),LAMP-1与Cathepsin B表达量分别增加36.41%、35.29% (P<0.01),Cathepsin B活性增加23.74%(P<0.01).结论 布比卡因能增加小鼠成肌细胞溶酶体含量,增强溶酶体活性.

  5. Identification of valid reference genes during the differentiation of human myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hörmann Karl

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of RNA expression using real-time PCR (qRT-PCR traditionally includes reference genes (RG as an internal control. This practice is being questioned as it becomes increasingly clear that RG may vary considerably under certain experimental conditions. Thus, the validity of a particular RG must be determined for each experimental setting. We used qRT-PCR to measure the levels of six RG, which have been reported in the literature to be invariant. The RG were analyzed in human myoblast cultures under differentiation conditions. We examined the expression by qRT-PCR of mRNA encoding Beta-actin (ACTB, Beta-2-microglobulin (B2M, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA, TATA box binding protein (TBP and ribosomal protein, large, P0 (RPLPO. The mRNA expression of the following genes of interest (GOI were analyzed: skeletal muscle alpha 1 actin (ACTA1, myogenin/myogenic factor 4 (MYOG, embryonic skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain 3 (MYH3 and the activity of creatine phosphokinase (CK. The geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software programs were used to ascertain the most suitable RG to normalize the RNA input. Results Using the geNorm program, RPLPO and TBP were found to be the most stable genes, additionally a suitable normalization factor (NF was calculated. The NormFinder software showed that RPLPO was the most stable, whereas TBP ranked second. BestKeeper program also revealed that RPLPO and TBP as stable genes, but PPIA was the most stable reference gene, whereas GAPDH and ACTB were the worst ranked. Conclusion RNA expression analyses including three independent softwares revealed that RPLPO, TBP as reference genes or NF calculated by geNorm software, are suitable to normalize the mRNA expression in myoblast after culture under differentiation conditions. Significant correlations can be identified between the differentiations markers ACTA1, MYOG, MYH3 and creatine phosphokinase (CK

  6. Photobiomodulation Protects and Promotes Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblast Cells Exposed to Snake Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Aline; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Cogo, José Carlos; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Snakebites is a neglected disease and in Brazil is considered a serious health problem, with the majority of the snakebites caused by the genus Bothrops. Antivenom therapy and other first-aid treatments do not reverse local myonecrose which is the main sequel caused by the envenomation. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of low level laser (LLL) therapy in reducing local myonecrosis induced by Bothropic venoms, however the mechanism involved in this effect is unknown. In this in vitro study, we aimed to analyze the effect of LLL irradiation against cytotoxicity induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom on myoblast C2C12 cells. Methodology C2C12 were utilized as a model target and were incubated with B. jararacussu venom (12.5 μg/mL) and immediately irradiated with LLL at wavelength of red 685 nm or infrared 830 nm with energy density of 2.0, 4.6 and 7.0 J/cm2. Effects of LLL on cellular responses of venom-induced cytotoxicity were examined, including cell viability, measurement of cell damage and intra and extracellular ATP levels, expression of myogenic regulatory factors, as well as cellular differentiation. Results In non-irradiated cells, the venom caused a decrease in cell viability and a massive release of LDH and CK levels indicating myonecrosis. Infrared and red laser at all energy densities were able to considerably decrease venom-induced cytotoxicity. Laser irradiation induced myoblasts to differentiate into myotubes and this effect was accompanied by up regulation of MyoD and specially myogenin. Moreover, LLL was able to reduce the extracellular while increased the intracellular ATP content after venom exposure. In addition, no difference in the intensity of cytotoxicity was shown by non-irradiated and irradiated venom. Conclusion LLL irradiation caused a protective effect on C2C12 cells against the cytotoxicity caused by B. jararacussu venom and promotes differentiation of these cells by up regulation of myogenic factors. A modulatory

  7. Fusion rules of equivariantizations of fusion categories

    OpenAIRE

    Burciu, Sebastian; Natale, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    We determine the fusion rules of the equivariantization of a fusion category $\\mathcal{C}$ under the action of a finite group $G$ in terms of the fusion rules of $\\mathcal{C}$ and group-theoretical data associated to the group action. As an application we obtain a formula for the fusion rules in an equivariantization of a pointed fusion category in terms of group-theoretical data. This entails a description of the fusion rules in any braided group-theoretical fusion category.

  8. Carpal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Jalal Jalalshokouhi; Mohammad Hossein Herischi; Shahyar Pashaei; Ali Akbar Ameri

    2012-01-01

    Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformatio...

  9. Cold Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chu; Yue, Manyu; Yu, Huanzhang; Chen, Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Science can often result in technologies which can solve energy problems in societies. On March 23, 1989, two scientists Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann claimed at a press conference that they had been able to perform nuclear fusion at room temperature. Their claim was quickly investigated and checked by many scientists around the world. Their discovery generated a heated debate in the scientific literature and magazines in the next few years, and their work was criticized for being unsci...

  10. Proteasome activity or expression is not altered by activation of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 in cultured fibroblasts or myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David M; Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D

    2005-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) with chaperoning function work together with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to prevent the accumulation of misfolded, potentially toxic proteins, as well as to control catabolism of the bulk of cytoplasmic, cellular protein. There is evidence for the involvement of both systems in neurodegenerative disease, and a therapeutic target is the heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, which mediates upregulation of Hsps in response to cellular stress. The mechanisms regulating expression of proteasomal proteins in mammalian cells are less well defined. To assess any direct effect of Hsf1 on expression of proteasomal subunits and activity in mammalian cells, a plasmid encoding a constitutively active form of Hsf1 (Hsf1act) was expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Hsf1 and in cultured human myoblasts. Plasmid encoding an inactivatible form of Hsf1 (Hsf1inact) served as control. In cultures transfected with plasmid hsf1act, robust expression of the major stress-inducible Hsp, Hsp70, occurred but not in cultures transfected with hsf1inact. No significant changes in the level of expression of representative proteasomal proteins (structural [20Salpha], a nonpeptidase beta subunit [20Sbeta3], or 2 regulatory subunits [19S subunit 6b, 11 Salpha]) or in chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, and caspaselike activities of the proteasome were measured. Thus, stress-induced or pharmacological activation of Hsf1 in mammalian cells would upregulate Hsps but not directly affect expression or activity of proteasomes. PMID:16184768

  11. Fusion fundamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States and other countries are in the process of formulating energy policies to meet an anticipated world-wide shortage of fuel supplies. Immediate attention will necessarily focus on fuel conservation and on stretching-out conventional energy technologies (oil, gas, coal and light water reactors). The underlying concern of all policy, however, must be to guard against the emergence of a time gap between the exhaustion of conventional fuels and the availability of appropriate inexhaustible energy sources in the next century. The only known candidates for providing the bulk of the world's long-term energy needs are fusion, solar and fission breeder reactors. These are all still in the development stage and, consequently, it is too early to precisely identify their relative advantages and disadvantages. To assure that fusion will be available as one of the long-term option, the US is continuing a dedicated research and development program to take fusion from its present state to a point where its commercial viability can be ascertained. Similar programs are being carried out in the USSR, Europe, and Japan. 2 tables

  12. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the physics of laser fusion is described on an elementary level. The irradiated matter consists of a dense inner core surrounded by a less dense plasma corona. The laser radiation is mainly absorbed in the outer periphery of the plasma. The absorbed energy is transported inward to the ablation surface where plasma flow is created. Due to this plasma flow, a sequence of inward going shock waves and heat waves are created, resulting in the compression and heating of the core to high density and temperature. The interaction physics between laser and matter leading to thermonuclear burn is summarized by the following sequence of events: Laser absorption → Energy transport → Compression → Nuclear Fusion. This scenario is shown in particular for a Nd:laser with a wavelength of 1 μm. The wavelength scaling of the physical processes is also discussed. In addition to the laser-plasma physics, the Nd high power pulsed laser is described. We give a very brief description of the oscillator, the amplifiers, the spatial filters, the isolators and the diagnostics involved. Last, but not least, the concept of reactors for laser fusion and the necessary laser system are discussed. (author)

  13. Cross talk between matrix elasticity and mechanical force regulates myoblast traction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing evidence suggests that critical cellular processes are profoundly influenced by the cross talk between extracellular nanomechanical forces and the material properties of the cellular microenvironment. Although many studies have examined either the effect of nanomechanical forces or the material properties of the microenvironment on biological processes, few have investigated the influence of both. Here, we performed simultaneous atomic force microscopy and traction force microscopy to demonstrate that muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) rapidly generate a significant increase in traction when stimulated with a local 10 nN force. Cells were cultured and nanomechanically stimulated on hydrogel substrates with controllable local elastic moduli varying from ∼16–89 kPa, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy. Importantly, cellular traction dynamics in response to nanomechanical stimulation only occurred on substrates that were similar to the elasticity of working muscle tissue (∼64–89 kPa) as opposed to substrates mimicking resting tissue (∼16–51 kPa). The traction response was also transient, occurring within 30 s, and dissipating by 60 s, during constant nanomechanical stimulation. The observed biophysical dynamics are very much dependent on rho-kinase and myosin-II activity and likely contribute to the physiology of these cells. Our results demonstrate the fundamental ability of cells to integrate nanoscale information in the cellular microenvironment, such as nanomechanical forces and substrate mechanics, during the process of mechanotransduction. (paper)

  14. First intron of nestin gene regulates its expression during C2C12 myoblast ifferentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Zhong; Zhigang Jin; Yongfeng Chen; Ting Zhang; Wei Bian; Xing Cui; Naihe Jing

    2008-01-01

    Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China Nestin is an intermediate filament protein expressed in neural progenitor cells and in developing skeletal muscle. Nestin has been widely used as a neural progenitor cell marker. It is well established that the specific expression of the nestin gene in neural progenitor cells is conferred by the neural-specific enhancer located in the second intron of the nestin gene. However, the transcriptional mechanism of nestin expression in developing muscle is still unclear. In this study, we identified a muscle cell-specific enhancer in the first intron of mouse nestin gene in mouse myoblast C2C12 cells.We localized the core enhancer activity to the 291-661 region of the first intron, and showed that the two E-boxes in the core enhancer region were important for enhancer activity in differentiating C2C12 cells. We also showed that MyoD protein was involved in the regulation of nestin expression in the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells.

  15. A gene-trap strategy identifies quiescence-induced genes in synchronized myoblasts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramkumar Sambasivan; Grace K Pavlath; Jyotsna Dhawan

    2008-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is characterized not only by reduced mitotic and metabolic activity but also by altered gene expression. Growing evidence suggests that quiescence is not merely a basal state but is regulated by active mechanisms. To understand the molecular programme that governs reversible cell cycle exit, we focused on quiescence-related gene expression in a culture model of myogenic cell arrest and activation. Here we report the identification of quiescence-induced genes using a gene-trap strategy. Using a retroviral vector, we generated a library of gene traps in C2C12 myoblasts that were screened for arrest-induced insertions by live cell sorting (FACS-gal). Several independent genetrap lines revealed arrest-dependent induction of gal activity, confirming the efficacy of the FACS screen. The locus of integration was identified in 15 lines. In three lines, insertion occurred in genes previously implicated in the control of quiescence, i.e. EMSY – a BRCA2-interacting protein, p8/com1– a p300HAT-binding protein and MLL5 – a SET domain protein. Our results demonstrate that expression of chromatin modulatory genes is induced in G0, providing support to the notion that this reversibly arrested state is actively regulated.

  16. Stimulative Effects of Low Intensity He-Ne Laser Irradiation on the Proliferative Potential and Cell-Cycle Progression of Myoblasts in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-Ping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI was found to promote the regeneration of skeletal muscle in vivo but the cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. Myoblasts, normally quiescent and inactivated in adult skeletal muscle, are a type of myogenic progenitor cells and considered as the major candidates responsible for muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of LILI on the growth potential and cell-cycle progression of the cultured myoblasts. Primary myoblasts isolated from rat hind legs were cultured in nutrient-deficient medium for 36 hours and then irradiated by helium-neon laser at a certain energy density. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis revealed that laser irradiation could increase the expression of cellular proliferation marker and the amount of cell subpopulations in the proliferative phase as compared with the nonirradiated control group. Meanwhile, the expressions of cell-cycle regulatory proteins in the laser-treated myoblasts were markedly upregulated as compared to the unirradiated cells, indicating that LILI could promote the reentry of quiescent myoblasts into the cell division cycle. These results suggest that LILI at certain fluences could promote their proliferation, thus contributing to the skeletal muscle regeneration following trauma and myopathic diseases.

  17. Data Fusion in Information Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Shengli

    2012-01-01

    The technique of data fusion has been used extensively in information retrieval due to the complexity and diversity of tasks involved such as web and social networks, legal, enterprise, and many others. This book presents both a theoretical and empirical approach to data fusion. Several typical data fusion algorithms are discussed, analyzed and evaluated. A reader will find answers to the following questions, among others: -          What are the key factors that affect the performance of data fusion algorithms significantly? -          What conditions are favorable to data fusion algorithms? -          CombSum and CombMNZ, which one is better? and why? -          What is the rationale of using the linear combination method? -          How can the best fusion option be found under any given circumstances?

  18. Carpal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Jalalshokouhi*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformation, Stickler syndrome, thalidomide embryopathy, Turner syndrome and many other conditions as mentioned in Rubinstein-Taybi's book. Sometimes there is no known causative disease.Diagnosis is usually made by plain X-ray during studying a syndrome or congenital disease or could be an incidental finding like our patients. Hand bone anomalies are more common in syndromes or other congenital or non-hereditary conditions, but polydactyly, syndactyly or oligodactyly and carpal fusions are interesting. X-ray is the modality of choice, but MRI and X-ray CT with multiplanar reconstructions may be used for diagnosis.

  19. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Dielectrophoretic separation/sorting of multipotent cells. •Plasma membrane microvilli structure of C2C12 and fibroblasts by SEM microscopy. •Cell cycle determination by Ki-67 in DEP-sorted cells. •Plasma membrane differences responsible for changes in membrane capacitance. -- Abstract: Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy

  20. Plasma membrane characterization, by scanning electron microscopy, of multipotent myoblasts-derived populations sorted using dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muratore, Massimo, E-mail: M.Muratore@ed.ac.uk [Institute of Integrated Micro and Nano System, School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Steve [Institute of Molecular Plant Science, School of Biological Science, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF (United Kingdom); Waterfall, Martin [Institute of Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Science, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Dielectrophoretic separation/sorting of multipotent cells. •Plasma membrane microvilli structure of C2C12 and fibroblasts by SEM microscopy. •Cell cycle determination by Ki-67 in DEP-sorted cells. •Plasma membrane differences responsible for changes in membrane capacitance. -- Abstract: Multipotent progenitor cells have shown promise for use in biomedical applications and regenerative medicine. The implementation of such cells for clinical application requires a synchronized, phenotypically and/or genotypically, homogenous cell population. Here we have demonstrated the implementation of a biological tag-free dielectrophoretic device used for discrimination of multipotent myoblastic C2C12 model. The multipotent capabilities in differentiation, for these cells, diminishes with higher passage number, so for cultures above 70 passages only a small percentage of cells is able to differentiate into terminal myotubes. In this work we demonstrated that we could recover, above 96% purity, specific cell types from a mixed population of cells at high passage number without any biological tag using dielectrophoresis. The purity of the samples was confirmed by cytometric analysis using the cell specific marker embryonic myosin. To further investigate the dielectric properties of the cell plasma membrane we co-culture C2C12 with similar size, when in suspension, GFP-positive fibroblast as feeder layer. The level of separation between the cell types was above 98% purity which was confirmed by flow cytometry. These levels of separation are assumed to account for cell size and for the plasma membrane morphological differences between C2C12 and fibroblast unrelated to the stages of the cell cycle which was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Plasma membrane conformational differences were further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy.

  1. A novel whole-cell lysate kinase assay identifies substrates of the p38 MAPK in differentiating myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight James DR

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK is a critical mediator of myoblast differentiation, and does so in part through the phosphorylation and regulation of several transcription factors and chromatin remodelling proteins. However, whether p38α is involved in processes other than gene regulation during myogenesis is currently unknown, and why other p38 isoforms cannot compensate for its loss is unclear. Methods To further characterise the involvement of p38α during myoblast differentiation, we developed and applied a simple technique for identifying relevant in vivo kinase substrates and their phosphorylation sites. In addition to identifying substrates for one kinase, the technique can be used in vitro to compare multiple kinases in the same experiment, and we made use of this to study the substrate specificities of the p38α and β isoforms. Results Applying the technique to p38α resulted in the identification of seven in vivo phosphorylation sites on six proteins, four of which are cytoplasmic, in lysate derived from differentiating myoblasts. An in vitro comparison with p38β revealed that substrate specificity does not discriminate these two isoforms, but rather that their distinguishing characteristic appears to be cellular localisation. Conclusion Our results suggest p38α has a novel cytoplasmic role during myogenesis and that its unique cellular localisation may be why p38β and other isoforms cannot compensate for its absence. The substrate-finding approach presented here also provides a necessary tool for studying the hundreds of protein kinases that exist and for uncovering the deeper mechanisms of phosphorylation-dependent cell signalling.

  2. Revitalizing Fusion via Fission Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2001-10-01

    Existing tokamaks could generate significant nuclear fuel. TFTR, operating steady state with DT might generate enough fuel for a 300 MW nuclear reactor. The immediate goals of the magnetic fusion program would necessarily shift from a study of advanced plasma regimes in larger sized devices, to mostly known plasmas regimes, but at steady state or high duty cycle operation in DT plasmas. The science and engineering of breeding blankets would be equally important. Follow on projects could possibly produce nuclear fuel in large quantity at low price. Although today there is strong opposition to nuclear power in the United States, in a 21st century world of 10 billion people, all of whom will demand a middle class life style, nuclear energy will be important. Concern over greenhouse gases will also drive the world toward nuclear power. There are studies indicating that the world will need 10 TW of carbon free energy by 2050. It is difficult to see how this can be achieved without the breeding of nuclear fuel. By using the thorium cycle, proliferation risks are minimized. [1], [2]. 1 W. Manheimer, Fusion Technology, 36, 1, 1999, 2.W. Manheimer, Physics and Society, v 29, #3, p5, July, 2000

  3. Catalysed fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Francis

    2012-01-01

    A sizzling romance and a romp with subatomic particles at CERN. Love, discovery and adventure in the city where nations meet and beams collide. Life in a large laboratory. As always, the challenges are the same. Who leads? Who follows? Who succeeds? Who gets the credit? Who gets the women or the men? Young Jeremy arrives in CERN and joins the quest for green energy. Coping with baffling jargon and manifold dangers, he is distracted by radioactive rats, lovely ladies and an unscrupulous rival. Full of doubts and hesitations, he falls for a dazzling Danish girl, who leads him astray. His brilliant idea leads to a discovery and a new route to cold fusion. But his personal life is scrambled. Does it bring fame or failure? Tragedy or triumph?

  4. Prevention of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of C2C12 myoblasts by a Cichorium intybus root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Yoon Suk; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2013-01-01

    Cell injury associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been reported in various muscular disorders. We found that a Cichorium intybus (Cii) extract reduced H(2)O(2)-induced viability loss in C2C12 myoblasts, inhibited oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and increased intracellular heat shock protein 70 (Hsp 70) expression. Cii also inhibited the level of intracellular ceramide. These results indicate that Cii may prevent skeletal muscle atrophy by inducing the expression of Hsp 70 and inhibiting the level of ceramide. PMID:23391909

  5. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes myoblast proliferation and skeletal muscle growth of embryonic chickens via the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minli; Wang, Huan; Xu, Yali; Yu, Debing; Li, Dongfeng; Liu, Xiuhong; Du, Wenxing

    2015-08-01

    During embryonic development, IGF-1 fulfils crucial roles in skeletal myogenesis. However, the involvement of IGF-1-induced myoblast proliferation in muscle growth is still unclear. In the present study, we have characterised the role of IGF-1 in myoblast proliferation both in vitro and in vivo and have revealed novel details of how exogenous IGF-1 influences myogenic genes in chicken embryos. The results show that IGF-1 significantly induces the proliferation of cultured myoblasts in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the IGF-1 treatment significantly promoted myoblasts entering a new cell cycle and increasing the mRNA expression levels of cell cycle-dependent genes. However, these effects were inhibited by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and the Akt inhibitor KP372-1. These data indicated that the pro-proliferative effect of IGF-1 was mediated in response to the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. Moreover, we also showed that exogenous IGF-1 stimulated myoblast proliferation in vivo. IGF-1 administration obviously promoted the incorporation of BrdU and remarkably increased the number of PAX7-positive cells in the skeletal muscle of chicken embryos. Administration of IGF-1 also significantly induced the upregulation of myogenic factors gene, the enhancement of c-Myc and the inhibition of myostatin (Mstn) expression. These findings demonstrate that IGF-1 has strong activity as a promoter of myoblast expansion and muscle fiber formation during early myogenesis. Therefore, this study offers insight into the mechanisms responsible for IGF-1-mediated stimulation of embryonic skeletal muscle development, which could have important implications for the improvement of chicken meat production. PMID:25808997

  6. Disruption of GLUT1 glucose carrier trafficking in L6E9 and Sol8 myoblasts by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P; Viñals, F; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1995-12-01

    In this study we have used wortmannin, a highly specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, to assess the role of this enzyme on GLUT1 glucose carrier distribution and glucose transport activity in myoblasts from two skeletal-muscle cell lines, L6E9 and Sol8. As detected in L6E9 cells, myoblasts exhibited basal and insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activities. Incubation of intact myoblasts with wortmannin resulted in a marked inhibition of both basal and insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activities. L6E9 and Sol8 myoblasts showed basal and insulin-stimulated glucose transport activities, both of them inhibited by wortmannin in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 approximately 10-20 nM). Concomitantly, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that 1 h treatment with wortmannin led to a dramatic intracellular accumulation of GLUT1 carriers (the main glucose transporter expressed in L6E9 and Sol8 myoblasts) in both cell systems. The effect of wortmannin on GLUT1 cellular redistribution was independent of the presence of insulin. The cellular distribution of two structural plasma-membrane components such as beta 1-integrin or the alpha 1 subunit of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase were unaffected by wortmannin in both the absence and the presence of insulin. As a whole, our results indicate that PI 3-kinase is necessary to basal and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in L6E9 and Sol8 myoblasts. Moreover, immunofluorescence assays suggest that in both cellular models there is a constitutive GLUT 1 trafficking pathway (independent of insulin) that involves PI 3-kinase and which, when blocked, locks GLUT1 in a perinuclear compartment. PMID:8526858

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 functions as a negative regulator in the differentiation of myoblasts, but not as an inducer for the formations of cartilage and bone in mouse embryonic tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Erika

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro studies using the myogenic cell line C2C12 demonstrate that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 converts the developmental pathway of C2C12 from a myogenic cell lineage to an osteoblastic cell lineage. Further, in vivo studies using null mutation mice demonstrate that BMPs inhibit the specification of the developmental fate of myogenic progenitor cells. However, the roles of BMPs in the phases of differentiation and maturation in skeletal muscles have yet to be determined. The present study attempts to define the function of BMP-2 in the final stage of differentiation of mouse tongue myoblast. Results Recombinant BMP-2 inhibited the expressions of markers for the differentiation of skeletal muscle cells, such as myogenin, muscle creatine kinase (MCK, and fast myosin heavy chain (fMyHC, whereas BMP-2 siRNA stimulated such markers. Neither the recombinant BMP-2 nor BMP-2 siRNA altered the expressions of markers for the formation of cartilage and bone, such as osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, collagen II, and collagen X. Further, no formation of cartilage and bone was observed in the recombinant BMP-2-treated tongues based on Alizarin red and Alcian blue stainings. Neither recombinant BMP-2 nor BMP-2 siRNA affected the expression of inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation 1 (Id1. The ratios of chondrogenic and osteogenic markers relative to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, a house keeping gene were approximately 1000-fold lower than those of myogenic markers in the cultured tongue. Conclusions BMP-2 functions as a negative regulator for the final differentiation of tongue myoblasts, but not as an inducer for the formation of cartilage and bone in cultured tongue, probably because the genes related to myogenesis are in an activation mode, while the genes related to chondrogenesis and osteogenesis are in a silencing mode.

  8. Tritium in fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When tritium is used in a fusion energy experiment or reactor, several implications affect and usually restrict the design and operation of the system and involve questions of containment, inventory, and radiation damage. Containment is expected to be particularly important both for high-temperature components and for those components that are prone to require frequent maintenance. Inventory is currently of major significance in cases where safety and environmental considerations limit the experiments to very low levels of tritium. Fewer inventory restrictions are expected as fusion experiments are placed in more-remote locations and as the fusion community gains experience with the use of tritium. However, the advent of power-producing experiments with high-duty cycle will again lead to serious difficulties based principally on tritium availability; cyclic operations with significant regeneration times are the principal problems

  9. Fracto-fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a cold fusion mechanism we investigated a fracto-fusion by which reacting particles are accelerated by the electric field generated between the crack surfaces in a crystal and the beam fusion occurs. By assuming the possible magnitude of the potential difference we calculated the fusion rate and energy multiplication factor. These results are consistent with cold fusion experiments. On the basis of a simple model it is conjectured that necessary electric potential difference to accelerate particles can be generated even in a metal crystal with rather low resistivity, and we conclude that the fracto-fusion mechanism can explain the cold fusion phenomena successfully. (author)

  10. Materials research for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  11. Culture of skeletal myoblasts from human donors aged over 40 years: dynamics of cell growth and expression of differentiation markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherubino Paolo

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local myogenesis, neoangiogenesis and homing of progenitor cells from the bone marrow appear to contribute to repair of the infarcted myocardium. Implantation into heart tissues of autologous skeletal myoblasts has been associated with improved contractile function in animal models and in humans with acute myocardial ischemia. Since heart infarction is most prevalent in individuals of over 40 years of age, we tested whether culture methods available in our laboratory were adequate to obtain sufficient numbers of differentiated skeletal myoblasts from muscle biopsy specimens obtained from patients aged 41 to 91. Methods and results No matter of donor age, differentiated skeletal muscle cells could be produced in vitro in amounts adequate for cellular therapy (≥300 millions. Using desmin as a cytoplasmic marker, about 50% cultured cells were differentiated along myogenic lineages and expressed proteins proper of skeletal muscle (myosin type I and II, actin, actinin, spectrin and dystrophin. Cytogenetic alterations were not detected in cultured muscle cells that had undergone at least 10 population doublings. Molecular methods employed for the screening of persistent viral infections evidenced that HCV failed to replicate in muscle cells cultured from one patient with chronic HCV infection. Conclusion The proposed culture methods appear to hold promise for aged patients not only in the field of cardiovascular medicine, but also in the urologic and orthopedic fields.

  12. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R ampersand D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R ampersand D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase

  13. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  14. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S., E-mail: knordgre@d.umn.edu; Wallace, Kendall B., E-mail: kwallace@d.umn.edu

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  15. MiRNA-199a-3p Regulates C2C12 Myoblast Differentiation through IGF-1/AKT/mTOR Signal Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Jia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs constitute a class of ~22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs. They modulate gene expression by associating with the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs of messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Although multiple miRNAs are known to be regulated during myoblast differentiation, their individual roles in muscle development are still not fully understood. In this study, we showed that miR-199a-3p was highly expressed in skeletal muscle and was induced during C2C12 myoblasts differentiation. We also identified and confirmed several genes of the IGF-1/AKT/mTOR signal pathway, including IGF-1, mTOR, and RPS6KA6, as important cellular targets of miR-199a-3p in myoblasts. Overexpression of miR-199a-3p partially blocked C2C12 myoblast differentiation and the activation of AKT/mTOR signal pathway, while interference of miR-199a-3p by antisense oligonucleotides promoted C2C12 differentiation and myotube hypertrophy. Thus, our studies have established miR-199a-3p as a potential regulator of myogenesis through the suppression of IGF-1/AKT/mTOR signal pathway.

  16. The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is activated by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuloaga, R; Fuentes, E N; Molina, A; Valdés, J A

    2013-10-18

    Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP3/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA-CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation. PMID:24064350

  17. Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehne, R W

    2006-01-01

    Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot fusion" scenario explains how nuclear fusion can be generated over a long time within deuterided metals. Moreover we predicted the explosion of large pieces of deuterided metals. This article reviews the "cold fusion" work of Steven Jones et al. and discusses the fracto-fusion scenario. I show that the extended micro hot fusion scenario can explain the observed neutron emissions, neutron bursts, and heat bursts.

  18. ADAM12-directed ectodomain shedding of E-cadherin potentiates trophoblast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghababaei, M; Hogg, K; Perdu, S; Robinson, W P; Beristain, A G

    2015-12-01

    Trophoblasts, placental cells of epithelial lineage, undergo extensive differentiation to form the cellular components of the placenta. Trophoblast progenitor cell differentiation into the multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast is a key developmental process required for placental function, where defects in syncytiotrophoblast formation and turnover associate with placental pathologies and link to poor pregnancy outcomes. The cellular and molecular processes governing syncytiotrophoblast formation are poorly understood, but require the activation of pathways that direct cell fusion. The protease, A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12), controls cell fusion in myoblasts and is highly expressed in the placenta localizing to multiple trophoblast populations. However, the importance of ADAM12 in regulating trophoblast fusion is unknown. Here, we describe a function for ADAM12 in regulating trophoblast fusion. Using two distinct trophoblast models of cell fusion, we show that ADAM12 is dynamically upregulated and is under the transcriptional control of protein kinase A. siRNA-directed loss of ADAM12 impedes spontaneous fusion of primary cytotrophoblasts, whereas overexpression of the secreted variant, ADAM12S, potentiates cell fusion in the Bewo trophoblast cell line. Mechanistically, both ectopic and endogenous levels of ADAM12 were shown to control trophoblast fusion through E-cadherin ectodomain shedding and remodeling of intercellular boundaries. This study describes a novel role for ADAM12 in placental development, specifically highlighting its importance in controlling the differentiation of villous cytotrophoblasts into multinucleated cellular structures. Moreover, this work identifies E-cadherin as a novel ADAM12 substrate, and highlights the significance that cell adhesion molecule ectodomain shedding has in normal development. PMID:25909890

  19. Review of fusion synfuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion

  20. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP3/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation

  1. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuloaga, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), Víctor Lamas 1290, PO Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Valdés, J.A., E-mail: jvaldes@unab.cl [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), Víctor Lamas 1290, PO Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  2. Absence of functional leptin receptor isoforms in the POUND (Lepr(db/lb mouse is associated with muscle atrophy and altered myoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phonepasong Arounleut

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Leptin receptors are abundant in human skeletal muscle, but the role of leptin in muscle growth, development and aging is not well understood. Here we utilized a novel mouse model lacking all functional leptin receptor isoforms (POUND mouse, Lepr(db/lb to determine the role of leptin in skeletal muscle. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Skeletal muscle mass and fiber diameters were examined in POUND mice, and primary myoblast cultures were used to determine the effects of altered leptin signaling on myoblast proliferation and differentiation. ELISA assays, integrated pathway analysis of mRNA microarrays, and reverse phase protein analysis were performed to identify signaling pathways impacted by leptin receptor deficiency. Results show that skeletal muscle mass and fiber diameter are reduced 30-40% in POUND mice relative to wild-type controls. Primary myoblast cultures demonstrate decreased proliferation and decreased expression of both MyoD and myogenin in POUND mice compared to normal mice. Leptin treatment increased proliferation in primary myoblasts from muscles of both adult (12 months and aged (24 months wild-type mice, and leptin increased expression of MyoD and myogenin in aged primary myoblasts. ELISA assays and protein arrays revealed altered expression of molecules associated with the IGF-1/Akt and MAPK/MEK signaling pathways in muscle from the hindlimbs of mice lacking functional leptin receptors. CONCLUSION: These data support the hypothesis that the adipokine leptin is a key factor important for the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and that leptin can act directly on its receptors in peripheral tissues to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation.

  3. Co-transplantation of plasmid-transfected myoblasts and myotubes into rat brains enables high levels of gene expression long-term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, S.; Williams, P.; Safda, N.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have previously proposed the use of primary muscle cells as a "platform," or "vehicle" for intracerebral transgene expression. Brain grafts of minced muscle, or cultured muscle cells persisted in rat brains for at least 6 mo without any decrease in graft size, or tumor formation. Stable, but moderate levels of intracerebral transgene expression were obtained by transplanting plasmid-transfected myotubes in culture. In the present study, high and stable levels of intracerebral transgene expression were achieved by the co-transplantation of plasmid-transfected myoblasts and myotubes in culture. Approximately 5 X 10(5) myoblasts and myotubes were transfected with 10 micrograms pRSVL plasmid DNA, and 30 micrograms Lipofectin (BRL), respectively. They were mixed together (total cell number was 1 million), and stereotactically injected into the caudate nucleus of an adult rat brain. The activity of luciferase, the product of transgene expression, was stable for at least 4 mo, and much higher than the levels in myotube grafts, or co-grafts of myoblasts and minced muscle. Presumably, the myotubes served as a framework on which the myoblasts can form myotubes. The sections of brains transplanted with co-graft of myoblasts, and myotubes transfected with pRSVLac-Z were stained immunofluorescently for beta-galactosidase activity. The muscle grafts contained beta-galactosidase positive myofibers 4 mo after transplantation. Such high and stable levels of in vivo expression after postnatal gene transfer have rarely been achieved. Primary muscle cells are useful vehicle for transgene expression in brains, and potentially valuable for gene therapy of degenerative neurological disorders.

  4. Dental Fusion with Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental Fusion is developmental anomaly due to the union of two tooth germs resulting in a single tooth. It is an infrequent phenomenon but may cause caries, periodontal, cosmetic and malocclusion abnormalities. Oral Submucous Fibrosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder and a precancerous condition affecting oral mucosa causing inability to open the mouth, burning sensation and leathery consistency. This manuscript describes a case of OSMF and dental fusion. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 308-310

  5. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cryosorption pumping of hydrogen with molecular sieves at temperatures between 16 and 35 K indicate that type Na-Y sieve gives significantly higher average pumping speeds than the more conventional type 5A sieve. Apparently, pump speeds are affected by diffusion rates into the crystallite particles, and the larger pore openings in the Na-Y sieve permit higher diffusion rates. Measurements of the rate of tritium sorption from liquid lithium by yttrium coupons gave encouragingly high values despite the stagnant lithium in the contact device

  6. Uniaxial cyclic strain enhances adipose-derived stem cell fusion with skeletal myocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Jens Isak; Juhl, Morten; Nielsen, Thøger; Emmersen, Jeppe; Fink, Trine; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo, E-mail: cpennisi@hst.aau.dk

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Uniaxial cyclic tensile strain (CTS) applied to ASCs alone or in coculture with myogenic precursors. • CTS promoted the formation of a highly ordered array of parallel ASCs. • Without biochemical supplements, CTS did not support advanced myogenic differentiation of ASCs. • Mechanical stimulation of cocultures boosted fusion of ASCs with skeletal myoblasts. - Abstract: Although adult muscle tissue possesses an exceptional capacity for regeneration, in the case of large defects, the restoration to original state is not possible. A well-known source for the de novo regeneration is the adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), which can be readily isolated and have been shown to have a broad differentiation and regenerative potential. In this work, we employed uniaxial cyclic tensile strain (CTS), to mechanically stimulate human ASCs to participate in the formation skeletal myotubes in an in vitro model of myogenesis. The application of CTS for 48 h resulted in the formation of a highly ordered array of parallel ASCs, but failed to support skeletal muscle terminal differentiation. When the same stimulation paradigm was applied to cocultures with mouse skeletal muscle myoblasts, the percentage of ASCs contributing to the formation of myotubes significantly exceeded the levels reported in the literature hitherto. In perspective, the mechanical strain may be used to increase the efficiency of incorporation of ASCs in the skeletal muscles, which could be found useful in diverse traumatic or pathologic scenarios.

  7. Fusion Canada issue 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue TdeV tokamak updates, fusion research in Korea, CCFM program review, TdeV divertor plasma, and CFFTP program review. 4 figs

  8. Fusion Canada issue 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue ITER reactor siting, a major upgrade for TdeV tokamak, Ceramic Breeders: new tritium mapping technique and Joint Fusion Symposium. 2 figs

  9. Fusion Canada issue 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion Canada's publication of the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is the CFFTP Industrial Impact Study, CCFM/TdeV Update:helium pumping, research funds, and deuterium in beryllium - high temperature behaviour. 3 figs

  10. Fusion Canada issue 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a funding report for CFFTP, a technical update for Tokamak de Varennes and a network for university research by the National Fusion Program. 4 figs

  11. Conessine Interferes with Oxidative Stress-Induced C2C12 Myoblast Cell Death through Inhibition of Autophagic Flux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunju Kim

    Full Text Available Conessine, a steroidal alkaloid isolated from Holarrhena floribunda, has anti-malarial activity and interacts with the histamine H3 receptor. However, the cellular effects of conessine are poorly understood. Accordingly, we evaluated the involvement of conessine in the regulation of autophagy. We searched natural compounds that modulate autophagy, and conessine was identified as an inhibitor of autophagic flux. Conessine treatment induced the formation of autophagosomes, and p62, an autophagic adapter, accumulated in the autophagosomes. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 result in muscle cell death by inducing excessive autophagic flux. Treatment with conessine inhibited H2O2-induced autophagic flux in C2C12 myoblast cells and also interfered with cell death. Our results indicate that conessine has the potential effect to inhibit muscle cell death by interfering with autophagic flux.

  12. Conessine Interferes with Oxidative Stress-Induced C2C12 Myoblast Cell Death through Inhibition of Autophagic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunju; Lee, Kang Il; Jang, Minsu; Namkoong, Sim; Park, Rackhyun; Ju, Hyunwoo; Choi, Inho; Oh, Won Keun

    2016-01-01

    Conessine, a steroidal alkaloid isolated from Holarrhena floribunda, has anti-malarial activity and interacts with the histamine H3 receptor. However, the cellular effects of conessine are poorly understood. Accordingly, we evaluated the involvement of conessine in the regulation of autophagy. We searched natural compounds that modulate autophagy, and conessine was identified as an inhibitor of autophagic flux. Conessine treatment induced the formation of autophagosomes, and p62, an autophagic adapter, accumulated in the autophagosomes. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) result in muscle cell death by inducing excessive autophagic flux. Treatment with conessine inhibited H2O2-induced autophagic flux in C2C12 myoblast cells and also interfered with cell death. Our results indicate that conessine has the potential effect to inhibit muscle cell death by interfering with autophagic flux. PMID:27257813

  13. Bemerkungen zur "kalten Fusion"

    OpenAIRE

    Kuehne, Rainer W.

    2006-01-01

    Steven Jones et al. reported to have observed nuclear fusion at room temperature. They observed this "cold fusion" by electrolyzing heavy water. Later experiments confirmed these observations. These experiments confirmed the generation of strong electric fields within the deuterided metals. These electric fields accelerate the deuterons to keV energies and allow the observed nuclear fusion. Roman Sioda and I suggested a theoretical description of this nuclear fusion. Our "extended micro hot f...

  14. Automated high-content assay for compounds selectively toxic to Trypanosoma cruzi in a myoblastic cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alonso-Padilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a very important public health problem in Latin America where it is endemic. Although mostly asymptomatic at its initial stage, after the disease becomes chronic, about a third of the infected patients progress to a potentially fatal outcome due to severe damage of heart and gut tissues. There is an urgent need for new drugs against Chagas disease since there are only two drugs available, benznidazole and nifurtimox, and both show toxic side effects and variable efficacy against the chronic stage of the disease.Genetically engineered parasitic strains are used for high throughput screening (HTS of large chemical collections in the search for new anti-parasitic compounds. These assays, although successful, are limited to reporter transgenic parasites and do not cover the wide T. cruzi genetic background. With the aim to contribute to the early drug discovery process against Chagas disease we have developed an automated image-based 384-well plate HTS assay for T. cruzi amastigote replication in a rat myoblast host cell line. An image analysis script was designed to inform on three outputs: total number of host cells, ratio of T. cruzi amastigotes per cell and percentage of infected cells, which respectively provides one host cell toxicity and two T. cruzi toxicity readouts. The assay was statistically robust (Z´ values >0.6 and was validated against a series of known anti-trypanosomatid drugs.We have established a highly reproducible, high content HTS assay for screening of chemical compounds against T. cruzi infection of myoblasts that is amenable for use with any T. cruzi strain capable of in vitro infection. Our visual assay informs on both anti-parasitic and host cell toxicity readouts in a single experiment, allowing the direct identification of compounds selectively targeted to the parasite.

  15. Detection of Pancreatic Cancer-Induced Cachexia Using a Fluorescent Myoblast Reporter System and Analysis of Metabolite Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnard, Paul T; Bharti, Santosh K; Penet, Marie-France; Marik, Radharani; Mironchik, Yelena; Wildes, Flonne; Maitra, Anirban; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-03-15

    The dire effects of cancer-induced cachexia undermine treatment and contribute to decreased survival rates. Therapeutic options for this syndrome are limited, and therefore efforts to identify signs of precachexia in cancer patients are necessary for early intervention. The applications of molecular and functional imaging that would enable a whole-body "holistic" approach to this problem may lead to new insights and advances for diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. Here we have developed a myoblast optical reporter system with the purpose of identifying early cachectic events. We generated a myoblast cell line expressing a dual tdTomato:GFP construct that was grafted onto the muscle of mice-bearing human pancreatic cancer xenografts to provide noninvasive live imaging of events associated with cancer-induced cachexia (i.e., weight loss). Real-time optical imaging detected a strong tdTomato fluorescent signal from skeletal muscle grafts in mice with weight losses of only 1.2% to 2.7% and tumor burdens of only approximately 79 to 170 mm(3). Weight loss in cachectic animals was also associated with a depletion of lipid, cholesterol, valine, and alanine levels, which may provide informative biomarkers of cachexia. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the utility of a reporter system that is capable of tracking tumor-induced weight loss, an early marker of cachexia. Future studies incorporating resected tissue from human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma into a reporter-carrying mouse may be able to provide a risk assessment of cachexia, with possible implications for therapeutic development. Cancer Res; 76(6); 1441-50. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26719527

  16. Fusion technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarizes work performed in the following areas: system and safety studies for fusion reactors; nuclear data for fusion reactors; neutronics calculations for fusion reactors; radiation damage of vanadium alloys and stainless steel 316; facility for in-pile crack growth measurement; niobium tin magnet for Sultan - stage II; development of NET conductor; and development of ceramic tritium breeding materials

  17. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  18. Towards cognitive image fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Nikolov, S.G.; Lewis, J.J.; Dixon, T.D.; Bull, D.R.; Canagarajah, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing availability and deployment of imaging sensors operating in multiple spectral bands has led to a large research effort in image fusion, resulting in a plethora of pixel-level image fusion algorithms. However, the cognitive aspects of multisensor image fusion have not received much att

  19. Towards cognitive image fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Nikolov, S.G.; Lewis, J.; Dixon, T.; Bull, D.; Canagarajah, N.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing availability and deployment of imaging sensors operating in multiple spectral bands has led to a large research effort in image fusion, resulting in a plethora of pixel-level image fusion algorithms. However, the cognitive aspects of multisensor image fusion have not received much att

  20. Fusion Canada issue 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the ITER agreement signed with the EDA, the robotic maintenance for NET, the CFFTP Fusion Pilot Study, the new IEA joint programs on environment, safety and economic aspects of fusion power, and a review by the CCFM advisory committee. 3 figs

  1. Fusion Canada issue 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs

  2. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans

  3. Structural and functional studies of FKHR-PAX3, a reciprocal fusion gene of the t(2;13 chromosomal translocation in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiande Hu

    Full Text Available Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS is an aggressive pediatric cancer of skeletal muscle. More than 70% of ARMS tumors carry balanced t(2;13 chromosomal translocation that leads to the production of two novel fusion genes, PAX3-FKHR and FKHR-PAX3. While the PAX3-FKHR gene has been intensely studied, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 gene has rarely been described. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of the FKHR-PAX3 gene as the first step towards a better understanding of its potential impact on ARMS biology. From RH30 ARMS cells, we detected and isolated three versions of FKHR-PAX3 cDNAs whose C-terminal sequences corresponded to PAX3c, PAX3d, and PAX3e isoforms. Unlike the nuclear-specific localization of PAX3-FKHR, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 proteins stayed predominantly in the cytoplasm. FKHR-PAX3 potently inhibited myogenesis in both non-transformed myoblast cells and ARMS cells. We showed that FKHR-PAX3 was not a classic oncogene but could act as a facilitator in oncogenic pathways by stabilizing PAX3-FKHR expression, enhancing cell proliferation, clonogenicity, anchorage-independent growth, and matrix adhesion in vitro, and accelerating the onset of tumor formation in xenograft mouse model in vivo. In addition to these pro-oncogenic behaviors, FKHR-PAX3 also negatively affected cell migration and invasion in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these functional characteristics suggested that FKHR-PAX3 might have a critical role in the early stage of ARMS development.

  4. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by reso...

  5. Fusion applications study: FAME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Fusion has a wide spectrum of applications that appear technically possible and may become economically feasible. Near-term (approx. 2000) application for production of nuclear fuels and useful radioisotopes is an economically attractive possibility as soon as fusion is ready. Electricity production will remain a prime, large-scale application of fusion. In the longer term, as fossil fuels dwindle, production of hydrogen could become a major application. Additional applications some of which have not even been conceived of yet, will add to this potential richness and diversity of fusion. It is the purpose of the fusion applications study - FMAE - to innovate, investigate, and evaluate these potential applications.

  6. Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, R. C. (Ronald C.)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion conditions is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion.

  7. Viral membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  8. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  9. Fusion technology 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the biennial series of symposia on the title subject, organized by the European Fusion Laboratories, is the exchange of information on the design, construction and operation of fusion experiments and on the technology being developed for the next step devices and fusion reactors. The coverage of the volume includes the technological aspects of fusion reactors in relation to new developments, this forming a guideline for the definition of future work. These proceedings comprise three volumes and contain both the invited lectures and contributed papers presented at the symposium which was attended by 569 participants from around the globe. The 343 papers, including 12 invited papers, characterize the increasing interest of industry in the fusion programme, giving a broad and current overview on the progress and trends fusion technology is experiencing now, as well as indicating the future for fusion devices

  10. The fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the U.S. fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the U.S. fusion program and the U.S. nuclear energy program. There is wide agreement that many approaches will work and will produce fuel for five equal-sized LWRs, and some approach as many as 20 LWRs at electricity costs within 20% of those at today's price of uranium ($30/lb of U3O8). The blankets designed to suppress fissioning, called symbiotes, fusion fuel factories, or just fusion breeders, will have safety characteristics more like pure fusion reactors and will support as many as 15 equal power LWRs. The blankets designed to maximize fast fission of fertile material will have safety characteristics more like fission reactors and will support 5 LWRs. This author strongly recommends development of the fission suppressed blanket type, a point of view not agreed upon by everyone. There is, however, wide agreement that, to meet the market price for uranium which would result in LWR electricity within 20% of today's cost with either blanket type, fusion components can cost severalfold more than would be allowed for pure fusion to meet the goal of making electricity alone at 20% over today's fission costs. Also widely agreed is that the critical-pathitem for the fusion breeder is fusion development itself; however, development of fusion breeder specific items (blankets, fuel cycle) should be started now in order to have the fusion breeder by the time the rise in uranium prices forces other more costly choices

  11. Prospects for bubble fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I. [Tyumen Institute of Mechanics of Multiphase Systems (TIMMS), Marx (Russian Federation); Lahey, R.T. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  12. Materials research for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  13. Economics of fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-10-15

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics.

  14. Economics of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics

  15. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  16. Overexpression of calsequestrin in L6 myoblasts: formation of endoplasmic reticulum subdomains and their evolution into discrete vacuoles where aggregates of the protein are specifically accumulated.

    OpenAIRE

    Gatti, G.; Podini, P; Meldolesi, J

    1997-01-01

    Calsequestrin (CSQ), the major low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding glycoprotein of striated muscle fibers, is concentrated to yield aggregates that occupy the lumen of the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). When infected or transfected into L6 myoblast, the protein is also concentrated, however, in dense vacuoles apparently separate from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). CSQ-rich cells appear otherwise normal; in particular, neither other proteins involved in Ca2+ homeostasis nor ER...

  17. Chemotropism and Cell Fusion in Neurospora crassa Relies on the Formation of Distinct Protein Complexes by HAM-5 and a Novel Protein HAM-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Fischer, Monika S; Do, Hung P; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2016-05-01

    In filamentous fungi, communication is essential for the formation of an interconnected, multinucleate, syncytial network, which is constructed via hyphal fusion or fusion of germinated asexual spores (germlings). Anastomosis in filamentous fungi is comparable to other somatic cell fusion events resulting in syncytia, including myoblast fusion during muscle differentiation, macrophage fusion, and fusion of trophoblasts during placental development. In Neurospora crassa, fusion of genetically identical germlings is a highly dynamic and regulated process that requires components of a MAP kinase signal transduction pathway. The kinase pathway components (NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2) and the scaffold protein HAM-5 are recruited to hyphae and germling tips undergoing chemotropic interactions. The MAK-2/HAM-5 protein complex shows dynamic oscillation to hyphae/germling tips during chemotropic interactions, and which is out-of-phase to the dynamic localization of SOFT, which is a scaffold protein for components of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase pathway. In this study, we functionally characterize HAM-5 by generating ham-5 truncation constructs and show that the N-terminal half of HAM-5 was essential for function. This region is required for MAK-2 and MEK-2 interaction and for correct cellular localization of HAM-5 to "fusion puncta." The localization of HAM-5 to puncta was not perturbed in 21 different fusion mutants, nor did these puncta colocalize with components of the secretory pathway. We also identified HAM-14 as a novel member of the HAM-5/MAK-2 pathway by mining MAK-2 phosphoproteomics data. HAM-14 was essential for germling fusion, but not for hyphal fusion. Colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation data indicate that HAM-14 interacts with MAK-2 and MEK-2 and may be involved in recruiting MAK-2 (and MEK-2) to complexes containing HAM-5. PMID:27029735

  18. Recycling fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inherent safety and environmental advantages of fusion power in comparison with other energy sources play an important role in the public acceptance. No waste burden for future generations is therefore one of the main arguments to decide for fusion power. The waste issue has thus been studied in several documents and the final conclusion of which it is stated that there is no permanent disposal waste needed if recycling is applied. But recycling of fusion reactor materials is far to be obvious regarding mostly the very high specific activity of the materials to be handled, the types of materials and the presence of tritium. The main objective of research performed by SCK-CEN is to study the possible ways of recycling fusion materials and analyse the challenges of the materials management from fusion reactors, based on current practices used in fission reactors and the requirements for the manufacture of fusion equipment

  19. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  20. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.;

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures...... around 20 C, but at temperatures above 26 C we observe an increase in the scattered intensity due to fusion. The system is unusually well suited for the study of basic mechanisms of vesicle fusion. The vesicles are flexible with a bending rigidity of only a few k(H)T. The monolayer spontaneous curvature......, Ho, depends strongly on temperature in a known way and is thus tunable. For temperatures where H-0 > 0 vesicles tyre long-term stable, while in the range H-0 fusion rate increases the more negative the Spontaneous curvature Through a quantitative;analysis of the fusion rate we arrive tit...

  1. Unexpected Distinct Roles of the Related Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methyltransferases G9a and G9a-Like Protein in Myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Valentine; Pontis, Julien; Boyarchuk, Ekaterina; Fritsch, Lauriane; Robin, Philippe; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Joliot, Véronique

    2016-06-01

    Lysine methyltransferases G9a and GLP (G9a-like protein) are highly homologous and form functional heterodimeric complexes that establish mono- and dimethylation on histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me1, H3K9me2) in euchromatin. Here, we describe unexpected distinct roles for G9a and GLP in skeletal muscle terminal differentiation. Indeed, gain- or loss-of-function assays in myoblasts showed, in agreement with previous reports, that G9a inhibits terminal differentiation. While GLP plays a more intricate role in muscle differentiation,in one hand, both GLP gain and loss of function inhibit late steps of differentiation; on the other hand, in contrast to G9a, GLP overexpression promotes abnormal precocious expression of muscle differentiation-specific genes already in proliferating myoblasts. In agreement, transcriptomic analysis indicates that G9a and GLP regulate different sets of genes. Thus, GLP, but not G9a, inhibits proteasome subunit-encoding genes expression, resulting in an inhibition of the proteasome activities. Subsequently, GLP, but not G9a, overexpression stabilizes MyoD that is likely to be responsible for muscle markers expression in proliferating myoblasts. PMID:27056598

  2. Status of fusion maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective maintenance will be an essential ingredient in determining fusion system productivity. This level of productivity will result only after close attention is paid to the entire system as an entity and appropriate integration of the elements is made. The status of fusion maintenance is reviewed in the context of the entire system. While there are many challenging developmental tasks ahead in fusion maintenance, the required technologies are available in several high-technology industries, including nuclear fission

  3. Filter Bank Fusion frames

    OpenAIRE

    Chebira, Amina; Fickus, Matthew; Mixon, Dustin G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we characterize and construct novel oversampled filter banks implementing fusion frames. A fusion frame is a sequence of orthogonal projection operators whose sum can be inverted in a numerically stable way. When properly designed, fusion frames can provide redundant encodings of signals which are optimally robust against certain types of noise and erasures. However, up to this point, few implementable constructions of such frames were known; we show how to construct them using ...

  4. Fusion reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work covers four separate areas: (1) development of technology for processing liquid lithium from blankets, (2) investigation of hydrogen isotope permeation in candidate structural metals and alloys for near-term fusion reactors, (3) analytical studies encompassing fusion reactor thermal hydraulics, tritium facility design, and fusion reactor safety, and (4) studies involving dosimetry and damage analysis. Recent accomplishments in each of these areas are summarized

  5. Fusion11 Conference Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a summary account of the conference Fusion11, held in Saint Malo, France, May 2-6, 2011. There were 77 talks by experts in the field. The author comments on a few of the physics topics discussed during the presentations. His comments concern: new facilities, fusion cross-sections (particularly the barrier penetration model, optical potentials, the channel coupling, the barrier distribution, fusion hindrance and transfer channels), rare isotopes, clusters and superheavy elements

  6. Magnetic fusion technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Fusion Technology describes the technologies that are required for successful development of nuclear fusion power plants using strong magnetic fields. These technologies include: ? magnet systems, ? plasma heating systems, ? control systems, ? energy conversion systems, ? advanced materials development, ? vacuum systems, ? cryogenic systems, ? plasma diagnostics, ? safety systems, and ? power plant design studies. Magnetic Fusion Technology will be useful to students and to specialists working in energy research.

  7. Fusion research principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2013-01-01

    Fusion Research, Volume I: Principles provides a general description of the methods and problems of fusion research. The book contains three main parts: Principles, Experiments, and Technology. The Principles part describes the conditions necessary for a fusion reaction, as well as the fundamentals of plasma confinement, heating, and diagnostics. The Experiments part details about forty plasma confinement schemes and experiments. The last part explores various engineering problems associated with reactor design, vacuum and magnet systems, materials, plasma purity, fueling, blankets, neutronics

  8. Astragalus Polysaccharide Inhibits Autophagy and Apoptosis from Peroxide-Induced Injury in C2C12 Myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi; Lu, Lu; Wang, Dongtao; Shi, Ying; Wang, Ming; Huang, Yanfeng; Chen, Dexiu; Deng, Cong; Chen, Jiebin; Lv, Peijia; Wang, Yanjing; Li, Chengjie; Wei, Lian-Bo

    2015-11-01

    The aim is to study the effects and underlying mechanisms of astragalus polysaccharide (APS) on the peroxide-induced injury in C2C12 myoblasts in vitro. Cell viability in the presence or absence of APS was detected by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium colorimetric assay. The autophagosomes were observed by electron microscopy to examine the influence of APS on autophagy caused by H2O2 in C2C12 cells, and the percentage of apoptosis cells was measured by flow cytometry. To further confirm the effect of H2O2 on C2C12 cells, the protein expression of LC3 and RARP, which are the markers of autophagy and apoptosis, respectively, was analyzed by Western blot, as well as the expression levels of p-p70S6K, p70S6K, Bcl-2, Bax, cyto-C, and Caspase-3, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. We observed multiple effects of APS on C2C12 functionality. APS treatment of C2C12 cells at 1 mg/mL reduced cell viability to less than 70 %, and analysis by electron microscopy revealed that APS also reduced the number of H2O2-induced autophagosome formation. Similarly, APS abated the H2O2-mediated increase in cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by the inhibition of LC3 II and RARP that are normally upregulated by H2O2. The expression of p-p70S6K and p70S6K, however, remained unchanged in C2C12 cells in the Control, H2O2 and H2O2 + APS groups. In addition, APS promoted the expression of protein Bcl-2 in H2O2-treated C2C12 cells, but did not change Bax, thus reducing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio that in turn prevented the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3. APS inhibits the autophagy and apoptosis induced by peroxide injury in C2C12 myoblasts through two independent signaling pathways: the mTOR-independent pathway for the inhibition of autophagy, and the caspase-3-dependent pathway for the suppression of apoptosis. PMID:27352334

  9. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission → fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ''burner'' far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ''implementation-by-default'' plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant

  10. Frontiers in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Frontiers in Fusion Research provides a systematic overview of the latest physical principles of fusion and plasma confinement. It is primarily devoted to the principle of magnetic plasma confinement, that has been systematized through 50 years of fusion research. Frontiers in Fusion Research begins with an introduction to the study of plasma, discussing the astronomical birth of hydrogen energy and the beginnings of human attempts to harness the Sun's energy for use on Earth. It moves on to chapters that cover a variety of topics such as: * charged particle motion, * plasma kinetic theory, *

  11. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  12. Laser fusion program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program is structured to proceed through a series of well defined fusion milestones to proof of the scientific feasibility, of laser fusion with the Shiva Nova system. Concurrently, those key technical areas, such as advanced lasers, which are required to progress beyond proof of feasibility, are being studied. We have identified and quantified the opportunities and key technical issues in military applications, such as weapons effects simulations, and in civilian applications, such as central-station electric power production. We summarize the current status and future plans for the laser fusion program at LLL, emphasizing the civilian applications of laser fusion

  13. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  14. Membrane fusion machines of paramyxoviruses: capture of intermediates of fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Charles J Russell; Theodore S Jardetzky; Lamb, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Peptides derived from heptad repeat regions adjacent to the fusion peptide and transmembrane domains of many viral fusion proteins form stable helical bundles and inhibit fusion specifically. Paramyxovirus SV5 fusion (F) protein-mediated fusion and its inhibition by the peptides N-1 and C-1 were analyzed. The temperature dependence of fusion by F suggests that thermal energy, destabilizing proline residues and receptor binding by the hemagglutinin–neuraminidase (HN) protein collectively contr...

  15. Differentiation-Associated Downregulation of Poly(ADP-Ribose Polymerase-1 Expression in Myoblasts Serves to Increase Their Resistance to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Oláh

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, the major isoform of the poly (ADP-ribose polymerase family, is a constitutive nuclear and mitochondrial protein with well-recognized roles in various essential cellular functions such as DNA repair, signal transduction, apoptosis, as well as in a variety of pathophysiological conditions including sepsis, diabetes and cancer. Activation of PARP-1 in response to oxidative stress catalyzes the covalent attachment of the poly (ADP-ribose (PAR groups on itself and other acceptor proteins, utilizing NAD+ as a substrate. Overactivation of PARP-1 depletes intracellular NAD+ influencing mitochondrial electron transport, cellular ATP generation and, if persistent, can result in necrotic cell death. Due to their high metabolic activity, skeletal muscle cells are particularly exposed to constant oxidative stress insults. In this study, we investigated the role of PARP-1 in a well-defined model of murine skeletal muscle differentiation (C2C12 and compare the responses to oxidative stress of undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. We observed a marked reduction of PARP-1 expression as myoblasts differentiated into myotubes. This alteration correlated with an increased resistance to oxidative stress of the myotubes, as measured by MTT and LDH assays. Mitochondrial function, assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potential, was preserved under oxidative stress in myotubes compared to myoblasts. Moreover, basal respiration, ATP synthesis, and the maximal respiratory capacity of mitochondria were higher in myotubes than in myoblasts. Inhibition of the catalytic activity of PARP-1 by PJ34 (a phenanthridinone PARP inhibitor exerted greater protective effects in undifferentiated myoblasts than in differentiated myotubes. The above observations in C2C12 cells were also confirmed in a rat-derived skeletal muscle cell line (L6. Forced overexpression of PARP1 in C2C12 myotubes sensitized the cells to oxidant

  16. Fusion power plant availability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consideration of fusion as an alternative energy source will need to demonstrate that Fusion Power Plant (FPP) design, operating and maintenance characteristics meet the electrical market requirements forecast for the second half of this century. Until now, fusion has been developed in the framework of research and development programmes following natural technological trends. To bring a greater sense of realism to commercial viability and to guarantee that technology-driven fusion development responds to the demands of the market, a conceptual study of future commercial FPPs has been performed with a Power Plant Availability (PPA) study aimed at identifying the aspects affecting the availability and generating costs of FPPs. EFET, who has also been involved in the study, can visualise it from two different points of view; that of the industry (ANSALDO, IBERTEF, SIEMENS, NNC) and that of the utilities (BELGATOM, FRAMATOME, FORTUM). The work carried out covered the following points: socio-economic forecasting; safety and licensing; operation and maintenance; waste and decommissioning; availability and reliability. The following are the most relevant findings, conclusions and recommendations for all these aspects: Demonstrate definitively that the physical principles of nuclear fusion have been validated by means of experiments; Establish a European Industrial Group to support the demonstration phases; Create the financial and contracting framework required to construct these installations. Secure the necessary budgets for the European Union's 5th and 6th Research Programmes. Look for supplementary long term financing sources; The existing Regulatory Bodies should combine to form a single Working Group with responsibility for fusion reactor safety and licensing activities, working on the harmonisation of the regulatory processes, developing FPP safety criteria and guidelines and reviewing industry standards; To be competitive, FPPs should have high availability

  17. Nuclear fusion inside condense matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jing-tang

    2007-01-01

    This article describes in detail the nuclear fusion inside condense matters--the Fleischmann-Pons effect, the reproducibility of cold fusions, self-consistentcy of cold fusions and the possible applications.

  18. Quantification of fusion in ashes from solid fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    1999-01-01

    which the agreement with fusion as determined by phase diagrams is very good, and for straw (salt-rich) and coal (silicate-rich) ashes. Comparing ash fusion curves to index points of current standard ash fusion tests showed initial melting at temperatures typically between 50 degrees and 100 degrees C......The fusion of ashes produced during solid fuel combustion greatly affects the tendency of these ashes to cause operational problems in utility boilers. In this paper, a new and quantitative laboratory method for assessing the fusion of ashes based on simultaneous thermal analysis, STA, is described....... Using STA, melting is detected as an endothermic reaction involving no change in mass. The measurement signals are transferred into a fusion curve showing the melt fraction in the ash as a function of temperature. This is done either by a simple comparison of the energies used for melting in different...

  19. Small molecules dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 inhibit myostatin/GDF8 signaling and promote functional myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbelt, Daniel; Boergermann, Jan H; Chaikuad, Apirat; Alfano, Ivan; Williams, Eleanor; Lukonin, Ilya; Timmel, Tobias; Bullock, Alex N; Knaus, Petra

    2015-02-01

    GDF8, or myostatin, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted polypeptide growth factors. GDF8 is a potent negative regulator of myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. We found that GDF8 signaling was inhibited by the small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189. These compounds were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of BMP signaling by binding to the BMP type I receptors ALK1/2/3/6. We present the crystal structure of the type II receptor ActRIIA with dorsomorphin and demonstrate that dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 target GDF8 induced Smad2/3 signaling and repression of myogenic transcription factors. As a result, both inhibitors rescued myogenesis in myoblasts treated with GDF8. As revealed by quantitative live cell microscopy, treatment with dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 promoted the contractile activity of myotubular networks in vitro. We therefore suggest these inhibitors as suitable tools to promote functional myogenesis. PMID:25368322

  20. Small Molecules Dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 Inhibit Myostatin/GDF8 Signaling and Promote Functional Myoblast Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbelt, Daniel; Boergermann, Jan H.; Chaikuad, Apirat; Alfano, Ivan; Williams, Eleanor; Lukonin, Ilya; Timmel, Tobias; Bullock, Alex N.; Knaus, Petra

    2015-01-01

    GDF8, or myostatin, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted polypeptide growth factors. GDF8 is a potent negative regulator of myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. We found that GDF8 signaling was inhibited by the small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189. These compounds were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of BMP signaling by binding to the BMP type I receptors ALK1/2/3/6. We present the crystal structure of the type II receptor ActRIIA with dorsomorphin and demonstrate that dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 target GDF8 induced Smad2/3 signaling and repression of myogenic transcription factors. As a result, both inhibitors rescued myogenesis in myoblasts treated with GDF8. As revealed by quantitative live cell microscopy, treatment with dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 promoted the contractile activity of myotubular networks in vitro. We therefore suggest these inhibitors as suitable tools to promote functional myogenesis. PMID:25368322

  1. Synthetically modified mRNA for efficient and fast human iPS cell generation and direct transdifferentiation to myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preskey, David; Allison, Thomas F; Jones, Mark; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Unger, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic mRNA transfection enables efficient and controlled gene expression in human cells, without genome integrations. Further, modifications to the mRNA and transfection protocol now allow for repeated transfection and long-term gene expression of an otherwise short-lived mRNA expression. This is mainly achieved through introducing modified nucleosides and interferon suppression. In this study we provide an overview and details of the advanced synthesis and modifications of mRNA originally developed for reprogramming. This mRNA allows for very efficient transfection of fibroblasts enabling the generation of high quality human iPS cells with a six-factor mRNA cocktail in 9 days. Furthermore, we synthesised and transfected modified MYOD1 mRNA to transdifferentiate human fibroblasts into myoblast-like cells without a transgene footprint. This efficient and integration-free mRNA technology opens the door for safe and controlled gene expression to reverse or redirect cell fate. PMID:26449459

  2. Tight p-fusion frames

    OpenAIRE

    Bachoc, Christine; Ehler, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Fusion frames enable signal decompositions into weighted linear subspace components. For positive integers p, we introduce p-fusion frames, a sharpening of the notion of fusion frames. Tight p-fusion frames are closely related to the classical notions of designs and cubature formulas in Grassmann spaces and are analyzed with methods from harmonic analysis in the Grassmannians. We define the p-fusion frame potential, derive bounds for its value, and discuss the connections to tight p-fusion fr...

  3. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Katsov; M Müller; M Schick

    2005-06-01

    The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by transient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified. Self-consistent field theory is applied to examine the free energy barriers in the different scenarios.

  4. Two Horizons of Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  5. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by resonance to overcome this Coulomb barrier. Thermal resonances combining with tunnel effects can greatly enhance the probability of the deuterium fusion to the detectable level. Our low energy nuclear fusion mechanism research - thermal resonance fusion mechanism results demonstrate how these light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium, can be fused in the crystal of metal, such as Ni or alloy, with synthetic thermal vibrations and resonances at different modes and energies experimentally. The probability of tunnel effect at dif...

  6. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  7. Fusion Canada issue 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a technical update on Tokamak de Varennes, a report on the Beatrix II Breeding Materials Test Program, the Tritium glovebox system for UPM, Saudi Arabia, a broad update of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is also included. 1 fig

  8. Fusion Canada issue 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on a fusion cooperation agreement between Japan and Canada, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on plasma biasing experiments and boronization tests and a collaboration between Canada and the U.S. on a compact toroid fuelling gun. 4 figs

  9. Nuclear fusion in Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study nuclear fusion occurring according to conventional wisdom in the planet Jupiter. In particular, we consider if in a standard evolutionary model of Jupiter a significant part of Jupiter's luminosity has been due to nuclear fusion at any time during its evolution. Nuclear rate equations in dense matter allowing for screening and pressure effects have been integrated in time

  10. FUSION03, Concluding Remarks

    OpenAIRE

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2004-01-01

    Fusion reactions below the Coulomb barrier provide new insights into multidimensional quantum tunneling, nuclear reaction dynamics and nuclear structure. These reactions are also of considerable interest to nuclear astrophysics. In this summary recent developments in the field are reviewed and open questions related to subbarrier fusion are presented.

  11. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bobin, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    The book is a presentation of the basic principles and main achievements in the field of nuclear fusion. It encompasses both magnetic and inertial confinements plus a few exotic mechanisms for nuclear fusion. The state-of-the-art regarding thermonuclear reactions, hot plasmas, tokamaks, laser-driven compression and future reactors is given.

  12. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, activities related to fusion focus on environmental tolerance of opto-electronic components. The objective of this program is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour, during and after neutron irradiation, of fusion-reactor materials and components. The main scientific activities for 1997 are summarized

  13. Fusion Canada issue 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the 1996 IAEA Fusion Conference site, operations at the Tokamak de Varennes including divertor pumping of impurities and pumping of carbon monoxide and methane, a discussion of the CFFTP and it's role. 1 fig

  14. Fusion product spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate fusion product data is required for most fusion plasma simulations. The energy broadening of reaction products is demonstrated to be more complicated than the usual Gaussian broadening. The accurate integrals are performed to obtain , , and for all binary reactions in the four- and five-nucleon systems. Reaction cross sections were developed using R-Matrix models that include most recent measurements

  15. Magnetic fusion theory effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present publication is a comprehensive listing of the magnetic fusion theory effort. It updates the last publication, ERDA 77-18, and gives data on the FY 1977 and FY 1978 budgets. There is a section devoted to the National Magnetic Fusion Computer Center

  16. Fusion Canada issue 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue a bi-lateral meeting between Canada and Japan, water and hydrogen detritiation, in-situ tokamak surface analysis, an update of CCFM/TdeV and tritium accounting Industry guidance in Fusion, fast probe for plasma-surface interaction. 4 figs

  17. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Plan reflects the present conditions of the energy situation and is consistent with national priorities for the support of basic and applied research. It is realistic in taking advantage of the technical position that the United States has already established in fusion research to make cost-effective progress toward the development of fusion power as a future energy option

  18. Fusion reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of fusion reactor systems studies, the objectives of these studies are outlined and some recent conceptual reactor designs are described. The need for further studies in greater depth is indicated so that progress towards a commercial fusion reactor may be consolidated. (U.K.)

  19. Magnetic Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrialized countries most active in nuclear fusion (China, Korea, Japan, India, Russia, the United States and the European Union) are participating in the development of the ITER, an experimental reactor representing a fundamental step toward nuclear fusion energy. Europe, and Italy in particular, are deeply involved in this initiative with an important related project too.

  20. Cold fusion stays elusive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short overview of papers presented at the 6. international conference on cold fusion which has taken place 13-18 Oct 1996 in Hokkaido (Japan) is given. The typical electrolysis cell used for cold fusion experiments is recalled and some new results are described, like a correlation of helium 4 production and heat excess. (C.B.)

  1. Fusion Canada issue 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the IAEA Plasma Biasing Meeting, the new IEA program -Nuclear Technology of Fusion reactors, TFTR tritium purification system, an update by CCFM on machine additions and modifications, and news of a new compact Toroid injector at the University of Saskatchewan. 1 fig

  2. Fusion Power Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment

  3. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  4. Nuclear structure and heavy-ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of lectures is presented on experimental studies of heavy-ion fusion reactions with emphasis on the role of nuclear structure in the fusion mechanism. The experiments considered are of three types: the fusion of lighter heavy ions at subcoulomb energies is studied with in-beam γ-ray techniques; the subbarrier fusion of 16O and 40Ar with the isotopes of samarium is detected out of beam by x-radiation from delayed activity; and measurements at very high energies, again for the lighter ions, employ direct particle identification of evaporation residues. The experimental data are compared with predictions based on the fusion of two spheres with the only degree of freedom being the separation of the centers, and which interact via potentials that vary smoothly with changes in the mass and charge of the projectile and target. The data exhibit with the isotopes of samarium, a portion of these deviations can be understood in terms of the changing deformation of the target nucleus, but an additional degree of freedom such as neck formation appears necessary. The results on 10B + 16O and 12C + 14N → 26Al at high bombarding energies indicate a maximum limiting angular momentum characteristic of the compound nucleus. At lower energies the nuclear structure of the colliding ion seems to affect strongly the cross section for fusion. Measurements made at subbarrier energies for a variety of projectile-target combinations in the 1p and 2s - 1d shell also indicate that the valence nucleons can affect the energy dependence for fusion. About half the systems studied so far have structureless excitation functions which follow a standard prediction. The other half exhibit large variations from this prediction. The possible importance of neutron transfer is discussed. The two-center shell model appears as a promising approach for gaining a qualitative understanding of these phenomena. 95 references, 52 figures, 1 table

  5. Filter Bank Fusion Frames

    CERN Document Server

    Chebira, Amina; Mixon, Dustin G

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we characterize and construct novel oversampled filter banks implementing fusion frames. A fusion frame is a sequence of orthogonal projection operators whose sum can be inverted in a numerically stable way. When properly designed, fusion frames can provide redundant encodings of signals which are optimally robust against certain types of noise and erasures. However, up to this point, few implementable constructions of such frames were known; we show how to construct them using oversampled filter banks. In this work, we first provide polyphase domain characterizations of filter bank fusion frames. We then use these characterizations to construct filter bank fusion frame versions of discrete wavelet and Gabor transforms, emphasizing those specific finite impulse response filters whose frequency responses are well-behaved.

  6. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  7. FUSION OF MEDICAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINE APARECIDA DE OLIVEIRA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of image multiple modalities to achieve medical diagnosis has been commom practice lately. Nowadays the most used practice is medical image fusion, that is integrating information from several different methods within the same image. This paper aims at showing aplication and functionality of medical image fusion process such as Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography and Doppler U.S. Image fusion process can be perfomed by pixel to pixel, region to region as well as based on decision taking. Free softwares can be found in the internet and images can be obtained either in separated or conneceted equipments. The choice of processes depends on several factors and the purpose of fusion as well as characteristics and conditions of each method should be taken into consideration. Currently equipment manufacturers are investing at improving the quality and detection capacity of images aiming at upgrading the fusion process which makes image interpretation more evident and trustworthy.

  8. Some fusion perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the concepts of nuclear fusion reactions, advanced fusion fuels, environmental impacts, etc., are explored using the following general outline: I. Principles of Fusion (Nuclear Fuels and Reactions, Lawson Condition, n tau vs T, Nuclear Burn Characteristics); II. Magnetic Mirror Possibilities (the Ion Layer and Electron Layer, Exponential Build-up at MeV energies, Lorentz trapping at GeV energies); III. Pellet Fuel Fusion Prospects (Advanced Pellet Fuel Fusion Prospects, Burn Characteristics and Applications, Excitation-heating Prospects for Runaway Ion Temperatures). Inasmuch as the outline is very skeletal, a significant research and development effort may be in order to evaluate these prospects in more detail and hopefully ''harness the H-bomb'' for peaceful applications, the author concludes. 28 references

  9. Decomposition of incomplete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The velocity distribution of fusion-like products formed in the reaction 701 MeV 28Si+100Mo is decomposed into 26 incomplete fusion channels. The momentum deficit of the residue per nonevaporative mass unit is approximately equal to the beam momentum per nucleon. The yields of the incomplete fusion channels correlate with the Q-value for projectile fragmentation rather than that for incomplete fusion. The backward angle multiplicities of light particles and heavy ions increase with momentum transfer, however, the heavy ion multiplicities also depend on the extent of the fragmentation of the incomplete fusion channel. These data indicate that at fixed linear momentum transfer, increased fragmentation of the unfused component is related to a reduced transferred angular momentum. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  10. Towards fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to present general but broad review of the recent developments in the field of plasma physics and its application to fusion power. The first chapter describes the fusion reactions and fusion power systems. The second chapter deals in detail with production and behaviour of plasma, screening, oscillations, instability, energy losses, temperature effects, etc. Magnetic confinements, including pinch systems, toroidal systems such as Tokamac and stellarator, minor machine, etc. are discussed in detail in chapter III. Laser produced plasma, laser implosion and problems associated with it and future prospects are explained in chapter IV. Chapter V is devoted entirely to the various aspects of hybrid systems. The last chapter throws light on problems of fusion technology, such as plasma heating, vacuum requirements, radiation damage, choice of materials, blanket problems, hazards of fusion reactions, etc. (K.B.)

  11. Industry's role in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an address to the Tenth Symposium on Fusion Engineering. The speaker first addressed the subject of industry's role in inertial fusion three years earlier in 1980, outlining programs that included participation in the Shiva construction project, and the industrial participants' program set up in the laser fusion program to bring industrial scientists and engineers into the laboratory to work on laser fusion. The speaker is now the president of KMS Fusion, Inc., the primary industrial participant in the inertial fusion program. The outlook for fusion energy and the attitude of the federal government toward the fusion program is discussed

  12. Fusion Frames: Existence and Construction

    CERN Document Server

    Calderbank, Robert; Heinecke, Andreas; Kutyniok, Gitta; Pezeshki, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Fusion frame theory is an emerging mathematical theory that provides a natural framework for performing hierarchical data processing. A fusion frame is a frame-like collection of subspaces in a Hilbert space, thereby generalizing the concept of a frame for signal representation. In this paper, we study the existence and construction of fusion frames. We first present a complete characterization of a special class of fusion frames, called Parseval fusion frames. The value of Parseval fusion frames is that the inverse fusion frame operator is equal to the identity and therefore signal reconstruction can be performed with minimal complexity. We then introduce two general methods -- the spatial complement and the Naimark complement -- for constructing a new fusion frame from a given fusion frame. We then establish existence conditions for fusion frames with desired properties. In particular, we address the following question: Given $M, N, m \\in \\NN$ and $\\{\\lambda_j\\}_{j=1}^M$, does there exist a fusion frame in ...

  13. Inertial fusion reactors and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of magnetic fields of simple configurations and modest strengths to direct target debris ions out of cavities can alleviate recognized shortcomings of several classes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. Complex fringes of the strong magnetic fields of heavy-ion fusion (HIF) focusing magnets may intrude into reactor cavities and significantly affect the trajectories of target debris ions. The results of an assessment of potential benefits from the use of magnetic fields in ICF reactors and of potential problems with focusing-magnet fields in HIF reactors conducted to set priorities for continuing studies are reported. Computational tools are described and some preliminary results are presented

  14. Scenarios for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Are there scenarios for the near future (5-10 years) in which the public interest in, and political support for, fusion energy are likely to increase significantly? If such a scenario should occur, what should the status of heavy-ion fusion be at that time so that it is looked upon as a favored approach? If such a status can be identified, what should the research strategy be so that this status can be achieved in a timely way? This paper will look for answers to the first two of the above questions. If the goal of a desired status can be identified, the research strategy may become obvious. Of the four long-term energy options - coal, solar, fission breeders and fusion - the present position of fusion is in fourth place, never having generated any power. However, coal has environmental and safety problems. Solar has limitations of cost, availability and space requirements. Fission in general, and breeder reactors in particular, have problems of cost, environment and public acceptance. To be accepted and elevated to a position of equality with the others, heavy-ion fusion must simultaneously avoid their real and perceived major flaws. To succeed, heavy-ion fusion must strive to be markedly the best fusion option. (orig.)

  15. Fusion Studies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  16. Affective Video Retrieval Based on Dempster-Shafer Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Nemati

    Full Text Available Affective video retrieval systems are designed to efficiently find videos matching the desires and needs of Web users. These systems usually use fusion strategies to combine information from different modalities aiming at understanding others` affective s ...

  17. Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    references, mostly to articles covering original research, allows the interested reader to go deeper into the various subjects. There are a few quite relevant areas which are essentially not covered in the book (plasma diagnostics; fuelling). The discussion of particle and power exhaust is limited to tokamaks and is somewhat scarce. Other points which I did not find fully satisfactory are: the index is too selective and does not really allow easy access to any specific subject. Cross references between different sections treating related topics are not always given. There are quite a lot of typographical errors which as far as cross references are concerned may be disturbing. A list of the symbols used would be a helpful supplement, especially since some of them appear with different meanings. There are apparent imperfections in the structure of certain chapters. While the English is sometimes unusual, this generally does not affect the readability. Overall, the book can be warmly recommended to all interested in familiarizing themselves with the physics of magnetic fusion. (book review)

  18. Fusion research in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungarian fusion research started in the 1970s, when the idea of installing a small tokamak experiment emerged. In return to computer equipment a soviet tokamak was indeed sent to Hungary and started to operate as MT-1 at the Central Research Institute for Physics (KFKI) in 1979. Major research topics included diagnostic development, edge plasma studies and investigation of disruptions. Following a major upgrade in 1992 (new vacuum vessel, active position control and PC network based data acquisition system) the MT-1M tokamak was used for the study of transport processes with trace impurity injection, micropellet ablation studies, X-ray tomography and laser blow-off diagnostic development. Although funding ceased in the middle of the 90's the group was held alive by collaborations with EU fusion labs: FZ -Juelich, IPP-Garching and CRPP-EPFL Lausanne. In 1998 the machine was dismantled due to reorganization of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. New horizons opened to fusion research from 1999, when Hungary joined EURATOM and a fusion Association was formed. Since then fusion physics studies are done in collaboration with major EU fusion laboratories, Hungarian researchers also play an active role in JET diagnostics upgrade and ITER design. Major topics are pellet ablation studies, plasma turbulence diagnosis using Beam Emission Spectroscopy and other techniques, tomography and plasma diagnostics using various neutral beams. In fusion relevant technology R and D Hungary has less records. Before joining EURATOM some materials irradiation studies were done at the Budapest Research Reactor at KFKI-AEKI. The present day fusion technology programme focuses still on irradiation studies, nuclear material database and electromagnetic testing techniques. Increasing the fusion technology research activities is a difficult task, as the competition in Hungarian industry is very strong and the interest of organizations in long-term investments into R and D is rather weak and

  19. Whither fusion research?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author maintains that the magnetic fusion program is ready for a dramatic change of course. The author's criteria for a desirable fusion power reactor are: it must produce power at a competitive price; it must work with high reliability and maintenance must be easy, fast and low cost, and that the fusion reactor must be safe and not damage the environment. The author's feelings are based on years of observation of the utility industry in general and commercial nuclear power development in particular. The author's views on the undesirability of tokamaks are discussed. Two concepts discussed as alternatives are the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) and the spheromak

  20. Remote sensing image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

  1. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  2. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  3. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  4. Modulation of Cell Cycle Progression by 5-Azacytidine Is Associated with Early Myogenesis Induction in Murine Myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, Anna; Luzi, Livio; Senesi, Pamela; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2013-01-01

    Myogenesis is a multistep process, in which myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle, cease to divide, elongate and fuse to form multinucleated myotubes. Cell cycle transition is controlled by a family of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) regulated by association with cyclins, negative regulatory subunits and phosphorylation. Muscle differentiation is orchestrated by myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), such as MyoD and Myf-5. DNA methylation is crucial in transcriptional control of genes involved in myogenesis. Previous work has indicated that treatment of fibroblasts with the DNA-demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (AZA) promotes MyoD expression. We studied the effects of AZA on cell cycle regulation and MRFs synthesis during myoblast proliferation and early myogenesis phases in C2C12 cells. During the proliferation phase, cells were incubated in growth medium with 5µM AZA (GMAZA) or without AZA (GM) for 24 hours. At 70% confluence, cells were kept in growth medium in order to spontaneously achieve differentiation or transferred to differentiation medium with 5μM AZA (DMAZA) or without AZA (DM) for 12 and 24 hours. Cells used as control were unstimulated. In the proliferation phase, AZA-treated cells seemed to lose their characteristic circular shape and become elongated. The presence of AZA resulted in significant increases in the protein contents of Cyclin-D (FC:1.23 GMAZA vs GM p≤0.05), p21 (FC: 1.23 GMAZA vs GM p≤0.05), Myf-5 (FC: 1.21 GMAZA vs GM p≤0.05) and MyoD (FC: 1.20 GMAZA vs GM p≤0.05). These results propose that AZA could inhibit cell proliferation. During 12 hours of differentiation, AZA decreased the downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and in restriction point (G1 and G1/S phase) and the expression of several cyclins, E2F Transcription Factors, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, specific genes responsible of cell cycle negative regulation. During 24 hours of differentiation, AZA induced an increment in the protein

  5. Modulation of cell cycle progression by 5-azacytidine is associated with early myogenesis induction in murine myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, Anna; Luzi, Livio; Senesi, Pamela; Terruzzi, Ileana

    2013-01-01

    Myogenesis is a multistep process, in which myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle, cease to divide, elongate and fuse to form multinucleated myotubes. Cell cycle transition is controlled by a family of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) regulated by association with cyclins, negative regulatory subunits and phosphorylation. Muscle differentiation is orchestrated by myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), such as MyoD and Myf-5. DNA methylation is crucial in transcriptional control of genes involved in myogenesis. Previous work has indicated that treatment of fibroblasts with the DNA-demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (AZA) promotes MyoD expression. We studied the effects of AZA on cell cycle regulation and MRFs synthesis during myoblast proliferation and early myogenesis phases in C2C12 cells. During the proliferation phase, cells were incubated in growth medium with 5µM AZA (GMAZA) or without AZA (GM) for 24 hours. At 70% confluence, cells were kept in growth medium in order to spontaneously achieve differentiation or transferred to differentiation medium with 5μM AZA (DMAZA) or without AZA (DM) for 12 and 24 hours. Cells used as control were unstimulated. In the proliferation phase, AZA-treated cells seemed to lose their characteristic circular shape and become elongated. The presence of AZA resulted in significant increases in the protein contents of Cyclin-D (FC:1.23 GMAZA vs GM p≤0.05), p21 (FC: 1.23 GMAZA vs GM p≤0.05), Myf-5 (FC: 1.21 GMAZA vs GM p≤0.05) and MyoD (FC: 1.20 GMAZA vs GM p≤0.05). These results propose that AZA could inhibit cell proliferation. During 12 hours of differentiation, AZA decreased the downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and in restriction point (G1 and G1/S phase) and the expression of several cyclins, E2F Transcription Factors, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, specific genes responsible of cell cycle negative regulation. During 24 hours of differentiation, AZA induced an increment in the protein

  6. Inertial thermonuclear fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of deuterium tritium (DT) magnetic or inertial thermonuclear fusion are given. Even if results would be better with heavy ions beams, most of the results on fusion are obtained with laser beams. Technical and theoretical aspects of the laser fusion are presented with an extrapolation to the future fusion reactor. (A.B.). 34 refs., 17 figs

  7. Fusion Systems for Profinite Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Stancu, Radu; Symonds, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the notion of a pro-fusion system on a pro-p group, which generalizes the notion of a fusion system on a finite p-group. We also prove a version of Alperin's Fusion Theorem for pro-fusion systems.

  8. Image Pixel Fusion for Human Face Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Nasipuri, Mita; Basu, Dipak Kumar; Kundu, Mahantapas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for fusion of optical and thermal face images based on image pixel fusion approach. Out of several factors, which affect face recognition performance in case of visual images, illumination changes are a significant factor that needs to be addressed. Thermal images are better in handling illumination conditions but not very consistent in capturing texture details of the faces. Other factors like sunglasses, beard, moustache etc also play active role in adding complicacies to the recognition process. Fusion of thermal and visual images is a solution to overcome the drawbacks present in the individual thermal and visual face images. Here fused images are projected into an eigenspace and the projected images are classified using a radial basis function (RBF) neural network and also by a multi-layer perceptron (MLP). In the experiments Object Tracking and Classification Beyond Visible Spectrum (OTCBVS) database benchmark for thermal and visual face images have been used. Compar...

  9. Converting energy from fusion into useful forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kovari, M; Jenkins, I; Kiely, C

    2014-01-01

    If fusion power reactors are to be feasible, it will still be necessary to convert the energy of the nuclear reaction into usable form. The heat produced will be removed from the reactor core by a primary coolant, which might be water, helium, molten lithium-lead, molten lithium-containing salt, or CO2. The heat could then be transferred to a conventional Rankine cycle or Brayton (gas turbine) cycle. Alternatively it could be used for thermochemical processes such as producing hydrogen or other transport fuels. Fusion presents new problems because of the high energy neutrons released. These affect the selection of materials and the operating temperature, ultimately determining the choice of coolant and working cycle. The limited temperature ranges allowed by present day irradiated structural materials, combined with the large internal power demand of the plant, will limit the overall thermal efficiency. The operating conditions of the fusion power source, the materials, coolant, and energy conversion system w...

  10. A novel in vitro system for gamete fusion in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Various systems by using electric pulse, calcium, or polyethylene glycol have been developed in the past decade for the in vitro fusion of plant gametes. These in vitro systems provide a new way to study the fertilization mechanisms of plants. In this study, we developed a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-mediated fusion system for the in vitro fusion of maize gametes. The in vitro fusion of the isolated single egg cell and sperm cell of maize was observed microscopically in the BSA solution and the fertilized egg cell showed normal cell wall regeneration and nuclear division. The effects of the BSA concentration, pH value and calcium level on the efficiency of the maize gamete fusion were also assessed. BSA concentration and pH value did significantly affect the efficiency of the gamete fusion. Calcium was not necessary for the gamete fusion when BSA was present. The optimal solution for the gamete fusion contained 0.1% BSA, pH 6.0. The fusion frequency was as high as 96.7% in that optimal solution. This new in vitro fertilization system offers an alternative tool for the in vitro study of fertilization mechanisms with much simpler manipulating procedure than PEG system,and it will be especially useful for the in vitro study of the calcium dynamics during plant fertilization.

  11. Alteration in Phospholipidome Profile of Myoblast H9c2 Cell Line in a Model of Myocardium Starvation and Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Bebiana; Melo, Tânia; Campos, Ana; Moreira, Ana S P; Maciel, Elisabete; Domingues, Pedro; Carvalho, Rita Pereira; Rodrigues, Teresa Ribeiro; Girão, Henrique; Domingues, Maria Rosario M

    2016-10-01

    Myocardium infarction is one of the most deathly cardiovascular diseases. It is characterized by myocardium ischemia as a result of nutrients depletion and hypoxia. The cell can respond to this injury by autophagy or apoptosis, which determines the evolution and possible recovery of the myocardium infarction. Lipids play an important role in cardiovascular disease. However reports stating lipidome variations in cardiovascular disease are scarce and the role that lipids play in this pathological condition is not completely understood. The aim of this work was to identify changes in lipid profile of a myoblast H9c2 cell line under starvation and ischemia, to better understand and recognize new biomarkers for myocardial infarction. Lipidomic profile was evaluated by HILIC-LC-MS and GC-MS. Cardiac cells showed alterations in phosphatidylcholines PC (34:1) and PC (36:2), lysophosphatidylcholines lyso PC(16:0), lysoPC(18:1) and lysoPC(18:0), phosphatidylethanolamine PE (34:1), phosphatidylserine PS (36:1), phosphatidylinositol PI (36:2), PI (38:3) and PI (38:5), sphingomyelin SM (34:1) and cardiolipins CL(68:4), CL(72:5) and CL(74:7) in ischemia and/or starvation, in comparison with control. Specific differences observed only in starvation were decrease of SM (34:1) and FA (20:4), and increase of PS (36:1). Differences observed only in ischemia were decrease of PC (36:2), lyso PC (16:0) and FA (18:1) and simultaneous increase of FA (16:0), and FA (18:0). Interestingly, PC (34:1) increased in ischemia and decreased in starvation. In conclusion, our work suggests that lipids are potential markers for evaluation of cell fate, either cell death or recovery, which will be useful to improve diagnosis and prognostic of cardiovascular diseases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2266-2274, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26887290

  12. Efficient non-viral reprogramming of myoblasts to stemness with a single small molecule to generate cardiac progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Pasha

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: The current protocols for generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells involve genome integrating viral vectors which may induce tumorgenesis. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize a non-viral method without genetic manipulation for reprogramming of skeletal myoblasts (SMs using small molecules. METHODS AND RESULTS: SMs from young male Oct3/4-GFP(+ transgenic mouse were treated with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT inhibitor, RG108. Two weeks later, GFP(+ colonies of SM derived iPS cells (SiPS expressing GFP and with morphological similarity of mouse embryonic stem (ESCs were formed and propagated in vitro. SiPS were positive for alkaline phosphatase activity, expressed SSEA1, displayed ES cell specific pluripotency markers and formed teratoma in nude mice. Optimization of culture conditions for embryoid body (EBs formation yielded spontaneously contracting EBs having morphological, molecular, and ultra-structural similarities with cardiomyocytes and expressed early and late cardiac markers. miR profiling showed abrogation of let-7 family and upregulation of ESCs specific miR-290-295 cluster thus indicating that SiPS were similar to ESCs in miR profile. Four weeks after transplantation into the immunocompetent mice model of acute myocardial infarction (n = 12 per group, extensive myogenesis was observed in SiPS transplanted hearts as compared to DMEM controls (n = 6 per group. A significant reduction in fibrosis and improvement in global heart function in the hearts transplanted with SiPS derived cardiac progenitor cells were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Reprogramming of SMs by DNMT inhibitor is a simple, reproducible and efficient technique more likely to generate transgene integration-free iPS cells. Cardiac progenitors derived from iPS cells propagated extensively in the infarcted myocardium without tumorgenesis and improved cardiac function.

  13. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  14. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KfK participates to the Fusion Technology Programme of the European Community. Most of the work in progress addresses the Next European Torus (NET) and the long term technology aspects as defined in the 82/86 programme. A minor part serves to preparation of future contributions and to design studies on fusion concepts in a wider perspective. The Fusion Technology Programme of Euratom covers mainly aspects of nuclear engineering. Plasma engineering, heating, refueling and vacuum technology are at present part of the Physics Programme. In view of NET, integration of the different areas of work will be mandatory. KfK is therefore prepared to address technical aspects beyond the actual scope of the physics experiments. The technology tasks are reported project wise under title and code of the Euratom programme. Most of the projects described here are shared with other European fusion laboratories as indicated in the table annexed to this report. (orig./GG)

  15. Fusion-breeder program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various approaches to a combined fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of breeding 239Pu and 233U are described. Design aspects and cost estimates for fuel production and electricity generation are discussed

  16. Label Fusion Strategy Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Robitaille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques—STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA—and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall.

  17. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  18. Middle interhemispheric fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman with seizures and mental deficiency attributed to perinatal anoxia. Brain MR showed a congenital malformation, a rare form of semilobar holoprosencephaly termed middle interhemispheric fusion. (orig.)

  19. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  20. Incomplete fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of the mechanism of heavy-ion induced reactions in the range of bombarding energies from a few to about 20 MeV/A are reviewed with special emphasis on the reactions for very asymmetric systems. Results of the experimental studies of binary reactions and particularly of the incomplete fusion reactions (selected by means of various coincidence techniques)are discussed. A model of generalized critical angular momentum is formulated. The model explains essential features of the incomplete fusion reactions and predicts that particular reaction channels are localized in well defined regions of angular momenta. An extension of this model (the sum-rule model) is also proposed in attempt to consistently describe the complete fusion reactions, incomplete fusion reactions and multibody reactions in the framework of statistical competition constrained by the angular momentum limitations. (author)

  1. Fusion technology (FT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report of tha fusion technology (FT) working group discusses the projects carried out by the participating institutes in the fields of 1) fuel injection and plasma heating, 2) magnetic field technology, and 3) systems investigations. (HK)

  2. International fusion og spaltning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone L.

    Bogen analyserer de nye muligheder fra 2007 i europæisk ret med hensyn til fusion eller spaltning mellem aktieselskaber og anpartsselskaber med hjemsted i forskellige europæiske lande. Bogen gennemgår de nye muligheder for strukturændringer, der herved er opstået mulighed for, og den sætter fokus...... på det spørgsmål, der i en grænseoverskridende fusion eller spaltning vil blive helt dominerende: Hvilken form for medbestemmelse (medarbejderrepræsentation i bestyrelse mv.) der eventuelt skal være i det fortsættende selskab efter fusionen. Bogen behandler både fusion med et dansk selskab som det...... fortsættende og fusion med et dansk selskab som det ophørende....

  3. Fusion technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes information on the following chapters: (1) conceptual design studies, (2) magnetics, (3) plasma heating, fueling, and exhaust, (4) materials for fusion reactors, (5) alternate applications, and (6) environment and safety

  4. Cell fusions in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Bjerregaard, Bolette; Talts, Jan Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Cell fusions are important to fertilization, placentation, development of skeletal muscle and bone, calcium homeostasis and the immune defense system. Additionally, cell fusions participate in tissue repair and may be important to cancer development and progression. A large number of factors appear...... to regulate cell fusions, including receptors and ligands, membrane domain organizing proteins, proteases, signaling molecules and fusogenic proteins forming alpha-helical bundles that bring membranes close together. The syncytin family of proteins represent true fusogens and the founding member......, syncytin-1, has been documented to be involved in fusions between placental trophoblasts, between cancer cells and between cancer cells and host ells. We review the literature with emphasis on the syncytin family and propose that syncytins may represent universal fusogens in primates and rodents, which...

  5. Cold nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In normal temperature condition, the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance method, realize the combination of deuterium and tritium, helium and lithium... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion". According to the similarity of the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance system, the different velocity and energy of the ion beam mixing control, developed ion speed dc transformer, it is cold nuclear fusion collide, issue of motivation and the nuclear power plant start-up fusion and power transfer system of the important equipment, so the merger to apply for a patent

  6. Fusion Revisits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It's going to be a hot summer at CERN. At least in the Main Building, where from 13 July to 20 August an exhibition is being hosted on nuclear fusion, the energy of the Stars. Nuclear fusion is the engine driving the stars but also a potential source of energy for mankind. The exhibition shows the different nuclear fusion techniques and research carried out on the subject in Europe. Inaugurated at CERN in 1993, following collaboration between Lausanne's CRPP-EPFL and CERN, with input from Alessandro Pascolini of Italy's INFN, this exhibition has travelled round Europe before being revamped and returning to CERN. 'Fusion, Energy of the Stars', from 13 July onwards, Main Building

  7. Sodium arsenite delays the differentiation of C2C12 mouse myoblast cells and alters methylation patterns on the transcription factor myogenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies have correlated arsenic exposure with cancer, skin diseases, and adverse developmental outcomes such as spontaneous abortions, neonatal mortality, low birth weight, and delays in the use of musculature. The current study used C2C12 mouse myoblast cells to examine whether low concentrations of arsenic could alter their differentiation into myotubes, indicating that arsenic can act as a developmental toxicant. Myoblast cells were exposed to 20 nM sodium arsenite, allowed to differentiate into myotubes, and expression of the muscle-specific transcription factor myogenin, along with the expression of tropomyosin, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (Socs3), prostaglandin I2 synthesis (Ptgis), and myocyte enhancer 2 (Mef2), was investigated using QPCR and immunofluorescence. Exposing C2C12 cells to 20 nM sodium arsenite delayed the differentiation process, as evidenced by a significant reduction in the number of multinucleated myotubes, a decrease in myogenin mRNA expression, and a decrease in the total number of nuclei expressing myogenin protein. The expression of mRNA involved in myotube formation, such as Ptgis and Mef2 mRNA, was also significantly reduced by 1.6-fold and 4-fold during differentiation. This was confirmed by immunofluorescence for Mef2, which showed a 2.6-fold reduction in nuclear translocation. Changes in methylation patterns in the promoter region of myogenin (-473 to + 90) were examined by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite genomic sequencing. Hypermethylated CpGs were found at -236 and -126 bp, whereas hypomethylated CpGs were found at -207 bp in arsenic-exposed cells. This study indicates that 20 nM sodium arsenite can alter myoblast differentiation by reducing the expression of the transcription factors myogenin and Mef2c, which is likely due to changes in promoter methylation patterns. The delay in muscle differentiation may lead to developmental abnormalities.

  8. Effects of Ghrelin on Triglyceride Accumulation and Glucose Uptake in Primary Cultured Rat Myoblasts under Palmitic Acid-Induced High Fat Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to study the effects of acylated ghrelin on glucose and triglyceride metabolism in rat myoblasts under palmitic acid- (PA- induced high fat conditions. Rat myoblasts were treated with 0, 10−11, 10−9, or 10−7 M acylated ghrelin and 0.3 mM PA for 12 h. Triglyceride accumulation was determined by Oil-Red-O staining and the glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase-peroxidase enzymatic method, and glucose uptake was determined by isotope tracer. The glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3 were assessed by RT-PCR and western blot. Compared to 0.3 mM PA, ghrelin at 10−9 and 10−7 M reduced triglyceride content (5.855 ± 0.352 versus 5.030 ± 0.129 and 4.158 ± 0.254 mM, P<0.05 and prevented PA-induced reduction of glucose uptake (1.717 ± 0.264 versus 2.233 ± 0.333 and 2.333 ± 0.273 10−2 pmol/g/min, P<0.05. The relative protein expression of p-AMPKα/AMPKα, UCP3, and p-ACC under 0.3 mM PA was significantly reduced compared to controls (all P<0.05, but those in the 10−9 and 10−7 M ghrelin groups were significantly protected from 0.3 mM PA (all P<0.05. In conclusion, acylated ghrelin reduced PA-induced triglyceride accumulation and prevented the PA-induced decrease in glucose uptake in rat myoblasts. These effects may involve fatty acid oxidation.

  9. Transmembrane proteoglycans syndecan-2, 4, receptor candidates for the impact of HGF and FGF2 on semaphorin 3A expression in early-differentiated myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Mai-Khoi Q; Shimizu, Naomi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ohtsubo, Hideaki; Mizunoya, Wataru; Nakamura, Mako; Sawano, Shoko; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide; Anderson, Judy E; Tatsumi, Ryuichi

    2015-09-01

    Regenerative mechanisms that regulate intramuscular motor innervation are thought to reside in the spatiotemporal expression of axon-guidance molecules. Our previous studies proposed an unexplored role of resident myogenic stem cell (satellite cell)-derived myoblasts as a key presenter of a secreted neural chemorepellent semaphorin 3A (Sema3A); hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) triggered its expression exclusively at the early differentiation phase. In order to advance this concept, the present study described that transmembrane heparan/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans syndecan-2, 4 may be the plausible receptor candidates for HGF and FGF2 to signal Sema3A expression. Results showed that mRNA expression of syndecan-2, 4 was abundant (two magnitudes higher than syndecan-1, 3) in early-differentiated myoblasts and their in vitro knockdown diminished the HGF/FGF2-induced expression of Sema3A down to a baseline level. Pretreatment with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC decreased the HGF and FGF2 responses, respectively, in non-knockdown cultures, supporting a possible model that HGF and FGF2 may bind to heparan and chondroitin sulfate chains of syndecan-2, 4 to signal Sema3A expression. The findings, therefore, extend our understanding that HGF/FGF2-syndecan-2, 4 association may stimulate a burst of Sema3A secretion by myoblasts recruited to the site of muscle injury; this would ensure a coordinated delay in the attachment of motoneuron terminals onto fibers early in muscle regeneration, and thus synchronize the recovery of muscle fiber integrity and the early resolution of inflammation after injury with reinnervation toward functional recovery. PMID:26381016

  10. Fusion research in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic growth of our country demands a rapid increase in the energy output. Fusion is one such alternate clean source of energy to contribute in the energy mix towards the second half of the century, with a virtually inexhaustible fuel supply. The environmental impact of fusion would be acceptable and relatively safe. These advantages have driven the world fusion research programme since its inception. Till a pure fusion energy source is available, it is worthwhile to develop it for the benefit of conventional fission fuel preparation and other various usages. Indian National Fusion Programme was initiated by indigenously developing the first Indian Tokamak, ADITYA, successfully commissioned in 1989 and has been generating interesting scientific results on various topics. The next major program at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) has been to construct a Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) by mix of import and indigenous development. After successful engineering validation of the subsystems in integrated operations, successful machine operation has been continued. Since then, the machine has been upgraded with a graphite first wall. As a strategy towards leapfrogging to save time, IPR and Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) decided on India’s participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as a full partner, unique features of which will be its ability to operate for long durations and at power levels ∼500 MW sufficient to demonstrate the physics of burning plasma in a power plant like environment. It will also serve as a test-bed for additional fusion power plant technologies. To accelerate the domestic fusion research programme with integration of knowledge gained from ITER, we would embark upon design of a smaller fusion machine which will use already available technologies to produce controlled fusion reactions and use it as an energetic neutron source for test of materials developed for future fusion reactors

  11. Fusion Canada issue 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Canada's plans to participate in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA), bilateral meetings with Canada and the U.S., committee meeting with Canada-Europe, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on Plasma Biasing experiments and boronized graphite tests, fusion materials research at the University of Toronto using a dual beam accelerator and a review of the CFFTP and the CCFM. 2 figs

  12. Economically competitive fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Ward

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Not since the oil crisis of the 1970s has the perception that energy is a crucial and precious resource been as strong as it is today. The need for a new approach to world energy supply, driven by concerns over resources, pollution, and security, is leading to a reappraisal of fusion. Fusion has enormous potential and major safety and environmental advantages, and hence could make a large difference to energy supplies.

  13. Cold nuclear fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    In normal temperature condition, the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance method, realize the combination of deuterium and tritium, helium and lithium... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion". According to the similarity of the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance system, the different velocity and energy of the ion be...

  14. Sonoluminescence and bubble fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Arakeri, Vijay H

    2003-01-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL), the phenomenon of light emission from nonlinear motion of a gas bubble, involves an extreme degree of energy focusing. The conditions within the bubble during the last stages of the nearly catastrophic implosion are thought to parallel the efforts aimed at developing inertial confinement fusion. A limited review on the topic of SL and its possible connection to bubble nuclear fusion is presented here. The emphasis is on looking for a link between the various forms o...

  15. Grassmannian Fusion Frames

    OpenAIRE

    King, Emily J.

    2010-01-01

    Transmitted data may be corrupted by both noise and data loss. Grassmannian frames are in some sense optimal representations of data transmitted over a noisy channel that may lose some of the transmitted coefficients. Fusion frame (or frame of subspaces) theory is a new area that has potential to be applied to problems in such fields as distributed sensing and parallel processing. Grassmannian fusion frames combine elements from both theories. A simple, novel construction of Grassmannian fusi...

  16. Fusion Simulation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. (1). Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical

  17. Economically competitive fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, David J.; Dudarev, Sergei L.

    2008-01-01

    Not since the oil crisis of the 1970s has the perception that energy is a crucial and precious resource been as strong as it is today. The need for a new approach to world energy supply, driven by concerns over resources, pollution, and security, is leading to a reappraisal of fusion. Fusion has enormous potential and major safety and environmental advantages, and hence could make a large difference to energy supplies.

  18. Conference on Norwegian fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of instituting a systematic research programme in Norway on aspects of thermonuclear and plasma physics has been raised. The conference here reported was intended to provide basic information on the status of fusion research internationally and to discuss a possible Norwegian programme. The main contributions covered the present status of fusion research, international cooperation, fusion research in small countries and minor laboratories, fusion research in Denmark and Sweden, and a proposed fusion experiment in Bergen. (JIW)

  19. Feasibility of dual reporter gene in rat myoblast cell line using human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a non-invasive combined imaging method of gamma camera and optical imaging to assess rat myoblast cell line, H9c2, we constructed retrovirus containing hNIS and EGFP gene, and transfected to rat myoblast cell and monitored hNIS and EGFP expression. Rat myoblast cell line, H9C2, was transfected with hNIS and EGFP gene using retrovirus (H9C2-NG). The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was determined by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The uptake and efflux of I-125 were measured in the transfected and wild type cell lines. Each cell line was injected to 4 flank sites (H9c2: 1X107 or 2X107, H9C2-NG: 1X107 or 2X107) in nude mouse. Scintigraphic image was performed at 3h, 1 day after H9C2 and H9C2-NG cell inoculation. We performed gamma camera and animal PET imaging to evaluate NIS expression. Also, GFP image obtained using optical imaging system. The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was confirmed by RT-PCR. In iodide uptake, H9C2-NG cells accumulated 274.52.2 pmol/ mg protein at 30 min. But wild type cell line did not uptake iodide. In fluorescent microscopy, H9C2-NG cells were highly fluorescent than that of H9C2 cells. In iodide efflux study, 50% of radioactivity flowed out during the first 10min. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake of Tc-99m in H9c2-NG than in H9C2 for 1 day. Also, H9C2-NG cells showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots in animal body. In this study, NIS and EGFP reporter gene were successfully transfected by a retrovirus in myoblast cell line, and the transfected cell can be easily visualized in vivo. These results suggest that NIS and EGFP gene has an excellent feasibility as a reporter gene, and it can be used to monitor cell trafficking for monitoring

  20. Feasibility of dual reporter gene in rat myoblast cell line using human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, You La; Ahn, Sohn Joo; Choi, Chang Ik; Lee, Sang Woo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To develop a non-invasive combined imaging method of gamma camera and optical imaging to assess rat myoblast cell line, H9c2, we constructed retrovirus containing hNIS and EGFP gene, and transfected to rat myoblast cell and monitored hNIS and EGFP expression. Rat myoblast cell line, H9C2, was transfected with hNIS and EGFP gene using retrovirus (H9C2-NG). The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was determined by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The uptake and efflux of I-125 were measured in the transfected and wild type cell lines. Each cell line was injected to 4 flank sites (H9c2: 1X107 or 2X107, H9C2-NG: 1X107 or 2X107) in nude mouse. Scintigraphic image was performed at 3h, 1 day after H9C2 and H9C2-NG cell inoculation. We performed gamma camera and animal PET imaging to evaluate NIS expression. Also, GFP image obtained using optical imaging system. The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was confirmed by RT-PCR. In iodide uptake, H9C2-NG cells accumulated 274.52.2 pmol/ mg protein at 30 min. But wild type cell line did not uptake iodide. In fluorescent microscopy, H9C2-NG cells were highly fluorescent than that of H9C2 cells. In iodide efflux study, 50% of radioactivity flowed out during the first 10min. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake of Tc-99m in H9c2-NG than in H9C2 for 1 day. Also, H9C2-NG cells showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots in animal body. In this study, NIS and EGFP reporter gene were successfully transfected by a retrovirus in myoblast cell line, and the transfected cell can be easily visualized in vivo. These results suggest that NIS and EGFP gene has an excellent feasibility as a reporter gene, and it can be used to monitor cell trafficking for monitoring.

  1. A feedback circuit between miR-133 and the ERK1/2 pathway involving an exquisite mechanism for regulating myoblast proliferation and differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Y; Niu, L-L; Wei, W; Zhang, W-Y; Li, X-Y; Cao, J-H; Zhao, S-H

    2013-01-01

    MiR-133 was found to be specifically expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle in previous studies. There are two members in the miR-133 family: miR-133a and miR-133b. Although previous studies indicated that miR-133a was related to myogenesis, the signaling pathways regulated by miR-133 were still not very clear. In this study, we showed that both miR-133a and miR-133b were upregulated during myogenesis through Solexa sequencing. We confirmed that miR-133 could promote myoblast differentiatio...

  2. Transient exposure of human myoblasts to tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits serum and insulin-like growth factor-I stimulated protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, R A; Lang, C H; Gelato, M C

    1997-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induces cachexia and is postulated to be responsible for muscle wasting in several pathophysiological conditions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether exposure of human myoblasts to TNF-alpha could directly inhibit the ability of serum or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to stimulate protein synthesis as assessed by the incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into protein. Serum and IGF-I stimulated protein synthesis dose dependently. Half-maximal stimulation of protein synthesis occurred at 05% serum and 8 ng/ml of IGF-I, respectively. TNF-alpha inhibited IGF-I-stimulated protein synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, as little as 2 ng/ml of TNF-alpha impaired the ability of IGF-I to stimulate protein synthesis by 33% and, at a dose of 100 ng/ml, TNF-alpha completely prevented the increase in protein synthesis induced by either serum or a maximally stimulating dose of IGF-I. Inhibition of protein synthesis was independent of whether TNF-alpha and growth factors were added to cells simultaneously or if the cells were pretreated with growth factors. Exposure ofmyoblasts to TNF-alpha for 10 min completely inhibited serum-induced stimulation of protein synthesis. TNF-alpha inhibited protein synthesis up to 48 h after addition of the cytokine. TNF-alpha also inhibited serum-stimulated protein synthesis in human myoblasts that were differentiated into myotubes. In contrast, exposure of myoblasts to TNF-alpha had no effect on IGF-I binding and failed to alter the ability of either IGF-I or serum to stimulate [3H]thymidine uptake. These data indicate that transient exposure of myoblasts or myotubes to TNF-alpha inhibits protein synthesis. Thus, the anabolic actions of IGF-I on muscle protein synthesis may be impaired during catabolic conditions in which TNF-alpha is over expressed. PMID:9322924

  3. Fusion, cold fusion, and space policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper critiques Americal science policy through a consideration of two examples-cold fusion and asteroid mining. It points out that the failure of central planning in science and technology policy is just as marked as in more mundane activities. It highlights the current low level of debate and points out some technical issues that need to be addressed. It concludes with evidence that the alliance of flawed policy options is further lowering the level of debate. (author)

  4. External costs of future fusion plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallberg, B. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Association Euratom, NFR Nykoping (Sweden); Hamacher, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Korhonen, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Lechon, Y.; Saez, R.M.; Cabal, H. [CIEMAT, Centro de Investigacion Energica Medioambiental y Technologia (Spain); Schleisner, L. [RIS0 National Lab. (Denmark)

    1998-07-01

    Early communication between research, public and politics is necessary to put new complex technology into use. The SERF project (Socio-Economic Research on Fusion) was therefore started in the autumn of 1997. SERF is part of the Longer Term Programme. The work is divided in five tasks: Long Term Scenari, Production Costs, External Costs and Benefits, Fusion as a Large Technical System, and Fusion and the Public Opinion. This paper presents preliminary results of external costs (externalities) caused by a commercially operating fusion plant. Externalities related to energy production are in general defined as costs imposed on society that are not accounted for by the producers or consumers of energy, in other words damages not reflected in the market price, e.g. public health, agriculture, ecosystems etc are affected by environmental effects of energy production. Consideration of externalities may make some energy options more attractive for society than other, in spite of higher direct costs. The methodology used to assess externalities related to a fusion plant was that of the EU ExternE project, which uses a bottom-up, site-specific and marginal approach, i.e. it considers extra effects due to a new activity at a studied site. Quantification of impacts is achieved through damage functions or impact pathway analysis. (authors)

  5. Dynamical effects in the fusion hindrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Yasuhisa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that there is a hindrance to fusion in collisions with heavy nuclei that plays a decisive role in synthesis of the super-heavy elements (SHE. The origin of the fusion hindrance is nowadays qualitatively understood but there are still quantitative ambiguities on the dynamics of the fusion mechanism and the predictions need to be assessed. In this communication, we stress the fact that dynamical effects play a crucial role in the amplitude of the reduction of the fusion probability. We found that the fast evolution of the neck degree of freedom affects the slow radial motion, i.e., the fusioning motion, through a dynamical coupling. We showed that we could do a so-called adiabatic elimination of the fast variable in the coupled equation, resulting in an effective one-dimensional equation for the radial motion with a shift of the starting point. This treatment of the dynamical coupling leads to a larger hindrance.

  6. External costs of future fusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early communication between research, public and politics is necessary to put new complex technology into use. The SERF project (Socio-Economic Research on Fusion) was therefore started in the autumn of 1997. SERF is part of the Longer Term Programme. The work is divided in five tasks: Long Term Scenari, Production Costs, External Costs and Benefits, Fusion as a Large Technical System, and Fusion and the Public Opinion. This paper presents preliminary results of external costs (externalities) caused by a commercially operating fusion plant. Externalities related to energy production are in general defined as costs imposed on society that are not accounted for by the producers or consumers of energy, in other words damages not reflected in the market price, e.g. public health, agriculture, ecosystems etc are affected by environmental effects of energy production. Consideration of externalities may make some energy options more attractive for society than other, in spite of higher direct costs. The methodology used to assess externalities related to a fusion plant was that of the EU ExternE project, which uses a bottom-up, site-specific and marginal approach, i.e. it considers extra effects due to a new activity at a studied site. Quantification of impacts is achieved through damage functions or impact pathway analysis. (authors)

  7. Perspectives of fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New and practically inexhaustible sources of energy must be developed for the period when oil, coal and uranium will become scarce and expensive. Nuclear fusion holds great promise as one of these practically inexhaustible energy sources. Based on the deuteriumtritium reaction with tritium obtained from naturally occuring lithium, which is also widely available in Europe, the accessible energy resources in the world are 3.1012 to 3.1016 toe; based on the deuterium-deuterium reaction, the deuterium content of the oceans corresponds to 1020 toe. It is presently envisaged that in order to establish fusion as a large-scale energy source, three major thresholds must be reached: - Scientific feasibility, - Technical feasibility, i.e. the proof that the basic technical problems of the fusion reactor can be solved. - Commercial feasibility, i.e. proof that fusion power reactors can be built on an industrial scale, can be operated reliably and produce usable energy at prices competitive with other energy sources. From the above it is clear that the route to commercial fusion will be long and costly and involve the solution of extremely difficult technical problems. In view of the many steps which have to be taken, it appears unlikely that commercial fusion power will be in general use within the next 50 years and by that time world-wide expenditure on research, development and demonstration may well have exceeded 100 Bio ECU. (author)

  8. Energy from inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 22 articles on inertial fusion energy (IFE) research and development written in the framework of an international collaboration of authors under the guidance of an advisory group on inertial fusion energy set up in 1991 to advise the IAEA. It describes the actual scientific, engineering and technological developments in the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It also identifies ways in which international co-operation in ICF could be stimulated. The book is intended for a large audience and provides an introduction to inertial fusion energy and an overview of the various technologies needed for IFE power plants to be developed. It contains chapters on (i) the fundamentals of IFE; (ii) inertial confinement target physics; (iii) IFE power plant design principles (requirements for power plant drivers, solid state laser drivers, gas laser drivers, heavy ion drivers, and light ion drivers, target fabrication and positioning, reaction chamber systems, power generation and conditioning and radiation control, materials management and target materials recovery), (iv) special design issues (radiation damage in structural materials, induced radioactivity, laser driver- reaction chamber interfaces, ion beam driver-reaction chamber interfaces), (v) inertial fusion energy development strategy, (vi) safety and environmental impact, (vii) economics and other figures of merit; (viii) other uses of inertial fusion (both those involving and not involving implosions); and (ix) international activities. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Molecular Principles of Gene Fusion Mediated Rewiring of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Oates, Matt E; Maddox, Louis; Flock, Tilman; Gough, Julian; Buljan, Marija; Weatheritt, Robert J; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-18

    Gene fusions are common cancer-causing mutations, but the molecular principles by which fusion protein products affect interaction networks and cause disease are not well understood. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of the structural, interactomic, and regulatory properties of thousands of putative fusion proteins. We demonstrate that genes that form fusions (i.e., parent genes) tend to be highly connected hub genes, whose protein products are enriched in structured and disordered interaction-mediating features. Fusion often results in the loss of these parental features and the depletion of regulatory sites such as post-translational modifications. Fusion products disproportionately connect proteins that did not previously interact in the protein interaction network. In this manner, fusion products can escape cellular regulation and constitutively rewire protein interaction networks. We suggest that the deregulation of central, interaction-prone proteins may represent a widespread mechanism by which fusion proteins alter the topology of cellular signaling pathways and promote cancer. PMID:27540857

  10. Overview of safety and environmental issues for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes safety and environmental issues of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE): inventories, effluents, maintenance, accident safety, waste management, and recycling. The fusion confinement approach among inertial and magnetic options affects how the fusion reaction is maintained and which materials surround the reaction chamber. The target fill technology has a major impact on the target factory tritium inventory. IFE fusion reaction chambers usually employ some means to protect the first structural wall from fusion pulses. This protective fluid or granular bed also moderates and absorbs most neutrons before they reach the first structural wall. Although the protective fluid activates, most candidate fluids have low activation hazard. Hands-on maintenance seems practical for the driver, target factory, and secondary coolant systems; remote maintenance is likely required for the reaction chamber, primary coolant, and vacuum exhaust cleanup systems. The driver and fuel target facility are well separated from the main reaction chamber

  11. Fusion program in Japan and prospect of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of nuclear fusion as a practical energy source could provide great benefits for all mankind. This fact has been widely recognized and this task could be good example to pursue the goal with worldwide collaboration and friendship. Fusion energy development is one of the big scientific programs in Japan. Both Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) are proceeded aiming to achieve clean, abundant and safe fusion energy. An overview of the fusion energy research and development in Japan is given

  12. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig

  13. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  14. Mechanical stimuli activation of calpain is required for myoblast differentiation and occurs via an ERK/MAP kinase signaling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Alberto; Karlsson, Anders H; Lawson, Moira Ann

    fusion, cell membrane and cytoskeleton component reorganization due to the activity of ubiquitous proteolytic enzymes known as calpains has been reported. Whether there is a link between stretch- or load induced signals, the MAPK pathway and calpain expression and activation is not known. Using a...

  15. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  16. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1982, KfK joined the fusion programme of EURATOM as a further association introducing its experience in nuclear technology. KfK closely cooperates with IPP Garching, the two institutions forming a research unit aiming at planning and realization of future development steps of fusion. KfK has combined its forces in the Nuclear Fusion Project (PKF) with participation of several KfK departments to the project tasks. Previous work of KfK in magnetic fusion has addressed mainly superconducting magnets, plasma heating by cluster ions and studies on structural materials. At present, emphasis of our work has concentrated increasingly on the nuclear part, i.e. the first wall and blanket structures and the elements of the tritium extraction and purification system. Associated to this component development are studies of remote maintenance and safety. Most of the actual work addresses NET, the next step to a demonstration of fusion feasibility. NET is supposed to follow JET, the operating plasma physics experiment of Euratom, on the 1990's. Detailed progress of the work in the past half year is described in this report. (orig./GG)

  17. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm‑2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  18. Coatings for fusion reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal surfaces of a tokamak fusion reactor control the impurity injection and gas recycling into the fusion plasma. Coating of internal surfaces may provide a desirable and possibly necessary design flexibility for achieving the temperatures, ion densities and containment times necessary for net energy production from fusion reactions to take place. In this paper the reactor environments seen by various componentare reviewed along with possible materials responses. Characteristics of coating-substrate systems, important to fusion applications, are delineated and the present status of coating development for fusion applications is reviewed. Coating development for fusion applications is just beginning and poses a unique and important challenge for materials development

  19. Fusion: Energy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion, which occurs in the sun and the stars, is a process of transforming matter into energy. If we can harness the fusion process on Earth, it opens the way to assuring that future generations will not want for heat and electric power. The purpose of this booklet is to introduce the concept of fusion energy as a viable, environmentally sustainable energy source for the twenty-first century. The booklet presents the basic principles of fusion, the global research and development effort in fusion, and Canada's programs for fusion research and development

  20. Physics of magnetic confinement fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner F

    2013-01-01

    Fusion is the energy source of the universe. The local conditions in the core of the Sun allow the transfer of mass into energy, which is finally released in the form of radiation. Technical fusion melts deuterons and tritons to helium releasing large amounts of energy per fusion process. Because of the conditions for fusion, which will be deduced, the fusion fuel is in the plasma state. Here we report on the confinement of fusion plasmas by magnetic fields. Different confinement concepts — t...

  1. Performance analysis of image fusion methods in transform domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonsuk; Sharifahmadian, Ershad; Latifi, Shahram

    2013-05-01

    Image fusion involves merging two or more images in such a way as to retain the most desirable characteristics of each. There are various image fusion methods and they can be classified into three main categories: i) Spatial domain, ii) Transform domain, and iii) Statistical domain. We focus on the transform domain in this paper as spatial domain methods are primitive and statistical domain methods suffer from a significant increase of computational complexity. In the field of image fusion, performance analysis is important since the evaluation result gives valuable information which can be utilized in various applications, such as military, medical imaging, remote sensing, and so on. In this paper, we analyze and compare the performance of fusion methods based on four different transforms: i) wavelet transform, ii) curvelet transform, iii) contourlet transform and iv) nonsubsampled contourlet transform. Fusion framework and scheme are explained in detail, and two different sets of images are used in our experiments. Furthermore, various performance evaluation metrics are adopted to quantitatively analyze the fusion results. The comparison results show that the nonsubsampled contourlet transform method performs better than the other three methods. During the experiments, we also found out that the decomposition level of 3 showed the best fusion performance, and decomposition levels beyond level-3 did not significantly affect the fusion results.

  2. Detection of fusion genes and fusion proteins in sarcoma : methodological and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Gunnar

    1999-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma/PNET and synovial sarcoma, all regarded as high-grade tumours, have their peak incidence during the second decade of life, thus affecting children and adolescents. Both tumour types have specific chromosomal translocations, i.e. t(11;22) and t(X;18), respectively, resulting in fusion genes coding for chimeric proteins. The t(11;22) translocation, present in 85% of Ewing's sarcoma/PNET, results in the fusion of the EWS gene to the FLI- 1 gene forming EWS-FLI- ...

  3. Canadian fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Research Council of Canada is establishing a coordinated national program of fusion research and development that is planned to grow to a total annual operating level of about $20 million in 1985. The long-term objective of the program is to put Canadian industry in a position to manufacture sub-systems and components of fusion power reactors. In the near term the program is designed to establish a minimum base of scientific and technical expertise sufficient to make recognized contributions and thereby gain access to the international effort. The Canadian program must be narrowly focussed on a few specializations where Canada has special indigenous skills or technologies. The programs being funded are the Tokamak de Varennes, the Fusion Fuels Technology Project centered on tritium management, and high-power gas laser technology and associated diagnostic instrumentation

  4. Inverse fusion PCR cloning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Spiliotis

    Full Text Available Inverse fusion PCR cloning (IFPC is an easy, PCR based three-step cloning method that allows the seamless and directional insertion of PCR products into virtually all plasmids, this with a free choice of the insertion site. The PCR-derived inserts contain a vector-complementary 5'-end that allows a fusion with the vector by an overlap extension PCR, and the resulting amplified insert-vector fusions are then circularized by ligation prior transformation. A minimal amount of starting material is needed and experimental steps are reduced. Untreated circular plasmid, or alternatively bacteria containing the plasmid, can be used as templates for the insertion, and clean-up of the insert fragment is not urgently required. The whole cloning procedure can be performed within a minimal hands-on time and results in the generation of hundreds to ten-thousands of positive colonies, with a minimal background.

  5. Fusion research at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ORNL Fusion Program includes the experimental and theoretical study of two different classes of magnetic confinement schemes - systems with helical magnetic fields, such as the tokamak and stellarator, and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) class of toroidally linked mirror systems; the development of technologies, including superconducting magnets, neutral atomic beam and radio frequency (rf) heating systems, fueling systems, materials, and diagnostics; the development of databases for atomic physics and radiation effects; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; and the design of advanced demonstration fusion devices. The program involves wide collaboration, both within ORNL and with other institutions. The elements of this program are shown. This document illustrates the program's scope; and aims by reviewing recent progress

  6. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Norman; Qerushi, Artan; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-06-01

    The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker-Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are generic in that they do not relate to specific confinement devices. In all cases except for a Tokamak with D-T fuel the recirculating power was found to exceed the fusion power by a large factor. In this paper we criticize the generality claimed for this calculation. The ratio of circulating power to fusion power is calculated for the Colliding Beam Reactor with fuels D-T, D-He3 and p-B11. The results are respectively, 0.070, 0.141 and 0.493.

  7. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  8. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  9. Sensor Data Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plascencia, Alfredo; Stepán, Petr

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to present a sensor fusion approach to scene environment mapping as part of a Sensor Data Fusion (SDF) architecture. This approach involves combined sonar array with stereo vision readings.  Sonar readings are interpreted using probability density functions...... to the occupied and empty regions. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) feature descriptors are interpreted using gaussian probabilistic error models. The use of occupancy grids is proposed for representing the sensor readings. The Bayesian estimation approach is applied to update the sonar array......  and the SIFT descriptors' uncertainty grids. The sensor fusion yields a significant reduction in the uncertainty of the occupancy grid compared to the individual sensor readings....

  10. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One objective of research on inertial confinement fusion is the development of a power generating system based on this concept. Realization of this goal will depend on the availability of a suitable laser or other system to drive the power plant. The primary laser systems used for laser fusion research, Nd3+: Glass and CO2, have characteristics which may preclude their use for this application. Glass lasers are presently perceived to be incapable of sufficiently high average power operation and the CO2 laser may be limited by and issues associated with target coupling. These general perceptions have encouraged a search for alternatives to the present systems. The search for new lasers has been directed generally towards shorter wavelengths; most of the new lasers discovered in the past few years have been in the visible and ultraviolet region of the spectrum. Virtually all of them have been advocated as the most promising candidate for a fusion driver at one time or another

  11. Laser inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the energy of the radiation pulses generated by the world's largest laser facilities approach the MJ limit, it is still lower than that calculated on means of the Lawson criterion for thermonuclear fusion. The severe energy requirements can be weakened by efficient pre-compression of laser targets and by non-linear conversion of laser radiation to shorter wavelengths. The homogeneity of the laser target irradiation can be improved by using multi-beam or indirect-drive laser schemes. The neodymium laser facilities such as Nova Upgrade in Livermore or Gekko XII in Osaca are still the most promising fusion drivers, but the chances of powerful iodine lasers such as ISKRA 5 in Arzamas and Asterix in Munich are also high. The prospects of these and other laser fusion drivers are critically assessed and the role of smaller devices as the Prague iodine laser Perun is discussed. (J.U.) 6 figs., 7 refs

  12. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  13. Fusion technology development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Fusion Technology Development Plan (FTDP) has been prepared to show how the technology development program conducted by the Division of Development and Technology of the Office of Fusion Energy supports the overall magnetic fusion energy program as delineated in the March 17, 1983, DOE testimony before the Energy Research and Production Subcommittee of the House Committee on Science and Technology. A first draft of this plan distributed for comment in November 1981. since that draft was prepared, changes in expectations for funding in the program have led us to develop a set of priorities based on critical technology issues. These critical issues and the priority ranking of technology development efforts was accomplished with help from each of the major program participants

  14. Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On October 1, 1977 work began at LLL on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an advanced experimental fusion device. Scheduled for operation in late 1981, MFTF is designed as an intermediate step between present mirror machines, such as 2XIIB, and an experimental fusion reactor. This design incorporates improved technology and a better theoretical understanding of how neutral beam injection, plasma guns, and gas injection into the plasma region compensate for cooling and particle losses. With the new facility, we expect to achieve a confinement factor (n tau) of 1012 particles . sm/cm3--a tenfold increase over 2XIIB n tau values--and to increase plasma temperature to over 500 million K. The following article describes this new facility and reports on progress in some of the R and D projects that are providing the technological base for its construction

  15. Cold fusion: an outlaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a status report on cold fusion. The experiment conducted by S.Pons and M.Fleischmann suggests that nuclear reactions can be triggered by particular chemical conditions. This experiment was difficult to reproduce because of the great number of variables that are to be mastered. The Stanford Research Institute realised an extensive study of this experiment. Its results show that an energy excess occurs in certain conditions and is very dependent on the quality of involved materials: some batches of palladium are more active than others. The author draws a parallel between cold fusion and the latest works of Japanese and Russian scientists which show that nuclear reactions can be induced by biological processes. A review of theoretical models explaining the fusion process is made and an extensive bibliography is given. (A.C.)

  16. Medical Image Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Rafizadeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in medical imaging in the past two decades have enable radiologists to create images of the human body with unprecedented resolution. MRI, PET,... imaging devices can quickly acquire 3D images. Image fusion establishes an anatomical correlation between corresponding images derived from different examination. This fusion is applied either to combine images of different modalities (CT, MRI or single modality (PET-PET."nImage fusion is performed in two steps:"n1 Registration: spatial modification (eg. translation of model image relative to reference image in order to arrive at an ideal matching of both images. Registration methods are feature-based and intensity-based approaches."n2 Visualization: the goal of it is to depict the spatial relationship between the model image and refer-ence image. We can point out its clinical application in nuclear medicine (PET/CT.

  17. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react, producing alpha particles and 14 MeV neutrons. These neutrons escape the reaction plasma and are absorbed by the surrounding material structure of the plant, transferring the heat of the reaction to an external cooling circuit. In such high-energy neutron irradiation environments, extensive atomic displacement damage and transmutation production of helium affect the mechanical properties of materials. Among these effect...

  18. Atomic and molecular processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-01-01

    The role of atomic and molecular processes in achieving and maintaining the conditions for thermonuclear burn in a magnetically confined fusion plasma is described. Emphasis is given to the energy balance and power and particle exhaust issues. The most important atomic and molecular processes which affect the radiation losses and impurity transport in the core plasma, the neutral particle transport in the plasma edge and the radiative cooling of divertor plasmas are discussed in greater detail. (author)

  19. Insulators for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design studies for fusion devices and reactors have become more detailed in recent years and with this has come a better understanding of requirements and operating conditions for insulators in these machines. Ceramic and organic insulators are widely used for many components of fusion devices and reactors namely: radio frequency (RF) energy injection systems (BeO, Al2O3, Mg Al2O4, Si3N4); electrical insulation for the torus structure (SiC, Al2O3, MgO, Mg Al2O4, Si4Al2O2N6, Si3N4, Y2O3); lightly-shielded magnetic coils (MgO, MgAl2O4); the toroidal field coil (epoxies, polyimides), neutron shield (B4C, TiH2); high efficiency electrical generation; as well as the generation of very high temperatures for high efficiency hydrogen production processes (ZrO2 and Al2O3 - mat, graphite and carbon - felt). Timely development of insulators for fusion applications is clearly necessary. Those materials to be used in fusion machines should show high resistance to radiation damage and maintain their structural integrity. Now the need is urgent for a variety of radiation resistant materials, but much effort in these areas is required for insulators to be considered seriously by the design community. This document contains 14 papers from an IAEA meeting. It was the objective of this meeting to identify existing problems in analysing various situations of applications and requirements of electrical insulators and ceramics in fusion and to recommend strategies and different stages of implementation. This meeting was endorsed by the International Fusion Research Council

  20. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 1020 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  1. Fusion or gemination? An unusual mandibular second molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Jordão Camargo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusion and gemination is not an uncommon finding and affected most primary dentition and the permanent maxillary incisors. These changes can develop a series of complication. A 11-year-old male presented radiography finding: an unusual mandibular second molar. A well-documented case brings a challenge for radiologists classify between fusion and gemination. In conclusion, this alteration although common in other regions, there are no case in the literature involving “second and third” molar.

  2. Nonlinear fusion dynamics in d-t tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global fusion dynamics are examined for a d-t plasma confined in an ITER-like tokamak reactor. The analysis is based on the solution of a set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the evolution of plasma density and plsma temperature as affected by the several particle and energy gain/loss mechanisms occurring in the burning d-t fusion plasma. (orig.)

  3. A framework for context-aware sensor fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Martí Muñoz, Enrique David

    2015-01-01

    Sensor fusion is a mature but very active research field, included in the more general discipline of information fusion. It studies how to combine data coming from different sensors, in such way that the resulting information is better in some sense –more complete, accurate or stable– than any of the original sources used individually. Context is defined as everything that constraints or affects the process of solving a problem, without being part of the problem or the solution itself. Over ...

  4. Implication des peptides de fusion des glycoprotéines de fusion virales de classe I dans la fusion membranaire

    OpenAIRE

    Brasseur R.; Charloteaux B.; Lins L.; Lorin A.

    2007-01-01

    The implication of fusion peptides of class I viral fusion glycoproteins in the membrane fusion. Viral infection involves fusion between the viral envelope and the target cell plasmic membrane. The fusion is induced by a glycoprotein anchored in the viral envelope. After activation, the glycoprotein undergoes a conformational change inducing the exposure of a region named « fusion peptide » essential for the fusion process. Studies on glycoproteins and on isolated fusion peptides have allowed...

  5. Atomic data for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research

  6. Alternate fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarizes the status of alternate fusion concepts and plans for their future. The concepts selected for review are those employing electromagnetic confinement for which there have been reasonable predictions of net energy gain from pure fusion and which have shown significant recent development or are the subjects of ongoing international activity. They include advanced tokamaks, stellarators, the spherical torus, reversed-field pinch and dense z-field pinch devices, field reversed configuration, and spheromaks. In addition, an overall view of the status of each concept with respect to achieving ignition and to reactor designs is presented

  7. Fusiones transfronterizas intracomunitarias

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Wintzer, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A lo largo de este trabajo llevará a cabo un estudio sobre las fusiones transfronterizas intracomunitarias. Dado que es una figura relativamente nueva en el ordenamiento jurídico, tanto a nivel español como europeo, se ha considerado oportuno estudiar dicha operación desde diferentes perspectivas. La elección de las fusiones transfronterizas intracomunitarias como objeto de es-tudio viene a partir de la valoración de las diferentes modificaciones estructurales existentes en el ámbito mercanti...

  8. Advanced fusion concepts program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the prospects for the eventual development of a tokamak-based fusion reactor appear promising at the present time, the Department of Energy maintains a vigorous program in alternate magnetic fusion concepts. Several of the concepts presently supported include the toroidal reversed field pinch, Tormac, Elmo Bumpy Torus, and various linear options. Recent technical accomplishments and program evaluations indicate that the possibility now exists for undertaking the next development stage, a proof-of-principle experiment, for a few of the most promising alternate concepts

  9. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current Fusion Technology Programme of the European Community the KfK association is working at present on 16 R and D contracts. Most of the work is strongly oriented towards the Next European Torus. Direct support to NET is given by three KfK delegates being member of the NET study group. In addition to the R and D contracts the association is working on 11 NET study contracts. Though KfK contributes to all areas defined in fusion technology, the main emphasis is put on superconducting magnet and breeding blanket development. Other important fields are tritium technology, materials research, and remote handling. (orig./GG)

  10. Magnetically Catalyzed Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Heyl, Jeremy S.; Hernquist, Lars

    1996-01-01

    We calculate the reaction cross-sections for the fusion of hydrogen and deuterium in strong magnetic fields as are believed to exist in the atmospheres of neutron stars. We find that in the presence of a strong magnetic field ($B \\gsim 10^{12}$G), the reaction rates are many orders of magnitude higher than in the unmagnetized case. The fusion of both protons and deuterons are important over a neutron star's lifetime for ultrastrong magnetic fields ($B \\sim 10^{16}$G). The enhancement may have...

  11. The European Fusion Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Fusion Programme is coordinated by Euratom and represents a long term cooperative project of Member States of the European Communities in the field of fusion, designed to lead to the joint construction of prototypes. The main lines of the programme proposed for 1982 to 1986 are: (1) the continuation of a strong effort on tokamaks with emphasis on JET construction, operation and upgrading, (2) conceptual design of NET and development of the related technology, and (3) further work on two alternative magnetic confinement systems. The current status and future plans for this programme are discussed in the paper. (author)

  12. Fusion's $372-Million Mothball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) was built to prove that a design using magnetic mirrors could compete in an international race to produce a commercial fusion reactor. The MFTF-B was to be used to propel the magnetic mirror program into a real contest against Livermore's arch rival: the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and its tokamak machine. On 21 February 1986, after 9 years of construction and $372 million, MTFT-B was officially dedicated. However, due to budget restriction DOE demanded the facility be put on standby the very next day

  13. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  14. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup;

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... with these modifications, it is likely that the primary use of DNA vaccines may be as primers for viral-vectored vaccines, rather than as single agents. This review discusses the approaches used to enhance DNA vaccine immunogenicity, with a primary focus on fusion strategies that enhance antigen presentation....

  15. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  16. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised

  17. Drivers for light ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The light ion approach to inertial confinement fusion requires the production of 1013 to 1014 watt and 106 to 107 joule pulses. The accelerator technology developed in the particle beam fusion program is capable of fulfilling these requirements

  18. The quest for fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.L. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    A brief history of the magnetic fusion program from the point of view of a stellarator enthusiast who worked at a major tokamak laboratory. The reason that success in the magnetic fusion energy program is essential is presented. (author)

  19. Accelerator and fusion research division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations

  20. The quest for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief history of the magnetic fusion program from the point of view of a stellarator enthusiast who worked at a major tokamak laboratory. The reason that success in the magnetic fusion energy program is essential is presented. (author)

  1. Fusion in the energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusion energy is the fundamental energy source of the Universe, as the energy of the Sun and the stars are produced by fusion of e.g. hydrogen to helium. Fusion energy research is a strongly international endeavor aiming at realizing fusion energy production in power plants on Earth. Reaching...... this goal, mankind will have a sustainable base load energy source with abundant resources, having no CO2 release, and with no longlived radioactive waste. This presentation will describe the basics of fusion energy production and the status and future prospects of the research. Considerations...... of integration into the future electricity system and socio-economic studies of fusion energy will be presented, referring to the programme of Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF) under the European Fusion Energy Agreement (EFDA)....

  2. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  3. Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for spine surgery called XLIF, extreme lateral interbody fusion. Dr. Juan Uribe will perform the procedure. Dr. ... A better term would be extreme lateral interbody fusion. This is a procedure that has been performed ...

  4. Fusion engineering device design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein

  5. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein

  6. Simulation science for fusion plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, S.; Skoric, M.M.; Watanabe, T-H.; Todo, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Miura, H; Ito, A; Ohtani, H.; Usami, S.; Nakamura, H; ITO, Atsushi; Ishiguro, S.; Tomita, Y.; Takayama, A.; M. Sato

    2008-01-01

    The world fusion effort has embarked into a new age with the construction of ITER in Cadarache, France, which will be the first magnetic confinement fusion plasma experiment dominated by the self-heating of fusion reactions. In order to operate and control burning plasmas and next generation demo fusion reactors, an advanced capability for comprehensive integrated computer simulations that are fully verified and validated against experimental data will be necessary. The ultimate goal is to pr...

  7. Fusion in the energy system

    OpenAIRE

    Grohnheit, Poul Erik

    2009-01-01

    Fusion energy is the fundamental energy source of the Universe, as the energy of the Sun and the stars are produced by fusion of e.g. hydrogen to helium. Fusion energy research is a strongly international endeavor aiming at realizing fusion energy production in power plants on Earth. Reaching this goal, mankind will have a sustainable base load energy source with abundant resources, having no CO2 release, and with no longlived radioactive waste. This presentation will describe the basics of f...

  8. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  9. A compensatory mutation provides resistance to disparate HIV fusion inhibitor peptides and enhances membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wood

    Full Text Available Fusion inhibitors are a class of antiretroviral drugs used to prevent entry of HIV into host cells. Many of the fusion inhibitors being developed, including the drug enfuvirtide, are peptides designed to competitively inhibit the viral fusion protein gp41. With the emergence of drug resistance, there is an increased need for effective and unique alternatives within this class of antivirals. One such alternative is a class of cyclic, cationic, antimicrobial peptides known as θ-defensins, which are produced by many non-human primates and exhibit broad-spectrum antiviral and antibacterial activity. Currently, the θ-defensin analog RC-101 is being developed as a microbicide due to its specific antiviral activity, lack of toxicity to cells and tissues, and safety in animals. Understanding potential RC-101 resistance, and how resistance to other fusion inhibitors affects RC-101 susceptibility, is critical for future development. In previous studies, we identified a mutant, R5-tropic virus that had evolved partial resistance to RC-101 during in vitro selection. Here, we report that a secondary mutation in gp41 was found to restore replicative fitness, membrane fusion, and the rate of viral entry, which were compromised by an initial mutation providing partial RC-101 resistance. Interestingly, we show that RC-101 is effective against two enfuvirtide-resistant mutants, demonstrating the clinical importance of RC-101 as a unique fusion inhibitor. These findings both expand our understanding of HIV drug-resistance to diverse peptide fusion inhibitors and emphasize the significance of compensatory gp41 mutations.

  10. Fusion development and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: superconducting magnet technology high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies -- Aries; ITER physics; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development

  11. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the middle of 21st century, the population on the earth is expected to double, and the energy that mankind consumes to triple. The nuclear fusion which is said the ultimate energy source for mankind is expected to solve this energy problem. As for fusion reactors, fuel materials exist inexhaustibly, distributing evenly, they have high safety in principle, the product of burning is harmless nonradioactive substance that does not require the treatment and disposal, and the attenuation of induced radioactivity due to neutrons is quick and the effect to global environment is little. The basic plan of second stage nuclear fusion research and development was decided in 1975, aiming at attaining the critical plasma condition. JT-60 has attained it in 1987. The project of international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER) was started, and the conceptual design was carried out. Under such background, the third stage basic plan was decided in 1992, and its objective is self ignition condition, long time burning and the basis of the reactor engineering technology. The engineering design of the ITER is investigated. (K.I.)

  12. Rencontre on fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report of a rencontre held to consider the technology of magnetic confinement fusion devices gives the agenda for the meeting and lists those topics which were identified as areas of research. These topics included materials, tritium, structures and heat transfer, neutronics and nuclear data, and corrosion problems. (UK)

  13. Fusion energy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are considered: (1) cryosorption vacuum pumping for fusion reactors, (2) TNS support studies, (3) tritium recovery from irradiated Li-Al and SAP, (4) actinide oxides, nitrides, and carbides, and (5) transition metal-actinide-C phase equilibria

  14. Fusion meets electronics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2011), s. 8-8. ISSN 1818-5355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : fusion * AMPER 2011 * ITER * COMPASS * IPP * CR Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.jet.efda.org/ multimedia /newsletter/current/

  15. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  16. Fusion Canada issue 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue the opening of the Garching ITER site, a CCFM/TdeV update,a tritium release field test, measuring radial profile of plasma current density on TdeV, power supplies for TdeV, 5th International Tritium Technology conference, and 1994 basic tritium course. 4 figs

  17. Status of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology advancement to high-power beams has also given birth to new technologies. That class of Free Electron Lasers that employs rf linacs, synchrotrons, and storage rings - although the use the tools of High Energy Physics (HEP) - was developed well behind the kinetic energy frontier. The induction linac, however, is something of an exception; it was born directly from the needs of the magnetic fusion program, and was not motivated by a high-energy physics application. The heavy-ion approach to inertial fusion starts with picking from the rich menu of accelerator technologies those that have, ab initio, the essential ingredients needed for a power plant driver: multigap acceleration - which leads to reliability/lifetime; electrical efficiency; repetition rate; and beams that can be reliably focused over a suitably long distance. The report describes the programs underway in Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research as well as listing expected advances in driver, target, and beam quality areas in the inertial fusion power program

  18. Fusion Canada issue 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are CFFTP highlights on the Karlsruhe Isotope Separation System, a report on ITER tritium process systems, an experimental update on Tokamak de Varennes and Canada-U.S. bilateral technical collaboration topics. 2 figs

  19. Intelligence Fusion [video

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security Naval Postgraduate School; France, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Paul France is the Homeland Security Field Operations Manager for the state of Wisconsin. He is a current participant in the Naval Postgraduate School's Homeland Security Master's Program and is working on a thesis entitled 'Preventing Terrorism through Information Sharing Using TEW Systems and Intelligence Fusion Centers.

  20. Fusion Canada issue 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Ontario Hydro's contract for tritium supply from Germany, a CCFM update on plasma biasing, divertor operation, radiofrequency plasma current drive and the plasma heating system for the Tokamak de Varennes, and an agreement for ITER engineering design activities. 5 figs

  1. Fusion Canada issue 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Europe proposes Canada's participation in ITER, tritium for JET, CCFM/TdeV-Tokamak helium pumping and TdeV update, ITER-related R and D at CFFTP, ITER Deputy Director visits Canada, NFP Director to Chair IFRC, Award for Akira Hirose. 3 figs

  2. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics

  3. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, James; Buchholtz, Brent; Ward, Paul; Freuh, Jim; Jensen, Eric

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium-3. Helium-3 can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system.

  4. Compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact, high-power-density approaches to fusion power are proposed to improve economic viability through the use of less-advanced technology in systems of considerably reduced scale. The rationale for and the means by which these systems can be achieved are discussed, as are unique technological problems

  5. Fusion og frasigelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone L.

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen analyserer, i hvilket omfang reglerne om beskyttelse af lønmodtagere ved virksomhedsoverdragelse også finder anvendelse ved selskabsretliug fusion og spaltning. Der sættes fokus på forskrifterne om erhververens frasigelse af overdragerens kollektive overenskomster, og det efterprøves, om...

  6. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KfK is involved in the European Fusion Programme predominantly in the NET and Fusion Technology part. The following fields of activity are covered: Studies for NET, alternative confinement concepts, and needs and issues of integral testing. Research on structural materials. Development of superconducting magnets. Gyrotron development (part of the Physics Programme). Nuclear technology (breeding materials, blanket design, tritium technology, safety and environmental aspects of fusion, remote maintenance). Reported here are status and results of work under contracts with the CEC within the NET and Technology Programme. The aim of the major part of this R and D work is the support of NET, some areas (e.g. materials, safety and environmental impact, blanket design) have a wider scope and address problems of a demonstration reactor. In the current working period, several new proposals have been elaborated to be implemented into the 85/89 Euratom Fusion Programme. New KfK contributions relate to materials research (dual beam and fast reactor irradiations, ferritic steels), to blanket engineering (MHD-effects) and to safety studies (e.g. magnet safety). (orig./GG)

  7. Bouillabaisse sushi fusion power

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "If avant-garde cuisine is any guide, Japanese-French fusion does not work all that well. And the interminable discussions over the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) suggest that what is true of cooking is true of physics" (1 page)

  8. The fusion applications study: FAME (Fusion Applications and Market Evaluation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, the fusion program has made a great deal of progress on the understanding of plasma physics. The primary mission of the fusion program in the past has been the generation of central station electricity. The demand for electricity, however, has slackened in recent years, fossil fuel prices are low, and the need to develop an assured, economical, long-term energy supply for the United States is no longer perceived as an immediate need. Fusion has the potential for a wide variety of nonelectric application including the breeding of fissile fuels and tritium, production of hydrogen and other chemical products, transmutation or burning of various nuclear and chemical products, transmutation or burning of various nuclear and chemical wastes, generation of process heat, production of many useful radioisotopes, radiation processing of materials, medical diagnosis and treatment, and space power and propulsion. To understand the many possible applications of fusion, GA Technologies has begun a fusion applications study for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy (DOE OFE) called FAME for Fusion Applications and Market Evaluation. The objective of this project is to investigate, evaluate, and summarize the potential applications of fusion energy, and to identify promising directions for future work on fusion applications. This study includes a broad survey of the possible uses of fusion and the products that could be obtained from a fusion reactor. The potential markets for these products are being assessed. 1 ref.

  9. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2006-01-01

    Resulting from ongoing, international research into fusion processes, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a major step in the quest for a new energy source.The first graduate-level text to cover the details of ITER, Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics introduces various aspects and issues of recent fusion research activities through the shortest access path. The distinguished author breaks down the topic by first dealing with fusion and then concentrating on the more complex subject of plasma physics. The book begins with the basics of controlled fusion research, foll

  10. Stau-catalyzed Nuclear Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Hamaguchi, K.; Hatsuda, T.(Theoretical Research Division, Nishina Center, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan); Yanagida, T. T.

    2006-01-01

    We point out that the stau may play a role of a catalyst for nuclear fusions if the stau is a long-lived particle as in the scenario of gravitino dark matter. In this letter, we consider d d fusion under the influence of stau where the fusion is enhanced because of a short distance between the two deuterons. We find that one chain of the d d fusion may release an energy of O(10) GeV per stau. We discuss problems of making the stau-catalyzed nuclear fusion of practical use with the present tec...

  11. Enhanced image capture through fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Peter J.; Hanna, Keith; Kolczynski, Raymond J.

    1993-01-01

    Image fusion may be used to combine images from different sensors, such as IR and visible cameras, to obtain a single composite with extended information content. Fusion may also be used to combine multiple images from a given sensor to form a composite image in which information of interest is enhanced. We present a general method for performing image fusion and show that this method is effective for diverse fusion applications. We suggest that fusion may provide a powerful tool for enhanced image capture with broad utility in image processing and computer vision.

  12. Commercial application of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamentals of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described

  13. Fusion Probability in Dinuclear System

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Juhee

    2015-01-01

    Fusion can be described by the time evolution of a dinuclear system with two degrees of freedom, the relative motion and transfer of nucleons. In the presence of the coupling between two collective modes, we solve the Fokker-Planck equation in a locally harmonic approximation. The potential of a dinuclear system has the quasifission barrier and the inner fusion barrier, and the escape rates can be calculated by the Kramers' model. To estimate the fusion probability, we calculate the quasifission rate and the fusion rate. We investigate the coupling effects on the fusion probability and the cross section of evaporation residue.

  14. Structural materials for fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of major technical and cost impact to Magnetic Fusion Energy development are the materials for the magnet structure. Those materials and fabrication techniques that are attractive to fusion magnets are discussed and relative comparisons made. Considerations such as strength, toughness, and joining techniques are balanced against recommended design criteria to reach an optimum design. Several examples of material selection are cited for large fusion magnets such as Base II, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility, the Toroidal Fusion Test Facility, and the Large Coil Project

  15. Lasers for Inertial Fusion Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The achievement of controlled fusion burn and gain with mega-joule-class laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility lays the foundation for future energy systems based on inertial confinement fusion. The technical challenges for laser inertial fusion energy systems are numerous and include the generation and operation of cost-effective, robust, mega-joule lasers that can operate at repetition rates that are more than 100 000 times beyond that of today's fusion demonstration laser systems. In this presentation we will review the 20+ year development of high power laser technologies for inertial fusion energy and the new laser architectures based on these technologies that will enable fusion energy generation via inertial confinement fusion. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. (author)

  16. Physics of magnetic confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusion is the energy source of the universe. The local conditions in the core of the Sun allow the transfer of mass into energy, which is finally released in the form of radiation. Technical fusion melts deuterons and tritons to helium releasing large amounts of energy per fusion process. Because of the conditions for fusion, which will be deduced, the fusion fuel is in the plasma state. Here we report on the confinement of fusion plasmas by magnetic fields. Different confinement concepts — tokamaks and stellarators — will be introduced and described. The first fusion reactor, ITER, and the most modern stellarator, Wendelstein 7-X, are under construction. Their basic features and objectives will be presented.

  17. Acquired spondylolysis after spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, J A; Wiley, J J

    1984-11-01

    Spondylolysis occurring after a spinal fusion is considered to result from operative damage to the pars interarticularis on both sides. Fourteen cases are reported, and compared with the 23 cases which have previously been published. The defects are usually recognised within five years of fusion, and usually occur immediately above the fusion mass. Other contributory causes may be: fatigue fracture from concentration of stress; damage and altered function of the posterior ligament complex; and degenerative disc disease immediately above or below the fusion. Fusion technique is critical, since virtually all cases occurred after posterior interlaminar fusions. This complication is easily overlooked in patients with recurrent back pain after an originally successful posterior spinal fusion. PMID:6501368

  18. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Weirather, Jason L.; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A.; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S.; Underwood, Jason G; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-01-01

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and ...

  19. New Characterizations of Fusion Bases and Riesz Fusion Bases in Hilbert Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Asgari, Mohammad Sadegh

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a new notion of bases in Hilbert spaces and similar to fusion frame theory we introduce fusion bases theory in Hilbert spaces. We also introduce a new definition of fusion dual sequence associated with a fusion basis and show that the operators of a fusion dual sequence are continuous projections. Next we define the fusion biorthogonal sequence, Bessel fusion basis, Hilbert fusion basis and obtain some characterizations of them. we study orthonormal fusion systems...

  20. Reduced, tame and exotic fusion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K.K.S.; Oliver, Bob; Ventura, Joana

    We define here two new classes of saturated fusion systems, reduced fusion systems and tame fusion systems. These are motivated by our attempts to better understand and search for exotic fusion systems: fusion systems which are not the fusion systems of any finite group. Our main theorems say that...... every saturated fusion system reduces to a reduced fusion system which is tame only if the original one is realizable, and that every reduced fusion system which is not tame is the reduction of some exotic (nonrealizable) fusion system....

  1. Characterization of the duck (Anas platyrhynchos) Rbm24 and Rbm38 genes and their expression profiles in myoblast and skeletal muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenqiang; Hu, Yaodong; Xu, Hengyong; He, Hua; Han, Chunchun; Liu, Hehe; Wang, Jiwen; Li, Liang

    2016-08-01

    RNA-binding motif proteins 24 (Rbm24) and 38 (Rbm38) are known to regulate genes expression in a post-transcriptional way. However, it remains unclear about the similarities and differences between Rbm24 and Rbm38 in terms of their sequence characteristics and expression profiles during myoblast differentiation and skeletal muscle development. In this study, we found that the coding domain sequences (CDSs) of duck Rbm24 and Rbm38 consisted of 678 and 648 nucleotides, respectively. Both of them contain a conserved RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Phylogenetic analysis showed that duck Rbm24 and Rbm38 were clustered with other Aves, nevertheless, avian Rbm24 was clustered with mammalian and reptilian Rbm24; avian Rbm38 was clustered with amphibian and reptilian Rbm38. Real-time PCR results exhibited that during embryonic stage, Rbm24 and Rbm38 in leg and breast muscle increased to their peak (Pdevelopment. PMID:27040525

  2. Modelling of PFC Life-Time in Tokamak Fusion Reactor (KIT Scientific Reports ; 7612)

    OpenAIRE

    Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of materials in fusion reactor DEMO has long been recognized as fundamental issue affecting the ultimate technological and economic feasibility of fusion power. Many factors influence the choice of a functional and structural material in a fusion reactor. Three effects limit component lifetime in the steady-state operation: radiation damage, disruptions, and sputtering erosion. Our design strategy is to determine the structure and coating thickness, which maximize component lifet

  3. Adaptive Decision Fusion with a Guidance Sensor in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaohua Yu; Qiang Ling; Yi Yu

    2015-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks, the fusion center collects the dates from the sensor nodes and makes the optimal decision fusion, while the optimal decision fusion rules need the performance parameters of each sensor node. However, sensors, particularly low-cost and low-precision sensors, are usually displaced in harsh environment and their performance parameters can be easily affected by the environment and hardly be known in advance. In order to resolve this issue, we take a heterogeneous wire...

  4. Pink1 regulates mitochondrial dynamics through interaction with the fission/fusion machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yufeng; Ouyang, Yingshi; Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M. Flint; McQuibban, Angus; Vogel, Hannes; Lu, Bingwei

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria form dynamic tubular networks that undergo frequent morphological changes through fission and fusion, the imbalance of which can affect cell survival in general and impact synaptic transmission and plasticity in neurons in particular. Some core components of the mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery, including the dynamin-like GTPases Drp1, Mitofusin, Opa1, and the Drp1-interacting protein Fis1, have been identified. How the fission and fusion processes are regulated under norma...

  5. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few years, several laser systems have been considered as possible laser fusion drivers. Recently, there has been an increasing effort to evaluate these systems in terms of a reactor driver application. The specifications for such a system have become firmer and generally more restrictive. Several of the promising candidates such as the group VI laser, the metal vapor excimers and some solid state lasers can be eliminated on the basis of inefficiency. New solid state systems may impact the long range development of a fusion driver. Of the short wavelength gas lasers, the KrF laser used in conjunction with Raman compression and pulse stacking techniques is the most promising approach. Efficiencies approaching 10% may be possible with this system. While technically feasible, these approaches are complex and costly and are unsatisfying in an aethetic sense. A search for new lasers with more compelling features is still needed

  6. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KfK-Association has continued work on 17 R and D contracts of the Fusion Technology Programme. An effort of 94 manyears per year is at present contributed by 10 KfK departments, covering all aereas defined in the Fusion Technology Programme. The dominant part of the work is directed towards the need of the NET design or supporting experiments. Some additional effort addresses long term technological issues and system studies relevant to DEMO or confinement schemes alternative to tokamaks. Direct contribution to the NET team has increased by augmentation of NET study contracts and delegation of personnel, three KfK delegates being at present members of the NET team. In reverse, specifications and design guidelines worked out by NET have started to have an impact on the current R and D-work in the laboratory. (orig./GG)

  7. Experiments in cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models

  8. Adaptive sensor fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Ivan

    1995-07-01

    A perceptual reasoning system adaptively extracting, associating, and fusing information from multiple sources, at various levels of abstraction, is considered as the building block for the next generation of surveillance systems. A system architecture is presented which makes use of both centralized and distributed predetection fusion combined with intelligent monitor and control coupling both on-platform and off-board track and decision level fusion results. The goal of this system is to create a `gestalt fused sensor system' whose information product is greater than the sum of the information products from the individual sensors and has performance superior to either individual or a sub-group of combined sensors. The application of this architectural concept to the law enforcement arena (e.g. drug interdiction) utilizing multiple spatially and temporally diverse surveillance platforms and/or information sources, is used to illustrate the benefits of the adaptive perceptual reasoning system concept.

  9. Fusion theory and computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to carry out theoretical studies of the equilibrium, stability, transport and heating properties of high-temperature fusion plasmas. Continued emphasis will be placed on the effective interface of fusion theory and computations with the local Alcator, Versator, Constance and Torex experimental programs. The proposed research includes but will not be limited to the following types of studies: (a) investigation of RF heating of toroidal plasmas, (b) investigation of the MHD equilibrium and stability properties of tokamak plasmas, (c) develop the basic understanding of a wide variety of non-linear and turbulent phenomena, including stochastic magnetic fields, clumps and nonlinear saturation of linear instabilities, (d) investigate the effects of ambipolar fields on transport and stability properties of toroidal plasmas. Investigate high-beat stability properties of tandem-mirror systems, and (e) investigation of the MHD equilibrium and stability properties of Torsatron/Stellarator configurations

  10. Computational fusion magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple magnetohydrodynamic models provide the framework for much of our understanding of the macroscopic behavior of magnetically confined laboratory plasmas. In even the simplest of models, however, the many different time and spatial scales, the multidimensionality, and the nonlinearity of the equations make finding solutions difficult. In realistic geometries obtaining quantitative results to aid our understanding, to interpret experiment, and to design new devices, involves the development of large scale numerical codes. During the past decade considerable effort has been extended in the fusion community to develop equilibrium, linear stability, and nonlinear time evolution codes in two and three dimensions, some of which have had a considerable impact on the fusion program. An overview of the various types of codes and numerical methods is given. Emphasis is on the spectrum of linear perturbations and ideal MHD stability, boundary layer methods and resistive MHD stability, and modeling of nonlinear, time evolution resistive MHD phenomena in tokamak configurations

  11. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  12. Confidence driven TGV fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ntouskos, Valsamis; Pirri, Fiora

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel model for spatially varying variational data fusion, driven by point-wise confidence values. The proposed model allows for the joint estimation of the data and the confidence values based on the spatial coherence of the data. We discuss the main properties of the introduced model as well as suitable algorithms for estimating the solution of the corresponding biconvex minimization problem and their convergence. The performance of the proposed model is evaluated considering...

  13. Materials for Fusion Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Matějíček

    2013-01-01

    An overview of materials foreseen for use or already used in fusion devices is given. The operating conditions, material requirements and characteristics of candidate materials in several specific application segments are briefly reviewed. These include: construction materials, electrical insulation, permeation barriers and plasma facing components. Special attention will be paid to the latter and to the issues of plasma-material interaction, materials joining and fuctionally graded interlayers.

  14. Fusion development and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R ampersand D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development

  15. Fusion reactor critical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document summarizes the results of a series of INTOR-related meetings organized by the IAEA in 1985-1986 with the following topics: Impurity control modelling, non-inductive current-drive, confinement in tokamaks with intense heating and DEMO requirements. These results are useful to the specialists involved in research on large fusion machines or in the design activity on the next generation tokamaks. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials includes studies (1) to investigate fracture mechanics of neutron-irradiated beryllium; (2) to describe the helium behaviour in irradiated beryllium at atomic scale; (3) to define the kinetics of beryllium reacting with air or steam; (3) to perform a feasibility study for the testing of integrated blanket modules under neutron irradiation. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported

  17. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  18. Heavy ion fusion III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report updates Heavy Ion Fusion, JSR-82-302, dated January, 1983. During the last four years, program management and direction has been changed and the overall Inertial Confinement Program has been reviewed. This report therefore concentrates on accelerator physics issues, how the program has addressed those issues during the last four years, and how it will be addressing them in the future. 8 refs., 3 figs

  19. Posterior instrumentation and fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Olgun, Z.; Yazici, Muharrem

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, which characteristically includes thoracic hypokyphosis and all three columns of the spine, is the achievement of a balanced spine while preserving as many motion segments as possible and avoiding neurologic damage. Many approaches have been defined in the treatment of this common disease. Posterior-only surgery, instrumentation and fusion have become the preferred technique in many centers throughout the world due to simplicity of a...

  20. OCR Based Pixel Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Rami Al-Hmouz

    2012-01-01

    Character recognition is the process that allows the automatic identification of character images, which is generally referred as Optical Character Recognition (OCR). The characters are either handwritten or typed. This study proposed a novel OCR approach based on the likelihood functions of pixels, which were obtained by averaging a trained set of character images. A Bayesian fusion process for all pixel probabilities decides the recognition of characters. Further tests using Support V...