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Sample records for affecting soil fauna

  1. Soil invertebrate fauna affect N2O emissions from soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, I.; Deyn, de G.B.; Thakur, M.P.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soils contribute significantly to global warming. Mitigation of N2O emissions is severely hampered by a lack of understanding of its main controls. Fluxes can only partly be predicted from soil abiotic factors and microbial analyses – a possible role for soil fauna

  2. Soil invertebrate fauna affect N2 O emissions from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Imke; de Deyn, Gerlinde B; Thakur, Madhav P; van Groenigen, Jan Willem

    2013-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions from soils contribute significantly to global warming. Mitigation of N2 O emissions is severely hampered by a lack of understanding of its main controls. Fluxes can only partly be predicted from soil abiotic factors and microbial analyses - a possible role for soil fauna has until now largely been overlooked. We studied the effect of six groups of soil invertebrate fauna and tested the hypothesis that all of them increase N2 O emissions, although to different extents. We conducted three microcosm experiments with sandy soil and hay residue. Faunal groups included in our experiments were as follows: fungal-feeding nematodes, mites, springtails, potworms, earthworms and isopods. In experiment I, involving all six faunal groups, N2 O emissions declined with earthworms and potworms from 78.4 (control) to 37.0 (earthworms) or 53.5 (potworms) mg N2 O-N m(-2) . In experiment II, with a higher soil-to-hay ratio and mites, springtails and potworms as faunal treatments, N2 O emissions increased with potworms from 51.9 (control) to 123.5 mg N2 O-N m(-2) . Experiment III studied the effect of potworm density; we found that higher densities of potworms accelerated the peak of the N2 O emissions by 5 days (P < 0.001), but the cumulative N2 O emissions remained unaffected. We propose that increased soil aeration by the soil fauna reduced N2 O emissions in experiment I, whereas in experiment II N2 O emissions were driven by increased nitrogen and carbon availability. In experiment III, higher densities of potworms accelerated nitrogen and carbon availability and N2 O emissions, but did not increase them. Overall, our data show that soil fauna can suppress, increase, delay or accelerate N2 O emissions from soil and should therefore be an integral part of future N2 O studies. PMID:23625707

  3. Soil Fauna Affects Dissolved Carbon and Nitrogen in Foliar Litter in Alpine Forest and Alpine Meadow.

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    Shu Liao

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN are generally considered important active biogeochemical pools of total carbon and nitrogen. Many studies have documented the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition, but the effects of the soil fauna on labile substances (i.e., DOC and TDN in litter during early decomposition are not completely clear. Therefore, a field litterbag experiment was carried out from 13th November 2013 to 23rd October 2014 in an alpine forest and an alpine meadow located on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Litterbags with different mesh sizes were used to provide access to or prohibit the access of the soil fauna, and the concentrations of DOC and TDN in the foliar litter were measured during the winter (the onset of freezing, deep freezing and thawing stage and the growing season (early and late. After one year of field incubation, the concentration of DOC in the litter significantly decreased, whereas the TDN concentration in the litter increased. Similar dynamic patterns were detected under the effects of the soil fauna on both DOC and TDN in the litter between the alpine forest and the alpine meadow. The soil fauna showed greater positive effects on decreasing DOC concentration in the litter in the winter than in the growing season. In contrast, the dynamics of TND in the litter were related to seasonal changes in environmental factors, rather than the soil fauna. In addition, the soil fauna promoted a decrease in litter DOC/TDN ratio in both the alpine forest and the alpine meadow throughout the first year of decomposition, except for in the late growing season. These results suggest that the soil fauna can promote decreases in DOC and TDN concentrations in litter, contributing to early litter decomposition in these cold biomes.

  4. Factors affecting soil fauna feeding activity in a fragmented lowland temperate deciduous woodland.

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    Jake E Simpson

    Full Text Available British temperate broadleaf woodlands have been widely fragmented since the advent of modern agriculture and development. As a result, a higher proportion of woodland area is now subject to edge effects which can alter the efficiency of ecosystem functions. These areas are particularly sensitive to drought. Decomposition of detritus and nutrient cycling are driven by soil microbe and fauna coactivity. The bait lamina assay was used to assess soil fauna trophic activity in the upper soil horizons at five sites in Wytham Woods, Oxfordshire: two edge, two intermediate and one core site. Faunal trophic activity was highest in the core of the woodland, and lowest at the edge, which was correlated with a decreasing soil moisture gradient. The efficiency of the assay was tested using four different bait flavours: standardised, ash (Fraxinus excelsior L., oak (Quercus robur L., and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.. The standardised bait proved the most efficient flavour in terms of feeding activity. This study suggests that decomposition and nutrient cycling may be compromised in many of the UK's small, fragmented woodlands in the event of drought or climate change.

  5. Irrigating poplar energy crops with landfill leachate negatively affects soil micro- and meso-fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, David R; Zalesny, Jill A; Zalesny, Ronald S; Wiese, Adam H

    2011-10-01

    Increased municipal solid waste generated worldwide combined with substantial demand for renewable energy has prompted testing and deployment of woody feedstock production systems that reuse and recycle wastewaters as irrigation and fertilization. Populus selections are ideal for such systems given their fast growth, extensive root systems, and high water usage rates. Maintaining ecological sustainability (i.e., the capacity for an ecosystem to maintain its function and retain its biodiversity over time) during tree establishment and development is an important component of plantation success, especially for belowground faunal populations. To determine the impact of solid waste leachate on soil micro- and meso-fauna, we compared soilfrom eight different Populus clones receiving municipal solid waste landfill leachate irrigation with clones receiving fertilized (N, P K) well water irrigation. Microfauna (i.e., nematodes) communities were more diverse in control soils. Mesofauna (i.e., insects) were associated with all clones; however, they were four times more abundant around trees found within the control plot than those that received leachate treatments. Nematode and insect abundance varied among Populus clones yet insect diversity was greater in the leachate-treated soils. Phytotechnologies must allow for soil faunal sustainability, as upsetting this balance could lead to great reductions in phytotechnology efficacy.

  6. Productivity affects the density-body mass relationship of soil fauna communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comor, V.N.R.; Thakur, M.P.; Berg, M.P.; Bie, de S.; Prins, H.H.T.; Langevelde, van F.

    2014-01-01

    The productivity of ecosystems and their disturbance regime affect the structure of animal communities. However, it is not clear which trophic levels benefit the most from higher productivity or are the most impacted by disturbance. The density-body mass (DBM) relationship has been shown to reflect

  7. Impact of Long-Term Fertilization on Cropland Soil Fauna Community at Loess Soil, Shannxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ying-hua; YANG Xue-yun; ZHANG Fu-dao; GU Qiao-zhen; SUN Ben-hua; MA Lu-jun

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between long-term fertilization and cropland soil fauna was studied at the station's experiment research network for soil fertility and fertilizers in Loess soil of Shannxi Provincefrom Jul. 2001 to Oct. 2002. Six types of long-term fertilizer were carried out for this study including non-fertilizer (CK), abandonment (ABAND), nitrogenous and phosphors and potassium fertilizers combined (NPK), straw and NPK (SNPK), organic material and NPK (MNPK) and 1.5 times MNPK (1.5MNPK). 72 soil samples were collected and 5 495 species of cropland soil fauna obtained by handsorting and Cobb methods at 4 times, belonging to 6 Phyla, 11 Classes, 22 Orders, 2 Superfamilies, 61 Families and 35 Genera. The result showed that different fertilizer had significantly impacted on the cropland soil fauna (F = 2.24, P<0.007). The number of the cropland soil fauna was related to the soil physicochemical properties caused by long-term fertilization. The result by principal component analysis, focusing on the number of 15 key soil fauna species group's diversity, evenness of community and the total soil fauna individuals indicated that the effects of SNPK, NPK, MNPK and 1.5MNPK were significantly different from that of the cropland soil fauna, in which, SNPK and NPK had the positive effect on cropland soil fauna, and MNPK and 1.5 MNPK had the negative affect, others could not be explained. By principal component I,the synthetic effect of different fertilization on the total soil fauna individuals and the group was most significant, and the effect was little on evenness and diversity. By value of eigenvectors, the maximum one was 9.6248, and the minimum one was -1.0904, that means the 6 types of fertilization did not affect evenly the cropland soil fauna.

  8. Interactions between microbial-feeding and predatory soil fauna trigger N2O emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, M.P.; Groenigen, van J.W.; Kuiper, I.; Deyn, de G.B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that microbial-feeding invertebrate soil fauna species can significantly contribute to N2O emissions. However, in soil food webs microbial-feeding soil fauna interact with each other and with their predators, which affects microbial activity. To date we lack empirical tests

  9. SOIL FAUNA CHARACTERIZATION IN Eucalyptus spp. PLANTATIONS

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    Juliana Garlet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509810545Forest soils provide good conditions for the development and the establishment of soil fauna, manly by the deposition of litter. However, monoculture systems conducted in a single substrate by providing food, can promote the development of certain animal groups over others, causing outbreaks of pest species. The aim of this study was to characterize the soil fauna and its relationship with meteorological variables, in plantations of Eucalyptus spp. This study was conducted in six stands of Eucalyptus from three species: Eucalyptus dunni Maiden, Eucalyptus grandis Maiden and Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla S. T. Blake (clone hybrid and two ages (planted in 2006 and 2007.

  10. On the contribution of the soil fauna to the macropores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barontini, Stefano; Vitale, Paolo; Comincini, Mattia; Pezzotti, Dario; Peli, Marco; Armiraglio, Stefano; Tomirotti, Massimo; Ranzi, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Soil fauna play an important role in characterizing the soil structure, and they are one of the main macropore sources, together with roots, swelling and local erosion. In an hydrological perspective, according to most of the authors, macropores are meati with meaningfully small capillary action, that is with a characteristic transverse-length greater than some tens of micrometers. Macropores importance is crucial for the hydrological cycle, as they are seat of preferential flow and they contribute to key hydrological processes, viz infiltration, percolation and subsurface runoff. In the framework of a wider investigation which aims at deepening the comprehension of the role played by the macropores in characterising the soil hydrological response (at spatial scales from the local to the slope one), we present a literature reanalysis focused on the capability of soil fauna to dig nests, holes, burrows, and subsoil tunnels and rooms. Particularly we examinated data about fauna with dimensions ranging from small arthropods and anellids to some big chordates. As a result we present a classification approach which aims at enlightening the hydrological features of the holes, e.g. structure, length, main direction, tortuosity, transverse section, displaced soil volume, hydraulic radius, digging technique, affected soil layers, in view of comparing the hydrological fallouts of different soil diggers.

  11. Differentiation of Soil Fauna Populations in Conventional Tillage and No—Tillage Red Soil Ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUFENG; LIHUIXIN; 等

    1997-01-01

    In a field experiment ,the popultions of major soil fauna groups including earthworms,enchytraeids,arthropods and nematodes were examined in conventional tillage(CT) and no-tillage(NT) red soil ecosystems to evaluate their responses to tillage disturbance.Earthworms,macro- and micro-arthropods were stimulated under NT with earthworms showing the highest population increase by four times ,while enchytraeids and nematodes favored CT system predicting certain adaptability of these animals to plow-disturbed soil envi-ronment ,On the basis of relative response index it was found that soil fauna was more sensitive to tillage than soil resource base(C and N pools) and microflora.The population structure of soil fauna was also affected by tillage treatments.Analysis on nematode trophic groups showed that bacteria-feeding and plant parasitic nematodes were more abundant in CT soil whereas the proportions of fungivores and onmivore-predators increased in NT soil.Possible reasons for the differentiaion in both size and structure of the fauna populaion were discussed and the ecological significance involved in these changes was emphasized.

  12. The fauna of soil nematodes of the rocky pinery

    OpenAIRE

    Gruzdeva L I

    2001-01-01

    The fauna of nematodes of the PetrSU Botanic Garden’s rocky pinery is investigated for the first time. 43 species of soil nematodes are revealed. These are representatives of 6 functional groups (bacteriotrophes, micotrophes, politrophes, predators, obligate and optional plant parasites). In general, the fauna of nematodes of the present biocenosis can be estimated as rather various (Shannon’s variability index H’ = 3.8). Specific diversity of the fauna of nematodes, availability ...

  13. SOIL FAUNA CHARACTERIZATION IN Eucalyptus spp. PLANTATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Garlet; Ervandil Correa Costa; Jardel Boscardin

    2013-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509810545Forest soils provide good conditions for the development and the establishment of soil fauna, manly by the deposition of litter. However, monoculture systems conducted in a single substrate by providing food, can promote the development of certain animal groups over others, causing outbreaks of pest species. The aim of this study was to characterize the soil fauna and its relationship with meteorological variables, in plantations of Eucalyptus spp. This ...

  14. Carbon redistribution during interrill erosion in subtropical forests: Effects of leaf litter diversity and soil fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is crucial for degradation of carbon (C) from their pools in the soil. If C of the eroded sediment and runoff are not only related to soil pools but also resulting additively from decomposition of litter cover, the system gets more complex. The role of these amounts for C cycling in a forest environment is not yet known properly and thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of leaf litter diversity, litter cover and soil fauna on C redistribution during interrill erosion. We established 96 runoff plots that were deployed with seven domestic leaf litter species resulting in none species (bare ground), 1-species, 2-species and 4-species mixtures. Every second runoff plot was equipped with a fauna extinction feature to investigate the role of soil meso- and macrofauna. Erosion processes were initiated using a rainfall simulator at two time steps (summer 2012 and autumn 2012) to investigate the role of leaf litter decomposition on C redistribution. C fluxes during 20 min rainfall simulation were 99.13 ± 94.98 g/m². C fluxes and C contents both were affected by soil fauna. C fluxes were higher with presence of soil fauna due to loosening and slackening of the soil surface rather than due to faster decomposition of leaves. In contrast, C contents were higher in the absence of soil fauna possibly resulting from a missing dilution effect in the top soil layer. Leaf litter diversity did not affect C fluxes, but indirectly affected C contents as it increased the soil fauna effect with higher leaf litter diversity due to superior food supply. Initial C contents in the soil mainly determined those of the eroded sediment. For future research, it will be essential to introduce a long-term decomposition experiment to get further insights into the processes of C redistribution.

  15. Community structures of soil fauna in reclaimed copper mine tailings and suburb forest land

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    Yongheng Zhu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil fauna were very important for the ecological reconstruction of mine tailings. We investigated community characteristics of soil fauna at two sites, including reclamated copper-mine-tailings (RCMT and suburb forest land of reclamated copper-mine-tailings (SFL in Tongling City to test and illustrate the value of soil fauna for mitigating the impacts of heavy metal pollution. In the spring of 2011, we established four transects (150 m at the two sites and collected soil samples of macro-, meso- and micro- soil fauna from four depths (0–5 cm, 5–10 cm, 10–15 cm, 15–20 cm at 13 30 cm× 30 cm sampling quadrats. Our results showed that at RCMT, the Acarina, Collembola and Nematoda were dominant groups; the Formicidae, Coleoptera larvae, Oligochaeta, Diptera larvae and Diplura were frequent groups; and the additional 16 groups were less commonly encountered. While at SFL the Collembola and Acarina were dominant groups and the Nematoda and Oligochaeta were frequent groups. Overall abundance of soil fauna at RCMT were significantly less than that of SFL (F=20.65, P<0.01, and number of faunal groups were lower at RCMT (F=5.88, P<0.05. We did not find a significant difference between the density of macro-soil fauna at RCMT and SFL, but found that the density of meso- and micro- soil fauna at RCMT was significantly lower than that of SFL (F=29.99, P<0.01. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H at RCMT was higher than that of SFL (F=24.06, P<0.01, but DG diversity index was lower at RCMT compared to SFL (F=4.75, P<0.05. There was evident surface aggregation of soil fauna at RCMT, especially in the differences between the first layer and the other layers of the soil profile (Find.=17.80, Fgro.=33.33, P<0.01. Redundancy analysis indicated that soil macro-, dry-type, wet-type meso- and micro-fauna at different habitats were differentially affected by various environmental factors. At reclaimed land with higher copper concentrations, we found a higher

  16. Effects of of Habitats and Pesticides on Aerobic Capacity and Survival of Soil Fauna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. TRIPATHI; B. M. SHARMA

    2005-01-01

    arthropods as well as total soil fauna. Acari was least affected by γ-BHC and maximally affected (72%) in response to quinalphos. The effect of γ-BHC was fairly similar on Coleoptera, Collembola, other arthropod and total soil fauna suggesting almost similar sensitivity to this pesticide. Likewise, quinalphos was similarly effective on Collemobola and other soil arthropods. Application of carbaryl decreased Acari and Coleoptera population but increased Collembola, other arthropods and total faunal populations. However, application of cypermethrin significantly reduced the population of Acari, Coleoptera, Collembola and total soil fauna and increased the population of other soil arthropods. In both the cases, acarine population was least affected. Conclusion The observations show the habitat-specific variation in aerobic capacity of soil fauna. However, pesticide-dependent loss in population might be due to impairment of aerobic capacity of soil inhabiting animals in desert.

  17. Preliminary Response of Soil Fauna to Simulated N Deposition in Three Typical Subtropical Forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guo-Liang; MO Jiang-Ming; ZHOU Guo-Yi; FU Sheng-Lei

    2006-01-01

    A field-scale experiment arranged in a complete randomized block design with three N addition treatments including a control (no addition of N), a low N (5 g m-2 year-1), and a medium N (10 g m-2 year-1) was performed in each of the three typical forests, a pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) forest (PF), a pine-broadleaf mixed forest (MF) and a mature monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest (MEBF), of the Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve in subtropical China to study the response of soil fauna community to additions of N. Higher NH4+ and NO3- concentrations and a lower soil pH occurred in the medium N treatment of MEBF, whereas the NO3- concentration was the lowest in PF after the additions of N. The response of the density, group abundance and diversity index of soil fauna to addition of N varied with the forest type,and all these variables decreased with increasing N under MEBF but the trend was opposite under PF. The N treatments had no significant effects on these variables under MF. Compared with the control plots, the medium N treatment had significant negative effect on soil fauna under MEBF. The group abundance of soil fauna increased significantly with additions of higher N rates under PF. These results suggested that the response of soil fauna to N deposition varied with the forest type and N deposition rate, and soil N status is one of the important factors affecting the response of soil fauna to N deposition.

  18. EFFECTS OF SOIL FAUNA ON LITTER DECOMPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Forest litter is the physical makeup part of forest ecosystem. The rate of decomposition of forest litter is low in temperate and cool temperate zones. There is important significance to search and utilize the function of soil animals, in order to probe the material circulation and energy flow in forest ecosystem. We selected three kinds of mesh bag with different mesh size, in which, large pore mesh bag is large enough to permit the activities of all kinds of soil animals, medium mesh bag is designed to exclude the function of soil macrofauna, while small mesh bag is small enough to exclude the effects of any kind of soil animals as far as possible. The decomposition time is three years. The studying results show that: the decomposing speed of the bags with big meshes, under functions of all kinds of soil animals, faster than the bags with medium meshes, under functions of medium and small soil animals, as well as the bags with small meshes that excluding all possibility of functions of soil animals; in the process of decomposition of litter, relationship of the litter lost weight with number of soil animals is not obvious clearly; the degree of functions of soil animals to soft litter higher than hard litter; according to the analysis of diversity index, no regular changes will happen to the diversity of soil animals as the time of decomposing samples lengthen.

  19. Soil fauna research in Poland: earthworms (Lumbricidae

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    Pączka Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are the foundation of ecosystem services. Of particular notice is zooedaphone, often underestimated and basically unknown to the general public. The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge related to earthworms occurring in natural and anthropogenically altered habitats in Poland, in the context of the requirement for protection of soil biodiversity.

  20. Soil fauna communities and microbial respiration in high Arctic tundra soils at Zackenberg, Northeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Louise I.; Holmstrup, Martin; Maraldo, Kristine;

    2006-01-01

    densities (naked amoeba and heterotrophic flagellates) were equal. Respiration rate of unamended soil was similar in soil from the three plots. However, a higher respiration rate increase in carbon + nutrient amended soil and the higher densities of soil fauna (with the exception of mites and protozoa...

  1. Impact of climate change on soil fauna diversity effects of experimental drought, irrigation, soil warming and nutrient addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, N.

    2001-12-01

    To detect possible effects of global climatic change on soil fauna abundance and diversity, two long-term (8-13 years) field experiments in Norway spruce stands were used, one in SW Sweden and one in N Sweden. Soil fauna samples (Oribatida, Mesostigmata, Collembola, macro arthropod predators, Enchytraeidae) taken from field plots experimentally simulating altered precipitation patterns (drought and irrigation) and increased soil temperature were analysed to find shifts in faunal abundance, diversity and dominance. Drought and irrigation both caused shifts in community composition of Oribatida and Collembola, but the effects were more pronounced in drought plots and irrigation only had large effects at one site, including positive abundance responses. Repeated summer drought caused large decreases in abundances and, partly, species diversity of soil fauna. Species dominating in drought plots were probably tolerant to desiccation. Increased soil temperatures applied under a period of 5 years resulted in positive responses in several Oribatida and negative in some Collembola. Community composition was probably affected, but inadequate methodology made this difficult to evaluate. Repeated nutrient fertilisation of forests may be one way to increase tree growth and replace fossil fuels with biofuels, to reduce the greenhouse effect. The impact on soil fauna from such fertilisation, both in solid and liquid form was investigated in plots receiving fertilisation during 13 years. Soil fauna decreased following addition of solid fertiliser, while slight increases were found in plots receiving liquid fertiliser. An interaction effect between fertilisation and irrigation was probably the case. The fertilisation treatments caused shifts in the community composition of Oribatida and Collembola but did not cause changes in species richness, probably because decreases in some species were balanced by increases in other species. In conclusion, global climatic change resulting in

  2. No adverse effect of genetically modified antifungal wheat on decomposition dynamics and the soil fauna community--a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Caroline; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Lindfeld, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) plants has raised several environmental concerns. One of these concerns regards non-target soil fauna organisms, which play an important role in the decomposition of organic matter and hence are largely exposed to GM plant residues. Soil fauna may be directly affected by transgene products or indirectly by pleiotropic effects such as a modified plant metabolism. Thus, ecosystem services and functioning might be affected negatively. In a litterbag experiment in the field we analysed the decomposition process and the soil fauna community involved. Therefore, we used four experimental GM wheat varieties, two with a race-specific antifungal resistance against powdery mildew (Pm3b) and two with an unspecific antifungal resistance based on the expression of chitinase and glucanase. We compared them with two non-GM isolines and six conventional cereal varieties. To elucidate the mechanisms that cause differences in plant decomposition, structural plant components (i.e. C∶N ratio, lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose) were examined and soil properties, temperature and precipitation were monitored. The most frequent taxa extracted from decaying plant material were mites (Cryptostigmata, Gamasina and Uropodina), springtails (Isotomidae), annelids (Enchytraeidae) and Diptera (Cecidomyiidae larvae). Despite a single significant transgenic/month interaction for Cecidomyiidae larvae, which is probably random, we detected no impact of the GM wheat on the soil fauna community. However, soil fauna differences among conventional cereal varieties were more pronounced than between GM and non-GM wheat. While leaf residue decomposition in GM and non-GM wheat was similar, differences among conventional cereals were evident. Furthermore, sampling date and location were found to greatly influence soil fauna community and decomposition processes. The results give no indication of ecologically relevant adverse effects of antifungal GM wheat on the

  3. No adverse effect of genetically modified antifungal wheat on decomposition dynamics and the soil fauna community--a field study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Duc

    Full Text Available The cultivation of genetically modified (GM plants has raised several environmental concerns. One of these concerns regards non-target soil fauna organisms, which play an important role in the decomposition of organic matter and hence are largely exposed to GM plant residues. Soil fauna may be directly affected by transgene products or indirectly by pleiotropic effects such as a modified plant metabolism. Thus, ecosystem services and functioning might be affected negatively. In a litterbag experiment in the field we analysed the decomposition process and the soil fauna community involved. Therefore, we used four experimental GM wheat varieties, two with a race-specific antifungal resistance against powdery mildew (Pm3b and two with an unspecific antifungal resistance based on the expression of chitinase and glucanase. We compared them with two non-GM isolines and six conventional cereal varieties. To elucidate the mechanisms that cause differences in plant decomposition, structural plant components (i.e. C∶N ratio, lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose were examined and soil properties, temperature and precipitation were monitored. The most frequent taxa extracted from decaying plant material were mites (Cryptostigmata, Gamasina and Uropodina, springtails (Isotomidae, annelids (Enchytraeidae and Diptera (Cecidomyiidae larvae. Despite a single significant transgenic/month interaction for Cecidomyiidae larvae, which is probably random, we detected no impact of the GM wheat on the soil fauna community. However, soil fauna differences among conventional cereal varieties were more pronounced than between GM and non-GM wheat. While leaf residue decomposition in GM and non-GM wheat was similar, differences among conventional cereals were evident. Furthermore, sampling date and location were found to greatly influence soil fauna community and decomposition processes. The results give no indication of ecologically relevant adverse effects of antifungal GM

  4. Climate and litter quality differently modulate the effects of soil fauna on litter decomposition across biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Maestre, Fernando T; Kattge, Jens; Wall, Diana H

    2013-08-01

    Climate and litter quality have been identified as major drivers of litter decomposition at large spatial scales. However, the role played by soil fauna remains largely unknown, despite its importance for litter fragmentation and microbial activity. We synthesised litterbag studies to quantify the effect sizes of soil fauna on litter decomposition rates at the global and biome scales, and to assess how climate, litter quality and soil fauna interact to determine such rates. Soil fauna consistently enhanced litter decomposition at both global and biome scales (average increment ~ 37%). [corrected]. However, climate and litter quality differently modulated the effects of soil fauna on decomposition rates between biomes, from climate-driven biomes to those where climate effects were mediated by changes in litter quality. Our results advocate for the inclusion of biome-specific soil fauna effects on litter decomposition as a mean to reduce the unexplained variation in large-scale decomposition models.

  5. 土壤动物学研究进展%Research Progresses of Soil Fauna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志丹; 董炜华; 魏健; 盖玉红

    2012-01-01

    In order to master the research progress of soil sauna and get to know the research emphasis and weak link, the author analyzed the research results at home and abroad, introduced the development and evolution of soil fauna abroad and the research results on classification and distribution, ecological characteristics of community, and the interaction between soil fauna and environment. On the basis of summarizing, the author forecasted that research on how global environmental change would affect soil fauna and other fields should be strengthened.%为全面了解与掌握土壤动物的相关研究进展,明晰相关的研究重点与薄弱环节.对国内外相关研究成果进行了综合分析,重点介绍了国外土壤动物学的发展演变进程,以及中国在土壤动物分类与分布、群落生态特征以及土壤动物与环境的交互作用等方面的研究成果.最后在总结与归纳的基础上对未来研究趋势进行了展望,指出应加强全球环境变化对土壤动物的影响等方面的研究.

  6. Soil salinization as a stress factor for soil fauna

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Gabriel Alexandre Isidoro

    2011-01-01

    A existência de condições desfavoráveis no solo (p.e. um agente químico) pode influenciar a presença de organismos de solo ou parâmetros do ciclo de vida tais como a reprodução da fauna do solo num local específico. Logo, a resposta de evitamento e o sucesso reprodutivo de organismos em locais contaminados pode ser utilizada como uma primeira ferramenta de avaliação de risco ecológico, já que respostas negativas de evitamento ou reprodução significam que deverá haver algum...

  7. Dynamics of Soil Fauna in Da Hinggan Mountains, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xueping; SUN Yuan; HUANG Lirong

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of soil animals was studied in seven representative forest communities in the north of the Da Hinggan Mountains, Northeast China. The results indicate that it was distinctive in the changes of the numbers of soil animals and groups and diversity in relationship with seasons for macrofauna and torso-micro fauna in the study area. The numbers of the observed soil animals in different months were: October>August>June. Group number was larger in August and October, but smaller in June. The change of diversity index in different months was: August>June>October. The biomass for macrofanna in different months was: October>June>August. The composition and number of each functional group was relatively stable. In the community of the predominant soil environment, the percentage of saprophagous animals was higher than carnivorous animals and herbivorous animals. The dynamics changes of saprophagous and carnivorous animals were distinctive, increasing from June to October, while the change of herbivorous animals was unremarkable.

  8. Soil tillage, physical disturbance and fauna population: a case study in western Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Jabbar

    2015-04-01

    As a vital biological habitat for a great number of organisms and a medium for soil food web, soil has a great importance in regulating the two main life-supporting processes: production and decomposition. For more sustainable agricultural systems, understanding the mechanisms shaping soil fauna populations is of great importance specially in semi-arid regions with low organic matter soils. In this regard a two year study in 2008 and 2009 was conducted in western Iran to see the consequences of implementing three different tillage systems (conventional, minimum and no tillage) and three levels of organic matter amendment (0, 20 and 40 ton.ha-1 of cattle manure) over the population of soil fauna (i.e. earthworms, mite, springtail and nematodes) in three different sampling periods each year. In the second year BD decreased in the tillage treatments with mechanical turmoil but seems it started to increase in conventional tillage that can be due to higher decomposition of organic matter as the result of aeration and mixing of organic matter with the soil but shows a decrease pattern for the other two which can be due to less and no disturbance and as a result less elimination of soil aggregates. Observed earthworm populations were low besides of their patchy distribution that made the numbers unreliable to be interpreted. Soil mites showed no change regarding to treatments implemented which highlighted the importance of the need to observations in the suborder level and some other environmental variables. Soil springtails were reduced by soil tillage indicating their sensitivity to the disturbance in their physical habitat. Nematodes were mainly affected by organic matter. They showed an increase in their population (113 N.100g soil-1) in 2008 with application of 40 ton.ha-1 of cattle manure but in the second year because of the remaining effects of cattle manure the changes has been observed in response to the disturbance induced by tillage with the lowest numbers in

  9. Microelement contents of litter, soil fauna and soil in Pinus koralensis and mixed broad-leaved forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jinxia; YIN Xiuqin; DONG Weihua

    2007-01-01

    The Mn,Zn and Cu contents of litter,soil fauna and soil in Pinus koraiensis and mixed broad-leaved forest in Liangshui Nature Reserve of Xiaoxing'an Mountains were analyzed in this paper,results showed that the tested microelement contents in the litter,soil fauna and soil followed the order:Mn>Zn>Cu,but varied with environmental components,for Mn the order is soil>litter>soil fauna,for Zn is soil fauna>litter and soil,and for Cu is soil fauna>soil>litter.The change range of the tested microelement contents in litter was larger in broad-leaved forest than those in coniferous forest.Different soil fauna differed in their microelementenrichment capability,the highest content of Mn,Zn and Cu existed in earthworm,centipede and diplopod,respectively.The contents of the tested microelements in soil fauna had significant correlations with their environmental background values,litter decomposition rate,food habit of soil fauna,and its absorbing selectively and enrichment to microelements.The microelements contained in 5-20 cm soil horizon were more than those in 0-5 cm humus layer,and their dynamics differed in various horizons.

  10. Soil fauna in forest and coffee plantations from the Sierra Nevada de Santa Mar ta, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two research stations (M inca, 700 m altitude and Maria Ter esa, 790 m altitude) were established in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Mar ta in places to study the soil fauna associated with forest and coffee plantations. Soil fauna was collected using pitfall and Bailer's traps. Samples were taken from litter as well as from horizons 0, A and B. individuals collected were identified to family level. Diversity, abundance and frequency indexes were used to compare fauna composition at both sites. Significant differences were found between the two research sites as well as with data from other high altitude forest in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Mar ta

  11. Soil fauna abundance and diversity in a secondary semi-evergreen forest in Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles): influence of soil type and dominant tree species

    OpenAIRE

    Loranger-Merciris, Gladys; Imbert, Daniel; Bernhard-Reversat, France; PONGE, Jean-François; Lavelle, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    International audience The importance of secondary tropical forests regarding the maintenance of soil fauna abundance and diversity is poorly known. The aims of this study were (1) to describe soil fauna abundance and diversity and (2) to assess the determinants of soil fauna abundance and diversity in two stands of a tropical semi-evergreen secondary forest. Soil macrofauna and microarthropod abundance and soil macrofauna diversity were described at two sites developed on different soils ...

  12. Microbial biomass and soil fauna during the decomposition of cover crops in no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Colpo Gatiboni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The decomposition of plant residues is a biological process mediated by soil fauna, but few studies have been done evaluating its dynamics in time during the process of disappearance of straw. This study was carried out in Chapecó, in southern Brazil, with the objective of monitoring modifications in soil fauna populations and the C content in the soil microbial biomass (C SMB during the decomposition of winter cover crop residues in a no-till system. The following treatments were tested: 1 Black oat straw (Avena strigosa Schreb.; 2 Rye straw (Secale cereale L.; 3 Common vetch straw (Vicia sativa L.. The cover crops were grown until full flowering and then cut mechanically with a rolling stalk chopper. The soil fauna and C content in soil microbial biomass (C SMB were assessed during the period of straw decomposition, from October 2006 to February 2007. To evaluate C SMB by the irradiation-extraction method, soil samples from the 0-10 cm layer were used, collected on eight dates, from before until 100 days after residue chopping. The soil fauna was collected with pitfall traps on seven dates up to 85 days after residue chopping. The phytomass decomposition of common vetch was faster than of black oat and rye residues. The C SMB decreased during the process of straw decomposition, fastest in the treatment with common vetch. In the common vetch treatment, the diversity of the soil fauna was reduced at the end of the decomposition process.

  13. Impacts of Soil Fauna on Litter Decomposition at Different Succession Stages of Wetland in Sanjiang Plain, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Haitao; LU Xianguo; JIANG Ming; BAO Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Litter decomposition is the key process in nutrient recycling and energy flow. The present study examined the impacts of soil fauna on decomposition rates and nutrient fluxes at three succession stages of wetland in the Sanji-ang Plain, China using different mesh litterbags. The results show that in each succession stage of wetland, soil fauna can obviously increase litter decomposition rates. The average contribution of whole soil fauna to litter mass loss was 35.35%. The more complex the soil fauna group, the more significant the role of soil fauna. The average loss of three types of litter in the 4mm mesh litterbags was 0.3-4.1 times that in 0.058mm ones. The decomposition function of soil fauna to litter mass changed with the wetland succession. The average contribution of soil fauna to litter loss firstly de-creased from 34.96% (Carex lasiocapa) to 32.94% (Carex meyeriana), then increased to 38.16% (Calamagrosties an-gustifolia). The contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition rates vary according to the litter substrata, soil fauna communities and seasons. Significant effects were respectively found in August and July on C angustifolia and C lasiocapa, while in June and August on C. Meyeriana. Total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) contents and the C/N and C/P ratios of decaying litter can be influenced by soil fauna. At different wetland succession stages, the effects of soil fauna on nutrient elements also differ greatly, which shows the significant difference of in-fluencing element types and degrees. Soil fauna communities strongly influenced the TC and TP concentrations of C meyeriana litter, and TP content of C lasiocapa. Our results indicate that soil fauna have important effects on litter decomposition and this influence will vary with the wetland succession and seasonal variation.

  14. Fauna-associated Changes in Chemical and Biochemical Properties of Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. TRIPATHI; B. M. SHARMA

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the impacts of abundance of woodlice, termites, and mites on some functional aspects of soil in order to elucidate the specific role of soil fauna in improving soil fertility in desert. Methods Fauna-rich sites were selected as experimental sites and adjacent areas were taken as control. Soil samples were collected from both sites. Soil respiration was measured at both sites. The soil samples were sent to laboratory, their chemical and biochemical properties were analyzed.Results Woodlice showed 25% decrease in organic carbon and organic matter as compared to control site. Whereas termites and mites showed 58% and 16% decrease in organic carbon and organic matter. In contrast, available nitrogen (nitrate and ammonical both) and phosphorus exhibited 2-fold and 1.2-fold increase, respectively. Soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity at the sites rich in woodlice, termites and mites produced 2.5-, 3.5- and 2-fold increases, respectively as compared to their control values. Fauna-associated increase in these biological parameters clearly reflected fauna-induced microbial activity in soil. Maximum decrease in organic carbon and increase in nitrate-nitrogen and ammonical-nitrogen, available phosphorus, soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity were produced by termites and minimum by mites reflecting termite as an efficient soil improver in desert environment. Conclusion The soil fauna-associated changes in chemical (organic carbon, nitrate-nitrogen, ammonical-nitrogen, phosphorus) and biochemical (soil respiration, dehydrogenase activity) properties of soil improve soil health and help in conservation of desert pedoecosystem.

  15. Effect of leaf litter quantity and type on forest soil fauna and biological quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhong Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important to assess forest litter management. Here we examined the effects of leaf litter addition on the soil faunal community in Huitong subtropical forest region in Hunan Province, China. The microcosm experiment involving leaf-litter manipulation using a block and nested experimental design, respectively, was established in May, 2011. In the block design, the effects of litter quantity and its control were examined, while in the nested design a comparison was made of litter quality by adding broad-leaved litter or needle litter to soils. In July, 2012, we measured the abundance, diversity, and community composition of soil fauna across these treatments. Significant differences in abundance of springtails were found due to litter addition and of Diptera larvae due to litter type treatment. However, the diversity, community composition and abundance of other taxa did not vary significantly across treatments. We also calculated soil biological quality based on soil fauna data. Its value increased significantly by 32.45% due to litter addition, but was unaffected by litter type based on nested ANOVA. The results indicate that litter quantity plays an more important role than litter type in determining soil quality in the earlier stages of soil evolution in the study region. Because soil biological quality based on soil fauna was more sensitive than abundance and diversity of soil fauna, we suggest it is used as an indicator for evaluating the effectiveness of forest litter management.

  16. Soil arthropod fauna from natural ecosites and reclaimed oil sands soils in northern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battigelli, J.P.; Leskiw, L.A. [Paragon Soil and Environmental Consulting Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    An understanding of soil invertebrates may facilitate current reclamation activities in the oil sands region of Alberta. This paper presented the results of a study investigating the density, diversity, and structure of soil arthropod assemblages in natural habitats and reclaimed sites. The purpose of the study was to establish a baseline inventory of soil arthropod assemblages in order to enable long-term monitoring of soil arthropod recolonization in disturbed sites. Nine natural ecosites were sampled for the study, including peat mix over secondary material over tailing sand; direct placement over tailing sand; peat mix over secondary over overburden; direct placement over overburden; peat mix over tailing sand; and peat mix over overburden. Samples were collected from previously established long-term soil and vegetation treatment plots in both natural ecosites and reclaimed soil sites located near Fort McMurray, Alberta. Results showed that densities of mesofauna were significantly higher in samples collected from natural ecosites. Acari and Collembola represented approximately 97 to 98 per cent of the fauna collected. It was also noted that the overall structure of the soil mesofauna community differed between natural soils and reclaimed soils. A significant reduction in the abundance of oribatid mites was observed in soils that had been reclaimed for over 34 years. Changes in the soil mesofauna community structure suggested that reclaimed soils continue to represent disturbed ecosites, as was indicated by higher proportions of prostigmatid mites and some collembolan families. Differences in community structure may influence soil ecosystem functions, including decomposition rates; nutrient recycling; soil structure; and fungal and bacterial biomass. It was concluded that further research is needed to examine oribatid mites and collembolan species diversity and community structure in reclaimed soils. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Quantification of soil fauna metabolites and dead mass as humification sources in forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertov, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of publications on soil food webs (FWs) allowed calculation of the contents of soil fauna metabolites and dead mass, which can serve as materials for humification. Excreta production of FWmicrofauna reaches 570 kg/ha annually, but the liquid excreta of protozoa and nematodes compose about 25%. The soil fauna dead mass can be also maximally about 580 kg/ha per year. However, up to 70% of this material is a dead mass of bacteria, protozoa, and nematodes. The undecomposed forest floor (L) has low values of these metabolites in comparison with the raw humus organic layer (F + H). The mass of these metabolites is twice lower in Ah. Theoretical assessment of earthworms' role in SOM formation shows that the SOM amount in fresh coprolites can be 1.4 to 4.5-fold higher than SOM in the bulk soil in dependence on food assimilation efficiency, the soil: litter ratio in the earthworms' ration, and SOM quantity in the bulk soil. Excreta production varies from 0.2 to 1.9% of the total SOM pool annually, including 0.15-1.5% of excrements of arthropods and enchytraeidae, but the amount of arthropods' dead mass comprises 0.2-0.4%. The calculated values of the SOM increase due to earthworms' coprolites are of the same order (0.9-2.7% of SOM pool annually). These values of SOM-forming biota metabolites and dead mass are close to the experimental and simulated data on labile and stable SOM fractions decomposition in forest soils (about 2% annually). Therefore, these biota's products can play a role to restock SOM decrease due to mineralization.

  18. Characterization of soil fauna under the influence of mercury atmospheric deposition in Atlantic Forest, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Andressa Cristhy; Correia, Maria Elizabeth Fernandes; Teixeira, Daniel Cabral; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira

    2015-06-01

    The increasing levels of mercury (Hg) found in the atmosphere arising from anthropogenic sources, have been the object of great concern in the past two decades in industrialized countries. Brazil is the seventh country with the highest rate of mercury in the atmosphere. The major input of Hg to ecosystems is through atmospheric deposition (wet and dry), being transported in the atmosphere over large distances. The forest biomes are of strong importance in the atmosphere/soil cycling of elemental Hg through foliar uptake and subsequent transference to the soil through litter, playing an important role as sink of this element. Soil microarthropods are keys to understanding the soil ecosystem, and for such purpose were characterized by the soil fauna of two Units of Forest Conservation of the state of the Rio de Janeiro, inwhich one of the areas suffer quite interference from petrochemicals and industrial anthropogenic activities and other area almost exempts of these perturbations. The results showed that soil and litter of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil tend to stock high mercury concentrations, which could affect the abundance and richness of soil fauna, endangering its biodiversity and thereby the functioning of ecosystems. PMID:26040748

  19. Contribution of soil fauna to soil functioning in degraded environments: a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Mele, Giacomo; Moradi, Jabbar; Kukla, Jaroslav; Jandová, Kateřina; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The restoration of the soil functions is essential for the recovery of highly degraded sites and, consequently, the study of the soil fauna role in the soil development in such environments has great potential from a practical point of view. The soils of the post-mining sites represent unique models for the study of the natural ecological succession because mining creates similar environments characterized by the same substrate, but by different ages according to the year of closure of mines. The aim of this work was to assess the contribution of different species of macrofauna on the evolution of soil structure and on the composition and activity of the microbial community in soil samples subjected to ecological restoration or characterized by spontaneous ecological succession. For this purpose, an experimental test was carried out in two sites characterized by different post-mining conditions: 1) natural succession, 2) reclamation with planting trees. These sites are located in the post-mining area of Sokolov (Czech Republic). For the experimental test repacked soil cores were prepared in laboratory with sieved soil sampled from the two sites. The soil cores were prepared maintaining the sequence of soil horizons present in the field. These samples were inoculated separately with two genera of earthworms (Lumbricus and Aporrectodea) and two of centipedes (Julida and Polydesmus). In particular, based on their body size, were inoculated for each cylinder 2 individuals of millipedes, 1 individual of Lumbricus and 4 individuals of Aporrectodea. For each treatment and for control samples 5 replicates were prepared and all samples were incubated in field for 1 month in the two original sampling sites. After the incubation the samples were removed from the field and transported in laboratory in order to perform the analysis of microbial respiration, of PLFA (phospholipid-derived fatty acids) and ergosterol contents and finally for the characterization of soil structure

  20. Insect fauna in soil at different grassland ecosystems at Sobral, state of Ceará, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Gislane dos Santos Sousa; Silvia Cristenia da Silva Xavier; Petronio Emanuel Timbó Braga

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was perform a surveillance of the insect fauna in soil in three grassland ecosystems of experimental farm Vale do Acaraú of Universidade Estadual Vale do Acaraú at Sobral, state of Ceará, Brazil, by the using of traps soil, with fortnightly collections, from March 2011 to February 2012. To characterize the insect fauna established a distribution pattern, whereas the rates of occurrence and dominance of species grouped by order, as an indicator of the frequency and the oc...

  1. The invertebrate fauna of anthropogenic soils in the High-Arctic settlement of Barentsburg, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torstein Solhøy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial environment of the High Arctic consists of a mosaic of habitat types. In addition to the natural habitat diversity, various human-influenced types may occur. For the resident invertebrate fauna, these anthropogenic habitats may be either unusually favourable or detrimental. In the town of Barentsburg, Svalbard, soils were imported for the greenhouses from southern Russia. These soils were subsequently discarded outside the greenhouses and have become augmented with manure from the cowsheds. Both the greenhouse and the cowsheds are now derelict. This site represents an unusually nutrient-rich location with considerable development of organic soils, in stark contrast to the naturally forming organic soils in Svalbard, which are typically thin and nutrient poor. Few previous studies have examined the soil invertebrate communities of human-disturbed or -created habitats in the Arctic. In an often nutrient-poor terrestrial environment, it is unclear how the invertebrate fauna will react to such nutrient enhancement. In these soils, 46 species of invertebrates were determined. Eleven species have not been recorded from other habitats in Svalbard and are hence likely to have been introduced. The native species assemblage in the anthropogenic soils was not atypical for many natural sites in Svalbard. Despite the enriched organic soils and highly ameliorated winter temperature conditions, the soil invertebrate fauna biodiversity does not appear to be enhanced beyond the presence of certain probably introduced species.

  2. Response of soil fauna to simulated nitrogen deposition: A nursery experiment in Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guo-liang; MO Jiang-ming; FU Sheng-lei; PER Gundersen; ZHOU Guo-yi; XUE Jing-Hua

    2007-01-01

    We studied the responses of soil fauna to a simulated nitrogen deposition in nursery experimental plots in Subtropical China. Dissolved NH4NO3 was applied to the soil by spraying twice per month for 16 months, starting January 2003 with treatments of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 30 gN/(m2·a). Soil fauna was sampled after 6, 9, 13 and 16 months of treatment in three soil depths (0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm). Soil available N increased in correspondence with the increasing N treatment, whereas soil pH decreased. Bacterial and fungal densities were elevated by the N treatment. Soil fauna increased in the lower nitrogen treatments but decreased in the higher N treatments, which might indicate that there was a threshold around 10 gN/(m2·a) for the stimulating effects of N addition. The N effects were dependent on the soil depth and sampling time. The data also suggested that the effects of the different N treatments were related to the level of N saturation, especially the concentration of NO3- in the soil.

  3. Fertilizer regime impacts on abundance and diversity of soil fauna across a poplar plantation chronosequence in coastal Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaojun; Chen, Han Y H; Tan, Yan; Fan, Huan; Ruan, Honghua

    2016-01-01

    Soil fauna are critical for ecosystem function and sensitive to the changes of soil fertility. The effects of fertilization on soil fauna communities, however, remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of fertilization form and quantity on the abundance, diversity and composition of soil fauna across an age-sequence of poplar plantations (i.e., 4-, 9- and 20-yr-old) in the coastal region of eastern China. We found that the effects of fertilization on faunal abundance, diversity, and composition differed among stand ages. Organic fertilizers increased the total abundance of soil fauna, whereas low level inorganic fertilizers imparted increases only in the 4- and 9-yr-old stands. The number of faunal groups did not change with fertilization, but Shannon's and Margalef diversity indices increased under low level organic fertilization, and decreased under inorganic fertilization in the 9- and 20-yr-old stands. Community composition of soil fauna differed strongly with fertilization and stand age. The changes in soil fauna were strongly associated with the changes in microbial biomass carbon, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, and available phosphorus and potassium. Our findings suggest that the responses of soil fauna to fertilization may be mediated through the fertilization effects on soil nutrient availability. PMID:26857390

  4. The invertebrate fauna of anthropogenic soils in the High-Arctic settlement of Barentsburg, Svalbard

    OpenAIRE

    Coulson, Steve J.; Fjellberg, Arne; Dariusz J. Gwiazdowicz; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Elena N. Melekhina; Solhøy, Torstein; Erséus, Christer; Maraldo, Kristine; Miko, Ladislav; Schatz, Heinrich; Rüdiger M. Schmelz; Søli, Geir; Stur,Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The terrestrial environment of the High Arctic consists of a mosaic of habitat types. In addition to the natural habitat diversity, various human-influenced types may occur. For the resident invertebrate fauna, these anthropogenic habitats may be either unusually favourable or detrimental. In the town of Barentsburg, Svalbard, soils were imported for the greenhouses from southern Russia. These soils were subsequently discarded outside the greenhouses and have become augmented with manure from...

  5. Atmospheric deposition of mercury in Atlantic Forest and ecological risk to soil fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristhy Buch, Andressa; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Fernandes Correia, Maria Elizabeth; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

    2014-05-01

    The increasing levels of mercury (Hg) found in the atmosphere nowadays has a great contribution from anthropogenic sources and has been a great concern in the past two decades in industrialized countries. Brazil is the seventh country with the highest rate of mercury in the atmosphere. Certainly, the petroleum refineries have significant contribution, seen that 100 million m3 of crude oil are annually processed. These refineries contribute with low generation of solid waste; however, a large fraction of Hg can be emitted to the atmosphere. There are sixteen refineries in Brazil, three of them located in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The Hg is a toxic and hazardous trace element, naturally found in the earth crust. The major input of Hg to ecosystems is through atmospheric deposition (wet and dry), being transported in the atmosphere over large distances. The forest biomes are of great importance in the atmosphere/soil cycling of elemental Hg through foliar uptake and subsequent transfer to the soil through litterfall, which play an important role as Hg sink. The Atlantic Forest of Brazil is the greater contributor of fauna and flora biodiversity in the world and, according to recent studies, this biome has the highest concentrations of mercury in litter in the world, as well as in China, at Subtropical Forest. Ecotoxicological assessments can predict the potential ecological risk of Hg toxicity in the soil can lead to impact the soil fauna and indirectly other trophic levels of the food chain within one or more ecosystems. This study aims to determine mercury levels that represent risks to diversity and functioning of soil fauna in tropical forest soils. The study is conducted in two forest areas inserted into conservation units of Rio de Janeiro state. One area is located next to an important petroleum refinery in activity since fifty-two years ago, whereas the other one is located next to other refinery under construction (beginning activities in 2015), which will

  6. [Composition and Density of Soil Fauna in the Region with Enhanced Radioactivity Level (Komi Republic, Vodnyi)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, A A; Kudrin, A A; Konakova, T N; Taskaeva, A A

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the influence of high levels of radiation on soil fauna were carried out in 2012 in the territory formed as a result of the activity of the enterprise for extraction and production of radium from reservoir water and waste of uranium ore from 1931 to 1956. At present the local radioactive pollution in this area is caused by the presence of heavy natural radionuclides 226Ra, 238U and products of their disintegration in soils. The oppression of soil invertebrate.fauna in pine forests and meadows with high levels of radionuclides and heavy metals is revealed. Also shown is the decrease in the number and density of different taxonomic groups of invertebrates, reduction of the diversity and spectrum of trophic groups and vital forms in the area with a high content of radionuclides in soil. Our results are in agreement with the results obtained by the similar studies showing negative influence of high-level ionizing radiation on soil fauna. PMID:26310020

  7. 松嫩草原地形分异对土壤动物分布格局的影响%Effect of topography heterogeneity on distribution of soil fauna in Songnen grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛未冬; 殷秀琴; 宋博

    2013-01-01

    Distribution of soil fauna was affected by several factors in Songnen grassland, such as topography, soil, vegetation, climate, sampling time and so on. Results showed that there were significant effects of topography on soil fauna in forest ecosystem, but we still do not know the effect of topography heterogeneity on distribution of soil fauna in grassland ecosystem. Five habitats of fixed dune and steppe in Songnen grassland were chosen to investigate soil fauna community characteristics for one year. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of ecological distribution and biodiversity of soil fauna and measured the interaction of topography heterogeneity and time on distribution of soil fauna by ANOVA for repeated measures. Results showed that the average density of soil fauna was 5144.62 ind穖-2 during research and soil fauna belong to four phyla, eight classes, and 24 groups. Arid and semi-arid regional characteristics of fauna have been shown in species composition of soil fauna. Coleoptera and Orthoptera are the typical fauna in this region. There were significant differences among five habitats in species composition and number of soil fauna. But there are no differences in group composition and number of total soil fauna with time. There were significant differences of dynamics of soil fauna diversity index among habitats. Three habitats in fixed dune with similar diversity index showed significant difference in two habitats in steppe with similar diversity index, and suggested the effects of topography heterogeneity on diversity index of soil fauna. Results of ANOVA showed that there were significant effects of time and topography heterogeneity on characteristics of quantity and diversity of soil fauna community, but the interaction of time and topography heterogeneity on soil fauna community was not always significant. Therefore, topography heterogeneity had significant effects on distribution of soil fauna in Songnen grassland, which may be

  8. Transient dwarfism of soil fauna during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.J.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Kraus, M.J.; Woody, D.T.

    2009-01-01

    Soil organisms, as recorded by trace fossils in paleosols of the Willwood Formation, Wyoming, show significant body-size reductions and increased abundances during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Paleobotanical, paleopedologic, and oxygen isotope studies indicate high temperatures during the PETM and sharp declines in precipitation compared with late Paleocene estimates. Insect and oligochaete burrows increase in abundance during the PETM, suggesting longer periods of soil development and improved drainage conditions. Crayfish burrows and molluscan body fossils, abundant below and above the PETM interval, are significantly less abundant during the PETM, likely because of drier floodplain conditions and lower water tables. Burrow diameters of the most abundant ichnofossils are 30-46% smaller within the PETM interval. As burrow size is a proxy for body size, significant reductions in burrow diameter suggest that their tracemakers were smaller bodied. Smaller body sizes may have resulted from higher subsurface temperatures, lower soil moisture conditions, or nutritionally deficient vegetation in the high-CO2 atmosphere inferred for the PETM. Smaller soil fauna co-occur with dwarf mammal taxa during the PETM; thus, a common forcing mechanism may have selected for small size in both above- and below-ground terrestrial communities. We predict that soil fauna have already shown reductions in size over the last 150 years of increased atmospheric CO2 and surface temperatures or that they will exhibit this pattern over the next century. We retrodict also that soil fauna across the Permian-Triassic and Triassic-Jurassic boundary events show significant size decreases because of similar forcing mechanisms driven by rapid global warming.

  9. Effects of ivermectin application on the diversity and function of dung and soil fauna: Regulatory and scientific background information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Nicole; Bachmann, Jean; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Floate, Kevin D; Jensen, John; Römbke, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    The application of veterinary medical products to livestock can impact soil organisms in manure-amended fields or adversely affect organisms that colonize dung pats of treated animals and potentially retard the degradation of dung on pastures. For this reason, the authorization process for veterinary medicinal products in the European Union includes a requirement for higher-tier tests when adverse effects on dung organisms are observed in single-species toxicity tests. However, no guidance documents for the performance of higher-tier tests are available. Hence, an international research project was undertaken to develop and validate a proposed test method under varying field conditions of climate, soil, and endemic coprophilous fauna at Lethbridge (Canada), Montpellier (France), Zurich (Switzerland), and Wageningen (The Netherlands). The specific objectives were to determine if fecal residues of an anthelmintic with known insecticidal activity (ivermectin) showed similar effects across sites on 1) insects breeding in dung of treated animals, 2) coprophilous organisms in the soil beneath the dung, and 3) rates of dung degradation. By evaluating the effects of parasiticides on communities of dung-breeding insects and soil fauna under field conditions, the test method meets the requirements of a higher-tier test as mandated by the European Union. The present study provides contextual information on authorization requirements for veterinary medicinal products and on the structure and function of dung and soil organism communities. It also provides a summary of the main findings. Subsequent studies on this issue provide detailed information on different aspects of this overall project. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1914-1923. © 2015 SETAC.

  10. Effects of ivermectin application on the diversity and function of dung and soil fauna: Regulatory and scientific background information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Nicole; Bachmann, Jean; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Floate, Kevin D; Jensen, John; Römbke, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    The application of veterinary medical products to livestock can impact soil organisms in manure-amended fields or adversely affect organisms that colonize dung pats of treated animals and potentially retard the degradation of dung on pastures. For this reason, the authorization process for veterinary medicinal products in the European Union includes a requirement for higher-tier tests when adverse effects on dung organisms are observed in single-species toxicity tests. However, no guidance documents for the performance of higher-tier tests are available. Hence, an international research project was undertaken to develop and validate a proposed test method under varying field conditions of climate, soil, and endemic coprophilous fauna at Lethbridge (Canada), Montpellier (France), Zurich (Switzerland), and Wageningen (The Netherlands). The specific objectives were to determine if fecal residues of an anthelmintic with known insecticidal activity (ivermectin) showed similar effects across sites on 1) insects breeding in dung of treated animals, 2) coprophilous organisms in the soil beneath the dung, and 3) rates of dung degradation. By evaluating the effects of parasiticides on communities of dung-breeding insects and soil fauna under field conditions, the test method meets the requirements of a higher-tier test as mandated by the European Union. The present study provides contextual information on authorization requirements for veterinary medicinal products and on the structure and function of dung and soil organism communities. It also provides a summary of the main findings. Subsequent studies on this issue provide detailed information on different aspects of this overall project. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1914-1923. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26573955

  11. How does litter cover, litter diversity and fauna affect sediment discharge and runoff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Litter cover plays a major role in soil erosion processes. It is known that litter cover reduces erosivity of raindrops, decreases sediment discharge and lowers runoff volume compared to bare ground. However, in the context of biodiversity, the composition of litter cover, its effect on sediment discharge and runoff volume and their influence on soil erosion have not yet been analyzed in detail. Focusing on initial soil erosion (splash), our experimental design is designated to get a better understanding of these mechanisms. The experiments were carried out within the DFG research unit "Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (BEF)-China" in subtropical China. The "New Integrated Litter Experiment (NILEx)" used as platform combining different subprojects of BEF-China dealing with "decomposition and nutrient cycling", "mechanisms of soil erosion" and "functional effects of herbivores, predators and saproxylics" in one experiment. In NILEx, 96 40cm x 40cm runoff plots on two hill slopes inside a castanea molissima forest plantation have been installed and filled with seven different types of litter cover. 16 one-species plots, 24 two-species plots, 4 four-species plots and 4 bare ground plots have been set up, each replicated once. We prepared 48 Plots with traps (Renner solution) for soil macrofauna (diplopods and collembola), so half of the plots were kept free from fauna while the other half was accessible for fauna. Rainfall was generated artificially by using a rainfall simulator with a continuous and stable intensity of 60 mm/h. Our experiments included two runs of 20 minutes duration each, both conducted at two different time steps (summer 2012 and autumn 2012). Runoff volume and sediment discharge were measured every 5 minutes during one rainfall run. Litter coverage and litter mass were recorded at the beginning (summer 2012) and at the end of the experiment (autumn 2012). Our results show that sediment discharge as well as runoff volume decreases

  12. La fauna edafica en bosques y plantaciones de coniferas de la estacion San Lorenzo-Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta Soil fauna in forest and pine plantations from San Lorenzo station-Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamorro Bello Clara

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available En la estacion de San Lorenzo-Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta-(2280 m. se seleccionaron suelos (Tropaquepts, bajo usos de bosque nativo y plantacion de pinos. La coleccion de las comunidades edafofaunisticas se realizo con base en la aplicacion de tecnicas de Barber y Berlesse, para su posterior determinacion hasta el nivel de familia. Se determino la biodiversidad medida en el Indice de Brillouin, las densidades poblacionales, su distribucion en el perfil del suelo, y los Indices de Riqueza y Constancia, para cada uno de los horizontes edaficos.Soils in San Lorenzo Station-Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta-(2280m were selected in two different uses: forest and pine plantations. Fauna was coleected out from the soils by Pitfall and Berlesse methods to be determinated up to family levels. Biodiversity, populations, fauna distribution into soil profile, and richness and constancy indexes, were determinated in soil horizons. Biodiversity, richness and Constancy Indexes are affected when natural condition are disturbed, generally by man action. This perturbation speed up the natural population growth when another population controllers have disappea.

  13. Effects of wildfire and prescribed burning on soil fauna in boreal coniferous forests

    OpenAIRE

    Malmström, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Fire is considered as the most important disturbance agent in many ecosystems. In northern Europe, fire suppression is today highly effective. This has led to a reduction of species that are dependent on fire for their long-term survival. Above ground positive responses of animal diversity to fire are common, whereas the knowledge of the responses of soil fauna to fire is fairly poor. The main aim of this thesis was to determine effects of wildfire and prescribed burning on survival and recov...

  14. Insect fauna in soil at different grassland ecosystems at Sobral, state of Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislane dos Santos Sousa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was perform a surveillance of the insect fauna in soil in three grassland ecosystems of experimental farm Vale do Acaraú of Universidade Estadual Vale do Acaraú at Sobral, state of Ceará, Brazil, by the using of traps soil, with fortnightly collections, from March 2011 to February 2012. To characterize the insect fauna established a distribution pattern, whereas the rates of occurrence and dominance of species grouped by order, as an indicator of the frequency and the occurrence of the amount of captured. At the end, we collected and identified a total of 17,008 specimens of insects belonging to 11 orders, namely: Blattariae, Coleoptera, Dermaptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera, Isoptera, Lepidoptera, Odonata, Orthoptera and Mantodea. The Order Hymenoptera was the one that stood out the largest number of individuals captured, attributing the presence of large amount of ants, are still considered common to the three ecosystems studied, according to the method employed.

  15. Evaluation of meso fauna soil as bio-indicator of environmental quality in forests remnants in the city of São Paulo - Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patucci, Natalia; Oliveira, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    Soil quality is particularly through composition and structure, as well as by, measured by physical and chemical indicators, as well as by living organisms contained therein, which play the most varied ecological functions. The abundance and diversity of soil macrofauna in ecosystems can be affected by many factors, precisely because these organisms are sensitive to environmental changes, whether induced or natural. Thus, soil populations can be measured as bioindicators, since changes in the community may indicate possible changes in soil functioning. This research aims to survey the biodiversity of meso soil fauna environments with remaining Atlantic Forest (Fontes do Ipiranga park, Cantareira park and Jaraguá park) in order to detect specific features and significant changes in ecological function performed by these soil communities. The project aims to develop an overview of multivariate understanding about soil, especially the relation of variation of pedofauna with the occurring physical and chemical modifications in order to be able to prove the adaptation of soil fauna with variations in temperature, humidity, sunshine, influence of vegetation, soil genesis and topographic gradient. According to Lavelle & Spain (2001), the temperature and humidity are the main factors that activate the metabolic regulation in subjects of soil fauna, which ultimately determine their spatial distribution, periods of increased activity, peculiarities and significant changes, the function of these communities in the substrate. Two combining sampling will be performed, one in the rainy season, in January, and another in the dry season, in July, with the purpose of measuring the diversity of populations according to seasonality. Invertebrates associated soil interface - burlap (Moreira et al, 2010) will be caught by pitfall traps, which will be distributed in three installments by park, containing a sampling gride with nine equidistant points 30 meters of each other. Through

  16. Disturbance-diversity relationships for soil fauna are explained by faunal community biomass in a salt marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, Madhav Prakash; Berg, Matty P.; Eisenhauer, Nico; van Langevelde, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Disturbance-diversity relationships have long been studied in ecology with a unimodal relationship as the key prediction. Although this relationship has been widely contested, it is rarely tested for soil invertebrate fauna, an important component of terrestrial biodiversity. We tested disturbance-d

  17. Disturbance–diversity relationships for soil fauna are explained by faunal community biomass in a salt marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, M.P.; Berg, M.P.; Eisenhauer, N.; Langevelde, van F.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbance–diversity relationships have long been studied in ecology with a unimodal relationship as the key prediction. Although this relationship has been widely contested, it is rarely tested for soil invertebrate fauna, an important component of terrestrial biodiversity. We tested disturbance–d

  18. Effects of ivermectin application on the diversity and function of dung and soil fauna: Regulatory and scientific background information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, Nicole; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Bachmann, Jean;

    2016-01-01

    on communities of dung-breeding insects and soil fauna under field conditions, the test method meets the requirements of a higher-tier test as mandated by the European Union. The present study provides contextual information on authorization requirements for veterinary medicinal products and on the structure...... and function of dung and soil organism communities. It also provides a summary of the main findings. Subsequent studies on this issue provide detailed information on different aspects of this overall project....

  19. Soil pH and earthworms affect herbage nitrogen recovery from solid cattle manure in production grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, M.I.; Goede, de R.G.M.; Corral Nunez, G.A.; Brussaard, L.; Lantinga, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Long term use of inorganic fertilisers and reduced organic matter inputs have contributed to acidification of agricultural soils. This strongly affects the soil dwelling fauna and nutrient mineralisation. Organic fertilisers such as solid cattle manure (SCM) resurge as an option to overcome this aci

  20. Soil Fauna Alter the Effects of Litter Composition on Nitrogen Cycling in a Mineral Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant chemical composition and the soil community are known to influence litter and soil organic matter decomposition. Although these two factors are likely to interact, their mechanisms and outcomes of interaction are not well understood. Studies of their interactive effects are...

  1. Investigation of Wetland Soil Properties affecting Optimum Soil Cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Babatunde, O. O.; K.A. Adeniran

    2010-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on wetland (fadama) soil properties affecting optimum soil cultivation. A cone penetrometerand a shear vane apparatus (19 mm) were used to determine the cone index and the torque that cause the soil to shearat different moisture contents. The study shows that the cone index and shear vane of fadama soils increased with depth anddecreased with increase in moisture content. High moisture content reduced the soil cohesion. The internal frictional angleof the soil...

  2. Loss of soil (macro)fauna due to the expansion of Brazilian sugarcane acreage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, André L C; Bartz, Marie L C; Cherubin, Maurício R; Baretta, Dilmar; Cerri, Carlos E P; Feigl, Brigitte J; Wall, Diana H; Davies, Christian A; Cerri, Carlos C

    2016-09-01

    Land use changes (LUC) from pasture to sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) crop are expected to add 6.4Mha of new sugarcane land by 2021 in the Brazilian Cerrado and Atlantic Forest biomes. We assessed the effects of these LUC on the abundance and community structure of animals that inhabit soils belowground through a field survey using chronosequences of land uses comprising native vegetation, pasture, and sugarcane along a 1000-km-long transect across these two major tropical biomes in Brazil. Macrofauna community composition differed among land uses. While most groups were associated with samples taken in native vegetation, high abundance of termites and earthworms appeared associated with pasture soils. Linear mixed effects analysis showed that LUC affected total abundance (X(2)(1)=6.79, p=0.03) and taxa richness (X(2)(1)=6.08, p=0.04) of soil macrofauna. Abundance increased from 411±70individualsm(-2) in native vegetation to 1111±202individualsm(-2) in pasture, but decreased sharply to 106±24individualsm(-2) in sugarcane soils. Diversity decreased 24% from native vegetation to pasture, and 39% from pasture to sugarcane. Thus, a reduction of ~90% in soil macrofauna abundance, besides a loss of ~40% in the diversity of macrofauna groups, can be expected when sugarcane crops replace pasture in Brazilian tropical soils. In general, higher abundances of major macrofauna groups (ants, coleopterans, earthworms, and termites) were associated with higher acidity and low contents of macronutrients and organic matter in soil. This study draws attention for a significant biodiversity loss belowground due to tropical LUC in sugarcane expansion areas. Given that many groups of soil macrofauna are recognized as key mediators of ecosystem processes such as soil aggregation, nutrients cycling and soil carbon storage, our results warrant further efforts to understand the impacts of altering belowground biodiversity and composition on soil functioning and agriculture performance

  3. Loss of soil (macro)fauna due to the expansion of Brazilian sugarcane acreage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, André L C; Bartz, Marie L C; Cherubin, Maurício R; Baretta, Dilmar; Cerri, Carlos E P; Feigl, Brigitte J; Wall, Diana H; Davies, Christian A; Cerri, Carlos C

    2016-09-01

    Land use changes (LUC) from pasture to sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) crop are expected to add 6.4Mha of new sugarcane land by 2021 in the Brazilian Cerrado and Atlantic Forest biomes. We assessed the effects of these LUC on the abundance and community structure of animals that inhabit soils belowground through a field survey using chronosequences of land uses comprising native vegetation, pasture, and sugarcane along a 1000-km-long transect across these two major tropical biomes in Brazil. Macrofauna community composition differed among land uses. While most groups were associated with samples taken in native vegetation, high abundance of termites and earthworms appeared associated with pasture soils. Linear mixed effects analysis showed that LUC affected total abundance (X(2)(1)=6.79, p=0.03) and taxa richness (X(2)(1)=6.08, p=0.04) of soil macrofauna. Abundance increased from 411±70individualsm(-2) in native vegetation to 1111±202individualsm(-2) in pasture, but decreased sharply to 106±24individualsm(-2) in sugarcane soils. Diversity decreased 24% from native vegetation to pasture, and 39% from pasture to sugarcane. Thus, a reduction of ~90% in soil macrofauna abundance, besides a loss of ~40% in the diversity of macrofauna groups, can be expected when sugarcane crops replace pasture in Brazilian tropical soils. In general, higher abundances of major macrofauna groups (ants, coleopterans, earthworms, and termites) were associated with higher acidity and low contents of macronutrients and organic matter in soil. This study draws attention for a significant biodiversity loss belowground due to tropical LUC in sugarcane expansion areas. Given that many groups of soil macrofauna are recognized as key mediators of ecosystem processes such as soil aggregation, nutrients cycling and soil carbon storage, our results warrant further efforts to understand the impacts of altering belowground biodiversity and composition on soil functioning and agriculture performance

  4. Variation of Soil Fauna Community in Eucalyptus grandis Plantation Before and After Felling Disturbance%采伐干扰前后巨桉人工林土壤动物群落比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖玖金; 张健; 黄玉梅; 马红星; 李旭东

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the response of soil animal community to harvesting disturbance and evaluate the ecological etfect of a eucalypt plantation, an investigation on soil fauna was carried out in the eucalypt (Eucalyptus grandis) plantation which was planted in 1997 and harvested in August 2006. Soil macro-fauna were picked up by hand. Nematodes and mesofauna were separated and collected from the soil samples by Baermann and Tullgren methods, respectively. Totally, 5 578 individuals of soil fauna, belonging to 4 phyla, 10 classes and 25 orders were collected before and after felling disturbance, and the individuals of soil fauna were 1 290 fewer than those before felling. Individuals were easier affected by felling disturbance than group numbers. Acarina, Hymenoptera and Nematode occupied 91.76% of the total decreased individuals, Collembolan 88.99%of the total increased individuals, and other soil fauna changed insignificantly. The meso-micro soil fauna (including those collected by Baermann and Tullgren methods) were mainly distributed in top soil layer, which was negatively correlated with soil temperature, and positively with soil organic content and soil moisture. The felling disturbance represented a significant effect on meso-micro soil fauna (P < 0.01). Shannon-Wiener (H') and Pielou (J) indexes increased significantly ( P > 0.05), DG index decreased extremely significantly ( P < 0.01), Simpson(C) index of plot A decreased and plot B increased, indicating that havesting disturbance had induced significant eftects on the structure of soil fauna in the eucalypt plantation. Tab 6, Ref 33%为了解采伐干扰对巨桉人工林土壤动物的影响,采用手捡法和干湿漏斗法对四川省洪雅县巨桉人工林采伐干扰前和干扰后土壤动物群落进行调查.结果显示:巨桉人工林采伐干扰前后共获大中小型土壤动物5 578头,分属4门10纲25目,采伐干扰后共减少1 290头,类群数减少了3个.采伐干扰前

  5. Effects of tillage mode on the diversity of soil meso- and micro-fauna%耕作方式对中小型土壤动物多样性影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    战丽莉; 许艳丽; 张兴义; 潘凤娟; 裴希超; 刘振宇

    2012-01-01

    moldboard plough and rotary tillage and between no tillage and reduced tillage. Combined tillage kept the surface accumulation of soil fauna. The diversity, evenness, and dominance of the soil fauna under reduced tillage were higher than those under other tillage modes. It was suggested that tillage mode could affect the community structure of soil meso- and micro-fauna, and conservation tillage (combined tillage and reduced tillage) could benefit the stability of soil faunal community structure and kept the surface accumulation of soil fauna in vertical distribution.

  6. Análise multivariada da fauna edáfica em diferentes sistemas de preparo e cultivo do solo Multivariate analysis of soil fauna under different soil tillage and crop management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilmar Baretta

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de sistemas de preparo e cultivo do solo sobre a diversidade de animais da fauna edáfica, por meio de técnicas de análise multivariada. Na análise canônica discriminante, os preparos conservacionistas com sucessão de culturas foram separados em relação aos tratamentos com rotação de culturas. Os grupos Acarina, Hymenoptera, Isopoda e Collembola, e o índice de Shannon (H foram os atributos que mais contribuíram para separar os tratamentos. A análise de correspondência mostrou forte associação dos grupos Acarina e Hymenoptera com o tratamento semeadura direta com sucessão de culturas, e do grupo Collembola com o preparo convencional.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different soil tillage and crop management systems on soil fauna groups, by means of multivariate analysis. In the canonical discriminant analysis the conservation soil management systems with crop succession were discriminated in relation to other treatments with crop rotation. The groups Acarina, Hymenoptera, Isopoda, and Collembola, and the Shannon index (H showed the highest contribution for the discrimination between treatments. The correspondence analysis showed a strong association between Acarina and Hymenoptera groups with the treatment no-tillage with crop succession, and between Collembola group with the conventional tillage system.

  7. Evaluating the Applicability of Phi Coefficient in Indicating Habitat Preferences of Forest Soil Fauna Based on a Single Field Study in Subtropical China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cui

    Full Text Available Phi coefficient directly depends on the frequencies of occurrence of organisms and has been widely used in vegetation ecology to analyse the associations of organisms with site groups, providing a characterization of ecological preference, but its application in soil ecology remains rare. Based on a single field experiment, this study assessed the applicability of phi coefficient in indicating the habitat preferences of soil fauna, through comparing phi coefficient-induced results with those of ordination methods in charactering soil fauna-habitat(factors relationships. Eight different habitats of soil fauna were implemented by reciprocal transfer of defaunated soil cores between two types of subtropical forests. Canonical correlation analysis (CCorA showed that ecological patterns of fauna-habitat relationships and inter-fauna taxa relationships expressed, respectively, by phi coefficients and predicted abundances calculated from partial redundancy analysis (RDA, were extremely similar, and a highly significant relationship between the two datasets was observed (Pillai's trace statistic = 1.998, P = 0.007. In addition, highly positive correlations between phi coefficients and predicted abundances for Acari, Collembola, Nematode and Hemiptera were observed using linear regression analysis. Quantitative relationships between habitat preferences and soil chemical variables were also obtained by linear regression, which were analogous to the results displayed in a partial RDA biplot. Our results suggest that phi coefficient could be applicable on a local scale in evaluating habitat preferences of soil fauna at coarse taxonomic levels, and that the phi coefficient-induced information, such as ecological preferences and the associated quantitative relationships with habitat factors, will be largely complementary to the results of ordination methods. The application of phi coefficient in soil ecology may extend our knowledge about habitat preferences

  8. Evaluating the Applicability of Phi Coefficient in Indicating Habitat Preferences of Forest Soil Fauna Based on a Single Field Study in Subtropical China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yang; Wang, Silong; Yan, Shaokui

    2016-01-01

    Phi coefficient directly depends on the frequencies of occurrence of organisms and has been widely used in vegetation ecology to analyse the associations of organisms with site groups, providing a characterization of ecological preference, but its application in soil ecology remains rare. Based on a single field experiment, this study assessed the applicability of phi coefficient in indicating the habitat preferences of soil fauna, through comparing phi coefficient-induced results with those of ordination methods in charactering soil fauna-habitat(factors) relationships. Eight different habitats of soil fauna were implemented by reciprocal transfer of defaunated soil cores between two types of subtropical forests. Canonical correlation analysis (CCorA) showed that ecological patterns of fauna-habitat relationships and inter-fauna taxa relationships expressed, respectively, by phi coefficients and predicted abundances calculated from partial redundancy analysis (RDA), were extremely similar, and a highly significant relationship between the two datasets was observed (Pillai's trace statistic = 1.998, P = 0.007). In addition, highly positive correlations between phi coefficients and predicted abundances for Acari, Collembola, Nematode and Hemiptera were observed using linear regression analysis. Quantitative relationships between habitat preferences and soil chemical variables were also obtained by linear regression, which were analogous to the results displayed in a partial RDA biplot. Our results suggest that phi coefficient could be applicable on a local scale in evaluating habitat preferences of soil fauna at coarse taxonomic levels, and that the phi coefficient-induced information, such as ecological preferences and the associated quantitative relationships with habitat factors, will be largely complementary to the results of ordination methods. The application of phi coefficient in soil ecology may extend our knowledge about habitat preferences and distribution

  9. Brachiaria species affecting soil nitrification

    OpenAIRE

    Adalton Mazetti Fernandes; Gabriel José Massoni de Andrade; Emerson de Freitas Cordova de Souza; Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification can lead to substantial losses of the applied N through nitrate leaching and N2O emission. The regulation of nitrification may be a strategy to improve fertilizer N recovery and increase its agronomic efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibiting capacity of nitrification in soil by Brachiaria species. The greenhouse experiment was conducted using pots with 10 dm³ of a Red Latosol sample. The treatments consisted of the cultivation of three forage specie...

  10. Effects of Mangrove Zonation and the Physicochemical Parameters of Soil on the Distribution of Macrobenthic Fauna in Kadolkele Mangrove Forest, a Tropical Mangrove Forest in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Navodha Dissanayake; Upali Chandrasekara

    2014-01-01

    The ecology of the macrobenthic fauna of the mangrove forests has received little attention compared to the mangrove flora. The present study was aimed at filling this information gap and investigated if the diversity and distribution of macrobenthic fauna at Kadolkele mangrove forest, a pristine mangrove forest situated at the Negombo estuary in Sri Lanka, are governed by the mangrove zonation and variation of physicochemical parameters of the mangrove soil. Since the aerial photographs iden...

  11. Dynamics and Relationships of Ca,Mg,Fe in Litter,Soil Fauna and Soil in Pinus koraiensis-Broadleaf Mixed Forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Bo; YIN Xiuqin; ZHANG Yu; DONG Weihua

    2008-01-01

    The Liangshui Natural Reserve in Heilongjiang Province of China was selected as the study area.The authors collected the samples of forest litter (Tilia amurensis,Fraxinus mandshurica,Pinus koraiensis,Acer mono,Betula costata,and mixed litter),soil in humus horizon (0-5cm) and soil horizon (5-20cm),and soil macrofauna (Oligochaeta,Geophiloporpha and Juliformia) from 2001 to 2002.The role of soil macrofauna in the material cycle was analyzed through comparing the macro-element contents among various parts of the subsystems and using enrichment index (EI).The results indicate that dynamic changes of various litters are very complicated.The contents of Fe in each kind of litter increase firstly,and then decrease in the study period.The changes of macro-element contents are greater in the broad-leaf litter than in the coniferous litter,and the mixed litter is in the middle level,but the differences among them are not significant.The contents of Mg and Fe in humus are higher than those in soil,but the contents of Ca in soil are higher than that in humus.The dynamic changes of macro-element contents in soil and soil fauna are not consistent with those in litter.The diplopod presented obvious enrichment of Ca and Mg (EI>1),but it does not significantly enrich Fe.Earthworm has a stronger enrichment ability of Fe than diplopod and scolopendra,but EI<1.Soil fauna can make great influences on the material cycle of the subsystems.

  12. Soil physical properties affecting soil erosion in tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total vegetated land area of the earth is about 11,500 hectare. Of this, about 12% is in South America. Of this, about 14% is degraded area. Water erosion, chemical degradation, wind erosion, and physical degradation have been reported as main types of degradation. In South America water erosion is a major process for soil degradation. Nevertheless, water erosion can be a consequence of degradation of the soil structure, especially the functional attributes of soil pores to transmit and retain water, and to facilitate root growth. Climate, soil and topographic characteristics determine runoff and erosion potential from agricultural lands. The main factors causing soil erosion can be divided into three groups: Energy factors: rainfall erosivity, runoff volume, wind strength, relief, slope angle, slope length; Protection factors: population density, plant cover, amenity value (pressure for use) and land management; and resistance factors: soil erodibility, infiltration capacity and soil management. The degree of soil erosion in a particular climatic zone, with particular soils, land use and socioeconomic conditions, will always result from a combination of the above mentioned factors. It is not easy to isolate a single factor. However, the soil physical properties that determine the soil erosion process, because the deterioration of soil physical properties is manifested through interrelated problems of surface sealing, crusting, soil compaction, poor drainage, impeded root growth, excessive runoff and accelerated erosion. When an unprotected soil surface is exposed to the direct impact of raindrops it can produce different responses: Production of smaller aggregates, dispersed particles, particles in suspension and translocation and deposition of particles. When this has occurred, the material is reorganized at the location into a surface seal. Aggregate breakdown under rainfall depends on soil strength and a certain threshold kinetic energy is needed to start

  13. 坡位对猕猴桃园土壤动物群落结构的影响%Community structure of soil fauna in kiwifruit plantation at different slope locations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖玖金; 黄晓丽; 卢昌泰; 郑家东; 张健; 杨万勤

    2013-01-01

    为了解坡位对猕猴桃园土壤动物群落结构的影响,采用手捡法和干湿漏斗法对四川省都江堰猕猴桃种植园土壤动物群落进行调查.结果显示:在猕猴桃园不同坡位共获土壤动物2 077只,分属13纲29目,坡上部以线虫纲和线蚓科为优势类群,坡中部以蜱螨目、线虫纲和线蚓科为优势类群,坡下部以弹尾目、蜱螨目和线虫纲为优势类群;除5~10 cm土层外,其余各层土壤动物剖面分布均以坡上部最大,坡中部次之,坡下部最小,其中,草本层和0~5 cm土层的干生土壤动物密度以坡上部高于坡中部和坡下部,5~10 cm和10~15 cm土层土壤动物密度均以坡上部显著高于坡中部和坡下部,0~5 cm和10~15 cm土层湿生土壤动物密度以坡上部显著高于坡中部和坡下部,5~10 cm土层则以坡中部显著高于坡上部和坡下部,且均有统计学意义(P<0.05);在各坡位中,腐食性和杂食性土壤动物为主要同功能群,其在坡上部、坡中部、坡下部的比例分别为68.72%、76.81%和81.1%;不同坡位土壤动物多样性指数(H')和均匀性指数(J)均表现为坡下部>坡中部>坡上部,即土壤动物多样性指标随着坡位的下降而逐渐上升,而优势度指数(C)表现为坡上部=坡中部>坡下部.表明不同坡位对猕猴桃园土壤动物群落多样性和分布产生了一定的影响.%Soil fauna is an important component of soil ecosystems,which plays a significant role in the decomposition of biological remains,soil properties and the enhancement of material recycling and energy conversion in soils.Slope locations are one of the important topographical factors in mountain environments,which play an important role in driving the reallocation of water and light,and have a significant effecton plant growth,soil moisture,microbes as well as soil fauna.However,how do the slope locations affect soil fauna community is still unknown.Hence,this study

  14. Community Structure of Soil Fauna in Kiwifruit Orchards in Spring%猕猴桃园春季土壤动物群落结构特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖玖金; 黄晓丽; 朱万强; 张健; 杨万勤

    2013-01-01

    为了解猕猴桃种植对春季土壤动物群落结构的影响,以混交林和农耕地为对照,采用手捡法和干湿漏斗法对猕猴桃园土壤动物群落结构进行调查和研究.结果显示:试验共采集土壤动物3 195头,平均密度为1.70×104头/m2,分属4门10纲24个类群.其中,猕猴桃园所采集到的土壤动物平均密度为0.98×104头/m2,共14个类群;混交林土壤动物平均密度为1.96×104头/m2,共18个类群;农耕地土壤动物平均密度为2.36×104头/m2,共17个类群.各样地大型、中小型土壤动物密度分别以混交林和农耕地最高,土壤动物个体数量的垂直分布具有表聚性.蜱螨目(A)与弹尾目(C)的比值(A/C)以猕猴桃园和混交林高于农耕地,表明猕猴桃园和混交林受到外界干扰的程度较农耕地轻.样地间土壤动物群落Morisita-Horn相似性系数较Sorenson相似性系数波动更大,说明样地间土壤动物群落各类群相对数量的影响较对其物种组成更大.Shannon-Wiener多样性指数(H')、Pielou均匀性指数(J)和密度-类群指数(DG)以混交林最高,猕猴桃园最低,而Simpson优势度指数(C)以猕猴桃园最高,混交林最低,表明混交林土壤动物群落结构较猕猴桃园具有更高的稳定性.%Soil fauna is an important component of soil ecosystems,which plays an important role in decomposing biological remains,affecting soil properties and enhancing material recycling and energy conversion in the soil.To understand the impacts of kiwifruit orchards on soil fauna is essential to achieve sustainable plantation management and conservation of biodiversity.Therefore,an investigation on soil fauna was carried out in kiwifruit orchards,mixed forest and cropland.Soil macro-fauna were picked up by hand.Nematodes and mesofauna were separated and collected from the soil samples by Baermann and Tullgren methods,respectively.A total of 3 195 individuals of soil fauna,belonging to 4 phyla,10 classes and 24

  15. Can soil drying affect the sorption of pesticides in soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplain, Véronique; Saint, Philippe; Mamy, Laure; Barriuso, Enrique

    2010-05-01

    The sorption of pesticides in soils mainly controls their further dispersion into the environment. Sorption is usually related to the physico-chemical properties of molecules but it also depends on the hydrophobic features of soils. However, the hydrophobicity of soils changes with wetting and drying cycles and this can be enhanced with climate change. The objective of this study was to measure by using controlled artificial soils the influence of the hydrophobic characteristic of soils on the retention of a model pesticide. Artificial soils consisted in silica particles covered by synthetic cationic polymers. Polymers were characterized by the molar ratio of monomers bearing an alkyl chain of 12C. Two polymers were used, with 20 and 80 % ratios, and the same degree of polymerization. In addition, porous and non-porous particles were used to study the accessibility notion and to measure the influence of diffusion on pesticide sorption kinetics. Lindane was chosen as model molecule because its adsorption is supposed mainly due to hydrophobic interactions. Results on polymers adsorption on silica showed that it was governed by electrostatic interactions, without any dependency of the hydrophobic ratio. Polymers covered the entire surface of porous particles. Kinetic measurements showed that lindane sorption was slowed in porous particles due to the molecular diffusion inside the microporosity. The adsorption of lindane on covered silica particles corresponded to a partition mechanism described by linear isotherms. The slope was determined by the hydrophobic ratio of polymers: the sorption of lindane was highest in the most hydrophobic artificial soil. As a result, modification in soil hydrophobicity, that can happen with climate change, might affect the sorption and the fate of pesticides. However additional experiments are needed to confirm these first results. Such artificial soils should be used as reference materials to compare the reactivity of pesticides, to

  16. Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil against the Lesser Mealworm (Alphitobius diaperinus and Its Possible Effect on the Soil Fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Volpato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro bioactivity of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil against larvae and adult forms of lesser mealworms (Alphitobius diaperinus and its influence on the soil fauna. Tests were performed in triplicate using pure tea tree oil (TTO; 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100%, TTO nanoparticles (1, 3, and 7.5%, or terpinen-4-ol, the main compound of the tea tree oil, at the same concentrations of TTO. Larvae and adult mortality occurred at concentrations up to 10 and 50% of TTO, respectively. No larvicidal or insecticidal effect of TTO nanoparticles was observed. Terpinen-4-ol showed insecticidal and larvicidal effect at concentrations higher than 25%. The evaluation of TTO effect on soil organisms was performed by standard ecotoxicological tests (ISO with the springtail species Folsomia candida. Only TTO was used for ecotoxicological tests in doses of 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg kg-1 of soil. TTO had no negative effects on F. candida survival or reproduction. Therefore, it was concluded that M. alternifolia oil may be a new alternative for control of the lesser mealworm.

  17. Fauna del suelo en bosques y cafetales de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia Soil fauna in forest and coffee plantations from the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camero R. Edgar

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available

    En la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta se establecieron dos estaciones de muestreo en las localidades de Minca a 700 m de altitud y María Teresa a 790 m, para realizar comparaciones de la fauna asociada a los suelos de plantaciones de café y de bosques naturales. Las colecciones se realizaron tanto en la hojarasca como en los horizontes  subsuperficiales O, Ay B de las dos coberturas vegetales mediante el empleo de trampas Pitfall y Berlesse y se utilizaron índices de diversidad, abundancia relativa y frecuencia para comparar su composici6n biológica, la cual se determine a nivel de familia. Los resultados mostraron diferencias significativas, tanto en la composición como en la abundancia y frecuencia de los grupos colectados en los dos tipos de ecosistemas, así Como variaciones altitudinales significativas al comparar los resultados obtenidos en los bosques nativos con trabajos hechos en zonas de mayor altitud en este sistema montañoso.

    Two research stations (Minca, 700 m altitude and Marfa Teresa, 790 m altitude were established in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in places to study the soil fauna associated with forest and coffee plantations. Soil fauna was collected using Pitfall and Berlesse traps. Samples were taken from litter as well as from horizons O, A and B. Individuals collected were identified to family level. Diversity, abundance and frequency indexes were used to compare fauna composition at both sites. Significant differences were found between the two research sites as well as with data from other high altitude forest in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta.

  18. Evaluating the Applicability of Phi Coefficient in Indicating Habitat Preferences of Forest Soil Fauna Based on a Single Field Study in Subtropical China

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yang; Wang, Silong; Yan, Shaokui

    2016-01-01

    Phi coefficient directly depends on the frequencies of occurrence of organisms and has been widely used in vegetation ecology to analyse the associations of organisms with site groups, providing a characterization of ecological preference, but its application in soil ecology remains rare. Based on a single field experiment, this study assessed the applicability of phi coefficient in indicating the habitat preferences of soil fauna, through comparing phi coefficient-induced results with those ...

  19. Earthworms and priming of soil organic matter - The impact of food sources, food preferences and fauna - microbiota interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Martin; Wichern, Florian; Dyckmans, Jens; Joergensen, Rainer Georg

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms deeply interact with the processes of soil organic matter turnover in soil. Stabilization of carbon by soil aggregation and in the humus fraction of SOM are well known processes related to earthworm activity and burrowing. However, recent research on priming effects showed inconsistent effects for the impact of earthworm activity. Endogeic earthworms can induce apparent as well as true positive priming effects. The main finding is almost always that earthworm increase the CO2 production from soil. The sources of this carbon release can vary and seem to depend on a complex interaction of quantity and quality of available carbon sources including added substrates like straw or other compounds, food preferences and feeding behavior of earthworms, and soil properties. Referring to recent studies on earthworm effects on soil carbon storage and release (mainly Eck et al. 2015 Priming effects of Aporrectodea caliginosa on young rhizodeposits and old soil organic matter following wheat straw addition, European Journal of Soil Biology 70:38-45; Zareitalabad et al. 2010 Decomposition of 15N-labelled maize leaves in soil affected by endogeic geophagous Aporrectodea caliginosa, Soil Biology and Biochemistry 42(2):276-282; and Potthoff et al. 2001 Short-term effects of earthworm activity and straw amendment on the microbial C and N turnover in a remoistened arable soil after summer drought, Soil Biology and Biochemistry 33(4):583-591) we summaries the knowledge on earthworms and priming and come up with a conceptual approach and further research needs.

  20. Soil Resources Area Affects Herbivore Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad M. Dacus

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil productivity effects nutritive quality of food plants, growth of humans and animals, and reproductive health of domestic animals. Game-range surveys sometimes poorly explained variations in wildlife populations, but classification of survey data by major soil types improved effectiveness. Our study evaluates possible health effects of lower condition and reproductive rates for wild populations of Odocoileus virginianus Zimmerman (white-tailed deer in some physiographic regions of Mississippi. We analyzed condition and reproductive data for 2400 female deer from the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks herd health evaluations from 1991–1998. We evaluated age, body mass (Mass, kidney mass, kidney fat mass, number of corpora lutea (CL and fetuses, as well as fetal ages. Region affected kidney fat index (KFI, which is a body condition index, and numbers of fetuses of adults (P ≤ 0.001. Region affected numbers of CL of adults (P ≤ 0.002. Mass and conception date (CD were affected (P ≤ 0.001 by region which interacted significantly with age for Mass (P ≤ 0.001 and CD (P < 0.04. Soil region appears to be a major factor influencing physical characteristics of female deer.

  1. Epigeal fauna of a degraded soil treated with mineral fertilizer and compound cellulose cultivated of tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giácomo, R. G.; de Arruda, O. G.; Souto Filho, S. N.; Alves, M. C.; Pereira, M. G.; Frigério, G. C.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of the epigeal fauna in a degraded soil in the recovery process after one year of cultivated with tree species. The experiment was established in February 2010 in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The experimental design was randomized blocks in split plots with five treatments and four replications. In the main plots, pure cultivation of Eucalyptus urograndis (exotic species - hybrids) and Mabea fistulifera Mart. (native species) and the subplot treatments: Control; D0 - without fertilization; DM - mineral fertilizer according to crop need; DC - with compost manure according to crop need (10 t ha-1); D15 - 15 t ha-1 and D20 - 20 t ha-1 of the compound. In February of the years 2010 and 2011 were installed in the central region of each treatment two traps "pitt fall" which remained for seven days in the field. We calculated Shannon diversity and Pielou evenness indices, and richness of wildlife activity groups. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Scott Knott test at 5% significance level. In 2010, the area with M. fistulifera, was captured a total of 2697 organisms distributed mainly in: Hymenoptera with 45.83% of the total collected, Collembola (36.93%), Hemiptera Heteroptera (6.56%). In the area with E. urograndis, 1938 organisms were captured, being 50.67% of the order Hymenoptera, Collembola 26.83%, 7.59% Hemiptera Heteroptera. It was found that there was no significant difference between treatments and between species for all variables. Collected in 2011 were 4970 organisms in 56.22% of the order Hymenoptera, Collembola 18.49% and 7.12% beetle in the area of M. fistulifera. In the area of E. urograndis were 4200 organisms, 55.29% (Hymenoptera), 23.79% (Collembola) and 5.86% (Coleoptera). It appears that the activity values and richness of the fauna groups were significantly higher in treatments with organic fertilization in both cultive. It is concluded that after one year there was a variation of the dominant

  2. Tillage system affects microbiological properties of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, A.; de Santiago, A.; Avilés, M.; Perea, F.

    2012-04-01

    Soil tillage significantly affects organic carbon accumulation, microbial biomass, and subsequently enzymatic activity in surface soil. Microbial activity in soil is a crucial parameter contributing to soil functioning, and thus a basic quality factor for soil. Since enzymes remain soil after excretion by living or disintegrating cells, shifts in their activities reflect long-term fluctuations in microbial biomass. In order to study the effects of no-till on biochemical and microbiological properties in comparison to conventional tillage in a representative soil from South Spain, an experiment was conducted since 1982 on the experimental farm of the Institute of Agriculture and Fisheries Research of Andalusia (IFAPA) in Carmona, SW Spain (37o24'07''N, 5o35'10''W). The soil at the experimental site was a very fine, montomorillonitic, thermic Chromic Haploxerert (Soil Survey Staff, 2010). A randomized complete block design involving three replications and the following two tillage treatments was performed: (i) Conventional tillage, which involved mouldboard plowing to a depth of 50 cm in the summer (once every three years), followed by field cultivation to a depth of 15 cm before sowing; crop residues being burnt, (ii) No tillage, which involved controlling weeds before sowing by spraying glyphosate and sowing directly into the crop residue from the previous year by using a planter with double-disk openers. For all tillage treatments, the crop rotation (annual crops) consisted of winter wheat, sunflower, and legumes (pea, chickpea, or faba bean, depending on the year), which were grown under rainfed conditions. Enzymatic activities (ß-glucosidase, dehydrogenase, aryl-sulphatase, acid phosphatase, and urease), soil microbial biomass by total viable cells number by acridine orange direct count, the density of cultivable groups of bacteria and fungi by dilution plating on semi-selective media, the physiological profiles of the microbial communities by BiologR, and the

  3. Distribution of Pill Millipedes (Arthrosphaera) and Associated Soil Fauna in the Western Ghats and West Coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. M. ASHWINI; K. R. SRIDHAR

    2008-01-01

    Seven sampling sites in each of three biomes (Western Ghats, foothills of Western Ghats and west coast) of south-western India were investigated to study the distribution, abundance and ecology of pill millipedes (Arthrosphaera) and associated fauna in relation to edaphic features. Abundance and biomass of Arthrosphaera and other millipedes were the highest in Western Ghats, while earthworms were in foothills. Arthrosphaera magna and Arthrosphaera spp. were common in Western Ghats and foothills respectively, while no Arthrosphaera were found in the west coast. None of the sampling sites consisted of more than one species of Arthrosphaera. Biomass of Arthrosphaera, other millipedes and earthworms significantly differed in Western Ghats (P = 9.48 × 10-7) and foothills (P = 1.35 × 10-8), as did the biomass of species of Arthrosphaera (P = 2.76 × 10-7) between Western Ghats and foothills. Correlation analysis revealed that biomass of Arthrosphaera was significantly (P = 0.01, r = 0.45) correlated with soil organic carbon rather than other edaphic fea-tures (pH, phosphate, calcium and magnesium). Distribution pattern, abundance, biomass and ecology of Arthrosphaera of Western Ghats in relation to soil qualities were compared with millipedes of other regions of the world.

  4. Caracterização da fauna edáfica em diferentes coberturas vegetais na região norte Fluminense Characterization of soil fauna in different vegetation covers in the northern Fluminense region (RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kellen da S. Moço

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O sistema solo-serapilheira é o habitat natural para grande variedade de organismos, que diferem em tamanho e metabolismo, responsáveis por inúmeras funções. O monitoramento dos grupos de fauna no sistema solo-serapilheira permite não só uma inferência sobre a funcionalidade destes organismos, mas também uma indicação simples da complexidade ecológica dessas comunidades. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo caracterizar a distribuição da fauna edáfica nos compartimentos solo e serapilheira em duas épocas do ano e em cinco diferentes coberturas vegetais (eucalipto, floresta não preservada, floresta preservada, capoeira, pasto no Norte Fluminense. As coberturas de floresta natural, especialmente das florestas preservadas e não preservadas, mostraram, de maneira geral, valores de densidade e riqueza de fauna superiores aos de eucalipto e pasto, tanto no solo quanto na serapilheira, nas duas épocas de coleta. Em geral, não houve preferência dos grupos de fauna pelos compartimentos solo e serapilheira. A densidade de fauna, riqueza de espécies, índice de Shannon e índice de Pielou também variaram conforme a época de coleta, sendo, no verão, estabelecidas maiores diferenças entre as diferentes coberturas vegetais estudadas do que no inverno. O índice de Pielou foi a variável mais estável e, portanto, mais apropriada para o estudo da dissimilaridade entre as coberturas vegetais em termos de distribuição dos grupos de fauna.The soil-litter system is a natural habitat for a great variety of organisms that differ in size and metabolism and are responsible for numerous functions. The study of groups of organism in the soil-litter system allows not only to make inferences on the functionality of these organisms, but also is a simple indication of the ecological complexity in these communities. Our study aimed at characterizing the distribution of groups of organism in soil and litter compartments in two seasons of the year

  5. An Open-source Low-cost Portable Apparatus for Soil Fauna Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliakopoulos, Ioannis; Wagner, Karl; Grillakis, Manolis; Apostolakis, Antonios; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    A low-cost apparatus for the extraction of living soil animals from soil or litter samples is presented. The main unit consists of a modular bank system with three horizontal shelves designed to accommodate lamps and soil samples over funnel and jar systems for animal collection, thus serving as a practical and standardized modification of the well-documented Berlese-Tullgren funnel. Shelves are vertically adjustable, sliding on 5 mm threaded rods and securing with wing nuts for easy assembly/disassembly and stability. Shelf material is 4 mm plywood (or similar), laser-cut (or similar) to accommodate lamp sockets, tubes and funnels at respective levels. Soil samples are inserted in 10 cm tubes from standard Ø50 mm PVC piping that can also function as direct collection corers for softer soils. Tubes are fitted in the tube bank shelf, each directly under a 25 W reflector lamp and over a funnel and jar system. Lamps are located 25 mm over the tubes' top creating a relatively constant 10 oC temperature gradient that drives soil animals away from heat and light, and towards the bottom end of the tube which is fitted with a suitable fabric mesh. Standard 106 ml panelled jars, filled with a safe-to-handle preservative (e.g. propylene glycol) to the lower end of the funnel fitted in them, trap and preserve soil organisms until identification. The apparatus offers flat-pack portability and scalability using low-cost standard material. Design specifications and Drawing eXchange Format (dxf) files for apparatus reproduction are provided.

  6. 铜尾矿复垦地与外围林地土壤动物群落结构%Community structures of soil fauna in reclaimed copper mine tailings and suburb forest land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱永恒; 张小会; 沈非; 陆林

    2012-01-01

    Soil fauna were very important for the ecological reconstruction of mine tailings. We investigated community characteristics of soil fauna at two sites, including reclamated copper-mine-tailings (RCMT) and suburb forest land of reclamated copper-mine-tailings (SFL) in Tongling City to test and illustrate the value of soil fauna for mitigating the impacts of heavy metal pollution. In the spring of 2011, we established four transects (150 m) at the two sites and collected soil samples of macro-, meso- and micro- soil fauna from four depths (0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm, 15-20 cm) at 13 30 cmx 30 cm sampling quadrats. Our results showed that at RCMT, the Acarina, Colletnbola and Nematoda were dominant groups; the Formicidae, Coleoptera larvae, Oligochaeta, Diptera larvae and Diplura were frequent groups; and the additional 16 groups were less commonly encountered. While at SFL the Collembola and Acarina were dominant groups and the Nematoda and Oligochaeta were frequent groups. Overall abundance of soil fauna at RCMT were significantly less than that of SFL (F=20.65, P<0.0l), and number of faunal groups were lower at RCMT (F=5.88, P<0.05). We did not find a significant difference between the density of macro-soil fauna at RCMT and SFL, but found that the density of meso- and micro- soil fauna at RCMT was significantly lower than that of SFL (F=29.99, P<0.01). The Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H) at RCMT was higher than that of SFL (F=24.06, P<0.01), but DG diversity index was lower at RCMT compared to SFL (F=4.75, P<0.05). There was evident surface aggregation of soil fauna at RCMT, especially in the differences between the first layer and the other layers of the soil profile (Find=17.80, Fgro=33.33, P<0.01). Redundancy analysis indicated that soil macro-, dry-type, wet-type meso- and micro-fauna at different habitats were differentially affected by various environmental factors. At reclaimed land with higher copper concentrations, we found a higher greater number of

  7. Biosolids applied to agricultural land: Influence on structural and functional endpoints of soil fauna on a short- and long-term scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coors, Anja; Edwards, Mark; Lorenz, Pascale; Römbke, Jörg; Schmelz, Rüdiger M; Topp, Edward; Waszak, Karolina; Wilkes, Graham; Lapen, David R

    2016-08-15

    Biosolids have well-documented crop and soil benefits similar to other sources of organic amendment, but there is environmental concern due to biosolids-associated pollutants. The present study investigated two field sites that had received biosolids at commercial-scale rates in parallel to associated field sections which were managed similarly but without receiving biosolids (controls). The investigated endpoints were abundance and diversity of soil organisms (nematodes, enchytraeids and earthworms) and soil fauna feeding activity as measured by the bait lamina assay. Repeated sampling of one of the field sites following the only biosolids application demonstrated an enrichment effect typical for organic amendments, which was mostly exhausted after 44months. After an initial suppression, the proportion of free-living plant-parasitic nematodes tended to increase in the biosolids-amended soil over time. Yet, none of the endpoints at this site indicated significant negative effects resulting from the biosolids until 44months post application. In contrast to the repeatedly tilled first field site, the second one was left fallow after three biosolids applications, and was sampled 96months post last application. It was only at this field site that potential evidence for a long-term impact of biosolids was detected with regard to two endpoints: earthworm abundance and structure of the nematode assemblage. Agricultural management and correlation with abiotic soil parameters explained the observed difference in earthworm abundance. Yet, the development of a highly structured and mature nematode assemblage at the control but not at the biosolids-amended section of this fallow field could not be explained by such correlations nor by soil metal concentrations. Overall, the present study found only weak evidence for negative long-term impacts of biosolids applied at commercial rates on soil fauna. High-level community parameters such as the nematode structure index (SI

  8. Soil microbes and fauna under Bt maize or an isogenic control, with and without additional insecticide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, B. S.; Birch, A. N. E.; Caul, S.;

    The experiment described is a component of the EU-funded project entitled 'Soil ecological and economic evaluation of genetically modified crops' (ECOGEN, www.ecogen.dk). The overall project has an emphasis on maize genetically modified to express the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin (Bt maize) and e...

  9. Fauna Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of fauna (animals), and environmental change derived from animal fossils. Parameter keywords describe what was measured in this data set. Additional summary...

  10. Relationship between Soil Fauna in Wetland and Wetland Restoration%湿地土壤动物及其与湿地恢复的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长海; 王希群; 王文强; 徐世才; 苑彩霞; 齐龙

    2014-01-01

    Soil animals, a crucial part of wetland ecosystems, play an important role in nutrient cycling and energy flow and are also an important driver of wetland ecosystem succession, the dynamic changes of soil fauna in wetland can be regarded as an important ecological indicator of wetland degradation and the recovery of response. Recently, due to the numerous single research on the community ecology of wetland soil animals, the research of wetland soil fauna and its environmental factors has made substantial progress. However, there are few reports about wetland soil animals and wetland degradation and recovery. This paper presents the mechanisms and advantages of soil fauna in wetland under wetland restoration process and indicates the research situation and progress of soil fauna in wetland. It shows that soil fauna in wetland is an important part of wetland ecosystem and biodiversity, and has become an important index of the wetland restoration. Through analyzing the relationship between soil fauna in wetland and wetland restoration, it is held that the dynamic change of soil fauna in wetland can reflect the changes of ecological functions in the process of degradation and restoration, so it can explore soil fauna’s response mechanism to wetland degradation and restoration. The research on wetland ecological indicating function is an essential issue needs resolving in the field of recovering ecology and wetland in the future, and it is also the key point of the change rules of soil fauna in the process of studying human interference and wetland recovery. In the future, further combination of the research of soil fauna and the whole wetland ecosystem is needed, namely, the combination of the ecology of wetland soil fauna under different intensity of interference and the quality of soil and the vegetation of wetland under different land use. From the angle of changes of soil fauna community structure, the research tries to illustrate the response mechanism of the

  11. Does introduced fauna influence soil erosion? A field and modelling assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, G R; Lowry, J B C; Dever, C; Braggins, M

    2015-06-15

    Pigs (Sus scrofa) are recognised as having significant ecological impacts in many areas of the world including northern Australia. The full consequences of the introduction of pigs are difficult to quantify as the impacts may only be detected over the long-term and there is a lack of quantitative information on the impacts of feral pigs globally. In this study the effect of feral pigs is quantified in an undisturbed catchment in the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia. Over a three-year period, field data showed that the areal extent of pig disturbance ranged from 0.3-3.3% of the survey area. The mass of material exhumed through these activities ranged from 4.3 t ha(-1) yr(-1) to 36.0 t ha(-1) yr(-1). The findings demonstrate that large introduced species such as feral pigs are disturbing large areas as well as exhuming considerable volumes of soil. A numerical landscape evolution and soil erosion model was used to assess the effect of this disturbance on catchment scale erosion rates. The modelling demonstrated that simulated pig disturbance in previously undisturbed areas produced lower erosion rates compared to those areas which had not been impacted by pigs. This is attributed to the pig disturbance increasing surface roughness and trapping sediment. This suggests that in this specific environment, disturbance by pigs does not enhance erosion. However, this conclusion is prefaced by two important caveats. First, the long term impact of soil disturbance is still very uncertain. Secondly, modelling results show a clear differentiation between those from an undisturbed environment and those from a post-mining landscape, in which pig disturbance may enhance erosion.

  12. Contribution of Soil Fauna to Foliar Litter-Mass Loss in Winter in an Ecotone between Dry Valley and Montane Forest in the Upper Reaches of the Minjiang River.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Peng

    Full Text Available Litter decomposition during winter can provide essential nutrients for plant growth in the subsequent growing season, which plays important role in preventing the expansion of dry areas and maintaining the stability of ecotone ecosystems. However, limited information is currently available on the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition during winter in such ecosystems. Therefore, a field experiment that included litterbags with two different mesh sizes (0.04 mm and 3 mm was conducted to investigate the contribution of soil fauna to the loss of foliar litter mass in winter from November 2013 to April 2014 along the upper reaches of the Minjiang River. Two litter types of the dominant species were selected in each ecosystem: cypress (Cupressus chengiana and oak (Quercus baronii in ecotone; cypress (Cupressus chengiana and clovershrub (Campylotropis macrocarpa in dry valley; and fir (Abies faxoniana and birch (Betula albosinensis in montane forest. Over one winter incubation, foliar litter lost 6.0%-16.1%, 11.4%-26.0%, and 6.4%-8.5% of initial mass in the ecotone, dry valley and montane forest, respectively. Soil fauna showed obvious contributions to the loss of foliar litter mass in all of the ecosystems. The highest contribution (48.5%-56.8% was observed in the ecotone, and the lowest contribution (0.4%-25.8% was observed in the montane forest. Compared with other winter periods, thawing period exhibited higher soil fauna contributions to litter mass loss in ecotone and dry valley, but both thawing period and freezing period displayed higher soil fauna contributions in montane forest. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the contribution of soil fauna was significantly correlated with temperature and soil moisture during the winter-long incubation. These results suggest that temperature might be the primary control factor in foliar litter decomposition, but more active soil fauna in the ecotone could contribute more in litter

  13. Effects of wood ash on the biologic diversity of the soil fauna. Final report; Effekter av vedaska paa biologisk maangfald hos markfaunan. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Tryggve; Ahlstroem, Kerstin; Lindberg, Niklas [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Vindeln (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    2005-06-01

    The aim was to assess long-term effects of wood-ash and lime application on the soil fauna diversity. The study was made at three sites, Oeringe and Torup in the county of Halland and Asa in the county of Smaaland, 20, 14 and 10 years after treatment, respectively. The soil fauna groups reported here are Enchytraeidae, Tardigrada and Oribatida. Different kinds of wood ash results in very different effects on soil pH despite similar dose. Non-hardened fresh ash increased pH as indicated by the liming potential (ca. 2 tonnes of CaCO{sub 3} correspond to 2,4 tonnes of loose ash). Hardened wood ash (at Asa) had a smaller effect on pH than corresponding amount of lime, and ca. 6 tonnes of ash/ha were needed to obtain the same effects as 3 tonnes of lime. Granulated wood ash (at Torup) had an even smaller effect on pH than the hardened ash at Asa. A preliminary estimate is that 6 tonnes/ha granulated ash correspond to 3 tonnes/ha of hardened ash, 1.5 tonnes/ha of non-hardened loose ash and 1 tonne/ha of CaCO{sub 3}. The results with regard to soil fauna show that individual numbers, species numbers and single species of Enchytraeidae and Oribatid mites are strongly dependent on the ash/lime effect on pH in the topsoil layer. Lime and ash appear to have similar effect on these animal groups provided that the pH effect is similar. Therefore, it is possible to extrapolate conclusions from liming trials to ash trials, provided that the pH effect is known. The Tardigrades did not seem to react on the treatments. We conclude that the effect of wood ash on the diversity of soil fauna investigated depends on the solubility of the wood ash and its effect on soil pH. Depending on the effect on pH, ash application results in (a) decreasing densities but increasing species numbers of enchytraeids, (b) decreasing densities but no change in species numbers of oribatid mites and (c) a strong change in the community structure of both enchytraeids and oribatid mites.

  14. Fauna Europaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pape, Thomas; Beuk, Paul; Pont, Adrian Charles;

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant multicellular European terrestrial and freshwater animals and their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (east of the Urals and excluding th...

  15. Outdoor Terrestrial Model Ecosystems are suitable to detect pesticide effects on soil fauna: design and method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz-Starke, B; Nikolakis, A; Leicher, T; Lechelt-Kunze, C; Heimbach, F; Theissen, B; Toschki, A; Ratte, H T; Schäffer, A; Ross-Nickoll, M

    2011-11-01

    Terrestrial Model Ecosystems (TME) were developed as one higher-tier option to detect and assess effects of pesticides on soil communities in a 1 year study using lindane (gamma-HCH) as a persistent and toxic reference pesticide. TME contained intact soil cores (diameter 300 mm, height 400 mm) including indigenous soil communities of undisturbed grassland. Forty units were placed outdoors between spring 2005 and 2006. The TME experiment was designed to provide data that fulfill the requirements of the revised European regulation on plant protection products (regulation 1107/2009/EEC replacing guideline 91/414/EC) with a focus on structural endpoints such as soil organisms and their community structure in case higher-tier evaluation is triggered. The key objective was to evaluate the dynamics and stability of species-diverse microarthropod communities of undisturbed grassland over at least 1 year after application. In grassland soils, less selection pressure towards insensitive species compared to arable land was presumed. Sufficient numbers of organisms and numerous TME replicates ensured that a statistical evaluation could be performed to estimate the sensitivity of the organisms upon application of lindane applied at high rates of 7.5 and 75 kg ai/ha. The application rates resulted in nominal concentrations of 10 and 100 mg ai/kg dry soil referred to the top 5 cm soil layer of 10 TME each; 20 untreated TME served as controls and were used to study the natural dynamics and the variability of populations under field conditions. Results showed that the grassland from which the soil cores were sampled contained communities of soil organisms marked by typical diversity of improved grassland. Lindane applied at excessive rates caused clear dose-related and long-lasting effects on the communities of microarthropods. On the contrary, lumbricids, the total feeding activity (bait lamina) and the growth of plant biomass were not affected up to 1 year after application

  16. Soil Aeration Variability as Affected by Reoxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.WOLI(N)SKA; Z.ST(E)PNIEWSKA

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between soil physical parameters during the recovery from anoxic stresses (reoxidation) is largely unrecognized.This study was conducted to characterise the soil aeration status and derive correlations between variable aeration factors during reoxidation.Surface layers (0-30 cm) of three soil types,Haplic Phaeozem,Mollic Gleysol,and Eutric Cambisol (FAO soil group),were selected for analysis.The moisture content was determined for a range of pF values (0,1.5,2.2,2.7,and 3.2),corresponding to the available water for microorganisms and plant roots.The variability of a number of soil aeration parameters,such as water potential (pF),air-filled porosity (Eg),oxygen diffusion rate (ODR),and redox potential (Eh),were investigated.These parameters were found to be interrelated in most cases.There were significant (P < 0.001) negative correlations of pF,Eg,and ODR with Eh.A decrease in water content as a consequence of soil reoxidation was manifested by an increase in the values of aeration factors in the soil environment.These results contributed to understanding of soil redox processes during recovery from flooding and might be useful for development of agricultural techniques aiming at soil reoxidation and soil fertility optimisation.

  17. How does soil management affect carbon losses from soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, A.; Trümper, G.

    2009-04-01

    Agricultural soils are a major source as well as a sink of organic carbon (OC). Amount and distribution of OC within the soil and within the landscape are driven by land management but also by erosion and deposition processes. At the other hand the type of soil management influences mineralization and atmospheric carbon dioxide losses by soil respiration. In a long-term field experiment the impacts of soil tillage systems on soil erosion processes were investigated. Following treatments were compared: 1) conventional tillage (CT), 2) conservation tillage with cover crop during the winter period (CS), and 3) no-till with cover crop during winter period (NT). The studies were carried out at three sites in the Eastern part of Austria with annual precipitation amounts from 650 to 900 mm. The soil texture ranged from silt loam to loam. Since 2007 soil CO2 emissions are measured with a portable soil respiration system in intervals of about one week, but also in relation to management events. Concurrent soil temperature and soil water content are measured and soil samples are taken for chemical and microbiological analyses. An overall 14-yr. average soil loss between 1.0 t.ha-1.yr-1 for NT and 6.1 t.ha-1.yr-1 for CT resulted in on-site OC losses from 18 to 79 kg ha-1.yr-1. The measurements of the carbon dioxide emissions from the different treatments indicate a high spatial variation even within one plot. Referred to CT plots calculated carbon losses amounted to 65-94% for NT plots while for the different RT plots they ranged between 84 and 128%. Nevertheless site specific considerations have to be taken into account. Preliminary results show that the adaptation of reduced or no-till management strategies has enormous potential in reducing organic carbon losses from agricultural used soils.

  18. Can transgenic maize affect soil microbial communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Christian; Wouterse, Marja; Raubuch, Markus; Roelofs, Willem; Rutgers, Michiel

    2006-09-29

    The aim of the experiment was to determine if temporal variations of belowground activity reflect the influence of the Cry1Ab protein from transgenic maize on soil bacteria and, hence, on a regulatory change of the microbial community (ability to metabolize sources belonging to different chemical guilds) and/or a change in numerical abundance of their cells. Litter placement is known for its strong influence on the soil decomposer communities. The effects of the addition of crop residues on respiration and catabolic activities of the bacterial community were examined in microcosm experiments. Four cultivars of Zea mays L. of two different isolines (each one including the conventional crop and its Bacillus thuringiensis cultivar) and one control of bulk soil were included in the experimental design. The growth models suggest a dichotomy between soils amended with either conventional or transgenic maize residues. The Cry1Ab protein appeared to influence the composition of the microbial community. The highly enhanced soil respiration observed during the first 72 h after the addition of Bt-maize residues can be interpreted as being related to the presence of the transgenic crop residues. This result was confirmed by agar plate counting, as the averages of the colony-forming units of soils in conventional treatments were about one-third of those treated with transgenic straw. Furthermore, the addition of Bt-maize appeared to induce increased microbial consumption of carbohydrates in BIOLOG EcoPlates. Three weeks after the addition of maize residues to the soils, no differences between the consumption rate of specific chemical guilds by bacteria in soils amended with transgenic maize and bacteria in soils amended with conventional maize were detectable. Reaped crop residues, comparable to post-harvest maize straw (a common practice in current agriculture), rapidly influence the soil bacterial cells at a functional level. Overall, these data support the existence of short

  19. Ruzigrass affecting soil-phosphorus availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Merlin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ruzigrass (Urochloaruziziensis in enhancing soil-P availability in areas fertilized with soluble or reactive rock phosphates. The area had been cropped for five years under no-till, in a system involving soybean, triticale/black-oat, and pearl millet. Previously to the five-year cultivation period, corrective phosphorus fertilization was applied once on soil surface, at 0.0 and 80 kg ha-1 P2O5, as triple superphosphate or Arad rock phosphate. After this five-year period, plots received the same corrective P fertilization as before and ruzigrass was introduced to the cropping system in the stead of the other cover crops. Soil samples were taken (0-10 cm after ruzigrass cultivation and subjected to soil-P fractionation. Soybean was grown thereafter without P application to seed furrow. Phosphorus availability in plots with ruzigrass was compared to the ones with spontaneous vegetation for two years. Ruzigrass cultivation increased inorganic (resin-extracted and organic (NaHCO3 soil P, as well as P concentration in soybean leaves, regardless of the P source. However, soybean yield did not increase significantly due to ruzigrass introduction to the cropping system. Soil-P availability did not differ between soluble and reactive P sources. Ruzigrass increases soil-P availability, especially where corrective P fertilization is performed.

  20. Soil warming affects soil organic matter chemistry of all density fractions of a mountain forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wanek, Wolfgang; Borken, Werner; Schindlbacher, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Rising temperatures enhance microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and increase thereby the soil CO2 efflux. Elevated microbial activity might differently affect distinct SOM pools, depending on their stability and accessibility. Soil fractions derived from density fractionation have been suggested to represent SOM pools with different turnover times and stability against microbial decomposition. We here investigated the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk soil and three different density fractions of forest soils from a long term warming experiment in the Austrian Alps. At the time of sampling the soils in this experiment had been warmed during the snow-free period for 8 consecutive years. During that time no thermal adaptation of the microbial community could be identified and CO2 release from the soil continued to be elevated by the warming treatment. Our results which included organic C content, total N content, δ13C, δ 14C, δ 15N and the chemical composition, identified by pyrolysis-GC/MS, showed no significant differences in bulk soil between warming treatment and control. The differences in the three individual fractions (free particulate organic matter, occluded particulate organic matter and mineral associated organic matter) were mostly small and the direction of warming induced change was variable with fraction and sampling depth. We did however find statistically significant effects of warming in all density fractions from 0-10 cm depth, 10-20 cm depth or both. Our results also including significant changes in the supposedly more stable mineral associated organic matter fraction where δ 13C values decreased at both sampling depths and the relative proportion of N-bearing compounds decreased at a sampling depth of 10-20 cm. All the observed changes can be attributed to an interplay of enhanced microbial decomposition of SOM and increased root litter input. This study suggests that soil warming destabilizes all density fractions of

  1. Salt-affected soils of Russia: Solved and unsolved problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, E. I.

    2015-02-01

    Data on salt-affected soils of Russia are analyzed. Three major problems of current research are outlined: (1) adequate diagnosis of soil salinization, (2) mapping and assessment of the areas of salt-affected soils, and (3) monitoring of the state of soil salinization. On the basis of recent publications, priority tasks and challenges for further research in this field are discussed. First, the notion of salt-affected soils should be specified with due respect for the diagnostic criteria of soil salinization. Second, in the assessment of these soils, not only the degree of salinization but also the chemistry of salts and the depth of the upper salt-bearing horizon should be taken into account. Third, to calculate the areas of salt-affected soils and to perform their monitoring, satellite images meeting specified requirements should be used. These requirements depend on the land use and cultivated crops. Modern technologies of the interpretation of satellite images should be applied for these purposes. Recent studies devoted to the monitoring of the salt status of irrigated and virgin soils of arid regions are discussed.

  2. Soil water repellency affects production and transport of CO2 and CH4 in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be vital in controlling both the production and transport of C gases in soil. Water availability regulates the decomposition rates of soil organic matter by the microorganisms, while the proportion of water/air filled pores controls the transport of gases within the soil and at the soil-atmosphere interface. Many experimental studies and process models looking at soil C gas fluxes assume that soil water is uniformly distributed and soil is easily wettable. Most soils, however, exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity) and do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist. They have restricted infiltration and conductivity of water, which also results in extremely heterogeneous soil water distribution. This is a world-wide occurring phenomenon which is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. This study investigates the effect of soil water repellency on microbial respiration, CO2 transport within the soil and C gas fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere. The results from the field monitoring and laboratory experiments show that soil water repellency results in non-uniform water distribution in the soil which affects the CO2 and CH4 gas fluxes. The main conclusion from the study is that water repellency not only affects the water relations in the soil, but has also a great impact on greenhouse gas production and transport and therefore should be included as an important parameter during the sites monitoring and modelling of gas fluxes.

  3. 烘虫温度和时间对中小型土壤动物烘虫分离效果的影响%Baking Temperature and Time on the Effect of Soil Meso-and Micro-fauna Separation Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    铁烈华; 张林成; 冯茂松; 白文玉; 王玲; 何沛

    2015-01-01

    and 32 ℃ respectively,and the baking temperature of shallow soil had been better to control at 36℃,in order to getting the better separation results.The process of baking soil meso-and micro-fauna could be completed within 18 h at exactly the right temperature,and that was mainly fo-cused on the first 13 h,and 4 h latter,after beginning baking,the separation effects still re-mained high.Generally,variation of separation effect with baking temperature is a single pak curve,the baking temperature is too low or too high will affect the separation effect.When bak- ing temperature bellowed 35 ℃,the different of separation effect is also obvious.[Conclusion]The variation of separation effect with baking temperature generally showed a single peak curve, and the differences were significant,so it will affect the separation effects while the temperature is too low or too high.When baking temperature bellowed 35 ℃,the different of separation effect was also obvious.Baking separation effects have nothing to do with stand structure,but it relates to the depth of soil.There is no direct relationship between length of baking time and stand struc-ture and the soil fauna's abundance on per unit area.But there is a relationship between the sepa-ration effects of dry soil fauna baking and soil animals categories.When the separation results of deep dry and wet soil meso-and micro-fauna are best,the temperature are 34 ℃ and 32 ℃.But the shallow soil is best to control the baking temperature at 36 ℃,in order to getting the better separation results.The process of baking soil meso-and micro-fauna can be completed in 18 h,and it is mainly concentrated at front 13 h.

  4. Flora and Fauna in Roundup Tolerant Fodder Beet Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, N.; Pedersen, Marianne Bruus

    three times. The results are reported at http://www.sns.dk/natur/bioteknologi/ roundup_art.htm. In 2000, six different fields were visited but only once (in June), in order to examine flora and fauna in field cultivated on different soil types, under different weather conditions and under different....... Thus, the conservation potential in RR-beets can be improved if dosage is reduced. At the studied sites there was a scope for dosage reduction without yield loss. Use of insecticides in fields with delayed weed control will counteract the benefits to the fauna from the herbicide regime. In the present...... study insecticide was only used as seed dressing. A dense and diverse weed flora is believed to benefit the fauna in several ways. Firstly, occurrence and density of the host affect herbivorous insect species thriving on specific weed species. Secondly, the microclimate and habitat structure of weedy...

  5. Structural relationships among vegetation, soil fauna and humus form in a subalpine forest ecosystem: a Hierarchical Multiple Factor Analysis (HMFA)

    OpenAIRE

    Bernier, Nicolas; F. Gillet

    2012-01-01

    Aboveground vegetation, four belowground fauna groups and humus composition have been analyzed in order to investigate the links between autotrophic and heterotrophic communities in a Norway-spruce mountain forest in Tours-en-Savoie (France). The aboveground plant community was recorded in small patches corresponding to contrasting microhabitats. Animal communities and humus layers were sampled within the same patches. The relationships between humus profile, faunistic and floristic compositi...

  6. Characteristics of Salt Affected Soil and Its Amelioration by Trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Salt-affected soils extensively distribute on the earth.Although the causes are various,generally speaking salinization occurrence results from the accumulation of free salts to an extent that causes degradation of vegetation and soils.Besides,irrational human practices have increased soil salinity by allowing excess recharging of groundwater to change the natural balance of the water cycle in the landscape. This reduces the suitability to plant growth and increases the potential for other forms of land ...

  7. Factors Affecting Sensitivity of Variable Charge Soils to Acid Rain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJING-HUA

    1995-01-01

    The sensitivity of a large number of variable charge soils to acid rain was evaluated through examining pH-H2SO4 input curves.Two derivative parameters,the consumption of hydrogen ions by the soil and the acidtolerant limit as defined as the quantity of sulfuric acid required to bring the soil to pH 3.5 in a 0.001mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 solution,were used.The sensitivity of variable charge soils was higher than that of constant charge soils,due to the predominance of kaolinite in clay mineralogical composition.Among these soils the sensitivity was generally of the order lateritic red soil>red soil> latosol.For a given type of soil within the same region the sensitivity was affected by parent material,due to differences in clay minerals and texture.The sensitivity of surface soil may be lower or higher than that of subsiol,depending on whether organic matter or texture plays the dominant role in determining the buffering capacity.Paddy soils consumed more acid within lower range of acid input when compared with upland soils,due to the presence of more exchangeable bases,but consumed less acid within higher acid input range,caused by the decrease in clay content.

  8. Climate change affects carbon allocation to the soil in shrublands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorissen, A.; Tietema, A.; Joosten, N.N.;

    2004-01-01

    than or equal to 0.10. Drought clearly reduced carbon flow from the roots to the soil compartments. The fraction of the C-14 fixed by the plants and allocated into the soluble carbon fraction in the soil and to soil microbial biomass in Denmark and the UK decreased by more than 60%. The effects...... of warming were not significant, but, as with the drought treatment, a negative effect on carbon allocation to soil microbial biomass was found. The changes in carbon allocation to soil microbial biomass at the northern sites in this study indicate that soil microbial biomass is a sensitive, early indicator...... may affect the supply of carbon and energy to the soil microbial population and subsequently alter decomposition and mineralization, important ecosystem processes in carbon and nutrient cycling. In this study, carried out within the cross-European research project CLIMOOR, the effect of climate change...

  9. Reduced soil wettability can affect greenhouse gas fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be an important factor affecting the carbon (C) dynamics in soils including decomposition of organic matter and exchange of gases like CO2 and CH4 between the soil and the atmosphere. Most studies and process models looking at the soil C dynamics assume, however, that soils are easily wettable and water is relatively uniformly distributed within the soil pores. Most soils, however, do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist, but instead exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity), which can restrict infiltration and conductivity of water for weeks or months. This is world-wide occurring phenomenon which affects all soil textural types but is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. Soil water repellency is most profound during drier seasons, when the soil moisture content is relatively low. Although prolonged contact with water can gradually decrease water repellency, some soils do not recover to being completely wettable even after very wet winter months or substantial rainfall events. It has been recognized that with the predicted climatic changes the phenomenon of soil water repellency will become even more pronounced and severe, additionally it may occur in the areas and climatic zones where the effect have not been currently recognized. One of the main implications of soil water repellency is restricted water infiltration and reduced conductivity, which results in reduced soil water availability for plants and soil biota, even after prolonged periods of rainfall. As the process of C mineralization and consequently CO2 efflux from soil is driven by the accessibility of organic matter to decomposing organisms, which in turn is directly dependent on (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature it is, therefore hypothesised that carbon decomposition and CO2 efflux in water repellent soils will also be affected when soil in the water repellent state. The CO2

  10. Factors Affecting Diffusion of Ions in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LICHENG-BAO; YANGDING-QING

    1993-01-01

    In this work the diffusion coefficients of Na+,K+,Ca2+,NO3- and Cl- ions were estimated in terms of measuring apparent direct current (DC) conductivities of latosol,red soil and yellow-brown earth containing,respectively,NaNO3,NCl,and CaCl2 of different concentrations (0.005,0.05,0.10,and 0.15 mol/L) in the case of moisture contents ranging from wet to water saturation.The results showed that when bulk density,moisture content,and electrolyte concentration were constant,the diffusion coefficients of cations were in the order Na+>K+>Ca2+ except for Na+ and K+ in latosol,while the order for anions was NO3->Cl-.The diffusion coefficients (Di) of cations and anions were linearly proportional to volumetric moisture content (θ) as electrolyte concentration and bulk density were unchanged.When moisture content and bulk density were constant,the diffusion coefficients of cations decreased,to varying extents,with the increase of electrolyte concentration,and the decrement in different soils followed the order yellow-brown earth> red soil> latosol,but the decrement order of different cations was Na+>K+>Ca2+.

  11. Burning management in the tallgrass prairie affects root decomposition, soil food web structure and carbon flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, E. A.; Denef, K.; Milano de Tomasel, C.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Wall, D. H.

    2015-09-01

    Root litter decomposition is a major component of carbon (C) cycling in grasslands, where it provides energy and nutrients for soil microbes and fauna. This is especially important in grasslands where fire is a common management practice and removes aboveground litter accumulation. In this study, we investigated whether fire affects root decomposition and C flow through the belowground food web. In a greenhouse experiment, we applied 13C-enriched big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) root litter to intact tallgrass prairie soil cores collected from annually burned (AB) and infrequently burned (IB) treatments at the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Incorporation of 13C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids and nematode trophic groups was measured on six occasions during a 180-day decomposition study to determine how C was translocated through the soil food web. Results showed significantly different soil communities between treatments and higher microbial abundance for IB. Root decomposition occurred rapidly and was significantly greater for AB. Microbes and their nematode consumers immediately assimilated root litter C in both treatments. Root litter C was preferentially incorporated in a few groups of microbes and nematodes, but depended on burn treatment: fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungivore nematodes for AB and only omnivore nematodes for IB. The overall microbial pool of root litter-derived C significantly increased over time but was not significantly different between burn treatments. The nematode pool of root litter-derived C also significantly increased over time, and was significantly higher for the AB treatment at 35 and 90 days after litter addition. In conclusion, the C flow from root litter to microbes to nematodes is not only measurable, but significant, indicating that higher nematode trophic levels are critical components of C flow during root decomposition which, in turn, is significantly

  12. Fractionation of Heavy Metals in Soils as Affected by Soil Types and Metal Load Quantity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two series of soil subsamples, by spiking copper (Cu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) in anorthogonal design, were prepared using red soil and brown soil, respectively. The results indicated that heavymetal fractions in these soil subsamples depended not only on soil types, but also on metal loading quantityas well as on interactions among metals in soil. Lead and Cu in red soil appeared mostly in weakly specificallyadsorbed (WSA), Fe and Mn oxides bound (OX), and residual (RES) fractions. Zinc existed in all fractionsexcept organic bound one, and Cd was major in water soluble plus exchangeable (SE) one. Different fromthe results of red soil, Pb and Cu was present in brown soil in all fractions except organic one, but over 75%of Zn and 90% of Cd existed only in SE fraction. Meanwhile, SE fraction for any metal in red soil was lowerthan that in brown soil and WSA and OX fractions were higher. It is in agreement with low cation exchangecapacity and large amounts of metal oxides included in red soil. Metal fractions in soil, especially for watersoluble plus exchangeable one, were obviously influenced by other coexisting metals. The SE fraction ofheavy metals increased with increasing loading amounts of metals in red soil but not obviously in brown soil,which suggest that metal availability be easily affected by their total amounts spiked in red soil. In addition,more metals in red soil were extracted with 0.20 mol L-1 NH4Cl (pH 5.40) than that with 1.0 mol L-1Mg(NO3)2 (pH 7.0), but the reverse happened in brown soil, implicating significantly different mechanismsof metal desorption from red soil and brown soil.

  13. Physical properties of magnesium affected soils in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium has some capacity to develop higher exchangeable sodium levels in clays and soil materials. The Mg+2 accumulation on the exchange complex of soils to a very high saturation levels affect their physical, chemical and biological properties. Colombia has a large area of these soils, located mainly in the main rivers valleys and in the Caribbean Region. In the Cauca River Valley there are about 117,000 hectares affected. There is a lack of information about the soil forming processes, the Mg+2 effects on soils, the type and source of compounds responsible for the magnesium enrichment, their relationship with the landscape and the way this accumulation occurs. To identify and quantify soil Mg+2 enriched areas over 2500 soil profiles from different landscape positions of the Cauca River Valley were studied. The information was processed to generate Mg-saturation maps, to identify the different soil profile types and to estimate the affected area. A topographic sequence from the alluvial inundation plain to the hills was used to explore the presence of diagnostic horizons and to determine the main soil characteristics and genetic, mineralogical or chemical evidences of soil forming processes. Two 180 kilometer transects parallel to the river were used to: a) study the type and source of Mg-compounds responsible for the Mg-enrichment and the way this accumulation occurs. b) the soil hydraulic properties like infiltration, saturated hydraulic conductivity and matrix potential at different depths were also measured. Samples of nine profiles were collected and the porosity and soil volume changes at different water content were examined. The program RETC was used for prediction of the hydraulic properties of non saturated soils. These properties involved the retention curve, the function of hydraulic conductivity and the diffusivity of the water in the soil. By grouping together the soil profiles, five main type of Mg-affected soils were identified as being

  14. Genetic by environment interactions affect plant–soil linkages

    OpenAIRE

    Pregitzer, Clara C; Joseph K Bailey; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of plant intraspecific variation in plant–soil linkages is poorly understood, especially in the context of natural environmental variation, but has important implications in evolutionary ecology. We utilized three 18- to 21-year-old common gardens across an elevational gradient, planted with replicates of five Populus angustifolia genotypes each, to address the hypothesis that tree genotype (G), environment (E), and G × E interactions would affect soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics be...

  15. Bacterial Communities in Malagasy Soils with Differing Levels of Disturbance Affecting Botanical Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Blasiak, Leah C.; Schmidt, Alex W.; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Wendy L Applequist; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P.; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communitie...

  16. Fire affects root decomposition, soil food web structure, and carbon flow in tallgrass prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, E. Ashley; Denef, Karolien; Milano de Tomasel, Cecilia; Cotrufo, M. Francesca; Wall, Diana H.

    2016-05-01

    Root litter decomposition is a major component of carbon (C) cycling in grasslands, where it provides energy and nutrients for soil microbes and fauna. This is especially important in grasslands where fire is common and removes aboveground litter accumulation. In this study, we investigated whether fire affects root decomposition and C flow through the belowground food web. In a greenhouse experiment, we applied 13C-enriched big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) root litter to intact tallgrass prairie soil cores collected from annually burned (AB) and infrequently burned (IB) treatments at the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Incorporation of 13C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids and nematode trophic groups was measured on six occasions during a 180-day decomposition study to determine how C was translocated through the soil food web. Results showed significantly different soil communities between treatments and higher microbial abundance for IB. Root decomposition occurred rapidly and was significantly greater for AB. Microbes and their nematode consumers immediately assimilated root litter C in both treatments. Root litter C was preferentially incorporated in a few groups of microbes and nematodes, but depended on burn treatment: fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungivore nematodes for AB and only omnivore nematodes for IB. The overall microbial pool of root-litter-derived C significantly increased over time but was not significantly different between burn treatments. The nematode pool of root-litter-derived C also significantly increased over time, and was significantly higher for the AB treatment at 35 and 90 days after litter addition. In conclusion, the C flow from root litter to microbes to nematodes is not only measurable but also significant, indicating that higher nematode trophic levels are critical components of C flow during root decomposition, which, in turn, is significantly affected by fire. Not

  17. Effects of sewage sludge addition to Norway spruce seedlings on nitrogen availability and soil fauna in clear-cut areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobically digested and composted sewage sludge (CSS) has been suggested to be a slow-release fertilizer in forestry and an alternative to quick-release inorganic fertilizers. The effects of CSS with or without added carbohydrate on inorganic nitrogen availability and on soil animals were tested in two Norway spruce plantations. Half of the seedlings were individually fertilized with CSS, and the rest were left as controls. Solid sucrose was added to half of the fertilized and untreated seedlings. Soil samples were taken in the autumn in the first and the second year after the treatments. CSS increased soil NH4–N (2100%), the proportion of soil NO3–N, and the N concentration of spruce needles. CSS greatly reduced the abundances of enchytraeids, tardigrades and collembolans, but increased the proportion and abundance of bacterial-feeding nematodes irrespective of carbohydrate addition. A better stabilization method needs to be developed before CSS can be used as a forest fertilizer. -- Highlights: •Spruces were fertilized with anaerobically digested and composted sewage sludge (CSS). •CSS increased soil N, proportion of NO3–N, and N concentration of spruce needles. •CSS reduced the abundances of enchytraeids, tardigrades and collembolans. •CSS increased the proportion and abundance of bacterial-feeding nematodes. •Sucrose did not reduce N pools or counteract negative CSS effects on soil animals. -- Composting and carbohydrate addition do not mitigate the harmful effects of anaerobically digested sewage sludge in boreal forest soil

  18. Pesticide interactions with soils affected by olive oil mill wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Yonatan; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda; Borisover, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    Soil pesticide sorption is well known to affect the fate of pesticides, their bioavailability and the potential to contaminate air and water. Soil - pesticide interactions may be strongly influenced by soil organic matter (SOM) and organic matter (OM)-rich soil amendments. One special OM source in soils is related to olive oil production residues that may include both solid and liquid wastes. In the Mediterranean area, the olive oil production is considered as an important field in the agricultural sector. Due to the significant rise in olive oil production, the amount of wastes is growing respectively. Olive oil mill waste water (OMWW) is the liquid byproduct in the so-called "three phase" technological process. Features of OMWW include the high content of fatty aliphatic components and polyphenols and their often-considered toxicity. One way of OMWW disposal is the land spreading, e.g., in olive orchards. The land application of OMWW (either controlled or not) is supposed to affect the multiple soil properties, including hydrophobicity and the potential of soils to interact with pesticides. Therefore, there is both basic and applied interest in elucidating the interactions between organic compounds and soils affected by OMWW. However, little is known about the impact of OMWW - soil interactions on sorption of organic compounds, and specifically, on sorption of agrochemicals. This paper reports an experimental study of sorption interactions of a series of organic compounds including widely used herbicides such as diuron and simazine, in a range of soils that were affected by OMWW (i) historically or (ii) in the controlled land disposal experiments. It is demonstrated that there is a distinct increase in apparent sorption of organic chemicals in soils affected by OMWW. In selected systems, this increase may be explained by increase in SOM content. However, the SOM quality places a role: the rise in organic compound - soil interactions may both exceed the SOM

  19. Composition and seasonal dynamics of soil fauna at jujube forest in Northern region of Shaanxi%陕北枣林土壤动物组成与季节动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长海; 骆有庆; 陈宗礼; 廉振民

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨枣林生态系统不同季节对土壤动物群落结构特征的影响,为枣林健康及其害虫生态调控提供基础资料.方法 选取延安万花山、延川县、清涧县、佳县4个样点7个样地,分别于2007年3,6,9,11月对陕北枣林土壤动物进行调查,通过手拣方法、干漏斗法和湿漏斗法采集和分离土壤动物.结果 获得4 029只土壤动物,属于22目;从枣林不同季节土壤动物群落多样性重要指标来分析,四季的交替对土壤动物群落组成、数量及多样性产生影响.结论 陕北枣林土壤动物群落多样性的四季变化为:秋季>夏季>春季>冬季.%Aim To study the impact of different seasons in jujube forest ecosystems in terms of composition and dynamics of soil fauna, and to provide basic data for jujube health and ecological regulation of pests. Methods The acquisition of macro-soil-fauna was mainly by hand-sorting. The dry funnel and wet funnel were separately used for separating and extracting meso-micro soil fauna, at 7 plots of 4 sample points, including Yan' an Wanhua Mountain, Yanchuan County, Qingjian County, Jia County, in March, June, September and November in 2007. Results 4 029 soil animals diversity have been identified, which belong to 22 orders. The analysis which is about diversity important indexes of soil fauna in different seasons of jujube forest shows that the succession of four seasons has influence on the composition, quantity and diversity of soil fauna community. Conclusion The seasonal change pattern of diversity of soil fauna groups of jujube forest in Northern area of Shaanxi is: autumn > summer > spring > winter.

  20. Effects of sewage sludge addition to Norway spruce seedlings on nitrogen availability and soil fauna in clear-cut areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Jouni K; Räisänen, Mikko

    2013-07-01

    Anaerobically digested and composted sewage sludge (CSS) has been suggested to be a slow-release fertilizer in forestry and an alternative to quick-release inorganic fertilizers. The effects of CSS with or without added carbohydrate on inorganic nitrogen availability and on soil animals were tested in two Norway spruce plantations. Half of the seedlings were individually fertilized with CSS, and the rest were left as controls. Solid sucrose was added to half of the fertilized and untreated seedlings. Soil samples were taken in the autumn in the first and the second year after the treatments. CSS increased soil NH4-N (2100%), the proportion of soil NO3-N, and the N concentration of spruce needles. CSS greatly reduced the abundances of enchytraeids, tardigrades and collembolans, but increased the proportion and abundance of bacterial-feeding nematodes irrespective of carbohydrate addition. A better stabilization method needs to be developed before CSS can be used as a forest fertilizer. PMID:23603467

  1. Spatial heterogeneity of soil biochar content affects soil quality and wheat growth and yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmo, Manuel; Lozano, Ana María; Barrón, Vidal; Villar, Rafael

    2016-08-15

    Biochar (BC) is a carbonaceous material obtained by pyrolysis of organic waste materials and has been proposed as a soil management strategy to mitigate global warming and to improve crop productivity. Once BC has been applied to the soil, its imperfect and incomplete mixing with soil during the first few years and the standard agronomic practices (i.e. tillage, sowing) may generate spatial heterogeneity of the BC content in the soil, which may have implications for soil properties and their effects on plant growth. We investigated how, after two agronomic seasons, the spatial heterogeneity of olive-tree prunings BC applied to a vertisol affected soil characteristics and wheat growth and yield. During the second agronomic season and just before wheat germination, we determined the BC content in the soil by an in-situ visual categorization based on the soil darkening, which was strongly correlated to the BC content of the soil and the soil brightness. We found a high spatial heterogeneity in the BC plots, which affected soil characteristics and wheat growth and yield. Patches with high BC content showed reduced soil compaction and increased soil moisture, pH, electrical conductivity, and nutrient availability (P, Ca, K, Mn, Fe, and Zn); consequently, wheat had greater tillering and higher relative growth rate and grain yield. However, if the spatial heterogeneity of the soil BC content had not been taken into account in the data analysis, most of the effects of BC on wheat growth would not have been detected. Our study reveals the importance of taking into account the spatial heterogeneity of the BC content. PMID:27110980

  2. The Stability of Unsaturated Soil Slope Affected by Rainfall Seeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shilin; Wang Guochen; Shao Longtan

    2007-01-01

    Because rainfall seeping makes losing stability of unsaturated soil slope, and arouses great loss to production and human being safety, the stability of unsaturated soil slope has been researched by many scholars recently. This article mainly uses the model for the prediction of shear strength with respect to soil suction, developed by Vanapalli and Fredlund to formulate rainfall seeping how to affect the stability of unsaturated soil slope. Firstly, volumetric water content of unsaturated soil slope changes with rainfall duration, and effective saturation changes with its volumetric water content. Secondly, soil volume weight changes with its volumetric water content. Thirdly, matric suction also changes with its volumetric water content. According to these causes, this article researches how much they make the contribution to the minimum safety coefficient respectively. At last, these factors roundly considered, this article gets the rule of minimum safety coefficient of unsaturated soil slope with rainfall duration that is minimum safety coefficient gradually increasing firstly, then decreasing that is composed of two sectors, first is slowly decreasing, then is fast decreasing after some value.

  3. 德阳市3种林草模式下土壤动物群落特征%The characteristics of soil fauna communities in three forest-grass patterns in Deyang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴韬; 冯茂松; 韩东苗; 李文兵; 铁烈华

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to study the composition and community structure of soil fauna in three types of forest-grass patterns (J uglans regia +Medicago sativa ,Cichorium intybus and Dactylis glomerata ), and a pure Juglans woodland was applied as a control group in Deyang,Sichuan Province.The results showed that,A total of 303 specimens of soil faunas was found in this study,which were belonged to 3 phylum,7 clas-ses and 17 orders.Of those,Nematoda,Hymenoptera and Acarina were the dominant groups.The soil fauna was found to gather on the surface of earth in three types of forest-grass pattern,while the order of soil fauna density was 5 — 10 cm > 10 — 15 cm > 0 — 5 cm.In addition,the diversity of Shannon-Wiener index and DG (Density-groups)index of soil fauna was the highest in the J .regia +M .sativa pattern while the lowest DG index in pure woodland that possessed the highest Pielou index;The J .regia +M .sativa pattern has a signifi-cant difference to the pure woodland pattern in individual number of soil fauna,but on the area of species of groups are similar to the pure woodland pattern,and it had a highest proportion of Saprozoic fauna in four pat-terns.In summary,the three forest-grass patterns can enrich the composition of soil fauna communities,and highest abundant soil fauna was observed in J .regia +M .sativa pattern.%为了解林草模式下土壤动物组成及群落结构特征,以核桃(J uglans regia )+紫花苜蓿(Medicago sativa )、核桃+菊苣(Cichorium intybus )及核桃+鸭茅(Dactylis glomerata )3种模式为研究对象,同时以纯核桃林模式作为对照进行土壤动物调查。结果表明,1)调查共获土壤动物303只,分属3门7纲17目,优势类群为线虫纲(Nematoda)、膜翅目(Hymenoptera)、蜱螨目(Acarina);2)林草模式下土壤动物表聚性明显,纯林模式下土壤动物个体密度土层分布表现为5—10 cm>10—15 cm>0—5 cm;3)核桃+苜蓿模式下 Shannon-Wiener 多样性指数

  4. Rheological Parameters as Affected by Water Tension in Subtropical Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pértile

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Rheological parameters have been used to study the interaction between particles and the structural strength of soils subjected to mechanical stresses, in which soil composition and water content most strongly affect soil resistance to deformation. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of water tension on rheological parameters of soils with different mineralogical, physical, and chemical composition. Surface and subsurface horizons of four Oxisols, two Ultisols, one Alfisol, and one Vertisol were physically and chemically characterized; their rheological parameters were obtained from amplitude sweep tests under oscillatory shear on disturbed soil samples that were saturated and subjected to water tension of 1, 3, 6, and 10 kPa. In these samples, the rheological parameters linear viscoelastic deformation limit (γL, maximum shear stress (τmax, and integral z were determined. By simple regression analysis of the rheological parameters as a function of soil water tension, we observed increased mechanical strength with increasing water tension up to at least 6 kPa, primarily due to increased capillary forces in the soil. However, increased elasticity assessed by γL was not as expressive as the increase in structural rigidity assessed by τmax and integral z. Elastic deformation of the soil (γL increases with the increase in the number of bonds among particles, which depend on the clay, total carbon, expansive clay mineral, and cation contents; however, maximum shear resistance (τmax and structural stiffness (integral z mainly increase with clay, kaolinite, and oxide content by increasing the strength of interparticle bonds. A decrease in mechanical strength occurs for water tension of 10 kPa (the lowest water content evaluated in sandy horizons or in horizons with a high proportion of resistant microaggregates (pseudosand, when associated with low bulk density, due to fewer points of contact between soil particles and therefore

  5. 银杏的复合经营对土壤动物多样性的影响%The effect of ginkgo agroforestry patterns on soil fauna diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张林杰; 汪贵斌; 曹福亮

    2015-01-01

    species abundance (S), diversity ( H), evenness ( J), similarity ( Q) and density⁃group ( IDG ), and the results showed that the diversity indexes of soil animals in five planting patterns had significant variation, and the dominant ani⁃mal groups were Collembola and Acarina. H, j and IDG indexes in G, GW and GR planting systems were higher than that in W and R systems, while Q index was lower. There was significant positive correlation between H and IDG indexs. Sea⁃son only affected diversity indexes of R pattern significantly. The Q index of G pattern was similar to GW and GR pat⁃terns, and it had significant variation with W and R patterns. So Ginkgo biloba agroforestry systems had significant effect on soil fauna communities, and interrcopping in Ginkgo biloba forest could protect the biodiversity of soil fauna.

  6. Prolonged Soil Frost Affects Hydraulics and Phenology of Apple Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beikircher, Barbara; Mittmann, Claudia; Mayr, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of an adequate water supply in spring is a prerequisite for survival of angiosperm trees in temperate regions. Trees must re-establish access to soil water and recover xylem functionality. We thus hypothesized that prolonged soil frost impairs recovery and affects hydraulics and phenology of Malus domestica var. 'Golden Delicious.' To test this hypothesis, over two consecutive winters the soil around some trees was insulated to prolong soil frosting, From mid-winter to early summer, the level of native embolism, the water and starch contents of wood, bark and buds were quantified at regular intervals and findings correlated with various phenological parameters, xylogenesis and fine root growth. The findings confirm that prolonged soil frost affects tree hydraulics and phenology but the severity of the effect depends on the climatic conditions. In both study years, percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC) decreased from about 70% at the end of winter to about 10% in May. Thereby, xylem refilling strongly coincided with a decrease of starch in wood and bark. Also treated trees were able to restore their hydraulic system by May but, in the warm spring of 2012, xylem refilling, the increases in water content and starch depolymerization were delayed. In contrast, in the cold spring of 2013 only small differences between control and treated trees were observed. Prolongation of soil frost also led to a delay in phenology, xylogenesis, and fine root growth. We conclude that reduced water uptake from frozen or cold soils impairs refilling and thus negatively impacts tree hydraulics and growth of apple trees in spring. Under unfavorable circumstances, this may cause severe winter damage or even dieback. PMID:27379146

  7. Use of Contour Maps of Water Depths to Predict Flora and Fauna Abundance in Moist Soil Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of this project was to develop a technique to quantitatively predict the area of moist soil that would be exposed as a result of a water drawdown of any...

  8. Xiphinema americanum as Affected by Soil Organic Matter and Porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchillia, P E

    1972-07-01

    The effects of four soil types, soil porosity, particle size, and organic matter were tested on survival and migration of Xiphinema americanum. Survival and migration were significantly greater in silt loam than in clay loam and silty clay soils. Nematode numbers were significantly greater in softs planted with soybeans than in fallow softs. Nematode survival was greatest at the higher of two pore space levels in four softs. Migration of X. americanum through soft particle size fractions of 75-150, 150-250, 250-500, 500-700, and 700-1,000 mu was significantly greater in the middle three fractions, with the least occurring in the smallest fraction. Additions of muck to silt loam and loamy sand soils resulted in reductions in survival and migration of the nematode. The fulvic acid fraction of muck, extracted with sodium hydroxide, had a deleterious effect on nematode activity. I conclude that soils with small amounts of air-filled pore space, extremes in pore size, or high organic matter content are deleterious to the migration and survival of X. americanum, and that a naturally occurring toxin affecting this species may be present in native soft organic matter.

  9. Effect of biosolid waste compost on soil respiration in salt-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Silvia; Gómez, Ignacio; García, Fuensanta; Navarro, José; Jordán, Manuel Miguel; Belén Almendro, María; Martín Soriano, José

    2013-04-01

    A great part of mediterranean soils are affected by salinization. This is an important problem in semiarid areas increased by the use of low quality waters, the induced salinization due to high phreatic levels and adverse climatology. Salinization affects 25% of irrigated agriculture, producing important losses on the crops. In this situation, the application of organic matter to the soil is one of the possible solutions to improve their quality. The main objective of this research was to asses the relation between the salinity level (electrical conductivity, EC) in the soil and the response of microbial activity (soil respiration rate) after compost addition. The study was conducted for a year. Soil samples were collected near to an agricultural area in Crevillente and Elche, "El Hondo" Natural Park (Comunidad de Regantes from San Felipe Neri). The experiment was developed to determine and quantify the soil respiration rate in 8 different soils differing in salinity. The assay was done in close pots -in greenhouse conditions- containing soil mixed with different doses of sewage sludge compost (2, 4 and 6%) besides the control. They were maintained at 60% of water holding capacity (WHC). Soil samples were analyzed every four months for a year. The equipment used to estimate the soil respiration was a Bac-Trac and CO2 emitted by the soil biota was measured and quantified by electrical impedance changes. It was observed that the respiration rate increases as the proportion of compost added to each sample increases as well. The EC was incremented in each sampling period from the beginning of the experiment, probably due to the fact that soils were in pots and lixiviation was prevented, so the salts couldńt be lost from soil. Over time the compost has been degraded and, it was more susceptible to be mineralized. Salts were accumulated in the soil. Also it was observed a decrease of microbial activity with the increase of salinity in the soil. Keywords: soil

  10. Copper phytoavailability and uptake by Elsholtzia splendens from contaminated soil as affected by soil amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong-Yun; Yang, Xiao-E; Jiang, Li-Ying; He, Zhen-Li

    2005-01-01

    Pot and field experiments were conducted to evaluate bioavailability of Cu in contaminated paddy soil (PS) and phytoremediation potential by Elsholtzia splendens as affected by soil amendments. The results from pot experiment showed that organic manure (M) applied to the PS not only remarkably raised the H2O exchangeable Cu, which were mainly due to the increased exchangeable and organic fractions of Cu in the PS by M, but also stimulated plant growth and Cu accumulation in E. splendens. At M application rate of 5.0%, shoot Cu concentration in the plant increased by four times grown on the PS, so as to the elevated shoot Cu accumulation by three times as compared to the control. In the field trial, soil amendments by M and furnace slag (F), and soil preparations like soil capping (S) and soil discing (D) were performed in the PS. Soil capping and discing considerably declined total Cu in the PS. Application of M solely or together with F enhanced plant growth and increased H2O exchangeable Cu levels in the soil. The increased extractability of Cu in the rhizosphere of E. splendens was noted, which may have mainly attributed to the rhizospheric acidification and chelation by dissolved organic matter (DOM), thus resulting in elevating Cu uptake and accumulation by E. splendens. Amendments with organic manure plus furnace slag (MF) to the PS caused the highest exactable Cu with saturated H2O in the rhizospheric soil of E. splendens after they were grown for 170 days in the PS, thus achieving 1.74 kg Cu ha(-1) removal from the contaminated soil by the whole plant of E. splendens at one season, which is higher than those of the other soil treatments. The results indicated that application of organic manure at a proper rate could enhance Cu bioavailability and increase effectiveness of Cu phytoextraction from the contaminated soil by the metal-tolerant and accumulating plant species (E. splendens). PMID:15792303

  11. Factors affecting potassium fixation in seven soils under 15-year long-term fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG HuiMin; XU MingGang; ZHANG WenJu; HE XinHua

    2009-01-01

    Potassium (K) fixation by seven soils, including black soil, fluvo-aquic soil, grey desert soil, loess soil, paddy soil, red soil and purple soil, was determined by laboratory simulation under a fifteen-year-pe-riod of long-term fertilization. Factors affecting soil K fixation were then discussed by factor analysis and stepwise regression. Magnitude of soil K fixation rate was as follows: the black soil > the purple soil > the loess soil > the fluvo-aquic soil > the paddy soil > the grey desert soil > the red soil. Our re-sulta showed that soil K fixation capacity was significantly affected by the clay mineral types in the soils. Potassium fixation capacity of soils, whose 2:1 layer silicates were dominant minerals, was af-fected by two components extracted by the method of principal component analysis: the first including soil available K, slow available K and K+ saturation, and the second including cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM) and <0.002 mm clay contents. Potassium fixation rate was mainly af-fected by K+ saturation and CEC with lower added K concentration (from 0.4 to 1.6 g/L), and by K+ saturation and <0.002 mm clay content with higher added K concentration (from 2.4 to 4.0 g/L).

  12. Fauna del suelo en bosques y cafetales de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia Soil fauna in forest and coffee plantations from the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Camero R. Edgar

    2002-01-01

    En la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta se establecieron dos estaciones de muestreo en las localidades de Minca a 700 m de altitud y María Teresa a 790 m, para realizar comparaciones de la fauna asociada a los suelos de plantaciones de café y de bosques naturales. Las colecciones se realizaron tanto en la hojarasca como en los horizontes  subsuperficiales O, Ay B de las dos coberturas vegetales mediante el empleo de trampas Pitfall y Berlesse y se utilizaron índices d...

  13. Thallium isotope variations in anthropogenically-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Ales; Chrastny, Vladislav; Penizek, Vit; Mihaljevic, Martin; Komarek, Michael; Cabala, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    Our preliminary data from soils impacted by long-term Tl deposition in the vicinity of a primary/secondary Zn smelter at Olkusz (Poland) indicate apparent variability of ɛ205Tl within soil profiles. The identified ɛ205Tl values presented for the forest soil profile reached -1.7 in the surface/organic horizon, +1.9 in the organo-mineral horizon (Ap), and +1.0 in the mineral horizon (C). This finding suggests both the enrichment of 203Tl isotope in the topsoil, as well as its preferential release during smelting operations, as "lighter" Tl tends to enter the emissions during a high-temperature process. The maximum ɛ205Tl value in the subsurface horizon Ap is in accordance with the concentration peak of oxalate-extractable Mn, indicating the presence of amorphous/poorly-crystalline Mn oxides with a potential to isotopically fractionate Tl toward the "heavier" fraction. The Tl isotope signature in the bottom horizon probably reflects the composition of a local geochemical anomaly of Tl. However, a portion of mobile (anthropogenic) Tl with negative ɛ205Tl moving downwards in the soil profile cannot be neglected. In general, there is no detailed information about the biogeochemical cycling and variations of Tl isotopes in areas affected by significant anthropogenic inputs of the metal (e.g., coal burning and primary metallurgy); the questions of the degree to which the factors such as soil (and sediment) chemistry, mineralogy, local biota, and pollution source control Tl isotope fractionation remain unresolved. Therefore, further research on the topic is needed before any principal conclusions will be made.

  14. Does the different mowing regime affect soil biological activity and floristic composition of thermophilous Pieniny meadow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefowska, Agnieszka; Zaleski, Tomasz; Zarzycki, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The study area was located in the Pieniny National Park in the Carpathian Mountain (Southern Poland). About 30% of Park's area is covered by meadows. The climax stage of this area is forest. Therefore extensive use is indispensable action to keep semi-natural grassland such as termophilous Pieniny meadows, which are characterized by a very high biodiversity. The purpose of this research was to answer the question, how the different way of mowing: traditional scything (H), and mechanical mowing (M) or abandonment of mowing (N) effect on the biological activity of soil. Soil biological activity has been expressed by microbial and soil fauna activity. Microbial activity was described directly by count of microorganisms and indirectly by enzymatic activity (dehydrogenase - DHA) and the microbial biomass carbon content (MBC). Enchytraeidae and Lumbricidae were chosen as representatives of soil fauna. Density and species diversity of this Oligochaeta was determined. Samples were collected twice in June (before mowing) and in September (after mowing). Basic soil properties, such as pH value, organic carbon and nitrogen content, moisture and temperature, were determined. Mean count of vegetative bacteria forms, fungi and Actinobacteria was higher in H than M and N. Amount of bacteria connected with nitrification and denitrification process and Clostridium pasteurianum was the highest in soil where mowing was discontinued 11 years ago. The microbial activity measured indirectly by MBC and DHA indicated that the M had the highest activity. The soil biological activity in second term of sampling had generally higher activity than soil collected in June. That was probably connected with highest organic carbon content in soil resulting from mowing and the end of growing season. Higher earthworm density was in mowing soil (220 and 208 individuals m‑2 in H and M respectively) compare to non-mowing one (77 ind. m‑2). The density of Enchytraeidae was inversely, the higher

  15. Macrofauna assemblage composition and soil moisture interact to affect soil ecosystem functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, E. J.; Riutta, T.; Slade, E. M.

    2013-02-01

    Changing climatic conditions and habitat fragmentation are predicted to alter the soil moisture conditions of temperate forests. It is not well understood how the soil macrofauna community will respond to changes in soil moisture, and how changes to species diversity and community composition may affect ecosystem functions, such as litter decomposition and soil fluxes. Moreover, few studies have considered the interactions between the abiotic and biotic factors that regulate soil processes. Here we attempt to disentangle the interactive effects of two of the main factors that regulate soil processes at small scales - moisture and macrofauna assemblage composition. The response of assemblages of three common temperate soil invertebrates (Glomeris marginata Villers, Porcellio scaber Latreille and Philoscia muscorum Scopoli) to two contrasting soil moisture levels was examined in a series of laboratory mesocosm experiments. The contribution of the invertebrates to the leaf litter mass loss of two common temperate tree species of contrasting litter quality (easily decomposing Fraxinus excelsior L. and recalcitrant Quercus robur L.) and to soil CO2 fluxes were measured. Both moisture conditions and litter type influenced the functioning of the invertebrate assemblages, which was greater in high moisture conditions compared with low moisture conditions and on good quality vs. recalcitrant litter. In high moisture conditions, all macrofauna assemblages functioned at equal rates, whereas in low moisture conditions there were pronounced differences in litter mass loss among the assemblages. This indicates that species identity and assemblage composition are more important when moisture is limited. We suggest that complementarity between macrofauna species may mitigate the reduced functioning of some species, highlighting the importance of maintaining macrofauna species richness.

  16. Soil Components Affecting Phosphate Sorption Parameters of Acid Paddy Soils in Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Soil components affecting phosphate sorption parameters were studied using acid paddy soils derived from basalt, granite, sand-shale and the Pearl River Delta sediments, respectively, in Guangdong Province.For each soil, seven 2.50 g subsamples were equilibrated with 50 mL 0.02 mol L-1 (pH=7.0) of KCl containing 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50 and 100 ng P kg-1, respectively, in order to derive P sorption parameters (P sorption maximum, P sorption intensity factor and maximum buffer capacity) by Langmuir isotherm equation. It was shown that the main soil components influencing phosphate sorption maximum (Xm) included soil clay, pH,amorphous iron oxide (Feo) and amorphous aluminum oxide (Alo), with their effects in the order of Alo >Feo > pH > clay. Among these components, pH had a negative effect, and the others had a positive effect.Organic matter (OM) was the only soil component influencing P sorption intensity factor (K). The main components influencing maximum phosphate buffer capacity (MBC) consisted of soil clay, OM, pH, Feo and Alo, with their effects in the order of Alo > OM > pH > Feo > clay. Path analysis indicated that among the components with positive effects on maximum phosphate buffer capacity (MBC), the effect was in the order of Alo > Feo > Clay, while among the components with negative effects, OM > pH. OM played an important role in mobilizing phosphate in acid paddy soils mainly through decreasing the sorption intensity of phosphate by soil particles.

  17. Do Land Characteristics Affect Farmers’ Soil Fertility Management?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Shu-hao

    2014-01-01

    Soil fertility management (SFM) has important implications for sustaining agricultural development and food self-sufifciency. Better understanding the determinants of farmers’ SFM can be a great help to the adoption of effective SFM practices. Based on a dataset of 315 plots collected from a typical rice growing area of South China, this study applied statistical method and econometric models to examine the impacts of land characteristics on farmers’ SFM practices at plot scale. Main results showed that in general land characteristics affected SFM behaviors. Securer land tenure arrangements facilitated effective practices of SFM through more diversiifed and more soil-friendly cropping pattern choices. Plot size signiifcantly reduced the intensities of phosphorus and potassium fertilizer application. Given other factors, 1 ha increase in plot size might reduce 3.0 kg ha-1 P2O5 and 1.8 kg ha-1 K2O. Plots far from the homestead were paid less attention in terms of both chemical fertilizers and manure applications. Besides, plots with better quality were put more efforts on management by applying more nitrogen and manure, and by planting green manure crops. Signiifcant differences existed in SFM practices between the surveyed villages with different socio-economic conditions. The ifndings are expected to provide important references to the policy-making incentive for improving soil quality and crop productivity.

  18. Pesticide soil contamination mainly affects earthworm male reproductive parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EduardoBustos-Obregon; RogerIzigaGoicochea

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To explore the effect of exposure to commercial Parathion(Pc)on the reproductive parameters(sperm and cocoon production and genotoxicity on male germ cells),the survival,the body weight and the gross anatomical changes in Eisenia foetida.Methods:Three doses of Pc(1478,739and 444mg/kg of soil)and three thme intervals of exposure(5,15and30days)were used.Results:Alltreated amimals were affected.An acute genotoxic effect,revealed by DNAfragmentation(comet assay),was seen by 5days,Alterations in reproductive parameters were conspicuous in regard to the number of sperm,cocoons and worms born,and the histological observation of the gonads and seminal receptacles.In addition,the body weight and survival rate were decreased,Neuromuscular function was also affected.Conclusion:Earthworms are suitable bioindicators of chemical contamination of the soil,their advantage being their easy and economical handling.

  19. 内蒙古高原东南缘森林草原交错带土壤动物群落特征%Characteristics of soil fauna community structure in forest-steppe ecotone on Southeastern Inner Mongolia Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高立杰; 侯建华; 安哲; 高宝嘉

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of soil fauna community structure in forest-steppe ecotone on Southeastern Inner Mongolia Plateau,the soil fauna communities from 4 different vegetation zones were investigated.A total of 53 722 soil fauna were collected and classified into 6 phyla,11 classes,and 27 orders,respectively.The dominant groups were Coleoptera,Stylommatophora,Microdrile oligochaetes,Collembola and Hymenoptera among macro-soil-fauna; whereas the dominant groups were Collembola and Acarina among soil meso-and micro-fauna; and the dominant group was Rhabditidia among soil animals of wet type.The individual numbers and the group numbers were declining with the transition from the forest zone to the steppe zone,among which forest zone and forest-meadow area had the highest number of groups as well as the meadowsteppe area in the ecotone and forest zone had the highest number of individuals.Besides,there are differences in numbers and compositions of the dominant groups of soil animal in different vegetation zones and significant difference especially in density-group index (DG),Pielou evenness index (J) and Simpson dominance index (C).The individual numbers and group numbers of soil animals in different vegetation zones showed clear surface assembly.The maximum of the group numbers appeared in summer in all the vegetation zones,but the maximum of the individual numbers in forest-meadow zone and forest zone appeared in autumn.There were not only significant seasonal differences in density-group index in different vegetation zones (except in forest zone) but also differences in the composition and abundance of the dominant groups of soil animals in different seasons.%为了解内蒙古高原东南缘森林草原交错带土壤动物群落特征,对这一地区不同植被地带中的土壤动物进行了调查.共捕获土壤动物53 722只,隶属于6门11纲27目(类).大型土壤动物优势类群为鞘翅目、柄眼目、小蚓类、弹尾目和膜翅目,

  20. 银北盐碱地土壤动物多样性与土壤因子的相关性%Soil Fauna Diversity and Its Relations with Soil Factors in Saline-alkali Soil in Northern Yinchuan of Ningxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建英; 杨贵军; 于有志

    2012-01-01

    为探讨不同利用方式的改良盐碱地土壤动物多样性与土壤因子的相关性,于2010-06-08调查银北改良盐碱地的玉米田、枸杞田、油葵田和未改良盐碱地的土壤动物,并测定土壤水分含量、pH、土壤碱化度和全盐量.采用干漏斗法分离土壤0~20 cm的土壤动物.共获得土壤动物7纲12目28类.分析表明,土壤动物的优势类群为弹尾目(56.58%),蜱螨类(18.04%),蜘蛛类(8.03%)和膜翅目蚁科(6.01%).土壤动物多样性因土地不同利用方式以及受干扰程度而表现出差异.改良的玉米地具有最高的多样性H'和丰富度D.群落相似性分析显示,改良玉米地和改良枸杞地有较高的相似性.典范对应分析(CCA)表明,土壤动物与土壤因子的相关性高达100%,说明盐碱地土壤因子变化影响土壤动物的分布,土壤全盐量和土壤含水量对土壤动物群落的分布影响最大,不同类群对环境因子响应存在差异.%In order to investigate the relationship between soil fauna diversity and soil factors in different types of improved saline land, we investigated the soil fauna communities at original saline-alkali soil and 3 types of improved saline land, corn field, wolf berry field and sunflower field in northern Yinchuan of Ningxia from June to August 2010. Some soil factors including soil water content, soil pH value, total salt content (TS) and exchange sodium percentage (ESP) were determined. The Modified Tullgren method was used to separate cropland soil animals from soil samples (0 — 20 cm). A total of 2029 individuals were collected, belonging to 7 classes, 12 orders and 28 groups. The results showed that Collembola, Acarina, Arane and Formicidae of Hymenoptera were dominant groups, accounting for 56. 58% , 18. 04% , 8. 03% and 6. 01%. The structure and diversity of soil fauna community were varied under different land practices and disturbances in this saline-alkali soil system. The highest Shannon

  1. Soil organic carbon pools and stocks in permafrost-affected soils on the tibetan plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Dörfer

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau reacts particularly sensitively to possible effects of climate change. Approximately two thirds of the total area is affected by permafrost. To get a better understanding of the role of permafrost on soil organic carbon pools and stocks, investigations were carried out including both discontinuous (site Huashixia, HUA and continuous permafrost (site Wudaoliang, WUD. Three organic carbon fractions were isolated using density separation combined with ultrasonic dispersion: the light fractions (1.6 g cm(-3 of mineral associated organic matter (MOM. The fractions were analyzed for C, N, and their portion of organic C. FPOM contained an average SOC content of 252 g kg(-1. Higher SOC contents (320 g kg(-1 were found in OPOM while MOM had the lowest SOC contents (29 g kg(-1. Due to their lower density the easily decomposable fractions FPOM and OPOM contribute 27% (HUA and 22% (WUD to the total SOC stocks. In HUA mean SOC stocks (0-30 cm depth account for 10.4 kg m(-2, compared to 3.4 kg m(-2 in WUD. 53% of the SOC is stored in the upper 10 cm in WUD, in HUA only 39%. Highest POM values of 36% occurred in profiles with high soil moisture content. SOC stocks, soil moisture and active layer thickness correlated strongly in discontinuous permafrost while no correlation between SOC stocks and active layer thickness and only a weak relation between soil moisture and SOC stocks could be found in continuous permafrost. Consequently, permafrost-affected soils in discontinuous permafrost environments are susceptible to soil moisture changes due to alterations in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, increasing temperature and therefore evaporation.

  2. Global Change Simulations Affect Potential Methane Oxidation in Upland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankinship, J. C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    decreased rates (p=0.014). These responses may be explained by improved soil aggregate stability in the first case, and reduced aggregate stability in the latter case. No effects of warming, elevated precipitation, elevated N deposition, or multifactor interactions were found. Among MCCE soils, similarly, no effects of elevated or reduced precipitation were found. While warming did not affect low elevation ecosystems, it did significantly decrease rates in the highest elevation mixed conifer forest (p=0.004). This suggests a vulnerability of cold-adapted CH4 oxidizing bacteria to elevated temperature. However, bacterial communities in all sampled ecosystems appear to be resistant to drier conditions and unaffected by wetter conditions. If biological oxidation is responsible for the current stability in atmospheric CH4 concentrations, then the improved function of this global CH4 sink is likely driven by indirect plant effects under elevated atmospheric CO2. Improved function, however, may be absent or reversed in future ecosystems that experience increased wildfire frequency and in high altitude and latitude ecosystems that experience rapid warming.

  3. Soil surface properties affected by organic by-products

    OpenAIRE

    Pachepsky Ya.A.; Rawls W.J.; Fournier L.L.; Filgueira R.R.; Sikora L.J.

    2002-01-01

    The beneficial effects of amending soils with organic by-products include improvement of both chemical and physical factors. Very few studies have investigated changes in the soil specific surface area (SSA) after amendments with manures or composts. Soil samples were taken from plots before and after four years� application of manures, composts or nitrogen fertilizer. A corn-wheat-soybean rotation was grown. Soil samples were tested for changes in water retention at �15 bar, bu...

  4. Enhancing productivity of salt affected soils through crops and cropping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reclamation of salt affected soils needs the addition of soil amendment and enough water to leach down the soluble salts. The operations may also include other simple agronomic techniques to reclaim soils and to know the crops and varieties that may be grown and other management practices which may be followed on such soils (Khan, 2001). The choice of crops to be grown during reclamation of salt affected soils is very important to obtain acceptable yields. This also decides cropping systems as well as favorable diversification for early reclamation, desirable yield and to meet the other requirements of farm families. In any salt affected soils, the following three measures are adopted for reclamation and sustaining the higher productivity of reclaimed soils. 1. Suitable choice of crops, forestry and tree species; 2. Suitable choice of cropping and agroforestry system; 3. Other measures to sustain the productivity of reclaimed soils. (author)

  5. The role of snow cover and soil freeze/thaw cycles affecting boreal-arctic soil carbon dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Northern Hemisphere permafrost affected land areas contain about twice as much carbon as the global atmosphere. This vast carbon pool is vulnerable to accelerated losses through mobilization and decomposition under projected global warming. Satellite data records spanning the past 3 decades indicate widespread reductions (∼ 0.8–1.3 days decade−1 in the mean annual snow cover extent and frozen season duration across the pan-Arctic domain, coincident with regional climate warming trends. How the soil carbon pool responds to these changes will have a large impact on regional and global climate. Here, we developed a coupled terrestrial carbon and hydrology model framework with detailed 1-D soil heat transfer representation to investigate the sensitivity of soil organic carbon stocks and soil decomposition to changes in snow cover and soil freeze/thaw processes in the Pan-Arctic region over the past three decades (1982–2010. Our results indicate widespread soil active layer deepening across the pan-Arctic, with a mean decadal trend of 6.6 ± 12.0 (SD cm, corresponding with widespread warming and lengthening non-frozen season. Warming promotes vegetation growth and soil heterotrophic respiration, particularly within surface soil layers (≤ 0.2 m. The model simulations also show that seasonal snow cover has a large impact on soil temperatures, whereby increases in snow cover promote deeper (≥ 0.5 m soil layer warming and soil respiration, while inhibiting soil decomposition from surface (≤ 0.2 m soil layers, especially in colder climate zones (mean annual T ≤ −10 °C. Our results demonstrate the important control of snow cover in affecting northern soil freeze/thaw and soil carbon decomposition processes, and the necessity of considering both warming, and changing precipitation and snow cover regimes in characterizing permafrost soil carbon dynamics.

  6. Atmospheric Deposition of Heavy Metals in Soil Affected by Different Soil Uses of Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, J. A.; Faz, A.; Martínez-Martínez, S.; Bech, J.

    2009-04-01

    Heavy metals are a natural constituent of rocks, sediments and soils. However, the heavy metal content of top soils is also dependent on other sources than weathering of the indigenous minerals; input from atmospheric deposition seems to be an important pathway. Atmospheric deposition is defined as the process by which atmospheric pollutants are transferred to terrestrial and aquatic surfaces and is commonly classified as either dry or wet. The interest in atmospheric deposition has increased over the past decade due to concerns about the effects of deposited materials on the environment. Dry deposition provides a significant mechanism for the removal of particles from the atmosphere and is an important pathway for the loading of heavy metals into the soil ecosystem. Within the last decade, an intensive effort has been made to determine the atmospheric heavy metal deposition in both urban and rural areas. The main objective of this study was to identification of atmospheric heavy metals deposition in soil affected by different soil uses. Study area is located in Murcia Province (southeast of Spain), in the surroundings of Murcia City. The climate is typically semiarid Mediterranean with an annual average temperature of 18°C and precipitation of 350 mm. In order to determine heavy metals atmospheric deposition a sampling at different depths (0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-15 cm and 15-30 cm) was carried out in 7 sites including agricultural soils, two industrial areas and natural sites. The samples were taken to the laboratory where, dried, passed through a 2 mm sieve, and grinded. For the determination of the moisture the samples were weighed and oven dried at 105 °C for 24 h. The total amounts of metals (Pb, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Mn, Ni and Cr) were determined by digesting the samples with nitric/perchoric acids and measuring with ICP-MS. Results showed that zinc contamination in some samples of industrial areas was detected, even this contamination reaches 30 cm depth; thus it is

  7. THE ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF THE EPIGEAL FAUNA IN THE CORN AGRICULTURAL ECOSYSTEM IN OCNA SIBIU (SIBIU COUNTY IN 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana ANTONIE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The arthropods have the role of biologic indicators, of diagnosis instruments regarding the negative effects of the human intervention in the structure and functioning of the agricultural ecosystems. Their presence or absence, the growth or lowering of their populations in the agricultural ecosystems can indicate the state of health of these systems and their good functioning. The aim of our researches is establishing the fauna structure of the community of arthropods at the soil level in the corn agricultural ecosystem in Ocna Sibiu, (Sibiu County; the characterization of the communities of invertebrates under the aspect of numerical abundance and of that of relative one; framing the entomologic fauna into a beneficial or pest one, the identification of the culture technology for the researched area. Regarding the applied researched methods, they were as follows: the using of pitfall traps (Barber traps that were at the level of the soil as well as the method of direct collecting of the fauna from the plants. As a result of our researches there was established the taxonomic and quantitative structure of the collected fauna through the methods of pitfall traps (Barber traps in Ocna Sibiu during 2012; there were identified 13 taxonomic groups. From the total of the collected agricultural fauna gathered by the help of pitfall traps in Ocna Sibiu locality there were identified 51 species of insects from which 30 were beneficial ones and 21 pest ones, the dominating order being Coleopteron with 35 species. The establishment of the group of arthropods, especially of the entomologic fauna, beneficial or pest indicates the equilibrium or the disequilibrium state from the researched corn three field systems. The ratio between the two types of fauna permits choosing the optimum method of maintaining the equilibrium between the species of the system and applying those measures of management in order to affect less the system in its assembly and to

  8. The Response of Diversity of Soil Fauna Community to Three Cropping Patterns%土壤动物群落多样性对3种种植模式的响应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐培智; 解开治; 李康活; 陈建生; 唐拴虎; 张发宝; 黄旭

    2012-01-01

    为合理筛选适宜种植模式,维持农业的可持续发展提供参考.采用手捡法和改进的Tullgren干漏斗法,研究休闲轮作(FRCs)、稻菜轮作(RVCs)、蔬菜连作(VCCs)3种种植模式下,土壤动物群落组成及多样性.结果表明,3个处理样点共获得各类土壤动物526只,经鉴定有3门9纲14目.与VCCs、FRCs处理相比,RVCs处理条件下引发了一些类群的发生与消长,造成了部分类群的缺失,形成了不同的优势类群.土壤动物数量0~15 cm土层均多于15~30 cm土层,分别较15~30 cm土层多出15.7%、86.6%和110.0%.RVCs处理Shannon-Weiner指数(月)、Pielou均匀性指数(E)、Simpson优势度指数(C)均为最大,且0~15 cm土层高于15~30 cm土层.土壤动物类群的相似性综合分析表明,VCCs处理与FRCs处理类群的相似性系数较高,与RVCs处理类群的相似性系数较小.%To create a reference by which to select optimal planting patterns, and maintain sustainable development of farmland ecosystems, the hand retrieval and Tullgren dry funnel methods were used to study community composition and diversity of soil fauna in three different cropping patterns; fallow rotation cycles (FRCs), rice-vegetable rotation cycles (RVCs), and vegetable continuous cropping cycles (VCCs). A total of 526 fauna were observed within the three rotation systems, belonging to 9 different phylogenetic classes and 14 different orders. The soil fauna diversity of the VCC, RFC and RVC patterns within the 0-15 cm soil layer averaged respective 15.7%, 86.6% and 110.0% higher than the 15-30 cm soil layer. The Shannon-Wiener index (H), Pielou evenness index (E), and Simpson Dominance index (C) of RVC treatment all reflected highest diversity within the RVC rotation system, as compared to the other two rotation patterns.

  9. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoczky, E. [Pannon Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Keszthely (Hungary); Szabados, I.; Marth, P. [Plant Health and Soil Conservation Station, Higany (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. 秸秆覆盖免耕条件下中小型土壤动物的生态分布特征%Ecological Distribution of Middle-small-size Soil Faunas under Conservation Tillage and Straw Mulch Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨佩; 王海霞; 岳佳

    2013-01-01

    分别于2011年5月、7月和9月,通过设置免耕农田不同的玉米秸秆覆盖率,调查了中小型土壤动物的生态分布特征.采用Tullgren法分离中小型土壤动物,室内显微镜下鉴定.结果表明:共获得中小型土壤动物6 814只.其中优势类群:甲螨(Oribatida)和辐螨(Actinedida),占总个体数的77.71%.土壤动物集中分布在0-10 cm土层,占总个体数的76%,表聚性明显.Margalef物种丰富度指数(R)指数显示,R(全秸秆覆盖+免耕)3.10>R(50%秸秆覆盖+免耕)2.96>R(普通玉米田)2.18,说明全玉米秸秆覆盖免耕的农田中小型土壤动物类群多样性最高,个体数量最多.50%秸秆覆盖和全秸秆覆盖处理下中小型土壤动物的丰富度均高于普通玉米田.全秸秆覆盖免耕条件下螨类的数量是2 680只,是普通玉米田螨类数量的1.32倍.在50%秸秆覆盖+免耕、全秸秆覆盖+免耕和普通玉米田这3种不同秸秆覆盖率和土壤环境下,中小型土壤动物的季节分布差异明显.全秸秆覆盖与普通玉米田相比,能提供更丰富的生存条件,有效提高了中小型土壤动物的生物多样性.%In May, July and September, 2011, the characteristics of the ecological distribution of small and medium-sized soil faunas was investigated by setting the no-tillage farmland of corn stover coverage. Small and medium-sized soil faunas were separated by using the Tullgren method. The results showed that a total of 6 814 small and medium-sized soil faunas under an indoor microscope were identified. The dominant group includes oribatida and actinedida, occupying 77. 1%. Soil faunas were concentrated in 0-10 cm soil layer, occupying 76% of the individuals, with the apparent surface gathering character. The results showed that the Margalef species richness index (R) sequence followed the order of 3. 10 (full straw cover+straw mulch) >2. 96(50% straw cover+straw mulch)>2. 18 (ordinary cornfield), indicating that the small and

  11. How historical copper contamination affects soil structure and mobilization and transport of colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo, Marcos; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin;

    Copper is accumulated in soils due to human activities such as mining industry, agriculture practises, or waste deposals. High concentrations of copper can affect plants and soil organisms, and subsequently the soil structure and its inner space architecture. In this work we investigated the effect...... of copper concentration on the movement of an inert tracer, tritium, and the mobilization and transport of colloid particles in undisturbed soil cores (10 cm diameter and 8 cm height). The cores were sampled along a copper gradient of 21 to 3837 mg Cu kg-1 soil on an abandoned arable soil polluted by copper...... between 0.01 to 0.43 pore volumes, with longer times for the most contaminated point, likely related with its higher soil density and lower air permeability. The copper pollution affected colloid and tracer transport in the soil columns. The release of colloids especially in the most contaminated points...

  12. Medicinal Mushroom Growth as Affected by Non-Axenic Casing Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. C. ZIED; M. T. A. MINHONI; J. KOPYTOWSKI-FILHO; L. BARBOSA; M. C. N. ANDRADE

    2011-01-01

    Ten different casing soils were collected from two soils at two depths (0.2 and 2.0 m below soil surface) to examine the relationships between the physical properties of non-axenic casing soil and yield, number and weight of the medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei ss. Heinemann. The results showed that soil clay content and bulk density were negatively correlated with the mushroom yield,respectively, but soil silt content and water-holding capacity were found to be positively correlated with the yield. The number of mushrooms was negatively correlated with soil water-holding capacity but positively correlated with soil clay, bulk density and porosity.The weight of mushroom was positively correlated with the content of soil fine sand and negatively correlated with the contents of soil coarse sand, total sand and clay. Neither soil depth nor different soil combinations affected the yield and number of mushrooms, but the mushroom weight was affected by the soil combinations and soil depth, so interplay in the fructification process with the physical characteristics of casing is complicated.

  13. 皆伐对落叶松人工林土壤动物群落结构的影响%Influence of Clear Cutting on Community Structures of Soil Fauna from Larix principis-rupprechtii Plantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王利民

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the effects of clear cutting on soil fauna,this study investigated the soil animal in clear cutting area and control area of Larix principis-rupprechtii plantation.We collected 4740 individuals belong to 33 groups,14 orders and 4 classes.Statistical analysis of species composition,community structure and biodiversity of soil fauna in control and clear cutting area showed that the dominant groups were Acarina and Collembola which accounted for 88.36%of the total number of species in total. Analysis also shows that Shannon-Weiner biodiversity index,Pielou evenness index and Simpson diversity index were increased in clear cutting area,while the dominant concentration index was decreased.%该研究通过对落叶松人工林皆伐区与对照区土壤动物进行抽样调查,分析比较皆伐对华北落叶松人工林土壤动物群落的影响。共获得土壤动物4740头,4纲15目32个类群,通过分析皆伐与未皆伐林分土壤动物的物种组成、群落结构和物种多样性,结果表明,蜱螨目、弹尾纲为皆伐华北落叶松人工林土壤动物的优势类群,共占物种总数的88.36%,且皆伐区土壤动物群落Shannon-Weiner多样性指数、Pielou均匀度指数、Simpson多样性指数和Pielou均度指数有所提高,而优势集中度指数C有所下降。

  14. Cobalt in alluvial Egyptian soils as affected by industrial activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-five surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from different locations in Egypt representing non-polluted,moderately and highly polluted soils. The aim of this study was to evaluate total Co content in alluvial soils of Delta in Egypt using the delayed Neturen activation analysis technique (DNAA). The two prominent gamma ray lines at 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV was efficiently used for 60Co determination. Co content in non-polluted soil samples ranged between 13.12 to 23.20 ppm Co with an average of 18.16*4.38 ppm. Cobalt content in moderately polluted soils ranged between 26.5 to 30.00 ppm with an average of 28.3*1.3 ppm. The highest Co levels (ranged from 36 to 64.69 ppm with an average of 51.9*9.5); were observed in soil samples collected from, either highly polluted agricultural soils due to prolonged irrigation with industrial wastewater or surface soil samples from industrial sites.

  15. PHOSPHORUS FORMS IN CALCAREOUS SOIL AS AFFECTED BY IRRIGATION WATER SALINITY

    OpenAIRE

    ABOU HUSSIEN, E.A.; RADWAN, S.A.; KHALIL, R.A.; HAMAD, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out on five calcareous soils of Egypt characterized by different content (%) of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and other physical and chemical properties to study their content of different forms of phosphorus and its affected by soil properties and irrigation water salinity. The tested calcareous soils were used in a greenhouse experiment, where these soils were planted by barley and irrigated by tap water and four sources of artificial saline water. The artificial saline ...

  16. Few apparent short-term effects of elevated soil temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation on the abundance and taxonomic diversity of desert soil micro- and meso-fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, B.J.; Neher, D.A.; Housman, D.C.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent hydration and drying of soils in arid systems can accelerate desert carbon and nitrogen mobilization due to respiration, microbial death, and release of intracellular solutes. Because desert microinvertebrates can mediate nutrient cycling, and the autotrophic components of crusts are known to be sensitive to rapid desiccation due to elevated temperatures after wetting events, we studied whether altered soil temperature and frequency of summer precipitation can also affect the composition of food web consumer functional groups. We conducted a two-year field study with experimentally-elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation in the Colorado Plateau desert, measuring the change in abundance of nematodes, protozoans, and microarthropods. We hypothesized that microfauna would be more adversely affected by the combination of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than either effect alone, as found previously for phototrophic crust biota. Microfauna experienced normal seasonal fluctuations in abundance, but the effect of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation was statistically non-significant for most microfaunal groups, except amoebae. The seasonal increase in abundance of amoebae was reduced with combined elevated temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation compared to either treatment alone, but comparable with control (untreated) plots. Based on our findings, we suggest that desert soil microfauna are relatively more tolerant to increases in ambient temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than the autotrophic components of biological soil crust at the surface.

  17. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Leah C; Schmidt, Alex W; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  18. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Leah C; Schmidt, Alex W; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas. PMID:24465484

  19. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C Blasiak

    Full Text Available Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  20. Fauna Europaea: Diptera - Brachycera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Pape; P. Beuk; A.C. Pont; A.I. Shatalkin; A.L. Ozerov; A.J. Woźnica; B. Merz; C. Bystrowski; C. Raper; C. Bergström; C. Kehlmaier; D.K. Clements; D. Greathead; E.P. Kameneva; E. Nartshuk; F.T. Petersen; G. Weber; G. Bächli; F. Geller-Grimm; G. van de Weyer; H.-P. Tschorsnig; H. de Jong; J.W. van Zuijlen; J. Vaňhara; J. Roháček; J. Ziegler; J. Majer; K. Hůrka; K. Holston; K. Rognes; L. Greve-Jensen; M. Munari; M. de Meyer; M. Pollet; M.C.D. Speight; M.J. Ebejer; M. Martinez; M. Carles-Tolrá; M. Földvári; M. Chvála; M. Barták; N.L. Evenhuis; P.J. Chandler; P. Cerretti; R. Meier; R. Rozkosny; S. Prescher; S.D. Gaimari; T. Zatwarnicki; T. Zeegers; T. Dikow; V.A. Korneyev; V.A. Richter; V. Michelsen; V.N. Tanasijtshuk; W.N. Mathis; Z. Hubenov; Y. de Jong

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant multicellular European terrestrial and freshwater animals and their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (east of the Urals and excluding the C

  1. Fauna Europaea: Gastrotricha

    Science.gov (United States)

    d`Hondt, Jean-Loup; Kisielewski, Jacek; Todaro, M. Antonio; Tongiorgi, Paolo; Guidi, Loretta; Grilli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Gastrotricha are a meiobenthic phylum composed of 813 species known so far (2 orders, 17 families) of free-living microinvertebrates commonly present and actively moving on and into sediments of aquatic ecosystems, 339 of which live in fresh and brackish waters. The Fauna Europaea database includes 214 species of Chaetonotida (4 families) plus a single species of Macrodasyida incertae sedis. This paper deals with the 224 European freshwater species known so far, 9 of which, all of Chaetonotida, have been described subsequently and will be included in the next database version. Basic information on their biology and ecology are summarized, and a list of selected, main references is given. As a general conclusion the gastrotrich fauna from Europe is the best known compared with that of other continents, but shows some important gaps of knowledge in Eastern and Southern regions. PMID:26379467

  2. Soil-aquifer phenomena affecting groundwater under vertisols: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, D.; Baram, S.; Dahan, O.

    2016-01-01

    Vertisols are cracking clayey soils that (i) usually form in alluvial lowlands where, normally, groundwater pools into aquifers; (ii) have different types of voids (due to cracking), which make flow and transport of water, solutes and gas complex; and (iii) are regarded as fertile soils in many areas. The combination of these characteristics results in the unique soil-aquifer phenomena that are highlighted and summarized in this review. The review is divided into the following four sections: (1) soil cracks as preferential pathways for water and contaminants: in this section lysimeter-to basin-scale observations that show the significance of cracks as preferential-flow paths in vertisols, which bypass matrix blocks in the unsaturated zone, are summarized. Relatively fresh-water recharge and groundwater contamination from these fluxes and their modeling are reviewed; (2) soil cracks as deep evaporators and unsaturated-zone salinity: deep sediment samples under uncultivated vertisols in semiarid regions reveal a dry (immobile), saline matrix, partly due to enhanced evaporation through soil cracks. Observations of this phenomenon are compiled in this section and the mechanism of evapoconcentration due to air flow in the cracks is discussed; (3) impact of cultivation on flushing of the unsaturated zone and aquifer salinization: the third section examines studies reporting that land-use change of vertisols from native land to cropland promotes greater fluxes through the saline unsaturated-zone matrix, eventually flushing salts to the aquifer. Different degrees of salt flushing are assessed as well as aquifer salinization on different scales, and a comparison is made with aquifers under other soils; (4) relatively little nitrate contamination in aquifers under vertisols: in this section we turn the light on observations showing that aquifers under cultivated vertisols are somewhat resistant to groundwater contamination by nitrate (the major agriculturally related

  3. Factors affecting the selection of a soil water sensing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviews of soil moisture measurement technologies are counterproductive in attempting to identify the single approach that has the best overall performance for a range of soil, crop and landscape conditions. Not only does such an approach preclude the addition of new technologies, but it also obscures the fact that we have available today sensors and technologies that cover most field conditions, are well understood in terms of technical capability and are mechanically and electronically reliable. This review defines decision-making processes for assessing the characteristics, good and bad, of technology in relation to project objectives. Two processes are needed. The first links soil texture and scale of variability with the nature of the project, single-plant to catchment scale, to the needs for soil water measurement. The second lists the capabilities of some devices and shows how they can be selected to accommodate necessary criteria. It is concluded that the 'best technology' is a function of the project and soil conditions. (author)

  4. Bacteria and protozoa in soil microhabitats as affected by earthworms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Anne; Rønn, Regin; Hendriksen, Niels B.

    1997-01-01

    -cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolim chloride (CTC)-reducing bacteria explained a major part of the variation in the number of protozoa. High protozoan activity and predation thus coincided with high bacterial activity. In soil with elm leaves, fungal growth is assumed to inhibit bacterial and protozoan......, were compared. The total, viable, and culturable number of bacteria, the metabolic potentials of bacterial populations, and the number of protozoa and nematodes were determined in soil size fractions. Significant differences between soil fractions were shown by all assays. The highest number...... of microorganisms was found in microaggregates of 2-53¿µm and the lowest in the bacteria in the latter fraction was viable, but non-culturable, while a relatively higher number of culturable bacteria was found in the macroaggregates. The number of colony-forming units and 5...

  5. Different tree species affect soil respiration spatial distribution in a subtropical forest of southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Yu, Jui-Chu; Wang, Ya-nan; Lai, Yen-Jen

    2014-05-01

    Global forests contain 69% of total carbon stored in forest soil and litter. But the carbon storage ability and release rate of warming gases of forest soil also affect global climate change. Soil carbon cycling processes are paid much attention by ecological scientists and policy makers because of the possibility of carbon being stored in soil via land use management. Soil respiration contributed large part of terrestrial carbon flux, but the relationship of soil respiration and climate change was still obscurity. Most of soil respiration researches focus on template and tropical area, little was known that in subtropical area. Afforestation is one of solutions to mitigate CO2 increase and to sequestrate CO2 in tree and soil. Therefore, the objective of this study is to clarify the relationship of tree species and soil respiration distribution in subtropical broad-leaves plantation in southern Taiwan. The research site located on southern Taiwan was sugarcane farm before 2002. The sugarcane was removed and fourteen broadleaved tree species were planted in 2002-2005. Sixteen plots (250m*250m) were set on 1 km2 area, each plot contained 4 subplots (170m2). The forest biomass (i.e. tree height, DBH) understory biomass, litter, and soil C were measured and analyzed at 2011 to 2012. Soil respiration measurement was sampled in each subplot in each month. The soil belongs to Entisol with over 60% of sandstone. The soil pH is 5.5 with low base cations because of high sand percentage. Soil carbon storage showed significantly negative relationship with soil bulk density (p<0.001) in research site. The differences of distribution of live tree C pool among 16 plots were affected by growth characteristic of tree species. Data showed that the accumulation amount of litterfall was highest in December to February and lowest in June. Different tree species planted in 16 plots, resulting in high spatial variation of litterfall amount. It also affected total amount of litterfall

  6. Spatial heterogeneity of plant-soil feedback affects root interactions and interspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Marloes; Ravenek, Janneke M; Smit-Tiekstra, Annemiek E; van der Paauw, Jan Willem; de Caluwe, Hannie; van der Putten, Wim H; de Kroon, Hans; Mommer, Liesje

    2015-08-01

    Plant-soil feedback is receiving increasing interest as a factor influencing plant competition and species coexistence in grasslands. However, we do not know how spatial distribution of plant-soil feedback affects plant below-ground interactions. We investigated the way in which spatial heterogeneity of soil biota affects competitive interactions in grassland plant species. We performed a pairwise competition experiment combined with heterogeneous distribution of soil biota using four grassland plant species and their soil biota. Patches were applied as quadrants of 'own' and 'foreign' soils from all plant species in all pairwise combinations. To evaluate interspecific root responses, species-specific root biomass was quantified using real-time PCR. All plant species suffered negative soil feedback, but strength was species-specific, reflected by a decrease in root growth in own compared with foreign soil. Reduction in root growth in own patches by the superior plant competitor provided opportunities for inferior competitors to increase root biomass in these patches. These patterns did not cascade into above-ground effects during our experiment. We show that root distributions can be determined by spatial heterogeneity of soil biota, affecting plant below-ground competitive interactions. Thus, spatial heterogeneity of soil biota may contribute to plant species coexistence in species-rich grasslands.

  7. Pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial community structure in mine soils affected by mining subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuanyuan a; Chen Longqian a; ⇑; Wen Hongyu b; Zhou Tianjian a; Zhang Ting a

    2014-01-01

    Based on the 454 pyrosequencing approach, this research evaluated the influence of coal mining subsi-dence on soil bacterial diversity and community structure in Chinese mining area. In order to characterize the bacterial community comparatively, this study selected a field experiment site with coal-excavated subsidence soils and an adjacent site with non-disturbed agricultural soils, respectively. The dataset com-prises 24512 sequences that are affiliated to the 7 phylogenetic groups: proteobacteria, actinobacteria, bacteroidetes, gemmatimonadetes, chloroflexi, nitrospirae and unclassified phylum. Proteobacteria is the largest bacterial phylum in all samples, with a marked shift of the proportions of alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria. The results show that undisturbed soils are relatively more diverse and rich than subsided soils, and differences in abundances of dominant taxonomic groups between the two soil groups are visible. Compared with the control, soil nutrient contents decline achieves significant level in subsided soils. Correlational analysis showed bacterial diversity indices have significantly positive corre-lation with soil organic matter, total N, total P, and available K, but in negative relation with soil salinity. Ground subsidence noticeably affects the diversity and composition of soil microbial community. Degen-eration of soil fertility and soil salinization inhibits the sole-carbon-source metabolic ability of microbial community, leading to the simplification of advantage species and uneven distribution of microbial spe-cies. This work demonstrates the great potential of pyrosequencing technique in revealing microbial diversity and presents background information of microbial communities of mine subsidence land.

  8. Physical mechanisms of plant roots affecting weathering and leaching of loess soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; ZHANG Qingwen; WAN Guojiang; HUANG Ronggui; PIAO Hechun; BAI Lingyu; LI Lu

    2006-01-01

    Plant roots have potential impacts on soil mineral weathering and leaching. Our objective is to understand the physical mechanisms of plant roots affecting weathering and leaching of loess soil. Root densities were measured through the method of a large-size dug profile, and transport fluxes of soil elements were determined using an undisturbed monolith soil infiltration device on the hilly and gully regions of the Chinese Loess Plateau. The results show that the improvement effects of soil environment by plant roots are mainly controlled by the density and weight of the fibrous roots with the diameters less than 1 mm. Plant roots have the stronger effects on soil physical properties than chemical properties. The principal components analysis (PCA) indicates that soil physical properties by plant roots account for 56.7% of variations in soil environment whereas soil chemical properties and pH contribute about 24.2% of the soil variations. The roles of plant roots in controlling soil weathering and leaching increased in the following order: infiltration enhancement > increase of bioactive substance > stabilization of soil structure. The effects of plant roots on soil mineral weathering and leaching can be quantified using the multiple regression models with the high prediction accuracies developed in this study.

  9. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Lei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust, as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (P<0.05; and soil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R(2 = 0.494∼0.955, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological soil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  10. Self diffusion coefficient of phosphorus in different soils of Egypt as affected by soil moisture and phosphate fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of soil water content and phosphate fertilization vz. phosphate diffusion on plant growth and p-uptake was studied by use of tracer technique. Two experiments were conducted using three different Egyptian soils, i.e. clay from Bahtim, loamy from Burg El-Arab and sandy loam from Abou-Zaabal. The first was a laboratory experiment and aimed to determine the self diffusion coefficient of 32P, sup(D)P, in these different soils, as affected by soil moisture content and phosphate fertilization. The second was a pot experiment conducted to further investigate the uptake and dry matter yield of corn plants under the same conditions mentioned in the first experiment. The data revealed that as the P applied was raised from 0 to 100 Kgp/Fed, the values of sup(D)P were increased with different magnitude according to the soil texture and its moisture content. The highest values for the sup(D)P were of the clay soil of Bahtim, while the lowest were of the sandy loam soil of Abou-Zaabal. The data showed the positive trends towards increasing the sup(D)P values with increasing soil moisture contents. The study of pot experiment showed that plant uptake of P is closely related to the diffusion coefficient of P in soils. The practical implication of the present study indicates that more phosphorus needs to be applied to crops during periods of moisture stress than during periods of adequate soil moisture level to provide optimum phosphorus nutrition to plants. The clay soils should show less tendency toward P deficiency during dry conditions than would sandy soils having less clay. Similarly, irrigation should help to overcome P-deficiencies, particularly on light-textured soils. (author)

  11. Low-Temperature Biochar Affects an Eroded Calcareous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research showed little benefit from using a high temperature, high pH biochar for improving the fertility of eroded calcareous soils. We thus explored the potential of an activated, low-temperature, low pH biochar to improve their fertility status. In a microcosm study conducted at 20 de...

  12. Influences affecting the soil-water characteristic curve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jian; YU Jian-lin

    2005-01-01

    The soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC) is the primary partially saturated soil information as its behavior and properties can be derived from it. Although there have been many studies of unsaturated soils and the SWCC, there is still no combined constitutive model that can simulate soil characteristics accurately. In cases when hydraulic hysteresis is dominant (e.g.under cyclic loading) it is particularly important to use the SWCC. In the past decades, several mathematical expressions have been proposed to model the curve. There are various influences on the SWCC as a source of information, so the curves obtained from conventional tests often cannot be directly applied;and the mathematical expressions from one scenario cannot be used to simulate another situation. The effects of void ratio, initial water content, stress state and high suction were studied in this work revealing that water content and stress state are more important than the other effects;but that the influences tend to decrease when suction increases. The van Genuchten model was modified to simulate better the changes in the degree of saturation at low values of suction. Predictions were compared with experimental results to determine the simulation capability of the model.

  13. Factors that affect the association of radionuclides with soil phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of field experiments to investigate the chemical or physical associations of some radionuclides with soil phases is limited by low levels of activity and complicated by the number of phases involved. Sequential extraction procedures provide one means of evaluating the relative importance of various phases in disposition. Although the separation steps may not be absolutely selective, these schemes can be used in a comparative manner to rationalise changes in association and disposition that can occur as soil conditions alter. In this way they can give a direction for specific laboratory studies and be of value in the prediction of the consequences of land contamination - an important aspect of radiological protection. In this paper the authors draw upon field and laboratory studies of the disposition of artificial radionuclides to illustrate the effects of changes in, for example, iron or organic content. The variety of soil types that are amenable to field studies is restricted. Complementary laboratory experiments are therefore essential. Results show that the generalisations often applied to radionuclide availability are not always approximate and that although predictions of disposition can sometimes be made on the basis of gross soil characteristics, this capability is limited and a more rigorous approach is desirable in extreme cases. The specificity of the extraction procedure is discussed and evidence is presented to support the participation of the residual phase which was previously observed in field studies of plutonium and americium

  14. Do genetic modifications in crops affect soil fungi? a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannula, S.E.; Boer, de W.; Veen, van J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of genetically modified (GM) plants in agriculture has been a topic in public debate for over a decade. Despite their potential to increase yields, there may be unintended negative side-effects of GM plants on soil micro-organisms that are essential for functioning of agro-ecosystems. Fungi

  15. Sorption of tannin-C by soils affects soil cation exchange capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some tannins, produced by plants, are able to sorb to soil, and thus influence soil organic matter and nutrient cycling. However, studies are needed that compare sorption of tannins to other related phenolic compounds, evaluate their effects across a broad range of soils, and determine if sorption ...

  16. Fauna Europaea: Gastrotricha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Balsamo

    2015-08-01

    Gastrotricha are a meiobenthic phylum composed of 813 species known so far (2 orders, 17 families of free-living microinvertebrates commonly present and actively moving on and into sediments of aquatic ecosystems, 339 of which live in fresh and brackish waters. The Fauna Europaea database includes 214 species of Chaetonotida (4 families plus a single species of Macrodasyida incertae sedis. This paper deals with the 224 European freshwater species known so far, 9 of which, all of Chaetonotida, have been described subsequently and will be included in the next database version. Basic information on their biology and ecology are summarized, and a list of selected, main references is given. As a general conclusion the gastrotrich fauna from Europe is the best known compared with that of other continents, but shows some important gaps of knowledge in Eastern and Southern regions.

  17. Study on the spatiotemporal variability and affecting factors in soil moisture at a humid area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Yu, Z.

    2008-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variability of soil moisture and its affecting factors in a humid area were examined based on the field measuring date in the Tai lake drainage basin, China. 24 sensors near the soil surface and 12 sensors in 2 profiles (6 in each) were set up for collecting hourly soil moisture data with the Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) sensors in 2006. Coefficient of variation (CV) and semi-variogram were calculated to evaluate the temporal variability in different locations and the spatial variability in different periods. The surface soil moisture appears middle or weak variability, and most of the CV values are in the range of 0.13-0.26. Soil characteristics, topography, vegetation, meteorological factors and human activities influenced the soil moisture spatiotemporal variability significantly. The factors appear having different affecting abilities on the spatiotemporal variability, and the domain factors are different in four seasons. Soil characteristics mainly influence the temporal variability in the scale of hill slope. Coarser texture on the upper part of the slope results in a larger variability. Topography and micro-topography affects the spatial variability in all 3 dimensions. The variability is larger at upper locations and chine of the slope. The effect of vegetation on the soil moisture variability is stronger in spring, summer, and autumn than in winter, according to the different growth activities and water demand. The trees on the slope influence the CV values along the slope. Meteorological factors are the forcing factors of the soil water variation. Higher rainfall and evaporation variations produce higher variability in soil moisture while the rainfall has more influence in the summer and the evaporation has more in the fall. The results provide better understanding of soil moisture variation and base for further study on how the soil moisture variation could affect the rainfall runoff partitioning.

  18. Field reconnaissance and estimation of petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metal contents of soils affected by the Ebocha-8 oil spillage in Niger Delta, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuji, Leo C; Onojake, Chukunedum M

    2006-04-01

    Field reconnaissance of the Ebocha-8 oil spill-affected site at Obiobi/Obrikom in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria was carried out to assess the extent of damage to the terrestrial ecosystem and delimit the epicenter of oil spillage. Following three successive reconnaissance surveys, the area to be sampled was delimited (200 x 200 m2), and soil samples were collected using the grid method from three replicate quadrats at two depths, surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface (15-30 cm). A geographically similar area located 50 m adjacent to the oil-polluted area was used as a reference (control) site. Total hydrocarbon content (THC) and heavy metal concentrations were later determined in the laboratory by extraction and spetrophotemetric techniques. Generally, the THC of soils at surface and subsurface depths of the oil-polluted plots was 2.06 x 10(4) +/- 4.97 x 10(3) mg/kg and 1.67 x 10(3) +/- 3.61 x 10(2) mg/kg soil, respectively, (no overlap in standard errors at 95% confidence limit) while concentrations of heavy metals(Pb, Cd, V, Cu and Ni) were enhanced, especially at the surface. The high levels of THC and heavy metals may predispose the site, which hitherto served as arable agricultural land, to impaired fertility and possible conflagration. When concentrations of heavy metals reach the levels obtained in this study, they may become toxic to plants or possibly bio-accumulate, thus leading to toxic reactions along the food chain. While the spilled-oil may have contributed to the enhanced levels of the metals in the affected soils, physico-chemical properties of the soils, mobility of metals, and the intense rainfall and flooding that preceded the period of study may have also contributed in part to their enhanced concentrations. The presence of high hydrocarbon content may cause oxygen deprivation, which may result in the death of soil fauna by asphyxiation. There is, therefore, an urgent need to clear the affected site of these excess hydrocarbon deposits so as to

  19. Soil Diversity as Affected by Land Use in China: Consequences for Soil Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shangguan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid land-use change in recent decades in China and its impact on terrestrial biodiversity have been widely studied, particularly at local and regional scales. However, the effect of land-use change on the diversity of soils that support the terrestrial biological system has rarely been studied. Here, we report the first effort to assess the impact of land-use change on soil diversity for the entire nation of China. Soil diversity and land-use effects were analyzed spatially in grids and provinces. The land-use effects on different soils were uneven. Anthropogenic soils occupied approximately 12% of the total soil area, which had already replaced the original natural soils. About 7.5% of the natural soil classes in China were in danger of substantial loss, due to the disturbance of agriculture and construction. More than 80% of the endangered soils were unprotected due to the overlook of soil diversity. The protection of soil diversity should be integrated into future conservation activities.

  20. Factors Affecting Anion Movement and Retention in Four Forest Soils

    OpenAIRE

    D. W. Johnson; Cole, D. W.; Van Miegroet, Helga; Horng, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Three hypotheses concerning the movement and retention of anions in forest soils were tested in a series of laboratory and field studies on two Tennessee Ultisols with mixed deciduous forest cover and two Washington Inceptisols, one with deciduous (red alder Alnus rubra Bong.) and one with coniferous [Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] forest cover. The first hypothesis, that sulfate and phosphate retention was related to adsorption to free Fe and Al oxides, which were in turn...

  1. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar; Ricart, Aurora M.; Lavery, Paul S.; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Masque, Pere; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Steven, Andy; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-08-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  2. Ecological soil quality affected by land use and management on semi-arid Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, J. P.; Moraetis, D.; Lair, G. J.; Bloem, J.; Nikolaidis, N. P.; Hemerik, L.; de Ruiter, P. C.

    2015-03-01

    Land use and soil management practice can have strong effects on soil quality, defined in terms of soil fertility, carbon sequestration and conservation of biodiversity. In this study, we investigate whether ecological soil quality parameters are adequate to assess soil quality under harsh conditions, and are able to reflect different land uses and intensities of soil management practices. We selected three sites as main representatives for the dominant types of land use in the region: an intensively cultivated olive orchard (annually tilled), an extensively used olive orchard (not tilled) and a heavily grazed pasture site in the Koiliaris catchment (Crete/Greece). Soil quality was analysed using an ecosystem approach, studying soil biological properties such as soil organism biomass and activity, and taxonomic diversity of soil microarthropods, in connection to abiotic soil parameters, including soil organic matter contents, and soil aggregate stability. The intensively cultivated olive orchard had a much lower aggregate water stability than the extensive olive orchard and the pasture. Contents of soil organic C and N were higher in the extensively used olive orchard than in the intensively cultivated orchard, with intermediate concentrations in the pasture. This was mainly caused by the highest input of organic matter, combined with the lowest organic matter decomposition rate. Soil organism biomasses in all sites were relatively low compared to values reported from less harsh systems, while microarthropod richness was highest in the pasture compared to both the intensive and extensive olive orchards. From the present results we conclude that microarthropod taxonomic richness is a very useful indicator for ecological soil quality, because it is not only able to separate harsh sites from other systems, but it is also sensitive enough to show differences between land management practices under harsh conditions. Microbial biomass and especially microarthropod

  3. Urban legacies and soil management affect the concentration and speciation of trace metals in Los Angeles community garden soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy metals in urban soils can compromise human health, especially in urban gardens, where gardeners may ingest contaminated dust or crops. To identify patterns of urban garden metal contamination, we measured concentrations and bioavailability of Pb, As, and Cd in soils associated with twelve community gardens in Los Angeles County, CA. This included sequential extractions to partition metals among exchangeable, reducible, organic, or residual fractions. Proximity to road increased all metal concentrations, suggesting vehicle emissions sources. Reducible Pb increased with neighborhood age, suggesting leaded paint as a likely pollutant source. Exchangeable Cd and As both increased with road proximity. Only cultivated soils showed an increase in exchangeable As with road proximity, potentially due to reducing humic acid interactions while Cd bioavailability was mitigated by organic matter. Understanding the geochemical phases and metal bioavailability allows incorporation of contamination patterns into urban planning. - Highlights: • Road proximity, legacies, and management affect garden soil metal concentrations. • Soil near old houses had high reducible Pb, likely due to lead paint. • Pb, As, and Cd all increased with proximity to road. • As and Cd reacted with organic matter to become more or less bioavailable to crops. - Road proximity, legacies, and management affect garden soil metal concentrations. Soil near old houses had high reducible Pb due to lead paint, while all metals increased near the road

  4. Fauna europaea: Diptera - brachycera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Thomas; Beuk, Paul; Pont, Adrian Charles; Shatalkin, Anatole I; Ozerov, Andrey L; Woźnica, Andrzej J; Merz, Bernhard; Bystrowski, Cezary; Raper, Chris; Bergström, Christer; Kehlmaier, Christian; Clements, David K; Greathead, David; Kameneva, Elena Petrovna; Nartshuk, Emilia; Petersen, Frederik T; Weber, Gisela; Bächli, Gerhard; Geller-Grimm, Fritz; Van de Weyer, Guy; Tschorsnig, Hans-Peter; de Jong, Herman; van Zuijlen, Jan-Willem; Vaňhara, Jaromír; Roháček, Jindřich; Ziegler, Joachim; Majer, József; Hůrka, Karel; Holston, Kevin; Rognes, Knut; Greve-Jensen, Lita; Munari, Lorenzo; de Meyer, Marc; Pollet, Marc; Speight, Martin C D; Ebejer, Martin John; Martinez, Michel; Carles-Tolrá, Miguel; Földvári, Mihály; Chvála, Milan; Barták, Miroslav; Evenhuis, Neal L; Chandler, Peter J; Cerretti, Pierfilippo; Meier, Rudolf; Rozkosny, Rudolf; Prescher, Sabine; Gaimari, Stephen D; Zatwarnicki, Tadeusz; Zeegers, Theo; Dikow, Torsten; Korneyev, Valery A; Richter, Vera Andreevna; Michelsen, Verner; Tanasijtshuk, Vitali N; Mathis, Wayne N; Hubenov, Zdravko; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant multicellular European terrestrial and freshwater animals and their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (east of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region). The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing taxonomic specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many user communities in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. The Diptera-Brachycera is one of the 58 Fauna Europaea major taxonomic groups, and data have been compiled by a network of 55 specialists. Within the two-winged insects (Diptera), the Brachycera constitute a monophyletic group, which is generally given rank of suborder. The Brachycera may be classified into the probably paraphyletic 'lower brachyceran grade' and the monophyletic Eremoneura. The latter contains the Empidoidea, the Apystomyioidea with a single Nearctic species, and the Cyclorrhapha, which in turn is divided into the paraphyletic 'aschizan grade' and the monophyletic Schizophora. The latter is traditionally divided into the paraphyletic 'acalyptrate grade' and the monophyletic Calyptratae. Our knowledge of the European fauna of Diptera-Brachycera varies tremendously among families, from the reasonably well known hoverflies (Syrphidae) to the extremely poorly known scuttle flies (Phoridae). There has been a steady growth in our knowledge of European Diptera for the last two centuries, with no apparent slow down, but there is a shift towards a larger fraction of the new species being found among the families of the nematoceran grade (lower Diptera), which due to a larger number of small

  5. European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh (contributor), Paul Henning

    on Earth, life within the soil is often hidden away and suffers by being 'out of sight and out of mind'. What kind of life is there in soil? What do we mean by soil biodiversity? What is special about soil biology? How do our activities affect soil ecosystems? What are the links between soil biota...... and climate change? The first ever European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity uses informative texts, stunning photographs and maps to answer these questions and other issues. The European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity functions as a comprehensive guide allowing non-specialists to access information about this unseen...... Biodiversity'. Starting with the smallest organisms such as the bacteria, this segment works through a range of taxonomic groups such as fungi, nematodes, insects and macro-fauna to illustrate the astonishing levels of heterogeneity of life in soil. The European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity is more than just...

  6. Effect of brushwood transposition on the leaf litter arthropod fauna in a cerrado area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina Benetton Vergílio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of ecological restoration techniques can be monitored through biological indicators of soil quality such as the leaf litter arthropod fauna. This study aimed to determine the immediate effect of brushwood transposition transferred from an area of native vegetation to a disturbed area, on the leaf litter arthropod fauna in a degraded cerrado area. The arthropod fauna of four areas was compared: a degraded area with signal grass, two experimental brushwood transposition areas, with and without castor oil plants, and an area of native cerrado. In total, 7,660 individuals belonging to 23 taxa were sampled. Acari and Collembola were the most abundant taxa in all studied areas, followed by Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera, and Symphyla. The brushwood transposition area without castor oil plants had the lowest abundance and dominance and the highest diversity of all areas, providing evidence of changes in the soil community. Conversely, the results showed that the presence of castor oil plants hampered early succession, negatively affecting ecological restoration in this area.

  7. Climate change affects carbon allocation to the soil in shrublands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, A.; Tietema, A.; Joosten, N.N.; Estiarte, M.; Peñuelas, J.; Sowerby, A.; Emmett, B.; Beier, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Climate change may affect ecosystem functioning through increased temperatures or changes in precipitation patterns. Temperature and water availability are important drivers for ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis, carbon translocation, and organic matter decomposition. These climate changes

  8. Hydraulic properties of typical salt-affected soils in Jiangsu Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaomin; SHEN Qirong; XU Yangchun

    2007-01-01

    Every year about 1,500 ha of land is reclaimed from the sea along the coastline of Jiangsu Province,China.It is important to characterize the hydraulic properties of this reclaimed land to be able to predict and manage salt and water movement for amelioration of these saline soils.In this paper,we report hydraulic properties of these salt-affected soils.The pressure-plate method,constant head method,the crust method and Klute's method were used in this study.The satu rated hydraulic conductivities of the soils ranged from 128.66 to 141.26 cm/day and decreased with increasing soil depth.The unsaturated hydraulic conductivities followed an expo nential function of pressure head.The soil water retention curves were similar for three soil layers in the soil.The satu rated water content,field capacity and wilting point decreased with increasing soil depth.Plant available water contents of the three layers in the soil profile were 0.21,0.20 and 0.19 cm3/cm3,respectively.The unsaturated soil water diffu sivity of the studied soils ranged from 0.07 to 10.46 cm2/min,and was related to the water content via an exponential relationship.

  9. Soil-restoration rate and initial soil formation trends on example of anthropogenically affected soils of opencast mine in Kursk region, Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigareva, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    The mining industry is one of the main factors which anthropogenically change the environment. Mining process results in removing of the rocks and mechanical changes of considerable amounts of ground. One of the main results of mining arising of antropic ecosystems as well as increasing of the new created soils total area is technosols. The main factor controlling the soil formation in postmining environment is the quality of spoiled materials. Initial soil formation has been investigated on spoils of the largest iron ore extraction complex in Russia - Mikhailovsky mining and concentration complex which is situated in Kursk region, Russia. Investigated soils are presented by monogenetic weak developed soils of different age (10-15-20 years). Young soils are formed on the loess parent materials (20 year-old soil), or on a mix of sand and clay overburdens (15 and 10-year-old soils). Anthropogenically affected soils are characterized by well-developed humus horizon which is gradually replaced by weakly changed soil-building rocks (profile type A-C for 10-, 15-years old soils, and A-AC-C for 20 years old soils). Gray-humus soils are characterized by presence of diagnostic humus horizon gradually replaced by soil-building rock. The maximum intensity of humus accumulation has been determined in a semi-hydromorphic 10-year-old soil developed on the mixed heaps which is connected with features of water-air conditions complicating mineralization of plant remnants. 20-year-old soil on loess is characterized by rather high rate of organic substances accumulation between all the automorphous soils. It was shown that one of the most effective restoration ways for anthropogenically affected soils is a biological reclamation. Since overburdens once appeared on a day surface are overgrown badly in the first years, they are subject to influence of water and wind erosion. Our researchers have found out that permanent grasses are able to grow quickly; they accumulate a considerable

  10. Minimum quantity of urban refuse compost affecting physical and chemical soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    Full Text Available The increasing production of urban waste requires urgent responses because of various environmental problems that arise when urban refuse is stored in landfills or incinerated. Recycling of domestic waste and composting of its organic fraction has been indicated as a possible disposal solution. A three-year experiment was conducted to quantify the minimum rate of urban refuse compost (URC addition able to improve some physical and chemical soil properties at the lowest cost and environmental impact. URC was added to a silty clay soil and to a sandy loam soil 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% rate (w/w. Samplings were made 12, 24 and 36 months after URC application. To study the only effect of compost on soil due to its interaction with the soil matrix, each soil-compost mixture was divided into three boxes and kept outdoors weed free. After 12 months, 3% URC resulted the minimum quantity able to ameliorate several soil properties. In silty clay soil this rate significantly ameliorated microaggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity, but negative effects were observed on electrical conductivity. After 24 months, 3% rate significantly increased soil organic matter content. In the sandy loam soil, after 12 months, 3% rate of URC determined a positive effect on organic matter and cone resistance in dry soil condition. Electrical conductivity increased at 3% URC addition. The minimum URC quantity affecting hydraulic conductivity and plastic limit was 6%, and 9% for the liquid limit. Under these experimental conditions, the lowest rate (3% of URC incorporation to soils appears to be the minimum quantity able to improve most of the soil properties influencing fertility. What the results show is that, to achieve sustainability of urban refuse compost application to agricultural soil, further research is needed to investigate soil property changes in the range between 0% and 3%.

  11. Minimum quantity of urban refuse compost affecting physical and chemical soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rocchini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing production of urban waste requires urgent responses because of various environmental problems that arise when urban refuse is stored in landfills or incinerated. Recycling of domestic waste and composting of its organic fraction has been indicated as a possible disposal solution. A three-year experiment was conducted to quantify the minimum rate of urban refuse compost (URC addition able to improve some physical and chemical soil properties at the lowest cost and environmental impact. URC was added to a silty clay soil and to a sandy loam soil 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% rate (w/w. Samplings were made 12, 24 and 36 months after URC application. To study the only effect of compost on soil due to its interaction with the soil matrix, each soil-compost mixture was divided into three boxes and kept outdoors weed free. After 12 months, 3% URC resulted the minimum quantity able to ameliorate several soil properties. In silty clay soil this rate significantly ameliorated microaggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity, but negative effects were observed on electrical conductivity. After 24 months, 3% rate significantly increased soil organic matter content. In the sandy loam soil, after 12 months, 3% rate of URC determined a positive effect on organic matter and cone resistance in dry soil condition. Electrical conductivity increased at 3% URC addition. The minimum URC quantity affecting hydraulic conductivity and plastic limit was 6%, and 9% for the liquid limit. Under these experimental conditions, the lowest rate (3% of URC incorporation to soils appears to be the minimum quantity able to improve most of the soil properties influencing fertility. What the results show is that, to achieve sustainability of urban refuse compost application to agricultural soil, further research is needed to investigate soil property changes in the range between 0% and 3%.

  12. Sorption interactions of organic compounds with soils affected by agricultural olive mill wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Yonatan; Borisover, Mikhail; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda

    2015-11-01

    The organic compound-soil interactions may be strongly influenced by changes in soil organic matter (OM) which affects the environmental fate of multiple organic pollutants. The soil OM changes may be caused by land disposal of various OM-containing wastes. One unique type of OM-rich waste is olive mill-related wastewater (OMW) characterized by high levels of OM, the presence of fatty aliphatics and polyphenolic aromatics. The systematic data on effects of the land-applied OMW on organic compound-soil interactions is lacking. Therefore, aqueous sorption of simazine and diuron, two herbicides, was examined in batch experiments onto three soils, including untreated and OMW-affected samples. Typically, the organic compound-soil interactions increased following the prior land application of OMW. This increase is associated with the changes in sorption mechanisms and cannot be attributed solely to the increase in soil organic carbon content. A novel observation is that the OMW application changes the soil-sorbent matrix in such a way that the solute uptake may become cooperative or the existing ability of a soil sorbent to cooperatively sorb organic molecules from water may become characterized by a larger affinity. The remarkable finding of this study was that in some cases a cooperative uptake of organic molecules by soils makes itself evident in distinct sigmoidal sorption isotherms rarely observed in soil sorption of non-ionized organic compounds; the cooperative herbicide-soil interactions may be characterized by the Hill model coefficients. However, no single trend was found for the effect of applied OMW on the mechanisms of organic compound-soil interactions. PMID:26183941

  13. Structure of domination of fauna in soil of central flood plain of the Samara river in the conditions of experimental heavy metal pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. М. Kunah

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysisresults of the soil animal complexes structure under in situ experimental heavy metal contamination are presented. The heavy metalsaffect the soil community over a year by changing the dominant structure of animal complexes. The main trend of changing dominant structure of the abundance and biomass is the decrease of absolute dominant and unimportantspecies role and the increase of the role of secondary species and dominants.

  14. Thallium occurrence and partitioning in soils and sediments affected by mining activities in Madrid province (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Garcia-Guinea, J. [National Museum of Natural Sciences, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Laborda, F. [Group of Analytical Spectroscopy and Sensors Group, Institute of Environmental Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Garrido, F., E-mail: fernando.garrido@mncn.csic.es [National Museum of Natural Sciences, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) and its compounds are toxic to biota even at low concentrations but little is known about Tl concentration and speciation in soils. An understanding of the source, mobility, and dispersion of Tl is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of Tl pollution cases. In this paper, we examine the Tl source and dispersion in two areas affected by abandoned mine facilities whose residues remain dumped on-site affecting to soils and sediments of natural water courses near Madrid city (Spain). Total Tl contents and partitioning in soil solid phases as determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure were also examined in soils along the riverbeds of an ephemeral and a permanent streams collecting water runoff and drainage from the mines wastes. Lastly, electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence probe are used as a suitable technique for Tl elemental detection on thallium-bearing phases. Tl was found mainly bound to quartz and alumino-phyllosilicates in both rocks and examined soils. Besides, Tl was also frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules in all samples from both mine scenarios. These biogenic silicates may regulate the transfer of Tl into the soil-water system. - Highlights: • Abandoned mine residues are Tl sources in soils of Madrid catchment area. • Tl was associated to quartz and aluminosilicates in both rocks and soils. • Tl was frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules. • Cathodoluminescence is a suitable technique for Tl detection on soils and rocks.

  15. Biochar pyrolyzed at two temperatures affects Escherichia coli transport through a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Carl H; Abit, Sergio M

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of biochar into soils has been proposed as a means to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. An added environmental benefit is that biochar has also been shown to increase soil retention of nutrients, heavy metals, and pesticides. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether biochar amendments affect the transport of Escherichia coli through a water-saturated soil. We looked at the transport of three E. coli isolates through 10-cm columns packed with a fine sandy soil amended with 2 or 10% (w/w) poultry litter biochar pyrolyzed at 350 or 700°C. For all three isolates, mixing the high-temperature biochar at a rate of 2% into the soil had no impact on transport behavior. When added at a rate of 10%, a reduction of five orders of magnitude in the amount of E. coli transported through the soil was observed for two of the isolates, and a 60% reduction was observed for the third isolate. Mixing the low-temperature biochar into the soil resulted in enhanced transport through the soil for two of the isolates, whereas no significant differences in transport behavior were observed between the low-temperature and high-temperature biochar amendments for one isolate. Our results show that the addition of biochar can affect the retention and transport behavior of E. coli and that biochar application rate, biochar pyrolysis temperature, and bacterial surface characteristics were important factors determining the transport of E. coli through our test soil. PMID:22218181

  16. Biochemical resistance of pyrogenic organic matter in fire-affected mineral soils of Southern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, H.; González Vila, F. J.; Clemente Salas, L.

    2012-04-01

    Incorporated into the soil, naturally formed pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) is considered as highly recalcitrant, but direct estimation of PyOM decomposition rates are scarce. With this aim in mind, we subjected organic matter (OM) of fire-affected and unaffected soils to biochemical degradation under laboratory conditions and monitored CO2 production over a period of seven months. The soils derived from fire affected and unaffected areas of the Sierra de Aznalcóllar and the Doñana National Park, Southern Spain. Virtual fractionation of the solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the fire affected soils into fire-unaffected soil organic matter (SOM) and PyOM yielded charcoal C contributions of 30 to 50% to the total organic C (Corg) of the sample derived from the Aznalcóllar region. Fitting the respiration data with a double exponential decay model revealed a fast carbon flush during the first three weeks of the experiment. Solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy evidenced the contribution of aromatic moieties of the PyOM to this initial carbon release and to the biosynthesis of new microbial biomass. The input of PyOM resulted in an increase of the mean residence time (MRT) of the slow OM pool of the soil by a factor of 3 to 4 to approximately 40 years which rises doubts rises doubts about the presumed big influence of PyOM as an additional C-sink in soils. On the other hand, although being small the difference in turnover rates is evident and has some major implication with respect to long-term alteration of the chemical composition of OM in fire-affected soils. Based on the obtained results and the analysis of PyOM in other soil systems, a conceptual model is presented which can explain the different behavior of PyOM under different soil conditions.

  17. Effects of rock fragments on water dynamics in a fire-affected soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; García-Moreno, Jorge; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.

    2014-05-01

    Rock fragments (RF) are common in the surface of Mediterranean semiarid soils, and have important effects on the soil physical (bulk density and porosity) and hydrological processes (infiltration, evaporation, splash erosion and runoff generation) (Poesen and Lavee, 1994; Rieke-Zapp et al., 2007). In some cases, RFs in Mediterranean areas have been shown to protect bare soils from erosion risk (Cerdà, 2001; Martínez-Zavala, Jordán, 2008; Zavala et al., 2010). Some of these effects are much more relevant when vegetation cover is low or has been reduced after land use change or other causes, as forest fires. Although very few studies exist, the interest on the hydrological effects of RFs in burned areas is increasing recently. After a forest fire, RFs may contribute significantly to soil recovery. In this research we have studied the effect of surface and embedded RFs on soil water control, infiltration and evaporation in calcareous fire-affected soils from a Mediterranean area (SW Spain). For this study, we selected an area with soils derived from limestone under holm oak forest, recently affected by a moderate severity forest fire. The proportion of RF cover showed a significant positive relation with soil water-holding capacity and infiltration rates, although infiltration rate reduced significantly when RF cover increased above a certain threshold. Soil evaporation rate decreased with increasing volumetric content of RFs and became stable with RF contents approximately above 30%. Evaporation also decreased with increasing RF cover. When RF cover increased above 50%, no significant differences were observed between burned and control vegetated plots. REFERENCES Poesen, J., Lavee, H. 1994. Rock fragments in top soils: significance and processes. Catena Supplement 23, 1-28. Cerdà, A. 2001. Effect of rock fragment cover on soil infiltration, interrill runoff and erosion. European Journal of Soil Science 52, 59-68. DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2389.2001.00354.x. Rieke

  18. [Spatial distribution pattern of soil nitrogen in Huanghuadianzi watershed and related affecting factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Yao, Yun-feng; Qin, Fu-cang; Gao, Yu-han; Zhang, Mei-li

    2015-05-01

    This research was conducted in Huanghuadianzi watershed in Aohan, Chifeng, Inner Mongolia. Geostatistic was used to study the spatial distribution of soil nitrogen and their affecting factors. The results showed that the soil nitrogen contents in all layers distributed as an island shape, and the high value areas were mainly distributed in the northwest of the watershed as an obvious fertile island shape, while the low value areas were mainly distributed in the south of the watershed. Nitrogen was mainly concentrated in the surface soil, and its content decreased with the increase of soil depth. The soil nitrogen content at first increased then decreased with the altitude, decreased with the slope, and showed the order of shady slope>semi-shady slope>semi-sunny slope> sunny slope in different aspects. The average soil nitrogen contents in different land use types ranked as cropland >woodland > grassland.

  19. Soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type affect pyrrolizidine alkaloids in Jacobaea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; Veen, van J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Secondary metabolites like pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) play a crucial part in plant defense. We studied the effects of soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type on pyrrolizidine alkaloids in roots and shoots of Jacobaea vulgaris. We used clones of two genotypes from a dune area (Meijendel), propagat

  20. Compost amendment of sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Cornelis, W.; Razzaghi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Sandy soils, with low productivity, could be improved by compost application to sustain crop production. This study aimed to examine the effect of three compost types (vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost, garden waste compost, and spent mushroom compost) on basic properties of a loamy sand...... and greenhouse tomato productivity. Disturbed and intact soil samples were taken from a decade-long compost field experiment on loamy sand with three compost types at application rate of 30 m3 ha-1 yr-1 (7.5 ton ha-1 yr-1). The soils were characterized for chemical and physical properties. Tomato was planted...... in a greenhouse using soil samples from the field and vegetative and yield parameters (plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, and fruit yield), water productivity, and harvest index were evaluated. All compost types significantly increased soil total carbon, total nitrogen, pH, electrical conductivity...

  1. Permafrost-Affected Soils of the Russian Arctic and their Carbon Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, S.; Kutzbach, L.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2014-02-01

    Permafrost-affected soils have accumulated enormous pools of organic matter during the Quaternary Period. The area occupied by these soils amounts to more than 8.6 million km2, which is about 27% of all land areas north of 50° N. Therefore, permafrost-affected soils are considered to be one of the most important cryosphere elements within the climate system. Due to the cryopedogenic processes that form these particular soils and the overlying vegetation that is adapted to the arctic climate, organic matter has accumulated to the present extent of up to 1024 Pg (1 Pg = 1015 g = 1 Gt) of soil organic carbon stored within the uppermost three meters of ground. Considering the observed progressive climate change and the projected polar amplification, permafrost-affected soils will undergo fundamental property changes. Higher turnover and mineralization rates of the organic matter are consequences of these changes, which are expected to result in an increased release of climate-relevant trace gases into the atmosphere. As a result, permafrost regions with their distinctive soils are likely to trigger an important tipping point within the global climate system, with additional political and social implications. The controversy of whether permafrost regions continue accumulating carbon or already function as a carbon source remains open until today. An increased focus on this subject matter, especially in underrepresented Siberian regions, could contribute to a more robust estimation of the soil organic carbon pool of permafrost regions and at the same time improve the understanding of the carbon sink and source functions of permafrost-affected soils.

  2. Linking hydraulic properties of fire-affected soils to infiltration and water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J.A.; Kinner, D.A.; Ubeda, X.

    2009-01-01

    Heat from wildfires can produce a two-layer system composed of extremely dry soil covered by a layer of ash, which when subjected to rainfall, may produce extreme floods. To understand the soil physics controlling runoff for these initial conditions, we used a small, portable disk infiltrometer to measure two hydraulic properties: (1) near-saturated hydraulic conductivity, Kf and (2) sorptivity, S(??i), as a function of initial soil moisture content, ??i, ranging from extremely dry conditions (??i capillarity, and adsorption in a transitional domain corresponding to extremely dry soil, and moreover, it may explain the observed non-linear behavior, and the critical soil-moisture threshold of water repellent soils. Laboratory measurements of Kf and S(??i) are the first for ash and fire-affected soil, but additional measurements are needed of these hydraulic properties for in situ fire-affected soils. They provide insight into water repellency behavior and infiltration under extremely dry conditions. Most importantly, they indicate how existing rainfall-runoff models can be modified to accommodate a possible two-layer system in extremely dry conditions. These modified models can be used to predict floods from burned watersheds under these initial conditions.

  3. Soil Diversity as Affected by Land Use in China: Consequences for Soil Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Shangguan; Peng Gong; Lu Liang; YongJiu Dai; Keli Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Rapid land-use change in recent decades in China and its impact on terrestrial biodiversity have been widely studied, particularly at local and regional scales. However, the effect of land-use change on the diversity of soils that support the terrestrial biological system has rarely been studied. Here, we report the first effort to assess the impact of land-use change on soil diversity for the entire nation of China. Soil diversity and land-use effects were analyzed spatially in grids and pro...

  4. Fauna Europaea: Mollusca - Bivalvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Rafael; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Mollusca-Bivalvia, data from 5 families (Margaritiferidae, Unionidae, Sphaeriidae, Cyrenidae, Dreissenidae) containing 55 species are included in this paper. European freshwater bivalves belong to the Orders Unionoida and Cardiida. All the European unionoids are included in the superfamily Unionoidea, the freshwater mussels or naiads. The European cardiids belong to the following three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Cyrenoidea and Dreissenoidea. Among the Unionoidea there are the most imperilled animal groups on the planet while the Cardioidea includes the cosmopolitan genus Pisidium, the Cyrenoidea the Asiatic clam (Corbiculafluminea) and the Dreissenoidea the famous invasive zebra mussel (Dreissenapolymorpha). Basic information is summarized on their taxonomy and biology. Tabulations include a complete list of the current estimated families, genera and species.

  5. How can climate, soil, and monitoring schedule affect temporal stability of soil water contents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal stability (TS) of soil water content (SWC) reflects the spatio-temporal organization of soil water. The TS SWC was originally recognized as a phenomenon that can be used to provide temporal average SWC of an area of interest from observations at a representative location(s). Currently application fields of TS SWC are numerous, e.g. up- and downscaling SWC, SWC monitoring and data assimilation, precision farming, and sensor network design and optimization. However, the factors that control the SWC organization and TS SWC are not completely understood. Among these factors are soil hydraulic properties that are considered as local controls, weather patterns, and the monitoring schedule. The objective of this work was to use modeling to assess the effect of these factors on the spatio-temporal patterns of SWC. We ran the HYDRUS6 code to simulate four years of SWC in 4-m long soil columns. The columns were assumed homogeneous, soil hydraulic conductivity was drawn from lognormal distributions. Sets of columns were generated separately for sandy loam and loamy soils, soil water retention was set to typical values for those soil textures. Simulations were carried out for four climates present at the continental US. The climate-specific weather patterns were obtained with the CLIGEN code using climate-specific weather observation locations that were humid subtropical from College Station (TX), humid continental from Indianapolis (IN), cold semiarid from Moscow (ID) and hot semiarid from Tucson (AZ). We evaluated the TS and representative location (RL) selections by comparing i) different climates; ii) for the same climates different years; iii) different time intervals between samplings; iv) one year duration surveys vs. one month summer campaigns; and v) different seasons of the same year. Spatial variability of the mean relative differences (MRD) differed among climates for both soils, as the probability of observing the same variance in the MRD was lower than

  6. Community Structure of Soil Fauna in Forest Belt of Different Areas of Shanghai in Fall%上海市外环林带秋季不同区域土壤动物群落结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强; 罗燕; 靳亚丽; 由文辉

    2012-01-01

    为了解上海市外环林带土壤动物群落的生态特征,于2010年11月对上海市外环林带香樟群落的9个样点进行系统调查.结果表明,共捕获土壤动物5 792头,分属6门12纲26个类群,优势类群有轮虫纲(Rotatoria)、涡虫纲(Turbellaria)、线虫纲(Nematoda)、蜱螨目(Acarina)和弹尾目(Collembola).区域环境及建成年份对土壤动物密度都有着明显影响:城乡结合部土壤动物密度最高,工业区最低;建成年份越早,土壤动物密度越低.在垂直方向上,土壤动物存在明显的表聚性.各样点间群落相似性并没有明显的规律性,但区域环境对土壤动物相似性有一定影响.不同区域土壤动物多样性规律存在明显差异,建成年份与土壤动物群落多样性也具有明显相关性,城区样点建成年份越早,多样性指数越高,而工业区则相反.由此可见,区域环境对土壤动物存在一定影响,而外环林带的建立能够缩小不同区域之间的差异,为土壤动物群落创造适宜的小生境.%To explore ecological features of the soil fauna in the forest belt around Shanghai, a systematical investigation was carried out centered on 9 sample plots of camphor woods in the forest belt of Shanghai in November 2010. A total of 5 792 soil animal individuals were collected, belonging to 26 groups of 12 classes under 6 phyla. The dominant species were Rotatoria, Turbellaria, Nematoda, Acarina and Collembola. The findings indicate that the impacts of regional environment and history of the establishment were significant on population density of the soil animals. The highest density was found in soils of the rural-urban fringe area, while the lowest one was in soils of the industrial areas. The earlier the industrial area was established, the lower the soil animal density was. In soil profiles, the animals tended to live in the surface soil layer. No specific regularity was found on similarity of animal communities between

  7. Organic Matter Decomposition in Red Soil as Affected by Earthworms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The earthworms Pheretima carnosa, Drawida gisti and Eisenia foetida were studied to compare their contributions to the decomposition of various organic materials surface-applied on red soil in a 165-day greenhouse experiment. The native species Pheretima carnosa and Drawida gisti were equally effective in accelerating the decomposition of maize residue, according to fresh body weight, while commercial species Eisenia foetida had no significant influence on dry mass loss of maize residue. Liming with CaCO3 or CaO showed little effect on maize residue breakdown involved by Pheretima carnosa, but it inhibited this process involved by Drawida gisti. The capability of Pheretima carnosa to the decomposition of five kinds of organic materials was thoroughly examined. The dry mass losses in worm treatments were in the order of soybean residue > maize residue > pig manure > semi-decayed maize > ryegrass. However, the relative contributions of the earthworm to dry mass loss were in the order of pig manure (89.8%) > semi-decayed maize residue (49.1%) > maize residue (29.4%) > soybean residue (20.9%) > ryegrass residue (16.5%). Pheretima carnosa consumed 20~120 mg dry weight of organic material per gram fresh weight of biomass per day.

  8. Characterizing Soil Organic Matter Degradation Levels in Permafrost-affected Soils using Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamala, R.; Jastrow, J. D.; Calderon, F.; Liang, C.; Miller, R. M.; Ping, C. L.; Michaelson, G. J.; Hofmann, S.

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse-reflectance Fourier-transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (MidIR) was used to (1) investigate soil quality along a latitudinal gradient of Alaskan soils, and in combination with soil incubations, (2) to assess the relative lability of soil organic matter in the active layer and upper permafrost for some of those soils. Twenty nine sites were sampled along a latitudinal gradient (78.79 N to 55.35 N deg). The sites included 8 different vegetation types (moss/lichen, non-acidic and acidic tundra, shrub areas, deciduous forests, mixed forests, coniferous forests, and grassland). At each site, soils were separated by soil horizons and analyzed for pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic and inorganic C, and total N. Samples were also scanned to obtain MidIR spectra, and ratios of characteristic bands previously suggested as indicators of organic matter quality or degradation level were calculated. Principal component analysis showed that axis 1 explained 70% of the variation and was correlated with the general Organic:Mineral ratio, soil organic C, total N, and CEC, but not with vegetation type. Axis 2 explained 25% of the variation and was correlated with most of the band ratios, with negative values for the condensation index (ratio of aromatic to aliphatic organic matter) and positive values for all humification ratios (HU1: ratio of aliphatic to polysaccharides; HU2: ratio of aromatics to polysaccharides; and HU3 ratio of lignin/phenols to polysaccharides) suggesting that axis 2 variations were related to differences in level of soil organic matter degradation. Active organic, active mineral and permafrost layers from selected tundra sites were incubated for two months at -1, 1, 4, 8 and 16 ⁰C. The same band ratios were correlated with total CO2 mineralized during the incubations. Data from 4⁰C showed that the cumulative respired CO2 from the active organic layer across all sites was negatively correlated with the HU1 humification ratio, suggesting

  9. Decreasing seagrass density negatively influences associated fauna

    OpenAIRE

    Rosemary M McCloskey; Unsworth, Richard K. F.

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass meadows globally are disappearing at a rapid rate with physical disturbances being one of the major drivers of this habitat loss. Disturbance of seagrass can lead to fragmentation, a reduction in shoot density, canopy height and coverage, and potentially permanent loss of habitat. Despite being such a widespread issue, knowledge of how such small scale change affects the spatial distribution and abundances of motile fauna remains limited. The present study investigated fish and macro...

  10. Mineralization and carbon turnover in subarctic heath soil as affected by warming and additional litter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Baath, Erland;

    2007-01-01

    was to assess how factorial warming and litter addition in a long-term field experiment on a subarctic heath affect resource limitation of soil microbial communities (measured by thymidine and leucine incorporation techniques), net growing-season mineralization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), and carbon...... the field incubation. The added litter did not affect the carbon content, but it was a source of nutrients to the soil, and it also tended to increase bacterial growth rate and net mineralization of P. The inorganic N pool decreased during the field incubation of soil cores, especially in the separate...... warming and litter addition treatments, while gross mineralized N was immobilized in the biomass of microbes and plants transplanted into the incubates soil cores, but without any significant effect of the treatments. The effects of warming plus litter addition on bacterial growth rates and of warming...

  11. Factors affecting paddy soil arsenic concentration in Bangladesh: prediction and uncertainty of geostatistical risk mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zia U; Panaullah, Golam M; DeGloria, Stephen D; Duxbury, John M

    2011-12-15

    Knowledge of the spatial correlation of soil arsenic (As) concentrations with environmental variables is needed to assess the nature and extent of the risk of As contamination from irrigation water in Bangladesh. We analyzed 263 paired groundwater and paddy soil samples covering highland (HL) and medium highland-1 (MHL-1) land types for geostatistical mapping of soil As and delineation of As contaminated areas in Tala Upazilla, Satkhira district. We also collected 74 non-rice soil samples to assess the baseline concentration of soil As for this area. The mean soil As concentrations (mg/kg) for different land types under rice and non-rice crops were: rice-MHL-1 (21.2)>rice-HL (14.1)>non-rice-MHL-1 (11.9)>non-rice-HL (7.2). Multiple regression analyses showed that irrigation water As, Fe, land elevation and years of tubewell operation are the important factors affecting the concentrations of As in HL paddy soils. Only years of tubewell operation affected As concentration in the MHL-1 paddy soils. Quantitatively similar increases in soil As above the estimated baseline-As concentration were observed for rice soils on HL and MHL-1 after 6-8 years of groundwater irrigation, implying strong retention of As added in irrigation water in both land types. Application of single geostatistical methods with secondary variables such as regression kriging (RK) and ordinary co-kriging (OCK) gave little improvement in prediction of soil As over ordinary kriging (OK). Comparing single prediction methods, kriging within strata (KWS), the combination of RK for HL and OCK for MHL-1, gave more accurate soil As predictions and showed the lowest misclassification of declaring a location "contaminated" with respect to 14.8 mg As/kg, the highest value obtained for the baseline soil As concentration. Prediction of soil As buildup over time indicated that 75% or the soils cropped to rice would contain at least 30 mg/L As by the year 2020. PMID:22055452

  12. Comparison of Soil Fauna (Oribatids and Enchytraeids)Between Conventional and Organic (Tillage and No—Tillage Practices)Farming Crop Fields in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.FUJITA; S.FUJIYAMA

    2001-01-01

    The major soil animal groups,enchyraeid worms and oribatid mites,were compared in the abundance and diversity between conventional fields(CT)and organic farming fields with tillage(OT) or no-tillage(ON)practices,The values of abundance,species richness,diversity and evenness were significantly larger in OT and ON than in CT,indicating that the abundance and diversity in organic farming fields were greater than those in conventional farming,The community structure of enchytraeid genera was different between OT and ON,Enchytraeus was the most abundant in OT ,while Fridericia in ON,The abundance of oribatids in OT was similar th that in ON,while the species richness and diversity in the former were smaller,These results suggeste that no-tilage practice under organic management might comtribute to the improvement in quality of soil mesofauna.

  13. Assessing Soil Quality in Areas Affected by Sulfide Mining. Application to Soils in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel González

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The characterization, evaluation and remediation of polluted soils is one of the present environmental challenges to be addressed in the coming years. The origin of trace elements in soils can be either geogenic or anthropogenic, but only the latter is interesting from a legal point of view. The hazard of the pollutants in the soils not only depends on their total concentration, but particularly on their availability. The mobility of the trace elements depends on their speciation, and it is also affected by several soil parameters. Mining activity is one of the most important anthropogenic causes of soil pollution. As a case study, this work is focused in the Riotinto mining area (Iberian Pyrite Belt, IPB, SW Spain. The IPB is one of the most important metallogenic provinces in the world and it has been exploited for thousands of years. The disposal of mining residues has produced important sources of contamination by trace elements and acidic waters affecting soils and rivers. In addition to these problems, the closure of mines in the Pyrite Belt at the end of the 20th Century has led to a great loss of employment, which has caused the development of an intensive agriculture of citrus fruits as a new source of income. The intensive growing of citrus fruits and the traditional subsistence agriculture have been developed surrounding the mining areas and on floodplains near to mining sites. The level of soil pollution has not been taken into account in these cases, nor has its impact on the health of the inhabitants of these areas. Therefore, it is of great interest to study the current state of the cultivated soils and the sources and types of contaminants derived from mining activity in order to program its decontamination, where appropriate, according to legislation. In order to know the present and future hazard posed by the soils chemical and mineralogical speciation has been carried out, given that the availability of a metal depends on the

  14. Soil composition and nutritional status of apple as affected by long-term application of gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Nava

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum does not affect the soil negative charges and maintains sulfate in the soil solution, making it one of the cheapest products to increase Ca activity in soil solution, especially in the deeper soil layers. Higher Ca levels in the soil solution can increase the uptake of this nutrient by apple trees, reducing the risk of physiological disorders caused by Ca deficiency. This study assessed the effect of long-term gypsum application on some soil properties and on the chemical composition of leaves and fruits of an apple cultivar susceptible to fruit disorders associated with low Ca. The experiment was conducted in São Joaquim, in the South of Brazil, from 2001 to 2009. Gypsum rates of 0, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 t ha-1 were annually broadcast over the soil surface, without incorporation, in an apple orchard with cultivar ´Catarina´, planted in 1997. Gypsum application over eight consecutive years had no effect on soil exchangeable K and Al to a depth of 80 cm, but increased exchangeable Ca in the sampled layers (0-10, 10-20, 40-60 and 60-80 cm, while exchangeable Mg decreased only in the surface layer (0-20 cm. Gypsum did not affect the concentration of any nutrient in the fruits, including Ca. The same was verified in the leaves, except for Mg which decreased with increased gypsum rate. Despite increasing the availability of Ca in the soil profile to a depth of 80 cm, gypsum was not effective to increase the Ca content in leaves and fruits of an apple cultivar susceptible to Ca deficiency grown in an appropriately limed soil.

  15. [Sizes of soil macropores and related main affecting factors on a vegetated basalt slope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qi; Xu, Ze-Min; Tian, Lin

    2013-10-01

    The landslide on vegetated slopes caused by extreme weather has being increased steadily, and the preferential flow in soil macropores plays an important role in the landslide. By using water breakthrough curve and Poiseuille equation, this paper estimated the radius range, amount, and average volume of soil macropores on a vegetated basalt slope of Maka Mountain, Southwest China, and analyzed the distribution of the soil macropores and the main affecting factors. In the study area, the radius of soil macropores ranged from 0.3 to 1.8 mm, mainly between 0.5 and 1.2 mm. The large-radius macropores (1.4-1.8 mm) were lesser, while the small-radius macropores (< 1.4 mm) were more. With the development of soil profile, soil macropores were more in upper layers and lesser in deeper layers. The average volume of the macropores contributed 84.7% to the variance of steady effluent rate. Among the factors affecting the average volume of the large macropores, vegetations root mass had a linear relationship, with the correlation coefficient being 0.70, and soil organic matter content also had a linear relationship, with the correlation coefficient being 0.64.

  16. [Sizes of soil macropores and related main affecting factors on a vegetated basalt slope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qi; Xu, Ze-Min; Tian, Lin

    2013-10-01

    The landslide on vegetated slopes caused by extreme weather has being increased steadily, and the preferential flow in soil macropores plays an important role in the landslide. By using water breakthrough curve and Poiseuille equation, this paper estimated the radius range, amount, and average volume of soil macropores on a vegetated basalt slope of Maka Mountain, Southwest China, and analyzed the distribution of the soil macropores and the main affecting factors. In the study area, the radius of soil macropores ranged from 0.3 to 1.8 mm, mainly between 0.5 and 1.2 mm. The large-radius macropores (1.4-1.8 mm) were lesser, while the small-radius macropores (soil profile, soil macropores were more in upper layers and lesser in deeper layers. The average volume of the macropores contributed 84.7% to the variance of steady effluent rate. Among the factors affecting the average volume of the large macropores, vegetations root mass had a linear relationship, with the correlation coefficient being 0.70, and soil organic matter content also had a linear relationship, with the correlation coefficient being 0.64. PMID:24483084

  17. Changes of soil fauna community in the subalpine coniferous plantation in western Sichuan after the Wenchuan Earthquake%汶川大地震后川西亚高山针叶林土壤动物群落变迁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉梅; 杨万勤; 张健; 吴炳林

    2014-01-01

    对川西亚高山针叶林土壤动物群落汶川大地震前后的结构特征进行对比研究,旨在通过土壤动物对地震的响应了解地震对川西亚高山针叶林生态系统功能及过程的影响.结果显示,地震后大型土壤动物类群数、个体密度、DG指数均有小幅增长,但无显著差异;中小型土壤动物类群中,湿生土壤动物线虫的个体密度有一定增加,而干生土壤动物蜱螨目、弹尾目的个体密度有一定减少,但均无显著差异;土壤原生动物由7 083个/g鲜土降至625个/g鲜土,有极显著差异(P<0.01).研究表明,受地震影响的林地内,不同体型的土壤动物响应不同,其中,大型土壤动物多样性有所增加,主要与微域生境趋于复杂化有关,而小型和微型土壤动物多样性有所减少,则与地下水位的变化有关.%Located at the transition between the Sichuan Basin and the Tibet Plateau,the area of Wenchuan Earthquake is one of the most ecologically fragile regions in China and plays an important role in ecological security of the Sichuan Basin.The earthquake resulted in great impacts on ecosystems in this area.Although numerous studies have been done about the changes of vegetation and giant panda habitat caused by the Wenchuan Earthquake,little field survey is yet done about the soil fauna response to the earthquake.This research studied the changes of soil fauna ecological characteristics in a subalpine coniferous plantation in western Sichuan after Wenchuan Earthquake.The group number,individual number and DG index of macrofauna increased without significant differences.Among mesofauna,Nematoda individuals increased,however Acarina and Collembola individuals decreased.As for microfauna,the individual number of soil protozoa decreased significantly.The results showed that soil protozoa are more sensitive to earthquake than macrofauna and mesofauna,therefore a good biological indicator for environmental changes.

  18. Climate, soil texture, and soil types affect the contributions of fine-fraction-stabilized carbon to total soil organic carbon in different land uses across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Andong; Feng, Wenting; Zhang, Wenju; Xu, Minggang

    2016-05-01

    Mineral-associated organic carbon (MOC), that is stabilized by fine soil particles (i.e., silt plus clay, organic carbon (SOC) persistence and sequestration, due to its large contribution to total SOC (TSOC) and long turnover time. Our objectives were to investigate how climate, soil type, soil texture, and agricultural managements affect MOC contributions to TSOC in China. We created a dataset from 103 published papers, including 1106 data points pairing MOC and TSOC across three major land use types: cropland, grassland, and forest. Overall, the MOC/TSOC ratio ranged from 0.27 to 0.80 and varied significantly among soil groups in cropland, grassland, and forest. Croplands and forest exhibited significantly higher median MOC/TSOC ratios than in grassland. Moreover, forest and grassland soils in temperate regions had higher MOC/TSOC ratios than in subtropical regions. Furthermore, the MOC/TSOC ratio was much higher in ultisol, compared with the other soil types. Both the MOC content and MOC/TSOC ratio were positively correlated with the amount of fine fraction (silt plus clay) in soil, highlighting the importance of soil texture in stabilizing organic carbon across various climate zones. In cropland, different fertilization practices and land uses (e.g., upland, paddy, and upland-paddy rotation) significantly altered MOC/TSOC ratios, but not in cropping systems (e.g., mono- and double-cropping) characterized by climatic differences. This study demonstrates that the MOC/TSOC ratio is mainly driven by soil texture, soil types, and related climate and land uses, and thus the variations in MOC/TSOC ratios should be taken into account when quantitatively estimating soil C sequestration potential of silt plus clay particles on a large scale. PMID:26905446

  19. Climate, soil texture, and soil types affect the contributions of fine-fraction-stabilized carbon to total soil organic carbon in different land uses across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Andong; Feng, Wenting; Zhang, Wenju; Xu, Minggang

    2016-05-01

    Mineral-associated organic carbon (MOC), that is stabilized by fine soil particles (i.e., silt plus clay, organic carbon (SOC) persistence and sequestration, due to its large contribution to total SOC (TSOC) and long turnover time. Our objectives were to investigate how climate, soil type, soil texture, and agricultural managements affect MOC contributions to TSOC in China. We created a dataset from 103 published papers, including 1106 data points pairing MOC and TSOC across three major land use types: cropland, grassland, and forest. Overall, the MOC/TSOC ratio ranged from 0.27 to 0.80 and varied significantly among soil groups in cropland, grassland, and forest. Croplands and forest exhibited significantly higher median MOC/TSOC ratios than in grassland. Moreover, forest and grassland soils in temperate regions had higher MOC/TSOC ratios than in subtropical regions. Furthermore, the MOC/TSOC ratio was much higher in ultisol, compared with the other soil types. Both the MOC content and MOC/TSOC ratio were positively correlated with the amount of fine fraction (silt plus clay) in soil, highlighting the importance of soil texture in stabilizing organic carbon across various climate zones. In cropland, different fertilization practices and land uses (e.g., upland, paddy, and upland-paddy rotation) significantly altered MOC/TSOC ratios, but not in cropping systems (e.g., mono- and double-cropping) characterized by climatic differences. This study demonstrates that the MOC/TSOC ratio is mainly driven by soil texture, soil types, and related climate and land uses, and thus the variations in MOC/TSOC ratios should be taken into account when quantitatively estimating soil C sequestration potential of silt plus clay particles on a large scale.

  20. Spatial variability of soil nitrogen in a hilly valley: Multiscale patterns and affecting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shirong; Xia, Chunlan; Li, Ting; Wu, Chungui; Deng, Ouping; Zhong, Qinmei; Xu, Xiaoxun; Li, Yun; Jia, Yongxia

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the spatial distribution of soil nitrogen at different scales is crucial for improving soil nitrogen use efficiency and controlling nitrogen pollution. We evaluated the spatial variability of soil total nitrogen (TN) and available nitrogen (AN) in the Fujiang River Valley, a typical hilly region composed of low, medium and high hills in the central Sichuan Basin, China. We considered the two N forms at single hill, landscape and valley scales using a combined method of classical statistics, geostatistics and a geographic information system. The spatial patterns and grading areas of soil TN and AN were different among hill types and different scales. The percentages of higher grades of the two nitrogen forms decreased from low, medium to high hills. Hill type was a major factor determining the spatial variability of the two nitrogen forms across multiple scales in the valley. The main effects of general linear models indicated that the key affecting factors of soil TN and AN were hill type and fertilization at the single hill scale, hill type and soil type at the landscape scale, and hill type, slope position, parent material, soil type, land use and fertilization at the valley scale. Thus, the effects of these key factors on the two soil nitrogen forms became more significant with upscaling. PMID:27135562

  1. Factors affecting Hg (II adsorption in soils from the Rio Negro basin (Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miretzky

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (II adsorption studies in top soils (top 10 cm from the Rio Negro basin show this process depends strongly on some selected parameters of the aqueous phase in contact with the soils. Maximum adsorption occurred in the pH range 3.0-5.0 (>90%. Dissolved organic matter shows an inhibitory effect on the availability of Hg (II to be adsorbed by the soils, whereas a higher chloride content of the solution resulted in a lower adsorption of Hg (II at pH 5.0. Soils with higher organic matter content were less affected by changes in the salinity. An increase in the initial Hg (II concentration increased the amount of Hg (II adsorbed by the soil and decreased the time needed to reach equilibrium. A Freundlich isotherm provided a good model for Hg (II adsorption in the two types of soil studied. The kinetics of Hg (II adsorption on Amazonian soils showed to be very fast and followed pseudo-second order kinetics. An environmental implication of these results is discussed under the real scenario present in the Negro River basin, where acidic waters are in contact with a soil naturally rich in mercury.

  2. Growth and phosphorus uptake of sorghum plants in salt affected soil as affected by organic materials composted with rock phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the influence of different organic materials, Farm yard manure (FYM), Humic acid (HA) and Press mud (PM) and their composts prepared with rock phosphate on the growth and phosphorus (P) uptake of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.). The experiment was conducted in Randomized Complete Block design with three replication in salt affected soil at research farm of botanical garden Azakhel Nowshera during kharif 2012. Fertilizers were applied at the rate of 120- 90-60 kg ha/sup -1/ N, P and K, respectively. The source of N was urea and organic materials in composted and non composted form. Single super phosphate, rock phosphate, organic materials and their composts were used as P source, while sulphate of potash was used as source of K. The organic materials were applied before crop sowing at recommended level on the basis of their P content. The maximum and significantly (p=0.05) increased sorghum total dry matter yield of 23733 kg ha/sup -1/, emergence m/sup -2/ of 142 and plant height of 147 cm were observed in the treatment where composts of FYM, HA and PM were applied in combination. Increase in soil organic matter content was recorded by the application of composts of different organic materials, while decreasing trend was found in the values of soil electrical conductivity (ECe) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Maximum plant N uptake of 159 kg ha/sup -1/, P uptake of 62.5 kg ha/sup -1/ and K uptake of 557 kg ha/sup -1/ were noted in the treatment where a combination of composts of FYM, HA and PM were added. Results suggest that the use of composts of different organic materials and RP are environment friendly and have the potential to improve sorghum growth, plants nutrient uptake and ameliorate salt affected soils. (author)

  3. To what extent clay mineralogy affects soil aggregation? Consequences for soil organic matter stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Ugalde, O.; Barré, P.; Hubert, F.; Virto, I.; Chenu, C.; Ferrage, E.; Caner, L.

    2012-12-01

    Aggregation is a key process for soil functioning as it influences C storage, vulnerability to erosion and water holding capacity. While the influence of soil organic C on aggregation has been documented, much less is known about the role of soil mineralogy. Soils usually contain a mixture of clay minerals with contrasted surface properties, which should result on different abilities of clay minerals to aggregation. We took advantage of the intrinsic mineral heterogeneity of a temperate Luvisol to compare the role of clay minerals (illite, smectite, kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite) in aggregation. In a first step, grassland and tilled soil samples were fractionated in water in aggregate-size classes according to the hierarchical model of aggregation (Tisdall and Oades, 1982). Clay mineralogy and organic C in the aggregate-size classes were analyzed. The results showed that interstratified minerals containing swelling phases accumulated in aggregated fractions (>2 μm) compared to free clay fractions (500 μm) to micro-aggregates (50-250 μm). C concentration and C/N ratio followed the opposite trend. These results constitute a clay mineral-based evidence for the hierarchical model of aggregation, which postulates an increasing importance of the reactivity of clay minerals in the formation of micro-aggregates compared to larger aggregates. In the latter aggregates, formation relies on the physical enmeshment of particles by fungal hyphae, and root and microbial exudates. In a second step, micro-aggregates from the tilled soil samples were submitted to increasingly disaggregating treatments by sonication to evaluate the link between their water stability and clay mineralogy. Micro-aggregates with increasing stability showed an increase of interstratified minerals containing swelling phases and C concentration for low intensities of disaggregation (from 0 to 5 J mL-1). This suggests that swelling phases promote their stability. Swelling phases and organic C

  4. Geohelminths distribution as affected by soil properties, physicochemical factors and climate in Sharkyia governorate Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etewa, Samia E; Abdel-Rahman, Sara A; Abd El-Aal, Naglaa F; Fathy, Ghada M; El-Shafey, Mahmoud A; Ewis, A M G

    2016-06-01

    Soil-transmitted helminths are mainly a group of parasitic nematodes causing human infection through contact with parasite eggs or larvae; they survive in the warm and moist soil of the tropical and subtropical countries. This study was carried out in Sharkyia governorate from October, 2011 to October, 2013, to correlate between the prevalence and distribution of these parasites in the soil and the physicochemical factors affecting the examined samples of the soil. One hundred and twenty samples of different types of soil (clay, silt, sand) from different localities were collected and examined. Diagnosis of geohelminths was confirmed by the recovery of their eggs and larvae with other protozoa by different parasitological methods. The modified baermann method was found to be more efficient in detection of geohelminths larvae than charcoal culture method. Among the examined sites geohelminths were much more numerous in the soil of rural areas especially in the spring and summer seasons, while the contamination of canal banks by geohelminths was the worst (80 %). An insignificant correlation was reported between the soil texture and the number of positive samples in the examined areas while the relationship was directly proportional among (moisture, PH, organic). It appeared that the most common geohelminthic stage was Toxocara spp. eggs besides other types of protozoa especially Balantidium coli cysts. This suggests that factors other than soil texture are important in the prevalence of geohelminths in the soil e.g. temperature, moisture, PH and organic matter. So, to change some of these factors in a trial to control geoparasites transmission but with keeping the environment should be tried. These results also open the way to further studies to highlight the mutual affection between inhabitants of these sites and the prevalence of these geoparasites.

  5. Geohelminths distribution as affected by soil properties, physicochemical factors and climate in Sharkyia governorate Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etewa, Samia E; Abdel-Rahman, Sara A; Abd El-Aal, Naglaa F; Fathy, Ghada M; El-Shafey, Mahmoud A; Ewis, A M G

    2016-06-01

    Soil-transmitted helminths are mainly a group of parasitic nematodes causing human infection through contact with parasite eggs or larvae; they survive in the warm and moist soil of the tropical and subtropical countries. This study was carried out in Sharkyia governorate from October, 2011 to October, 2013, to correlate between the prevalence and distribution of these parasites in the soil and the physicochemical factors affecting the examined samples of the soil. One hundred and twenty samples of different types of soil (clay, silt, sand) from different localities were collected and examined. Diagnosis of geohelminths was confirmed by the recovery of their eggs and larvae with other protozoa by different parasitological methods. The modified baermann method was found to be more efficient in detection of geohelminths larvae than charcoal culture method. Among the examined sites geohelminths were much more numerous in the soil of rural areas especially in the spring and summer seasons, while the contamination of canal banks by geohelminths was the worst (80 %). An insignificant correlation was reported between the soil texture and the number of positive samples in the examined areas while the relationship was directly proportional among (moisture, PH, organic). It appeared that the most common geohelminthic stage was Toxocara spp. eggs besides other types of protozoa especially Balantidium coli cysts. This suggests that factors other than soil texture are important in the prevalence of geohelminths in the soil e.g. temperature, moisture, PH and organic matter. So, to change some of these factors in a trial to control geoparasites transmission but with keeping the environment should be tried. These results also open the way to further studies to highlight the mutual affection between inhabitants of these sites and the prevalence of these geoparasites. PMID:27413327

  6. Thallium occurrence and partitioning in soils and sediments affected by mining activities in Madrid province (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, M A; Garcia-Guinea, J; Laborda, F; Garrido, F

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) and its compounds are toxic to biota even at low concentrations but little is known about Tl concentration and speciation in soils. An understanding of the source, mobility, and dispersion of Tl is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of Tl pollution cases. In this paper, we examine the Tl source and dispersion in two areas affected by abandoned mine facilities whose residues remain dumped on-site affecting to soils and sediments of natural water courses near Madrid city (Spain). Total Tl contents and partitioning in soil solid phases as determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure were also examined in soils along the riverbeds of an ephemeral and a permanent streams collecting water runoff and drainage from the mines wastes. Lastly, electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence probe are used as a suitable technique for Tl elemental detection on thallium-bearing phases. Tl was found mainly bound to quartz and alumino-phyllosilicates in both rocks and examined soils. Besides, Tl was also frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules in all samples from both mine scenarios. These biogenic silicates may regulate the transfer of Tl into the soil-water system. PMID:26218566

  7. Thallium occurrence and partitioning in soils and sediments affected by mining activities in Madrid province (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, M A; Garcia-Guinea, J; Laborda, F; Garrido, F

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) and its compounds are toxic to biota even at low concentrations but little is known about Tl concentration and speciation in soils. An understanding of the source, mobility, and dispersion of Tl is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of Tl pollution cases. In this paper, we examine the Tl source and dispersion in two areas affected by abandoned mine facilities whose residues remain dumped on-site affecting to soils and sediments of natural water courses near Madrid city (Spain). Total Tl contents and partitioning in soil solid phases as determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure were also examined in soils along the riverbeds of an ephemeral and a permanent streams collecting water runoff and drainage from the mines wastes. Lastly, electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence probe are used as a suitable technique for Tl elemental detection on thallium-bearing phases. Tl was found mainly bound to quartz and alumino-phyllosilicates in both rocks and examined soils. Besides, Tl was also frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules in all samples from both mine scenarios. These biogenic silicates may regulate the transfer of Tl into the soil-water system.

  8. Yield and Nicotine Content of Flue-Cured Tobacco as Affected by Soil Nitrogen Mineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Xiao-Tang; CHAO Feng-Chun; LI Chun-Jian; JIANG Rong-Feng; P.CHRISTIE; ZHANG Fu-Suo

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) supply is the most important factor affecting yield and quality of flue-cured tobacco (FCT).A field experiment and an in situ incubation method were used to study the effects of soil N mineralization in the later stages of growth on yield and nicotine content of FCT in Fenggang and Jiusha,Guizhou Province.The yield and market value of FCT at Fenggang were much lower than those at Jinsha.However,the nicotine content of middle and upper leaves was much higher at Fenggang than at Jiusha when the same rate of fertilizer N was applied,which might be due to a higher N supply capacity at the Fenggang site.At later stages of growth (7-16 weeks after transplanting),the soil net N mineralization at Fenggang (56 kg N ha-1) was almost double that at Jiusha (30 kg N ha-1).While soil NHa-N and NO3-N were almost exhausted by the plants or leached 5 weeks after transplanting,the N taken up at the later growth stages at Fenggang were mainly derived from soil N mineralization,which contributed to a high nicotine content in the upper leaves.The order of soil N contribution to N buildup in different leaves was:upper leaves > middle leaves > lower leaves.Thus,soil N mineralization at late growth stages was an important factor affecting N accumulation and therefore the nicotine content in the upper leaves.

  9. Nitrous Oxide and Methane Emissions as Affected by Water, Soil and Nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Zheng-Qin; XING Guang-Xi; ZHU Zhao-Liang

    2007-01-01

    Specific management of water regimes,soil and N in China might play an important role in regulating N2O and CH4 emissions in rice fields.Nitrous oxide and methane emissions from alternate non-flooded/flooded paddies were monitored simultaneously during a 516-day incubation with lysimeter experiments.Two N sources (15N-(NH4)2SO4 and 15N-labeled milk vetch)were applied to two contrasting paddies:one derived from Xiashu loess(Loess)and one from Quaternary red clay(Clay).Both N2O and CH4 emissions were significantly higher in soil Clay than in soil Loess during the flooded period.For both soil,N2O emissions peaked at the transition periods shortly after the beginning of the flooded and non-flooded seasons.Soil type affected N2O emission patterns.In soil Clay,the emission peak during the transition period from non-flooded to flooded conditions was much higher than the peak during the transition period from flooded to non-flooded conditions.In soil Loess,the emission peak during the transition period from flooded to non-flooded conditions was obviously higher than the peak during the transition period from non-flooded to flooded conditions except for milk vetch treatment.Soil type also had a significant effect on CH4 emissions during the flooded season,over which the weighted average flux was 111 mg C m-2 h-1 and 2.2 mg C m-2 h-1 from Clay and Loess,respectively.Results indicated that it was the transition in the water regime that dominated N2O emissions while it was the soil type that dominated CH4 emissions during the flooded season.Anaerobic oxidation of methane possibly existed in soil Loess during the flooded season.

  10. Comparison of Soil Fauna (Oribatids and Enchytraeids){1mm BetweenConventional and Organic (Tillage and No-1mm TillagePractices) Farming Crop Fields in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The major soil animal groups, enchytraeid worms and oribatid mites,were compared in the abundance and diversity between conventionalfields (CT) and organic farming fields with tillage (OT) or no-tillage(ON) practices. The values of abundance, species richness, diversityand evenness were significantly larger in OT and ON than in CT,indicating that the abundance and diversity in organic farming fieldswere greater than those in conventional farming. The communitystructure of enchytraeid genera was different between OT and ON.{ Enchytraeus was the most abundant in OT, whileFridericia in ON. The abundance of oribatids in OT was similarto that in ON, while the species richness and diversity in the formerwere smaller. These results suggested that no-tillage practice underorganic management might contribute to the improvement in quality ofsoil mesofauna.

  11. Bacterial diversity in Greenlandic soils as affected by potato cropping and inorganic versus organic fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Charlotte Frydenlund; Pedas, Pai Rosager; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    Arctic and Subarctic ecosystems will in the near future be exposed to severe environmental stresses due to global warming. For example, the microbial community structure and function may change as a result of increased temperatures. In Greenland, agriculture is carried out in the Subarctic regions...... with only limited pest management, despite the presence of plant pathogenic fungi. The microbial community composition in agricultural soils, which plays an important role for soil and plant health and for crop yield, may be affected by the use of different fertilizer treatments. Currently, only limited...... on bacterial diversity, nutrient composition and crop yield in two Greenlandic agricultural soils. An effect of fertilizer was found on soil and plant nutrient levels and on crop yields. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences did not reveal any major changes in the overall bacterial community composition...

  12. To Identify the Important Soil Properties Affecting Dinoseb Adsorption with Statistical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqing Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the influences of soil characteristic factors on dinoseb adsorption parameter with different statistical methods would be valuable to explicitly figure out the extent of these influences. The correlation coefficients and the direct, indirect effects of soil characteristic factors on dinoseb adsorption parameter were analyzed through bivariate correlation analysis, and path analysis. With stepwise regression analysis the factors which had little influence on the adsorption parameter were excluded. Results indicate that pH and CEC had moderate relationship and lower direct effect on dinoseb adsorption parameter due to the multicollinearity with other soil factors, and organic carbon and clay contents were found to be the most significant soil factors which affect the dinoseb adsorption process. A regression is thereby set up to explore the relationship between the dinoseb adsorption parameter and the two soil factors: the soil organic carbon and clay contents. A 92% of the variation of dinoseb sorption coefficient could be attributed to the variation of the soil organic carbon and clay contents.

  13. On the structural factors of soil humic matter related to soil water repellence in fire-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, G.; González-Vila, F. J.; González-Pérez, J. A.; Knicker, H.; De la Rosa, J. M.; Dettweiler, C.; Hernández, Z.

    2012-04-01

    In order to elucidate the impact of forest fires on physical and chemical properties of the soils as well as on the chemical composition of the soil organic matter, samples from two Mediterranean soils with contrasted characteristics and vegetation (O horizon, Lithic Leptosols under Quercus ilex and Pinus pinaster) and one agricultural soil (Ap horizon, Luvisol) were heated at 350 °C in laboratory conditions for three successive steps up to 600 s. The C- and N-depletion in the course of the heating showed small changes up to an oxidation time of 300 s. On the other side, and after 600 s, considerable C-losses (between 21% in the Luvisol and 50% in the Leptosols) were observed. The relatively low N-depletion ca. 4% (Luvisol) and 21% (Leptosol under pine) suggested preferential loss of C and the subsequent relative enrichment of nitrogen. Paralleling the progressive depletion of organic matter, the Leptosols showed a significant increase of both pH and electrical conductivity. The former change paralleled the rapid loss of carboxyl groups, whereas the latter point to the relative enrichment of ash with a bearing on the concentration of inorganic ions, which could be considered a positive effect for the post-fire vegetation. The quantitative and qualitative analyses by solid-state 13C NMR spectra of the humic fractions in the samples subjected to successive heating times indicate significant concentration of aromatic structures newly-formed in the course of the dehydration and cyclization of carbohydrates (accumulation of black carbon-type polycyclic aromatic structures), and probably lipids and peptides. The early decarboxylation, in addition to the depletion of O-alkyl hydrophilic constituents and further accumulation of secondary aromatic structures resulted in the dramatic increase in the soil water drop penetration time. It was confirmed that this enhancement of the soil hydrophobicity is not related to an increased concentration of soil free lipid, but is

  14. Soil Erosion as Affected by Polyacrylamide Application Under Simulated Furrow Irrigation with Saline Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Chao-Yin; LI Fa-Hu; L. S.WU

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of soil and water losses under furrow.irrigation with saline water is important to environnental protection and agricultural production.The objective of this study was to determine the effect of polyacrylamide (pAM) application on soil infiltration and erosion under simulated furrow irrigation with saline water.Polyacrylamide was applied by dissolving it in irrigation water at the rates of 1.5,7.5,and 15.0 mg L-1 or spreading it as a powder on soil surface at the rates of 0.3,15,3.0,and 6.0 g m-2,respectively.The electrolyte concentration of tested irrigation water was 10 and 30 mmolc L-1 and its sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) was 0.5,10.0,and 20.0 (mmol(c) L-1)0.5.Distilled water was used as a control for irrigation water quality.Results indicated that the electrolyte concentration and SAR generally did not significantly affect soil and water losses after PAM application.Infiltration rate and total infiltration volume decreased with the increase of PAM application rate.Polyacrylamide application in both methods significantly reduced soil erosion,but PAM application rate did not significantly affect it.The solution PAM application was more effective in controlling soil erosion than the powdered PAM application,but the former exerted a greater adverse influence on soil infiltration than the latter.Under the same total amounts,the powdered PAM application resulted in a 38.2%-139.6% granter infiltration volume but a soil mass loss of 1.3-3.4 times greater than the solution PAM apllication.

  15. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  16. Investigations of Gamasina mites in natural and man-affected soils in Latvia (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmane, I.

    2003-01-01

    Investigations of Gamasina mites in natural and man-affected soils in Latvia (Acari: Mesostigmata) A short overview is presented on Gamasina material collected in 22 natural and man-disturbed habitats in Latvia. Species diversity, average density and species dominance were investigated. Altogether 1

  17. Organic matter protection as affected by the mineral soil matrix: allophanic vs. non-allophanic volcanic ash soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierop, K. G. J.; Kaal, J.; Jansen, B.; Naafs, D. F. W.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic ash soils (Andosols) contain the largest amounts of organic carbon of all mineral soil types. Chemical (complexes of organic matter with allophane, Al/Fe) and physical (aggregation) mechanisms are protecting the carbon from decomposition. While allophanic Andosols are dominated by short range order minerals such as allophane, imogolite and ferrihydrite, organic matter-Al/Fe complexes dominate non-allophanic Andosols. Consequently, chemical interactions between the mineral soil matrix and organic matter differ between these two soil types. This difference could potentially lead to different organic matter compositions. In this study, the organic matter of Ah horizons of an allophanic Andosol with a non-allophanic Andosol from Madeira Island is compared using analytical pyrolysis. Both volcanic soil types showed a relative decrease of lignin-derived pyrolysis products with depth, but this decrease was more pronounced in the allophanic Andosol. Polysaccharides were more abundant in the allophanic Ah horizon, particularly at lower depth, and this was also the case for the non-plant-derived N-containing polysaccharide chitin. Most likely, these biopolymers are adsorbed onto short range order minerals such as allophane and therefore were better protected in the allophanic Andosol. In addition, the higher chitin contents combined with the more pronounced lignin degradation suggests a higher fungal activity. Aliphatic pyrolysis products (n-alkenes/n-alkanes, fatty acids) were relatively more enriched in the non-allophanic Andosol. Lower microbial activity caused by the more acidic pH and higher levels of (toxic) aluminium are the most plausible reasons for the accumulation of these compounds in the non-allophanic Andosol. Although the allophanic and non-allophanic Andosol resembled each other in containing biopolymer groups of the same orders of magnitudes, in particular the contents of chitin and aliphatic compounds were distinctly affected by the differences in

  18. Biogeochemical weathering of serpentinites: An examination of incipient dissolution affecting serpentine soil formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Dissolution of primary minerals is important to porosity generation in serpentinites. • Mineral weathering extent in serpentinites follows the order Fe > Mg > Al rich minerals. • Fe-oxidizing bacteria may mediate Fe-rich primary and serpentine mineral alteration. • Serpentinite weathering is strongly impacted by degree of serpentinization. - Abstract: Serpentinite rocks, high in Mg and trace elements including Ni, Cr, Cd, Co, Cu, and Mn and low in nutrients such as Ca, K, and P, form serpentine soils with similar chemical properties resulting in chemically extreme environments for the biota that grow upon them. The impact of parent material on soil characteristics is most important in young soils, and therefore the incipient weathering of serpentinite rock likely has a strong effect on the development of serpentine soils and ecosystems. Additionally, porosity generation is a crucial process in converting rock into a soil that can support vegetation. Here, the important factors affecting the incipient weathering of serpentinite rock are examined at two sites in the Klamath Mountains, California. Serpentinite-derived soils and serpentinite rock cores were collected in depth profiles from each sampling location. Mineral dissolution in weathered serpentinite samples, determined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, electron microprobe analyses, and synchrotron microXRD, is consistent with the order, from most weathered to least weathered: Fe-rich pyroxene > antigorite > Mg-rich lizardite > Al-rich lizardite. These results suggest that the initial porosity formation within serpentinite rock, impacting the formation of serpentine soil on which vegetation can exist, is strongly affected both by the presence of non-serpentine primary minerals as well as the composition of the serpentine minerals. In particular, the presence of ferrous Fe appears to contribute to greater dissolution, whereas the presence of Al within the

  19. The Phosphorus Transfer From Soil To Water As Affected By The Agronomic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Teresa; Celi, Luisella; Buenemann, Else; Oberson, Astrid; Frossard, Emmanuel; Barberis, Elisabetta

    2010-05-01

    Fertilizer management, in the long term, can affect the amount of P that can be in excess compared to the cultural needs and modify the soil P buffer capacity. These factors can led to P losses from soil to waters, especially via runoff and as particulate P (90% of TP). Soil texture and the amount of organic matter are the main key factors to estimate soil disperdibility but, in turn, the P amount and its forms can also have a dispersive effect and can influence P enrichment of particles potentially lost during runoff processes and its contribution to water eutrophication. The environmental impact due to the P transfer depends on P speciation, because only the inorganic and soluble P forms, or the most degradable organic P ones, are bioavailable. To evaluate the effect of agronomic practices on P losses and on its bioavailability in the long term, soil samples from a middle term experiment have been selected. The field experiment is based on maize cropping systems applying different fertilizers, mineral, as NPK and PK, and organic, as manure (M) and slurry (S) since 1992. To obtain the suspended sediment from soil, a simple water dispersion test was applied (Withers et al., 2007) and the different P forms were characterized. On soil and on suspended sediment the Hedley fractionation (Hedley et al., 1982) was used to determine the P forms, their potential lability and the effect on soil disperdibility. The adoption of isotopic techniques was considered to compare different methods and to estimate the risk of P losses in the long-term. Dispersion test, to simulate the rainy event and the irrigation practices effect on soil, showed that the amount of total suspended sediment lost (TSS) was lower in the organic fertilized plots, while the particulate P bounded to sediment (PP/TSS) was higher than in the mineral fertilized plots. Indeed the complexive effect of organic fertilization, increasing organic matter content and Olsen P, was reflected in a lower soil

  20. Benthic fauna of mangrove environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    The distribution, abundance and importance of benthic fauna in a mangrove environment has been discussed. This ecosystem is enriched with terrestrial, aquatic, marshy and mudflat species mangrove environment. Qualitative and quantitative...

  1. Distribution of CO2 in Soil Air Affected by Vegetation in the Shilin National Park

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋林华; 梁福源

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the CO2 distribution of soil atmosphere in the Shilin National Park. The measurement sites were chosen according to different topographic features and different vegetations. Seven measurement sites on 3 cross sections were chosen to pass through 3 karstic depressions or on the slopes of depressions. All measurement results show soils with pH values lower than 7.0 (from 5.4 to 6.6). There are 2 cases for the pH values of soil in different topographic features: the pH values of 2 profiles on the ridges or upper slopes of depressions are lower than those in the depressions;and the pH values of 2 soil profiles on the slopes of depressions are higher than those in the depressions. Most samples show relatively low humidity and CO2 contents on the ridges or slopes of depressions compared with soil profiles in the depressions. High CO2 contents occur at depths from -40 to -80 cm and high and dense grassland shows high CO2 contents in the soil atmosphere. Grass roots may grow and are distributed mainly at depths from -20 to -40 cm; while tree roots predominantly as deep as -60 cm even -80 cm. The influences of pine, cypress and eucalyptus on soil CO2 have been studied. Soil CO2 influenced by pine and cypress are generally concentrated in an area surrounding the tree with a diameter of 1 m and the strongly influenced distance is 50 cm. Eucalyptus will strongly affect the CO2 contents in an area with a diameter of 2 m, especially 1 m distant from the tree. The highest concentration of soil CO2 at a depth of-30 and 100 cm from the tree reaches 92000 ppm.``

  2. Land-use systems affect Archaeal community structure and functional diversity in western Amazon soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio Aparecido Navarrete

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of the ecology of soil microbial communities at relevant spatial scales is primordial in the wide Amazon region due to the current land use changes. In this study, the diversity of the Archaea domain (community structure and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (richness and community composition were investigated using molecular biology-based techniques in different land-use systems in western Amazonia, Brazil. Soil samples were collected in two periods with high precipitation (March 2008 and January 2009 from Inceptisols under primary tropical rainforest, secondary forest (5-20 year old, agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA (PCR-DGGE using the 16S rRNA gene as a biomarker showed that archaeal community structures in crops and pasture soils are different from those in primary forest soil, which is more similar to the community structure in secondary forest soil. Sequence analysis of excised DGGE bands indicated the presence of crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal organisms. Based on clone library analysis of the gene coding the subunit of the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (amoA of Archaea (306 sequences, the Shannon-Wiener function and Simpson's index showed a greater ammonia-oxidizing archaeal diversity in primary forest soils (H' = 2.1486; D = 0.1366, followed by a lower diversity in soils under pasture (H' = 1.9629; D = 0.1715, crops (H' = 1.4613; D = 0.3309 and secondary forest (H' = 0.8633; D = 0.5405. All cloned inserts were similar to the Crenarchaeota amoA gene clones (identity > 95 % previously found in soils and sediments and distributed primarily in three major phylogenetic clusters. The findings indicate that agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture affect the archaeal community structure and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in western Amazon soils.

  3. Sitona lineatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Feeding on Pisum sativum L. Affects Soil and Plant Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo, Héctor A; Herle, Carolyn E; Lupwayi, Newton Z

    2015-01-01

    Adults of Sitona lineatus (pea leaf weevil, PLW) feed on foliage of several Fabaceae species but larvae prefer to feed on nodules of Pisum sativum L. and Vicia faba L. Indirectly, through their feeding on rhizobia, weevils can reduce soil and plant available nitrogen (N). However, initial soil N can reduce nodulation and damage by the weevil and reduce control requirements. Understanding these interactions is necessary to make integrated pest management recommendations for PLW. We conducted a greenhouse study to quantify nodulation, soil and plant N content, and nodule damage by weevil larvae in relation to soil N amendment with urea, thiamethoxam insecticide seed coating and crop stage. PLWs reduced the number of older tumescent (multilobed) nodules and thiamethoxam addition increased them regardless of other factors. Nitrogen amendment significantly increased soil available N (>99% nitrate) as expected and PLW presence was associated with significantly lower levels of soil N. PLW decreased plant N content at early flower and thiamethoxam increased it, particularly at late flower. The study illustrated the complexity of interactions that determine insect herbivory effects on plant and soil nutrition for invertebrates that feed on N-fixing root nodules. We conclude that effects of PLW on nodulation and subsequent effects on plant nitrogen are more pronounced during the early growth stages of the plant. This suggests the importance of timing of PLW infestation and may explain the lack of yield depression in relation to this pest observed in many field studies. Also, pea crops in soils with high levels of soil N are unlikely to be affected by this herbivore and should not require insecticide inputs.

  4. Golf courses and wetland fauna

    OpenAIRE

    Colding, Johan; Lundberg, Jakob; Lundberg, Stefan; Andersson, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Golf courses are often considered to be chemical-intensive ecosystems with negative impacts on fauna. Here we provide evidence that golf courses can contribute to the support and conservation of wetland fauna, i.e., amphibians and macroinvertebrates. Comparisons of amphibian occurrence, diversity of macroinvetebrates, and occurrence of species of conservation concern were made between permanent freshwater ponds surveyed on golf courses around Sweden's capital city, Stockholm, and off-course p...

  5. Soil hydraulic properties affected by topsoil thickness in cultivated switchgrass and corn-soybean rotation production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss of productive topsoil by soil erosion over time can reduce the productive capacity of soil and can significantly affect soil hydraulic properties. This study evaluated the effects of reduced topsoil thickness and perennial switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) versus corn (Zea mays L.)/soybean [Gly...

  6. Synchrotron microtomographic quantification of geometrical soil pore characteristics affected by compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udawatta, Ranjith P.; Gantzer, Clark J.; Anderson, Stephen H.; Assouline, Shmuel

    2016-05-01

    Soil compaction degrades soil structure and affects water, heat, and gas exchange as well as root penetration and crop production. The objective of this study was to use X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) techniques to compare differences in geometrical soil pore parameters as influenced by compaction of two different aggregate size classes. Sieved (diameter Advanced Photon Source (synchrotron facility) using X-ray CMT. Images of 58.9 mm3 volume were analyzed using 3-Dimensional Medial Axis (3-DMA) software. Geometrical characteristics of the spatial distributions of pore structures (pore radii, volume, connectivity, path length, and tortuosity) were numerically investigated. Results show that the coordination number (CN) distribution and path length (PL) measured from the medial axis were reasonably fit by exponential relationships P(CN) = 10-CN/Co and P(PL) = 10-PL/PLo, respectively, where Co and PLo are the corresponding characteristic constants. Compaction reduced porosity, average pore size, number of pores, and characteristic constants. The average pore radii (63.7 and 61 µm; p treatment. Aggregate size also influenced measured geometrical pore parameters. This analytical technique provides a tool for assessing changes in soil pores that affect hydraulic properties and thereby provides information to assist in assessment of soil management systems.

  7. Phosphorus geochemistry in a Brazilian semiarid mangrove soil affected by shrimp farm effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, G N; Otero, X L; Macías, F; Ferreira, T O

    2014-09-01

    Wastewater discharge from shrimp farming is one of the main causes of eutrophication in mangrove ecosystems. We investigated the phosphorus (P) geochemistry in mangrove soils affected by shrimp farming effluents by carrying out a seasonal study of two mangrove forests (a control site (CS); a site affected by shrimp farm effluents (SF)). We determined the soil pH, redox potential (Eh), total organic carbon (TOC), total phosphorus (TP), and dissolved P. We also carried out sequential extraction of the P-solid phases. In SF, the effluents affected the soil physicochemical conditions, resulting in lower Eh and higher pH, as well as lower TOC and higher TP than in CS. Organic P forms were dominant in both sites and seasons, although to a lesser extent in SF. The lower TOC in SF was related to the increased microbial activity and organic matter decomposition caused by fertilization. The higher amounts of P oxides in SF suggest that the effluents alter the dominance of iron and sulfate reduction in mangrove soils, generating more reactive Fe that is available for bonding to phosphates. Strong TP losses were recorded in both sites during the dry season, in association with increased amounts of exchangeable and dissolved P. The higher bioavailability of P during the dry season may be attributed to increased mineralization of organic matter and dissolution of Ca-P in response to more oxidizing and acidic conditions. The P loss has significant environmental implications regarding eutrophication and marine productivity. PMID:24838803

  8. Soil water balance as affected by throughfall in gorse ( Ulex europaeus, L.) shrubland after burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Benedicto; Diaz-Fierros, Francisco

    1997-08-01

    The role of fire in the hydrological behaviour of gorse shrub is studied from the point of view of its effects on vegetation cover and throughfall. In the first year after fire, throughfall represents about 88% of gross rainfall, whereas in unburnt areas it is 58%. Four years after fire, the throughfall coefficients are similar in burnt and unburnt plots (about 6096). The throughfall is not linearly related to vegetation cover because an increase in cover does not involve a proportional reduction in throughfall. The throughfall predicted by the two-parameter exponential model of Calder (1986, J. Hydrol., 88: 201-211) provides a good fit with the observed throughfall and the y value of the model reflects the evolution of throughfall rate. The soil moisture distribution is modified by fire owing to the increase of evaporation in the surface soil and the decrease of transpiration from deep soil layers. Nevertheless, the use of the old root system by sprouting vegetation leads to a soil water profile in which 20 months after the fire the soil water is similar in burnt and unburnt areas. Overall, soil moisture is higher in burnt plots than in unburnt plots. Surface runoff increases after a fire but does not entirely account for the increase in throughfall. Therefore the removal of vegetation cover in gorse scrub by fire mainly affects the subsurface water flows.

  9. Addition of Pumice Affects Physical Properties of Soil Used for Container Grown Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ustun Sahin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Aeration of horticultural media is oft en reported to be a problem. The air filled porosity is generally considered as the quality determining factor for media and is generally determining the shape of the moisture characteristic curve. The objective of this study was to determine affects of different size and rate of pumice mixed with soil on the pore size distribution and bulk density of a mixture medium. Pumice of different size (100 μm diameter were 98.2 % and 70.3 %, and the decreases in bulk density were 24.8 % and 21.0 % for soil I and II, respectively. While the mesopores (100-30 μm diameter, which are important for water conductivity, decreased significantly with pumice application in soil I, no significant changes were obtained for soil II. The amount of water held at 0.01 MPa – 0.10 MPa decreased significantly with 30 % or more pumice application in both soils. The amount of water held at 0.10 MPa or greater suctions decreased with pumice application. Significant changes in physical properties of soil-pumice mixture media were obtained for different sizes of pumice application.

  10. Do soil fertilization and forest canopy foliage affect the growth and photosynthesis of Amazonian saplings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilvanda dos Santos Magalhães

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Most Amazonian soils are highly weathered and poor in nutrients. Therefore, photosynthesis and plant growth should positively respond to the addition of mineral nutrients. Surprisingly, no study has been carried out in situ in the central Amazon to address this issue for juvenile trees. The objective of this study was to determine how photosynthetic rates and growth of tree saplings respond to the addition of mineral nutrients, to the variation in leaf area index of the forest canopy, and to changes in soil water content associated with rainfall seasonality. We assessed the effect of adding a slow-release fertilizer. We determined plant growth from 2010 to 2012 and gas exchange in the wet and dry season of 2012. Rainfall seasonality led to variations in soil water content, but it did not affect sapling growth or leaf gas exchange parameters. Although soil amendment increased phosphorus content by 60 %, neither plant growth nor the photosynthetic parameters were influenced by the addition of mineral nutrients. However, photosynthetic rates and growth of saplings decreased as the forest canopy became denser. Even when Amazonian soils are poor in nutrients, photosynthesis and sapling growth are more responsive to slight variations in light availability in the forest understory than to the availability of nutrients. Therefore, the response of saplings to future increases in atmospheric [CO2] will not be limited by the availability of mineral nutrients in the soil.

  11. Soil amendment affects Cd uptake by wheat - are we underestimating the risks from chloride inputs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, A Sigrun; Eriksson, Jan; Campbell, Colin D; Öborn, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    Many parts of the world are investigating the efficacy of recycling nutrient resources to agriculture from different industry and domestic sectors as part of a more circular economy. The complex nature of recycled products as soil amendments coupled to the large diversity of soil types and their inherent properties make it difficult to optimize the benefits and minimize the risks from potentially toxic elements often present in recycled materials. Here we investigated how wheat grain cadmium (Cd) concentration was affected by soil amendments, namely human urine and biogas digestate compared to traditional farm manures and mineral fertilizers. We show that Cl(-) inadvertently added to soils with e.g. urine or biogas digestate strongly increased crop Cd concentrations, largely by mobilizing inherent soil Cd. This resulted in wheat grain Cd levels that could result in exceeding recommended WHO limits for dietary intake. This was evident even in soils with low inherent Cd content and when Cd inputs were low. The future of a circular economy that helps to underpin global food security needs to ensure that the effects of applying complex materials to different types of agricultural land are fully understood and do not jeopardize food safety. PMID:26974588

  12. Movement of Phosphorus in a Calcareous Soil as Affected by Humic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Zhen-Yu; WANG Qing-Hua; LIU Fang-Chun; MA Hai-Lin; MA Bing-Yao; S.S.MALHI

    2013-01-01

    When humic acid (HA) and phosphorus (P) fertilizer are simultaneously applied to soil,HA may affect the movement of P.A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of a commercial HA product co-applied with monocalcium phosphate (MCP) on the distance of P movement and the concentration of P in various forms at different distances from the P fertilizer application site in a calcareous soil from northern China.Fertilizer MCP (at a rate equivalent to 26.6 kg P ha-1) was applied alone or in combination with HA (at 254.8 kg HA ha-1) to the surface of soil packed in cylinders (150 mm high and 50 mm internal diameter),and then incubated at 320 g kg-1 moisture content for 7 and 28 d periods.Extraction and analysis of each 2 mm soil layer in columns showed that the addition of HA to MCP increased the distance of P movement and the concentrations of water-extractable P,acid-extractable P and Olsen P in soil.The addition of HA to MCP could enhance P availability by increasing the distance of P movement and the concentration of extractable P in soil surrounding the P fertilizer.

  13. Soil Fertility and Electrical Conductivity Affected by Organic Waste Rates and Nutrient Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Lopes do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The composition of organic waste (OW and its effect on soil processes may change soil fertility and electrical conductivity (EC. The side effects of waste use in crop fertilization are poorly understood for Brazilian soils. This study examined the effect of the addition of 15 different organic wastes to Oxisols and a Neosol on pH, base saturation, EC, cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7, and the availability of Al, macro (P, K, Ca2+, Mg2+ and S and micronutrients (B, Fe2+, Mn2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. Soil samples (150 g were treated with chicken, pig, horse, cattle, and quail manures, sewage sludge 1 and 2, eucalyptus sawdust, plant substrate, coconut fiber, pine bark, coffee husk, peat, limed compost, and biochar. Wastes were added considering a fixed amount of C (2 g kg-1, which resulted in waste rates ranging from 2.5 to 25.6 Mg ha-1. The soil-waste mixtures were incubated for 330 days in laboratory conditions. The waste liming or acidification values were soil-dependent. The use of some manures and compost increased the pH to levels above of those considered adequate for plant growth. The soil EC was slightly increased in the Neosol and in the medium textured Oxisol, but it was sharply changed (from 195 to 394 µS cm-1 by the addition of organic wastes in the clayey Oxisol, although the EC values were below the range considered safe for plant growth. Changes in the soil availability of P, K+, Ca2+ and Zn2+ were highly related to the inputs of these nutrients by the wastes, and other factors in soil changed due to waste use. Organic waste use simultaneously affects different soil fertility attributes; thus, in addition to the target nutrient added to the soil, the soil acidity buffering capacity and the waste liming and agronomic value must be taken into account in the waste rate definition.

  14. Salt—Water Dynamics in Highly Salinized Topsoil of Salt—Affected Soil During Water Infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXUE-FENG; YOUWEN-RUI; 等

    1991-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of salt and water movement in the soil profile of highly salinized topsoil under steadystate infiltration was conducted.It gives that salt and water dynamics during convection-diffusion period can be divided into three stages:1.formation of a salt peak,2.the salt peak moving downwards till the appearance of the summit of the salt peak,3.the salt peak moving further downwards with the peak value decreasing.Results show that the maximum salt peak appears at the same depth if soil texture and outflow condition are the same.Factors affecting salt and water movement and ion components in the outflow solution underinfiltration are discussed.

  15. Scaling preferential flow processes in agricultural soils affected by tillage and trafficking at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, Vilim; Coquet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    There is an accumulation of experimental evidences that agricultural soils, at least the top horizons affected by tillage practices, are not homogeneous and present a structure that is strongly dependent on farming practices like tillage and trafficking. Soil tillage and trafficking can create compacted zones in the soil with hydraulic properties and porosity which are different from those of the non-compacted zones. This spatial variability can strongly influence transport processes and initiate preferential flow. Two or three dimensional models can be used to account for spatial variability created by agricultural practices, but such models need a detailed assessment of spatial heterogeneity which can be rather impractical to provide. This logically raises the question whether and how one dimensional model may be designed and used to account for the within-field spatial variability in soil structure created by agricultural practices. Preferential flow (dual-permeability) modelling performed with HYDRUS-1D will be confronted to classical modelling based on the Richards and convection-dispersion equations using HYDRUS-2D taking into account the various soil heterogeneities created by agricultural practices. Our goal is to derive one set of equivalent 1D soil hydraulic parameters from 2D simulations which accounts for soil heterogeneities created by agricultural operations. A field experiment was carried out in two phases: infiltration and redistribution on a plot by uniform sprinkle irrigation with water or bromide solution. Prior to the field experiment the soil structure of the tilled layer was determined along the face of a large trench perpendicular to the tillage direction (0.7 m depth and 3.1 m wide). Thirty TDR probes and tensiometers were installed in different soil structural zones (Δ compacted soil and Γ macroporous soil) which ensured soil water monitoring throughout the experiment. A map of bromide was constructed from small core samples (4 cm diam

  16. Metal concentrations in soil paste extracts as affected by extraction ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Filip M G; Dezillie, Nic; Verloo, Marc G

    2002-04-01

    Saturated paste extracts are sometimes used to estimate metal levels in the soil solution. To assess the significance of heavy-metal concentrations measured in saturation extracts, soil paste extracts were prepared with distilled water in amounts ranging from 60-200% of the moisture content at saturation. Trace metals behaved as if a small pool consistently was dissolved independent of the extraction ratio applied. Metal concentrations in the solution hence were not buffered by the solid phase, but the observed behaviour would allow the estimation of metal concentrations in the soil solution as a function of moisture content. The behaviour of iron and manganese suggested that some microbial reduction occurred. The intensity increased with increasing extraction ratio but not to the extent of affecting dissolution of trace elements. PMID:12805950

  17. Metal Concentrations in Soil Paste Extracts as Affected by Extraction Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip M.G. Tack

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Saturated paste extracts are sometimes used to estimate metal levels in the soil solution. To assess the significance of heavy-metal concentrations measured in saturation extracts, soil paste extracts were prepared with distilled water in amounts ranging from 60–200% of the moisture content at saturation. Trace metals behaved as if a small pool consistently was dissolved independent of the extraction ratio applied. Metal concentrations in the solution hence were not buffered by the solid phase, but the observed behaviour would allow the estimation of metal concentrations in the soil solution as a function of moisture content. The behaviour of iron and manganese suggested that some microbial reduction occurred. The intensity increased with increasing extraction ratio but not to the extent of affecting dissolution of trace elements.

  18. Flocculant in wastewater affects dynamics of inorganic N and accelerates removal of phenanthrene and anthracene in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Luqueno, F; Thalasso, F; Luna-Guido, M L; Ceballos-Ramírez, J M; Ordoñez-Ruiz, I M; Dendooven, L

    2009-06-01

    Recycling of municipal wastewater requires treatment with flocculants, such as polyacrylamide. It is unknown how polyacrylamide in sludge affects removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from soil. An alkaline-saline soil and an agricultural soil were contaminated with phenanthrene and anthracene. Sludge with or without polyacrylamide was added while emission of CO(2) and concentrations of NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), phenanthrene and anthracene were monitored in an aerobic incubation experiment. Polyacrylamide in the sludge had no effect on the production of CO(2), but it reduced the concentration of NH(4)(+), increased the concentration of NO(3)(-) in the Acolman soil and NO(2)(-) in the Texcoco soil, and increased N mineralization compared to the soil amended with sludge without polyacrylamide. After 112d, polyacrylamide accelerated the removal of anthracene from both soils and that of phenanthrene in the Acolman soil. It was found that polyacrylamide accelerated removal of phenanthrene and anthracene from soil.

  19. Soil physical and hydrological properties as affected by long-term addition of various organic amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Marie; Völkel, Jörg; Mercier, Vincent; Labat, Christophe; Houot, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    The use of organic residues as soil amendments in agriculture not only reduces the amount of waste needing to be disposed of; it may also lead to improvements in soil properties, including physical and hydrological ones. The present study examines a long-term experiment called "Qualiagro", run jointly by INRA and Veolia Environment in Feucherolles, France (near Paris). It was initiated in 1998 on a loess-derived silt loam (787 g/kg silt, 152 g/kg clay) and includes ten treatments: four types of organic amendments and a control (CNT) each at two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal (Nmin) and optimal (Nopt). The amendments include three types of compost and farmyard manure (FYM), which were applied every other year at a rate of ca. 4 t carbon ha-1. The composts include municipal solid waste compost (MSW), co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (GWS), and biowaste compost (BIO). The plots are arranged in a randomized block design and have a size of 450 m²; each treatment is replicated four times (total of 40 plots). Ca. 15 years after the start of the experiment soil organic carbon (OC) had continuously increased in the amended plots, while it remained stable or decreased in the control plots. This compost- or manure-induced increase in OC plays a key role, affecting numerous dependant soil properties like bulk density, porosity and water retention. The water holding capacity (WHC) of a soil is of particular interest to farmers in terms of water supply for plants, but also indicates soil quality and functionality. Addition of OC may affect WHC in different ways: carbon-induced aggregation may increase larger-pore volume and hence WHC at the wet end while increased surface areas may lead to an increased retention of water at the dry end. Consequently it is difficult to predict (e.g. with pedotransfer functions) the impact on the amount of water available for plants (PAW), which was experimentally determined for the soils, along with the entire range

  20. Bacterial population succession and adaptation affected by insecticide application and soil spraying history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideomi eItoh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although microbial communities have varying degrees of exposure to environmental stresses such as chemical pollution, little is known on how these communities respond to environmental disturbances and how past disturbance history affects these community-level responses. To comprehensively understand the effect of organophosphorus insecticide application on microbiota in soils with or without insecticide-spraying history, we investigated the microbial succession in response to the addition of fenitrothion (O,O-dimethyl O-(3-methyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate, abbreviated as MEP by culture-dependent experiments and deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Despite similar microbial composition at the initial stage, microbial response to MEP application was remarkably different between soils with and without MEP-spraying history. MEP-degrading microbes more rapidly increased in the soils with MEP-spraying history, suggesting that MEP-degrading bacteria might already exist at a certain level and could quickly respond to MEP re-treatment in the soil. Culture-dependent and -independent evaluations revealed that MEP-degrading Burkholderia bacteria are predominant in soils after MEP application, limited members of which might play a pivotal role in MEP-degradation in soils. Notably, deep sequencing also revealed that some methylotrophs dramatically increased after MEP application, strongly suggesting that these bacteria play a role in the consumption and removal of methanol, a harmful derivative from MEP-degradation, for better growth of MEP-degrading bacteria. This comprehensive study demonstrated the succession and adaptation processes of microbial communities under MEP application, which were critically affected by past experience of insecticide-spraying.

  1. Geographic information science: Contribution to understanding salt and sodium affected soils in the Senegal River Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Ramatoulaye

    The Senegal River valley and delta (SRVD) are affected by long term climate variability. Indicators of these climatic shifts include a rainfall deficit, warmer temperatures, sea level rise, floods, and drought. These shifts have led to environmental degradation, water deficits, and profound effects on human life and activities in the area. Geographic Information Science (GIScience), including satellite-based remote sensing methods offer several advantages over conventional ground-based methods used to map and monitor salt-affected soil (SAS) features. This study was designed to assess the accuracy of information on soil salinization extracted from Landsat satellite imagery. Would available imagery and GIScience data analysis enable an ability to discriminate natural soil salinization from soil sodication and provide an ability to characterize the SAS trend and pattern over 30 years? A set of Landsat MSS (June 1973 and September 1979), Landsat TM (November 1987, April 1994 and November 1999) and ETM+ (May 2001 and March 2003) images have been used to map and monitor salt impacted soil distribution. Supervised classification, unsupervised classification and post-classification change detection methods were used. Supervised classifications of May 2001 and March 2003 images were made in conjunction field data characterizing soil surface chemical characteristics that included exchange sodium percentage (ESP), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the electrical conductivity (EC). With this supervised information extraction method, the distribution of three different types of SAS (saline, saline-sodic, and sodic) was mapped with an accuracy of 91.07% for 2001 image and 73.21% for 2003 image. Change detection results confirmed a decreasing trend in non-saline and saline soil and an increase in saline-sodic and sodic soil. All seven Landsat images were subjected to the unsupervised classification method which resulted in maps that separate SAS according to their degree of

  2. Evaluation of soil characteristics potentially affecting arsenic concentration in paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdan, Katja, E-mail: katja.bogdan@pflern.uni-hannover.d [Institute of Plant Nutrition, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str. 2, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Schenk, Manfred K., E-mail: schenk@pflern.uni-hannover.d [Institute of Plant Nutrition, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str. 2, 30419 Hannover (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Paddy rice may contribute considerably to the human intake of As. The knowledge of soil characteristics affecting the As content of the rice plant enables the development of agricultural measures for controlling As uptake. During field surveys in 2004 and 2006, plant samples from 68 fields (Italy, Po-area) revealed markedly differing As concentration in polished rice. The soil factors total As{sub (aquaregia)}, pH, grain size fractions, total C, plant available P{sub (CAL)}, poorly crystalline Fe{sub (oxal.)} and plant available Si{sub (Na-acetate)} content that potentially affect As content of rice were determined. A multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant positive influence of the total As{sub (aquaregia)} and plant available P{sub (CAL)} content and a negative influence of the poorly crystalline Fe{sub (oxal.)} content of the soil on the As content in polished rice and rice straw. Si concentration in rice straw varied widely and was negatively related to As content in straw and polished rice. - Field selection for total As, poorly crystalline Fe and plant available P in soil might contribute to control As content of paddy rice.

  3. Patterns of woody plant species diversity in Lebanon as affected by climatic and soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebanese biodiversity is threatened by tourist and urban development, political instability, over-collection of medicinal and aromatic plants, lack of compliance to the regulations prohibiting over-exploitation from the wild, over-grazing and forest fires. A large number of the native species have unexplored economic potential for either medicinal or ornamental use. One way to preserve these species is by propagation and reintroduction into appropriate habitats. However, this requires an understanding of the species biology and environment. The relationship of nine species to the soil and climatic conditions in eight sites along an altitudinal gradient was studied. Individual species were counted and identified within transects at each site. Climatic data were collected and soil samples were taken and analyzed for soil texture, soil pH, EC, CaCO3, organic matter content and the following nutrients: Ca, Mn, Na, Fe, P, K, Cu, Mg, and Zn. Each ecosystem had a unique environment that could be described using the first two factors (70.3 % of variation) in a Factor Analysis of the six most important variables. Some species densities were affected by soil conditions (the first factor) while climatic conditions (the second factor) explained the densities of other species. Recommendations are made for the in-situ and ex-situ preservations of the nine species and their ecosystems.(author)

  4. Winter climate change affects growing-season soil microbial biomass and activity in northern hardwood forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Jorge; Morse, Jennifer L; Groffman, Peter M; Campbell, John L; Christenson, Lynn M; Driscoll, Charles T; Fahey, Timothy J; Fisk, Melany C; Mitchell, Myron J; Templer, Pamela H

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change remains a major challenge of ecological research. We exploited a natural elevation gradient in a northern hardwood forest to determine how reductions in snow accumulation, expected with climate change, directly affect dynamics of soil winter frost, and indirectly soil microbial biomass and activity during the growing season. Soils from lower elevation plots, which accumulated less snow and experienced more soil temperature variability during the winter (and likely more freeze/thaw events), had less extractable inorganic nitrogen (N), lower rates of microbial N production via potential net N mineralization and nitrification, and higher potential microbial respiration during the growing season. Potential nitrate production rates during the growing season were particularly sensitive to changes in winter snow pack accumulation and winter soil temperature variability, especially in spring. Effects of elevation and winter conditions on N transformation rates differed from those on potential microbial respiration, suggesting that N-related processes might respond differently to winter climate change in northern hardwood forests than C-related processes. PMID:24796872

  5. Soil water retention and structure stability as affected by water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrakh I. Mamedov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In arid and semi-arid zones with a short water resources studying the effects of water quality on soil water retention and structure is important for the development of effective soil and water conservation and management practices. Three water qualities (electrical conductivity, EC ~ 2, 100 and 500 μS cm-1 with a low SAR representing rain, canal-runoff and irrigation water respectively and semi-arid loam and clay soils were tested to evaluate an effect of soil texture and water quality on water retention, and aggregate and structure stability using the high energy moisture characteristic (HEMC method. The water retention curves obtained by the HEMC method were characterized by the modified van Genuchten (1980 model that provides (i model parameters α and n, which represent the location (of the inflection point and the steepness of the S-shaped water retention curve respectively, and (ii a volume of drainable pores (VDP, which is an indicator for the quantity of water released by the tested sample over the range of suction studied, and modal suction (MS, which corresponds to the most frequent pore sizes, and soil structure index, SI =VDP/MS. Generally (i treatments significantly affected the shape of the water retention curves (α and n and (ii contribution of soil type, water EC, and wetting rate and their interaction had considerable effect on the stability induces and model parameters. Most of changes due to the water quality and wetting condition were in the range of matric potential (ψ, 1.2-2.4; and 2.4-5.0 J kg-1 (pore size 125-250 μm and 60-125 μm. The VDP, SI and α increased, and MS and n decreased with the increase in clay content, water EC and the decrease in rate of aggregate wetting. The SI increased exponentially with the increase in VDP, and with the decrease in MS. Contribution of water EC on stability indices and model parameters was not linear and was soil dependent, and could be more valuable at medium water EC. Effect of

  6. Changes in canopy structure and ant assemblages affect soil ecosystem variables as a foundation species declines

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Aaron M.; Kendrick, J.A.; Classen, A.T.; Ribbons, R.R.

    2015-01-01

    The decline of Tsuga canadensis (eastern hemlock) – a foundation tree species – due to infestation by Adelges tsugae (hemlock woolly adelgid) or its complete removal from a stand by salvage logging dramatically affects associated faunal assemblages. Among these assemblages, species composition (richness and abundance) of ants increases rapidly as T. canadensis is lost from the stands. Because ants live and forage at the litter-soil interface, we hypothesized that environmental changes caused ...

  7. Biochar affects soil organic matter cycling and microbial functions but does not alter microbial community structure in a paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Wang, Jingyuan; Dippold, Michaela; Gao, Yang; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-06-15

    The application of biochar (BC) in conjunction with mineral fertilizers is one of the most promising management practices recommended to improve soil quality. However, the interactive mechanisms of BC and mineral fertilizer addition affecting microbial communities and functions associated with soil organic matter (SOM) cycling are poorly understood. We investigated the SOM in physical and chemical fractions, microbial community structure (using phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and functions (by analyzing enzymes involved in C and N cycling and Biolog) in a 6-year field experiment with BC and NPK amendment. BC application increased total soil C and particulate organic C for 47.4-50.4% and 63.7-74.6%, respectively. The effects of BC on the microbial community and C-cycling enzymes were dependent on fertilization. Addition of BC alone did not change the microbial community compared with the control, but altered the microbial community structure in conjunction with NPK fertilization. SOM fractions accounted for 55% of the variance in the PLFA-related microbial community structure. The particulate organic N explained the largest variation in the microbial community structure. Microbial metabolic activity strongly increased after BC addition, particularly the utilization of amino acids and amines due to an increase in the activity of proteolytic (l-leucine aminopeptidase) enzymes. These results indicate that microorganisms start to mine N from the SOM to compensate for high C:N ratios after BC application, which consequently accelerate cycling of stable N. Concluding, BC in combination with NPK fertilizer application strongly affected microbial community composition and functions, which consequently influenced SOM cycling. PMID:26974565

  8. Biochar affects soil organic matter cycling and microbial functions but does not alter microbial community structure in a paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Wang, Jingyuan; Dippold, Michaela; Gao, Yang; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-06-15

    The application of biochar (BC) in conjunction with mineral fertilizers is one of the most promising management practices recommended to improve soil quality. However, the interactive mechanisms of BC and mineral fertilizer addition affecting microbial communities and functions associated with soil organic matter (SOM) cycling are poorly understood. We investigated the SOM in physical and chemical fractions, microbial community structure (using phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and functions (by analyzing enzymes involved in C and N cycling and Biolog) in a 6-year field experiment with BC and NPK amendment. BC application increased total soil C and particulate organic C for 47.4-50.4% and 63.7-74.6%, respectively. The effects of BC on the microbial community and C-cycling enzymes were dependent on fertilization. Addition of BC alone did not change the microbial community compared with the control, but altered the microbial community structure in conjunction with NPK fertilization. SOM fractions accounted for 55% of the variance in the PLFA-related microbial community structure. The particulate organic N explained the largest variation in the microbial community structure. Microbial metabolic activity strongly increased after BC addition, particularly the utilization of amino acids and amines due to an increase in the activity of proteolytic (l-leucine aminopeptidase) enzymes. These results indicate that microorganisms start to mine N from the SOM to compensate for high C:N ratios after BC application, which consequently accelerate cycling of stable N. Concluding, BC in combination with NPK fertilizer application strongly affected microbial community composition and functions, which consequently influenced SOM cycling.

  9. Does temperature of charcoal creation affect subsequent mineralization of soil carbon and nitrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier-Bergeron, S.; Bradley, R.; Munson, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fire is the most common form of natural disturbance of boreal forest ecosystems and has primordial influence on successional processes. This may be due in part to the pre-disturbance vegetation development stage and species composition, but these successional pathways could also vary with differences in fire behavior and consequently in fire intensity, defined as the energy released during various phases of a fire. Fire intensity may also affect soil C and N cycling by affecting the quality of the charcoal that is produced. For example, the porosity of coal tends to increase with increasing temperature at which it is produced Higher porosity would logically increase the surface area to which dissolved soil molecules, such as tannins and other phenolics, may be adsorbed. We report on a microcosm study in which mineral and organic soils were jointly incubated for eight weeks with a full factorial array of treatments that included the addition of Kalmia tannins, protein, and wood charcoal produced at five different temperatures. A fourth experimental factor comprised the physical arrangement of the material (stratified vs. mixed), designed to simulate the effect of soil scarification after fire and salvage harvest. We examined the effects of these treatments on soil C and N mineralisation and soil microbial biomass. The furnace temperature at which the charcoal was produced had a significant effect on its physico-chemical properties; increasing furnace temperatures corresponded to a significant increase in % C (P<0.001), and a significant decrease in %O (P<0.001) and %H (P<0.001). Temperature also had significant impacts on microporosity (surface area and volume). Temperature of production had no effect (P=0.1355) on soil microbial biomass. We observed a linear decreasing trend (P<0.001) in qCO2 with increasing temperature of production, which was mainly reflected in a decline in basal respiration. Finally, we found a significant interaction (P=0.010) between

  10. Soil Properties and Wheat Growth and Nutrients as Affected by Compost Amendment Under Saline Water Irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. M. MAHDY

    2011-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to test and compare the suitability of saline compost and saline irrigation water for nutrient status amendment of a slightly productive sandy clay loam soil,to study the macronutrient utilization and dry matter production of wheat (Triticum aestivum c.v.Gemmiza 7) grown in a modified soil environment and to determine the effects of compost and saline irrigation water on soil productivity.The sandy clay loam soil was treated with compost of five rates (0,24,36,48,and 60 m3 ha-1,equivalent to 0,3,4.5,and 6 g kg-1 soil,respectively) and irrigation water of four salinity levels (0.50 (tap water),4.9,6.3,and 8.7 dS m-1).The results indicated that at harvest,the electrical conductivity (EC) of the soil was significantly (P < 0.05) changed by the compost application as compared to thecontrol.In general,the soil salinity significantly increased with increasing application rates of compost.Soluble salts,K,C1,HCO3,Na,Ca,and Mg,were significantly increased by the compost treatment.Soil sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) was significantly affected by the salinity levels of the irrigation water,and showed a slight response to the compost application.The soil organic carbon content was also significantly (P < 0.05) affected by application of compost,with a maximum value of 31.03 g kg-1 recorded at the compost rate of 60 m3 ha-1 and the irrigation water salinity level of 8.7 dS m-1 and a minimum value of 12.05 g kg-1 observed in the control.The compost application produced remarkable increases in wheat shoot dry matter production.The maximum dry matter production (75.11 g pot-1) occurred with 60 m3 ha-1 compost and normal irrigation water,with a minimum of 19.83 g pot-1 with no addition of compost and irrigation water at a salinity level of 8.70 dS m-1.Significant increases in wheat shoot contents of K,N,P,Na,and C1 were observed with addition of compost.The relatively high shoot N values may be attributed to increases in N availability in

  11. Pyrene fate affected by humic acid amendment in soil slurry systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Joan E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Humic acid (HA has been found to affect the solubility, mineralization, and bound residue formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. However, most of the studies on the interaction between HA and PAH concentrated on one or two of the three phases. Few studies have provided a simple protocol to demonstrate the overall effects of HA on PAH distribution in soil systems for all three phases. Methods In this study, three doses of standard Elliott soil HA (ESHA, 15, 187.5, and 1,875 μg ESHA/g soil slurry, were amended to soil slurry systems. 14C-pyrene was added to the systems along with non-radiolabeled pyrene; 14C and 14CO2 were monitored for each system for a period of 120 days. Results The highest amendment dose significantly increased the 14C fraction in the aqueous phase within 24 h, but not after that time. Pyrene mineralization was significantly inhibited by the highest dose over the 120-day study. While organic solvent extractable 14C decreased with time in all systems, non-extractable or bound 14C was significantly enhanced with the highest dose of ESHA addition. Conclusion Amendment of the highest dose of ESHA to pyrene contaminated soil was observed to have two major functions. The first was to mitigate CO2 production significantly by reducing 14CO2 from 14C pyrene mineralization. The second was to significantly increase stable bound 14C formation, which may serve as a remediation end point. Overall, this study demonstrated a practical approach for decontamination of PAH contaminated soil. This approach may be applicable to other organic contaminated environments where active bioremediation is taking place.

  12. Multiple factors affect diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in iron mine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yi; Si, Yan-Xiao; Hong, Chen; Li, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation by microorganisms is a critical process in the nitrogen cycle. In this study, four soil samples collected from a desert zone in an iron-exploration area and others from farmland and planted forest soil in an iron mine surrounding area. We analyzed the abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in iron-mining area near the Miyun reservoir using ammonia monooxygenase. A subunit gene (amoA) as molecular biomarker. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was applied to explore the relationships between the abundance of AOA and AOB and soil physicochemical parameters. The results showed that AOA were more abundant than AOB and may play a more dominant role in the ammonia-oxidizing process in the whole region. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the structural changes of AOA and AOB. The results showed that AOB were much more diverse than AOA. Nitrosospira cluster three constitute the majority of AOB, and AOA were dominated by group 1.1b in the soil. Redundancy analysis was performed to explore the physicochemical parameters potentially important to AOA and AOB. Soil characteristics (i.e. water, ammonia, organic carbon, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and soil type) were proposed to potentially contribute to the distributions of AOB, whereas Cd was also closely correlated to the distributions of AOB. The community of AOA correlated with ammonium and water contents. These results highlight the importance of multiple drivers in microbial niche formation as well as their affect on ammonia oxidizer composition, both which have significant consequences for ecosystem nitrogen functioning. PMID:25860433

  13. Effects of Altered Temperature & Precipitation on Soil Bacterial & Microfaunal Communities as Mediated by Biological Soil Crusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neher, Deborah A. [University of Vermont

    2004-08-31

    With increased temperatures in our original pot study we observed a decline in lichen/moss crust cover and with that a decline in carbon and nitrogen fixation, and thus a probable decline of C and N input into crusts and soils. Soil bacteria and fauna were affected negatively by increased temperature in both light and dark crusts, and with movement from cool to hot and hot to hotter desert climates. Crust microbial biomass and relative abundance of diazotrophs was reduced greatly after one year, even in pots that were not moved from their original location, although no change in diazotroph community structure was observed. Populations of soil fauna moved from cool to hot deserts were affected more negatively than those moved from hot to hotter deserts.

  14. Community traits of soil fauna in forestlands converted from cultivated lands in limestone red soil region of Ruichang, Jiangxi Province of China%瑞昌石灰岩红壤区退耕还林土壤动物群落特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 刘苑秋; 郭圣茂; 柯国庆; 张钊; 肖绪宝; 刘武

    2012-01-01

    以江西瑞昌石灰岩红壤区采取多树种混交、竹阔混交和林苗一体化3种模式退耕还林6年后的林地为研究对象,分析退耕还林对土壤动物群落及其数量变化的影响.退耕还林地土壤动物隶属于6门17纲34目,优势类群为线虫纲,占总类群数的86.7%;常见类群为蜱螨目、线蚓科以及弹尾目.对照农耕地土壤动物隶属于5门10纲21目,优势类群为线虫纲,占总密度的86.7%;常见类群为蜱螨目和线蚓科.退耕还林地土壤稀有类群数(30类)明显大于农耕地(18类).除冬季外退耕还林地土壤动物类群数和平均密度显著高于农耕地.土壤动物的垂直分布具有明显的表聚性,表层(0~5 cm)土壤动物数量与5~10、10~15 cm土层存在极显著差异,且退耕还林地表聚性较农耕地更明显.退耕还林地土壤动物类群数均为夏季>秋季>春季>冬季,且夏、秋季与春、冬季差异显著;平均密度为秋季>夏季>春季>冬季,季节间差异显著.退耕还林地土壤动物生物多样性指数显著高于农耕地,3种退耕还林模式中,多树种混交模式的生物多样性最高,林苗一体化模式最低.%This paper studied the variations of the community composition and individuals' number of soil fauna in limestone red soil region of Ruichang, Jiangxi Province after six years of converting cultivated lands into forestlands. Three converted forestlands, including the lands of mixed multiple-species forest, bamboo-broadleaved forest, and tree-seedling integration, were selected as test objects, with cultivated lands as the comparison. A total of 34 orders, 17 classes, and 6 phyla of soil fauna were observed in the converted forestlands. The dominant group was Nematoda, accounting for 86. 7% of the total, whereas Acarina, Enchytraeidae, and Collembola were the common groups. In the cultivated lands, soil fauna had 21 orders, 10 classes, and 5 phyla. The dominant group was also

  15. Biological soil crusts emit large amounts of NO and HONO affecting the nitrogen cycle in drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Alexandra; Wu, Dianming; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Dryland systems currently cover ˜40% of the world's land surface and are still expanding as a consequence of human impact and global change. In contrast to that, information on their role in global biochemical processes is limited, probably induced by the presumption that their sparse vegetation cover plays a negligible role in global balances. However, spaces between the sparse shrubs are not bare, but soils are mostly covered by biological soil crusts (biocrusts). These biocrust communities belong to the oldest life forms, resulting from an assembly between soil particles and cyanobacteria, lichens, bryophytes, and algae plus heterotrophic organisms in varying proportions. Depending on the dominating organism group, cyanobacteria-, lichen-, and bryophyte-dominated biocrusts are distinguished. Besides their ability to restrict soil erosion they fix atmospheric carbon and nitrogen, and by doing this they serve as a nutrient source in strongly depleted dryland ecosystems. In this study we show that a fraction of the nitrogen fixed by biocrusts is metabolized and subsequently returned to the atmosphere in the form of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). These gases affect the radical formation and oxidizing capacity within the troposphere, thus being of particular interest to atmospheric chemistry. Laboratory measurements using dynamic chamber systems showed that dark cyanobacteria-dominated crusts emitted the largest amounts of NO and HONO, being ˜20 times higher than trace gas fluxes of nearby bare soil. We showed that these nitrogen emissions have a biogenic origin, as emissions of formerly strongly emitting samples almost completely ceased after sterilization. By combining laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data we made a best estimate of global annual emissions amounting to ˜1.1 Tg of NO-N and ˜0.6 Tg of HONO-N from biocrusts. This sum of 1.7 Tg of reactive nitrogen emissions equals ˜20% of the soil release under natural vegetation according

  16. Fractionation of Added Cadmium in Submerged Soils as Affected by Organic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUO; GAOSHAN; 等

    1999-01-01

    The effect of three organic materials(rice straw,Chinese milk vetch and pig manure)on the fractionation of cadmium added into two soils(a red soil and a fluvo-aquic soil) was studied using submerged incubation experiment.The organic materials increased soil soild organic carbon(SOC),pH value,the concentration of active Si in all the treatments and active Fe and Mn in some treatments.Accumulated SOC caused directly the increase of Cd bound to solid organic matter and consequently the decrease of exchangeable Cd.Higher active Si and pH,as well as lower Eh,were also responsible for the reduction of exchangeable Cd.Cd bound to mn oxide was positively correlated with pH values and rose significantly after one-month incubation,but decreased after three-month incubation.Cd bound to amporphous Fe oxide increased with the incubation time,but was not affected significantly by adding organic materials.

  17. Trifolium isthmocarpum Brot, a salt-tolerant wild leguminous forage crop in salt-affected soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawtar Bennani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant scientists are investigating the potential of previously unexploited legume species where environmental and biological stresses constrain the use of more conventional forage crops or where these species are better suited to the needs of sustainable agriculture. Trifolium isthmocarpum Brot., Moroccan clover, occurs as a weed in different habitats in Morocco. It grows in moderately saline areas, where traditional forage legumes cannot be cultivated; however, it has not been widely studied despite its good palatability. The salt tolerance was studied between natural field conditions and glasshouse. The extensive field studies have recorded the species in many different habitats ranging from healthy agricultural lands to abandoned saline areas. The plants maintained high nodulation capacity (ranging between 60% and 97% and nitrogenase activities (average 2.04 µmol C2H4 plant-1 h-1 in different habitats. Shoot systems of plants collected from salt-affected soils exhibited higher concentrations of Na+ and Cl- than those collected from healthy soils. Greenhouse experiments showed that germination percentage and vigor value of the studied species was not significantly (P > 0.05 affected at 160 mM NaCl, and that 25% of the germination ability was maintained when growing on substrats containing 240 mM NaCl. The growth rate of seedlings was not signicantly affected by 160 mM NaCl but was reduced by 38% under 240 mM NaCl. Leaf succulence and indices of leaf water status did not differ among the salt treatments, whereas relative water content was reduced by only 8% and water content at saturation increased by about 12% at high salt concentrations in the growing medium. This study suggest recommending the cultivation of T. isthmocarpum in salt-affected soils, which are widespread and pose a problem for the farmers of Morocco and other countries in the world’s arid belt.

  18. Fauna Europaea: Helminths (Animal Parasitic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.I. Gibson; R.A. Bray; D. Hunt; B.B. Georgiev; T. Scholz; P.D. Harris; T.A. Bakke; T. Pojmanska; K. Niewiadomska; A. Kostadinova; V. Tkach; O. Bain; M.C. Durette-Desset; L. Gibbons; F. Moravec; A. Petter; Z.M. Dimitrova; K. Buchmann; E.T. Valtonen; Y. de Jong

    2014-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fa

  19. Effect of leaf litter quantity and type on forest soil fauna and biological quality%叶凋落物数量和类型对森林土壤动物及其生物学质量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁志忠; 崔洋; 颜绍馗

    2013-01-01

    It is important to assess forest litter management. Here we examined the effects of leaf litter addition on the soil faunal community in Huitong subtropical forest region in Hunan Province, China. The microcosm experiment involving leaf-litter manipulation using a block and nested experimental design, respectively, was established in May, 2011. In the block design, the effects of litter quantity and its control were examined, while in the nested design a comparison was made of litter quality by adding broad-leaved litter or needle litter to soils. In July, 2012, we measured the abundance, diversity, and community composition of soil fauna across these treatments. Significant differences in abundance of springtails were found due to litter addition and of Diptera larvae due to litter type treatment. However, the diversity, community composition and abundance of other taxa did not vary significantly across treatments. We also calculated soil biological quality based on soil fauna data. Its value increased significantly by 32.45% due to litter addition, but was unaffected by litter type based on nested ANOVA. The results indicate that litter quantity plays an more important role than litter type in determining soil quality in the earlier stages of soil evolution in the study region. Because soil biological quality based on soil fauna was more sensitive than abundance and diversity of soil fauna, we suggest it is used as an indicator for evaluating the effectiveness of forest litter management.%评估森林凋落物的管理效应是一项重要的工作,本文在亚热带湖南会同林区,通过2011年5月布置的野外控制实验,采用区组设计和巢式设计,通过添加凋落物与否来检查凋落物的数量效应,添加阔或针叶凋落物来检查凋落物的质量效应,研究了叶凋落物对土壤动物群落的影响.在2012年7月对土壤动物多度、多样性、群落组成等指标进行测量,检测到跳虫多度对添加凋

  20. Degradation of soil fumigants as affected by initial concentration and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q L; Gan, J; Papiernik, S K; Becker, J O; Yates, S R

    2001-01-01

    Soil fumigation using shank injection creates high fumigant concentration gradients in soil from the injection point to the soil surface. A temperature gradient also exists along the soil profile. We studied the degradation of methyl isothiocyanate (MITC) and 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) in an Arlington sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed, thermic Haplic Durixeralf) at four temperatures and four initial concentrations. We then tested the applicability of first-order, half-order, and second-order kinetics, and the Michaelis-Menten model for describing fumigant degradation as affected by temperature and initial concentration. Overall, none of the models adequately described the degradation of MITC and 1,3-D isomers over the range of the initial concentrations. First-order and half-order kinetics adequately described the degradation of MITC and 1,3-D isomers at each initial concentration, with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.78 (r2> 0.78). However, the derived rate constant was dependent on the initial concentration. The first-order rate constants varied between 6 and 10x for MITC for the concentration range of 3 to 140 mg kg(-1), and between 1.5 and 4x for 1,3-D isomers for the concentration range of 0.6 to 60 mg kg(-1), depending on temperature. For the same initial concentration range, the variation in the half-order rate constants was between 1.4 and 1.7x for MITC and between 3.1 and 6.1x for 1,3-D isomers, depending on temperature. Second-order kinetics and the Michaelis-Menten model did not satisfactorily describe the degradation at all initial concentrations. The degradation of MITC and 1,3-D was primarily biodegradation, which was affected by temperature between 20 and 40 degrees C, following the Arrhenius equation (r2 > 0.74). PMID:11476506

  1. Selection pressure, cropping system and rhizosphere proximity affect atrazine degrader populations and activity in s-triazine adapted soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrazine degrader populations and activity in s-triazine adapted soils are likely affected by interactions among and (or) between s-triazine application frequency, crop production system, and proximity to the rhizosphere. A field study was conducted on an s-triazine adapted soil to determine the ef...

  2. Changes in Soil Properties Under the Influences of Cropping and Drip Irrigation During the Reclamation of Severe Salt-Affected Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Jun-li; KANG Yue-hu

    2009-01-01

    Reclamation of salt-affected land plays an important role in mitigating the pressure of agricultural land due to competition with industry and construction in China. Drip irrigation was found to be an effective method to reclaim salt-affected land. In order to improve the effect of reclamation and sustainability of salt-affected land production, a field experiment (with reclaimed 1-3 yr fields) was carried out to investigate changes in soil physical, chemical, and biological properties during the process of reclamation with cropping maize and drip irrigation. Results showed that soil bulk density in 0-20 cm soil layer decreased from 1.71 g cm-3 in unreclaimed land to 1.44 g cm-3 in reclaimed 3 yr fields, and saturated soil water content of 0-10 cm layer increased correspondingly from 20.3 to 30.2%. Both soil salinity and pH value in 0-40 cm soil layer dropped markedly after reclaiming 3 yr. Soil organic matter content reduced, while total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total potassium all tended to increase after cropping and drip irrigation. The quantities of bacteria, actinomycete, and fungi in 0-40 cm soil layer all greatly increased with increase of reclaimed years, and they tended to distribute homogeneously in 0-40 cm soil profile. The urease activity and alkaline phosphatase activity in 0-40 era soil layers were also enhanced, but the sucrase activity was not greatly changed. These results indicated that after crop cultivation and drip irrigation, soil physical environment and nutrients status were both improved. This was benefit for microorganism's activity and plant's growth.

  3. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  4. Do soil Fe transformation and secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids affect the availability of Cd to rice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Yang, Yazhou; Liu, Danqing; Zhang, Chunhua; Ge, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The bioavailability of cadmium (Cd) to rice may be complicated by chemical and biological factors in the rhizosphere. The aim of this work is to investigate how soil iron (Fe) redox transformations and low-molecular-weight organic acid (LMWOA) exudation from root affect Cd accumulation in rice. Two soils (a paddy soil and a saline soil) with different physicochemical properties were used in this study. Soil redox conditions were changed by flooding and addition of organic matter (OM). Two days after the soil treatments, rice seedlings were transplanted in a vermiculite-soil system and grown for 10 days. We measured pH and Eh, LMWOA, Fe and Cd contents in rice, and their fractions in the soils and vermiculite. Cadmium accumulation in rice declined in both soils upon the flooding and OM treatment. Iron dissolution in the paddy soil and its deposition in the rhizosphere significantly increased upon the OM addition, but the concentration of Fe plaque on the rice root significantly declined. Conversely, although Fe transformed into less active fractions in the saline soil, Fe accumulation on the surface and in the tissue of root was considerably enhanced. The secretion of LMWOA was remarkably induced when the OM was amended in the saline soil, but the same effect was not observed in the paddy soil. Reduction of Cd uptake by rice could be attributed to different factors in the two soils. For the paddy soil, the lowered Cd bioavailability was likely due to the competition of Fe and Cd for the binding sites on the vermiculite surface. For the saline soil, however, rice responded to the low Fe mobility through more LMWOA exudation and Fe plaque formation, and their increases could explain the decrease of rice Cd.

  5. Land-use and soil depth affect resource and microbial stoichiometry in a tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Global change phenomena, such as forest disturbance and land-use change, significantly affect elemental balances as well as the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the importance of shifts in soil nutrient stoichiometry for the regulation of belowground biota and soil food webs have not been intensively studied for tropical ecosystems. In the present account, we examine the effects of land-use change and soil depth on soil and microbial stoichiometry along a land-use sequence (natural forest, pastures of different ages, secondary succession) in the tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador. Furthermore, we analyzed (PLFA-method) whether shifts in the microbial community structure were related to alterations in soil and microbial stoichiometry. Soil and microbial stoichiometry were affected by both land-use change and soil depth. After forest disturbance, significant decreases of soil C:N:P ratios at the pastures were followed by increases during secondary succession. Microbial C:N ratios varied slightly in response to land-use change, whereas no fixed microbial C:P and N:P ratios were observed. Shifts in microbial community composition were associated with soil and microbial stoichiometry. Strong positive relationships between PLFA-markers 18:2n6,9c (saprotrophic fungi) and 20:4 (animals) and negative associations between 20:4 and microbial N:P point to land-use change affecting the structure of soil food webs. Significant deviations from global soil and microbial C:N:P ratios indicated a major force of land-use change to alter stoichiometric relationships and to structure biological systems. Our results support the idea that soil biotic communities are stoichiometrically flexible in order to adapt to alterations in resource stoichiometry.

  6. Mercury affects the distribution of culturable species of Pseudomonas in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtze, Maria Sommer; Nielsen, Preben; Ekelund, Flemming;

    2006-01-01

    temperatures. Furthermore, the isolates were tested for their ability to grow on agar amended with 10 mg Hg kg(-1) as an indication of mercury resistance. We found that up to 80% of the isolates in soil amended with 15 mg Hg kg(-1) were mercury-resistant, whereas only up to 20% were resistant in the treatments......Pseudomonas bacteria isolated during 52 days on Gould's S1 agar from soil spiked with 0, 3.5 and 15 mg Hg(II) kg soil(-1) were characterised to reveal whether mercury affected them differently. Isolates from the treatments with 0 and 15 mg Hg kg(-1) were characterised using FT-IR characterisation...... and subsequent 16S rDNA partial sequencing of representative isolates. To verify the selectivity of Gould's S1 agar and the FT-IR characterisation, all 450 isolates were subjected to the following tests: Gram-determination, catalase and oxidase activity, pigment production on PDA and growth at different...

  7. Land Management Effects on Biogeochemical Functioning of Salt-Affected Paddy Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.QUANTIN; O.GRUNBERGER; N.SUVANNANG; E.BOURDON

    2008-01-01

    Most lowlands in Northeast Thailand (Isaan region) are cultivated with rice and large areas are affected by salinity,which drastically limits rice production.A field experiment was conducted during the 2003 rainy season to explore the interactions between salinity and land management in two fields representative of two farming practices:an intensively managed plot with organic inputs and efficient water management,and one without organic matter addition.Field measurements,including pH,Eh,electrical conductivity (EC),and soil solution chemistry,were performed at three depths,with a particular focus on Fe dynamics,inside and outside saline patches.High reducing conditions appeared after flooding particularly in plots receiving organic matter and reduction processes leading to oxide reduction and to the release of Fe and,to a lesser extend,Mn to the soil solution.Oxide reduction led to the consumption of H+ and the more the Fe reduction was,the higher the pH was,up to 6.5.Formation of hydroxy-green rust were likely to be at the origin of the pH stabilization.In the absence of organic amendments,high salinity prevented the establishment of the reduction processes and pH value remained around 4.Even under high reduction conditions,the Fe concentrations in the soil solution were below commonly observed toxic values and the amended plot had better rice production yield.

  8. Characterization on the rhizoremediation of petroleum contaminated soil as affected by different influencing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, pilot experiments were conducted to analyze the effect of different environmental factors on the rhizoremediation of petroleum contaminated soil. Different plant species (cotton, ryegrass, tall fescue, and alfalfa, addition of fertilizer, different concentration of TPH in soil, bioaugmentation with effective microbial agent (EMA and PGPR, and remediation time were tested as influencing factors during bioremediation process of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH. The result shows that the remediation process can be enhanced by different plants species with the following order: tall fescue > ryegrass > alfalfa > cotton. The degradation rate of TPH increased with increased fertilizer addition and moderate level of 20 g/m2 urea is best for both plant growth and TPH remediation. High TPH content is toxic to plant growth and inhibits the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon with 5% TPH content showing the best degradation result in soil planted with ryegrass. Bioaugmentation with different bacteria and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR showed the following results for TPH degradation: cotton + EMA + PGPR > cotton + EMA > cotton + PGPR > cotton > control. Rapid degradation of TPH was found at the initial period of remediation caused by the activity of microorganisms, continuous increase was found from 30–90 d period and slow increase was found from 90 to 150 d. The result suggests that rhizoremediation can be enhanced with the proper control of different influencing factors that affect both plant growth and microbial activity in the rhizosphere environment.

  9. Characterization on the rhizoremediation of petroleum contaminated soil as affected by different influencing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Wang, R.; Niu, X.; Wang, M.; Zhou, Q.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, pilot experiments were conducted to analyze the effect of different environmental factors on the rhizoremediation of petroleum contaminated soil. Different plant species (cotton, ryegrass, tall fescue, and alfalfa), addition of fertilizer, different concentration of TPH in soil, bioaugmentation with effective microbial agent (EMA) and PGPR, and remediation time were tested as influencing factors during bioremediation process of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH). The result shows that the remediation process can be enhanced by different plants species with the following order: tall fescue > ryegrass > alfalfa > cotton. The degradation rate of TPH increased with increased fertilizer addition and moderate level of 20 g/m2 urea is best for both plant growth and TPH remediation. High TPH content is toxic to plant growth and inhibits the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon with 5% TPH content showing the best degradation result in soil planted with ryegrass. Bioaugmentation with different bacteria and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) showed the following results for TPH degradation: cotton + EMA + PGPR > cotton + EMA > cotton + PGPR > cotton > control. Rapid degradation of TPH was found at the initial period of remediation caused by the activity of microorganisms, continuous increase was found from 30-90 d period and slow increase was found from 90 to 150 d. The result suggests that rhizoremediation can be enhanced with the proper control of different influencing factors that affect both plant growth and microbial activity in the rhizosphere environment.

  10. Incorporating rice residues into paddy soils affects methylmercury accumulation in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huike; Zhong, Huan; Wu, Jialu

    2016-06-01

    Paddy fields are characterized by frequent organic input (e.g., fertilization and rice residue amendment), which may affect mercury biogeochemistry and bioaccumulation. To explore potential effects of rice residue amendment on methylmercury (MMHg) accumulation in rice, a mercury-contaminated paddy soil was amended with rice root (RR), rice straw (RS) or composted rice straw (CS), and planted with rice. Incorporating RS or CS increased grain MMHg concentration by 14% or 11%. The observed increases could be attributed to the elevated porewater MMHg levels and thus enhanced MMHg uptake by plants, as well as increased MMHg translocation to grain within plants. Our results indicated for the first time that rice residue amendment could significantly affect MMHg accumulation in rice grain, which should be considered in risk assessment of MMHg in contaminated areas. PMID:26974480

  11. Environmental factors influencing trace house gas production in permafrost-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Josefine; Knoblauch, Christian; Böhme, Luisa; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2016-04-01

    The permafrost-carbon feedback has been identified as a major feedback mechanism to climate change. Soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in the active layer and thawing permafrost is an important source of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Decomposability and potential CO2 and CH4 production are connected to the quality of SOM. SOM quality varies with vegetation composition, soil type, and soil depth. The regulating factors affecting SOM decomposition in permafrost landscapes are not well understood. Here, we incubated permafrost-affected soils from a polygonal tundra landscape in the Lena Delta, Northeast Siberia, to examine the influence of soil depth, oxygen availability, incubation temperature, and fresh organic matter addition on trace gas production. CO2 production was always highest in topsoil (0 - 10 cm). Subsoil (10 - 50 cm) and permafrost (50 - 90 cm) carbon did not differ significantly in their decomposability. Under anaerobic conditions, less SOM was decomposed than under aerobic conditions. However, in the absence of oxygen, CH4 can also be formed, which has a substantially higher warming potential than CO2. But, within the four-month incubation period (approximate period of thaw), methanogenesis played only a minor role with CH4 contributing 1-30% to the total anaerobic carbon release. Temperature and fresh organic matter addition had a positive effect on SOM decomposition. Across a temperature gradient (1, 4, 8°C) aerobic decomposition in topsoil was less sensitive to temperature than in subsoil or permafrost. The addition of labile plant organic matter (13C-labelled Carex aquatilis, a dominant species in the region) significantly increased overall CO2 production across different depths and temperatures. Partitioning the total amount of CO2 in samples amended with Carex material into SOM-derived CO2 and Carex-derived CO2, however, revealed that most of the additional CO2 could be assigned to the organic carbon from the amendment

  12. Management strategies to utilize salt affected soils. Isotopic and conventional research methods. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes the results of a co-ordinated research programme on ''The Use of Nuclear Techniques for Improvement of Crop Production in Salt-affected Soils''. It aims at providing scientists experimental evidence of demonstrating technical feasibility of biological amelioration of salt affected soils as an alternative option of using expensive chemical amendments in soil reclamation complementing engineering structures of farm drainage systems or option of leaving the saline areas as barren lands in spite of the fact that arable agricultural lands have exhausted. 68 refs, 26 figs, 32 tabs

  13. Affectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Stenner, Paul; Greco, Monica

    2013-01-01

    The concept of affectivity has assumed central importance in much recent scholarship, and many in the social sciences and humanities now talk of an ‘affective turn’. The concept of affectivity at play in this ‘turn’ remains, however, somewhat vague and slippery. Starting with Silvan Tomkins’ influential theory of affect, this paper will explore the relevance of the general assumptions (or ‘utmost abstractions’) that inform thinking about affectivity. The technological and instrumentalist char...

  14. How the sorption of benzene in soils contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons is affected by the presence of biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Manuela Carvalho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of biofuels as additives to gasoline may have potential indirect effects on the efficiency of soil remediation technologies used to remediate fuel spills. This problem has not yet been studied. Sorption is one of the controlling processes in soil remediation. The effect of biofuels on sorption and phase distribution of contaminants by different natural soils has not been reported on the literature. The present work examines how two different biofuels, n-butanol and soybean biodiesel, affect benzene sorption in two naturally occurring subsoils (granite and limestone. Sorption isotherms were made with soils deliberately contaminated with benzene, benzene and n-butanol and benzene plus biodiesel, using lab-scale reactors operated at constant temperature, each one loaded with 700 grams of wet sterilized soil. For each type of soil, five isotherms were determined corresponding to different contamination profiles. It was concluded that sorption was strongly affected by the nature of the soil. The partition of benzene into the different phases of the soil was significantly affected by the presence of biofuels. The experimental data was fitted to conventional sorption models, Freundlich, Langmuir and a second order polynomial. Model parameters were determined using a non-linear least squares (NLLS optimization algorithm and showed a good agreement between experimental and fitted data.

  15. The levels and composition of persistent organic pollutants in alluvial agriculture soils affected by flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliszewska-Kordybach, Barbara; Smreczak, Bozena; Klimkowicz-Pawlas, Agnieszka

    2013-12-01

    The concentrations and composition of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were determined in alluvial soils subjected to heavy flooding in a rural region of Poland. Soil samples (n = 30) were collected from the upper soil layer from a 70-km(2) area. Chemical determinations included basic physicochemical properties and the contents of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, 16 compounds). The median concentrations of Σ7PCB (PCB28 + PCB52 + PCB101 + PCB118 + PCB138 + PCB153 + PCB180), Σ3HCH (α-HCH + β-HCH + γ-HCH) and Σ3pp'(DDT + DDE + DDD) were 1.60 ± 1.03, 0.22 ± 0.13 and 25.18 ± 82.70 μg kg(-1), respectively. The median concentrations of the most abundant PAHs, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene were 50 ± 37, 38 ± 27, 29 ± 30, 45 ± 36 and 24 ± 22 μg kg(-1), respectively. Compared with elsewhere in the world, the overall level of contamination with POPs was low and similar to the levels in agricultural soils from neighbouring countries, except for benzo[a]pyrene and DDT. There was no evidence that flooding affected the levels of POPs in the studied soils. The patterns observed for PAHs and PCBs indicate that atmospheric deposition is the most important long-term source of these contaminants. DDTs were the dominant organochlorine pesticides (up to 99%), and the contribution of the parent pp' isomer was up to 50 % of the ΣDDT, which indicates the advantage of aged contamination. A high pp'DDE/pp'DDD ratio suggests the prevalence of aerobic transformations of parent DDT. Dominance of the γ isomer in the HCHs implies historical use of lindane in the area. The effect of soil properties on the POP concentrations was rather weak, although statistically significant links with the content of the <0.02-mm fraction, Ctotal or Ntotal were observed for some individual compounds in the PCB group. PMID:23877573

  16. Estimating Exchangeable Sodium Percentage from Sodium Adsorption Ratio of Salt-Affected Soil in the Songnen Plain of Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Chun-Ming; ZHAO Chang-Wei; SUN Xiao-Jing; WANG Zhi-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Soil exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) are commonly used to assess soil sodicity. Correlation between ESP and SAR of saturated pasted extract (SARe) or of 1:5 (m:m) mixture soil to water (SAR1:5) has been documented to predict ESP from SAR. However limited studies have been undertaken to model soil ESP based on soil SAR in the Songnen Plain,Northeast China. In this study, 117 soil samples were used to predict ESP from SARe and SAR1:5 of salt-affected soils in western Songnen Plain. Soil ESP was highly related (r2>0.76, P < 0.001) with SARe and SAR1:5. ESP of salt-affected soils in the Songnen Plain could be predicted using a logarithmic regression equations of ESP = 10.72·In(SARe) - 15.36 and ESP = 11.44·In(SAR1:5) + 5.48.

  17. Relationships between soil properties and community structure of soil macroinvertebrates in oak-history forests along an acidic deposition gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-02-01

    Soil macroinvertebrate communities were studied in ecologically analogous oak-hickory forests across a three-state atmospheric pollution gradient in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. The goal was to investigate changes in the community structure of soil fauna in study sites receiving different amounts of acidic deposition for several decades and the possible relationships between these changes and physico-chemical properties of soil. The study revealed significant differences in the numbers of soil animals among the three study sites. The sharply differentiated pattern of soil macroinvertebrate fauna seems closely linked to soil chemistry. Significant correlations of the abundance of soil macroinvertebrates with soil parameters suggest that their populations could have been affected by acidic deposition in the region. Abundance of total soil macroinvertebrates decreased with the increased cumulative loading of acidic deposition. Among the groups most sensitive to deposition were: earthworms gastropods, dipteran larvae, termites, and predatory beetles. The results of the study support the hypothesis that chronic long-term acidic deposition could aversely affect the soil decomposer community which could cause lower organic matter turnover rates leading to an increase in soil organic matter content in high deposition sites.

  18. Relationships of soil physical and microbial properties with nitrous oxide emission affected by freeze-thaw event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianfeng WANG; Xin SUN; Yanjiang CAI; Hongtu XIE; Xudong ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Freeze-thaw event often occurs in regions at mid-high latitude and high altitude.This event can affect soil physical and biological properties,such as soil water status,aggregate stability,and microbial biomass and community structure.Under its effects,the bio-indicators of soil microbes including the kinds and quantities of some specific amino sugars may vary,and the process and intensity of soil nitrogen transformation may change,which can result in an increase in nitrous oxide (N2O)production and emission,making the soil as the major source of N2O emission.This paper summarizes the research progress on the aspects mentioned above,and suggests further research directions on the theoretical problems of soil N2O production and emission under the effects of freeze-thaw event.

  19. Mite species (Acari: Mesostigmata new and rare to Polish fauna, inhabiting the soil of broadleaved forests dominated by small-leaved lime (Tilia cordata Mill. in Kwidzyn Forest District (N Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FALEŃCZYK-KOZIRÓG KATARZYNA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During a two-year study on mites of the order Mesostigmata in broadleaved forest stands dominated by small-leaved lime (Tilia cordata Mill., 117 mite species were identified. Among them, 3 had been so far rarely recorded in Poland (Haemogamasus nidi, Stylochirus rovenensis and Eugamasus crassitarsis and 2 were classified as new to the Polish fauna (Veigaia sibirica and Digamasellus perpusillus.

  20. Bacterial diversity and composition in major fresh produce growing soils affected by physiochemical properties and geographic locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A Mark; Yang, Ching-Hong; Crowley, David E

    2016-09-01

    Microbial diversity of agricultural soils has been well documented, but information on leafy green producing soils is limited. In this study, we investigated microbial diversity and community structures in 32 (16 organic, 16 conventionally managed soils) from California (CA) and Arizona (AZ) using pyrosequencing, and identified factors affecting bacterial composition. Results of detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity analysis showed that bacterial community structures of conventionally managed soils were similar to that of organically managed soils; while the bacterial community structures in soils from Salinas, California were different (Psoils from Yuma, Arizona and Imperial Valley, California. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of bacterial community structures and soil variables showed that electrical conductivity (EC), clay content, water-holding capacity (WHC), pH, total nitrogen (TN), and organic carbon (OC) significantly (Psoil physical properties (clay, EC, and WHC), soil chemical variables (pH, TN, and OC) and sampling location explained 16.3%, 12.5%, and 50.9%, respectively, of total variations in bacterial community structure, leaving 13% of the total variation unexplained. Our current study showed that bacterial community composition and diversity in major fresh produce growing soils from California and Arizona is a function of soil physiochemical characteristics and geographic distances of sampling sites. PMID:27135583

  1. Dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization strongly affect co2 emissions following lime application to acidic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission of greenhouse gases from agricultural soils has main contribution to the climatic change and global warming. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen mineralization can affect CO/sub 2/ emission from soils. Influence of DOC and nitrogen mineralization on CO/sub 2/ emissions following lime application to acidic soil was investigated in current study. Laboratory experiment was conducted under aerobic conditions with 25% moisture contents (66% water-filled pore space) at 25 degree C in the dark conditions. Different treatments of lime were applied to acidic soil as follows: CK (control), L (low rate of lime: 0.2g lime / 100 g soil) and H (high rate of lime: 0.5g lime /100g soil). CO/sub 2/ emissions were measured by gas chromatography and dissolved organic carbon, NH4 +-N, NO/sub 3/ --N and soil pH were measured during incubation study. Addition of lime to acidic soil significantly increased the concentration of DOC and N mineralization rate. Higher concentrations of DOC and N mineralization, consequently, increased the CO/sub 2/ emissions from lime treated soils. Cumulative CO/sub 2/ emission was 75% and 71% higher from L and H treatments as compared to CK. The results of current study suggest that DOC and N mineralization are critical in controlling gaseous emissions of CO/sub 2/ from acidic soils following lime application. (author)

  2. Long-term sediment yield from small catchment in southern Brazil affected by land use and soil management changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Minella, Jean Paolo; Henrique Merten, Gustavo; Alessandra Peixoto de Barros, Claudia; Dalbianco, Leandro; Ramon, Rafael; Schlesner, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion and sediment yield are the main cause of soil degradation in Brazil. Despite this, there is a lack of information about the effects of the soil management on the hydrology and sediment yield at catchment scale. This study aimed to investigate the long-term relationship between the land use and sediment yield in a small catchment with significant changes in soil management, and its impacts on soil erosion and sediment yield. To account the anthropogenic and climatic effects on sediment yield were monitored precipitation, stream flow and suspended sediment concentration during thirteen years (2002 and 2014) at 10 minutes interval and the changes that occurred each year in the land use and soil management. Despite the influence of climate on the sediment yield, the results clearly show three distinct periods affected by the land use and soil management changes during this this period. In the first four years (2002-2004) the predominant land use was the tobacco with traditional soil management, where the soils are plough every year and without winter cover crop. In this period the sediment yield reached the order of 160 t.ha-1.y-1. In the period of 2005-2009, a soil conservation program introduced the adoption of minimum tillage in the catchment and the sediment yield decrease to 70 t.ha-1.y-1. In the last period (2010-2014) there was a partial return to the traditional soil management practices with an increase trend in sediment yield. However, there was also an increase in reforestation areas with positive effect in reducing erosion and sediment yield. The magnitude order of sediment yield in this period was 100 t.ha-1.y-1. The long term sediment yield data was able to demonstrate the impact of the improved management practices in reducing soil erosion and sediment yield. The results allowed a good understanding of the changing sediment dynamics and soil erosion at catchment scale.

  3. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg‑1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation.

  4. Zn—Cu Interaction Affecting Zn Adsorption and Plant Availability in a Metal—Contaminated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.L.Rimmer; LuoYongming

    1996-01-01

    In a previous greenhouse experiment,we showed that there was an interaction between cu and Zn,which affected growth and metal uptake by young barley plants grown on soil to which Cd,Cu,Pb,and Zn had been added.We suggested that the underlying mechanism was the control of the amount of plant-available Zn by competitive adsorption between Cu and Zn,In order to test this hypothesis,the adsorption of Zn alone,and in the presence of added Cd,Cu and Pb,has been measured using the same soil.Following adsorption,the extractability of the Zn in CaCl2 solution was measured .The adsorption isotherms showed that of the added metals only Cu had a large effect on Zn adsorption.The effect of Cu was to reduce Zn adsoption and to increase the amount of CaCl2-extractable(i.e.plant-available) Zn,in agreement with the conclusions from the greenhouse experiment.The magnitude of the effect of Cu on plant-avalilable Zn was similar in both experiments.

  5. Sonoran Desert winter annuals affected by density of red brome and soil nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, L.F.; McPherson, G.R.; Williams, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    Red brome [Bromus madritensis subsp. rubens (L.) Husn.] is a Mediterranean winter annual grass that has invaded Southwestern USA deserts. This study evaluated interactions among 13 Sonoran Desert annual species at four densities of red brome from 0 to the equivalent of 1200 plants ma??2. We examined these interactions at low (3 I?g) and high (537 I?g NO3a?? g soila??1) nitrogen (N) to evaluate the relative effects of soil N level on survival and growth of native annuals and red brome. Red brome did not affect emergence or survival of native annuals, but significantly reduced growth of natives, raising concerns about effects of this exotic grass on the fecundity of these species. Differences in growth of red brome and of the three dominant non nitrogen-fixing native annuals at the two levels of soil N were similar. Total species biomass of red brome was reduced by 83% at low, compared to high, N levels, whereas that of the three native species was reduced by from 42 to 95%. Mean individual biomass of red brome was reduced by 87% at low, compared to high, N levels, whereas that of the three native species was reduced by from 72 to 89%.

  6. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X M; Drury, C F; Reynolds, W D; Yang, J Y

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and sand (53-2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg(-1) soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg(-1), but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  7. Remote sensing and geographic information system for appraisal of salt-affected soils in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurbachan; Bundela, D S; Sethi, Madhurama; Lal, Khajanchi; Kamra, S K

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of the nature, extent, and spatial distribution of salt-affected soils (SAS) for India and the world is essential for planning and implementing reclamation programs in a timely and cost-effective manner for sustained crop production. The national extent of SAS for India over the last four decades was assessed by conventional and remote sensing approaches using diverse methodologies and class definitions and ranged from 6.0 to 26.1 million hectares (Mha) and 1.2 to 10.1 Mha, respectively. In 1966, an area of 6 Mha under SAS was first reported using the former approach. Three national estimates, obtained using remote sensing, were reconciled using a geographic information system, resulting in an acceptable extent of 6.73 Mha. Moderately and severely salt-encrusted lands having large contiguous area have been correctly mapped, but slightly salt-encrusted land having smaller affected areas within croplands has not been accurately mapped. Recent satellite sensors (e.g., Resourcesat-1, Cartosat-2, IKONOS-II, and RISAT-2), along with improved image processing techniques integrated with terrain and other spatial data using a geographic information system, are enabling mapping at large scale. Significant variations in salt encrustation at the surface caused by soil moisture, waterlogging conditions, salt-tolerant crops, and dynamics of subsurface salts present constraints in appraisal, delineation, and mapping efforts. The article provides an overview of development, identification, characterization, and delineation of SAS, past and current national scenarios of SAS using conventional and remote sensing approaches, reconciliation of national estimates, issues of SAS mapping, and future scope.

  8. Use of advanced information technologies for water conservation on salt-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water conservation on arid and semi-arid soils must be done with constant and careful consideration of the distribution of salinity across the landscape and through the soil profile. Soil salinity can be managed through leaching and the application of various soil amendments. The field-scale manag...

  9. Initial water repellency affected organic matter depletion rates of manure amended soils in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Leelamanie, D.A.L.

    2014-01-01

    The wetting rate of soil is a measure of water repellency, which is a property of soils that prevents water from wetting or penetrating into dry soil. The objective of the present research was to examine the initial water repellency of organic manure amended soil, and its relation to the soil organic matter (SOM) depletion rates in the laboratory. Soil collected from the Wilpita natural forest, Sri Lanka, was mixed with organic manure to prepare soil samples with 0, 5, 10, 25, and 50% organic...

  10. potencialmente repelentes à fauna consumidora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme O. S. Ferraz de Arruda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The seed of Araucaria angustifolia, “pinhão”, is becoming a alternative way of income for many families living at south and southeast of Brazil. The intensive attack on Paraná pine seeds by the wild fauna, that occur at newly-planted areas by direct sowing and at nursery of seedlings, is one of several adverses and distimulating factors to specie spreading. The objective of this work was to verify probable phytotoxics effects of some naturals and synthetics substances potentially repellentes to wild fauna, in Araucaria angustifolia seeds “in vitro”. The experiment was realized at Phytopatology and Plant Physiology Laboratory of Center of Agroveterinary Sciences, University of Santa Catarina State – Brazil, from june to december, 2004. The Paraná pine seeds, after preparation and treatment with vegetal and not vegetal substances, were sown in plastic trays with vermiculite substratum and put on cabin of growth with controlled temperature, relative humidity of air, humidity of substratum and photoperiods. It was adopted the randomized complete design with 15 treatments, with 10 seeds each treatment and with 4 repetitions. The tested substances separately or in mixtures were: extract of fruit of red pepper, root of parsley, stem and leaf of wormwood herb, lemon scented gum essential oil, linseed oil, castor bean oil, rosin, copper oxychloride, copper sulphate, sulphur and látex ink. The root emission, stem emission, length of main root and length of stem were evaluated 76 days after sowing and statisticaly analyzed. The analysis make possible to conclude that the tested extract do not have phytotoxic effect on seeds and that the substances tested “in vitro” can be used in field experiments, in repellence traits for Parana pine seeds consuming fauna. Keywords: effects fitotóxicos; pine seeds of Araucaria angustifolia; predação of seeds.

  11. Factors Affecting Spatial Variation of Annual Apparent Q10 of Soil Respiration in Two Warm Temperate Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Luan, Junwei; Liu, Shirong; Wang, Jingxin; Zhu, Xueling

    2013-01-01

    A range of factors has been identified that affect the temperature sensitivity (Q10 values) of the soil-to-atmosphere CO2 flux. However, the factors influencing the spatial distribution of Q10 values within warm temperate forests are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the spatial variation of Q10 values and its controlling factors in both a naturally regenerated oak forest (OF) and a pine plantation (PP). Q10 values were determined based on monthly soil respiration (RS) measurement...

  12. Spatial Analysis of Soil and Water Quality in Tsunami AffectedAreas of Nagapattinam District, Tamilnadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Velayudha Das

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In India, the natural disasters, especially the Tsunami in 2004 having exposed our unpreparedness, variability, diverse scientific, engineering, financial and also social processes. Vedaranyamtalukof Nagapattinam coastal region of Tamilnadu, India,was severely affected by Tsunami-2004. Due to its unique geological nature and climate conditions, the quality of soil and water resources was subjected to natural and synthetic changes. The recent efforts of prawn culture and saltpan in these areas also affect the natural resources. This study has revealed the present scenario of soil and water resources by analyzing their chemical parameters in the Tsunami affected areas after ten years of Tsunami-2004. For this study, soil samples (less than 30cm depth from land surface and groundwater samples (from existing hand/bore pumps were collected in the study area. It was observed from the analysis that the pH of soil was improved well and EC was lowered significantly except few places. Regarding the available N, P, K of soil, N was low, P and Kwere low to medium range. Further thepH,DO, Turbidity, Hardness,Cl and Mgof groundwater were within the permissible limit;EC and TDS were slight to moderate range for irrigation and drinking.The SAR is within the maximum allowable limit which inferred that groundwater can be used for irrigation without any risk.Thisspatial-temporal variability of soil and water parameters were mapped in GIS environment (Surfer ver. 9 and compared with pretsunami-2004 as well as ground truth scenario. Keeping these results, the soil is suitable for agriculture production. The natural flash flood has helped to reduce contamination of soil and water due to Tsunami-2004. However,due to alkaline in nature the quality of groundwater is not fit for drinking in some places but suitable for irrigation. Among the affected villages, Vedaranyam village has worst quality. This study also recommends suitable management strategies for sustainable

  13. Plant material as bioaccumulator of arsenic in soils affected by mining activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, Salvadora; Martínez-Sánchez, Maria Jose; García-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    arsenic extracted by HCl, with the oxidizable-organic matter and sulfides fraction and with the arsenic extracted by Mehra-Jackson extraction. According to our results, As is accumulated in the leaves of the plants and is linked with iron oxides of these soils affected by mining activities.

  14. Environmental Factors Affect Acidobacterial Communities below the Subgroup Level in Grassland and Forest Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Naether, A.; Foesel, B.; Naegele, V.; Wuest, P.; Weinert, J.; Bonkowski, M.; Alt, F; Y. Oelmann; Polle, A.; Lohaus, G.; Gockel, S.; Hemp, A.; Kalko, E.; Linsenmair, K.; Pfeiffer, S

    2012-01-01

    In soil, Acidobacteria constitute on average 20% of all bacteria, are highly diverse, and are physiologically active in situ. However, their individual functions and interactions with higher taxa in soil are still unknown. Here, potential effects of land use, soil properties, plant diversity, and soil nanofauna on acidobacterial community composition were studied by cultivation-independent methods in grassland and forest soils from three different regions in Germany. The analysis of 16S rRNA ...

  15. Bioaccessibility of trace elements as affected by soil parameters in smelter-contaminated agricultural soils: A statistical modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was undertaken to identify the most significant soil parameters that can be used to predict Cd, Pb, and Zn bioaccessibility in smelter-contaminated agricultural soils. A robust model was established from an extended database of soils by using: (i) a training set of 280 samples to select the main soil parameters, to define the best population to be taken into account for the model elaboration, and to construct multivariate regression models, and (ii) a test set of 110 samples to validate the ability of the regression models. Total carbonate, organic matter, sand, P2O5, free Fe–Mn oxide, and pseudototal Al and trace element (TE) contents appeared as the main variables governing TE bioaccessibility. The statistical modeling approach was reasonably successful, indicating that the main soil factors influencing the bioaccessibility of TEs were taken into account and the predictions could be applicable for further risk evaluation in the studied area. - Highlights: ► We model the effects of varying soil parameters on TE bioaccessibility. ► Model calibration and validation were conducted on a test set of 390 soil samples. ► The use of an extended database is needed to elaborate a robust model. ► The bioaccessibility predictions could be applicable for further risk evaluation. - This study supports the hypothesis that the use of an extended database is needed to elaborate a robust model predicting the TE bioaccessibility in the studied soils.

  16. Physicochemical and biological quality of soil in hexavalent chromium-contaminated soils as affected by chemical and microbial remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yingping; Min, Xiaobo; Yang, Zhihui; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Shujuan; Wang, Yangyang

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and microbial methods are the main remediation technologies for chromium-contaminated soil. These technologies have progressed rapidly in recent years; however, there is still a lack of methods for evaluating the chemical and biological quality of soil after different remediation technologies have been applied. In this paper, microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria and chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate were used for the remediation of soils contaminated with Cr(VI) at two levels (80 and 1,276 mg kg(-1)) through a column leaching experiment. After microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria, the average concentration of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the soils was reduced to less than 5.0 mg kg(-1). Soil quality was evaluated based on 11 soil properties and the fuzzy comprehensive assessment method, including fuzzy mathematics and correlative analysis. The chemical fertility quality index was improved by one grade using microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria, and the biological fertility quality index increased by at least a factor of 6. Chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate, however, resulted in lower levels of available phosphorus, dehydrogenase, catalase and polyphenol oxidase. The result showed that microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria was more effective for remedying Cr(VI)-contaminated soils with high pH value than chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate. In addition, the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method was proven to be a useful tool for monitoring the quality change in chromium-contaminated soils. PMID:23784058

  17. Soil nitrogen affects phosphorus recycling: foliar resorption and plant-soil feedbacks in a northern hardwood forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Craig R; Yanai, Ruth D; Fisk, Melany C; Vadeboncoeur, Matthew A; Quintero, Brauuo A; Fahey, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have attempted to link foliar resorption of nitrogen and phosphorus to their. respective availabilities in soil, with mixed results. Based on resource optimization theory, we hypothesized that the foliar resorption of one element could be driven by the availability of another element. We tested various measures of soil N and P as predictors of N and P resorption in six tree species in 18 plots across six stands at the Bartlett Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA. Phosphorus resorption efficiency (P soil N content. to 30 cm depth, suggesting that trees conserve P based on the availability of soil N. Phosphorus resorption also increased with soil P content, which is difficult to explain basdd on single-element limitation, butfollows from the correlation between soil N and soil P. The expected single-element relationships were evident only in the 0 horizon: P resorption was high where resin-available P was low in the Oe (P soil N content on foliar P resorption is the first evidence of multiple-element control on nutrient resorption to be reported from an unmanipulated ecosystem.

  18. The Effects of Farmyard Manure and Mulch on Soil Physical Properties in a Reclaimed Coastal Tidal Flat Salt-Affected Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-bing; YANG Jing-song; YAO Rong-jiang; YU Shi-peng; LI Fu-rong; HOU Xiao-jing

    2014-01-01

    Careful soil management is important for the soil quality and productivity improvement of the reclaimed coastal tidal lfat saline land in northern Jiangsu Province, China. Farmyard manure (FYM) and mulch applications, which affect soil characteristics and plant signiifcantly, are regard as an effective pattern of saline land improvement. As a conventional management in the study region, FYM and mulch are used for the amendment of the new reclaimed tidal lfat regularly, but little is known about their effects on soil physical properties functioning. A study was conducted on a typical coastal tidal lfat saline land, which was reclaimed in 2005, to evaluate the effects of FYM, polyethylene iflm mulch (PM), straw mulch (SM), FYM combined with PM (FYM+PM), FYM combined with SM (FYM+SM), on soil hydraulic properties and soil mechanical impedance. CK represented conventional cultivation in study area without FYM and mulch application and served as a control. The experiment, laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications, was studied in Huanghaiyuan Farm, which specialized in the agricultural utilization for coastal tidal lfat. Result showed that capillary water holding capacity (CHC), saturated water content (SWC), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and bulk density (BD), cone index (CI) were affected signiifcantly by the FYM and mulch application, especially in the 0-10 cm soil layer. FYM and mulch management increased CHC, SWC and Ks over all soil depth in the order of FYM+SM>FYM+PM>FYM>SM>PM>CK. With the contrary sequence, BD and CI decreased signiifcantly;however, FYM and mulch application affected BD and CI only in the upper soil layers. CHC, SWC and Ks decreased signiifcantly with the increasing of soil depth, BD and CI, and a signiifcant liner equation was found between CHC, SWC, Ks and BD, CI. With the highest CHC (38.15%), SWC (39.55%), Ks (6.00 mm h-1) and the lowest BD (1.26 g cm-3) and CI (2.71 MPa), the combined management of FYM

  19. Seasonal dynamics of CO2 efflux in soils amended with composted and thermally-dried sludge as affected by soil tillage systems in a semi-arid agroecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Juan Carlos; Soler-Rovira, Pedro; López-de-Sa, Esther G.; Polo, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    In semi-arid agricultural soils, seasonal dynamic of soil CO2 efflux (SCE) is highly variable. Based on soil respiration measurements the effects of different management systems (moldboard plowing, chisel and no-tillage) and the application of composted sludge (CS) and thermally-dried sewage sludge (TSS) was investigated in a long-term field experiment (28 years) conducted on a sandy-loam soil at the experimental station 'La Higueruela' (40o 03'N, 4o 24'W). Both organic amendments were applied at a rate of 30 Mg ha-1 prior to tillage practices. Unamended soils were used as control for each tillage system. SCE was moderate in late spring (2.2-11.8 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) when amendments were applied and tillage was performed, markedly decreased in summer (0.4-3.2 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1), following a moderate increase in autumn (3.4-14.1 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1), rising sharply in October (5.6-39.8 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 ). In winter, SCE was low (0.6-6.5 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). In general, SCE was greater in chisel and moldboard tilled soils, and in CS and particularly TSS-amended soils, due to the addition of labile C with these amendments, meanwhile no-tillage soils exhibited smaller increases in C efflux throughout the seasons. Soil temperature controlled the seasonal variations of SCE. In summer, when drought occurs, a general decrease of SCE was observed due to a deficit in soil water content. After drought period SCE jumped to high values in response to rain events ('Birch effect') that changed soil moisture conditions. Soil drying in summer and rewetting in autumn may promotes some changes on the structure of soil microbial community, affecting associated metabolic processes, and enhancing a rapid mineralization of water-soluble organic C compounds and/or dead microbial biomass that acts as an energy source for soil microorganisms. To assess the effects of tillage and amendments on SCE, Q10 values were calculated. Data were grouped into three groups according to soil moisture (0

  20. Soil quality index as affected by different cropping systems in northwestern Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofi, J A; Bhat, A G; Kirmai, N A; Wani, J A; Lone, Aabid H; Ganie, Mumtaz A; Dar, G I H

    2016-03-01

    Soil quality assessment provides a tool for evaluating the sustainability of soils under different crop cafeterias. Our objective was to develop the soil quality index for evaluating the soil quality indicators under different cropping systems in northwest Himalaya-India. Composite soil samples were taken from the study area from different cropping systems which include T1 (forest soil control), T2 (rice-oilseed, lower belts), T3 (rice-oilseed, higher belts), T4 (rice-oats), T5 (rice-fallow), T6 (maize-oats), T7 (maize-peas), T8 (apple), T9 (apple-beans), and T10 (apple-maize). Physical, chemical, and biological soil indicators were determined, and it was found that soil enzyme activities involved in nutrient cycling were significantly higher in forest soils, which were reflected in higher levels of available pool of nutrients. Carbon stocks were found significantly higher in forest soil which was translated in improved soil physical condition. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to reduce multidimensionality of data followed by scoring by homothetic transformation of the selected indicators. Pearson's interclass correlation was performed to avoid redundancy, and highly correlated variables were not retained. Inclusion of legumes in the apple orchard floor recorded highest soil quality rating across the treatments. Cereal-based cropping systems were found in lower soil quality rating; however, the incorporation of peas in the system improved soil health.

  1. Fauna Europaea: Helminths (Animal Parasitic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gibson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region, and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Helminths parasitic in animals represent a large assemblage of worms, representing three phyla, with more than 200 families and almost 4,000 species of parasites from all major vertebrate and many invertebrate groups. A general introduction is given for each of the major groups of parasitic worms, i.e. the Acanthocephala, Monogenea, Trematoda (Aspidogastrea and Digenea, Cestoda and Nematoda. Basic information for each group includes its size, host-range, distribution, morphological features, life-cycle, classification, identification and recent key-works. Tabulations include a complete list of families dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition, a list of additional specialists who helped with particular groups, and a list of higher taxa dealt with down to the family level. A compilation of useful references is appended.

  2. Microbial activity and community diversity in a variable charge soil as affected by cadmium exposure levels and time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-li SHENTU; Zhen-li HE; Xiao-e YANG; Ting-qiang LI

    2008-01-01

    Effects of cadmium (Cd) on microbial biomass, activity and community diversity were assessed in a representative variable charge soil (Typic Aquult) using an incubation study. Cadmium was added as Cd(NO3)2> to reach a concentration range of 0~16 mg Cd/kg soil. Soil extractable Cd generally increased with Cd loading rate, but decreased with incubation time. Soil mi-crobial biomass was enhanced at low Cd levels (0.5~1 mg/kg), but was inhibited consistently with increasing Cd rate. The ratio of microbial biomass C/N varied with Cd treatment levels, decreasing at low Cd rate (<0.7 mg/kg available Cd), but increasing progressively with Cd loading. Soil respiration was restrained at low Cd loading (<1 mg/kg), and enhanced at higher Cd levels. Soil microbial metabolic quotient (MMQ) was generally greater at high Cd loading (1~16 mg/kg). However, the MMQ is also affected by other factors. Cd contamination reduces species diversity of soil microbial communities and their ability to metabolize different C substrates. Soils with higher levels of Cd contamination showed decreases in indicator phospholipids fatty acids (PLFAs) for Gram-negative bacteria and actinomycetes, while the indicator PLFAs for Gram-positive bacteria and fungi increased with increasing levels of Cd contamination.

  3. Stratification and Storage of Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as Affected by Tillage Practices in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Kong, Fan-Lei; Chen, Fu; Lal, Rattan; Zhang, Hai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tillage practices can redistribute the soil profiles, and thus affects soil organic carbon (SOC), and its storage. The stratification ratio (SR) can be an indicator of soil quality. This study was conducted to determine tillage effects on the profile distribution of certain soil properties in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and summer maize (Zea mays L.) systems in the North China Plain (NCP). Three tillage treatments, including no till (NT), rotary tillage (RT), and plow tillage (PT), were established in 2001 in Luancheng County, Hebei Province. The concentration, storage, and SR of SOC and soil total nitrogen (TN) were assessed in both the wheat and maize seasons. Compared with RT and PT, the mean SRs for all depth ratios of SOC under NT increased by 7.85% and 30.61% during the maize season, and by 14.67% and 30.91% during the wheat season, respectively. The SR of TN for 0–5:30–50 cm increased by 140%, 161%, and 161% in the maize season, and 266%, 154%, and 122% in the wheat season compared to the SR for 0–5:5–10 cm under NT, RT and PT, respectively. The data indicated that SOC and TN were both concentrated in the surface-soil layers (0–10 cm) under NT but were distributed relatively evenly through the soil profile under PT. Meanwhile, the storage of SOC and TN was higher under NT for the surface soil (0–10 cm) but was higher under PT for the deeper soil (30–50 cm). Furthermore, the storage of SOC and TN was significantly related to SR of SOC and TN along the whole soil profile (P<0.0001). Therefore, SR could be used to explain and indicate the changes in the storage of SOC and TN. Further, NT stratifies SOC and TN, enhances the topsoil SOC storage, and helps to improve SOC sequestration and soil quality. PMID:26075391

  4. Soil phosphorus dynamics as affected by Congo grass and P fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Some plant species can change soil phosphorus (P availability and this may be an important tool in managing tropical high fixing phosphorus soils. An experiment was conducted to evaluate phosphorus transformations in the soil and phosphatase activity during periods of Congo grass (Brachiaria ruziziensis, Germain et Evrard growth in two tropical soils receiving 20, 40, 80, 160 mg dm-3 of inorganic P. Plants were grown for 84 days in 8-L pots. Acid phosphatase activity, P in the microbial mass, soil organic and inorganic P and P accumulation by Congo grass were evaluated. Phosphorus fertilization increased soil P availability, Congo grass yields and P accumulation in the plant. On average, less labile P forms in the soil were not changed by Congo grass; however, the P in the soil extracted with HCl (P-Ca - non labil form decreased. This decrease may have resulted from the combination of the presence of grass and phosphatase capacity to dissolve less available P in the soil. Thus, soil exploration by Congo grass roots and the subsequent extraction of calcium phosphate may have increased the P concentration in the plant tissue. Despite the decrease in the P extracted from the soil with HCl resulting in increased labile P forms in the soil, the effect of Congo grass on the availability of P depends on the soil type.

  5. Does S-metolachlor affect the performance of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP as bioaugmentation bacterium for atrazine-contaminated soils?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina A Viegas

    Full Text Available Atrazine (ATZ and S-metolachlor (S-MET are two herbicides widely used, often as mixtures. The present work examined whether the presence of S-MET affects the ATZ-biodegradation activity of the bioaugmentation bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP in a crop soil. S-MET concentrations were selected for their relevance in worst-case scenarios of soil contamination by a commercial formulation containing both herbicides. At concentrations representative of application of high doses of the formulation (up to 50 µg g(-1 of soil, corresponding to a dose approximately 50× higher than the recommended field dose (RD, the presence of pure S-MET significantly affected neither bacteria survival (~10(7 initial viable cells g(-1 of soil nor its ATZ-mineralization activity. Consistently, biodegradation experiments, in larger soil microcosms spiked with 20× or 50 × RD of the double formulation and inoculated with the bacterium, revealed ATZ to be rapidly (in up to 5 days and extensively (>96% removed from the soil. During the 5 days, concentration of S-MET decreased moderately to about 60% of the initial, both in inoculated and non-inoculated microcosms. Concomitantly, an accumulation of the two metabolites S-MET ethanesulfonic acid and S-MET oxanilic acid was found. Despite the dissipation of almost all the ATZ from the treated soils, the respective eluates were still highly toxic to an aquatic microalgae species, being as toxic as those from the untreated soil. We suggest that this high toxicity may be due to the S-MET and/or its metabolites remaining in the soil.

  6. Accumulation of nutrients in soils affected by perennial colonies of piscivorous birds with reference to biogeochemical cycles of elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, Slawomir; Smal, Halina

    2003-07-01

    The accumulation of selected N, K, and P forms in soils within three perennial colonies of black cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) and grey heron (Ardea cinerea) located in northern and eastern Poland were investigated. Soil samples were collected beneath the nests from the most representative for each colony plots. Control samples were taken outside the colonies within sites adjacent to the nesting areas but not affected by bird excrement. From each genetic horizon (20 horizons) in soil profiles, a cumulative sample of about 25-30 kg of soil was taken for analysis. Nitrogen by Kjeldahl, ammonium ions (N(NH(4))), nitrates (N(NO(3))), exchangeable potassium (K(ex)), available potassium (K(av)), and available phosphorus (P(av)) were determined. The soils affected by birds demonstrated a very strong enrichment with N, K, and P in comparison to the control sites, especially in the topsoil horizons. The content of N(NH(4)) in individual soil horizons from the colonies was from 1.7 to 10.1 times higher than the respective control, N(NO(3)) from 2.9 to 215.7, K(ex) from 2.0 to 35.1, K(av) from 1.1 to 48.1, and P(av) in the range from 2.4 to 53.0 times. The highest increment of chemical elements was noticeable in the soils of territories inhabited by cormorants and the least in forest occupied by herons. Some relationships between soil texture and accumulation of biogenic nutrients were determined. Clay loam soil showed the greatest enrichment with analysed forms of elements with the exception of N(NH(4)).

  7. Wheat Growth and Photosynthesis as Affected by Oxytetracycline as a Soil Contaminant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhao-Jun; XIE Xiao-Yu; ZHANG Shu-Qing; LIANG Yong-Chao

    2011-01-01

    Extensive worldwide use of oxytetracycline (OTC), a member of the tetracyclines, has resulted in its accumulation in soils, posing a potential risk to food production and safety. A pair of OTC-sensitive (Heyou 1) and OTC-tolerant (Yannong 21) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars was compared hydroponically at 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 mmol L-1 OTC in terms of wheat growth and photosynthesis. Biomass and shoot length decreased significantly with the addition of OTC, with the decreases in dry biomass and shoot length being 5.61%-13.75% and 3.33%-8.57% larger, respectively, for Heyou 1 than Yannong 21. Photosynthesis of Heyou 1 was suppressed by OTC as indicated by the significant decreases in photosynthetic rate (PN), transpiration rate (TR), and stomatal conductance (GS) and the significant increase in intercellular CO2 concentrations (CI), at all OTC levels. Stomatal limitation (LS)and water use efficiencies (WUE) of Heyou 1 also increased significantly, but not at 0.08 mmol L-1 OTC. However, photosynthesis of Yannong 21 was suppressed by OTC only at high OTC levels from 0.02 to 0.08 mmol L- 1 as indicated by the decreases in PN, GS,TR, and LS; at 0.01 mmol L-1 OTC, PN, CI, GS, and TR significantly increased. It was noted that WUE of Yannong 21 was not affected by OTC addition. The results from this hydroponic test suggested that OTC had a potential risk to crop growth through inhibition of photosynthesis, requiring further confirmation with soil tests.

  8. Formation and Water Stability of Aggregates in Red Soils as Affected by Organic Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGMINGKUI等; M.J.WILSON; 等

    1996-01-01

    The water stability of aggregates in various size classes separated from 18 samples of red soils under different managements,and the mechanisms responsible for the formation of waer-stable soil aggregates were studied.The results showed that the water stbility of soil aggregates declined with increasing size,especially for the low organic matter soils.Organic matter plays a key role in the formation of water-stable soil aggregates.The larger the soil aggregate size.the greater the impact of organic matter on the water stability of soil aggregates.Removal of organic matter markedly disintegrated the large water-stable aggregates(>2.0mm)and increased the small ones(2.0mm)were mainly glued up by organic mater,Both free oxides and organic matter contribute to the formation and water stability of aggregates in red soils.

  9. Soil sterilization affects aging-related sequestration and bioavailability of p,p'-DDE and anthracene to earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slizovskiy, Ilya B. [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States); Kelsey, Jason W., E-mail: Kelsey@muhlenberg.ed [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Laboratory experiments investigated the effects of soil sterilization and compound aging on the bioaccumulation of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene by Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris. Declines in bioavailability occurred as pollutant residence time in both sterile and non-sterile soils increased from 3 to 203 d. Accumulation was generally higher in sterile soils during initial periods of aging (from 3-103 d). By 203 d, however, bioavailability of the compounds was unaffected by sterilization. Gamma irradiation and autoclaving may have altered bioavailability by inducing changes in the chemistry of soil organic matter (SOM). The results support a dual-mode partitioning sorption model in which the SOM components associated with short-term sorption (the 'soft' or 'rubbery' phases) are more affected than are the components associated with long-term sorption (the 'glassy' or microcrystalline phases). Risk assessments based on data from experiments in which sterile soil was used could overestimate exposure and bioaccumulation of pollutants. - Soil sterilization affects aging-related sequestration of organic contaminants.

  10. Soil organic matter in fire-affected pastures and in an Araucaria forest in South-Brazilian Leptosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana da Luz Potes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the distribution pattern and composition of soil organic matter (SOM and its physical pools of Leptosols periodically affected by fire over the last 100 years in South Brazil. Soil samples at 0-5, 5-10, and 10-15 cm depths were collected from the following environments: native pasture without burning in the last year and grazed with 0.5 livestock per hectare per year (1NB; native pasture without burning in the last 23 years and grazed with 2.0 livestock per hectare per year (23NB; and an Araucaria forest (AF. Physical fractionation was performed with the 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers. Soil C and N stocks were determined in the three depths and in the physical pools, and organic matter was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The largest C stocks in all depths and physical pools were found under the AF. The 23NB environment showed the lowest soil C and N stocks at the 5-15 cm depth, which was related to the end of burning and to the higher grazing intensity. The SOM of the occluded light fraction showed a greater chemical recalcitrance in 1NB than in 23NB. Annual pasture burning does not affect soil C stocks up to 15 cm of depth.

  11. Appraisal of biogeochemical markers for the assessment of damage levels in soils affected by wild fires

    OpenAIRE

    González-Vila, Francisco Javier; González-Pérez, José Antonio; Almendros Martín, Gonzalo; Arias Fernández, Mª E.; Knicker, Heike

    2006-01-01

    Comunicación oral SSS22-1TU3O-005 presentada en la sesión Oral Programme - SSS22 Wildfire effects on soil organic carbon dynamics, soil degradation and soil redistribution (co-listed in BG & ERE).-- Congreso, celebrado del 2-7 de abril de 2006, en Viena, Austria.

  12. Organic matter dynamics in a forest soil as affected by climate change.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.S.J.

    1998-01-01

    Large amounts of carbon are stored in boreal soils as soil organic matter. Aim of the research presented in this thesis was to quantify the effects of climate change on decomposition soil organic matter in a boreal forest ecosystem by means of field and laboratory experiments. Field experiments were

  13. Integrated Effects of Wheat Residue and Phosphorus Application on Rice Productivity and Soil Health Under Salt Affected Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of crop residue incorporation along with P application on rice production under salt affected soil having pH 8.57, ECe 5.65 (dS/m), SAR 17.38 (mmol/L)percentage and available P (3.9 mg/kg). The study was carried out at MK Farm, Farooqabad, Sheikhupura, Pakistan during Kharif season in 2009. Treatments were arranged using randomised complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. The treatments were control (T/sub 1/), straw incorporation @ 5 tonnes/ha (T/sub 2/), T/sub 2/+20 kg/ P2O5/ha (T/sub 3/), T/sub 2/+40 kg/P2O5/ha (T/sub 4/) and T/sbu 2/+60 kg/P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha (T/sub 5/). The highest grain yield (4.407 t/ha) was recorded in treatment receiving 5 tonnes wheat straw along with 40 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha which is 14.6percentage more than control and the lowest grain yield (3.847 t/ha) was recorded in control. Maximum P (0.37percentage) and K(0.13percentage) contents of grain were recorded where wheat straw was applied @ 5 t/ha along with 40 and 60 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha whereby P content of control was (0.3percentage). The residual P was 5.7 mg/kg where wheat straw was applied @ 5 t/ha along with 40 and 60 kg P/sub 2/O/sub 5//ha. The residual P in control was 4.3 mg/kg. It can be concluded that incorporation of residue enhanced the availability of P, K and Ca to plant roots. Under saline-sodic/sodic conditions, plant can better cope with salinity in the presence of calcium and K availability. (author)

  14. New Records of Aphid Fauna in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Kaygin, Azize Toper; Gorur, Gazi; Cota, Figen

    2010-01-01

    Three aphid species were identified as new records for Turkey aphid fauna from Bartin province. These species are Ceruraphis viburnicola (Gillette) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), Dysaphis apiifolia (Theobald) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Macrosiphum mordvilkoi Miyazaki (Hemiptera: Aphididae). These records increase the recorded aphid-fauna of Turkey to 433 species.

  15. Vertical distribution of radiocesium in soils of the area affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, A. V.; Golosov, V. N.; Yoschenko, V. I.; Nanba, K.; Onda, Y.; Takase, T.; Wakiyama, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Presented are results of the study of radiocesium vertical distribution in the soils of the irrigation pond catchments in the near field 0.25 to 8 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP, on sections of the Niida River floodplain, and in a forest ecosystem typical of the territory contaminated after the accident. It is shown that the vertical migration of radiocesium in undisturbed forest and grassland soils in the zone affected by the Fukushima accident is faster than it was in the soils of the 30-km zone of the Chernobyl NPP for a similar time interval after the accident. The effective dispersion coefficients in the Fukushima soils are several times higher than those for the Chernobyl soils. This may be associated with higher annual precipitation (by about 2.5 times) in Fukushima as compared to the Chernobyl zone. In the forest soils the radiocesium dispersion is faster as compared to grassland soils, both in the Fukushima and Chernobyl zones. The study and analysis of the vertical distribution of the Fukushima origin radiocesium in the Niida gawa floodplain soils has made it possible to identify areas of contaminated sediment accumulation on the floodplain. The average accumulation rate for sediments at the study locations on the Niida gawa floodplain varied from 0.3 to 3.3 cm/year. Taking into account the sediments accumulation leading to an increase in the radiocesium inventory in alluvial soils is key for predicting redistribution of radioactive contamination after the Fukushima accident on the river catchments, as well as for decision-making on contaminated territories remediation and clean-up. Clean-up of alluvial soils does not seem to be worthwhile because of the following accumulation of contaminated sediments originating from more contaminated areas, including the exclusion zone.

  16. Stratification and Storage of Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as Affected by Tillage Practices in the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Xue, Jian-Fu; Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Kong, Fan-Lei; Chen, Fu; Lal, Rattan; Zhang, Hai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tillage practices can redistribute the soil profiles, and thus affects soil organic carbon (SOC), and its storage. The stratification ratio (SR) can be an indicator of soil quality. This study was conducted to determine tillage effects on the profile distribution of certain soil properties in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and summer maize (Zea mays L.) systems in the North China Plain (NCP). Three tillage treatments, including no till (NT), rotary tillage (RT), and plow tillage (PT), were established in 2001 in Luancheng County, Hebei Province. The concentration, storage, and SR of SOC and soil total nitrogen (TN) were assessed in both the wheat and maize seasons. Compared with RT and PT, the mean SRs for all depth ratios of SOC under NT increased by 7.85% and 30.61% during the maize season, and by 14.67% and 30.91% during the wheat season, respectively. The SR of TN for 0-5:30-50 cm increased by 140%, 161%, and 161% in the maize season, and 266%, 154%, and 122% in the wheat season compared to the SR for 0-5:5-10 cm under NT, RT and PT, respectively. The data indicated that SOC and TN were both concentrated in the surface-soil layers (0-10 cm) under NT but were distributed relatively evenly through the soil profile under PT. Meanwhile, the storage of SOC and TN was higher under NT for the surface soil (0-10 cm) but was higher under PT for the deeper soil (30-50 cm). Furthermore, the storage of SOC and TN was significantly related to SR of SOC and TN along the whole soil profile (Psoil quality.

  17. Trace metal distribution in pristine permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta and its Hinterland, Northern Siberia, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Antcibor

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Soils are an important compartment of ecosystems and have the ability to immobilize chemicals preventing their movement to other environment compartments. Predicted climatic changes together with other anthropogenic influences on Arctic terrestrial environments may affect biogeochemical processes enhancing leaching and migration of trace elements in permafrost-affected soils. This is especially important since the Arctic ecosystems are considered to be very sensitive to climatic changes as well as to chemical contamination. This study characterizes background levels of trace metals in permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta and its hinterland in northern Siberia (73.5° N–69.5° N representing a remote region far from evident anthropogenic trace metal sources. Investigations on total element contents of iron (Fe, arsenic (As, manganese (Mn, zinc (Zn, nickel (Ni, copper (Cu, lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, cobalt (Co and mercury (Hg in different soil types developed in different geological parent materials have been carried out. The highest concentrations of the majority of the measured elements were observed in soils belonging to ice-rich permafrost sediments formed during the Pleistocene (ice-complex in the Lena River Delta region. Correlation analyses of trace metal concentrations and soil chemical and physical properties at a Holocene estuarine terrace and two modern floodplain levels in the southern-central Lena River Delta (Samoylov Island showed that the main factors controlling the trace metal distribution in these soils are organic matter content, soil texture and contents of iron and manganese-oxides. Principal Component Analysis (PCA revealed that soil oxides play a significant role in trace metal distribution in both top and bottom horizons. Occurrence of organic matter contributes to Cd binding in top soils and Cu binding in bottom horizons. Observed ranges of the background concentrations of the majority of trace elements were

  18. Salvage logging effect on soil properties in a fire-affected Mediterranean forest: a two years monitoring research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Moltó, Jorge; Arcenegui, Vicky; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Chrenkovà, Katerina; Torres, Pilar; Jara-Navarro, Ana B.; Díaz, Gisela; Izquierdo, Ezequiel

    2015-04-01

    In the Mediterranean countries, forest fires are common and must be considered as an ecological factor, but changes in land use, especially in the last five decades have provoked a modification in their natural regime. Moreover, post-fire management can have an additional impact on the ecosystem; in some cases, even more severe than the fire. Salvage logging is a traditional management in most fire-affected areas. In some cases, the way of doing it, using heavy machinery, and the vulnerability of soils to erosion and degradation make this management potentially very agresive to soil, and therefore to the ecosystem. Very little research has been done to study how this treatment could affect soil health. In this research we show 2 years of monitoring of some soil properties in an area affected by a forest fire, where some months later this treatment was applied. The study area is located in 'Sierra de Mariola Natural Park' in Alcoi, Alicante (E Spain). A big forest fire (>500 has) occurred in July 2012. The forest is composed mainly of Pinus halepensis trees with an understory of typical Mediterranean shrubs species such as Quercus coccifera, Rosmarinus officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, Brachypodium retusum, etc. Soil is classified as a Typic Xerorthent (Soil Survey Staff, 2014) developed over marls. In February 2013, salvage logging (SL) treatment consisting in a complete extraction of the burned wood using heavy machinery was applied in a part of the affected forest. Plots for monitoring this effect were installed in this area and in a similar nearby area where no treatment was done, and then used as control (C) for comparison. Soil samplings were done immediately after treatment and every 6 months. Some soil properties were analysed, including soil organic matter (SOM) content, basal soil respiration (BSR), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), bulk density (BD), soil water repellency (SWR), aggregate stability (AS), field capacity, nitrogen, etc. After two years of

  19. Sterilization affects soil organic matter chemistry and bioaccumulation of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene by earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Jason W., E-mail: kelsey@muhlenberg.ed [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States); Slizovskiy, Ilya B.; Peters, Richard D.; Melnick, Adam M. [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the effects of soil sterilization on the bioavailability of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene to the earthworms Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris. Physical and chemical changes to soil organic matter (SOM) induced by sterilization were also studied. Uptake of both compounds added after soil was autoclaved or gamma irradiated increased for E. fetida. Sterilization had no effect on bioaccumulation of p,p'-DDE by L. terrestris, and anthracene uptake increased only in gamma-irradiated soils. Analyses by FT-IR and DSC indicate sterilization alters SOM chemistry and may reduce pollutant sorption. Chemical changes to SOM were tentatively linked to changes in bioaccumulation, although the effects were compound and species specific. Artifacts produced by sterilization could lead to inaccurate risk assessments of contaminated sites if assumptions derived from studies carried out in sterilized soil are used. Ultimately, knowledge of SOM chemistry could aid predictions of bioaccumulation of organic pollutants. - Soil sterilization affects soil organic matter chemistry and pollutant bioaccumulation.

  20. Fauna of an acid stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewell, M.E.

    1922-01-01

    The hydrogen-ion concentration of the water of the big muddy river was found to vary between pH 5.8 and pH 6.8 to 7.2, the higher acidity occurring during the winter. The bottom fauna was characterized by the abundance of clams and shrimp, and by the absence of branchiate snails and ephemerid nymphs. Fish fry and fingerlings were found in large numbers during the summer in weakly acid water, pH 6.8. Observations on our acid streams, continued over a considerable period of time, would tell us much concerning the adaptability of various species to different hydrogen-ion concentrations and are greatly needed in the interpretation of experimental data.

  1. How do alternative root water uptake models affect the inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters and the prediction of evapotranspiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayler, Sebastian; Salima-Sultana, Daisy; Selle, Benny; Ingwersen, Joachim; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Högy, Petra; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Soil water extraction by roots affects the dynamics and distribution of soil moisture and controls transpiration, which influences soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedback processes. Consequently, root water uptake requires close attention when predicting water fluxes across the land surface, e.g., in agricultural crop models or in land surface schemes of weather and climate models. The key parameters for a successful simultaneous simulation of soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration in Richards equation-based models are the soil hydraulic parameters, which describe the shapes of the soil water retention curve and the soil hydraulic conductivity curve. As measurements of these parameters are expensive and their estimation from basic soil data via pedotransfer functions is rather inaccurate, the values of the soil hydraulic parameters are frequently inversely estimated by fitting the model to measured time series of soil water content and evapotranspiration. It is common to simulate root water uptake and transpiration by simple stress functions, which describe from which soil layer water is absorbed by roots and predict when total crop transpiration is decreased in case of soil water limitations. As for most of the biogeophysical processes simulated in crop and land surface models, there exist several alternative functional relationships for simulating root water uptake and there is no clear reason for preferring one process representation over another. The error associated with alternative representations of root water uptake, however, contributes to structural model uncertainty and the choice of the root water uptake model may have a significant impact on the values of the soil hydraulic parameters estimated inversely. In this study, we use the agroecosystem model system Expert-N to simulate soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration at three agricultural field sites located in two contrasting regions in Southwest Germany (Kraichgau, Swabian Alb). The Richards

  2. Long-term toxicity assessment of soils in a recovered area affected by a mining spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Freire, A; García Fernández, I; Simón Torres, M; Martínez Garzón, F J; Martín Peinado, F J

    2016-01-01

    Residual pollution in the Guadiamar Green Corridor still remains after Aználcollar mine spill in 1998. The polluted areas are identified by the absence of vegetation, soil acidic pH and high concentrations of As, Pb, Zn and Cu. Soil toxicity was assessed by lettuce root elongation and induced soil respiration bioassays. In bare soils, total As and Pb concentrations and water-extractable levels for As, Zn and Cu exceeded the toxicity guidelines. Pollutants responsible for toxicity were different depending on the tested organism, with arsenic being most toxic for lettuce and the metal mixture to soil respiration. Soil properties, such as pH or organic carbon content, are key factors to control metal availability and toxicity in the area. According to our results, there is a risk of pollution to living organisms and the soil quality criteria established in the area should be revised to reduce the risk of toxicity.

  3. Environmental Factors Affecting Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Soil Erosion in Xingguo County, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ku; SHI Xue-Zheng; YU Dong-Sheng; SHI De-Ming; CHEN Jing-Ming; XU Bin-Bin; LIANG Yin; LI De-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    By using soil erosion maps of four different time periods and a digital elevation model (DEM), in combination with the remote sensing and GIS technologies, soil erosion dynamics in Xingguo County of Jiangxi Province in South China were analyzed on both temporal and spatial scales in soils of different parent materials, altitudes and slopes. The results showed that from 1958 to 2000 severe soil erosion was coming under control with a decreasing percentage of the land under severe erosion. It was also found that the soils developed from Quaternary red clay, granite and purple shale were more susceptible to soil erosion and that areas sitting between 200 to 500 m in altitude with a slope less than 3° or between 7° to 20° where human activities were frequent remained to be zones where soil erosion was most likely to occur. These areas deserve special attention in monitoring and controlling.

  4. Test speed and other factors affecting the measurements of tree root properties used in soil reinforcement models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cofie, P.; Koolen, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    Measured values of the mechanical properties of tree roots are found to be affected by a number of factors. Shear properties of tree roots are found to be partly influenced by size of the testing equipment, level of soil compaction, deformation of the root material and estimated width of the shear z

  5. The ash in forest fire affected soils control the soil losses. Part 2. Current and future research challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi

    2013-04-01

    Ash distribution on soil surface and impacts on soil properties received a great attention in recently (Pereira et al., 2010; Pereira et al., 2013). Ash it is a highly mobile material that can be easily transported wind, especially in severe wildland fires, where organic matter is reduced to dust, due the high temperatures of combustion. In the immediate period after the fire, ash cover rules soil erosion as previous researchers observed (Cerdà, 1998a; 1998b) and have strong influence on soil hydrological properties, such as water retention (Stoof et al. 2011 ) and wettability (Bodi et al., 2011). Ash it is also a valuable source of nutrients important for plant recuperation (Pereira et al., 2011; Pereira et al., 2012), but can act also as a source contamination, since are also rich in heavy metals (Pereira and Ubeda, 2010). Ash has different physical and chemical properties according the temperature of combustion, burned specie and time of exposition (Pereira et al., 2010). Thus this different properties will have different implications on soil properties including erosion that can increase due soil sealing (Onda et al. 2008) or decrease as consequence of raindrop impact reduction (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008). The current knowledge shows that ash has different impacts on soil properties and this depends not only from the type of ash produced, but of the soil properties (Woods and Balfour, 2010). After fire wind and water strong redistribute ash on soil surface, increasing the vulnerability of soil erosion in some areas, and reducing in others. Understand this mobility is fundamental have a better comprehension about the spatial and temporal effects of ash in soil erosion. Have a better knowledge about this mobility is a priority to future research. Other important aspects to have to be assessed in the future are how ash particulates percolate on soil and how ash chemical composition is important to induce soil aggregation and dispersion. How soil micro topography

  6. Urban legacies and soil management affect the concentration and speciation of trace metals in Los Angeles community garden soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Lorraine Weller; Jenerette, G Darrel; Bain, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    Heavy metals in urban soils can compromise human health, especially in urban gardens, where gardeners may ingest contaminated dust or crops. To identify patterns of urban garden metal contamination, we measured concentrations and bioavailability of Pb, As, and Cd in soils associated with twelve community gardens in Los Angeles County, CA. This included sequential extractions to partition metals among exchangeable, reducible, organic, or residual fractions. Proximity to road increased all metal concentrations, suggesting vehicle emissions sources. Reducible Pb increased with neighborhood age, suggesting leaded paint as a likely pollutant source. Exchangeable Cd and As both increased with road proximity. Only cultivated soils showed an increase in exchangeable As with road proximity, potentially due to reducing humic acid interactions while Cd bioavailability was mitigated by organic matter. Understanding the geochemical phases and metal bioavailability allows incorporation of contamination patterns into urban planning. PMID:25437835

  7. Chemical and Microbiological Parameters of Paddy Soil Quality as Affected by Different Nutrient and Water Regimes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chang-Ming; YANG Lin-Zhang; YAN Ting-Mei

    2005-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted from 1999 to 2002 to compare and evaluate the effects of nutrient and water regimes on paddy soil quality by investigating soil chemical and microbiological parameters. Four nutrient regimes, a control, chemical fertilizers only (CF), chemical fertilizers with swine manure (SM), and chemical fertilizers with wheat straw (WS), and two soil moisture regimes, continuous waterlogging (CWL) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD),were investigated. With SM and WS total organic carbon and total nitrogen in the paddy soil were significantly higher (P <0.05) than those with CF. A similar effect for organic amendments was observed in the soil light fraction organic C (LFOC), water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC), and water-soluble organic C (WSOC). CWL, in particular when swine manure was incorporated into the paddy soil, markedly decreased soil redox potential (Eh) and increased total active reducing substances (ARS). Meanwhile, as compared to CF, SM and WS significantly (P < 0.05) increased soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and mineralizable carbon, with differences in AWD being higher than CWL. In addition, SM and WS treatments significantly (P < 0.05) improved rice above-ground biomass and grain yield, with AWD being greater than CWL. Thus, for ecologically sustainable agricultural management of paddy soils, long-term waterlogging should be avoided when organic manure was incorporated into paddy soil.

  8. Calcareous Sodic Soil Reclamation as Affected by Corn Stalk Application and Incubation:A Laboratory Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fa-Hu; R.KEREN

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory lysimeter experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of forage corn (Zea mays L.) stalk application on the CO2 concentration in soil air and calcareous sodic soil reclamation.The experimental treatments tested were soil exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) levels of 1,11,and 19,added corn stalk contents of 0 to 36 g kg-1,and incubation durations of 30 and 60 days.The experimental results indicated that corn stalk application and incubation significantly increased CO2 partial pressure in soil profile and lowered pH value in soil solution,subsequently increased native CaCO3 mineral dissolution and electrolyte concentration of soil solution,and finally significantly contributed to reduction on soil sodicity level.The reclamation efficiency of calcareous sodic soils increased with the added corn stalk.When corn stalks were added at the rates of 22 and 34 g kg-1 into the soil with initial ESP of 19,its ESP value was decreased by 56% and 78%,respectively,after incubation of 60 days and the leaching of 6.5 pore volumes (about 48 L of percolation water) with distilled water.Therefore,crop stalk application and incubation could be used as a choice to reclaim moderate calcareous sodic soils or as a supplement of phytoremediation to improve reclamation efficiency.

  9. Do microorganism stoichiometric alterations affect carbon sequestration in paddy soil subjected to phosphorus input?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, ZhiJian; Li, HongYi; Hu, Jiao; Li, Xia; He, Qiang; Tian, GuangMing; Wang, Hang; Wang, ShunYao; Wang, Bei

    2015-04-01

    Ecological stoichiometry provides a powerful tool for integrating microbial biomass stoichiometry with ecosystem processes, opening far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to soil carbon (C) metabolism in response to agricultural nutrient management. Despite its importance to crop yield, the role of phosphorus (P) with respect to ecological stoichiometry and soil C sequestration in paddy fields remains poorly understood, which limits our ability to predict nutrient-related soil C cycling. Here, we collected soil samples from a paddy field experiment after seven years of superphosphate application along a gradient of 0, 30, 60, and 90 (P-0 through P-90, respectively) kg.ha-1.yr-1 in order to evaluate the role of exogenous P on soil C sequestration through regulating microbial stoichiometry. P fertilization increased soil total organic C and labile organic C by 1-14% and 4-96%, respectively, while rice yield is a function of the activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase (BG), acid phosphatase (AP), and the level of available soil P through a stepwise linear regression model. P input induced C limitation, as reflected by decreases in the ratios of C:P in soil and microbial biomass. An eco-enzymatic ratio indicating microbial investment in C vs. P acquisition, i.e., ln(BG): ln(AP), changed the ecological function of microbial C acquisition, and was stoichiometrically related to P input. This mechanism drove a shift in soil resource availability by increasing bacterial community richness and diversity, and stimulated soil C sequestration in the paddy field by enhancing C-degradation-related bacteria for the breakdown of plant-derived carbon sources. Therefore, the decline in the C:P stoichiometric ratio of soil microorganism biomass under P input was beneficial for soil C sequestration, which offered a "win-win" relationship for the maximum balance point between C sequestration and P availability for rice production in the face of climate change. PMID

  10. Dynamics of Soil and Grain Micronutrients as Affected by Long-Term Fertilization in an Aquic Inceptisol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ben-Yin; HUANG Shao-Min; WEI Ming-Bao; H.L.ZHANG; SHEN A-Lin; XU Jian-Ming; RUAN Xin-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Micronutrient status in soils can be affected by long-term fertilization and intensive cropping.A 19-year experiment (1990-2008) was carried out to investigate the influence of different fertilization regimes on micronutrients in an Aquic Inceptisol and maize and wheat grains in Zhengzhou,China.The results showed that soil total Cu and Zn markedly declined after 19 years with application of N fertilizer alone.Soil total Fe and Mn were significantly increased mainly due to atmospheric deposition.Applications of P and organic fertilizer with incorporation of straws resulted in dramatic increases in soil total Cu,Zn,Fe,and Mn.Soil diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cu in all treatments sharply decreased from initially 1.12 to about 0.8 mg kg-1.The treatments with organic fertilizer had the highest soil DTPA-extractable Cu,Zn,Fe,and Mn after 19 years of cropping and fertilization,thus demonstrating the important role of organic fertilizer application in improving available micronutrient status.Cu and Zn contents in wheat grains in the no-P treatments were significantly higher than those of the treatments with P application.In addition,Fe and Mn contents in wheat grains were positively correlated with their soil DTPA-extractable concentrations.These indicated that the long-term application of organic fertilizer resulted in significant increases in soil total and available micronutrient concentrations and remarkable reduction in wheat grain Cu and Zn contents,which was due to high soil available P.

  11. DICKINSARTELLA FAUNA FROM THE SAIWAN FORMATION (OMAN: A BIVALVE FAUNA TESTIFYING TO THE LATE SAKMARIAN (EARLY PERMIAN CLIMATIC AMELIORATION ALONG THE NORTH-EASTERN GONDWANAN FRINGE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIANO LARGHI

    2005-11-01

    Dickinsartella Fauna and confirms the correlation between Arabian and Australian series already remarked by previous authors. The "Dickinsartella fauna" is the first bivalve fauna testifying to the climatic amelioration gradually affecting the North-Eastern Gondwanan fringe at the end of the Early Permian glacial events. This pioneer fauna spread out, probably in a cool-temperate climate, on the substrate provided by the mid-Sakmarian (basal Sterlitamakian transgression, connected with the final stages of the Gondwanan deglaciation and/or with initial sea-floor spreading in the Neotethys. In the present paper some remarks on the autecology of the new species from the "Pachycyrtella bed" are also discussed.

  12. Biogeochemical factors affecting mercury methylation rate in two contaminated floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frohne

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An automated biogeochemical microcosm system allowing controlled variation of redox potential (EH in soil suspensions was used to assess the effect of various factors on the mobility of mercury (Hg as well as on the methylation of Hg in two contaminated floodplain soils with different Hg concentrations (approximately 5 mg kg−1 Hg and >30 mg kg−1 Hg. The experiment was conducted under stepwise variation from reducing (approximately −350 mV at pH 5 to oxidizing conditions (approximately 600 mV at pH 5. Results of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA analysis indicate the occurrence of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB such as Desulfobacter species (10me16:0, cy17:0, 10me18:0, cy19:0 or Desulfovibrio species (18:2ω6,9, which are considered to promote Hg methylation. The products of the methylation process are lipophilic, highly toxic methyl mercury species such as the monomethyl mercury ion [MeHg+], which is named as MeHg here. The ln(MeHg/Hgt ratio is assumed to reflect the net production of monomethyl mercury normalized to total dissolved Hg (Hgt concentration. This ratio increases with rising dissolved organic carbon (DOC to Hgt ratio (lnDOC/lnHgt ratio (R2 = 0.39, p < 0.0001, n = 63 whereas the relation between ln(MeHg/Hgt ratio and lnDOC is weaker (R2 = 0.09; p < 0.05; n = 63. In conclusion, the DOC/Hgt ratio might be a more important factor for the Hg net methylation than DOC alone in the current study. Redox variations seem to affect the biogeochemical behavior of dissolved inorganic Hg species and MeHg indirectly through related changes in DOC, sulfur cycle, and microbial community structure whereas E,H and pH values, as well as concentration of dissolved Fe,3+/Fe2+ and Cl seem to play subordinate roles in Hg

  13. Phytoremediation of salt-affected soils: a review of processes, applicability, and the impact of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, João M; Danko, Anthony S; Fiúza, António; Borges, Maria-Teresa

    2015-05-01

    Soil salinization affects 1-10 billion ha worldwide, threatening the agricultural production needed to feed the ever increasing world population. Phytoremediation may be a cost-effective option for the remediation of these soils. This review analyzes the viability of using phytoremediation for salt-affected soils and explores the remedial mechanisms involved. In addition, it specifically addresses the debate over plant indirect (via soil cation exchange enhancement) or direct (via uptake) role in salt remediation. Analysis of experimental data for electrical conductivity (ECe) + sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) reduction and plant salt uptake showed a similar removal efficiency between salt phytoremediation and other treatment options, with the added potential for phytoextraction under non-leaching conditions. A focus is also given on recent studies that indicate potential pathways for increased salt phytoextraction, co-treatment with other contaminants, and phytoremediation applicability for salt flow control. Finally, this work also details the predicted effects of climate change on soil salinization and on treatment options. The synergetic effects of extreme climate events and salinization are a challenging obstacle for future phytoremediation applications, which will require additional and multi-disciplinary research efforts.

  14. Iron biofortification of wheat grains through integrated use of organic and chemical fertilizers in pH affected calcareous soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzani, Pia Muhammad Adnan; Khalid, Muhammad; Naveed, Muhammad; Ahmad, Rashid; Shahid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Incidence of iron (Fe) deficiency in human populations is an emerging global challenge. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of iron sulphate combined with biochar and poultry manure for Fe biofortification of wheat grains in pH affected calcareous soil. In first two incubation studies, rates of sulfur (S) and Fe combined with various organic amendments for lowering pH and Fe availability in calcareous soil were optimized. In pot experiment, best rate of Fe along with biochar (BC) and poultry manure (PM) was evaluated for Fe biofortification of wheat in normal and S treated low pH calcareous soil. Fe applied with BC provided fair increase in root-shoot biomass and photosynthesis up to 79, 53 and 67%, respectively in S treated low pH soil than control. Grain Fe and ferritin concentration was increased up to 1.4 and 1.2 fold, respectively while phytate and polyphenol was decreased 35 and 44%, respectively than control in treatment where Fe was applied with BC and S. In conclusion, combined use of Fe and BC could be an effective approach to improve growth and grain Fe biofortification of wheat in pH affected calcareous soil. PMID:27179316

  15. Phytoremediation of salt-affected soils: a review of processes, applicability, and the impact of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, João M; Danko, Anthony S; Fiúza, António; Borges, Maria-Teresa

    2015-05-01

    Soil salinization affects 1-10 billion ha worldwide, threatening the agricultural production needed to feed the ever increasing world population. Phytoremediation may be a cost-effective option for the remediation of these soils. This review analyzes the viability of using phytoremediation for salt-affected soils and explores the remedial mechanisms involved. In addition, it specifically addresses the debate over plant indirect (via soil cation exchange enhancement) or direct (via uptake) role in salt remediation. Analysis of experimental data for electrical conductivity (ECe) + sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) reduction and plant salt uptake showed a similar removal efficiency between salt phytoremediation and other treatment options, with the added potential for phytoextraction under non-leaching conditions. A focus is also given on recent studies that indicate potential pathways for increased salt phytoextraction, co-treatment with other contaminants, and phytoremediation applicability for salt flow control. Finally, this work also details the predicted effects of climate change on soil salinization and on treatment options. The synergetic effects of extreme climate events and salinization are a challenging obstacle for future phytoremediation applications, which will require additional and multi-disciplinary research efforts. PMID:25854203

  16. Free and bound aroma compounds characterization by GC-MS of Negroamaro wine as affected by soil management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, Aline T; Crupi, Pasquale; Gambacorta, Giuseppe; Dipalmo, Tiziana; Antonacci, Donato; Coletta, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Negroamaro is an autochthonous wine grape variety of Southern Italy, which is becoming very important for the Italian wine market. The wine aroma is primary affected by the chemical composition of grapes, which can be influenced also by agronomic practices such as soil management. In this study, the free and bound aroma characterization was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses, and the influence of two soil managements (cover cropping and soil tillage) was evaluated. A total of 40 volatile compounds were observed in the wine samples. Alcohols (55.7 mg/L), fatty acids (7.0 mg/L) and esters (6.6 mg/L) were found as the main classes in Negroamaro wine. The results showed that the aroma composition of Negroamaro wine was positively affected by soil tillage probably because of the higher water stress (ψ(s)) recorded in the vines from this treatment. Indeed, among the free volatile compounds, higher contents of esters, carboxylic acids, alcohols, phenolics and acetamides together with lower contents of sulfurs compounds were found in soil tillage wine. Conversely, no difference was observed in glycoside volatile compounds.

  17. Brassica spp cover crop affects soil microbial activity, carbon and nitrogen nutrient dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Marinari, S.; Papp, R.; Marabottini, R.; Moscatelli, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    A general positive effect of Brassica on soil microbial biomass and its activity was observed at all European sites in no tilled soil at both sampling date. Conversely, Brassica under tillage may produce a negative effect on biochemical properties after CC suppression. The effect of Brassica on C and N dynamics differed among the european sites when soil was tilled. These preliminary results establish the bases for the evaluation of the interaction between the pedoclimatic conditions and Bras...

  18. Particulate Organic Matter Affects Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Two Crop Rotation Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongyan Bu

    Full Text Available Changes in the quantity and/or quality of soil labile organic matter between and after different types of cultivation system could play a dominant role in soil nitrogen (N mineralization. The quantity and quality of particulate organic matter (POM and potentially mineralizable-N (PMN contents were measured in soils from 16 paired rice-rapeseed (RR/cotton-rapeseed (CR rotations sites in Hubei province, central China. Then four paired soils encompassing low (10th percentile, intermediate (25th and 75th percentiles, and high (90th percentile levels of soil PMN were selected to further study the effects of POM on soil N mineralization by quantifying the net N mineralization in original soils and soils from which POM was removed. Both soil POM carbon (POM-C and N (POM-N contents were 45.8% and 55.8% higher under the RR rotation compared to the CR rotation, respectively. The PMN contents were highly correlated with the POM contents. The PMN and microbial biomass N (MBN contents concurrently and significantly decreased when POM was removed. The reduction rate of PMN was positively correlated with changes in MBN after the removal of POM. The reduction rates of PMN and MBN after POM removal are lower under RR rotations (38.0% and 16.3%, respectively than CR rotations (45.6% and 19.5%, respectively. Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy indicated that compounds with low-bioavailability accumulated (e.g., aromatic recalcitrant materials in the soil POM fraction under the RR rotation but not under the CR rotation. The results of the present study demonstrated that POM plays a vital role in soil N mineralization under different rotation systems. The discrepancy between POM content and composition resulting from different crop rotation systems caused differences in N mineralization in soils.

  19. DOC-trail: 20 years of organic and conventional farming affect soil microbial properties

    OpenAIRE

    Oberholzer, H.R.; Mäder, Paul; Fliessbach, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    In a long-term field trial (DOC; = bio-Dynamic, bio-Organic, Conventional) at Therwil, Switzerland, agricultural production systems have been compared since 1978. The production systems differ mainly in the amount and form of fertiliser and plant protection strategy. Crop rotation and soil tillage were the same. In the most prominent systems soil microbial properties were investigated for the first time after two crop rotations in 1990. In 1998, after 3 crop rotations, soil microbial properti...

  20. Current Status of Trace Metal Pollution in Soils Affected by Industrial Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsanul Kabir; Sharmila Ray; Ki-Hyun Kim; Hye-On Yoon; Eui-Chan Jeon; Yoon Shin Kim; Yong-Sung Cho; Seong-Taek Yun; Richard J. C. Brown

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing public concern over the potential accumulation of heavy metals in soil, owing to rapid industrial development. In an effort to describe the status of the pollutions of soil by industrial activities, relevant data sets reported by many studies were surveyed and reviewed. The results of our analysis indicate that soils were polluted most significantly by metals such as lead, zinc, copper, and cadmium. If the dominant species are evaluated by the highest mean concentration obs...

  1. Particulate Organic Matter Affects Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Two Crop Rotation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Rongyan; Lu, Jianwei; Ren, Tao; Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaokun; Cong, Rihuan

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the quantity and/or quality of soil labile organic matter between and after different types of cultivation system could play a dominant role in soil nitrogen (N) mineralization. The quantity and quality of particulate organic matter (POM) and potentially mineralizable-N (PMN) contents were measured in soils from 16 paired rice-rapeseed (RR)/cotton-rapeseed (CR) rotations sites in Hubei province, central China. Then four paired soils encompassing low (10th percentile), intermediate (25th and 75th percentiles), and high (90th percentile) levels of soil PMN were selected to further study the effects of POM on soil N mineralization by quantifying the net N mineralization in original soils and soils from which POM was removed. Both soil POM carbon (POM-C) and N (POM-N) contents were 45.8% and 55.8% higher under the RR rotation compared to the CR rotation, respectively. The PMN contents were highly correlated with the POM contents. The PMN and microbial biomass N (MBN) contents concurrently and significantly decreased when POM was removed. The reduction rate of PMN was positively correlated with changes in MBN after the removal of POM. The reduction rates of PMN and MBN after POM removal are lower under RR rotations (38.0% and 16.3%, respectively) than CR rotations (45.6% and 19.5%, respectively). Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy indicated that compounds with low-bioavailability accumulated (e.g., aromatic recalcitrant materials) in the soil POM fraction under the RR rotation but not under the CR rotation. The results of the present study demonstrated that POM plays a vital role in soil N mineralization under different rotation systems. The discrepancy between POM content and composition resulting from different crop rotation systems caused differences in N mineralization in soils.

  2. Growth, Yield, and Physiology of Sugarcane as Affected by Soil and Foliar Application of Silicon on Organic and Mineral Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.), a Si accumulator plant, responds positively to application of Si in terms of cane and sucrose yield. However, data is limited on the response of sugarcane leaf physiology to Si application. Moreover, most of the published studies focused on soil (root) application with li...

  3. Manure-amended soil characteristics affecting the survival of E. coli O157:h7 in 36 Dutch soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, E.; Semenov, A.V.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Vos, de O.J.; Bokhorst, J.G.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent increase in foodborne disease associated with the consumption of fresh vegetables stresses the importance of the development of intervention strategies that minimize the risk of preharvest contamination. To identify risk factors for Escherichia coli O157:H7 persistence in soil, we studied

  4. Soil NH+4 Fixation and Fertilizer N Recovery as Affected by Soil Moisture and Fertilizer Application Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Yah-An; O.EMTERYD; H.GRIP; LU Dian-Qing

    2004-01-01

    Ammonium fixation and the effects of soil moisture and application methods on fertilizer N recovery were investigated in two soils of Shaanxi Province,China,a Luvisol and an Entisol,through two experiments performed in the laboratory and in a glass shelter,respectively,by using ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3). The laboratory closed incubation box experiment was conducted using the Luvisol to study NH4+ fixation rate at soil moisture levels of 10.1%,22.7% and 35.3% water filled pore space (WFPS). The fixed NH4+-N increased dramatically to 51% and 66%,67% and 74%,and 82% and 85% 1,2 and 36 h after fertilizer incorporation at moisture levels of 10.1% and 22.7% WFPS and 35.3%WFPS,respectively. The rapid NH4+ fixation rates at all moisture levels could help prevent NH4+ losses from ammonia volatilization. In the glass shelter pot experiment,N fertilizer was applied by either banding (in a concentrated strip)or incorporating (thoroughly mixing) with the Entisol and the Luvisol. An average of 74.2% of the added N fertilizer was recovered 26 days after application to the Luvisol,while only 61.4% could be recovered from the Entisol,due to higher NH4+ fixation capacity of the Luvisol. The amount of fixed NH4+ decreased with increasing WFPS. The amount of fixed NH4+ in the incorporated fertilizer treatment was,on average,10% higher than that in the banded treatment.Higher NH4+ fixation rates could prevent N loss and thus increase N recovery. The results from the Luvisol showed lower nitrogen recovery as soil moisture level increased,which could be explained by the fact that most of the fixed NH4+ was still not released when the soil moisture level was low. When the fertilizer was incorporated into the soil,the recovery of N increased,compared with the banded treatment,by an average of 26.2% in the Luvisol and 11.2% in the Entisol,which implied that when farmers applied fertilizer,it would be best to mix it well with the soil.

  5. Congo grass grown in rotation with soybean affects phosphorus bound to soil carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Merlin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The phosphorus supply to crops in tropical soils is deficient due to its somewhat insoluble nature in soil, and addition of P fertilizers has been necessary to achieve high yields. The objective of this study was to examine the mechanisms through which a cover crop (Congo grass - Brachiaria ruziziensis in rotation with soybean can enhance soil and fertilizer P availability using long-term field trials and laboratory chemical fractionation approaches. The experimental field had been cropped to soybean in rotation with several species under no-till for six years. An application rate of no P or 240 kg ha-1 of P2O5 had been applied as triple superphosphate or as Arad rock phosphate. In April 2009, once more 0.0 or 80.0 kg ha-1 of P2O5 was applied to the same plots when Congo grass was planted. In November 2009, after Congo grass desiccation, soil samples were taken from the 0-5 and 5-10 cm depth layer and soil P was fractionated. Soil-available P increased to the depth of 10 cm through growing Congo grass when P fertilizers were applied. The C:P ratio was also increased by the cover crop. Congo grass cultivation increased P content in the soil humic fraction to the depth of 10 cm. Congo grass increases soil P availability by preventing fertilizer from being adsorbed and by increasing soil organic P.

  6. Microbial Biomass Carbon and Total Organic Carbon of Soils as Affected by Rubber Cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; ZHANG Gan-Lin

    2003-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from different rubber fields in twenty-five plots selected randomly in the Experimental Farm of the Chinese Academy of Tropical Agriculture Sciences located in Hainan, China, to analyse the ecological effect of rubber cultivation. The results showed that in the tropical rubber farm,soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and total organic C (TOC) were relatively low in the content but highly correlated with each other. After rubber tapping, soil MBC of mature rubber fields decreased significantly,by 55.5%, compared with immature rubber fields. Soil TOC also decreased but the difference was not significant. Ratios of MBC to TOC decreased significantly. The decreasing trend of MBC stopped at about ten years of rubber cultivation. After this period, soil MBC increased relatively while soil TOC still kept in decreasing. Soil MBC changes could be measured to predict the tendency of soil organic matter changes due to management practices in a tropical rubber farm several years before the changes in soil TOC become detectable.

  7. Bioavailability of zinc and phosphorus in calcareous soils as affected by citrate exudation

    OpenAIRE

    Duffner, A.; Hoffland, E.; Temminghoff, E. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Zinc (Zn) and phosphorus (P) deficiency often occurs at the same time and limits crop production in many soils. It has been suggested that citrate root exudation is a response of plants to both deficiencies. We used white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) as a model plant to clarify if citrate exuded by roots could increase the bioavailability of Zn and P in calcareous soils. Methods White lupin was grown in nutrient solution and in two calcareous soils in a rhizobox. Rhizosphere soil solution wa...

  8. [Carbon source metabolic diversity of soil microbial community under different climate types in the area affected by Wenchuan earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Shuai; Lin, Yong-Ming; Ma, Rui-Feng; Deng, Hao-Jun; Du, Kun; Wu, Cheng-Zhen; Hong, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008 led to huge damage to land covers in northwest Sichuan, one of the critical fragile eco-regions in China which can be divided into Semi-arid dry hot climate zone (SDHC) and Subtropical humid monsoon climate zone (SHMC). Using the method of Bilog-ECO-microplate technique, this paper aimed to determine the functional diversity of soil microbial community in the earthquake-affected areas which can be divided into undamaged area (U), recover area (R) and damaged area without recovery (D) under different climate types, in order to provide scientific basis for ecological recovery. The results indicated that the average-well-color-development (AWCD) in undamaged area and recovery area showed SDHC > SHMC, which was contrary to the AWCD in the damaged area without recovery. The AWCD of damaged area without recovery was the lowest in both climate zones. The number of carbon source utilization types of soil microbial in SHMC zone was significantly higher than that in SDHC zone. The carbon source utilization types in both climate zones presented a trend of recover area > undamaged area > damaged area without recovery. The carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community was significantly different in different climate zones. The diversity index and evenness index both showed a ranking of undamaged area > recover area > damaged area without recovery. In addition, the recovery area had the highest richness index. The soil microbial carbon sources metabolism characteristic was affected by soil nutrient, aboveground vegetation biomass and vegetation coverage to some extent. In conclusion, earthquake and its secondary disasters influenced the carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community mainly through the change of aboveground vegetation and soil environmental factors. PMID:26031097

  9. Production of biochar out of organic urban waste to amend salt affected soils in the basin of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez Garcia, Elizabeth; Siebe, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Biochar is widely recognized as an efficient tool for carbon sequestration and soil fertility. The understanding of its chemical and physical properties, strongly related to the biomass and production conditions, is central to identify the most suitable application of biochar. On the other hand, salt affected soils reduce the value and productivity of extensive areas worldwide. One feasible option to recover them is to add organic amendments, which improve water holding capacity and increase sorption sites for cations as sodium. The former lake Texcoco in the basin of Mexico has been a key area for the control of surface run-off and air quality of Mexico City. However, the high concentrations of soluble salts in their soils do not allow the development of a vegetation cover that protects the soil from wind erosion, being the latter the main cause of poor air quality in the metropolitan area during the dry season. On the other hand, the population of the city produces daily 2000 t of organic urban wastes, which are currently composted. Thus, we tested if either compost or biochar made out of urban organic waste can improve the salt affected soils of former lake Texcoco to grow grass and avoid wind erosion. We examined the physico-chemical properties of biochar produced from urban organic waste under pyrolysis conditions. We also set up a field experiment to evaluate the addition of these amendments into the saline soils of Texcoco. Our preliminary analyses show biochar yield was ca. 40%, it was mainly alkaline (pH: 8-10), with a moderate salt content (electrical conductivity: 0.5-3 mS/cm). We show also results of the initial phase of the field experiment in which we monitor the electrical conductivity, pH, water content, water tension and soil GHG fluxes on small plots amended with either biochar or compost in three different doses.

  10. Ammonium and nitrate in soil and upland rice yield as affected by cover crops and their desiccation time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Stephan Nascente

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of cover crops and their desiccation times on upland rice yield and on the levels of nitrate and ammonium in a no-tillage soil. The experiment was carried out in a randomized blocks, with split plots and three replicates. Cover crops (plots were sowed in the off-season (March 2009. In November 2009, at 30, 20, 10 and 0 days before rice sowing (split plots, herbicide was applied on the cover crops (fallow, Panicum maximum, Urochloa ruziziensis, U. brizantha and millet. Straw and soil were sampled (0 - 10 cm at the sowing day, and after 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days. Straws from millet and fallow were degraded more rapidly and provided the lowest level of nitrate in the soil. Urochloa ruziziensis, U. brizantha and P. maximum produced higher amounts of dry matter, and provided the highest levels of nitrate in the soil. Millet provides the lowest nitrate/ammonium ratio and the highest upland rice yield. Desiccations carried out at 30 and 20 days before sowing had the largest levels of nitrate in the soil at the sowing date. Nitrogen content and forms in the soil are affected by cover crops and their desiccation times.

  11. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two (13)C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change. PMID:25960162

  12. Contamination of soil, medicinal, and fodder plants with lead and cadmium present in mine-affected areas, Northern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, Javed; Khan, Sardar; Shah, Mohammad Tahir; Qamar, Zahir; Din, Islamud; Mahmood, Qaisar; Gul, Nayab; Huang, Qing

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in the soil and plants (medicinal and fodder) grown in chromite mining-affected areas, Northern Pakistan. Soil and plant samples were collected and analyzed for Pb and Cd concentrations using atomic absorption spectrometer. Soil pollution load indices (PLIs) were greater than 2 for both Cd and Pb, indicating high level of contamination in the study area. Furthermore, Cd concentrations in the soil surrounding the mining sites exceeded the maximum allowable limit (MAL) (0.6 mg kg(-1)), while the concentrations of Pb were lower than the MAL (350 mg kg(-1)) set by State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) for agriculture soil. The concentrations of Cd and Pb were significantly higher (P soil of the mining-contaminated sites as compared to the reference site, which can be attributed to the dispersion of toxic heavy metals, present in the bed rocks and waste of the mines. The concentrations of Pb and Cd in majority of medicinal and fodder plant species grown in surrounding areas of mines were higher than their MALs set by World Health Organization/Food Agriculture Organization (WHO/FAO) for herbal (10 and 0.3 mg kg(-1), respectively) and edible (0.3 and 0.2 mg kg(-1), respectively) plants. The high concentrations of Cd and Pb may cause contamination of the food chain and health risk.

  13. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W.; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-05-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two 13C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change.

  14. Soil CO2 Emissions as Affected by 20-Year Continuous Cropping in Mollisols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Meng-yang; YUAN Ya-ru; LI Lu-jun; XU Yan-li; HAN Xiao-zeng

    2014-01-01

    Long-term continuous cropping of soybean (Glycine max), spring wheat (Triticum aesativum) and maize (Zea mays) is widely practiced by local farmers in northeast China. A ifeld experiment (started in 1991) was used to investigate the differences in soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions under continuous cropping of the three major crops and to evaluate the relationships between CO2 lfuxes and soil temperature and moisture for Mollisols in northeast China. Soil CO2 emissions were measured using a closed-chamber method during the growing season in 2011. No remarkable differences in soil organic carbon were found among the cropping systems (P>0.05). However, signiifcant differences in CO2 emissions from soils were observed among the three cropping systems (Pcontinuous wheat ((629±22) g CO2 m-2)>continuous soybean ((474±30) g CO2 m-2). Soil temperature explained 42-65% of the seasonal variations in soil CO2 flux, with a Q10 between 1.63 and 2.31; water-filled pore space explained 25-47% of the seasonal variations in soil CO2 lfux. A multiple regression model including both soil temperature (T, °C) and water-iflled pore space (W,%), log(f)=a+bT log(W), was established, accounting for 51-66%of the seasonal variations in soil CO2 lfux. The results suggest that soil CO2 emissions and their Q10 values under a continuous cropping system largely depend on crop types in Mollisols of Northeast China.

  15. Transport of manure-borne testosterone in soils affected by artificial rainfall events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yong; Zhang, Tian C

    2016-04-15

    Information is very limited on fate and transport of steroidal hormones in soils. In this study, the rainfall simulation tests were conducted with a soil slab reactor to investigate the transport of manure-borne testosterone in a silty-clay loam soil under six controllable operation conditions (i.e., three rainfall intensities and two tillage practices). The properties [e.g., rainwater volume, particle size distribution (PSD)] of the slurry samples collected in runoff and leachate at different time intervals were measured; their correlation with the distribution of testosterone among runoff, leachate and soil matrix was analyzed. The results indicated that more than 88% of the testosterone was held by the applied manure and/or soil matrix even under the rainfall intensity of 100-year return frequency. The runoff facilitated testosterone transport through both dissolved and particle-associated phases, with the corresponding mass ratio being ∼7 to 3. Soil particles collected through runoff were mainly silt-sized aggregates (STA) and clays, indicating the necessity of using partially-dispersed soil particles as testing materials to conduct batch tests (e.g., sorption/desorption). No testosterone was detected at the soil depth >20 cm or in the leachate samples, indicating that transport of testosterone through the soil is very slow when there is no preferential flow. Tillage practice could impede the transport of testosterone in runoff. For the first time, results and the methodologies of this study allow one to quantify the hormone distribution among runoff, leachate and soil matrix at the same time and to obtain a comprehensive picture of the F/T of manure-borne testosterone in soil-water environments.

  16. Transport of manure-borne testosterone in soils affected by artificial rainfall events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yong; Zhang, Tian C

    2016-04-15

    Information is very limited on fate and transport of steroidal hormones in soils. In this study, the rainfall simulation tests were conducted with a soil slab reactor to investigate the transport of manure-borne testosterone in a silty-clay loam soil under six controllable operation conditions (i.e., three rainfall intensities and two tillage practices). The properties [e.g., rainwater volume, particle size distribution (PSD)] of the slurry samples collected in runoff and leachate at different time intervals were measured; their correlation with the distribution of testosterone among runoff, leachate and soil matrix was analyzed. The results indicated that more than 88% of the testosterone was held by the applied manure and/or soil matrix even under the rainfall intensity of 100-year return frequency. The runoff facilitated testosterone transport through both dissolved and particle-associated phases, with the corresponding mass ratio being ∼7 to 3. Soil particles collected through runoff were mainly silt-sized aggregates (STA) and clays, indicating the necessity of using partially-dispersed soil particles as testing materials to conduct batch tests (e.g., sorption/desorption). No testosterone was detected at the soil depth >20 cm or in the leachate samples, indicating that transport of testosterone through the soil is very slow when there is no preferential flow. Tillage practice could impede the transport of testosterone in runoff. For the first time, results and the methodologies of this study allow one to quantify the hormone distribution among runoff, leachate and soil matrix at the same time and to obtain a comprehensive picture of the F/T of manure-borne testosterone in soil-water environments. PMID:26922564

  17. Management Practices Affect Soil Nutrients and Bacterial Populations in Backgrounding Beef Feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netthisinghe, A M P; Cook, K L; Gilfillen, R A; Sistani, K R; Woosley, P B

    2015-11-01

    Contaminants associated with manure in animal production sites are of significant concern. Unless properly managed, manure-derived soil nutrients in livestock production sites can deteriorate soil and water quality. This 3-yr study evaluated a soil nutrient management strategy with four sequentially imposed management practices: 12-mo backgrounding (BG), manure removal from the feeder area (FD), 12-mo destocking (DS), and 12-mo grass hay harvesting (H) in a small backgrounding feedlot. Resulting soil nutrient levels, total (), and N cycling bacterial ( and ) populations after each management practice in feedlot feeder and grazing (GR) areas and in crop grown at the control location (CT) were measured. Irrespective of management practice, FD contained greater soil nutrient concentrations than the GR and CT. Regardless of management practice, total bacteria cells (1.4 × 10 cells g soil) and nitrate reducers (5.2 × 10 cells g soil) were an order of magnitude higher in the FD than in the GR and CT, whereas nitrifying bacteria concentrations (1.4 × 10 cells g soil) were higher in the GR. Manure removal from the feeder area reduced M3-P (39%), total C (21%), total N (23%), NH-N (47%), and NO-N (93%) levels established in the FD during BG. Destocking lowered total C and N (45%) in the FD and NH-N (47%), NO-N (76%), and Zn (16%) in the GR. Hay harvesting reduced all soil nutrients in the FD and GR marginally. The management strategy has potential to lower soil nutrient concentrations, control soil nutrient buildup, and limit nutrient spread within the feedlot. PMID:26641341

  18. MINERALIZATION OF NITROGEN FROM BROILER LITTER AS AFFECTED BY SOIL TEXTURE IN THE SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted during 2004-2005 to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (...

  19. Soil water infiltration affected by biofuel and grain crop production systems in claypan landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of soil management systems on water infiltration is very crucial within claypan landscapes to maximize production as well as minimize environmental risks. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of topsoil thickness on water infiltration in claypan soils for grain and biofuel...

  20. Post cold-storage conditioning time affects soil denitrifying enzyme activity

    OpenAIRE

    Chirinda, Ngonidzashe; J. E. Olesen; Porter, J R

    2011-01-01

    Soil denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) is often assessed after cold storage.Previous studies using the short-term acetylene inhibition method have not considered conditioning time (post-cold storage warming-up time prior to soil analysis) as a factor influencing results. We observed fluctuations in DEA following cold storage, suggesting a need to consider conditioning time when planning and interpreting results.

  1. The affect of industrial activities on zinc in alluvial Egyptian soil determined using neutron activation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-two surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from different locations in Egypt representing non-polluted,moderately and highly polluted soils.The aim of this study was to evaluate total Zn content in alluvial soils of Nile Delta in Egypt by using the delayed neutron activation analysis technique (DNAA),in the irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1).The gamma-ray spectra were recorded with a hyper pure germanium detection system.The well resolved gamma-ray peak at 1116.0 kev was efficiently used for 65Zn content determination.Zn content in non-polluted soil samples ranged between 74.1 and 103.8 ppm with an average of 98.5 + 5.1 ppm.Zn content in moderately polluted soils ranged between 136.0 and 232.5 ppm with an average of 180.1 + 32.6 ppm.The highest Zn levels ranging from 240.0 and 733.0 ppm with an average of 410.3 + 54.4 ppm,were observed in soil samples collected from,either highly polluted agricultural soils exposed to prolonged irrigation with industrial wastewater or surface soil samples from industrial sites.

  2. Mechanisms that promote bacterial fitness in fungal-affected soil microhabitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazir, Rashid; Warmink, J.A.; Boersma, F.G.H.; van Elsas, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    Soil represents a very heterogeneous environment for its microbiota. Among the soil inhabitants, bacteria and fungi are important organisms as they are involved in key biogeochemical cycling processes. A main energy source driving the system is formed by plants through the provision of plant-fixed (

  3. Soil water retention as affected by tillage and residue management in semiarid Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bescansa, P.; Imaz, M.J.; Virto, I.; Enrique, A.; Hoogmoed, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    Conservation tillage preserves soil water and this has been the main reason for its rapid dissemination in rainfed agriculture in semiarid climates. We determined the effects of conservation versus conventional tillage on available soil water capacity (AWC) and related properties at the end of 5 yea

  4. Management systems in irrigated rice affect physical and chemical soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues de Lima, A.C.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Pauletto, E.A.; Pinto, L.F.S.

    2009-01-01

    Lowland soils are commonly found in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern of Brazil, where they represent around 20% of the total area. Deficient drainage is the most important natural characteristic of these soils which therefore are mainly in use for irrigated rice (Oriza sativa). Degradation i

  5. Soil aggregation and the stabilization of organic carbon as affected by erosion and deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Wang; E.L.H. Cammeraat; C. Cerli; K. Kalbitz

    2014-01-01

    The importance of soil aggregation in determining the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) during erosion, transportation and deposition is poorly understood. Particularly, we do not know how aggregation contributes to the often-observed accumulation of SOC at depositional sites. Our objective was

  6. Chemical and biological attributes of a lowland soil affected by land leveling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Barbat Parfitt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the relationship between soil chemical and biological attributes and the magnitude of cuts and fills after the land leveling process of a lowland soil. Soil samples were collected from the 0 - 0.20 m layer, before and after leveling, on a 100 point grid established in the experimental area, to evaluate chemical attributes and soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC. Leveling operations altered the magnitude of soil chemical and biological attributes. Values of Ca, Mg, S, cation exchange capacity, Mn, P, Zn, and soil organic matter (SOM decreased in the soil profile, whereas Al, K, and MBC increased after leveling. Land leveling decreased in 20% SOM average content in the 0 - 0.20 m layer. The great majority of the chemical attributes did not show relations between their values and the magnitude of cuts and fills. The relation was quadratic for SOM, P, and total N, and was linear for K, showing a positive slope and indicating increase in the magnitude of these attributes in cut areas and stability in fill areas. The relationships between these chemical attributes and the magnitude of cuts and fills indicate that the land leveling map may be a useful tool for degraded soil recuperation through amendments and organic fertilizers.

  7. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-04-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils.

  8. Landscape position moderates how ant nests affect hydrology and soil chemistry across a Chihuahuan Desert watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ants moderate the supply of critical resources such as water and nutrients in desert environments by changing the physical arrangement of soils during nest construction. We measured water infiltration and soil physical and chemical properties on and off the nests of two ant species (Pogonomyrmex rug...

  9. Assessing dominant factors affecting soil erosion using a portable rainfall simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.VAHABI; D.NIKKAMI

    2008-01-01

    Investigating the causes of soil erosion is difficult in natural conditions owing to the presence of other factors.Without simplifying the experimental conditions,studying soil behavior with its numerous parameters while considering factors such as vegetation cover,topography,and rainfall is difficult and in most conditions impossible.The application of simulation approaches is therefore necessary to simplify the prototype.In this research,the effects of physical soil factors such as texture and antecedent soil moisture,along with land slope and vegetation cover were evaluated in the Taleghan watershed,lran,using a rainfall simulator and soil erosion plots.For this purpose,a 89 × 120 cm rainfall simulator producing 24.5 and 32 mm/h rainfall intensities of 30 rain duration,as a common condition of the study area,was used at 144 locations over soil erosion plots with dimensions of 95 × 125 cm.Plots had slope classes of 12-20 and 20-30 %,different soil textures,different antecedent soil moistures,and medium to poor vegetation cover conditions.It was found that for 24.5 and 32 mm/h rainfall intensities,the sediment yield had high correlations of-0.771 and -0.796 with vegetation cover and slight correlations of 0.045 and 0.029 with land slope respectively.Regression equations for predicting the sediment yield were also developed for different conditions.

  10. COSMOS soil water sensing affected by crop biomass and water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water sensing methods are widely used to characterize water content in the root zone and below, but only a few are capable of sensing soil volumes larger than a few hundred liters. Scientists with the USDA-ARS Conservation & Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, evaluated: a) the Cos...

  11. Zeolite Soil Application Method Affects Inorganic Nitrogen, Moisture, and Corn Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoption of new management techniques which improve soil water storage and soil nitrogen plant availability yet limit nitrogen leaching may help improve environmental quality. A benchtop study was conducted to determine the influence of a single urea fertilizer rate (224 kilograms of Nitrogen per ...

  12. Post-cold-storage conditioning time affects soil denitrifying enzyme activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngonidzashe; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Porter, John Roy

    2011-01-01

    Soil denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) is often assessed after cold storage. Previous studies using the short-term acetylene inhibition method have not considered conditioning time (post-cold-storage warm-up time prior to soil analysis) as a factor influencing results. We observed fluctuations...

  13. Factors affecting N immobilisation/mineralisation kinetics for cellulose-, glucose- and straw-amended sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinten, A.J.A.; Whitmore, A.P.; Bloem, J.; Howard, R.; Wright, F.

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of nitrogen immobilization/mineralization for cellulose-, glucose- and straw-amended sandy soils were investigated in a series of laboratory incubations. Three Scottish soils expected to exhibit a range of biological activity were used: aloamy sand, intensively cropped horticultural soi

  14. Fertilization strategies affect phosphorus forms and release from soils and suspended solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Teresa; Celi, Luisella; Bünemann, Else K; Oberson, Astrid; Frossard, Emmanuel; Barberis, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    The release of phosphorus from soils in surface runoff is strongly influenced by fertilizer inputs and contributes significantly to agriculturally driven eutrophication. This work evaluated the forms and availability of P in bulk soils and suspended solids (SS) produced by a water dispersion test that mimics the action of rain events and/or irrigation. This test was applied on soils cultivated with maize and fertilized with mineral N, P, and K (NPK); mineral P and K (PK); bovine slurry and P (S); or manure and P (M) for 15 yr. The P surplus in the treated soils was in the order NPK fertilizer-derived P salts in the suspended solids control P forms and exchangeability for mineral fertilizer treatments, whereas in M soil carbon content assumed a key role.

  15. Organic carbon stocks in permafrost-affected soils from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simas, F.N.B.; Schaefer, C.E.G.R.; Mendonça, E.S.; Silva, I.R.; Santana, R.M.; Ribeiro, A.S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent works show that organic matter accumulation in some soils from coastal Antarctica is higher than previously expected. The objective of the present work was to estimate the organic C stocks for soils from maritime Antarctica. Cryosols from subpolar desert landscapes presented the lowest organic C stocks. Ornithogenic soils are the most important C reservoirs in terrestrial ecosystems in this part of Antarctica. Although these soils correspond to only 2.5 % of the ice-free areas at Admiralty Bay, they contain approximately 20 % of the estimated C stock. Most of the organic C in the studied soils is stored in the active layer but in some cases the C is also stored in the permafrost.

  16. Fertilization strategies affect phosphorus forms and release from soils and suspended solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Teresa; Celi, Luisella; Bünemann, Else K; Oberson, Astrid; Frossard, Emmanuel; Barberis, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    The release of phosphorus from soils in surface runoff is strongly influenced by fertilizer inputs and contributes significantly to agriculturally driven eutrophication. This work evaluated the forms and availability of P in bulk soils and suspended solids (SS) produced by a water dispersion test that mimics the action of rain events and/or irrigation. This test was applied on soils cultivated with maize and fertilized with mineral N, P, and K (NPK); mineral P and K (PK); bovine slurry and P (S); or manure and P (M) for 15 yr. The P surplus in the treated soils was in the order NPK fertilizer-derived P salts in the suspended solids control P forms and exchangeability for mineral fertilizer treatments, whereas in M soil carbon content assumed a key role. PMID:25602831

  17. Fire regime, not time-since-fire, affects soil fungal community diversity and composition in temperate grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Eleonora; McMullan-Fisher, Sapphire; Morgan, John W; May, Tom; Zeeman, Ben; Franks, Ashley E

    2016-09-01

    Frequent burning is commonly undertaken to maintain diversity in temperate grasslands of southern Australia. How burning affects below-ground fungal community diversity remains unknown. We show, using a fungal rDNA metabarcoding approach (Illumina MiSeq), that the fungal community composition was influenced by fire regime (frequency) but not time-since-fire. Fungal community composition was resilient to direct fire effects, most likely because grassland fires transfer little heat to the soil. Differences in the fungal community composition due to fire regime was likely due to associated changes that occur in vegetation with recurrent fire, via the break up of obligate symbiotic relationships. However, fire history only partially explains the observed dissimilarity in composition among the soil samples, suggesting a distinctiveness in composition in each grassland site. The importance of considering changes in soil microbe communities when managing vegetation with fire is highlighted. PMID:27528692

  18. Ecology and living conditions of groundwater fauna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the current state of ecological knowledge and applied research relating to groundwater. A conceptual picture is given of groundwater fauna occurrence in regard to Swedish environmental conditions. Interpretation features for groundwater fauna and applications are outlined. Groundwater is one of the largest and oldest limnic habitats populated by a rich and diverse fauna. Both very old species and species occurring naturally in brackish or salt water can be found in groundwater. Groundwater ecosystems are heterotrophic; the fauna depends on imports from the surface. Most species are meiofauna, 0.3-1 mm. The food chain of groundwater fauna is the same as for relatives in surface water and salt water. Smaller animals graze biofilms and detritus, larger animals act facutatively as predators. A difference is that stygobiotic fauna has become highly adapted to its living space and tolerates very long periods without food. Oxygen is a limiting factor, but groundwater fauna tolerates periods with low oxygen concentrations, even anoxic conditions. For longer periods of time a minimum oxygen requirement of 1 mg/l should be fulfilled. Geographic features such as Quaternary glaciation and very old Pliocene river systems are important for distribution patterns on a large spatial scale, but aquifer characteristics are important on a landscape scale. Area diversity is often comparable to surface water diversity. However, site diversity is low in groundwater. Site specific hydrological exchange on a geological facies level inside the aquifer, e.g. porous, fractured and karstic aquifers as well as the hyporheic zone, controls distribution patterns of groundwater fauna. For a better understanding of controlling factors indicator values are suggested. Different adequate sampling methods are available. They are representative for the aquifer, but a suitable number of monitoring wells is required. The existence of groundwater fauna in Sweden is considered as very

  19. Ecology and living conditions of groundwater fauna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thulin, Barbara (Geo Innova AB (Sweden)); Hahn, Hans Juergen (Arbeitsgruppe Grundwasseroekologie, Univ. of Koblenz-Landau (Germany))

    2008-09-15

    This report presents the current state of ecological knowledge and applied research relating to groundwater. A conceptual picture is given of groundwater fauna occurrence in regard to Swedish environmental conditions. Interpretation features for groundwater fauna and applications are outlined. Groundwater is one of the largest and oldest limnic habitats populated by a rich and diverse fauna. Both very old species and species occurring naturally in brackish or salt water can be found in groundwater. Groundwater ecosystems are heterotrophic; the fauna depends on imports from the surface. Most species are meiofauna, 0.3-1 mm. The food chain of groundwater fauna is the same as for relatives in surface water and salt water. Smaller animals graze biofilms and detritus, larger animals act facutatively as predators. A difference is that stygobiotic fauna has become highly adapted to its living space and tolerates very long periods without food. Oxygen is a limiting factor, but groundwater fauna tolerates periods with low oxygen concentrations, even anoxic conditions. For longer periods of time a minimum oxygen requirement of 1 mg/l should be fulfilled. Geographic features such as Quaternary glaciation and very old Pliocene river systems are important for distribution patterns on a large spatial scale, but aquifer characteristics are important on a landscape scale. Area diversity is often comparable to surface water diversity. However, site diversity is low in groundwater. Site specific hydrological exchange on a geological facies level inside the aquifer, e.g. porous, fractured and karstic aquifers as well as the hyporheic zone, controls distribution patterns of groundwater fauna. For a better understanding of controlling factors indicator values are suggested. Different adequate sampling methods are available. They are representative for the aquifer, but a suitable number of monitoring wells is required. The existence of groundwater fauna in Sweden is considered as very

  20. Soil Quality Indicators as Affected by a Long Term Barley-Maize and Maize Cropping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Corsini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Most soil studies aim a better characterization of the system through indicators. In the present study nematofauna and soil structure were chosen as indicators to be assess soil health as related to agricultural practices. The field research was carried out on the two fodder cropping systems continuous maize (CM, Zea mays L. and a 3-year rotation of silage-maize – silage-barley (Hordeum vulgare L. with Italian ryegrass (R3 and grain-maize maintained in these conditions for 18 years. Each crop system was submitted to two management options: 1 the high input level (H, done as a conventional tillage, 2 the low input level (L, where the tillage was replaced by harrowing and the manure was reduced by 30%. The effects of the two different cropping systems was assessed on soil nematofauna and soil physic parameters (structure or aggregate stability. Comparison was made of general composition, trophic structure and biodiversity of the nematofauna collected in both systems. Differences in nematode genera composition and distribution between the two systems were also recorded. The monoculture, compared to the three year rotation, had a negative influence on the nematofauna composition and its ecological succession. The Structural Stability Index (SSI values indicate that both the cropping systems had a negative effect on the aggregate stability. The results indicate that nematofauna can be used to assess the effects of cropping systems on soil ecosystem, and therefore be considered a good indicator of soil health to integrate information from different chemical or physical indicators.

  1. Soil Quality Indicators as Affected by a Long Term Barley-Maize and Maize Cropping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Manachini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Most soil studies aim a better characterization of the system through indicators. In the present study nematofauna and soil structure were chosen as indicators to be assess soil health as related to agricultural practices. The field research was carried out on the two fodder cropping systems continuous maize (CM, Zea mays L. and a 3-year rotation of silage-maize – silage-barley (Hordeum vulgare L. with Italian ryegrass (R3 and grain-maize maintained in these conditions for 18 years. Each crop system was submitted to two management options: 1 the high input level (H, done as a conventional tillage, 2 the low input level (L, where the tillage was replaced by harrowing and the manure was reduced by 30%. The effects of the two different cropping systems was assessed on soil nematofauna and soil physic parameters (structure or aggregate stability. Comparison was made of general composition, trophic structure and biodiversity of the nematofauna collected in both systems. Differences in nematode genera composition and distribution between the two systems were also recorded. The monoculture, compared to the three year rotation, had a negative influence on the nematofauna composition and its ecological succession. The Structural Stability Index (SSI values indicate that both the cropping systems had a negative effect on the aggregate stability. The results indicate that nematofauna can be used to assess the effects of cropping systems on soil ecosystem, and therefore be considered a good indicator of soil health to integrate information from different chemical or physical indicators.

  2. Factors affecting spatial variation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface soils in North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xilong; Zuo, Qian; Duan, Yonghong; Liu, Wenxin; Cao, Jun; Tao, Shu

    2012-10-01

    The spatial variation in concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface soils in the North China Plain and the influential factors were examined in the present study. High concentrations of the sum of 16 PAHs (∑PAH(16) ) appeared in cities and their surrounding areas. Emissions and soil organic carbon (SOC) content significantly regulated spatial differentiation of PAH contamination in soils in the study area. Compared with emissions, concentrations of individual and total PAHs in soils were more closely controlled by the SOC content. Furthermore, concentrations of PAH species with lower molecular weight (e.g., two- or three-ring) in surface soils were more strongly correlated with the SOC content in comparison with those of higher molecular weight (e.g., five- or six-ring), mainly because of their higher saturated vapor pressure, thus higher mobility. The spatial variation of PAH species in soils in the North China Plain tended to be larger with increasing benzene ring numbers, and the difference in physicochemical properties of PAH species determined their distinct spatial distribution characteristics. The present study highlights the relative importance of emissions and SOC content in spatial variation of PAHs and the dependence of the spatial distribution characteristics of PAH species in surface soils on their physicochemical properties at a regional scale. Results of the present work are helpful for regional risk assessment of the contaminants tested. PMID:22847656

  3. Bioaccumulation of thallium in an agricultural soil as affected by solid-phase association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaněk, Aleš; Grösslová, Zuzana; Mihaljevič, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The work focused on the biogeochemical behavior of synthetic Tl modified phases, namely birnessite, ferrihydrite, and calcite, in a neutral soil Leptosol. The data presented here clearly demonstrate a strong relationship between the mineralogical position of Tl in the soil and its uptake by the studied plant (Sinapis alba L.). All tested Tl phases behaved as potential Tl sources in the rhizosphere, with a maximum for ferrihydrite and minimum for birnessite. Therefore, it can be concluded that Mn(III,IV) oxides, if present in the soil system, may reduce biological uptake of Tl to a substantial degree, including the case of Tl-accumulating species (i.e., Brassicaceae). It was proven that even Tl-enriched calcite present in the carbonate-rich soil is an important precursor for further contaminant mobilization, despite its relative resistance to degradation. Our data indicate that the fate of secondary Tl phases in the rhizosphere might be significantly influenced by the pH of the soil matrix, i.e., soils with lower pHs reduce their stability, making them more susceptible to further degradation by root exudates. Bulk soil mineralogy and the content and quality of SOM are thus suggested to be critical parameters controlling the bioaccumulation potential for Tl. This research was supported by the Czech Science Foundation (grant no. 14-01866S).

  4. Soil Organic N Forms and N Supply as Affected by Fertilization Under Intensive Rice Cropping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi-Chun; WANG Guang-Huo; XIE Weng-Xia

    2006-01-01

    Changes of soil organic nitrogen forms and soil nitrogen supply under continuous rice cropping system were investigated in a long-term fertilization experiment in Jinhua, Zhejiang Province, China. The fertilizer treatments included combination of P-K, N-K, N-P, and N-P-K as well as the control. After six years of continuous double-rice cropping, total soil N and hydrolysable N contents remained stable in plots with N treatments, while the hydrolysable N contents were substantially reduced in those plots without N application. Compared to the unbalanced fertilization treatments, P and K increased the percentage of hydrolysable ammonium N in the total soil N with the balanced application of N, and also maintained higher rice grain yields and nitrogen uptake. Grain yield was positively correlated with total N uptake (r = 0.875**),hydrolysable N (r = 0.608**), hydrolysable ammonium N (r = 0.560**) and the hydrolysable unknown N (r = 0.417**). Total N uptake was positively correlated with hydrolysable N (r = 0.608**), hydrolysable ammonium N (r = 0.440**)and hydro lysable unknown N (r = 0.431**). Soil nutrient depletion and/or unbalanced fertilization to rice crop reduced N content in soil microbial biomass, and therefore increased C/N ratio, suggesting a negative effect on the total microbial biomass in the soil.

  5. Bacterial community structure and diversity in a black soil as affected by long-term fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Dan; YANG Qian; ZHANG Jun-Zheng; WANG Shuang; CHEN Xue-Li; ZHANG Xi-Lin; LI Wei-Qun

    2008-01-01

    Black soil (Mollisol) is one of the main soil types in northeastern China.Biolog and polymerase chain reactiondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) methods were used to examine the influence of various fertilizer combinations on the structure and function of the bacterial community in a black soil collected from Harbin,Heilongjiang Province.Biolog results showed that substrate richness and catabolic diversity of the soil bacterial community were the greatest in the chemical fertilizer and chemical fertilizer+manure treatments.The metabolic ability of the bacterial community in the manure treatment was similar to the control.DGGE fingerprinting indicated similarity in the distribution of most 16S rDNA bands among all treatments,suggesting that microorganisms with those bands were stable and not influenced by fertilization.However,chemical fertilizer increased the diversity of soil bacterial community.Principal component analysis of Biolog and DGGE data revealed that the structure and function of the bacterial community were similar in the control and manure treatments,suggesting that the application of manure increased the soil microbial population,but had no effect on the bacterial community structure.Catabolic function was similar in the chemical fertilizer and chemical fertilizer+manure treatments,but the composition structure of the soil microbes differed between them.The use of chemical fertilizers could result in a decline in the catabolic activity of fast-growing or eutrophic bacteria.

  6. Carbon Sequestration in Soils Affected by Douglas Fir Reforestation in Apennines (Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Di Biase

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Douglas fir reforestation plays an important role in Italian forest because no indigenous conifer has similar characteristics of productivity and timber quality. Few studies on physicochemical properties of soils under Douglas fire are noticeable. The aim of this work is to evaluate the organic C stock into soils under Douglas fir plantation in different selected areas. The areas of study are located in the North Apennine (Italy; Corno alle Scale (COR, Vallombrosa (VAL, Mulino Mengoni (MEN, respectively are chosen for the presence of Douglas fir reforestation of 60 years old. Two soil profiles for each area have been open and described. The pH value decreased along the profile depth. The organic C amount in organic layers was higher in Val and Men pedons than that determined in COR one. Higher amount of organic C were detected in organo-mineral horizons of Co pedons, highlighting a rapid turnover of soil organic matter. The C stock calculated in the first 30 cm of soil showed that the higher C amount is stored in highest altitudes profiles (COR6 and VAL6 than the other. The soil are classified as Lithic Dystrudepts in the highest altitudes (COR 6, 7 and VAL 6, 7, respectively while as Humic Dystrudepts in MEN (4 and 5 pedons. We conclude that no dangerous effects on soil quality of Douglas fir were investigated and they seem to be similar to those of native tree species, even if other different aspects should be investigated.

  7. Soil eukaryotic microorganism succession as affected by continuous cropping of peanut--pathogenic and beneficial fungi were selected.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingna Chen

    Full Text Available Peanut is an important oil crop worldwide and shows considerable adaptability but growth and yield are negatively affected by continuous cropping. Soil micro-organisms are efficient bio-indicators of soil quality and plant health and are critical to the sustainability of soil-based ecosystem function and to successful plant growth. In this study, 18S rRNA gene clone library analyses were employed to study the succession progress of soil eukaryotic micro-organisms under continuous peanut cultivation. Eight libraries were constructed for peanut over three continuous cropping cycles and its representative growth stages. Cluster analyses indicated that soil micro-eukaryotic assemblages obtained from the same peanut cropping cycle were similar, regardless of growth period. Six eukaryotic groups were found and fungi predominated in all libraries. The fungal populations showed significant dynamic change and overall diversity increased over time under continuous peanut cropping. The abundance and/or diversity of clones affiliated with Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Glomerales, Orbiliales, Mucorales and Tremellales showed an increasing trend with continuous cropping but clones affiliated with Agaricales, Cantharellales, Pezizales and Pyxidiophorales decreased in abundance and/or diversity over time. The current data, along with data from previous studies, demonstrated that the soil microbial community was affected by continuous cropping, in particular, the pathogenic and beneficial fungi that were positively selected over time, which is commonplace in agro-ecosystems. The trend towards an increase in fungal pathogens and simplification of the beneficial fungal community could be important factors contributing to the decline in peanut growth and yield over many years of continuous cropping.

  8. Soil eukaryotic microorganism succession as affected by continuous cropping of peanut--pathogenic and beneficial fungi were selected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingna; Li, Xiao; Yang, Qingli; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Pan, Lijuan; Chen, Na; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Tong; Wang, Mian; Yu, Shanlin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut is an important oil crop worldwide and shows considerable adaptability but growth and yield are negatively affected by continuous cropping. Soil micro-organisms are efficient bio-indicators of soil quality and plant health and are critical to the sustainability of soil-based ecosystem function and to successful plant growth. In this study, 18S rRNA gene clone library analyses were employed to study the succession progress of soil eukaryotic micro-organisms under continuous peanut cultivation. Eight libraries were constructed for peanut over three continuous cropping cycles and its representative growth stages. Cluster analyses indicated that soil micro-eukaryotic assemblages obtained from the same peanut cropping cycle were similar, regardless of growth period. Six eukaryotic groups were found and fungi predominated in all libraries. The fungal populations showed significant dynamic change and overall diversity increased over time under continuous peanut cropping. The abundance and/or diversity of clones affiliated with Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Glomerales, Orbiliales, Mucorales and Tremellales showed an increasing trend with continuous cropping but clones affiliated with Agaricales, Cantharellales, Pezizales and Pyxidiophorales decreased in abundance and/or diversity over time. The current data, along with data from previous studies, demonstrated that the soil microbial community was affected by continuous cropping, in particular, the pathogenic and beneficial fungi that were positively selected over time, which is commonplace in agro-ecosystems. The trend towards an increase in fungal pathogens and simplification of the beneficial fungal community could be important factors contributing to the decline in peanut growth and yield over many years of continuous cropping.

  9. Aboveground Epichloë coenophiala-Grass Associations Do Not Affect Belowground Fungal Symbionts or Associated Plant, Soil Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Lindsey C; McCulley, Rebecca L

    2016-10-01

    Cool season grasses host multiple fungal symbionts, such as aboveground Epichloë endophytes and belowground arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and dark septate endophytes (DSEs). Asexual Epichloë endophytes can influence root colonization by AMF, but the type of interaction-whether antagonistic or beneficial-varies. In Schedonorus arundinaceus (tall fescue), Epichloë coenophiala can negatively affect AMF, which may impact soil properties and ecosystem function. Within field plots of S. arundinaceus that were either E. coenophiala-free (E-), infected with the common, mammal-toxic E. coenophiala strain (CTE+), or infected with one of two novel, non-toxic strains (AR542 NTE+ and AR584 NTE+), we hypothesized that (1) CTE+ would decrease AMF and DSE colonization rates and reduce soil extraradical AMF hyphae compared to E- or NTE+, and (2) this would lead to E- and NTE+ plots having greater water stable soil aggregates and C than CTE+. E. coenophiala presence and strain did not significantly alter AMF or DSE colonization, nor did it affect extraradical AMF hypha length, soil aggregates, or aggregate-associated C and N. Soil extraradical AMF hypha length negatively correlated with root AMF colonization. Our results contrast with previous demonstrations that E. coenophiala symbiosis inhibits belowground AMF communities. In our mesic, relatively nutrient-rich grassland, E. coenophiala symbiosis did not antagonize belowground symbionts, regardless of strain. Manipulating E. coenophiala strains within S. arundinaceus may not significantly alter AMF communities and nutrient cycling, yet we must further explore these relationships under different soils and environmental conditions given that symbiont interactions can be important in determining ecosystem response to global change. PMID:27502203

  10. Fertilization Affects Biomass Production of Suaeda salsa and Soil Organic Carbon Pool in East Coastal Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-feng; YANG Jing-song; YAO Rong-jiang; LIU Guang-ming; YU Shi-peng

    2013-01-01

    Land use practice significantly affects soil properties. Soil is a major sink for atmospheric carbon, and soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered as an essential indicator of soil quality. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of N and P applied to Suaeda salsa on biomass production, SOC concentration, labile organic carbon (LOC) concentration, SOC pool and carbon management index (CMI) as well as the effect of the land use practice on soil quality of coastal tidal lands in east coastal region of China. The study provided relevant references for coastal exploitation, tidal land management and related study in other countries and regions. The field experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design, consisting of four N-fertilization rates (0 (N0), 60 (N1), 120 (N2) and 180 kg ha-1 (N3)), three P-fertilization rates (0 (P0), 70 (P1) and 105 kg ha-1 (P2)) and bare land without vegetation. N and P applied to S. salsa on coastal tidal lands significantly affected biomass production (above-ground biomass and roots), bulk density (ρb), available N and P, SOC, LOC, SOC pool and CMI. Using statistical analysis, significantly interactions in N and P were observed for biomass production and the dominant factor for S. salsa production was N in continuous 2-yr experiments. There were no significant interactions between N and P for SOC concentration, LOC concentration and SOC pool. However, significant interaction was obtained for CMI at the 0-20 cm depth and N played a dominant role in the variation of CMI. There were significant improvements for soil measured attributes and parameters, which suggested that increasing the rates of N and P significantly decreasedρb at the 0-20 cm depth and increased available N and P, SOC, LOC, SOC pool as well as CMI at both the 0-20 and 20-40 cm depth, respectively. By correlation analysis, there were significantly positive correlations between biomass (above-ground biomass and roots) and SOC as well as LOC in

  11. Changes of the soil environment affected by fly ash dumping site of the electric power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jerzy; Gwizdz, Marta; Jamroz, Elzbieta; Debicka, Magdalena; Kocowicz, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    In this study the effect of fly ash dumping site of the electric power plant on the surrounding soil environment was investigated. The fly ash dumping site collect wastes form brown coal combustion of Belchatow electric power station, central Poland. The dumping site is surrounding by forest, where pine trees overgrow Podzols derived from loose quartz sands. The soil profiles under study were located at a distance of 50, 100, 400 and 500 m from the dumping site, while control profiles were located 8 km away from the landfill. In all horizons of soil profiles the mpain hysico-chemical and chemical properties were determined. The humic substances were extracted from ectohumus horizons by Shnitzer's method, purified using XAD resin and freeze-dried. The fulvic acids were passed through a cation exchange column and freeze-dried. Optical density, elemental composition and atomic ratios were determined in the humic and fulvic acids. Organic carbon by KMnO4 oxidation was also determined in the organic soil horizons. The fly ash from the landfill characterized by high salinity and strong alkaline reaction (pH=10), which contributed significantly to the changes of the pH values in soils horizons. The alkalization of soils adjacent to the landfill was found, which manifested in increasing of pH values in the upper soil horizons. The impact of the landfill was also noted in the changes of the soil morphology of Podzols analysed. As a result of the alkalization, Bhs horizons have been converted into a Bs horizons. Leaching of low molecular humus fraction - typical for podzolization - has been minimized as a result of pH changes caused by the impact of the landfill, and originally occurring humic substances in the Bhs horizon (present in the control profiles) have been probably transported out of the soil profile and then into the groundwater.

  12. Initial water repellency affected organic matter depletion rates of manure amended soils in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leelamanie D.A.L.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The wetting rate of soil is a measure of water repellency, which is a property of soils that prevents water from wetting or penetrating into dry soil. The objective of the present research was to examine the initial water repellency of organic manure amended soil, and its relation to the soil organic matter (SOM depletion rates in the laboratory. Soil collected from the Wilpita natural forest, Sri Lanka, was mixed with organic manure to prepare soil samples with 0, 5, 10, 25, and 50% organic manure contents. Locally available cattle manure (CM, goat manure (GM, and Casuarina equisetifolia leaves (CE were used as the organic manure amendments. Organic matter content of soils was measured in 1, 3, 7, 14, and 30 days intervals under the laboratory conditions with 74±5% relative humidity at 28±1°C. Initial water repellency of soil samples was measured as the wetting rates using the water drop penetration time (WDPT test. Initial water repellency increased with increasing SOM content showing higher increasing rate for hydrophobic CE amended samples compared with those amended with CM and GM. The relation between water repellency and SOM content was considered to be governed by the original hydrophobicities of added manures. The SOM contents of all the soil samples decreased with the time to reach almost steady level at about 30 d. The initial SOM depletion rates were negatively related with the initial water repellency. However, all the CE amended samples initially showed prominent low SOM depletion rates, which were not significantly differed with the amended manure content or the difference in initial water repellency. It is explicable that the original hydrophobicity of the manure as well has a potentially important effect on initiation of SOM decomposition. In contrast, the overall SOM depletion rate can be attributed to the initial water repellency of the manure amended sample, however, not to the original hydrophobicity of the amended manure

  13. Soil moisture variations affect short-term plant-microbial competition for ammonium, glycine, and glutamate

    OpenAIRE

    Månsson, Katarina F; Olsson, Magnus O; Falkengren-Grerup, Ursula; Bengtsson, Göran

    2014-01-01

    We tested whether the presence of plant roots would impair the uptake of ammonium ( ), glycine, and glutamate by microorganisms in a deciduous forest soil exposed to constant or variable moisture in a short-term (24-h) experiment. The uptake of 15NH4 and dual labeled amino acids by the grass Festuca gigantea L. and soil microorganisms was determined in planted and unplanted soils maintained at 60% WHC (water holding capacity) or subject to drying and rewetting. The experiment used a design by...

  14. Changes in canopy structure and ant assemblages affect soil ecosystem variables as a foundation species declines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendrick, Joseph A.; Ribbons, Relena Rose; Classen, Aimee Taylor;

    2015-01-01

    in ant species composition would interact to alter soil ecosystem variables. In the Harvard Forest Hemlock Removal Experiment (HF-HeRE), established in 2003, T. canadensis in large plots were killed in place or logged and removed to mimic adelgid infestation or salvage harvesting, respectively. In 2006...... (richness and abundance) of ants increases rapidly as T. canadensis is lost from the stands. Because ants live and forage at the litter-soil interface, we hypothesized that environmental changes caused by hemlock loss (e.g., increased light and warmth at the forest floor, increased soil pH) and shifts...

  15. Macrobenthic fauna community in the Middle Songkhla Lake, Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angsupanich, S.

    2005-02-01

    richness was in the SW monsoon season (light rain, June-August. Polychaetes and molluscs tended to decrease in the NE monsoon season with heavy rain from December-February, while crustaceans increased during this time. The best fitting of the environmental variables to explain the macrobenthic fauna community pattern of the Inner Songkhla Lake was an 8-variable combination of %clay, %silt, %organic carbon, soil pH, depth, dissolved oxygen, total suspended solid and temperature (harmonic rank correlation coefficient, ρw = 0.84.

  16. Dissipation and effects of tricyclazole on soil microbial communities and rice growth as affected by amendment with alperujo compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jaramillo, M; Redondo-Gómez, S; Barcia-Piedras, J M; Aguilar, M; Jurado, V; Hermosín, M C; Cox, L

    2016-04-15

    The presence of pesticides in surface and groundwater has grown considerably in the last decades as a consequence of the intensive farming activity. Several studies have shown the benefits of using organic amendments to prevent losses of pesticides from runoff or leaching. A particular soil from the Guadalquivir valley was placed in open air ponds and amended at 1 or 2% (w/w) with alperujo compost (AC), a byproduct from the olive oil industry. Tricyclazole dissipation, rice growth and microbial diversity were monitored along an entire rice growing season. An increase in the net photosynthetic rate of Oryza sativa plants grown in the ponds with AC was observed. These plants produced between 1100 and 1300kgha(-1) more rice than plants from the unamended ponds. No significant differences were observed in tricyclazole dissipation, monitored for a month in soil, surface and drainage water, between the amended and unamended ponds. The structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities were also studied by the use of the polymerase chain reaction denaturing gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) from DNA extracted directly from soil samples. The banding pattern was similar for all treatments, although the density of bands varied throughout the time. Apparently, tricyclazole did not affect the structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities, and this was attributed to its low bioavailability. Rice cultivation under paddy field conditions may be more efficient under the effects of this compost, due to its positive effects on soil properties, rice yield, and soil microbial diversity.

  17. Spatial pattern formation of microbes at the soil microscale affect soil C and N turnover in an individual-based microbial community model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christina; Evans, Sarah; Dieckmann, Ulf; Widder, Stefanie

    2016-04-01

    At the μm-scale, soil is a highly structured and complex environment, both in physical as well as in biological terms, characterized by non-linear interactions between microbes, substrates and minerals. As known from mathematics and theoretical ecology, spatial structure significantly affects the system's behaviour by enabling synergistic dynamics, facilitating diversity, and leading to emergent phenomena such as self-organisation and self-regulation. Such phenomena, however, are rarely considered when investigating mechanisms of microbial soil organic matter turnover. Soil organic matter is the largest terrestrial reservoir for organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) and plays a pivotal role in global biogeochemical cycles. Still, the underlying mechanisms of microbial soil organic matter buildup and turnover remain elusive. We explored mechanisms of microbial soil organic matter turnover using an individual-based, stoichiometrically and spatially explicit computer model, which simulates the microbial de-composer system at the soil microscale (i.e. on a grid of 100 x 100 soil microsites). Soil organic matter dynamics in our model emerge as the result of interactions among individual microbes with certain functional traits (f.e. enzyme production rates, growth rates, cell stoichiometry) at the microscale. By degrading complex substrates, and releasing labile substances microbes in our model continusly shape their environment, which in turn feeds back to spatiotemporal dynamics of the microbial community. In order to test the effect of microbial functional traits and organic matter input rate on soil organic matter turnover and C and N storage, we ran the model into steady state using continuous inputs of fresh organic material. Surprisingly, certain parameter settings that induce resource limitation of microbes lead to regular spatial pattern formation (f.e. moving spiral waves) of microbes and substrate at the μm-scale at steady-state. The occurrence of these

  18. Soil remediation in the areas affected by space-rocket industry activities in the Central Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study has been carried out to demonstrate that the modified carbon-mineral sorbents based on the schungite material can be effectively used for decontamination of soil polluted by liquid rocket fuel components and its decomposition products.

  19. Transport and reaction processes affecting the attenuation of landfill gas in cover soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Scheutz, Charlotte;

    2008-01-01

    of methane, chlorofluorocarbons, and hydrochlorofluorocarbons to the atmosphere. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of oxidation reactions on the overall gas transport regime and to evaluate, the contributions of various gas transport processes on methane attenuation in landfill cover soils...... to the atmosphere. Oxygen supply into the soil column is driven exclusively by diffusion, whereas advection outward offsets part of the diffusive contribution. In the reaction zone, methane consumption reduces the pressure gradient, further decreasing the significance of advection near the top of the column......Methane and trace organic gases produced in landfill waste are partly oxidized in the top 40 cm of landfill cover soils under aerobic conditions. The balance between the oxidation of landfill gases and the ingress of atmospheric oxygen into the soil cover determines the attenuation of emissions...

  20. 'Fingerprints' of four crop models as affected by soil input data aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angulo, Carlos; Gaiser, Thomas; Rötter, Reimund P;

    2014-01-01

    The spatial variability of soil properties is an important driver of yield variability at both field and regional scale. Thus, when using crop growth simulation models, the choice of spatial resolution of soil input data might be key in order to accurately reproduce observed yield variability......-morphologically) contrasting regions of the federal state of North-Rhine-Westphalia (Germany) for the period from 1995 to 2008. Three spatial resolutions of soil input data were taken into consideration, corresponding to the following map scales: 1:50 000, 1:300 000 and 1:1 000 000. The four crop models were run for water......-limited production conditions and model results were evaluated in the form of frequency distributions, depicted by bean-plots. In both regions, soil data aggregation had very small influence on the shape and range of frequency distributions of simulated yield and simulated total growing season evapotranspiration...

  1. Changes in canopy structure and ant assemblages affect soil ecosystem variables as a foundation species declines:Ecosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Kendrick, Joseph A.; Ribbons, Relena Rose; Classen, Aimee Taylor; Ellison, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    The decline of Tsuga canadensis (eastern hemlock)?a foundation tree species?due to infestation by Adelges tsugae (hemlock woolly adelgid) or its complete removal from a stand by salvage logging dramatically affects associated faunal assemblages. Among these assemblages, species composition (richness and abundance) of ants increases rapidly as T. canadensis is lost from the stands. Because ants live and forage at the litter-soil interface, we hypothesized that environmental changes caused by h...

  2. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy reveals a convergence of the chemical composition in methanogenic archaea from a Siberian permafrost-affected soil

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano, P; Hermelink, A.; Lasch, P.; de Vera, J.-P.; König, N.; Burckhardt, O.; Wagner, D.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea are widespread anaerobic microorganisms responsible for the 25 production of biogenic methane. Several new species of psychrotolerant methanogenic archaea were recently isolated from a permafrost-affected soil in the Lena delta (Siberia, Russia), showing an exceptional resistance against desiccation, osmotic stress, low temperatures, starvation, UV and ionizing radiation when compared to methanogens from non-permafrost environments. To gain a deeper insight into the diffe...

  3. Microbial Functional Diversity, Biomass and Activity as Affected by Soil Surface Mulching in a Semiarid Farmland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yufang; Chen, Yingying; Li, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Mulching is widely used to increase crop yield in semiarid regions in northwestern China, but little is known about the effect of different mulching systems on the microbial properties of the soil, which play an important role in agroecosystemic functioning and nutrient cycling. Based on a 4-year spring maize (Zea mays L.) field experiment at Changwu Agricultural and Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, we evaluated the responses of soil microbial activity and crop to various management systems. The treatments were NMC (no mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), GMC (gravel mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), FMC (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer) and FMO (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and organic manure addition). The results showed that the FMO soil had the highest contents of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, dehydrogenase activity, microbial activity and Shannon diversity index. The relative use of carbohydrates and amino acids by microbes was highest in the FMO soil, whereas the relative use of polymers, phenolic compounds and amines was highest in the soil in the NMC soil. Compared with the NMC, an increased but no significant trend of biomass production and nitrogen accumulation was observed under the GMC treatment. The FMC and FMO led a greater increase in biomass production than GMC and NMC. Compare with the NMC treatment, FMC increased grain yield, maize biomass and nitrogen accumulation by 62.2, 62.9 and 86.2%, but no significant difference was found between the FMO and FMC treatments. Some soil biological properties, i.e. microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, being sensitive to the mulching and organic fertilizer, were significant correlated with yield and nitrogen availability. Film mulching over gravel mulching can serve as an effective measure for crop production and nutrient cycling, and plus organic fertilization additions may thus have improvements in the biological quality of the

  4. Microbial Functional Diversity, Biomass and Activity as Affected by Soil Surface Mulching in a Semiarid Farmland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yufang; Chen, Yingying; Li, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Mulching is widely used to increase crop yield in semiarid regions in northwestern China, but little is known about the effect of different mulching systems on the microbial properties of the soil, which play an important role in agroecosystemic functioning and nutrient cycling. Based on a 4-year spring maize (Zea mays L.) field experiment at Changwu Agricultural and Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, we evaluated the responses of soil microbial activity and crop to various management systems. The treatments were NMC (no mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), GMC (gravel mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), FMC (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer) and FMO (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and organic manure addition). The results showed that the FMO soil had the highest contents of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, dehydrogenase activity, microbial activity and Shannon diversity index. The relative use of carbohydrates and amino acids by microbes was highest in the FMO soil, whereas the relative use of polymers, phenolic compounds and amines was highest in the soil in the NMC soil. Compared with the NMC, an increased but no significant trend of biomass production and nitrogen accumulation was observed under the GMC treatment. The FMC and FMO led a greater increase in biomass production than GMC and NMC. Compare with the NMC treatment, FMC increased grain yield, maize biomass and nitrogen accumulation by 62.2, 62.9 and 86.2%, but no significant difference was found between the FMO and FMC treatments. Some soil biological properties, i.e. microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, being sensitive to the mulching and organic fertilizer, were significant correlated with yield and nitrogen availability. Film mulching over gravel mulching can serve as an effective measure for crop production and nutrient cycling, and plus organic fertilization additions may thus have improvements in the biological quality of the

  5. Microbial Functional Diversity, Biomass and Activity as Affected by Soil Surface Mulching in a Semiarid Farmland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufang Shen

    Full Text Available Mulching is widely used to increase crop yield in semiarid regions in northwestern China, but little is known about the effect of different mulching systems on the microbial properties of the soil, which play an important role in agroecosystemic functioning and nutrient cycling. Based on a 4-year spring maize (Zea mays L. field experiment at Changwu Agricultural and Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, we evaluated the responses of soil microbial activity and crop to various management systems. The treatments were NMC (no mulching with inorganic N fertilizer, GMC (gravel mulching with inorganic N fertilizer, FMC (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and FMO (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and organic manure addition. The results showed that the FMO soil had the highest contents of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, dehydrogenase activity, microbial activity and Shannon diversity index. The relative use of carbohydrates and amino acids by microbes was highest in the FMO soil, whereas the relative use of polymers, phenolic compounds and amines was highest in the soil in the NMC soil. Compared with the NMC, an increased but no significant trend of biomass production and nitrogen accumulation was observed under the GMC treatment. The FMC and FMO led a greater increase in biomass production than GMC and NMC. Compare with the NMC treatment, FMC increased grain yield, maize biomass and nitrogen accumulation by 62.2, 62.9 and 86.2%, but no significant difference was found between the FMO and FMC treatments. Some soil biological properties, i.e. microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, being sensitive to the mulching and organic fertilizer, were significant correlated with yield and nitrogen availability. Film mulching over gravel mulching can serve as an effective measure for crop production and nutrient cycling, and plus organic fertilization additions may thus have improvements in the biological

  6. Land-use systems affect Archaeal community structure and functional diversity in western Amazon soils

    OpenAIRE

    Acácio Aparecido Navarrete; Rodrigo Gouvêa Taketani; Lucas William Mendes; Fabiana de Souza Cannavan; Fatima Maria de Souza Moreira; Siu Mui Tsai

    2011-01-01

    The study of the ecology of soil microbial communities at relevant spatial scales is primordial in the wide Amazon region due to the current land use changes. In this study, the diversity of the Archaea domain (community structure) and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (richness and community composition) were investigated using molecular biology-based techniques in different land-use systems in western Amazonia, Brazil. Soil samples were collected in two periods with high precipitation (March 2008 a...

  7. Biofumigation using a wild Brassica oleracea accession with high glucosinolate content affects beneficial soil

    OpenAIRE

    Zuluaga, D.L.; Ommen Kloeke van, A.E.E.; Verkerk, R.; Röling, W.F.M.; Ellers, J.; Roelofs, D.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims This study explores the biofumigation effects of glucosinolate (GSL) containing Brassica oleracea plant material on beneficial, non-target soil organisms, and aims to relate those effects to differences in GSL profiles. Methods Leaf material of purple sprouting broccoli ‘Santee’, Savoy cabbage ‘Wintessa’, and the wild B. oleracea accession Winspit was analysed for GSL production and used for biofumigation experiments on the beneficial soil invertebrates, Folsomia candida (springtail) and...

  8. Assessment of heavy metals pollution in sulphide mine affected-soils of madrid, central spain

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, M.; Recio Vázquez, Lorena; Carral, Pilar; Álvarez, Ana María

    2011-01-01

    The uncontrolled extraction of mineral resources is considered one of the major anthropogenic sources of soil pollution. In Spain, exploitation of metallic mineral deposits and its subsequent abandonment in last decades has lead to significant environmental hazard for natural systems. In this research, potentially contaminated soils surrounding an old chalcopyrite mine district in Madrid (Central Spain) have been studied. The focus is to assess the degree of pollution by heavy metals and othe...

  9. Metal Concentrations in Soil Paste Extracts as Affected by Extraction Ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Filip M.G. Tack; Nic Dezillie; Verloo, Marc G.

    2002-01-01

    Saturated paste extracts are sometimes used to estimate metal levels in the soil solution. To assess the significance of heavy-metal concentrations measured in saturation extracts, soil paste extracts were prepared with distilled water in amounts ranging from 60–200% of the moisture content at saturation. Trace metals behaved as if a small pool consistently was dissolved independent of the extraction ratio applied. Metal concentrations in the solution hence were not buffered by the solid phas...

  10. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles strongly impact soil microbial function by affecting archaeal nitrifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Marie; Richaume, Agnès; Guyonnet, Julien P.; Dubost, Audrey; Martins, Jean M. F.; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soils are facing new environmental stressors, such as titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs). While these emerging pollutants are increasingly released into most ecosystems, including agricultural fields, their potential impacts on soil and its function remain to be investigated. Here we report the response of the microbial community of an agricultural soil exposed over 90 days to TiO2-NPs (1 and 500 mg kg−1 dry soil). To assess their impact on soil function, we focused on the nitrogen cycle and measured nitrification and denitrification enzymatic activities and by quantifying specific representative genes (amoA for ammonia-oxidizers, nirK and nirS for denitrifiers). Additionally, diversity shifts were examined in bacteria, archaea, and the ammonia-oxidizing clades of each domain. With strong negative impacts on nitrification enzyme activities and the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing microorganism, TiO2-NPs triggered cascading negative effects on denitrification enzyme activity and a deep modification of the bacterial community structure after just 90 days of exposure to even the lowest, realistic concentration of NPs. These results appeal further research to assess how these emerging pollutants modify the soil health and broader ecosystem function. PMID:27659196

  11. Can cyanobacterial biomass applied to soil affect survival and reproduction of springtail Folsomia candida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lána, Jan; Hofman, Jakub; Bláha, Luděk

    2011-05-01

    Biomass of cyanobacterial water blooms including cyanobacterial toxins may enter soils, for example, when harvested water bloom is directly applied as an organic fertilizer or when water with massive cyanobacterial biomass is used for irrigation. In spite of this, no information is available about the potential effects on soil arthropods. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of water bloom biomass sampled in five different fresh water lakes on the soil dwelling arthropod, springtail Folsomia candida (Collembola). These samples contained different dominant species of cyanobacteria and varied significantly in microcystin content (21-3662 μg/g dw biomass). No adverse effects on survival or reproduction were observed for any tested sample at concentration up to 4 g dw biomass/kg dw soil. Despite the known hazardous properties of water blooms in aquatic ecosystems, our pilot results suggest that cyanobacterial biomass might have no significant impact on arthropods in soil. It remains a question, if this is due to low bioavailability of cyanobacterial toxins in soil. PMID:21176962

  12. Chemical Behavior of Cadmium in Purple Soil as Affected by Surfactants and EDTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Cheng; XIONG Zhi-Ting; DONG Shan-Yan

    2006-01-01

    A soil batch experiment was conducted to investigate both separate and compound effects of three types of surfactants:anionic dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid sodiumsalt (DBSS), cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic nonyl phenol polyethyleneoxy ether (TX-100), as well as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on cadmium solubility, sorption kinetics, and sorption-desorption behavior in purple soil. The results indicated that both individual application of the three types of surfactants and surfactants combined with EDTA could stimulate Cd extraction from the soil with a general effectiveness ranking of EDTA/TX-100 > EDTA/DBSS > EDTA/CTAB > EDTA > TX-100 >DBSS > CTAB. Further study showed that the compound application of surfactants and EDTA had stronger (P < 0.05)effects on Cd solubility than those added individually. The application of surfactants and EDTA to purple soil (P < 0.05)decreased the proportion of Cd sorbed, while their effectiveness ranking was similar to that of enhanced solubilization. The sorption kinetics of Cd in purple soil was best described by the double-constant equation, while the Freundlich equation gave an excellent fit to the sorption isotherm curves. Therefore, surfactant-enhanced remediation of Cd contaminated soil is feasible and further research should be conducted.

  13. Depth distribution of preferential flow patterns in a sandy loam soil as affected by tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Petersen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-tracer studies using the anionic dye Brilliant Blue FCF were conducted on a structured sandy loam soil (Typic Agrudalf. 25 mm of dye solution was applied to the surface of 11 1.6 x 1.6 m field plots, some of which had been subjected to conventional seed bed preparation (harrowing while others had been rotovated to either 5 or 15 cm depth before sowing. The soil was excavated to about 160 cm depth one or two days after dye application. Flow patterns and structural features appearing on vertical or horizontal cross sections were examined and photographed. The flow patterns were digitized, and depth functions for the number of activated flow pathways and the degree of dye coverage were calculated. Dye was found below 100 cm depth on 26 out of 33 vertical cross sections made in conventionally tilled plots showing that preferential flow was a prevailing phenomenon. The depth-averaged number of stained flow pathways in the 25-100 cm layer was significantly smaller in a plot rotovated to 5 cm depth than in a conventionally tilled plot, both under relatively dry initial soil conditions and when the entire soil profiles were initially at field capacity. There were no examples of dye penetration below 25 cm depth one month after deep rotovation. Distinct horizontal structures in flow patterns appearing at 20-40 cm depth coupled with changes in flow domains indicated soil layering with abrupt changes in soil structure and hydraulic properties.

  14. Evaluation of a WorldView-2 image for soil salinity monitoring in a moderately affected irrigated area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Divan; van Niekerk, Adriaan

    2016-04-01

    Conventional methods for monitoring salt accumulation within irrigation schemes involve regular field visits to collect soil samples for laboratory analysis. Remote sensing has been proposed as a less time-consuming, more cost-effective alternative as it provides imagery covering large areas throughout the year. This study evaluated the efficacy of very high resolution (VHR) WorldView-2 imagery to map areas affected by salt accumulation. Classifications based on thresholds obtained from Jeffries-Matusita distance, regression modeling, classification and regression trees, as well as supervised classification approaches, were evaluated for discriminating between salt-affected and unaffected soils in Vaalharts, South Africa. The WorldView-2 bands were supplemented with salinity indices (SIs), principal components, and texture measures to increase the number of predictive variables. In situ soil samples were used for model development, classifier training, and accuracy assessment. The results showed that a simple threshold implemented on a normalized difference SI was the most successful in separating classes, with an overall accuracy of 80%. The findings suggest that VHR satellite imagery holds much potential for monitoring salt accumulation, but more research is needed to investigate why the classification results tend to overestimate salt-affected areas. More work is also needed to evaluate the transferability of the techniques to other irrigation schemes.

  15. Dynamics of aggregate stability and soil organic C distribution as affected by climatic aggressiveness: a mesocosm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Sergio; Elio Agnelli, Alessandro; Costanza Andrenelli, Maria; Barbetti, Roberto; Castelli, Fabio; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Pasqui, Massimiliano; Tomozeiu, Rodica; Razzaghi, Somayyeh; Vignozzi, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    changed at the end of the trial, depending of soil types. In CAS and MED a decrease of C content was observed in fractions larger than 0.250 mm, while an accumulation occurred only in CAS microaggregates. BOV showed a singular pattern, with an increase of organic C in all fractions. In this site an improvement of aggregation, involving the coarser fractions, seems to have been favoured during the experiment. Overall, the imposed climate did not affect significantly these trends, except in CAS, where TYP and SIM climates showed an increase of macroaggregates and their C concentration. Soil pedoclimatic characteristics showed to be the main factors affecting C and aggregates dynamics in this mesocosm experiment.

  16. Distribution of organic carbon in physical fractions of soils as affected by agricultural management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindhu, Jagadamma [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University, The, Columbus

    2010-08-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is distributed heterogeneously among different-sized primary particles and aggregates. Further, the SOC associated with different physical fractions respond differently to managements. Therefore, this study was conducted with the objective to quantify the SOC associated with all the three structural levels of SOC (particulate organic matter, soil separates and aggregate-size fractions) as influenced by long-term change in management. The study also aims at reevaluating the concept that the SOC sink capacity of individual size-fractions is limited. Long-term tillage and crop rotation effects on distribution of SOC among fractions were compared with soil from adjacent undisturbed area under native vegetation for the mixed, mesic, Typic Fragiudalf of Wooster, OH. Forty five years of no-till (NT) management resulted in more SOC accumulation in soil surface (0 7.5 cm) than in chisel tillage and plow tillage (PT) treatments. However, PT at this site resulted in a redistribution of SOC from surface to deeper soil layers. The soils under continuous corn accumulated significantly more SOC than those under corn soybean rotation at 7.5 45 cm depth. Although soil texture was dominated by the silt-sized particles, most of the SOC pool was associated with the clay fraction. Compared to PT, the NT treatment resulted in (i) significantly higher proportion of large macroaggregates (>2,000 m) and (ii) 1.5 2.8 times higher SOC concentrations in all aggregate-size classes. A comparative evaluation using radar graphs indicated that among the physical fractions, the SOC associated with sand and silt fractions quickly changed with a land use conversion from native vegetation to agricultural crops. A key finding of this study is the assessment of SOC sink capacity of individual fractions, which revealed that the clay fraction of agricultural soils continues to accumulate more SOC, albeit at a slower rate, with progressive increase in total SOC concentration

  17. Environmental Factors Affecting Chromium-Manganese Oxidation-Reduction Reactions in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.O.P.TREBIEN; L.BORTOLON; M.J.TEDESCO; C.A.BISSANI; F.A.O.CAMARGO

    2011-01-01

    Disposal of chromium (Cr) hexavalent form, Cr(Ⅵ), in soils as additions in organic fertilizers, liming materials or plant nutrient sources can be dangerous since Cr(Ⅵ) can be highly toxic to plants, animals, and humans. In order to explore soil conditions that lead to Cr(Ⅵ) generation, this study were performed using a Paleudult (Dystic Nitosol) from a region that has a high concentration of tannery operations in the Rio Grande do Sul State, southern Brazil. Three laboratory incubation experiments were carried out to examine the influences of soil moisture content and concentration of cobalt and organic matter additions on soil Cr(Ⅵ) formation and release and manganese (Mn) oxide reduction with a salt of chromium chloride (CrCl3) and tannery sludge as inorganic and organic sources of Cr(Ⅲ), respectively. The amount of Cr(Ⅲ) oxidation depended on the concentration of easily reducible Mn oxides and the oxidation was more intense at the soil water contents in which Mn(Ⅲ/Ⅳ) oxides were more stable. Soluble organic compounds in soil decreased Cr(Ⅵ) formation due to Cr(Ⅲ) complexation. This mechanism also resulted in the decrease in the oxidation of Cr(Ⅲ) due to the tannery sludge additions. Chromium(Ⅲ) oxidation to Cr(Ⅵ) at the solid/solution interface involved the following mechanisms:the formation of a precursor complex on manganese (Mn) oxide surfaces, followed by electron transfer from Cr(Ⅲ) to Mn(Ⅲ or Ⅳ),the formation of a successor complex with Mn(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅵ), and the breakdown of the successor complex and release of Mn(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅵ) into the soil solution.

  18. Plant species diversity affects soil-atmosphere fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklaus, Pascal A; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck; Buchmann, Nina; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Weigelt, Alexandra; Barnard, Romain L

    2016-07-01

    Plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning can potentially interact with global climate by altering fluxes of the radiatively active trace gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). We studied the effects of grassland species richness (1-16) in combination with application of fertilizer (nitrogen:phosphorus:potassium = 100:43.6:83 kg ha(-1) a(-1)) on N2O and CH4 fluxes in a long-term field experiment. Soil N2O emissions, measured over 2 years using static chambers, decreased with species richness unless fertilizer was added. N2O emissions increased with fertilization and the fraction of legumes in plant communities. Soil CH4 uptake, a process driven by methanotrophic bacteria, decreased with plant species numbers, irrespective of fertilization. Using structural equation models, we related trace gas fluxes to soil moisture, soil inorganic N concentrations, nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activity, and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers, nitrite oxidizers, and denitrifiers (quantified by real-time PCR of gene fragments amplified from microbial DNA in soil). These analyses indicated that plant species richness increased soil moisture, which in turn increased N cycling-related activities. Enhanced N cycling increased N2O emission and soil CH4 uptake, with the latter possibly caused by removal of inhibitory ammonium by nitrification. The moisture-related indirect effects were surpassed by direct, moisture-independent effects opposite in direction. Microbial gene abundances responded positively to fertilizer but not to plant species richness. The response patterns we found were statistically robust and highlight the potential of plant biodiversity to interact with climatic change through mechanisms unrelated to carbon storage and associated carbon dioxide removal. PMID:27038993

  19. Wheat productivity in sandy soil as affected by plant residues, irrigation and nitrogen rates using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing population in Egypt is becoming a major problem for agricultural production. The Egyptian Government must manage to increase the land productivity quickly and at low coasts. The best way to increase land productivity is the addition of organic matter to the sandy soils, to reduce the losses of water and fertilizers. The use of organic matter is considered as a good tool for maximizing soil fertility. Most of the farmers are interested with the effective use of crop residues and other recycled organic materials. The role of plant residues in modern agricultural systems has become a topic of major interest for the scientific research and agricultural authorities through improving water use efficiency. It could be concluded that the main and most effective factor affecting soil fertility, especially in sandy soils, is the organic matter content. So the main objective of the present work is to study the impact of the application of crop residues, as a source of organic matter, to sandy soils, with different nitrogen and water levels, for maximizing the input use efficiency and as well the output of wheat yield. Two field experiments were conducted at the Experimental Farm of Inshas, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority through 1997/1998 and 1998/1999 growing seasons. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) c.v. Sakha-69 was cultivated on a sandy soil to investigate: 1- the effect of different plant residues, i.e., corn ash and casourina leaves applied to sandy soils, at the rate of 10 t Fed-1, in a circle lines, 30 cm depth and 60 cm apart around the irrigation system (sprinkler); 2- two different irrigation levels namely, irrigation after 50 and 70% loss of the soil water holding capacity (SWHC) and with irrigation based on moisture depletion as measured by the Neutron Moisture Gauge; 3- two nitrogen rates as ammonium sulphate, i.e., 60 and 120 kg N /Fed, as well as the control. Nitrogen was applied in five equal splitting doses, starting 15 days after

  20. Tomato yield and potassium concentrations in soil and in plant petioles as affected by potassium fertirrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FONTES PAULO CEZAR REZENDE

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Santa Clara was grown on a silt clay soil with 46 mg dm-3 Mehlich 1 extractable K, to evaluate the effects of trickle-applied K rates on fruit yield and to establish K critical concentrations in soil and in plant petioles. Six potassium rates (0, 48, 119, 189, 259 and 400 kg ha-1 K were applied in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Soil and plant K critical levels were determined at two plant growth stages (at the beginning of the second and fourth cluster flowering. Total, marketable and weighted yields increased with K rates, reaching their maximum of 86.4, 73.4, and 54.9 ton ha-1 at 198, 194, and 125 kg ha-1 K , respectively. At the first soil sampling date K critical concentrations in the soil associated with K rates for maximum marketable and weighted yields were 92 and 68 mg dm-3, respectively. Potassium critical concentrations in the dry matter of the petioles sampled by the beginning of the second and fourth cluster flowering time, associated with maximum weighted yield, were 10.30 and 7.30 dag kg-1, respectively.

  1. Ozone exposure of field-grown winter wheat affects soil mesofauna in the rhizosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2-year open-top chamber experiment with field-grown winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Astron) was conducted to examine the effects of ozone on plant growth and selected groups of soil mesofauna in the rhizosphere. From May through June in each year, plants were exposed to two levels of O3: non-filtered (NF) ambient air or NF+ 40 ppb O3 (NF+). During O3 exposure, soil sampling was performed at two dates according to different plant growth stages. O3 exposure reduced above- and below-ground plant biomass in the first year, but had little effect in the second year. The individual density of enchytraeids, collembolans and soil mites decreased significantly in the rhizosphere of plants exposed to NF+ in both years. Differences were highest around anthesis, i.e. when plants are physiologically most active. The results suggest that elevated O3 concentrations may influence the dynamic of decomposition processes and the turnover of nutrients. - Ozone reduced the individual densities of enchytraeids, collembolans and soil mites in the rhizosphere of winter wheat indirectly via the plant-soil-system.

  2. Dissolution of Aluminum in Variably Charged Soils as Affected by Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiu-Yu; XU Ren-Kou; JI Guo-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids exist widely in soils and play an important role in soil processes such as mineral weathering, nutrient mobilization and Al detoxification. In this research, a batch experiment was conducted to examine the effects of LMW organic acids on dissolution of aluminum in two variably charged soils, an Ultisol and an Oxisol. The results showed that the LMW organic acids enhanced the dissolution of Al in the two investigated soils in the following order: citric > oxalic > malonic > malic > tartaric > salicylic > lactic > maleic. This was generally in agreement with the magnitude of the stability constants for the Al-organic complexes. The effects of LMW organic acids on Al dissolution were greater in the Ultisol than in the Oxisol as compared to their controls. Also, the accelerating effects of citric and oxalic acids on dissolution of Al increased with an increase in pH, while the effects of lactic and salicylic acids decreased. Additionally, when the organic acid concentration was less than 0.2 mmol L-1, the dissolution of Al changed little with increase in acid concentration. However, when the organic acid concentration was greater than 0.2 mmol L-1,the dissolution of Al increased with increase in acid concentration. In addition to the acid first dissociation constant and stability constant of Al-organic complexes, the promoting effects of LMW organic acids on dissolution of Al were also related to their sorption-desorption equilibrium in the soils.

  3. Soluble organic carbon and pH of organic amendments affect metal mobility and chemical speciation in mine soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Masaguer, Alberto; Vargas, Carmen; Moliner, Ana

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of pH and soluble organic carbon affected by organic amendments on metal mobility to find out the optimal conditions for their application in the stabilization of metals in mine soils. Soil samples (pH 5.5-6.2) were mixed with 0, 30 and 60 th a(-1) of sheep-horse manure (pH 9.4) and pine bark compost (pH 5.7). A single-step extraction procedure was performed using 0.005 M CaCl2 adjusted to pH 4.0-7.0 and metal speciation in soil solution was simulated using NICA-Donnan model. Sheep-horse manure reduced exchangeable metal concentrations (up to 71% Cu, 75% Zn) due to its high pH and degree of maturity, whereas pine bark increased them (32% Cu, 33% Zn). However, at increasing dose and hence pH, sheep-horse manure increased soluble Cu because of higher soluble organic carbon, whereas soluble Cu and organic carbon increased at increasing dose and correspondingly decreasing pH in pine bark and non-amended treatments. Near the native pH of these soils (at pH 5.8-6.3), with small doses of amendments, there was minimum soluble Cu and organic carbon. Pine bark also increased Zn solubility, whereas sheep-horse manure reduced it as soluble Zn always decreased with increasing pH. Sheep-horse manure also reduced the proportion of free metals in soil solution (from 41% to 4% Cu, from 97% to 94% Zn), which are considered to be more bioavailable than organic species. Sheep-horse manure amendment could be efficiently used for the stabilization of metals with low risk of leaching to groundwater at low doses and at relatively low pH, such as the native pH of mine soils.

  4. Soil organic matter composition along a slope in an erosion-affected arable landscape in North East Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Ruth, H.; Gerke, Horst, H.; Deumlich, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    In hummocky landscapes, soil erosion is forming truncated profiles at steep slope positions and colluvial soils in topographic depressions thereby affecting soil organic carbon (SOC) storage. However, the knowledge on the spatial distribution and composition of differently stable organic matter (OM) fractions in arable landscapes is still limited. Here, amount and composition of OM from top- and subsoil horizons at eroded, colluvic, and non -eroded slope positions were compared. The horizons were from a Luvisol at plateau (LV), an eroded Luvisol (eLV) at mid slope (6%slope gradient), a calcaric Regosol (caRG) at steep slope (13%), and a colluvic Regosol (coRG) at hollow position. Water soluble (OM-W) and pyrophosphate soluble (OM-PY) fractions were extracted sequentially. Soil samples, OM fractions, and extraction residues were analyzed with transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The soluble fractions were 3% of SOC for OM-W and 15% of SOC for OM-PY. For topsoil samples, extract ion rates were independent of slope position. The highest intensities of both, C-H (alkyl groups) and C=O (carboxyl groups) absorption band, were found in FTIR spectra of OM-PY from top and subsoil horizons at the steep slope position (caRG). The C-H/C=O ratio in OM-PY decreased with increasing contents of oxalate soluble Fe and Al oxides from steep slope (0.25 for caRG-Ap) towards plateau, and hollow position (0.09 for coRG-Ap) except for the Bt -horizons. This relation is reflecting that the down slope-deposited Ap material, which is higher in poorly crystalline Fe an d Al oxides, consists of relatively stable OM. This OM is enriched in C=O groups that are known for their interaction with soil minerals. These OM-mineral interactions may help explaining C storage in arable soil landscapes.

  5. Nutrient omission in Bt cotton affects soil organic carbon and nutrients status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladakatti, Y. R.; Biradar, D. P.; Satyanarayana, T.; Majumdar, K.; Shivamurthy, D.

    2012-04-01

    Studies carried out at the University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India, in medium black soils assessed the effect of nutrient omission in Bt cotton and its effect on the soil organic carbon (SOC) and available nutrients at the end of second consecutive year of nutrient omission. The study also assessed the extent of contribution of the macro and micronutrients towards seed cotton yield. The experiment consisting 11 treatments omitting a nutrient in each treatment including an absolute control without any nutrients was conducted in a Randomised Block Design with three replications. Cotton crop sufficiently fertilized with macro and micro nutrients (165 : 75 : 120 NPK kg ha-1 and 20 kg each of CaSO4, and MgSO4, 10 kg of S, 20 kg each of ZnSO4, FeSO4 and 0.1 per cent Boron twice as foliar spray) was taken as a standard check to assess the contribution of each nutrient in various nutrient omission treatments. Soils of each treatment were analysed initially and after each crop of cotton for SOC and available nutrient status. Results indicated that the SOC decreased after each crop of cotton in absolute control where no nutrients were applied (0.50 % to 0.38 %) and also in the N omission treatment (0.50 % to 0.35 %). But there was no significant impact of omission of P, K and other nutrients on soil organic carbon. Soil available N, P and K in the soil were reduced as compared to the initial soil status after first and second crop of cotton in the respective treatment where these nutrients were omitted. The soil available N, P and K were reduced to the extent of 61 kg ha-1, 7.1 kg ha-1 and 161.9 kg ha-1 in the respective nutrient omission treatment at end of second crop of cotton as compared to the initial status of these nutrients in the soil. This might be due to the mining of these nutrients from the soil nutrient pool with out addition of these nutrients extraneously. The nutrient status of N, P and K remained almost similar in omission of other nutrients

  6. Yield-loss Models for Tobacco Infected with Meloidogyne incognita as Affected by Soil Moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, T A; Barker, K R; Schneider, S M

    1991-10-01

    Yield-loss models were developed for tobacco infected with Meloidogyne incognita grown in microplots under various irrigation regimes. The rate of relative yield loss per initial nematode density (Pi), where relative yield is a proportion of the value of the harvested leaves in uninfected plants with the same irrigation treatment, was greater under conditions of water stress or with high irrigation than at an intermediate level of soil moisture. The maximum rate of plant growth per degree-day (base 10 C) was reduced as nematode Pi increased when plots contained adequate water. When plants were under water stress, increasing Pi did not luther reduce the maximum rate of plant growth (water stress was the limiting factor). Cumulative soil matric potential values were calculated to describe the relationship between available water in the soil (matric potential) due to the irrigation treatments and subsequent plant growth. PMID:19283140

  7. Analysis of bioavailable Ge in agricultural and mining-affected-soils in Freiberg area (Saxony, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Kummer, Nicolai-Alexeji; Heinemann, Ute; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    Germanium (Ge) concentrations in different soil fraction were investigated using a sequential selective dissolution analysis and a rhizosphere-based single-step extraction method for the identification of Ge-bearing soil fractions and prediction of bioavailability of Ge in soil to plants. About 50 soil samples were collected from various soil depths (horizons A and B) and study sites with different types of land use (dry and moist grassland, arable land, mine dumps) in Freiberg area (Saxony, Germany). Ge has been extracted in six soil fractions: mobile fraction, organic matter and sulfides, Mn- and Fe-oxides (amorphous and crystalline), and kaolinite and phytoliths, and residual fraction. The rhizosphere-based method included a 7-day-long extraction sequence with various organic acids like citric acid, malic acid and acetic acid. For the residue the aforementioned sequential extraction has been applied. The Ge-content of the samples have been measured with ICP-MS using rhodium internal standard and two different soil standards. Total Ge concentrations were found to be in the range of 1.6 to 5.5 ppm with highest concentrations on the tailing site in the mining area of Altenberg. The mean Ge concentration in agriculturally used soils was 2.6 ± 0.67 ppm, whereas the maximum values reach 2.9 ± 0.64 ppm and 3.2 ± 0.67 ppm in Himmelsfürst and in a grassland by the Mulde river, respectively. With respect to the fractions, the vast majority of Ge is contained in the last three fractions, indicating that the bioavailable Ge is typically low in the samples. On the other hand at the soil horizons A at the aforementioned two sites characterised by high total Ge, together with that of Reiche Zeche mine dump have also the highest concentrations of Ge in the first three fractions, reaching levels of 1.74 and 0.98 ppm which account for approximately 40% of the total Ge content. Ge concentrations of soil samples extracted with 0.01 or 0.1 M citric acid and malic acid were

  8. Distributed Modeling of soil erosion and deposition affected by buffer strips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Iversen, Bo Vangsø;

    Soil degradation and environmental impacts due to water erosion are a growing concern globally. Large parts of Denmark are covered by gently rolling moraine landscape with moderately to locally highly erodible soils where water erosion causes off-site problems in the form of eutrophication of water...... and discharge to streams with predictions obtained with the distributed soil erosion and deposition model WaTEM and assess the potential of using such tool to assist with the planning of buffer zones in landscapes....... bodies. Buffer zones can be efficient in terms of retaining sediment and phosphorus transported by water erosion. This study aimed at parameterizing a spatial distributed erosion model to evaluate the effect of different buffer zone properties and dimension. It was our hypothesis that the placement...

  9. Investigating nitrate dynamics in a fine-textured soil affected by feedlot effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veizaga, E. A.; Rodríguez, L.; Ocampo, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    Feedlots concentrate large volumes of manure and effluents that contain high concentrations of nitrate, among other constituents. If not managed properly, pen surfaces run-off and lagoons overflows may spread those effluents to surrounding land, infiltrating into the soil. Soil nitrate mobilization and distribution are of great concern due to its potential migration towards groundwater resources. This work aimed at evaluating the migration of nitrate originated on feedlots effluents in a fine-textured soil under field conditions. Soil water constituents were measured during a three-year period at three distinct locations adjacent to feedlot retention lagoons representing different degrees of exposure to water flow and manure accumulation. A simple statistical analysis was undertaken to identify patterns of observed nitrate and chloride concentrations and electrical conductivity and their differences with depth. HYDRUS-1D was used to simulate water flow and solute transport of Cl-, NO4+sbnd N, NO3-sbnd N and electrical conductivity to complement field data interpretation. Results indicated that patterns of NO3-sbnd N concentrations were not only notoriously different from electrical conductivity and Cl- but also ranges and distribution with depth differed among locations. A combination of dilution, transport, reactions such as nitrification/denitrification and vegetation water and solute uptake took place at each plots denoting the complexity of soil-solution behavior under extreme polluting conditions. Simulations using the concept of single porosity-mobile/immobile water (SP-MIM) managed structural controls and correctly simulated -all species concentrations under field data constrains. The opposite was true for the other two locations experiencing near-saturation conditions, absence of vegetation and frequent manure accumulation and runoff from feedlot lagoons. Although the results are site specific, findings are relevant to advance the understanding of NO3-sbnd

  10. Soil moisture and fungi affect seed survival in California grassland annual plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A Mordecai

    Full Text Available Survival of seeds in the seed bank is important for the population dynamics of many plant species, yet the environmental factors that control seed survival at a landscape level remain poorly understood. These factors may include soil moisture, vegetation cover, soil type, and soil pathogens. Because many soil fungi respond to moisture and host species, fungi may mediate environmental drivers of seed survival. Here, I measure patterns of seed survival in California annual grassland plants across 15 species in three experiments. First, I surveyed seed survival for eight species at 18 grasslands and coastal sage scrub sites ranging across coastal and inland Santa Barbara County, California. Species differed in seed survival, and soil moisture and geographic location had the strongest influence on survival. Grasslands had higher survival than coastal sage scrub sites for some species. Second, I used a fungicide addition and exotic grass thatch removal experiment in the field to tease apart the relative impact of fungi, thatch, and their interaction in an invaded grassland. Seed survival was lower in the winter (wet season than in the summer (dry season, but fungicide improved winter survival. Seed survival varied between species but did not depend on thatch. Third, I manipulated water and fungicide in the laboratory to directly examine the relationship between water, fungi, and survival. Seed survival declined from dry to single watered to continuously watered treatments. Fungicide slightly improved seed survival when seeds were watered once but not continually. Together, these experiments demonstrate an important role of soil moisture, potentially mediated by fungal pathogens, in driving seed survival.

  11. Soil moisture and fungi affect seed survival in California grassland annual plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordecai, Erin A

    2012-01-01

    Survival of seeds in the seed bank is important for the population dynamics of many plant species, yet the environmental factors that control seed survival at a landscape level remain poorly understood. These factors may include soil moisture, vegetation cover, soil type, and soil pathogens. Because many soil fungi respond to moisture and host species, fungi may mediate environmental drivers of seed survival. Here, I measure patterns of seed survival in California annual grassland plants across 15 species in three experiments. First, I surveyed seed survival for eight species at 18 grasslands and coastal sage scrub sites ranging across coastal and inland Santa Barbara County, California. Species differed in seed survival, and soil moisture and geographic location had the strongest influence on survival. Grasslands had higher survival than coastal sage scrub sites for some species. Second, I used a fungicide addition and exotic grass thatch removal experiment in the field to tease apart the relative impact of fungi, thatch, and their interaction in an invaded grassland. Seed survival was lower in the winter (wet season) than in the summer (dry season), but fungicide improved winter survival. Seed survival varied between species but did not depend on thatch. Third, I manipulated water and fungicide in the laboratory to directly examine the relationship between water, fungi, and survival. Seed survival declined from dry to single watered to continuously watered treatments. Fungicide slightly improved seed survival when seeds were watered once but not continually. Together, these experiments demonstrate an important role of soil moisture, potentially mediated by fungal pathogens, in driving seed survival.

  12. Movement of carbon to roots of food legumes as affected by soil moisture and fertilizer potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Food legumes are an important component of agricultural systems in developing countries. They are cultivated in a wide range of environments where soil moisture could be generally considered limiting for optimum growth and yield. In terms of vegetative growth, root systems of plants adapt to extract the limited moisture from dry soils. Although it is known that fertilizer K helps plants mitigate soil moisture stress, this has not been evaluated on a comparative basis in food legumes. Therefore, a study was carried out under controlled conditions to determine the role of K+ in the movement of labelled C in three tropical food legumes that have differing optimal soil-moisture requirements. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), mung bean (Vigna radiata), and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) were grown under two moisture regimes with three levels of K+ (01, 1.0 and 3.0 mM K). Uniform seedlings of the three species were transplanted into pots containing quartz sand, maintained at two soil-moisture levels (High, less than 25% depleted of available soil moisture; Low, more than 50% depleted), by weighing at 3-day intervals and adding the required water or nutrient solution. The modified nutrient solutions had 0.1, 1.0 or 3.0 mM K+ with 1.5 mM N. The plants were kept in a growth chamber, maintained at 25 deg. /18 deg. C day/night, with a 16-h photoperiod, and at 60% humidity. At the V4 growth stage of each species, four plants were selected randomly, and approximately 1 cm2 of the upper surface of the youngest fully expanded leaf abraded with Carborundum. Thereafter, 5 μL of 14C contained in a 5-mM solution of sucrose (148 KBq) was applied to the abraded area. Another 10 μL of unlabelled sucrose was applied to the same area 10 min later and the plants replaced. After 24 h, they were carefully removed, roots washed, dried and weighed. Thereafter, the samples were ground and digested, and labelled C determined by liquid scintillation. Cowpea, the species most adapted to soil

  13. Overland flow generation mechanisms affected by topsoil treatment: Application to soil conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Paloma, Hueso; Juan Francisco, Martinez-Murillo; Damian, Ruiz-Sinoga Jose; Hanoch, Lavee

    2015-04-01

    Hortonian overland-flow is responsible for significant amounts of soil loss in Mediterranean geomorphological systems. Restoring the native vegetation is the most effective way to control runoff and sediment yield. During the seeding and plant establishment, vegetation cover may be better sustained if soil is amended with an external source. Four amendments were applied in an experimental set of plots: straw mulching (SM); mulch with chipped branches of Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis L.) (PM); TerraCotten hydroabsobent polymers (HP); sewage sludge (RU); and control (C). Plots were afforested following the same spatial pattern, and amendments were mixed with the soil at the rate 10 Mg ha-1. This research demonstrates the role played by the treatments in overland flow generation mechanism (runoff, overland flow and soil moisture along the soil profile). The general overland flow characteristics showed that in the C plots the average overland flow was 8.0 ± 22.0 l per event, and the HP plots produced a similar mean value (8.1 ± 20.1 l). The average overland flow per event was significantly less for soil amended with SM, PM or RU (2.7 ± 8.3 l; 1.3 ± 3.5 l and 2.2 ± 5.9 l, respectively). There was a similar trend with respect to the maximum overland flow. The mean sediment yield per event was relatively high in the C and HP plots (8.6 ± 27.8 kg and 14.8 ± 43.4 kg, respectively), while significantly lower values were registered in the SM, PM and RU plots (0.4 ± 1.0 kg; 0.2 ± 0.3 kg and 0.2 ± 0.3 kg, respectively). Very similar trends were found for the maximum sediment yield. Regarding to the soil moisture values, there was a difference in the trends between the C and HP plots and the SM, PM and RU plots. In the C and HP plots the general trend was for a decrease in soil moisture downward through the soil profile, while in the SM, PM and RU plots the soil moisture remained relatively constant or increased, except for the RU treatment in which the soil moisture

  14. Short-term mesofauna responses to soil additions of corn stover biochar and the role of microbial biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Domene, X. (Xavier); Hanley, Kelly; Enders, Akio; Lehmann, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Biochar additions have been suggested to influence soil microbial communities that, through a cascade effect, may also impact soil fauna. In turn, any direct biochar effects on fauna can influence microbial communities through grazing, physical fragmentation of organic debris (and biochar) and modifying soil structure. If biochar creates a favorable environment for soil microorganisms, it is also plausible for fauna to be attracted to such microbially enriched habitats. However, how soil faun...

  15. 城市化对土壤环境的影响%The Affects of Urbanization to Soil Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖金凤

    2001-01-01

    Urbanization affects the soil environment deeply.Municipal polluted water,industrial waste gas,waste gas of automobiles and garbage can change the physical and chemical nature of the soil.Some actions must be taleen to prevent the soil pollution and improve municipal soil environment such as reasonable industry allocation,rectifying the resource of pollution,enhancement of the custody on agriculture environment,etc.%城市化对土壤环境产生深刻影响,城市污水灌溉、工业废气和汽车废气、城市生活垃圾等都会改变土壤的理化性质。防治土壤污染、改善城市土壤环境,必须工业合理布局,治理工业污染源,加强农业环境的监测等。

  16. Vertical Distribution of Cadmium and Lead on Soils Affected by Metropolitan Refuse Disposal in Owerri, Southeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.U. Onweremadu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors investigated distribution of cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb in soil profile pits affected by municipal solid wastes in Avu dumpsite in Owerri, Southeastern Nigeria in 2010. Transect soil survey technique was used in aligning profile pits for field studies and sampling. Standard procedures were used in digging, describing and sampling from profile pits. Sieved soil samples were subjected to laboratory analyses and data were analyzed statistically using coefficient of variation measured in percentages. Results showed higher values of % CV in silt and clay contents. Variability of clay increased from dumpsite (CV=43.77 % to moderately dumped site (CV=62.73% decreased in slightly dumped side (20.98%. Highest mean values of organic matter (26.8 g/kg and pH water (5.7 were reported in heavily dumped site. Organic Matter showed very significant positive relationship with Cd (r = 0.92; p = 0.01 and Pb (r=0.97; P = 0.97. There is need to include more soil attributes; results of which should be subjected to multi-variate techniques for more reliability and confidence especially in field applications.

  17. Combined Chemical and Mineralogical Evidence for Heavy Metal Binding in Mining- and Smelting-Affected Alluvial Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. VAN(E)K; V. ETTLER; T. GRYGAR; L. BOR(U)VKA; O. (S)EBEK; O. DR(A)BEK

    2008-01-01

    The binding of metallic contaminants (Pb, Cd, and Zn) and As on soil constituents was studied on four highly con-taminated alluvial soil profiles from the mining/smelting district of Pribram (Czech Republic) using a combination of mineralogical and chemical methods. Sequential extraction analysis (SEA) was supplemented by mineralogical investi-gation of both bulk samples and hcavy mineral fractions using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS). The mineralogy of Fe and Mn oxides was studied by voltammetry of microparticles (VMP) and diffuse reflectance spectrometry (DRS). Zinc and Pb were predominantly were detected in soils by XRD and SEM/EDS. In contrast, Cd was the most mobile contaminant and was predominantly present in the exchangeable fraction. Arsenic was bound to the residual and reducible fractions (corresponding to Fe oxides or to unidentified Fe-Pb arsenates). SEM/EDS observations indicate the predominant affinity of Pb for Mn oxides,and to a lesser extent, for Fe oxidcs. Thus, a more suitable SEA procedure should be used for these mining-affected soils to distinguish between the contaminant fraction bound to Mn oxides and Fe oxides.

  18. FACTORS AFFECTING THE HYDRAULIC BARRIER PERFORMANCE OF SOIL-BENTONITE MIXTURE CUT-OFF WALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Atsushi; Inui, Toru; Katsumi, Takeshi; Kamon, Masashi; Araki, Susumu

    Containment technique using cut-off walls is a valid method against contaminants in subsurface soil and/or groundwater. This paper states laboratory testing results on hydraulic barrier performance of Soil-Bentonite (SB), which is made by mixing bentonite with in-situ soil. Since the bentonite swelling is sensitive to chemicals, chemical compatibility is important for the hydraulic barrier performance of SB. Hydraulic conductivity tests using flexible-wall permeameter were conducted on SB specimens with various types and concentrations of chemicals in the pore water and/or in the permeant and with various bentonite powder contents. As a result, hydraulic barrier performance of SB was influenced by the chemical concentration in the pore water of original soil and bentonite powder content. In the case that SB specimens have damage parallel to the permeating direction, no significant leakage in the SB occurs by the self-sealing property of SB. In addition, the hydraulic conductivity values of SB have excellent correlation with their plastic indexes and swelling pr essures, thus these properties of SB have some possibility to be indicators for estimation of the hydraulic barrier performance of SB.

  19. Current Status of Trace Metal Pollution in Soils Affected by Industrial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsanul Kabir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing public concern over the potential accumulation of heavy metals in soil, owing to rapid industr