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Sample records for affecting plant growth

  1. Endophytic bacteria affect sugarcane physiology without changing plant growth

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Castro Correia Marcos; Raquel de Paula Freitas Iório; Adriana Parada Dias da Silveira; Rafael Vasconcelos Ribeiro; Eduardo Caruso Machado; Ana Maria Magalhães Andrade Lagôa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate if endophytic bacteria inoculants would be beneficial to the sugarcane varieties IACSP94-2094 and IACSP95-5000, promoting changes in photosynthesis and plant growth. The plants, obtained from mini stalks with one bud, were treated with two bacteria mixtures (inoculum I or II) or did not receive any inoculum (control plants). The inocula did not affect shoot and root dry matter accumulation as compared to the control condition (plants with native ...

  2. Irrigation and planting density affect river red gum growth

    OpenAIRE

    Cockerham, Stephen T.

    2004-01-01

    In a 6-year study, production of river red gum, an excellent fuel-wood source, was evaluated for responses to three levels of irrigation, fertilization and planting density. Irrigation and planting density had the greatest influence on tree growth. Irrigation in the fifth and sixth years produced greater wood volume and weight per tree. Tree size was greatest in the wide spacing of the lower planting density. Fertilizer had no effect on any of the treatments. Per acre volume and weight yields...

  3. Fusarium oxysporum volatiles enhance plant growth via affecting auxin transport and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios eBitas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption.

  4. Does overhead irrigation with salt affect growth, yield, and phenolic content of lentil plants?

    OpenAIRE

    Giannakoula Anastasia; Ilias I.F.; Dragišić-Maksimović Jelena J.; Maksimović V.M.; Živanović Branka D.

    2012-01-01

    Overhead irrigation of lentil plants with salt (100 mM NaCl) did not have any significant impact on plant growth, while chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm were affected. Under such poor irrigation water quality, the malondialdehyde content in leaves was increased due to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. In seeds, the total phenolic content (TPC) was correlated to their total antioxidant capacity (TAC). High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrom...

  5. Growth and phosphorus uptake of sorghum plants in salt affected soil as affected by organic materials composted with rock phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the influence of different organic materials, Farm yard manure (FYM), Humic acid (HA) and Press mud (PM) and their composts prepared with rock phosphate on the growth and phosphorus (P) uptake of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.). The experiment was conducted in Randomized Complete Block design with three replication in salt affected soil at research farm of botanical garden Azakhel Nowshera during kharif 2012. Fertilizers were applied at the rate of 120- 90-60 kg ha/sup -1/ N, P and K, respectively. The source of N was urea and organic materials in composted and non composted form. Single super phosphate, rock phosphate, organic materials and their composts were used as P source, while sulphate of potash was used as source of K. The organic materials were applied before crop sowing at recommended level on the basis of their P content. The maximum and significantly (p=0.05) increased sorghum total dry matter yield of 23733 kg ha/sup -1/, emergence m/sup -2/ of 142 and plant height of 147 cm were observed in the treatment where composts of FYM, HA and PM were applied in combination. Increase in soil organic matter content was recorded by the application of composts of different organic materials, while decreasing trend was found in the values of soil electrical conductivity (ECe) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Maximum plant N uptake of 159 kg ha/sup -1/, P uptake of 62.5 kg ha/sup -1/ and K uptake of 557 kg ha/sup -1/ were noted in the treatment where a combination of composts of FYM, HA and PM were added. Results suggest that the use of composts of different organic materials and RP are environment friendly and have the potential to improve sorghum growth, plants nutrient uptake and ameliorate salt affected soils. (author)

  6. Does overhead irrigation with salt affect growth, yield, and phenolic content of lentil plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakoula Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Overhead irrigation of lentil plants with salt (100 mM NaCl did not have any significant impact on plant growth, while chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm were affected. Under such poor irrigation water quality, the malondialdehyde content in leaves was increased due to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. In seeds, the total phenolic content (TPC was correlated to their total antioxidant capacity (TAC. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS detection showed that flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, rutin, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid and resveratrol appear to be the compounds with the greatest influence on the TAC values. Catechin is the most abundant phenolic compound in lentil seeds. Overhead irrigation with salt reduced the concentration of almost all phenolic compounds analyzed from lentil seed extracts.

  7. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%-26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21°C-36°C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  8. The presence of Bt-transgenic oilseed rape in wild mustard populations affects plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongbo; Stewart, C Neal; Li, Junsheng; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Xitao

    2015-12-01

    The adventitious presence of transgenic plants in wild plant populations is of ecological and regulatory concern, but the consequences of adventitious presence are not well understood. Here, we introduced Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac (Bt)-transgenic oilseed rape (Bt OSR, Brassica napus) with various frequencies into wild mustard (Brassica juncea) populations. We sought to better understand the adventitious presence of this transgenic insecticidal crop in a wild-relative plant population. We assessed the factors of competition, resource availability and diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) infestation on plant population dynamics. As expected, Bt OSR performed better than wild mustard in mixed populations under herbivore attack in habitats with enough resources, whereas wild mustard had higher fitness when Bt OSR was rarer in habitats with limited resources. Results suggest that the presence of insect-resistant transgenic plants could decrease the growth of wild mustard and Bt OSR plants and their populations, especially under high herbivore pressure. PMID:26338267

  9. Reproduction of Heterodera zeae and Its Suppression of Corn Plant Growth as Affected by Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Hashmi, Sarwar; Krusberg, Lorin R.; Sardanelli, Sandra

    1993-01-01

    Reproduction of the corn cyst nematode (Heterodera zeae) and its effect on growth of corn (Zea mays) was studied in plant growth chambers at 24, 27, 30, 33, and 36 C. Reproduction of H. zeae increased directly with increase in temperature from 24 to 36 C. Fifteen-cm-d pots of corn seedlings inoculated with a mixture of 5,000 eggs + J2 and maintained for 8 weeks in growth chambers contained an average of 7,042 cysts + females at 36 C, but only 350 cysts + females at 24 C. Fresh weights of plan...

  10. Quantity and quality of light affect growth and reproduction of the invasive annual plant Impatiens glandulifera

    OpenAIRE

    Strømme, Christian Bianchi

    2012-01-01

    Biological invasions occur worldwide and are among the primary causes of biodiversity loss. Some ecosystems are more prone to biological invasions due to interactions between traits of the invasive species and their new environment. For plants, light quantity and quality affect community invasibility, and previous studies show that the performance of the invasive summer-annual Impatiens glandulifera (Royle) is negatively affected by shade due to reduced light quantity, but effects of light qu...

  11. Ozone affects growth and development of Pieris brassicae on the wild host plant Brassica nigra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When plants are exposed to ozone they exhibit changes in both primary and secondary metabolism, which may affect their interactions with herbivorous insects. Here we investigated the performance and preferences of the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae on the wild plant Brassica nigra under elevated ozone conditions. The direct and indirect effects of ozone on the plant-herbivore system were studied. In both cases ozone exposure had a negative effect on P. brassicae development. However, in dual-choice tests larvae preferentially consumed plant material previously fumigated with the highest concentration tested, showing a lack of correlation between larval preference and performance on ozone exposed plants. Metabolomic analysis of leaf material subjected to combinations of ozone and herbivore-feeding, and focussing on known defence metabolites, indicated that P. brassicae behaviour and performance were associated with ozone-induced alterations to glucosinolate and phenolic pools. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of ozone on Pieris brassicae performance and preference. • We studied ozone and herbivore induced changes in the metabolome of Brassica nigra. • The performance of P. brassicae did not correlate with preference of ozonated plants. • Ozone and herbivore-feeding stress changes the phytochemical pools of B. nigra. - Ozone indirectly reduces herbivore performance, which is associated with change in phytochemical pools, but does not correlate with host plant preference

  12. Molecular analyses of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions affecting plant growth and yield. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, K.J.

    1998-11-01

    Mitochondria have a central role in the production of cellular energy. The biogenesis and functioning of mitochondria depends on the expression of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. One approach to investigating the role of nuclear-mitochondrial cooperation in plant growth and development is to identify combinations of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that result in altered but sublethal phenotypes. Plants that have certain maize nuclear genotypes in combination with cytoplasmic genomes from more distantly-related teosintes can exhibit incompatible phenotypes, such as reduced plant growth and yield and cytoplasmic male sterility, as well as altered mitochondrial gene expression. The characterization of these nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions was the focus of this grant. The authors were investigating the effects of two maize nuclear genes, RcmI and Mct, on mitochondrial function and gene expression. Plants with the teosinte cytoplasms and homozygous for the recessive rcm allele are small (miniature) and-slow-growing and the kernels are reduced in size. The authors mapped this locus to molecular markers on chromosome 7 and attempted to clone this locus by transposon tagging. The effects of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial protein profiles were also studied.

  13. Biochemical attributes, plant growth and yield of tomato as affected by boron application rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glass house pot experiment, with two tomato cultivars VCT-1 and Riogrande, was 1) in carried out to assess the effects of four levels of soil application of B (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg kg/sup -1/ in the form of borax on plant growth, biochemical content, antioxidant activity and fruit yield. Higher -1 plant growth and fruit yield in both cultivars were achieved by the B 1.0 and 1.5 mg kg/sup -1/ soil application respectively. Application of 0.5 mg B kg/sup -1/ had lower dry matter production as well as fruit yield when compared with B 1.0 and 1.5 mg kg/sup -1/. The percent increase of fruit yield at 0.5 mg B kg/sup -1/ was 12 and 10, in VCT-1 and Riogrande respectively. In the same cultivars, B application at the rate of 1.0 mg B kg/sup -1/ caused fruit yield by 23 and 21% while 1.5 mg B kg/sup -1/ enhanced by 22 and 20% respectively. Boron concentration in leaf, fruit and root increased with the increasing level of B. Boron application at 1.0 and 1.5 mg kg/sup -1/ significantly increased chlorophyll, sugar and protein content in both cultivars. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity was significantly increased by the soil application of 1.5 mg B kg/sup -1/ in both cultivars of tomato. Results showed that soil application of 1.0 mg B kg soil have a positive effect on plant growth, yield and biochemical attributes of both the tomato cultivars. (author)

  14. Metal contaminated biochar and wood ash negatively affect plant growth and soil quality after land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D L; Quilliam, R S

    2014-07-15

    Pyrolysis or combustion of waste wood can provide a renewable source of energy and produce byproducts which can be recycled back to land. To be sustainable requires that these byproducts pose minimal threat to the environment or human health. Frequently, reclaimed waste wood is contaminated by preservative-treated timber containing high levels of heavy metals. We investigated the effect of feedstock contamination from copper-preservative treated wood on the behaviour of pyrolysis-derived biochar and combustion-derived ash in plant-soil systems. Biochar and wood ash were applied to soil at typical agronomic rates. The presence of preservative treated timber in the feedstock increased available soil Cu; however, critical Cu guidance limits were only exceeded at high rates of feedstock contamination. Negative effects on plant growth and soil quality were only seen at high levels of biochar contamination (>50% derived from preservative-treated wood). Negative effects of wood ash contamination were apparent at lower levels of contamination (>10% derived from preservative treated wood). Complete removal of preservative treated timber from wood recycling facilities is notoriously difficult and low levels of contamination are commonplace. We conclude that low levels of contamination from Cu-treated wood should pose minimal environmental risk to biochar and ash destined for land application. PMID:24915641

  15. Physiological integration affects growth form and competitive ability in clonal plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (2004), s. 493-520. ISSN 0269-7653 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/02/0953 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : competitive ability * Physiological integration * clonal plant s Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.215, year: 2004

  16. Significant factors affecting the economic sustainability of closed aquaponic systems. Part II: fish and plant growth

    OpenAIRE

    Palm, Harry W.; Karl Bissa; Ulrich Knaus

    2014-01-01

    Two identical closed ebb-flow substrate aquaponic systems for warm-water fish were tested for fish and plant productivity. Each system contained 3.7 m3 water, and the relationship of the water volume in the aquaculture tank to the settling basin (sedimenter, clarifier), the biofilter and the hydroponic units was 2.25:1:0.075:0.6 (fish tank:hydroponic unit = 3.75). The comparative batch cultivation of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) at ...

  17. Mycorrhizal symbiosis in leeks increases plant growth under low phosphorus and affects the levels of specific flavonoid glycosides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction- Mycorrhizae symbiosis is a universal phenomenon in nature that promotes plant growth and food quality in most plants, especially, under phosphorus deficiency and water stress. Objective- The objective of this study was to assess the effects of mycorrhizal symbiosis on changes in the le...

  18. Tomato root growth and phosphorus absorption kinetics by tomato plants as affected by phosphorus concentration in nutrient solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the effects P concentrations in nutrient solution on root growth and on root physiological characteristics involved in P uptake by tomato Lycopersicon esculentum Mill plants, six seedlings were grown in nutrient solution at initial concentrations of 48.5, 97, 194 and 388 μMP until one day before harvest. They were then transferred to solutions with P at 20 μM and 30 μM, and the depletion curves and Michaelis-Menten parameters were determined. The conclusions were that as P supply increased and as the plant P contents are sufficient for maximum growth, the rate of P uptake tends to be lower. The results also indicate that total P uptake by tomato seedlings depends on the amount of root surface area exposed to P. (M.A.C.)

  19. Characterization of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from root system of sunflower (helianthus annus l) grown under salt affected area of pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) directly promote plant growth by providing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), solubilization of inorganic phosphates, nitrogen fixation and siderophores and other organic acid production, whereas indirectly support plant growth by suppressing plant pathogens. The objective of this study was isolation and characterization of bacterial strains from rhizosphere, endosphere and rhizoplane of sunflower. Thirty six bacterial strains were selected out of 44 from plant root samples along with rhizospheric soil, collected from different salt affected areas of Central Punjab (Pakistan). Selected bacterial strains were characterized morphologically as well as biochemically at National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad during 2011-13. It was observed that all isolates produced IAA, whereas 14 strains were declared as phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB), eight isolates exhibited antifungal characteristics, 30 were nitrogen fixer and all of them were gram -ve. During biochemical characterization of bacterial isolates KS 15 and KS 8 produced the highest indole acetic acid whereas KS 15 and KS 17 indicated maximum phosphate solubilization (PS) among all isolated strains. The bacterial strains KS 10 and KS 44 showed maximum bio-control activity (fungal growth inhibition) than other isolated strains. (author)

  20. Availability and temporal heterogeneity of water supply affect the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore and consequently plant growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Tsunoda

    Full Text Available We examined how the volume and temporal heterogeneity of water supply changed the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore, and consequently affected plant biomass. Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae seedlings were grown at one per pot under different combinations of water volume (large or small volume and heterogeneity (homogeneous water conditions, watered every day; heterogeneous conditions, watered every 4 days in the presence or absence of a larva of the belowground herbivorous insect, Anomala cuprea (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae. The larva was confined in different vertical distributions to top feeding zone (top treatment, middle feeding zone (middle treatment, or bottom feeding zone (bottom treatment; alternatively no larva was introduced (control treatment or larval movement was not confined (free treatment. Three-way interaction between water volume, heterogeneity, and the herbivore significantly affected plant biomass. With a large water volume, plant biomass was lower in free treatment than in control treatment regardless of heterogeneity. Plant biomass in free treatment was as low as in top treatment. With a small water volume and in free treatment, plant biomass was low (similar to that under top treatment under homogeneous water conditions but high under heterogeneous ones (similar to that under middle or bottom treatment. Therefore, there was little effect of belowground herbivory on plant growth under heterogeneous water conditions. In other watering regimes, herbivores would be distributed in the shallow soil and reduced root biomass. Herbivore mortality was high with homogeneous application of a large volume or heterogeneous application of a small water volume. Under the large water volume, plant biomass was high in pots in which the herbivore had died. Thus, the combinations of water volume and heterogeneity affected plant growth via the change of a belowground herbivore.

  1. Flavonoids Affect the Light Reaction of Photosynthesis in Vitro and in Vivo as Well as the Growth of Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Flores, Félix; Olivares-Palomares, Karen Susana; Aguilar-Laurents, María Isabel; Rivero-Cruz, José Fausto; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas; King-Díaz, Beatriz

    2015-09-23

    Flavonoids retusin (5-hydroxy-3,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone) (1) and pachypodol (5,4'-dihydroxy-3,7,3'-trimethoxyflavone) (2) were isolated from Croton ciliatoglanduliferus Ort. Pachypodol acts as a Hill reaction inhibitor with its target on the water splitting enzyme located in PSII. In the search for new herbicides from natural compounds, flavonoids 1 and 2 and flavonoid analogues quercetin (3), apigenin (4), genistein (5), and eupatorin (6) were assessed for their effect in vitro on the photosynthetic electron transport chain and in vivo on the germination and growth of the plants Physalis ixocarpa, Trifolium alexandrinum and Lolium perenne. Flavonoid 3 was the most active inhibitor of the photosynthetic uncoupled electron flow (I50 = 114 μM) with a lower log P value (1.37). Results in vivo suggest that 1, 2, 3, and 5 behave as pre- and postemergent herbicides, with 3 and 5 being more active. PMID:26322527

  2. Plant growth promoting rhizobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Weston, David

    2015-08-11

    The present invention is directed to the Pseudomonas fluorescens strain GM30 deposited under ATCC Accession No. PTA-13340, compositions containing the GM30 strain, and methods of using the GM30 strain to enhance plant growth and/or enhance plant resistance to pathogens.

  3. Integrated use of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, biogas slurry and chemical nitrogen for sustainable production of maize under salt-affected conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinity is one of the most critical constraints hampering agricultural production throughout the world, including Pakistan. Some plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) have the ability to reduce the deleterious effect of salinity on plants due to the presence of ACC-deaminase enzyme along with some other mechanisms. The integrated use of organic, chemical and biofertilizers can reduce dependence on expensive chemical inputs. To sustain high crop yields without deterioration of soil fertility, it is important to work out optimal combination of chemical and biofertilizers, and manures in the cropping system. A pot trial was conducted to study the effect of integrated use of PGPR, chemical nitrogen, and biogas slurry for sustainable production of maize under salt-stressed conditions and for good soil health. Results showed that sole application of PGPR, chemical nitrogen and biogas slurry enhanced maize growth but their combined application was more effective. Maximum improvement in maize growth, yield, ionic concentration in leaves and nutrient concentration in grains was observed in the treatment where PGPR and biogas slurry was used in the presence of 100% recommended nitrogen as chemical fertilizer. It also improved the soil pH, ECe, and available N, P and K contents. It is concluded that integrated use of PGPR, biogas slurry and chemical nitrogen not only enhanced maize growth, yield and quality but also improved soil health. So, it may be evaluated under field conditions to get sustained yield of maize from salt-affected soils. (author)

  4. Growth and yield performance of maize (zea mays L.) as affected by planting methods and NPK levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two year research was conducted to find out the best combination of sowing geometry and levels of N, P and K fertilizers for maize hybrid 32-W-86. Four N-P-K levels viz., 0-0-0, 200-100-100, 250-125-125 and 300-150-150 kg ha-1 were tested in combination with 3 planting geometries viz., flat sowing in 75 cm spaced rows, ridge sowing on 75 cm spaced ridges and bed sowing (120 cm wide beds separated by 30 cm furrows) in randomized complete block design with factorial arrangement. During both years, treatment with 250-125-125 kg ha/sup -1/ NPK and 75 cm apart ridge sowing was found to be superior as it showed significantly higher grain yield (10.02 to 10.54 t ha/sup -1/), number of cobs per plant (1.80 to 1.87), number of grains per cob (359.33 to 378.67), 1000-grain weight (306.46 to 320.62 g), biological yield (24.01 to 24.36 t ha/sup -1/) and harvest index (41.76 to 43.51 %). Contrastingly, 0-0-0 NPK kg ha/sup -1/ fertilizer treatment in combination with all 3 planting geometries remained at lowest position with respect to grain yield. Grain yield showed significant positive relationship with number of cobs per plant, number of grains per cob, 1000-grain weight, biological yield and harvest index of maize. (author)

  5. Sourgrass densities affecting the initial growth and macronutrient content of coffee plants Densidades de capim-amargoso afetando o crescimento inicial e o teor de macronutrientes do cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.B Carvalho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the coexistence effects of coffee (Coffea arabica with densities of sourgrass (Digitaria insularis on crop macronutrient content and plant growth. The experiment was conducted in plots where one coffee plant was maintained in coexistence with 0 (weed-free check, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 sourgrass plants, using a completely randomized design with three replicates. Reduction of coffee growth and macronutrient content, except P that increased, started when the coexistence occurred with sourgrass plants in a density of 1 plant per plot. In general, macronutrient content was reduced by 18-50%, while growth characteristics were reduced by 9-41%, when coffee plants coexisted with 16 plants of sourgrass. Thus, sourgrass competition for nutrients was a strong factor limiting coffee plant growth.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos da convivência do cafeeiro (Coffea arabica com densidades de capim-amargoso (Digitaria insularis sobre o teor de macronutrientes e o crescimento das plantas da cultura. O experimento foi conduzido em caixas enterradas no solo, onde uma planta de café foi mantida em convivência com 0 (testemunha livre de plantas daninhas, 1, 2, 4, 8 e 16 plantas de capim-amargoso, usando o delineamento inteiramente casualizado com três repetições. A redução no crescimento e no teor de macronutrientes do cafeeiro - exceto P, que aumentou - iniciou-se quando a convivência ocorreu com plantas de capim-amargoso na densidade de uma planta por caixa. Em geral, o teor de macronutrientes foi reduzido em 10-50%, enquanto as características de crescimento foram reduzidas em 9-41%, quando o cafeeiro conviveu com 16 plantas de capim-amargoso. Assim, a competição de capim-amargoso por nutrientes foi um forte fator limitante para o crescimento das plantas de café.

  6. In Vitro Propagation Of ‘Gisela 5’ Rootstock As Affected By Mineral Composition Of Media And Plant Growth Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Fallahpour Maliheh; Miri Seied Mehdi; Bouzari Naser

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the presented study was to determine the best mineral composition of media and plant growth regulators in the micropropagation of the ‘Gisela 5’ (Prunus cerasus × P. canescens) dwarf sweet cherry rootstock. Nodal explants from young healthy shoots were excised and cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium without growth regulators. In vitro raised shoot tips were transferred to three culture media including Murashige and Skoog (MS), Driver and Kuniyuki (DKW) and Lloyd and McCown (...

  7. Does energy consumption affect growth?

    OpenAIRE

    Saten Kumar; Don J. Webber; Antonio Paradiso

    2012-01-01

    A review of the literature reveals discrepancies between estimates of the impact of energy consumption on output and growth. This paper highlights the importance of underlying theoretical concerns, extends a neoclassical growth model to include energy consumption, applies panel data cointegration methods that deal with cross-sectional dependence and structural breaks to a sample of thirteen high energy consuming countries, and provides empirical estimates of the impact of energy consumption o...

  8. Flooding and Plant Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, E.J.W.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.; VARTAPETIAN, B. B.; Jackson, M B

    2003-01-01

    This Special Issue is based on the 7th Conference of the International Society for Plant Anaerobiosis (ISPA), held in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 12–16 June 2001. The papers describe and analyse many of the responses that plants display when subjected to waterlogging of the soil or deeper submergence. These responses may be injurious or adaptive, and are discussed at various levels of organizational complexity ranging from ecosystem processes, through individual plants to single cells. The res...

  9. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Different Ferromagnetic Alloys Affect the Growth and Development of Rice Seedlings by Changing the C:N Ratio and Plant Hormones Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Yi; Yu, Feifan; Lv, Ruitao; Ma, Chuanxin; Zhang, Zetian; Rui, Yukui; Liu, Liming; Cao, Weidong; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phytotoxicity of thin-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings. Three different CNTs, including hollow multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs), and Fe-Co-filled carbon nanotubes (FeCo-CNTs), were evaluated. The CNTs significantly inhibited rice growth by decreasing the concentrations of endogenous plant hormones. The carbon to nitrogen ratio (C:N ratio) significantly increased in rice r...

  10. Fenton process-affected transformation of roxarsone in paddy rice soils: Effects on plant growth and arsenic accumulation in rice grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Junhao; Li, Huashou; Lin, Chuxia

    2016-08-01

    Batch and greenhouse experiments were conducted to examine the effects of Fenton process on transformation of roxarsone in soils and its resulting impacts on the growth of and As uptake by a rice plant cultivar. The results show that addition of Fenton reagent markedly accelerated the degradation of roxarsone and produced arsenite, which was otherwise absent in the soil without added Fenton reagent. Methylation of arsenate was also enhanced by Fenton process in the earlier part of the experiment due to abundant supply of arsenate from Roxarsone degradation. Overall, addition of Fenton reagent resulted in the predominant presence of arsenate in the soils. Fenton process significantly improved the growth of rice in the maturity stage of the first crop, The concentration of methylated As species in the rice plant tissues among the different growth stages was highly variable. Addition of Fenton reagent into the soils led to reduced uptake of soil-borne As by the rice plants and this had a significant effect on reducing the accumulation of As in rice grains. The findings have implications for understanding As biogeochemistry in paddy rice field receiving rainwater-borne H2O2 and for development of mitigation strategies to reduce accumulation of As in rice grains. PMID:27060198

  11. A 3-year study reveals that plant growth stage, season and field site affect soil fungal communities while cultivar and GM-trait have minor effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silja Emilia Hannula

    Full Text Available In this three year field study the impact of different potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cultivars including a genetically modified (GM amylopectin-accumulating potato line on rhizosphere fungal communities are investigated using molecular microbiological methods. The effects of growth stage of a plant, soil type and year on the rhizosphere fungi were included in this study. To compare the effects, one GM cultivar, the parental isoline, and four non-related cultivars were planted in the fields and analysed using T-RFLP on the basis of fungal phylum specific primers combined with multivariate statistical methods. Additionally, fungal biomass and some extracellular fungal enzymes (laccases, Mn-peroxidases and cellulases were quantified in order to gain insight into the function of the fungal communities. Plant growth stage and year (and agricultural management had the strongest effect on both diversity and function of the fungal communities while the GM-trait studied was the least explanatory factor. The impact of cultivar and soil type was intermediate. Occasional differences between cultivars, the amylopectin-accumulating potato line, and its parental variety were detected, but these differences were mostly transient in nature and detected either only in one soil, one growth stage or one year.

  12. Availability and Temporal Heterogeneity of Water Supply Affect the Vertical Distribution and Mortality of a Belowground Herbivore and Consequently Plant Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Tsunoda, Tomonori; Kachi, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou

    2014-01-01

    We examined how the volume and temporal heterogeneity of water supply changed the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore, and consequently affected plant biomass. Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae) seedlings were grown at one per pot under different combinations of water volume (large or small volume) and heterogeneity (homogeneous water conditions, watered every day; heterogeneous conditions, watered every 4 days) in the presence or absence of a larva of the belowgr...

  13. Adhesion and biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food processing plants as affected by growth medium, surface type and incubation temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Heloísa Maria Ângelo Jerônimo; Rita de Cássia Ramos do Egypto Queiroga; Ana Caroliny Vieira da Costa; Isabella de Medeiros Barbosa; Maria Lúcia da Conceição; Evandro Leite de Souza

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of different growth media [BHI broth, BHI broth plus glucose (10 g/100 mL) and BHI broth plus NaCl (5 g/100 mL)] and incubation temperatures (28 or 37 ºC) on the adherence, detachment and biofilm formation on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces (2 x 2 cm coupons) for a prolonged period (24-72 h) by some strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S3, S28 and S54) from food processing plants. The efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/mL) and peracet...

  14. nfluência do uso de biorreguladores no crescimento de Hymenaea courbaril (Nota Científica. Hymenaea courbaril growth as affected by plant bioregulators (Scientific Note.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Bueno de MORAES

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerando-se a reduzida disponibilidade de trabalhos científicos relacionados com a avaliação de espécies florestais sob o efeito de biorreguladores vegetais, o estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito da aplicação dos seguintes representantes destas substâncias: paclobutrazol (PBZ, ácido giberélico (GA3 e ethephon em mudas de Hymenaea courbaril. O experimento foi implantado em esquema fatorial 3 x 3 (3 biorreguladores x 3 dosagens, sob delineamento de blocos casualizados, com três repetições e utilizando quatro plantas por parcela, em condições de viveiro. Para avaliar o efeito dos tratamentos no crescimento das plantas, foram medidas as seguintes variáveis: altura da planta, diâmetro do colo, teor de clorofila e teores de proteínas solúveis totais. A aplicação do PBZ promoveu alterações morfológicas nas folhas, como a redução no tamanho e intensidade da cor. Foram verificadas redução na altura das plantas (28% e redução na síntese de proteínas (48%. Já o GA3 promoveu aumento desta variável (12%. O ethephon promoveu morte dos ponteiros apicais, reduzindo a altura das mudas (22%. Concluiu-se que as aplicações dos biorreguladores influenciaram no desenvolvimento vegetativo do jatobá, fornecendo resultados preliminares importantes para a utilização de hormônios sintéticos em espécie arbórea.The study aimed to evaluate the effect of application of plant growth regulators: paclobutrazol (PBZ, gibberellic acid (GA3 and ethephon in seedlings of Hymenaea courbaril. The experiment was established in randomized block design, three replications, three regulators, three dosages/regulators, plots with four plants and witness treatment. Parameters such as height and diameter, chlorophyll content and total soluble proteins were measured to assess the effect of treatments on plant growth. The application of PBZ promoted morphological changes in leaves as a reduction in size, texture and color intensity. We

  15. Plant perceptions of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas.

    OpenAIRE

    Preston, Gail M.

    2004-01-01

    Plant-associated Pseudomonas live as saprophytes and parasites on plant surfaces and inside plant tissues. Many plant-associated Pseudomonas promote plant growth by suppressing pathogenic micro-organisms, synthesizing growth-stimulating plant hormones and promoting increased plant disease resistance. Others inhibit plant growth and cause disease symptoms ranging from rot and necrosis through to developmental dystrophies such as galls. It is not easy to draw a clear distinction between pathoge...

  16. In Vitro Propagation Of ‘Gisela 5’ Rootstock As Affected By Mineral Composition Of Media And Plant Growth Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallahpour Maliheh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the presented study was to determine the best mineral composition of media and plant growth regulators in the micropropagation of the ‘Gisela 5’ (Prunus cerasus × P. canescens dwarf sweet cherry rootstock. Nodal explants from young healthy shoots were excised and cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium without growth regulators. In vitro raised shoot tips were transferred to three culture media including Murashige and Skoog (MS, Driver and Kuniyuki (DKW and Lloyd and McCown (WPM containing benzyl adenine (BA (0.5, 1 or 2 mg·l−1 in combination with kinetin (Kin at 0 or 0.5 mg·l−1. WPM and DKW media were proving to be the most effective, resulting in a higher percentage of shoot multiplication and shoot number as compared to MS. BA in concentration 2 mg·l−1 resulted in the highest number of microshoots per explant (3.1. For rooting, 0, 0.5, 1 or 2 mg·l−1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA on MS, DKW and WPM media were tested. WPM medium containing 2 mg·l−1 IBA was most effective for rooting (93.7% in comparison to MS (53.1% and DKW (14.0%. Rooted plantlets were successfully hardened and established in pots.

  17. How Does Social Trust Affect Economic Growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    This paper connects two strands of the literature on social trust by estimating the effects of trust on growth through a set of potential transmission mechanisms directly. It does so by modelling the process using a three-stage least squares estimator on a sample of countries for which a full data...... set is available. The results indicate that trust affects schooling and the rule of law directly. These variables in turn affect the investment rate (schooling) and provide a direct effect (rule of law) on the growth rate. The paper closes with a short discussion of the relevance of the findings....

  18. Does Political Ideology Affect Economic Growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper asks the question whether political ideology affects economic growth. Voters may demand inefficient levels of redistribution and government intervention, and they may care too little for aspects that really matter for the economy. Their norms and perceptions of society might, via their...... political ideology, affect economic performance. The paper presents evidence suggesting that rightwing societies have grown faster in the last decades than other democratic societies. Further analysis suggests that these societies develop better legal systems and less government intervention, which in turn...... explain some but not all of the growth difference....

  19. Growth and N-uptake in sorghum plants manured with different amounts of Leucaena Leucocephala shoots as affected by time of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pot experiment was conducted throughout two successive years to determine the impact of adding four rates of nitrogen (0, 60, 120 and 180 kg N/ha) in the form of Leucaena leucocephala (lam.) de Wit green manure as affected by different time (T0, T15 and T30) of application (just before sowing, 15 and 30 days before sowing, respectively) on the performance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) using the indirect N-15 isotopic dilution technique. Results showed that leucaena leaves, used as a green manure, significantly increased dry matter production and N yield of sorghum. The effect was more pronounced in panicles than shoots. In the first year, N recoveries in sorghum of the total N contained in leucaena green manure ranged between 17-24% in T0, 14-24% in T15 and 15-19% in T30. The highest N recovery value was obtained in lowest rate of n treatment (N60). Moreover, soil incorporated with leucaena green manure one month before planting enhanced both soil and mineral N fertilizer in sorghum plants. In the second year, total N uptake in sorghum (eg., panicles and the entire plant) increased with increasing amounts of N added as a leucaena green manure. N recoveries in sorghum ranged between 26-47% in T0, about 24% in T15 and 23-325 in T30 of the total N contained in leucaena green manure (LGM). As shown in the first year, the highest value of N recovery was obtained in lowest rate of N treatment. The beneficial effects of leucaena green manure on dry matter and N yield in sorghum was attributed not only to the additional N availability to the plant, but also to effects on the enhancement of soil N uptake, particularly when the incorporation was made before a sufficient time from sowing. The beneficial effect of green manuring with leucaena leaves at T15 and T30 was mainly resulted from enhancement of N uptake from this added material, as well as from soil and fertilizer N; whereas, it was only attributed to N uptake from green manure in the T0 treatment. Incorporation

  20. Growth and N-uptake in sorghum plants manured with different amounts of Leucaena Leucocephala shoots as affected by time of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pot experiment was conducted throughout two successive years to determine the impact of adding four rates of nitrogen (0, 60, 120 and 180 kg N/ha) in the form of Leucaena leucocephala (lam.) de Wit green manure as affected by different time (T0, T15 and T30) of application (just before sowing, 15 and 30 days before sowing, respectively) on the performance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) using the indirect N-15 isotopic dilution technique. Results showed that leucaena leaves, used as a green manure, significantly increased dry matter production and N yield of sorghum. The effect was more pronounced in panicles than shoots. In the first year, N recoveries in sorghum of the total N contained in leucaena green manure ranged between 17-24% in T0, 14-24% in T15 and 15-19% in T30. The highest N recovery value was obtained in lowest rate of n treatment (N60). Moreover, soil incorporated with leucaena green manure one month before planting enhanced both soil and mineral N fertilizer in sorghum plants. In the second year, total N uptake in sorghum (eg., panicles and the entire plant) increased with increasing amounts of N added as a leucaena green manure. N recoveries in sorghum ranged between 26-47% in T0, about 24% in T15 and 23-325 in T30 of the total N contained in leucaena green manure (LGM). As shown in the first year, the highest value of N recovery was obtained in lowest rate of N treatment. The beneficial effects of leucaena green manure on dry matter and N yield in sorghum was attributed not only to the additional N availability to the plant, but also to effects on the enhancement of soil N uptake, particularly when the incorporation was made before a sufficient time from sowing. The beneficial effect of green manuring with leucaena leaves at T15 and T30 was mainly resulted from enhancement of N uptake from this added material, as well as from soil and fertilizer N. Whereas, it was only attributed to N uptake from green manure in the T0 treatment. Incorporation

  1. How Does Social Trust Affect Economic Growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    Social capital in the form of generalized trust has been shown to be a determinant of economic growth in a number of studies. Other studies have explored other consequences of trust, such as its effects on governance, corruption, education and investment. This paper connects the two strands of...... literature by estimating the effects of trust on growth through a set of potential transmission mechanisms directly. It does so by modelling the process using a three-stage least squares estimator on a sample of countries for which a full data set is available. The results indicate that trust affects...... schooling and the rule of law directly. These variables in turn affect the investment rate (schooling) and provide a direct effect (rule of law) on the growth rate. The paper closes with a short discussion of the relevance of the findings....

  2. Boron affects the growth and ultrastructure of castor bean plants Boro afeta o crescimento e a ultra-estrutura da mamoneira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Herisson da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of oleaginous plants like the castor bean guarantees employment for agricultural families and can contribute in energy and chemical sectors, especially in the northeastern semi-arid regions of Brazil. Boron (B deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder despite the fact that various anthropogenic sources with high B content may increase soil B to toxic levels for plants. The present study was designed to investigate the ultrastructural effects of boron deficiency and toxicity on castor bean plants which were grown under greenhouse condition using plastic containers with 10 L of nutrient solution. Boron treatments comprised: control (no B; 0.27 mg L-1, 5.40 mg L-1 B pots (one plant per pot, tested in a completely randomized design with three replicates. The dry matter of all plant parts and B concentration were determined. Cellular ultrastructure was evaluated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy on samples of leaves and petioles. Dry matter yield was affected by the B absence treatment but there was no difference for the 5.4 mg L-1 B (toxic conditions treatment. A marginal leaf burn at edge and tips of oldest leaves and absence of starch granules in chloroplasts were noted for the B toxicity treatment. The deformation of the youngest leaves, the death of the apical meristem as well as the swelling of the middle lamella, absence of starch granules in chloroplasts and petiole vessels untidily were observed in the B absent treatment. It is concluded that the production and development of castor bean plants is affected by boron deficiency, but not for boron toxicity conditions.A mamoneira é uma oleaginosa com grande potencial para a geração de renda na agricultura familiar e para produção de matéria prima para a indústria química e setor energético brasileiro, especialmente em regiões do semi-árido nordestino. A deficiência de boro (B ocorre de forma generalizada no Brasil e a aplicação excessiva deste

  3. LED Systems Target Plant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To help develop technologies for growing edible biomass (food crops) in space, Kennedy Space Center partnered with Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC), of Madison, Wisconsin, through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. One result of this research was the High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC) system, components of which have been incorporated into a variety of agricultural greenhouse and consumer aquarium lighting features. The new lighting systems can be adapted to a specific plant species during a specific growth stage, allowing maximum efficiency in light absorption by all available photosynthetic tissues.

  4. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  5. Growth and Nitrogen Uptake in Sorghum Plants Manured with Leucaena Leucocaphala Leaves as Affected by Nitrogen Rate and Time of Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pot experiment was conducted to determine the effect of four rates of nitrogen (N) in the form of leucaena leaves and the time of application on the performance of sorghum plants using the 15N isotopic dilution technique. Results showed that leucaena green manure (LGM) increased dry matter and N yield of sorghum. Nitrogen recoveries of LGM ranged between 23 and 47%. An additional beneficial effect of LGM was attributed to the enhancement of soil N uptake. The best timing of LGM incorporation for obtaining more N derived from LGM, less soil N uptake, and greater dry matter and N in sorghum leaves seemed to be at planting. However, the appropriate timing and rate of LGM to obtain greater dry matter and N yield in panicles, as well as in the whole plant of sorghum, appeared to be at 30 days before planting, particularly a rate of 120 kg N ha-1. (author)

  6. Mammalian epidermal growth factor promotes plant growth

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Melvin I.

    1980-01-01

    Application of mouse submaxillary gland epidermal growth factor to young sorghum seedlings at low concentrations (≈0.4-4 μM) increased shoot growth significantly over 3- and 6-day periods. The effects were dose dependent.

  7. Adhesion and biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food processing plants as affected by growth medium, surface type and incubation temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Maria Ângelo Jerônimo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effect of different growth media [BHI broth, BHI broth plus glucose (10 g/100 mL and BHI broth plus NaCl (5 g/100 mL] and incubation temperatures (28 or 37 ºC on the adherence, detachment and biofilm formation on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces (2 x 2 cm coupons for a prolonged period (24-72 h by some strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S3, S28 and S54 from food processing plants. The efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/mL and peracetic acid (30 mg/mL in reducing the number of viable bacterial cells in a preformed biofilm was also evaluated. S. aureus strains adhered in highest numbers in BHI broth, regardless of the type of surface or incubation temperature. Cell detachment from surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. The number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted in all experimental systems after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered onto polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacities to adhere and form biofilms on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under the different growth conditions, and the cells in biofilm matrixes were resistant to total removal when exposed to the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito de diferentes meios de crescimento [caldo BHI, caldo BHI adicionado de glucose (10 g/100 mL e caldo BHI adicionado de NaCl (5 g/100 mL] e temperaturas de incubação (28 e 37 ºC sobre a adesão, separação e formação de biofilme sobre superfícies (2 x 2 cm de polipropileno e aço inoxidável durante longo tempo de incubação (24-72 h por parte de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus (S3, S58 e S54 isoladas de plantas de processamento de alimentos. Também foi avaliada a eficácia dos sanitizantes hipoclorito de sódio (250 mg/mL e ácido perac

  8. Constitutively overexpressing a tomato fructokinase gene (lefrk1) in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. coker 312) positively affects plant vegetative growth, boll number and seed cotton yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing fructokinase (FRK) activity in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) plants may reduce fructose inhibition of sucrose synthase (Sus) and lead to improved fibre yield and quality. Cotton was transformed with a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fructokinase gene (LeFRK1) under the control of the C...

  9. Factors affecting growth and pigmentation of Penicillium caseifulvum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Haasum, I.; Steenstrup, L.D.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2002-01-01

    Color formation, metabolite production and growth of Penicillium caseifulvum were studied in order to elucidate factors contributing to. yellow discoloration of Blue Cheese caused by the mold. A screening experiment was set up to study the effect of pH, concentration of salt (NaCl), P, K, N, S, Mg...... formation. Among the factors contributing to yellow color formation, pH and salt concentration are easy to control for the cheesemaker, while the third factor, P-concentration, is not. Naturally occurring variations in the P-concentration in milk delivered to Blue Cheese plants, could be responsible for the...... metabolites, appeared at low pH (pH 4). Mold growth was not correlated to the yellow color formation. Salt concentration was the most important factor affecting mold growth and length of lag phase. Production of secondary metabolites was strongly influenced by both pH and salt concentration. The screening...

  10. Constitutive expression of pathogen-inducible OsWRKY31 enhances disease resistance and affects root growth and auxin response in transgenic rice plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Zhang; Youliang Peng; Zejian Guo

    2008-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors have many regulatory roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we isolated a rice WRKY gene (OsWRKY31) that is induced by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea and auxin. This gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino-acid residues and belongs to a subgroup of the rice WRKY gene family that probably originated after the divergence of monocot and dicot plants. OsWRKY31 was found to be localized to the nucleus of onion epidermis cells to transiently express OsWRKY31-eGFP fusion protein. Analysis of 0sWRKY31 and its mutants fused with a Cal4 DNA-binding domain indicated that OsWRKY31 has transactivation activity in yeast. Overexpression of the OsWRKY31 gene was found to enhance resistance against infection with M. grisea, and the transgenic lines exhibited reduced lateral root formation and elongation compared with wild-type and RNAi plants. The lines with overexpression showed constitutive expression of many defense-related genes, such as PBZ1 and OsSci2, as well as early auxin-response genes, such as OsIAA4 and OsCrll genes. Furthermore, the plants with overexpression were less sensitive to exogenously supplied IBA, NAA and 2,4-D at high concentrations, suggesting that overexpression of the OsWRKY31 gene might alter the auxin response or transport. These results also suggest that OsWRKY31 might be a common component in the signal transduction pathways of the auxin response and the defense response in rice.

  11. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixi Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs.

  12. Variations in grain lipophilic phytochemicals, proteins and resistance to Fusarium spp. growth during grain storage as affected by biological plant protection with Aureobasidium pullulans (de Bary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowska, Urszula; Tańska, Małgorzata; Konopka, Iwona

    2016-06-16

    Modern agriculture relies on an integrated approach, where chemical treatment is reduced to a minimum and replaced by biological control that involves the use of active microorganisms. The effect of the antagonistic yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans on proteins and bioactive compounds (alkylresorcinols, sterols, tocols and carotenoids) in winter wheat grain and on the colonization of wheat kernels by fungal microbiota, mainly Fusarium spp. pathogens, was investigated. Biological treatment contributed to a slight increase contents of tocols, alkylresorcinols and sterols in grain. At the same time, the variation of wheat grain proteins was low and not significant. Application of A. pullulans enhanced the natural yeast colonization after six months of grain storage and inhibited growth of F. culmorum pathogens penetrating wheat kernel. This study demonstrated that an integrated approach of wheat grain protection with the use of the yeast-like fungus A. pullulans reduced kernel colonization by Fusarium spp. pathogens and increased the content of nutritionally beneficial phytochemicals in wheat grain without a loss of gluten proteins responsible for baking value. PMID:27055191

  13. Straw gasification biochar increases plant available water capacity and plant growth in coarse sandy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Petersen, Carsten Tilbæk;

    was conducted to investigate the effect of soil amendment of straw (SGB) and wood (WGB) GB on shoot and root growth under two levels of water supply in a temperate sandy loam and coarse sandy soil. In the sandy loam, the reduced water regime significantly affected plant growth and water consumption......Gasification biochar (GB) contains recalcitrant carbon that can contribute to soil carbon sequestration and soil quality improvement. However, the impact of GB on plant available water capacity (AWC) and plant growth in diverse soil types needs further reserach. A pot experiment with spring barley...... increase of plant biomass under both water regimes, most likely due to reduced mechanical impedance to root growth. No positive effects on plant growth were achieved by addition of WGB. Our results suggest that SGB has a great global potential to increase crop productivity on coarser soil types changing...

  14. Modelling asymmetric growth in crowded plant communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian

    2010-01-01

    A class of models that may be used to quantify the effect of size-asymmetric competition in crowded plant communities by estimating a community specific degree of size-asymmetric growth for each species in the community is suggested. The model consists of two parts: an individual size......-asymmetric growth part, where growth is assumed to be proportional to a power function of the size of the individual, and a term that reduces the relative growth rate as a decreasing function of the individual plant size and the competitive interactions from other plants in the neighbourhood....

  15. Magnetic fields: how is plant growth and development impacted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Dobránszki, Judit

    2016-03-01

    This review provides detailed insight on the effects of magnetic fields on germination, growth, development, and yield of plants focusing on ex vitro growth and development and discussing the possible physiological and biochemical responses. The MFs considered in this review range from the nanoTesla (nT) to geomagnetic levels, up to very strong MFs greater than 15 Tesla (T) and also super-weak MFs (near 0 T). The theoretical bases of the action of MFs on plant growth, which are complex, are not discussed here and thus far, there is limited mathematical background about the action of MFs on plant growth. MFs can positively influence the morphogenesis of several plants which allows them to be used in practical situations. MFs have thus far been shown to modify seed germination and affect seedling growth and development in a wide range of plants, including field, fodder, and industrial crops; cereals and pseudo-cereals; grasses; herbs and medicinal plants; horticultural crops (vegetables, fruits, ornamentals); trees; and model crops. This is important since MFs may constitute a non-residual and non-toxic stimulus. In addition to presenting and summarizing the effects of MFs on plant growth and development, we also provide possible physiological and biochemical explanations for these responses including stress-related responses of plants, explanations based on dia-, para-, and ferromagnetism, oriented movements of substances, and cellular and molecular changes. PMID:25952081

  16. Changes in alpine plant growth under future climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rammig

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Alpine shrub- and grasslands are shaped by extreme climatic conditions such as a long-lasting snow cover and a short vegetation period. Such ecosystems are expected to be highly sensitive to global environmental change. Prolonged growing seasons and shifts in temperature and precipitation are likely to affect plant phenology and growth. In a unique experiment, climatology and plant growth was monitored for almost a decade at 17 snow meteorological stations in different alpine regions along the Swiss Alps. Regression analyses revealed highly significant correlations between mean air temperature in May/June and snow melt out, onset of plant growth, and plant height. These correlations were used to project plant growth phenology for future climate conditions based on the gridded output of a set of regional climate models runs. Melt out and onset of growth were projected to occur on average 17 days earlier by the end of the century than in the control period from 1971–2000 under the future climate conditions of the low resolution climate model ensemble. Plant height and biomass production were expected to increase by 77% and 45%, respectively. The earlier melt out and onset of growth will probably cause a considerable shift towards higher growing plants and thus increased biomass. Our results represent the first quantitative and spatially explicit estimates of climate change impacts on future growing season length and the respective productivity of alpine plant communities in the Swiss Alps.

  17. Plant growth promotion and Penicillium citrinum

    OpenAIRE

    Choo Yeon-Sik; Lee In-Jung; Kim Jong-Myeong; Hwang Seon-Kap; Suh Seok-Jong; Kim Ho-Youn; Yoon Hyeokjun; Hamayun Muhammad; Khan Sumera; Yoon Ung-Han; Kong Won-Sik; Lee Byung-Moo; Kim Jong-Guk

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Endophytic fungi are known plant symbionts. They produce a variety of beneficial metabolites for plant growth and survival, as well as defend their hosts from attack of certain pathogens. Coastal dunes are nutrient deficient and offer harsh, saline environment for the existing flora and fauna. Endophytic fungi may play an important role in plant survival by enhancing nutrient uptake and producing growth-promoting metabolites such as gibberellins and auxins. We screened roo...

  18. Plant photomorphogenesis and canopy growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballare, Carlos L.; Scopel, Ana L.

    1994-01-01

    An important motivation for studying photomorphogenesis is to understand the relationships among plant photophysiology in canopies, canopy productivity, and agronomic yield. This understanding is essential to optimize lighting systems used for plant farming in controlled environments (CE) and for the design of genetically engineered crop strains with altered photoresponses. This article provides an overview of some basic principles of plant photomorphogenesis in canopies and discusses their implications for (1) scaling up information on plant photophysiology from individual plants in CE to whole canopies in the field, and (2) designing lighting conditions to increase plant productivity in CE used for agronomic purposes (e.g. space farming in CE Life Support Systems). We concentrate on the visible (lambda between 400 and 700 nm) and far-infrared (FR; lambda greater than 700 nm) spectral regions, since the ultraviolet (UV; 280 to 400 nm) is covered by other authors in this volume.

  19. Straw gasification biochar increases plant available water capacity and plant growth in coarse sandy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Petersen, Carsten Tilbæk;

    increase of plant biomass under both water regimes, most likely due to reduced mechanical impedance to root growth. No positive effects on plant growth were achieved by addition of WGB. Our results suggest that SGB has a great global potential to increase crop productivity on coarser soil types changing...... was conducted to investigate the effect of soil amendment of straw (SGB) and wood (WGB) GB on shoot and root growth under two levels of water supply in a temperate sandy loam and coarse sandy soil. In the sandy loam, the reduced water regime significantly affected plant growth and water consumption......, whereas the effect was less pronounced in the coarse sand. Independent of the soil type, both GBs increased AWC, with the highest absolute effect in the coarse sand. In the sandy loam, soil application of GB had no effect on plant growth, however, the addition of SGB to coarse sand led to a substantial...

  20. Foreign acquisition, plant survival, and employment growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger; Görg, Holger

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of foreign acquisition on survival and employment growth of targets using data on Swedish manufacturing plants.We separate targeted plants into those within Swedish MNEs, Swedish exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. The results, controlling for possible...... endogeneity of acquisition using IV and propensity score matching approaches suggest that acquisition by foreign owners increases the lifetime of the acquired plants only if the plant was an exporter. The effect is robust to controlling for domestic acquisitions and differs between horizontal and vertical...... acquisitions. We find robust positive employment growth effects only for exporters and only if the takeover is vertical....

  1. Expert System Control of Plant Growth in an Enclosed Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, George; Lanoue, Mark; Bathel, Matthew; Ryan, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    The Expert System is an enclosed, controlled environment for growing plants, which incorporates a computerized, knowledge-based software program that is designed to capture the knowledge, experience, and problem-solving skills of one or more human experts in a particular discipline. The Expert System is trained to analyze crop/plant status, to monitor the condition of the plants and the environment, and to adjust operational parameters to optimize the plant-growth process. This system is intended to provide a way to remotely control plant growth with little or no human intervention. More specifically, the term control implies an autonomous method for detecting plant states such as health (biomass) or stress and then for recommending and implementing cultivation and/or remediation to optimize plant growth and to minimize consumption of energy and nutrients. Because of difficulties associated with delivering energy and nutrients remotely, a key feature of this Expert System is its ability to minimize this effort and to achieve optimum growth while taking into account the diverse range of environmental considerations that exist in an enclosed environment. The plant-growth environment for the Expert System could be made from a variety of structures, including a greenhouse, an underground cavern, or another enclosed chamber. Imaging equipment positioned within or around the chamber provides spatially distributed crop/plant-growth information. Sensors mounted in the chamber provide data and information pertaining to environmental conditions that could affect plant development. Lamps in the growth environment structure supply illumination, and other additional equipment in the chamber supplies essential nutrients and chemicals.

  2. How Plants Make Light Work of Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas in biology. Contained is information on how plants use light for growth, seed germination, and flowering. (PB)

  3. Plant Growth Under Light Emitting Diode Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessen, Daniel John

    Plant growth under light emitting diodes (LEDs) was investigated to determine if LEDs would be useful to provide radiant energy for two plant processes, photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis. Photosynthesis of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) and Kudzu (Pueraria lobata (Willd) Ohwi.) was measured using photons from LEDs to answer the following: (1) Are leaves able to use red LED light for photosynthesis? and (2) Is the efficiency of photosynthesis in pulsed light equal to that of continuous light? In 175 Pa CO _2, or in response to changes in CO _2,photosynthesis and ATP status were the same in LED as in white xenon arc light. In 35 Pa CO_2, photosynthesis was 10% lower in LED than in xenon arc light due to lowered stomatal conductance. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in pulsed light was equal to continuous light, even when pulses were twice as bright as sunlight. Xanthophyll pigments were not affected by these bright pulses. Photomorphogenesis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and transformed tobacco and tomato (expressing oat phytochrome-A) was assessed by growing plants under red LED lamps in an attempt to answer the following: (1) What is the developmental response of non-transformed and transformed tobacco to red LED light? and (2) Can tomato plants that grow tall and spindly in red LED light be made to grow short by increasing the amount of phytochrome-A? The short phenotype of transformed tobacco was not evident when plants were grown in LED light. Addition of photons of far-red or blue light to red light resulted in short transformed tobacco. Tomato plants grew three times as tall and lacked leaf development in LED versus white light, but transformed tomato remained short and produced fruit under LED light. I have determined that the LED photons are useful for photosynthesis and that the photon efficiency of photosynthesis is the same in pulsed as in continuous light. From responses of tobacco, I concluded

  4. Foreign acquisition, plant survival, and employment growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger; Görg, Holger

    This paper analyses the effect of foreign acquisition on survival probability and employment growth of target plant using data on Swedish manufacturing plants during the period 1993-2002.  An improvement over previous studies is that we take into account firm level heterogeneity by separating the...

  5. Plant Growth Absorption Spectrum Mimicking Light Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Jwo-Huei Jou; Ching-Chiao Lin; Tsung-Han Li; Chieh-Ju Li; Shiang-Hau Peng; Fu-Chin Yang; Justin Thomas, K. R.; Dhirendra Kumar; Yun Chi; Ban-Dar Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Plant factories have attracted increasing attention because they can produce fresh fruits and vegetables free from pesticides in all weather. However, the emission spectra from current light sources significantly mismatch the spectra absorbed by plants. We demonstrate a concept of using multiple broad-band as well as narrow-band solid-state lighting technologies to design plant-growth light sources. Take an organic light-emitting diode (OLED), for example; the resulting light source shows an ...

  6. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  7. Transgenic plants with enhanced growth characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-09-06

    The invention relates to transgenic plants exhibiting dramatically enhanced growth rates, greater seed and fruit/pod yields, earlier and more productive flowering, more efficient nitrogen utilization, increased tolerance to high salt conditions, and increased biomass yields. In one embodiment, transgenic plants engineered to over-express both glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) are provided. The GPT+GS double-transgenic plants of the invention consistently exhibit enhanced growth characteristics, with T0 generation lines showing an increase in biomass over wild type counterparts of between 50% and 300%. Generations that result from sexual crosses and/or selfing typically perform even better, with some of the double-transgenic plants achieving an astounding four-fold biomass increase over wild type plants.

  8. The Root Herbivore History of the Soil Affects the Productivity of a Grassland Plant Community and Determines Plant Response to New Root Herbivore Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Sonnemann, Ilja; Hempel, Stefan; Beutel, Maria; Hanauer, Nicola; Reidinger, Stefan; Wurst, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Insect root herbivores can alter plant community structure by affecting the competitive ability of single plants. However, their effects can be modified by the soil environment. Root herbivory itself may induce changes in the soil biota community, and it has recently been shown that these changes can affect plant growth in a subsequent season or plant generation. However, so far it is not known whether these root herbivore history effects (i) are detectable at the plant community level and/or...

  9. Rhizosphere Microbial Community Composition Affects Cadmium and Zinc Uptake by the Metal-Hyperaccumulating Plant Arabidopsis halleri

    OpenAIRE

    Muehe, E. Marie; Weigold, Pascal; Adaktylou, Irini J.; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The remediation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction depends on plant growth and plant metal accessibility. Soil microorganisms can affect the accumulation of metals by plants either by directly or indirectly stimulating plant growth and activity or by (im)mobilizing and/or complexing metals. Understanding the intricate interplay of metal-accumulating plants with their rhizosphere microbiome is an important step toward the application and optimization of phytoremediation. We compare...

  10. Thermodynamics of irreversible plant cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Pietruszka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The time-irreversible cell enlargement of plant cells at a constant temperature results from two independent physical processes, e.g. water absorption and cell wall yielding. In such a model cell growth starts with reduction in wall stress because of irreversible extension of the wall. The water absorption and physical expansion are spontaneous consequences of this initial modification of the cell wall (the juvenile cell vacuolate, takes up water and expands. In this model the irreversible aspect of growth arises from the extension of the cell wall. Such theory expressed quantitatively by time-dependent growth equation was elaborated by Lockhart in the 60's.The growth equation omit however a very important factor, namely the environmental temperature at which the plant cells grow. In this paper we put forward a simple phenomenological model which introduces into the growth equation the notion of temperature. Moreover, we introduce into the modified growth equation the possible influence of external growth stimulator or inhibitor (phytohormones or abiotic factors. In the presence of such external perturbations two possible theoretical solutions have been found: the linear reaction to the application of growth hormones/abiotic factors and the non-linear one. Both solutions reflect and predict two different experimental conditions, respectively (growth at constant or increasing concentration of stimulator/inhibitor. The non-linear solution reflects a common situation interesting from an environmental pollution point of view e.g. the influence of increasing (with time concentration of toxins on plant growth. Having obtained temperature modified growth equations we can draw further qualitative and, especially, quantitative conclusions about the mechanical properties of the cell wall itself. This also concerns a new and interesting result obtained in our model: We have calculated the magnitude of the cell wall yielding coefficient (T [m3 J-1•s-1] in

  11. Plant Hormones: How They Affect Root Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Diana Hereda

    This science study aid, produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, includes a series of plant rooting activities for secondary science classes. The material in the pamphlet is written for students and includes background information on plant hormones, a vocabulary list, and five learning activities. Objectives, needed materials, and…

  12. Experimental icing affects growth, mortality, and flowering in a high Arctic dwarf shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Jos M; Varpe, Øystein; van der Wal, René; Hansen, Brage Bremset

    2016-04-01

    Effects of climate change are predicted to be greatest at high latitudes, with more pronounced warming in winter than summer. Extreme mid-winter warm spells and heavy rain-on-snow events are already increasing in frequency in the Arctic, with implications for snow-pack and ground-ice formation. These may in turn affect key components of Arctic ecosystems. However, the fitness consequences of extreme winter weather events for tundra plants are not well understood, especially in the high Arctic. We simulated an extreme mid-winter rain-on-snow event at a field site in high Arctic Svalbard (78°N) by experimentally encasing tundra vegetation in ice. After the subsequent growing season, we measured the effects of icing on growth and fitness indices in the common tundra plant, Arctic bell-heather (Cassiope tetragona). The suitability of this species for retrospective growth analysis enabled us to compare shoot growth in pre and postmanipulation years in icing treatment and control plants, as well as shoot survival and flowering. Plants from icing treatment plots had higher shoot mortality and lower flowering success than controls. At the individual sample level, heavily flowering plants invested less in shoot growth than nonflowering plants, while shoot growth was positively related to the degree of shoot mortality. Therefore, contrary to expectation, undamaged shoots showed enhanced growth in ice treatment plants. This suggests that following damage, aboveground resources were allocated to the few remaining undamaged meristems. The enhanced shoot growth measured in our icing treatment plants has implications for climate studies based on retrospective analyses of Cassiope. As shoot growth in this species responds positively to summer warming, it also highlights a potentially complex interaction between summer and winter conditions. By documenting strong effects of icing on growth and reproduction of a widespread tundra plant, our study contributes to an understanding of

  13. Lunar base agriculture: Soils for plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Editor); Henninger, Donald L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This work provides information on research and experimentation concerning various aspects of food production in space and particularly on the moon. Options for human settlement of the moon and Mars and strategies for a lunar base are discussed. The lunar environment, including the mineralogical and chemical properties of lunar regolith are investigated and chemical and physical considerations for a lunar-derived soil are considered. It is noted that biological considerations for such a soil include controlled-environment crop production, both hydroponic and lunar regolith-based; microorganisms and the growth of higher plants in lunar-derived soils; and the role of microbes to condition lunar regolith for plant cultivation. Current research in the controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) project is presented in detail and future research areas, such as the growth of higher research plants in CELSS are considered. Optimum plant and microbiological considerations for lunar derived soils are examined.

  14. Analysis of plant growth regulating substances

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Barbro

    1982-01-01

    Natural plant growth regulators (phytohormones) are a group of organic compounds which, in very small amounts, act as regulators of physiological processes in plants.Methods were developed for the analysis of phytohormones in samples from Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris (L.) Karst»). Identification of abscisic acid, 3-indoleacetic acid, gibbe-rellin Ag and the conjugate N-(3-indoleacetyl)aspartic acid was performed by GC-MS as their methyl esters. A qu...

  15. Phytohormone profiles induced by Trichoderma isolates correspond with their biocontrol and plant growth-promoting activity on melon plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Pascual, Jose A.; van Wees, Saskia C M

    2014-01-01

    The application of Trichoderma strains with biocontrol and plant growth-promoting capacities to plant substrates can help reduce the input of chemical pesticides and fertilizers in agriculture. Some Trichoderma isolates can directly affect plant pathogens, but they also are known to influence the ph

  16. Growth and N-uptake of sorghum grown on saline soil as affected by green manuring with sesbania aculeata plant residues using the indirect 15N isotopic dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the effects of manuring with three types of plant residues (R, roots; L, shoots and L+R shoots plus roots) of dhaincha (Sesbania aculeata Pers.) on the growth of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) grown on a saline soil using the indirect 15N isotopic dilution technique. The use of Sesbania aculeata residues, particularly the shoots, as green manure, can provide a substantial portion of total N in sorghum, enhanced soil N uptake, and increased water use efficiency. Moreover, the use of sesbania green manure in saline soils, as a bio-reclaiming material, can be a promising approach for enhancing plant growth on a sustainable basis. (author)

  17. Osmolyte cooperation affects turgor dynamics in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiolas, Alfredo; Puleo, Gian Luigi; Sinibaldi, Edoardo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Scientists have identified turgor-based actuation as a fundamental mechanism in plant movements. Plant cell turgor is generated by water influx due to the osmolyte concentration gradient through the cell wall and the plasma membrane behaving as an osmotic barrier. Previous studies have focused on turgor modulation with respect to potassium chloride (KCl) concentration changes, although KCl is not efficiently retained in the cell, and many other compounds, including L-glutamine (L-Gln) and D-glucose (D-Glc), are present in the cytosol. In fact, the contributions of other osmolytes to turgor dynamics remain to be elucidated. Here, we show the association of osmolytes and their consequent cooperative effects on the time-dependent turgor profile generated in a model cytosol consisting of KCl, D-Glc and L-Gln at experimentally measured plant motor/generic cell concentrations and at modified concentrations. We demonstrate the influence and association of the osmolytes using osmometry and NMR measurements. We also show, using a plant cell-inspired device we previously developed, that osmolyte complexes, rather than single osmolytes, permit to obtain higher turgor required by plant movements. We provide quantitative cues for deeper investigations of osmolyte transport for plant movement, and reveal the possibility of developing osmotic actuators exploiting a dynamically varying concentration of osmolytes.

  18. How Does Human Capital Affect on Growth in Different Economies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Safdari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The main objective of this study was to investigate how human capital can affect growth in different economies. Approach: For this purpose, we investigated the model, which the growth rate of total factor productivity depends on human capital stock level using a cross-country panel approach for 104 countries in five-year intervals during the 1980-2005. Results: The finding of this study showed that human capital through its effect on the speed of technology adoption from abroad has positive effect and significantly on growth in total samples of countries while human capital directly in developed countries enter negatively inverse developing countries. Conclusion: Moreover human capital affects growth in different ways it has more effects on per capital growth through technology/catch-up component than domestic innovation component. Moreover human capital of different ways has different effects on growth but in total it has positive effect on economic growth.

  19. How will Population Aging Affect Economic Growth?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡昉; 王美艳

    2007-01-01

    Not long ago,the problem of an aging population only emerged in developed countries once per capita GDP had reached a relatively high level.However,in today’s China,although the per capita GDP has remained low,the problem of growing old before becoming rich is looming.As China is not yet prosperous,economic development needs to be persistently upheld;however,will the aging problem cause economic growth to be challenged by labour shortages in the future? From a structural perspective,although continuous rural labour transfer can ease demand for urban labour,the problem now is that rural labourers are not always qualified to take on positions requiring ever-advancing skills,resulting in a skills drought.It could be claimed that this skills drought is due to a lack of education on the part of rural workers,yet university students with a formal education also encounter difficulties when hunting for a job.Does this indicate that the current education structure should be revised? The above questions suggest that China is currently facing a complicated and delicate situation with regard to the interrelated problems of economy,population,employment and education,and will continue to do so for a long period in the future.These problems require the cautious planning of overall and sustainable policies.The two"Domestic Column"articles this issue offer in-depth analyses of these problems and provide valuable policy suggestions.

  20. Some Environmental Factors Affecting on Growth Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tuzemen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Live weights, weight gains and some body measurements at different ages of Eastern Anatolian Red Cattle (EAR were determined and some environmental factors affecting on these traits were investigated. The effect of dam’s age on the birth weight was highly significant (P<0.01. Although the lowest birth weight was obtained from calves of dams at the 3 years of age, the highest birth weight was obtained from calves given birth by cows at the 5 years of age. The males had heavier live weights and weight gains at different ages than the females. The effect of the sex on the live weights except for 9 and 12 months weights was found as highly significant (P<0.01. Feeding of the calves with different amount of milk had significant (P<0.01 influence on the 3, 6 and 9 months weights as well as weight gains. The effect of the years on the daily weight gains in EAR was also highly significant (P<0.01. The results shows the importance of the environmental effects on the traits studied and revealed that there is need for them to be corrected prior to the improvement studies.

  1. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils

    OpenAIRE

    Rocheli de Souza; Adriana Ambrosini; Passaglia, Luciane M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitro...

  2. Pectin Methylesterification Impacts the Relationship between Photosynthesis and Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Weraduwage, Sarathi; Kim, Sang-Jin; Renna, Luciana; C Anozie, Fransisca; D Sharkey, Thomas; Brandizzi, Federica

    2016-06-01

    Photosynthesis occurs in mesophyll cells of specialized organs such as leaves. The rigid cell wall encapsulating photosynthetic cells controls the expansion and distribution of cells within photosynthetic tissues. The relationship between photosynthesis and plant growth is affected by leaf area. However, the underlying genetic mechanisms affecting carbon partitioning to different aspects of leaf growth are not known. To fill this gap, we analyzed Arabidopsis plants with altered levels of pectin methylesterification, which is known to modulate cell wall plasticity and plant growth. Pectin methylesterification levels were varied through manipulation of cotton Golgi-related (CGR) 2 or 3 genes encoding two functionally redundant pectin methyltransferases. Increased levels of methylesterification in a line over-expressing CGR2 (CGR2OX) resulted in highly expanded leaves with enhanced intercellular air spaces; reduced methylesterification in a mutant lacking both CGR-genes 2 and 3 (cgr2/3) resulted in thin but dense leaf mesophyll that limited CO2 diffusion to chloroplasts. Leaf, root, and plant dry weight were enhanced in CGR2OX but decreased in cgr2/3. Differences in growth between wild type and the CGR-mutants can be explained by carbon partitioning but not by variations in area-based photosynthesis. Therefore, photosynthesis drives growth through alterations in carbon partitioning to new leaf area growth and leaf mass per unit leaf area; however, CGR-mediated pectin methylesterification acts as a primary factor in this relationship through modulation of the expansion and positioning of the cells in leaves, which in turn drive carbon partitioning by generating dynamic carbon demands in leaf area growth and leaf mass per unit leaf area. PMID:27208234

  3. Different growth promoting effects of endophytic bacteria on invasive and native clonal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Cong eDai; Wei eFu; Ling-Yun eWan; Hong-Hong eCai; Ning eWang; Shanshan eQi; Daolin eDu

    2016-01-01

    The role of the interactions between endophytes and alien plants has been unclear yet in plant invasion. We used a completely germ-free culture system to quantify the plant growth-promoting (PGP) effects of endophytic bacteria Bacillus sp. on aseptic seedlings of W. trilobata and of its native clonal congener W. chinensis. The endophytic bacteria did not affect the growth of W. chinensis, but they significantly promoted the growth of W. trilobata. With the PGP effects of endophytic bacteria,...

  4. Micropropagation of phytoplasma-affected Limonium sinuatum Mill. plants

    OpenAIRE

    Eleonora Gabryszewska; Maria Kamińska; Małgorzata Korbin; Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-01-01

    Healthy and AY-affected plants of L.sinuatum have been propagated in vitro for 12 months on the media with and without cytokinins. In the contrary to the healthy plants the phytoplasma affected statice showed abnormal proliferation of the axillary shoots, shortening of the internodes, smaller leaves and severe chlorosis. On the medium without cytokinins, diseased plants proliferated and formed 7.0 axillary shoots per explant but the healthy ones only formed 2.3 shoots; however, the fresh weig...

  5. Plant growth strategies are remodeled by spaceflight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Anna-Lisa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arabidopsis plants were grown on the International Space Station within specialized hardware that combined a plant growth habitat with a camera system that can capture images at regular intervals of growth. The Imaging hardware delivers telemetric data from the ISS, specifically images received in real-time from experiments on orbit, providing science without sample return. Comparable Ground Controls were grown in a sister unit that is maintained in the Orbital Environment Simulator at Kennedy Space Center. One of many types of biological data that can be analyzed in this fashion is root morphology. Arabidopsis seeds were geminated on orbit on nutrient gel Petri plates in a configuration that encouraged growth along the surface of the gel. Photos were taken every six hours for the 15 days of the experiment. Results In the absence of gravity, but the presence of directional light, spaceflight roots remained strongly negatively phototropic and grew in the opposite direction of the shoot growth; however, cultivars WS and Col-0 displayed two distinct, marked differences in their growth patterns. First, cultivar WS skewed strongly to the right on orbit, while cultivar Col-0 grew with little deviation away from the light source. Second, the Spaceflight environment also impacted the rate of growth in Arabidopsis. The size of the Flight plants (as measured by primary root and hypocotyl length was uniformly smaller than comparably aged Ground Control plants in both cultivars. Conclusions Skewing and waving, thought to be gravity dependent phenomena, occur in spaceflight plants. In the presence of an orienting light source, phenotypic trends in skewing are gravity independent, and the general patterns of directional root growth typified by a given genotype in unit gravity are recapitulated on orbit, although overall growth patterns on orbit are less uniform. Skewing appears independent of axial orientation on the ISS – suggesting

  6. Growth but Not Photosynthesis Response of a Host Plant to Infection by a Holoparasitic Plant Depends on Nitrogen Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hao; Xu, Shu-Jun; Hong, Lan; Wang, Zhang-Ming; Ye, Wan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic plants can adversely influence the growth of their hosts by removing resources and by affecting photosynthesis. Such negative effects depend on resource availability. However, at varied resource levels, to what extent the negative effects on growth are attributed to the effects on photosynthesis has not been well elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of nitrogen supply on the growth and photosynthesis responses of the host plant Mikania micrantha to infection by the holoparasi...

  7. Plant growth promotion and Penicillium citrinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choo Yeon-Sik

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endophytic fungi are known plant symbionts. They produce a variety of beneficial metabolites for plant growth and survival, as well as defend their hosts from attack of certain pathogens. Coastal dunes are nutrient deficient and offer harsh, saline environment for the existing flora and fauna. Endophytic fungi may play an important role in plant survival by enhancing nutrient uptake and producing growth-promoting metabolites such as gibberellins and auxins. We screened roots of Ixeris repenes (L. A. Gray, a common dune plant, for the isolation of gibberellin secreting endophytic fungi. Results We isolated 15 endophytic fungi from the roots of Ixeris repenes and screened them for growth promoting secondary metabolites. The fungal isolate IR-3-3 gave maximum plant growth when applied to waito-c rice and Atriplex gemelinii seedlings. Analysis of the culture filtrate of IR-3-3 showed the presence of physiologically active gibberellins, GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7 (1.95 ng/ml, 3.83 ng/ml, 6.03 ng/ml and 2.35 ng/ml, respectively along with other physiologically inactive GA5, GA9, GA12, GA15, GA19, GA20 and, GA24. The plant growth promotion and gibberellin producing capacity of IR-3-3 was much higher than the wild type Gibberella fujikuroi, which was taken as control during present study. GA5, a precursor of bioactive GA3 was reported for the first time in fungi. The fungal isolate IR-3-3 was identified as a new strain of Penicillium citrinum (named as P. citrinum KACC43900 through phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA sequence. Conclusion Isolation of new strain of Penicillium citrinum from the sand dune flora is interesting as information on the presence of Pencillium species in coastal sand dunes is limited. The plant growth promoting ability of this fungal strain may help in conservation and revegetation of the rapidly eroding sand dune flora. Penicillium citrinum is already known for producing mycotoxin citrinin and cellulose digesting

  8. Size and Growth of Japanese Plants in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Blonigen, Bruce A.; KaSaundra Tomlin

    1999-01-01

    Using a unique database on all Japanese manufacturing plants in the United States, we examine the relationship between plant size and growth for these foreign-owned plants. These plants average sizes are three times larger than comparable U.S. plants and experienced 30 percent growth from 1987 through 1990, while U.S. average plant sizes declined over the same period. Our estimates strongly reject Gibrat's Law for these plants, and suggest that smaller plants grow faster. We also find learnin...

  9. Circularly Polarized Light and Growth of Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayev, Pavel; Pergolizzi, Robert

    2011-03-01

    The influence of linearly polarized light on the direction of plants growth has been recently demonstrated. The state of circularly polarized (CP) light can also change when it is reflected from the surface of leaves and stems. However, the role of light handedness in the development of plants and CP light interaction with the complexes of chlorophyll molecules have still not been studied enough. In this work, the role of left CP light in the accelerated growth of lentil and pea plants is revealed and studied. The mechanism of such an enhancement is discussed in terms of the model considering transmission, absorption, and scattering of CP light on micro and macro levels of leaf organization. Theoretical modeling of light interaction with the interior of the leaf was conducted for a number of recently proposed models of organization of chlorophyll molecules and chloroplasts. All the calculations were performed by employing a 4x4 matrix method in solving Maxwell equations. It is shown that left-handed chiral organization of chlorophyll molecules can greatly enhance the absorption of light and therefore lead to the enhanced growth of the whole plant under CP light.

  10. Plant density affects measures of biodiversity effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stachová, T.; Fibich, P.; Lepš, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-11. ISSN 1752-9921 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/08/H044 Grant ostatní: GA JU(CZ) 138/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biodiversity effects * plant density * constant final yield Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.284, year: 2013 http://jpe.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/04/27/jpe.rts015.full.pdf+html

  11. Plant Growth Absorption Spectrum Mimicking Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jwo-Huei Jou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant factories have attracted increasing attention because they can produce fresh fruits and vegetables free from pesticides in all weather. However, the emission spectra from current light sources significantly mismatch the spectra absorbed by plants. We demonstrate a concept of using multiple broad-band as well as narrow-band solid-state lighting technologies to design plant-growth light sources. Take an organic light-emitting diode (OLED, for example; the resulting light source shows an 84% resemblance with the photosynthetic action spectrum as a twin-peak blue dye and a diffused mono-peak red dye are employed. This OLED can also show a greater than 90% resemblance as an additional deeper red emitter is added. For a typical LED, the resemblance can be improved to 91% if two additional blue and red LEDs are incorporated. The approach may facilitate either an ideal use of the energy applied for plant growth and/or the design of better light sources for growing different plants.

  12. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Eric W.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Chelius, Marisa K.

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  13. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated

  14. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated.

  15. Effect of various sucker sizes and planting times on growth and flower yield of chrysanthemum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small and large sized suckers of Chrysanthemum morifolium were planted on four different dates, i.e. 18th February, 18th April, 17th June and 16th August to find out their effect on growth and flower yield. Plants resulting from small sized suckers produced significantly higher number of primary and secondary branches and leaves plant/sup -1/. However, plant height, leaf area, number of suckers produced, biomass (fresh plant weight) and flower yield plant/sup -1/ were not affected by the sucker sizes. As the planting was delayed, plant growth and flower yield was reduced. Early plantings resulted in increased plant height, more number of branches and leaves plant/sup -1/, greater biomass, and higher flower yields but reduced leaf area as compared to late plantings. (author)

  16. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  17. Biofortification of iron in chickpea by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron deficiency is a major nutritional disorder being responsible to affect millions of people around the globe. Its malnutrition may be reduced through biofortification: a process to produce micronutrient enriched staple food. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can fortify iron content within edible plant tissues by enhancing its availability through various mechanisms. In a pot study, five bacterial isolates (S1, S2, S3, S4 and S5) were tested for improving plant growth and bioavailable iron (Fe) content in chickpea where Fe was applied in the form of iron sulphate solution. Results showed that inoculation with PGPR significantly enhanced the plant height, root length, root fresh and dry weights, shoot fresh and dry weights and Fe content compared to un-inoculated control plants. Application of FeSO/sub 4/ significantly improved the Fe content upto 100 and 173% in grain and shoot respectively, as compared to control. Application of PGPR along with iron showed 81 and 75% increase in grain and shoot iron contents, respectively, over control. These results suggested that PGPR can help plants to uptake extra Fe from soil, if soil is supplemented with additional Fe. These findings advocate that microbial assisted biofortification in grain can alleviate micronutrient deficiency in humans especially in resource limited countries. (author)

  18. DOSES DE NITROGÊNIO E DENSIDADES DE PLANTAS COM E SEM UM REGULADOR DE CRESCIMENTO AFETANDO O TRIGO, CULTIVAR OR-1 NITROGEN DOSES AND PLANT DENSITIES WITH AND WITHOUT A GROWTH REGULATOR AFFECTING WHEAT, CULTIVAR OR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Zagonel

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Doses de nitrogênio e elevadas populações de plantas são utilizadas visando a obtenção de altas produtividades em trigo. Porém, estes fatores podem promover o acamamento das plantas, especialmente para as cultivares de porte médio ou alto. O uso de produtos que reduzem a estatura das plantas pode minimizar este problema. Visando avaliar o efeito do regulador de crescimento trinexapc-ethyl em diferentes populações de plantas e doses de nitrogênio, na cultivar de trigo OR-1, instalou-se um experimento na Fazenda Escola "Capão da Onça", da Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, em Ponta Grossa, PR, no ano de 1999. O delineamento experimental foi blocos ao acaso em esquema fatorial 2 x 3 x 4, em quatro repetições. Os vinte e quatro tratamentos constaram da aplicação de 125 g i.a./ha de trinexapac-ethyl e testemunha; densidades de 55, 75 e 112 plantas/m no espaçamento de 0,17m entre fileiras e doses de 0, 45, 90 e 135kg/ha de nitrogênio em cobertura. A aplicação do trinexapac-ethyl resultou em plantas com entre-nós mais curtos; em aumento do número de espigas/m e da produtividade. Com o aumento da dose de nitrogênio, ocorreu aumento da estatura das plantas, do número de espigas/m e da produtividade. Com o aumento da densidade de plantas, o diâmetro do caule, a massa seca das plantas e o número de grãos por espiga diminuíram mas o número de espigas/m e o peso de mil grãos aumentaram, sem afetarem a produtividade. Não ocorreu acamamento em nenhum dos tratamentos.Elevated nitrogen rates and high plant populations are adopted with the purpose of achieving high wheat yields. However, these factors may promote the lodging of the plants, especially for the medium and tall height cultivars. The utilization of products which reduce plant height could minimize this problem. With the aim of evaluating the effects of a growth regulator on different plant populations and nitrogen rates for the wheat cultivar OR-1, an experiment was

  19. (Metabolic mechanisms of plant growth at low water potentials)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The work supported by DOE showed that water-limitation inhibits plant growth first by imposing a physical limitation that is followed in a few h by metabolic changes leading to reduced wall extensibility in the enlarging cells. After the wall extensibility decreased, a 28kD protein accumulated particularly in the walls of the growth-affected cells. Antibodies were used to identify cDNA for the protein. The base sequence of the cDNA was typical of an enzyme rather than known structural components of walls. The sequence was identical to one published by another laboratory at the same time and encoding a protein that accumulates in vacuoles of depodded soybean plants.

  20. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Stimulate Vegetative Growth and Asexual Reproduction of Kalanchoe daigremontiana

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yong-Soon; Park, Kyungseok; Kloepper, Joseph W.; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Certain bacterial species associate with plant roots in soil. The plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) stimulate plant growth and yield in greenhouse and field. Here, we examined whether application of known bacilli PGPR strains stimulated growth and asexual reproduction in the succulent plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Four PGPR strains B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a, B. cereus BS107, B. pumilus INR7, and B. subtilis GB03 were applied to young plantlets by soil-drenching, and plant growth...

  1. Protocol: optimising hydroponic growth systems for nutritional and physiological analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants

    OpenAIRE

    Conn, Simon J; Hocking, Bradleigh; Dayod, Maclin; Xu, Bo; Athman, Asmini; Henderson, Sam; Aukett, Lucy; Conn, Vanessa; Shearer, Monique K; Fuentes, Sigfredo; TYERMAN, STEPHEN D.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydroponic growth systems are a convenient platform for studying whole plant physiology. However, we found through trialling systems as they are described in the literature that our experiments were frequently confounded by factors that affected plant growth, including algal contamination and hypoxia. We also found the way in which the plants were grown made them poorly amenable to a number of common physiological assays. Results The drivers for the development of this hydroponic s...

  2. The influence of growth retardants and cytokinins on flowering of ornamental plants

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Pobudkiewicz

    2012-01-01

    Growth retardants are applied in order to obtain short and well compact plants. They usually inhibit stem elongation, but also can influence the flowering of plants. The aim of cytokinin application is to obtain well branched plants without removing the apical meristem. Cytokinins usually increase the number of axillary shoots but also can influence flowering. Growth retardants and cytokinins can affect flower size, pedicel length, number of flowers, flower longevity, abortion of flower buds ...

  3. Different growth promoting effects of endophytic bacteria on invasive and native clonal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Cong eDai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of the interactions between endophytes and alien plants has been unclear yet in plant invasion. We used a completely germ-free culture system to quantify the plant growth-promoting (PGP effects of endophytic bacteria Bacillus sp. on aseptic seedlings of W. trilobata and of its native clonal congener W. chinensis. The endophytic bacteria did not affect the growth of W. chinensis, but they significantly promoted the growth of W. trilobata. With the PGP effects of endophytic bacteria, relative change ratios of the clonal traits and the ramets' growth traits of W. trilobata were significantly greater than those of W. chinensis. Our results indicate that the growth-promoting effects of endophytes may differ between invasive and native clonal plants, and the endophytes of invasive plant may be host-specific to facilitate plant invasion.

  4. Different Growth Promoting Effects of Endophytic Bacteria on Invasive and Native Clonal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhi-Cong; Fu, Wei; Wan, Ling-Yun; Cai, Hong-Hong; Wang, Ning; Qi, Shan-Shan; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The role of the interactions between endophytes and alien plants has been unclear yet in plant invasion. We used a completely germ-free culture system to quantify the plant growth-promoting (PGP) effects of endophytic bacteria Bacillus sp. on aseptic seedlings of Wedelia trilobata and of its native clonal congener W. chinensis. The endophytic bacteria did not affect the growth of W. chinensis, but they significantly promoted the growth of W. trilobata. With the PGP effects of endophytic bacteria, relative change ratios of the clonal traits and the ramets’ growth traits of W. trilobata were significantly greater than those of W. chinensis. Our results indicate that the growth-promoting effects of endophytes may differ between invasive and native clonal plants, and the endophytes of invasive plant may be host-specific to facilitate plant invasion. PMID:27252722

  5. Does ozone exposure alter growth and carbon allocation of mycorrhizal plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, L.C.; Gamon, J.A. (California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Andersen, C.P. (Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Ozone is known to adversely affect plant growth. However, it is less clear how ozone affects belowground processes. This study tests the hypothesis that ozone alters growth and carbon allocation of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) plants. Two ecotypes of Elymus glaucus (blue wild rye) were exposed to mycorrhizal inoculation and episodic ozone exposures simulating atmospheric conditions in the Los Angeles Basin. Preliminary results show that effects of ozone on growth were subtle. In both ecotypes, growth of aboveground biomass was not affected by ozone while root growth was decreased. In most treatments, mycorrhizal inoculation decreased growth of leaves and stems, but had no significant effect on root growth. Three-way ANOVA tests indicated interactive effects between ecotype, mycorrhiza and ozone. Further experimental work is needed to reveal the biological processes governing these responses.

  6. Gravitational effects on plant growth hormone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Schulze, A.

    1983-01-01

    Dolk's (1936) finding that more growth hormone diffuses from the lower side of a gravity-stimulated plant shoot than from the upper side is presently confirmed by means of both an isotope dilution assay and selected ion monitoring-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and it is established that the asymmetrically distributed hormone is indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). This is the first physicochemical demonstration that there is more IAA on the lower sides of a geostimulated plant shoot. It is also found that free IAA primarily occurs in the conductive vascular tissues of the shoot, while IAA esters predominate in the growing cortical cells. A highly sensitive gas chromatographic isotope dilution assay shows that the hormone asymmetry also occurs in the nonvascular tissue.

  7. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley L Gallagher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a glass wastebasket. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction.

  8. Propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration influence the establishment and growth of an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Hua eYou; Cui-min eHan; Long-xiang eFang; Dao-lin eDu

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxero...

  9. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    OpenAIRE

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxer...

  10. Controlled ecological life support systems: Development of a plant growth module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averner, Mel M.; Macelroy, Robert D.; Smernoff, David T.

    1987-01-01

    An effort was made to begin defining the scientific and technical requirements for the design and construction of a ground-based plant growth facility. In particular, science design criteria for the Plant Growth Module (PGM) of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) were determined in the following areas: (1) irradiation parameters and associated equipment affecting plant growth; (2) air flow; (3) planting, culture, and harvest techniques; (4) carbon dioxide; (5) temperature and relative humidity; (6) oxygen; (7) construction materials and access; (8) volatile compounds; (9) bacteria, sterilization, and filtration; (10) nutrient application systems; (11) nutrient monitoring; and (12) nutrient pH and conductivity.

  11. Do soil fertilization and forest canopy foliage affect the growth and photosynthesis of Amazonian saplings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilvanda dos Santos Magalhães

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Most Amazonian soils are highly weathered and poor in nutrients. Therefore, photosynthesis and plant growth should positively respond to the addition of mineral nutrients. Surprisingly, no study has been carried out in situ in the central Amazon to address this issue for juvenile trees. The objective of this study was to determine how photosynthetic rates and growth of tree saplings respond to the addition of mineral nutrients, to the variation in leaf area index of the forest canopy, and to changes in soil water content associated with rainfall seasonality. We assessed the effect of adding a slow-release fertilizer. We determined plant growth from 2010 to 2012 and gas exchange in the wet and dry season of 2012. Rainfall seasonality led to variations in soil water content, but it did not affect sapling growth or leaf gas exchange parameters. Although soil amendment increased phosphorus content by 60 %, neither plant growth nor the photosynthetic parameters were influenced by the addition of mineral nutrients. However, photosynthetic rates and growth of saplings decreased as the forest canopy became denser. Even when Amazonian soils are poor in nutrients, photosynthesis and sapling growth are more responsive to slight variations in light availability in the forest understory than to the availability of nutrients. Therefore, the response of saplings to future increases in atmospheric [CO2] will not be limited by the availability of mineral nutrients in the soil.

  12. Peat soil composition as indicator of plants growth environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormets, M.; Tonutare, T.; Kauer, K.; Szajdak, L.; Kolli, R.

    2009-04-01

    Exhausted milled peat areas have been left behind as a result of decades-lasting intensive peat production in Estonia and Europe. According to different data there in Estonia is 10 000 - 15 000 ha of exhausted milled peat areas that should be vegetated. Restoration using Sphagnum species is most advantageous, as it creates ecological conditions closest to the natural succession towards a natural bog area. It is also thought that the large scale translocation of vegetation from intact bogs, as used in some Canadian restoration trials, is not applicable in most of European sites due to limited availability of suitable donor areas. Another possibility to reduce the CO2 emission in these areas is their use for cultivation of species that requires minimum agrotechnical measures exploitation. It is found by experiments that it is possible to establish on Vaccinium species for revegetation of exhausted milled peat areas. Several physiological activity of the plant is regulated by the number of phytohormones. These substances in low quantities move within the plant from a site of production to a site of action. Phytohormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is formed in soils from tryptophane by enzymatic conversion. This compound seems to play an important function in nature as result to its influence in regulation of plant growth and development. A principal feature of IAA is its ability to affect growth, development and health of plants. This compound activates root morphology and metabolic changes in the host plant. The physiological impact of this substance is involved in cell elongation, apical dominance, root initiation, parthenocarpy, abscission, callus formation and the respiration. The investigation areas are located in the county of Tartu (58˚ 22' N, 26˚ 43' E), in the southern part of Estonia. The soil of the experimental fields belongs according to the WRB soil classification, to the soils subgroups of Fibri-Dystric Histosols. The investigation areas were

  13. How Stock Markets Development Affect Endogenous Growth Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeb Masoud

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper can bedescribed as a significant exploratory study that will provide a significantcontribution to knowledge to consider crucial issues which need to be barriersto understanding or a temptation/ requirement to judge some practices as‘better’ than others for stock market development effective approach andimplement successful stock market performance and economic growth. Recentanalysis of the link between financial development and growth, gained frominsights acquired as a result of using the technique of endogenous growthmodels, has illustrated that growth without exogenous technical progress andthat growth rates could be related to technology, income distribution andinstitutional arrangements. This provides the theoretical background thatempirical studies have lacked; illustrating that financial intermediationaffects the level of economic growth. Resulting models have provided newimpetus to empirical research of the effects of financial development. Thebirth of the new endogenous growth theory has facilitated the development ofimproved growth models where the long-term rate could be affected by a numberof elements. These included technology, education and health policies in theprocess of economic development, capital accumulation, government policies andinstitutional activities in the role of financial development in economicgrowth.

  14. Drought stress affects plant metabolites and herbivore preference but not host location by its parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldegergis, Berhane T; Zhu, Feng; Poelman, Erik H; Dicke, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    One of the main abiotic stresses that strongly affects plant survival and the primary cause of crop loss around the world is drought. Drought stress leads to sequential morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular changes that can have severe effects on plant growth, development and productivity. As a consequence of these changes, the interaction between plants and insects can be altered. Using cultivated Brassica oleracea plants, the parasitoid Microplitis mediator and its herbivorous host Mamestra brassicae, we studied the effect of drought stress on (1) the emission of plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs), (2) plant hormone titres, (3) preference and performance of the herbivore, and (4) preference of the parasitoid. Higher levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and abscisic acid (ABA) were recorded in response to herbivory, but no significant differences were observed for salicylic acid (SA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Drought significantly impacted SA level and showed a significant interactive effect with herbivory for IAA levels. A total of 55 VOCs were recorded and the difference among the treatments was influenced largely by herbivory, where the emission rate of fatty acid-derived volatiles, nitriles and (E)-4,8-dimethylnona-1,3,7-triene [(E)-DMNT] was enhanced. Mamestra brassicae moths preferred to lay eggs on drought-stressed over control plants; their offspring performed similarly on plants of both treatments. VOCs due to drought did not affect the choice of M. mediator parasitoids. Overall, our study reveals an influence of drought on plant chemistry and insect-plant interactions. PMID:25370387

  15. Effects of microgravity on growth hormone concentration and distribution in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Aga; Jensen, Philip; Desrosiers, Mark; Bandurski, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    On earth, gravity affects the distribution of the plant growth hormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), in a manner such that the plant grows into a normal vertical orientation (shoots up, roots down). How the plant controls the amount and distribution of IAA is only partially understood and is currently under investigation in this laboratory. The question to be answered in the flight experiment concerns the effect of gravity on the concentration, turn over, and distribution of the growth hormone. The answer to this question will aid in understanding the mechanism by which plants control the amount and distribution of growth hormone. Such knowledge of a plant's hormonal metabolism may aid in the growth of plants in space and will lead to agronomic advances.

  16. Phytohormone profiles induced by trichoderma isolates correspond with their biocontrol and plant growth-promoting activity on melon plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Pascual, Jose A; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2014-07-01

    The application of Trichoderma strains with biocontrol and plant growth-promoting capacities to plant substrates can help reduce the input of chemical pesticides and fertilizers in agriculture. Some Trichoderma isolates can directly affect plant pathogens, but they also are known to influence the phytohormonal network of their host plant, thus leading to an improvement of plant growth and stress tolerance. In this study, we tested whether alterations in the phytohormone signature induced by different Trichoderma isolates correspond with their ability for biocontrol and growth promotion. Four Trichoderma isolates were collected from agricultural soils and were identified as the species Trichoderma harzianum (two isolates), Trichoderma ghanense, and Trichoderma hamatum. Their antagonistic activity against the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis was tested in vitro, and their plant growth-promoting and biocontrol activity against Fusarium wilt on melon plants was examined in vivo, and compared to that of the commercial strain T. harzianum T-22. Several growth- and defense-related phytohormones were analyzed in the shoots of plants that were root-colonized by the different Trichoderma isolates. An increase in auxin and a decrease in cytokinins and abscisic acid content were induced by the isolates that promoted the plant growth. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to evaluate the relationship between the plant phenotypic and hormonal variables. PCA pointed to a strong association of auxin induction with plant growth stimulation by Trichoderma. Furthermore, the disease-protectant ability of the Trichoderma strains against F. oxysporum infection seems to be more related to their induced alterations in the content of the hormones abscisic acid, ethylene, and the cytokinin trans-zeatin riboside than to the in vitro antagonism activity against F. oxysporum. PMID:25023078

  17. Does Misaligned Currency Affect Economic Growth? – Evidence from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonći Svilokos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to measure the currency misalignment of the Croatian kuna and to reveal whether it affects economic growth for the period 2001 (Q1 to 2013 (Q3. The estimate relies on recent cointegration techniques, VAR models and Granger causality tests. The findings show that there are two misalignment sub-periods for the Croatian kuna: undervaluation in the period from 2000Q1 to 2007Q4 and overvaluation in the period from 2008Q1 to 2013Q3. The evidence reveals that for the whole sample period, the Granger causality goes from misalignments (MISA to GDP growth under the 10 percent significance level. However, for the two sub-periods no evidence of Granger causality from MISA to GDP growth or vice versa is found. The research also reveals that the currency misalignments in the observed period are relatively small.

  18. Influence of calcium foliar fertilization on plant growth, nutrient concentrations, and fruit quality of papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium (Ca) is a major plant nutrient that affects cell wall and plasma membrane formation and plays a key role in plant growth and biomass production. It can be used to decrease fruit decay and increase firmness and shelf life. So far, little attention has been paid to investigate the effects of f...

  19. Mechanisms and applications of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria: Current perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munees Ahemad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are the soil bacteria inhabiting around/on the root surface and are directly or indirectly involved in promoting plant growth and development via production and secretion of various regulatory chemicals in the vicinity of rhizosphere. Generally, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria facilitate the plant growth directly by either assisting in resource acquisition (nitrogen, phosphorus and essential minerals or modulating plant hormone levels, or indirectly by decreasing the inhibitory effects of various pathogens on plant growth and development in the forms of biocontrol agents. Various studies have documented the increased health and productivity of different plant species by the application of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria under both normal and stressed conditions. The plant-beneficial rhizobacteria may decrease the global dependence on hazardous agricultural chemicals which destabilize the agro-ecosystems. This review accentuates the perception of the rhizosphere and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria under the current perspectives. Further, explicit outlooks on the different mechanisms of rhizobacteria mediated plant growth promotion have been described in detail with the recent development and research. Finally, the latest paradigms of applicability of these beneficial rhizobacteria in different agro-ecosystems have been presented comprehensively under both normal and stress conditions to highlight the recent trends with the aim to develop future insights.

  20. Martian Soil Plant Growth Experiment: The Effects of Adding Nitrogen, Bacteria, and Fungi to Enhance Plant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliman, D. M.; Cooper, J. B.; Anderson, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Plant growth is enhanced by the presence of symbiotic soil microbes. In order to better understand how plants might prosper on Mars, we set up an experiment to test whether symbiotic microbes function to enhance plant growth in a Martian soil simulant.

  1. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Vacheron, Jordan; Desbrosses, Guilhem; Bouffaud, Marie-Lara; Touraine, Bruno; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Muller, Daniel; Legendre, Laurent; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and developme...

  2. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan eVacheron; Guilhem eDesbrosses; Marie-Lara eBouffaud; Bruno eTouraine; Yvan eMoënne-Loccoz; Daniel eMuller; Laurent eLegendre; Florence eWisniewski-Dyé; Claire ePrigent-Combaret

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and developme...

  3. Artificial Life of Soybean Plant Growth Modeling Using Intelligence Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Atris Suyantohadi; Mochamad Hariadi; Mauridhi Hery Purnomo

    2010-01-01

    The natural process on plant growth system has a complex system and it has could be developed on characteristic studied using intelligent approaches conducting with artificial life system. The approaches on examining the natural process on soybean (Glycine Max L.Merr) plant growth have been analyzed and synthesized in these research through modeling using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Lindenmayer System (L-System) methods. Research aimed to design and to visualize plant growth modeling...

  4. Formaldehyde exposure affects growth and metabolism of common bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent state and federal directives have slated a substantial increase in the use of methanol as an alternative to gasoline in both fleet and private vehicles in the coming decade. The incomplete combustion of methanol produces formaldehyde vapor, and catalytic converter technology that completely oxidizes formaldehyde has yet to be developed. The approach of this study was to use a range of methanol concentrations encompassing levels currently found or that may occur in the future in the ambient air of some heavily polluted areas to test the potential phytotoxicity of formaldehyde. The study had the following objectives: (1) design and build a formaldehyde vapor generator with sufficient capacity for long-term plant fumigations; (2) determine growth response of common bean to formaldehyde; (3) evaluate physiological and biochemical changes of bean plants associated with formaldehyde exposures. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Plant growth promotion induced by phosphate solubilizing endophytic Pseudomonas isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Oteino, Nicholas; Lally, Richard D.; Kiwanuka, Samuel; Lloyd, Andrew; Ryan, David; Germaine, Kieran J.; Dowling, David N.

    2015-01-01

    The use of plant growth promoting bacterial inoculants as live microbial biofertilizers provides a promising alternative to chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Inorganic phosphate solubilization is one of the major mechanisms of plant growth promotion by plant associated bacteria. This involves bacteria releasing organic acids into the soil which solubilize the phosphate complexes converting them into ortho-phosphate which is available for plant up-take and utilization. The study presented h...

  6. Strigolactones as mediators of plant growth responses to environmental conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) have been recently identified as a new group of plant hormones or their derivatives thereof, shown to play a role in plant development. Evolutionary forces have driven the development of mechanisms in plants that allow adaptive adjustments to a variety of different habitats by employing plasticity in shoot and root growth and development. The ability of SLs to regulate both shoot and root development suggests a role in the plant's response to its growth environment. To pl...

  7. Plant Turnover and Productivity Growth in Canadian Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Wulong; Baldwin, John R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper outlines the size of the turnover in plants that have entered and exited the Canadian manufacturing sector during the three periods: 1973-1979, 1979-1988 and 1988-1997. It also examines the contribution of plant turnover to labour productivity growth in the manufacturing sector over the three periods. Plant turnover makes a significant contribution to productivity growth as more productive entrants replace exiting plants that are less productive. A disproportionately large fraction...

  8. Root cooling strongly affects diel leaf growth dynamics, water and carbohydrate relations in Ricinus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiré, Richard; Schneider, Heike; Thorpe, Michael R; Kuhn, Arnd J; Schurr, Ulrich; Walter, Achim

    2010-03-01

    In laboratory and greenhouse experiments with potted plants, shoots and roots are exposed to temperature regimes throughout a 24 h (diel) cycle that can differ strongly from the regime under which these plants have evolved. In the field, roots are often exposed to lower temperatures than shoots. When the root-zone temperature in Ricinus communis was decreased below a threshold value, leaf growth occurred preferentially at night and was strongly inhibited during the day. Overall, leaf expansion, shoot biomass growth, root elongation and ramification decreased rapidly, carbon fluxes from shoot to root were diminished and carbohydrate contents of both root and shoot increased. Further, transpiration rate was not affected, yet hydrostatic tensions in shoot xylem increased. When root temperature was increased again, xylem tension reduced, leaf growth recovered rapidly, carbon fluxes from shoot to root increased, and carbohydrate pools were depleted. We hypothesize that the decreased uptake of water in cool roots diminishes the growth potential of the entire plant - especially diurnally, when the growing leaf loses water via transpiration. As a consequence, leaf growth and metabolite concentrations can vary enormously, depending on root-zone temperature and its heterogeneity inside pots. PMID:19968824

  9. Plant diversity and functional groups affect Si and Ca pools in aboveground biomass of grassland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Jörg; Roscher, Christiane; Hillebrand, Helmut; Weigelt, Alexandra; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Anne; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity is an important driver of nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in aboveground plant biomass of grassland ecosystems, but plant diversity effects on other elements also important for plant growth are less understood. We tested whether plant species richness, functional group richness or the presence/absence of particular plant functional groups influences the Si and Ca concentrations (mmol g(-1)) and stocks (mmol m(-2)) in aboveground plant biomass in a large grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). In the experiment including 60 temperate grassland species, plant diversity was manipulated as sown species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16) and richness and identity of plant functional groups (1-4; grasses, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes). We found positive species richness effects on Si as well as Ca stocks that were attributable to increased biomass production. The presence of particular functional groups was the most important factor explaining variation in aboveground Si and Ca stocks (mmol m(-2)). Grass presence increased the Si stocks by 140 % and legume presence increased the Ca stock by 230 %. Both the presence of specific plant functional groups and species diversity altered Si and Ca stocks, whereas Si and Ca concentration were affected mostly by the presence of specific plant functional groups. However, we found a negative effect of species diversity on Si and Ca accumulation, by calculating the deviation between mixtures and mixture biomass proportions, but in monoculture concentrations. These changes may in turn affect ecosystem processes such as plant litter decomposition and nutrient cycling in grasslands. PMID:27164912

  10. Herbivory Differentially Affects Plant Fitness in Three Populations of the Perennial Herb Lythrum salicaria along a Latitudinal Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Lehndal; Jon Ågren

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory can negatively and selectively affect plant fitness by reducing growth, survival and reproductive output, thereby influencing plant population dynamics and evolution. Latitudinal variation in intensity of herbivory is common, but the extent to which it translates into corresponding variation in effects on plant performance is still poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that variation in the fitness-consequences of herbivory mirror differences in intensity of herbivory among three n...

  11. The research on Virtual Plants Growth Based on DLA Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, YunLan; Chai, Bencheng

    This article summarizes the separated Evolutionary Algorithm in fractal algorithm of Diffusion Limited Aggregation model (i.e. DLA model) and put forward the virtual plant growth realization in computer based on DLA model. The method is carried out in the VB6.0 environment to achieve and verify the plant growth based on DLA model.

  12. Productivity growth patterns in US dairy products manufacturing plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geylani, P.C.; Stefanou, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the productivity growth patterns in the US dairy products industry using the Census Bureau's plant-level data set. We decompose Total Factor Productivity (TFP) growth into the scale and technical change components and analyse variability of plants' productivity by constructing transition

  13. Artificial Life of Soybean Plant Growth Modeling Using Intelligence Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atris Suyantohadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The natural process on plant growth system has a complex system and it has could be developed on characteristic studied using intelligent approaches conducting with artificial life system. The approaches on examining the natural process on soybean (Glycine Max L.Merr plant growth have been analyzed and synthesized in these research through modeling using Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Lindenmayer System (L-System methods. Research aimed to design and to visualize plant growth modeling on the soybean varieties which these could help for studying botany of plant based on fertilizer compositions on plant growth with Nitrogen (N, Phosphor (P and Potassium (K. The soybean plant growth has been analyzed based on the treatments of plant fertilizer compositions in the experimental research to develop plant growth modeling. By using N, P, K fertilizer compositions, its capable result on the highest production 2.074 tons/hectares. Using these models, the simulation on artificial life for describing identification and visualization on the characteristic of soybean plant growth could be demonstrated and applied.

  14. Dietary methionine level affects growth performance and hepatic gene expression of GH-IGF system and protein turnover regulators in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed plant protein-based diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolland, Marine; Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang; Holm, Jorgen;

    2015-01-01

    ), cathepsin L, calpains 1 and 2 (Capn 1 and Capn 2, respectively), and calpastatin long and short isoforms (CAST-L and CAST-S, respectively) were measured for each dietary treatment. The transcript levels of GHR-I and IGF-I increased linearly with the increase of dietary Met content (P <0.01), reflecting...... somatotropic axis: including the growth hormone receptor I (GHR-I), insulin-like growth hormones land II (IGF-I and IGF-II, respectively), and insulin-like growth hormone binding protein-1b (IGFBP-1b); and ii) protein turnover: including the target of rapamycin protein (TOR), proteasome 20 delta (Prot 20D...... or indirectly, the expression of genes involved in the GH/IGF axis response and protein turnover, which are centrally involved in the regulation of growth. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  15. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocheli de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPlant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria.

  16. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rocheli de; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-12-01

    Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria. PMID:26537605

  17. Growth and Wood/Bark Properties of Abies faxoniana Seedlings as Affected by Elevated CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Zhou Qiao; Yuan-Bin Zhang; Kai-Yun Wang; Qian Wang; Qi-Zhuo Tian

    2008-01-01

    Growth and wood and bark properties of Abies faxoniana seedlings after one year's exposure to elevated CO2 concentration (ambient + 350 (=1= 25) μmol/mol) under two planting densities (28 or 84 plants/mz) were investigated in closed-top chambers. Tree height, stem diameter and cross-sectional area, and total biomass were enhanced under elevated CO2 concentration, and reduced under high planting density. Most traits of stem bark were improved under elevated CO2 concentration and reduced under high planting density. Stem wood production was significantly increased in volume under elevated CO2 concentration under both densities, and the stem wood density decreased under elevated CO2 concentration and increased under high planting density. These results suggest that the response of stem wood and bark to elevated CO2 concentration is density dependent. This may be of great importance in a future CO2 enriched world in natural forests where plant density varies considerably. The results also show that the bark/wood ratio in diameter, stem cross-sectional area and dry weight are not proportionally affected by elevated CO2 concentration under the two contrasting planting densities. This indicates that the response magnitude of stem bark and stem wood to elevated CO2 concentration are different but their response directions are the same.

  18. Plant growth and architectural modelling and its applications

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yan; Fourcaud, Thierry; Jaeger, Marc; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Li, Baoguo

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, a growing number of scientists around the world have invested in research on plant growth and architectural modelling and applications (often abbreviated to plant modelling and applications, PMA). By combining physical and biological processes, spatially explicit models have shown their ability to help in understanding plant–environment interactions. This Special Issue on plant growth modelling presents new information within this topic, which are summarized in this pref...

  19. PEMANFAATAN PLANT GROWTH PROMOTING RHIZOBACTERIA UNTUK BIOSTIMULANTS DAN BIOPROTECTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khamdan Khalimi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Various findings on the benefit of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR for agriculture have been reported by many research institutional. The enthusiasm to commercialize these bacteria as a promising alternative technology is triggered mainly by the to develop environmentally benign agriculture by reducing the use of synthetically agrochemical inputs (fertilizers and pesticides. These result suggested that application of PGPR could promoted the plant growth and increase the resistance of plant against fungi pathogen.

  20. Effect of vanadium on plant growth and its accumulation in plant tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumol Vachirapatama

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate vanadium uptake by Chinese green mustard and tomato plantsand its effect on their growth. Twenty-eight (Chinese green mustard and 79 days (tomato after germination, the plants wereexposed for a further seven days to a solution containing six different concentrations of ammonium metavanadate (0-80 mg/lNH4VO3. The vanadium accumulated in the plant tissues were determined by ion-interaction high performance liquid chromatography,with confirmation by magnetic sector ICP-MS.The results indicated that nutrient solution containing more than 40 mg/l NH4VO3 affected plant growth for bothChinese green mustard and tomato plant. Chinese green mustard grown in the solution containing NH4VO3 at the concentrationsof 40 and 80 mg/l had stem length, number of leaves, dry weight of leaf, stem and root significantly lower than those ofplants grown in the solution containing 0-20 mg/l NH4VO3. Tomato plants were observed to wilt after four days in contactwith the nutrient solutions containing 40 and 80 mg/l NH4VO3. As the vanadium concentrations increased, a resultantdecrease in the stem length, root fresh weight, and fruit fresh weight were noted. The accumulation of vanadium was higher inthe root compared with leaf, stem, or fruit. Measured levels of vanadium, from a nutrient solution containing 40 mg/l NH4VO3,were 328, 340, and 9.66x103 g/g in the leaf, stem and root for Chinese green mustard, and 4.04 and 4.01x103 g/g in the fruitand roots for tomato plants, respectively.

  1. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  2. Cytokinins as key regulators in plant-microbe-insect interactions: connecting plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giron, D.; Frago, E.; Glevarec, G.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Dicke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant hormones play important roles in regulating plant growth and defence by mediating developmental processes and signalling networks involved in plant responses to a wide range of parasitic and mutualistic biotic interactions. Plants are known to rapidly respond to pathogen and herbivore attack b

  3. Herbivory: effects on plant abundance, distribution and population growth

    OpenAIRE

    Maron, John L.; Crone, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Plants are attacked by many different consumers. A critical question is how often, and under what conditions, common reductions in growth, fecundity or even survival that occur due to herbivory translate to meaningful impacts on abundance, distribution or dynamics of plant populations. Here, we review population-level studies of the effects of consumers on plant dynamics and evaluate: (i) whether particular consumers have predictably more or less influence on plant abundance, (ii) whether par...

  4. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Stimulate Vegetative Growth and Asexual Reproduction of Kalanchoe daigremontiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Soon Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Certain bacterial species associate with plant roots in soil. The plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR stimulate plant growth and yield in greenhouse and field. Here, we examined whether application of known bacilli PGPR strains stimulated growth and asexual reproduction in the succulent plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Four PGPR strains B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a, B. cereus BS107, B. pumilus INR7, and B. subtilis GB03 were applied to young plantlets by soil-drenching, and plant growth and development was monitored for three months. Aerial growth was significantly stimulated in PGPR-inoculated plants, which was observed as increases in plant height, shoot weight, and stem width. The stimulated growth influenced plant development by increasing the total number of leaves per plant. Treatment with bacilli also increased the total root biomass compared with that of control plants, and led to a 2-fold increase in asexual reproduction and plantlet formation on the leaf. Collectively, our results firstly demonstrate that Bacillus spp. promote vegetative development of K. daigremontiana, and the enhanced growth stimulates asexual reproduction and plantlet formation.

  5. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Stimulate Vegetative Growth and Asexual Reproduction of Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Park, Kyungseok; Kloepper, Joseph W; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-09-01

    Certain bacterial species associate with plant roots in soil. The plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) stimulate plant growth and yield in greenhouse and field. Here, we examined whether application of known bacilli PGPR strains stimulated growth and asexual reproduction in the succulent plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Four PGPR strains B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a, B. cereus BS107, B. pumilus INR7, and B. subtilis GB03 were applied to young plantlets by soil-drenching, and plant growth and development was monitored for three months. Aerial growth was significantly stimulated in PGPR-inoculated plants, which was observed as increases in plant height, shoot weight, and stem width. The stimulated growth influenced plant development by increasing the total number of leaves per plant. Treatment with bacilli also increased the total root biomass compared with that of control plants, and led to a 2-fold increase in asexual reproduction and plantlet formation on the leaf. Collectively, our results firstly demonstrate that Bacillus spp. promote vegetative development of K. daigremontiana, and the enhanced growth stimulates asexual reproduction and plantlet formation. PMID:26361480

  6. Do plastic particles affect microalgal photosynthesis and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjollema, Sascha B; Redondo-Hasselerharm, Paula; Leslie, Heather A; Kraak, Michiel H S; Vethaak, A Dick

    2016-01-01

    The unbridled increase in plastic pollution of the world's oceans raises concerns about potential effects these materials may have on microalgae, which are primary producers at the basis of the food chain and a major global source of oxygen. Our current understanding about the potential modes and mechanisms of toxic action that plastic particles exert on microalgae is extremely limited. How effects might vary with particle size and the physico-chemical properties of the specific plastic material in question are equally unelucidated, but may hold clues to how toxicity, if observed, is exerted. In this study we selected polystyrene particles, both negatively charged and uncharged, and three different sizes (0.05, 0.5 and 6μm) for testing the effects of size and material properties. Microalgae were exposed to different polystyrene particle sizes and surface charges for 72h. Effects on microalgal photosynthesis and growth were determined by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry and flow cytometry, respectively. None of the treatments tested in these experiments had an effect on microalgal photosynthesis. Microalgal growth was negatively affected (up to 45%) by uncharged polystyrene particles, but only at high concentrations (250mg/L). Additionally, these adverse effects were demonstrated to increase with decreasing particle size. PMID:26675372

  7. Family poverty affects the rate of human infant brain growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Hanson

    Full Text Available Living in poverty places children at very high risk for problems across a variety of domains, including schooling, behavioral regulation, and health. Aspects of cognitive functioning, such as information processing, may underlie these kinds of problems. How might poverty affect the brain functions underlying these cognitive processes? Here, we address this question by observing and analyzing repeated measures of brain development of young children between five months and four years of age from economically diverse backgrounds (n = 77. In doing so, we have the opportunity to observe changes in brain growth as children begin to experience the effects of poverty. These children underwent MRI scanning, with subjects completing between 1 and 7 scans longitudinally. Two hundred and three MRI scans were divided into different tissue types using a novel image processing algorithm specifically designed to analyze brain data from young infants. Total gray, white, and cerebral (summation of total gray and white matter volumes were examined along with volumes of the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes. Infants from low-income families had lower volumes of gray matter, tissue critical for processing of information and execution of actions. These differences were found for both the frontal and parietal lobes. No differences were detected in white matter, temporal lobe volumes, or occipital lobe volumes. In addition, differences in brain growth were found to vary with socioeconomic status (SES, with children from lower-income households having slower trajectories of growth during infancy and early childhood. Volumetric differences were associated with the emergence of disruptive behavioral problems.

  8. Potential of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and chemical fertilizers on soil enzymes and plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation deals with the role of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and chemical fertilizers alone or in combination on urease, invertase and phosphatase activities of rhizospheric soil and also on general impact on growth of safflower cvv. Thori and Saif-32. The PGPR (Azospirillum brasilense and Azotobacter vinelandii) were applied at 10/sup 6/ cells/mL as seed inoculation prior to sowing. Chemical fertilizers were applied at full (Urea 60 Kg ha/sup -1/ and Diammonium phosphate (DAP) 30 Kg ha/sup -1/), half (Urea 30 Kg ha/sup -1/ and DAP 15 Kg ha/sup -1/) and quarter doses (Urea 15 Kg ha-1 and DAP 7.5 Kg ha/sup -1/) during sowing. The chemical fertilizers and PGPR enhanced urease and invertase activities of soil. Presence of PGPR in combination with quarter and half doses of chemical fertilizers further augmented their effect on soil enzymes activities. The soil phosphatase activity was greater in Azospirillum and Azotobacter in combination with half dose of chemical fertilizers. Maximum increase in leaf melondialdehyde content was recorded in full dose of chemical fertilizers whereas coinoculation treatment exhibited significant reduction in cv. Thori. Half and quarter dose of chemical fertilizers increased the shoot length of safflower whereas maximum increase in leaf protein was recorded in Azotobacter in combination with full dose of chemical fertilizers. Root length was improved by Azospirillum and Azotobacter in combination with quarter dose of chemical fertilizers. Leaf area and chlorophyll contents were significantly improved by Azotobacter in combination with half dose of chemical fertilizers. It is inferred that PGPR can supplement 50 % chemical fertilizers for better plant growth and soil health. (author)

  9. Tubular Membrane Plant-Growth Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Hydroponic system controls nutrient solution for growing crops in space. Pump draws nutrient solution along inside of tubular membrane in pipe from reservoir, maintaining negative pressure in pipe. Roots of plants in slot extract nutrient through membrane within pipe. Crop plants such as wheat, rice, lettuce, tomatoes, soybeans, and beans grown successfully with system.

  10. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Z.; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 2 (2014), s. 377-388. ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/0963 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : clonal plants * frequency * plant communities of Central Europe Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.654, year: 2014

  11. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan eVacheron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and development of root hairs. PGPR also modify root functioning, improve plant nutrition and influence the physiology of the whole plant. Recent results provided first clues as to how PGPR signals could trigger these plant responses. Whether local and/or systemic, the plant molecular pathways involved remain often unknown. From an ecological point of view, it emerged that PGPR form coherent functional groups, whose rhizosphere ecology is influenced by a myriad of abiotic and biotic factors in natural and agricultural soils, and these factors can in turn modulate PGPR effects on roots. In this paper, we address novel knowledge and gaps on PGPR modes of action and signals, and highlight recent progress on the links between plant morphological and physiological effects induced by PGPR. We also show the importance of taking into account the size, diversity and gene expression patterns of PGPR assemblages in the rhizosphere to better understand their impact on plant growth and functioning. Integrating mechanistic and ecological knowledge on PGPR populations in soil will be a prerequisite to develop novel management strategies for sustainable agriculture.

  12. Factors Affecting Bacterial Growth in Drinking Water Distribution System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI LU; XIAO-JIAN ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Objective To define the influence of some parameters, including assimilable organic carbon (AOC), chloramine residual, etc. on the bacterial growth in drinking water distribution systems. Methods Three typical water treatment plants in a northern city (City T) of China and their corresponding distribution systems were investigated. Some parameters of the water samples, such as heterotrophic plate content (HPC), AOC, CODMn, TOC, and phosphate were measured. Results The AOC in most water samples were more than 100 μg/L, or even more than 200 μg/L in some cases. The HPC in distribution systems increased significantly with the decrease of residual chlorine. When the residual chlorine was less than 0.1 mg/L, the magnitude order of HPC was 104 CFU/mL; when it was 0.5-0.7 mg/L, the HPC was about 500 CFU/mL. Conclusion For controlling the biostability of drinking water, the controlling of AOC and residual chlorine should be considered simultaneously. The influence of phosphors on the AOC tests of water is not significant. Phosphors may not be the limiting nutrient in the water distribution systems.

  13. Experiments with Corn To Demonstrate Plant Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldeman, Janice H.; Gray, Margarit S.

    2000-01-01

    Explores using corn seeds to demonstrate plant growth and development. This experiment allows students to formulate hypotheses, observe and record information, and practice mathematics. Presents background information, materials, procedures, and observations. (SAH)

  14. Effects of different plant growth inhibitors on growth and flowering of narcissus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Xuqin

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine effects of four plant growth inhibitors viz. PP333, Het, CCC and B9 with different concentrations on growth and flowering of narcissus. The results indicated that the narcissus treated with certain concentration inhibitors could grow shorter plants with shorter scapes of flower and smaller leaves than the check, and the compact, straight and coordinate plants improve the decorative value obviously.

  15. Multinationals as Stabilizers?: Economic Crisis and Plant Employment Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Espinoza, Roberto; Görg, Holger

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the link between multinational enterprises and employment growth at the plant-level. We investigate in detail the comparative response of multinationals and domestic firms to an economic crisis, using the empirical setting of a well defined case of economic slowdown in Chile as a natural experiment. In our empirical analysis we find that employment growth in manufacturing plants has been drastically reduced during the economic crisis. More importantly, we do not find evide...

  16. Plant Hormones Promote Growth in Lichen-Forming Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin Yu; Wei, Xin Li; Luo, Heng; Kim, Jung A; Jeon, Hae Sook; Koh, Young Jin; Hur, Jae-Seoun

    2010-01-01

    The effect of plant hormones on the growth of lichen-forming fungi (LFF) was evaluated. The use of 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid and indole-3-butyric acid resulted in a 99% and 57% increase in dry weight of the lichen-forming fungus Nephromopsis ornata. The results suggest that some plant hormones can be used as inducers or stimulators of LFF growth for large-scale culture.

  17. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  18. Potential for Plant Growth Promotion of Rhizobacteria Associated with Salicornia Growing in Tunisian Hypersaline Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Mapelli; Ramona Marasco; Eleonora Rolli; Marta Barbato; Hanene Cherif; Amel Guesmi; Imen Ouzari; Daniele Daffonchio; Sara Borin

    2013-01-01

    Soil salinity and drought are among the environmental stresses that most severely affect plant growth and production around the world. In this study the rhizospheres of Salicornia plants and bulk soils were collected from Sebkhet and Chott hypersaline ecosystems in Tunisia. Depiction of bacterial microbiome composition by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis unveiled the occurrence of a high bacterial diversity associated with Salicornia root system. A large collection of 475 halophilic an...

  19. In Vitro Morphogenesis of Arabidopsis to Search for Novel Endophytic Fungi Modulating Plant Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Dovana; Marco Mucciarelli; Maurizio Mascarello; Anna Fusconi

    2015-01-01

    Fungal endophytes have shown to affect plant growth and to confer stress tolerance to the host; however, effects of endophytes isolated from water plants have been poorly investigated. In this study, fungi isolated from stems (stem-E) and roots (root-E) of Mentha aquatica L. (water mint) were identified, and their morphogenetic properties analysed on in vitro cultured Arabidopsis (L.) Heynh., 14 and 21 days after inoculation (DAI). Nineteen fungi were analysed and, based on ITS analysis, 17 i...

  20. Growth and conversion of solar energy of grafted tomato plants under protected cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Pedó

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The grafting technique favors cultivation tomato under conditions environment adverse, being the effects on the physiology of scarce plants. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the growth and solar energy conversion efficiency in grafted tomato and not grafted in greenhouse. The grafting was performed by grafting of cleft and the treatments consisted of tomato plants grafted on hybrid Kaguemusha® and not grafted. The samples for growth analysis were performed at intervals of fourteen days after transplanting (DAT by the end of the crop cycle. At each harvest, plants were separated into organs, being determined to total dry matter (Wt, rates of dry matter production (Ct and relative growth (Rw, net assimilation (Ea, leaf area index (L, growth rate, leaf area (Ca, relative growth of leaf area (Ra, leaf area ratio (Fa, leaf weight (Fw, specific leaf area (Sa, conversion efficiency solar energy (? and assimilation rate of fruit (Efr. From the analysis of data growth, the plants grafted on the hybrid Kaguemusha® had higher Wt, Ct, Rw, Ea and ? compared to non-grafted that showed a high Fa and Fw. Therefore, the stress caused by grafting did not affect the growth at the end of the development cycle of tomato plants, being important feature to keep the crop yield

  1. Plant extracts used as growth promoters in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSR Barreto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out to assess the efficacy of plant extracts as alternatives for antimicrobial growth promoters in broiler diets. The performance experiment included 1,200 male broilers raised from 1 to 42 days of age. The metabolism experiment used 96 male broilers in the grower phase housed in metabolic cages for total excreta collection. At the end of the metabolism experiment, 24 birds were sacrificed to assess organ morphometrics. In both experiments, the following treatments were applied: control diet (CD; CD + 10 ppm avilamycin; CD + 1000 ppm oregano extract; CD + 1000 ppm clove extract; CD + 1000 ppm cinnamon extract; and CD + 1000 ppm red pepper extract. The microencapsulated extracts contained 20% of essential oil. No significant differences (P>0.05 in the studied performance parameters were observed among treatments. The dietary supplementation of the extracts did not influence (P>0.05 nitrogen-corrected apparent metabolizable energy values. In general, organ morphometrics was not affected by the experimental treatments, but birds fed the control diet had higher liver relative weight (P<0.05 as compared to those fed the diet containing red pepper extract, which presented the lowest liver relative weight. These results showed that there was no effect of the tested plant extracts on live performance or in organ morphometrics.

  2. Temperate heath plant response to dry conditions depends on growth strategy and less on physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Kongstad, J.; Schmidt, I. K.;

    2012-01-01

    The evidence that is currently available demonstrates that future changes in precipitation patterns will affect plant carbon uptake. However, the outcome in terms of success, productivity and fecundity depends upon individual species and different responses of various growth forms. Examination of...

  3. Differential effect of transpiration and Ca supply on growth and Ca concentration of tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, del F.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the extent to which transpiration and Ca concentration in the nutrient solution affect the regulation of growth, two independent experiments with young tomato plants were carried out under fully controlled climate conditions and grown hydroponically. The first experiment consisted of th

  4. Effect of Plant Age and Longidorus africanus on the Growth of Lettuce and Carrot

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiang; Ploeg, Antoon T.

    2001-01-01

    Needle nematodes, Longidorus africanus, were added to carrot and lettuce seedlings in a range of inoculum levels and at various times after seeding. The effects of inoculum density and delayed inoculation on plant growth were analyzed according to Seinhorst's damage function. Growth of both lettuce and carrot was severely affected by L. africanus, but delaying nematode inoculation until 10 days after seeding significantly increased estimated minimum yields in both crop species. Tolerance leve...

  5. CRECIMIENTO Y EFICIENCIA FOTOQUÍMICA DEL FOTOSISTEMA II EN PLANTAS DE FRESA (Fragaria sp. AFECTADAS POR LA CALIDAD DE LA LUZ:: IMPLICACIONES AGRONÓMICAS GROWTH AND PHOTOCHEMICAL EFFICIENCY OF PHOTOSYSTEM II IN STRAWBERRY PLANTS (Fragaria sp. AFFECTED BY THE LIGHT QUALITY: AGRONOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fánor Casierra Posada

    influence of light quality on the growth and photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII in strawberry plants (Fragaria sp., cv. Chandler was examined in a factorial set up, under greenhouse in Tunja / Colombia. Plants grew under diverse light qualities (yellow, green, blue, red, transparent, and control without colored cover provided by polypropylene filter films. Determinations of minimum (F0, maximum (Fm, variable (Fv, and terminal (Ft fluorescence and maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm of dark-adapted leaves were done 32 weeks after the transplant. Related to growth, control plants recorded highest dry matter and specific leaf weight. Plants growing under the red filter developed highest leaf area. The green film reduced the growth. The color films changed the dry matter partitioning patterns in the plants organs, specially the green filter. Filtered light affected the chlorophyll fluorescence variables, related to control plants. Regards to control plants, Fv , Fm and Ft were higher in plants growing under all covers. While F0 was higher under the transparent and yellow films, Fv /Fm was lower under these covers. The results were discussed in relation to possible implications for appropriate agronomic practices.

  6. Using plant growth modeling to analyze C source–sink relations under drought: inter- and intraspecific comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Pallas, Benoît; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Rebolledo, Maria-Camila; Soulié, Jean-Christophe; Luquet, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    The ability to assimilate C and allocate non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) to the most appropriate organs is crucial to maximize plant ecological or agronomic performance. Such C source and sink activities are differentially affected by environmental constraints. Under drought, plant growth is generally more sink than source limited as organ expansion or appearance rate is earlier and stronger affected than C assimilation. This favors plant survival and recovery but not always agronomic per...

  7. Using plant growth modeling to analyse C source-sink relations under drought: inter and intra specific comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit ePallas; Anne eClément-Vidal; Maria-Camila eRebolledo; Jean-Christophe eSoulié; Delphine eLuquet

    2013-01-01

    The ability to assimilate C and allocate NSC (non structural carbohydrates) to the most appropriate organs is crucial to maximize plant ecological or agronomic performance. Such C source and sink activities are differentially affected by environmental constraints. Under drought, plant growth is generally more sink than source limited as organ expansion or appearance rate is earlier and stronger affected than C assimilation. This favors plant survival and recovery but not always agronomic perf...

  8. Plant Growth and Morphogenesis under Different Gravity Conditions: Relevance to Plant Life in Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The growth and morphogenesis of plants are entirely dependent on the gravitational acceleration of earth. Under microgravity conditions in space, these processes are greatly modified. Recent space experiments, in combination with ground-based studies, have shown that elongation growth is stimulated and lateral expansion suppressed in various shoot organs and roots under microgravity conditions. Plant organs also show automorphogenesis in space, which consists of altered growth direction and spontaneous curvature in the dorsiventral (back and front) directions. Changes in cell wall properties are responsible for these modifications of growth and morphogenesis under microgravity conditions. Plants live in space with interesting new sizes and forms. PMID:25370193

  9. The microbiome of medicinal plants: diversity and importance for plant growth, quality and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köberl, Martina; Schmidt, Ruth; Ramadan, Elshahat M; Bauer, Rudolf; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Past medicinal plant research primarily focused on bioactive phytochemicals, however, the focus is currently shifting due to the recognition that a significant number of phytotherapeutic compounds are actually produced by associated microbes or through interaction with their host. Medicinal plants provide an enormous bioresource of potential use in modern medicine and agriculture, yet their microbiome is largely unknown. The objective of this review is (i) to introduce novel insights into the plant microbiome with a focus on medicinal plants, (ii) to provide details about plant- and microbe-derived ingredients of medicinal plants, and (iii) to discuss possibilities for plant growth promotion and plant protection for commercial cultivation of medicinal plants. In addition, we also present a case study performed both to analyse the microbiome of three medicinal plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L., and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.) cultivated on organically managed Egyptian desert farm and to develop biological control strategies. The soil microbiome of the desert ecosystem was comprised of a high abundance of Gram-positive bacteria of prime importance for pathogen suppression under arid soil conditions. For all three plants, we observed a clearly plant-specific selection of the microbes as well as highly specific diazotrophic communities that overall identify plant species as important drivers in structural and functional diversity. Lastly, native Bacillus spec. div. strains were able to promote plant growth and elevate the plants' flavonoid production. These results underline the numerous links between the plant-associated microbiome and the plant metabolome. PMID:24391634

  10. PLANT-MICROBIAL INTERACTIONS IN THE RHIZOSPHERE – STRATEGIES FOR PLANT GROWTH-PROMOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are a group of bacteria that can actively colonize plant rootsand enhance plant growth using different mechanisms: production of plant growth regulators like indoleacetic acid,gibberellic acid, cytokinins and ethylene(Zahir et al., 2003, providing the host plant with fixed nitrogen, solubilizationof soil phosphorus, enhance Fe uptake, biocontrol, reducing the concentration of heavy metals. PGPR are perfectcandidates to be used as biofertilizers – eco-friendly alternative to common applied chemical fertilizer in today’sagriculture. The most important benefit of PGPR usage is related to the reduction of environmental pollution in conditionof increasing crop yield. This review presents the main mechanisms involved in PGPR promotion of plant growth.

  11. Multiscale models in the biomechanics of plant growth

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, O.E. & Fozard, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth occurs through the coordinated expansion of tightly adherent cells, driven by regulated softening of cell walls. It is an intrinsically multiscale process, with the integrated properties of multiple cell walls shaping the whole tissue. Multiscale models encode physical relationships to bring new understanding to plant physiology and development.

  12. Different shades of JAZ during plant growth and defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Pierik, R.; Van Wees, S.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Ever since their discovery as key regulators of the jasmonate (JA) signaling pathway, repressor proteins of the JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) family are rising stars in research on hormonal regulation of plant growth and defense. In plant cells, JAZ repressor proteins interact with an E3 ubiquitin liga

  13. Pattern of growth and 14C-assimilates distributions in relation to photosynthesis in radish plants treated with growth substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a series of radish plants, with very thin hypocotyl and with a normal storage organ, the rates of photosynthesis, photorespiration and dark respiration did not differ. Therefore, the conclusion may be advanced, that translocation to the swollen hypocotyl is not determined by the photosynthetic productivity, but rather be the storage capacity. To check it this is connected with an unbalanced hormonal content, plants were treated with lanoline paste, with IAA, GA3, zeatin and all three in mixture or with injections of GA3-water solution into the swollen hypocotyl. In young radish plants, with high rate of growth of aerial parts, treatment with the above mentioned substances stimulated 14CO2-assimilation and increased retention of assimilates in 14C-donors, probably owing to retardation of their senescence. It increeased the competition for photosynthates between shoot and storage organ. In older plants, in the stage of accumulation of nutrients in the swollen hypocotyl, IAA + GA3 + zeatin did not affect 14CO2-assimilation; but in plants eated with growth regulators separately, assimilation decreased; IAA and GA3 stimulated transport and accumulation of labelled substances in the swollen hypocotyl. On the basis of experimental data the conclusion may be advanced that responsiveness of the particular organs and processes to growth regulators depends on the stage of plant development. Phytohormone did not change quantitatively the pattern 14C-assimilates distribution. They stimulated processes with preference for particular stages of development. (author)

  14. Pattern of growth and 14C-assimilates distributions in relation to photosynthesis in radish plants treated with growth substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Starck

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In a series of radish plants, with very thin hypocotyl and with a normal storage organ, the rates of photosynthesis, photorespiration and dark respiration did not differ. Therefore, the conclusion may be advanced, that translocation to the swollen hypocotyl is not determinated by the photosynthetic productivity, but rather the by storage capacity. To check it this is connected with an unbalanced hormonal content, plants were treated with lanoline paste, with IAA, GA3, zeatin and all three in mixture or with injections of GA3-water solution into the swollen hypocotyl. In young radish plants, with high rate of growth of aerial parts, treatment with the above mentioned substances stimulated 14CO2-assimilation and increased retention of assimilates in 14C-donors, probably owing to retardation of their senescence. It increased the competition for photosynthates between shoot and storage organ. In older plants, in the stage of accumulation of nutrients in the swollen hypocotyl, IAA +GA3+zeatin did not affect 14CO2-assimilation, but in plants treated with growth regulators separately, assimilation decreased; IAA and GA3 stimulated transport and accumulation of labelled substances in the swollen hypocotyl. On the basis of experimental data the conclusion may be advanced that responsiveness of the particular organs and processes to growth regulators depends on the stage of plant development. Phytohormone did not changed quantitatively the pattern of 14C-assimilates distribution. They stimulated processes with preference for particular stages of development.

  15. Legacy effects of drought on plant growth and the soil food web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Franciska; Liiri, Mira; Strandmark, Lisa Bjørnlund;

    2012-01-01

    potential to feed back on each other's performance. In a greenhouse experiment, we compared legacy effects of repeated drought on plant growth and the soil food web in two contrasting land-use systems: extensively managed grassland, rich in C and with a fungal-based food web, and intensively managed wheat...... lower in C and with a bacterial-based food web. Moreover, we assessed the effect of plant presence on the recovery of the soil food web after drought. Drought legacy effects increased plant growth in both systems, and a plant strongly reduced N leaching. Fungi, bacteria, and their predators were more...... resilient after drought in the grassland soil than in the wheat soil. The presence of a plant strongly affected the composition of the soil food web, and alleviated the effects of drought for most trophic groups, regardless of the system. This effect was stronger for the bottom trophic levels, whose...

  16. Effect of Silicon on Plant Growth and Drought Stress Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Janislampi, Kaerlek W.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon is not considered an essential nutrient, but it is typically abundant in soils and can be taken up in large amounts by plants. Silicon is known to have beneficial effects when added to rice and several other plants. These effects include disease and insect resistance, structural fortification, and regulation of the uptake of other ions. In this study, the effect of silicic acid fertilization on the growth and drought tolerance of four crop plants (corn, wheat, soybean, and rice) was a...

  17. WHOLE-PLANT GROWTH STAGE ONTOLOGY FOR ANGIOSPERMS AND ITS APPLICATION IN PLANT BIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant growth stages are identified as distinct morphological landmarks in a continuous developmental process. The terms describing these developmental stages record the morphological appearance of the plant at a specific point in its life cycle. The widely differing morphology of plant species conse...

  18. Growth of ponderosa pine seedlings as affected by air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, B.; Anderson, P. D.; Houpis, J. L. J.; Helms, J. A.

    The effect of air pollution on seedling survival and competitive ability is important to natural and artificial regeneration of forest trees. Although biochemical and physiological processes are sensitive indicators of pollution stress, the cumulative effects of air pollutants on seedling vigor and competitive ability may be assessed directly from whole-plant growth characteristics such as diameter, height, and photosynthetic area. A few studies that have examined intraspecific variation in seedling response to air pollution indicate that genotypic differences are important in assessing potential effects of air pollution on forest regeneration. Here, we studied the effects of acid rain (no-rain, pH 5.1 rain, pH 3.0 rain) and ozone (filtered, ambient, twice-ambient) in the field on height, diameter, volume, the height:diameter ratio, maximum needle length, and time to reach maximum needle length in seedlings of three families of ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws). Seedling diameter, height, volume, and height:diameter ratio related significantly to their pre-treatment values. Twice-ambient ozone decreased seedling diameter compared with ozone-filtered air. A significant family-by-ozone interaction was detected for seedling height, as the height of only one of the three families was decreased by twice-ambient ozone compared with the ambient level. Seedling diameter was larger and the height:diameter ratio was smaller under pH 3.0 rain compared to either the no-rain or the pH 5.1-rain treatment. This suggests greater seedling vigor, perhaps due to a foliar fertilization effect of the pH 3.0 rain.

  19. Dynamical Riemannian Geometry and Plant Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Pulwicki, Julia

    2010-01-01

    A new model for biological growth is introduced that couples the geometry of an organism (or part of the organism) to the flow and deposition of material. The model has three dynamical variables (a) a Riemann metric tensor for the geometry, (b) a transport velocity of the material and (c) a material density. While the model was developed primarily to determine the effects of geometry (i.e. curvature and scale changes) in two-dimensional systems such as leaves and petals, it can be applied to any dimension. Results for one dimensional systems are presented and compared to measurements of growth made on blades of grass and corn roots. It is found that the model is able to reproduce many features associated with botanical growth.

  20. The microbiome of medicinal plants: diversity and importance for plant growth, quality and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köberl, Martina; Schmidt, Ruth; Ramadan, Elshahat M.; Bauer, Rudolf; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Past medicinal plant research primarily focused on bioactive phytochemicals, however, the focus is currently shifting due to the recognition that a significant number of phytotherapeutic compounds are actually produced by associated microbes or through interaction with their host. Medicinal plants provide an enormous bioresource of potential use in modern medicine and agriculture, yet their microbiome is largely unknown. The objective of this review is (i) to introduce novel insights into the plant microbiome with a focus on medicinal plants, (ii) to provide details about plant- and microbe-derived ingredients of medicinal plants, and (iii) to discuss possibilities for plant growth promotion and plant protection for commercial cultivation of medicinal plants. In addition, we also present a case study performed both to analyse the microbiome of three medicinal plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L., and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.) cultivated on organically managed Egyptian desert farm and to develop biological control strategies. The soil microbiome of the desert ecosystem was comprised of a high abundance of Gram-positive bacteria of prime importance for pathogen suppression under arid soil conditions. For all three plants, we observed a clearly plant-specific selection of the microbes as well as highly specific diazotrophic communities that overall identify plant species as important drivers in structural and functional diversity. Lastly, native Bacillus spec. div. strains were able to promote plant growth and elevate the plants’ flavonoid production. These results underline the numerous links between the plant-associated microbiome and the plant metabolome. PMID:24391634

  1. Material and methods to increase plant growth and yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirst, Matias

    2015-09-15

    The present invention relates to materials and methods for modulating growth rates, yield, and/or resistance to drought conditions in plants. In one embodiment, a method of the invention comprises increasing expression of an hc1 gene (or a homolog thereof that provides for substantially the same activity), or increasing expression or activity of the protein encoded by an hc1 gene thereof, in a plant, wherein expression of the hc1 gene or expression or activity of the protein encoded by an hc1 gene results in increased growth rate, yield, and/or drought resistance in the plant.

  2. Design and construction of an inexpensive homemade plant growth chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Fumiaki; Canelon-Suarez, Dario; Griffin, Kelsey; Petersen, John; Meyer, Rachel K; Siegle, Megan; Mase, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth chambers produce controlled environments, which are crucial in making reproducible observations in experimental plant biology research. Commercial plant growth chambers can provide precise controls of environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and light cycle, and the capability via complex programming to regulate these environmental parameters. But they are expensive. The high cost of maintaining a controlled growth environment is often a limiting factor when determining experiment size and feasibility. To overcome the limitation of commercial growth chambers, we designed and constructed an inexpensive plant growth chamber with consumer products for a material cost of $2,300. For a comparable growth space, a commercial plant growth chamber could cost $40,000 or more. Our plant growth chamber had outside dimensions of 1.5 m (W) x 1.8 m (D) x 2 m (H), providing a total growth area of 4.5 m2 with 40-cm high clearance. The dimensions of the growth area and height can be flexibly changed. Fluorescent lights with large reflectors provided a relatively spatially uniform photosynthetically active radiation intensity of 140-250 μmoles/m2/sec. A portable air conditioner provided an ample cooling capacity, and a cooling water mister acted as a powerful humidifier. Temperature, relative humidity, and light cycle inside the chamber were controlled via a z-wave home automation system, which allowed the environmental parameters to be monitored and programmed through the internet. In our setting, the temperature was tightly controlled: 22.2°C±0.8°C. The one-hour average relative humidity was maintained at 75%±7% with short spikes up to ±15%. Using the interaction between Arabidopsis and one of its bacterial pathogens as a test experimental system, we demonstrate that experimental results produced in our chamber were highly comparable to those obtained in a commercial growth chamber. In summary, our design of an inexpensive plant growth chamber

  3. Design and construction of an inexpensive homemade plant growth chamber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Katagiri

    Full Text Available Plant growth chambers produce controlled environments, which are crucial in making reproducible observations in experimental plant biology research. Commercial plant growth chambers can provide precise controls of environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and light cycle, and the capability via complex programming to regulate these environmental parameters. But they are expensive. The high cost of maintaining a controlled growth environment is often a limiting factor when determining experiment size and feasibility. To overcome the limitation of commercial growth chambers, we designed and constructed an inexpensive plant growth chamber with consumer products for a material cost of $2,300. For a comparable growth space, a commercial plant growth chamber could cost $40,000 or more. Our plant growth chamber had outside dimensions of 1.5 m (W x 1.8 m (D x 2 m (H, providing a total growth area of 4.5 m2 with 40-cm high clearance. The dimensions of the growth area and height can be flexibly changed. Fluorescent lights with large reflectors provided a relatively spatially uniform photosynthetically active radiation intensity of 140-250 μmoles/m2/sec. A portable air conditioner provided an ample cooling capacity, and a cooling water mister acted as a powerful humidifier. Temperature, relative humidity, and light cycle inside the chamber were controlled via a z-wave home automation system, which allowed the environmental parameters to be monitored and programmed through the internet. In our setting, the temperature was tightly controlled: 22.2°C±0.8°C. The one-hour average relative humidity was maintained at 75%±7% with short spikes up to ±15%. Using the interaction between Arabidopsis and one of its bacterial pathogens as a test experimental system, we demonstrate that experimental results produced in our chamber were highly comparable to those obtained in a commercial growth chamber. In summary, our design of an inexpensive plant

  4. Manufactured soils for plant growth at a lunar base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.

    1989-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of synthetic soils are discussed. It is pointed out that synthetic soils may provide the proper physical and chemical properties necessary to maximize plant growth, such as a toxic-free composition and cation exchange capacities. The importance of nutrient retention, aeration, moisture retention, and mechanical support as qualities for synthetic soils are stressed. Zeoponics, or the cultivation of plants in zeolite substrates that both contain essential plant-growth cations on their exchange sites and have minor amounts of mineral phases and/or anion-exchange resins that supply essential plant growth ions, is discussed. It is suggested that synthetic zeolites at lunar bases could provide adsorption media for separation of various gases, act as catalysts and as molecular sieves, and serve as cation exchangers in sewage-effluent treatment, radioactive-waste disposal, and pollution control. A flow chart of a potential zeoponics system illustrates this process.

  5. Shoot growth restriction in dry matter partitioning andminituber production of potato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilson Antônio Bisognin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the effect of shoot growth restriction in the dry matter partitioning and minituber production of potato plants grown in a closed soilless system. Minitubers of the cultivars 'Macaca' and 'Asterix' were planted in the greenhouse in the density of 100 hills m-2, during autumn and spring growing seasons. Growth restriction levels were gotten by pruning shoots at 10, 20 and 30cm height or without pruning. The growth restriction levels were identified by their respective leaf area index. The experiment was a factorial (cultivars x growth restriction x growing season in a random design, with four replications. Growth restriction affected the dry matter production of potato plants in both growing seasons and cultivars. Pruning potato plants at 30cm is a feasible technique to control leaf area index and it has lower effect on harvest index and number than in dry matter production of minitubers. Growth restriction does not change dry matter partitioning of potato plants grown in soilless system.

  6. Rhizosphere microbial community composition affects cadmium and zinc uptake by the metal-hyperaccumulating plant Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Weigold, Pascal; Adaktylou, Irini J; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2015-03-01

    The remediation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction depends on plant growth and plant metal accessibility. Soil microorganisms can affect the accumulation of metals by plants either by directly or indirectly stimulating plant growth and activity or by (im)mobilizing and/or complexing metals. Understanding the intricate interplay of metal-accumulating plants with their rhizosphere microbiome is an important step toward the application and optimization of phytoremediation. We compared the effects of a "native" and a strongly disturbed (gamma-irradiated) soil microbial communities on cadmium and zinc accumulation by the plant Arabidopsis halleri in soil microcosm experiments. A. halleri accumulated 100% more cadmium and 15% more zinc when grown on the untreated than on the gamma-irradiated soil. Gamma irradiation affected neither plant growth nor the 1 M HCl-extractable metal content of the soil. However, it strongly altered the soil microbial community composition and overall cell numbers. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons of DNA extracted from rhizosphere samples of A. halleri identified microbial taxa (Lysobacter, Streptomyces, Agromyces, Nitrospira, "Candidatus Chloracidobacterium") of higher relative sequence abundance in the rhizospheres of A. halleri plants grown on untreated than on gamma-irradiated soil, leading to hypotheses on their potential effect on plant metal uptake. However, further experimental evidence is required, and wherefore we discuss different mechanisms of interaction of A. halleri with its rhizosphere microbiome that might have directly or indirectly affected plant metal accumulation. Deciphering the complex interactions between A. halleri and individual microbial taxa will help to further develop soil metal phytoextraction as an efficient and sustainable remediation strategy. PMID:25595759

  7. Plant growth with Led lighting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leds lighting is highly relevant for the horticultural industry. Compared to other light sources used for plant production, leds have several properties which are potentially useful in relation to horticulture. However, although LEDs technology has raised strong interest in research for extraterrestrial agriculture, current LEDs panel costs are still too high for commercial adoption in greenhouse sector, and their electrical efficacies do not compete with those of high-pressure sodium lamps, but several manufactures are working to address these issues. When LEDs become practical, their ability to based light sources specifically suitable for photosynthesis and other horticulturally relevant plant properties (i.e. low radiated heat; lighting from within the canopy) will render the narrow band spectrum of LEDs of particular interest for providing light to greenhouse horticulture. A general description of LEDs application and their technical characteristics is briefly reported.

  8. Spatial heterogeneity of soil biochar content affects soil quality and wheat growth and yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmo, Manuel; Lozano, Ana María; Barrón, Vidal; Villar, Rafael

    2016-08-15

    Biochar (BC) is a carbonaceous material obtained by pyrolysis of organic waste materials and has been proposed as a soil management strategy to mitigate global warming and to improve crop productivity. Once BC has been applied to the soil, its imperfect and incomplete mixing with soil during the first few years and the standard agronomic practices (i.e. tillage, sowing) may generate spatial heterogeneity of the BC content in the soil, which may have implications for soil properties and their effects on plant growth. We investigated how, after two agronomic seasons, the spatial heterogeneity of olive-tree prunings BC applied to a vertisol affected soil characteristics and wheat growth and yield. During the second agronomic season and just before wheat germination, we determined the BC content in the soil by an in-situ visual categorization based on the soil darkening, which was strongly correlated to the BC content of the soil and the soil brightness. We found a high spatial heterogeneity in the BC plots, which affected soil characteristics and wheat growth and yield. Patches with high BC content showed reduced soil compaction and increased soil moisture, pH, electrical conductivity, and nutrient availability (P, Ca, K, Mn, Fe, and Zn); consequently, wheat had greater tillering and higher relative growth rate and grain yield. However, if the spatial heterogeneity of the soil BC content had not been taken into account in the data analysis, most of the effects of BC on wheat growth would not have been detected. Our study reveals the importance of taking into account the spatial heterogeneity of the BC content. PMID:27110980

  9. Long term effects on petrochemical activated sludge on plants and soil. Plant growth and metal absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, M.J.; Gianello, C. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Ribas, P.I.F.; Carvalho, E.B. [CORSAN-SITEL, Triunfo, RS (Brazil). Polo Petroquimico do Sul. Dept. de Operacao e Manutencao

    1993-12-31

    An experiment to study the effects of several application rates of excess activated sludge on plants, soil and leached water was started in 1985. Sludge was applied for six years and increased plant growth due to its nitrogen and phosphorous contribution, even though the decomposition rate in soil is low. Plant zinc, cadmium and nickel content increased with sludge application, while liming decreased the amounts of these metals taken up by plants. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  10. Piriformospora indica enhances plant growth by transferring phosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Vikas; Kumar, Hemant; Sharma, Ruby; Singh, Archana; Tuteja, Narendra; Johri, Atul Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is an endophytic fungus that colonized monocot as well as dicot. P. indica has been termed as plant probiotic because of its plant growth promoting activity and its role in enhancement of the tolerance of the host plants against abiotic and biotic stresses. In our recent study, we have characterized a high affinity phosphate transporter (PiPT) and by using RNAi approach, we have demonstrated the involvement of PiPT in P transfer to the host plant. When knockdown strains ...

  11. Does military spending nonlinearly affect economic growth in South Africa?

    OpenAIRE

    Phiri, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Using annual data collected from 1988 to 2014, this study provides evidence of a nonlinear relationship between military spending, economic growth and other growth determinants for the South African economy. The empirical study is based on estimates of a logistic smooth transition regression (LSTR) model and our empirical results point to an inverted U-shaped relationship between military spending and economic growth for the data. Furthermore, our empirical results suggest that the current le...

  12. Will The Kyoto Protocol Affect Growth in Russia?

    OpenAIRE

    Lecocq, Franck; Shalizi, Zmarak

    2004-01-01

    In light of the recent argument that rapid economic growth in Russia over the next decade, might result in emissions higher than the Kyoto target, thereby putting much-needed growth at risk, the authors revisit the discussion on the costs and benefits of ratification of the Kyoto Protocol by Russia. They conclude that even under a very high economic growth assumption, and even under very c...

  13. How might climate change affect economic growth in developing countries ? a review of the growth literature with a climate lens

    OpenAIRE

    Lecocq, Franck; Shalizi, Zmarak

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical and theoretical literature on economic growth to examine how the four components of the climate change bill, namely mitigation, proactive (ex ante) adaptation, reactive (ex post) adaptation, and ultimate damages of climate change affect growth, especially in developing countries. The authors consider successively the Cass-Koopmans growth model and three maj...

  14. Growth Characteristics of Rhizophagus clarus Strains and Their Effects on the Growth of Host Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hwa; Eom, Ahn-Heum

    2015-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous in the rhizosphere and form symbiotic relationships with most terrestrial plant roots. In this study, four strains of Rhizophagus clarus were cultured and variations in their growth characteristics owing to functional diversity and resultant effects on host plant were investigated. Growth characteristics of the studied R. clarus strains varied significantly, suggesting that AMF retain high genetic variability at the intraspecies level despite asexual lineage. Furthermore, host plant growth response to the R. clarus strains showed that genetic variability in AMF could cause significant differences in the growth of the host plant, which prefers particular genetic types of fungal strains. These results suggest that the intraspecific genetic diversity of AMF could be result of similar selective pressure and may be expressed at a functional level. PMID:26839504

  15. Growth and ion accumulation in dwarf cashew plants at different times of salinity exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdineia Soares Freitas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the influence of salt stress exposition on growth and ion accumulation in dwarf cashew plants. For this purpose, cashew nuts (CCP 06 clone were sown in plastic trays containing vermiculite moistened with nutrient solution containing NaCl with electrical conductivities ranging from 0.0 to 18.0 dS m-1. Plants were harvested after 30 and 60 days under salt stress. It was determined the shoot dry masses (SDM and root (RDM, the SDM/RDM ratio, Na+, K+, Cl- and NO3 - contents and the Na+ and Cl- fluxes for whole plant in the period between two times of exposure to salt stress. The cashew growth was affected by salinity and by the exposure time to this stress, and the plants subjected to 60 days of stress were the most affected by NaCl. The Na+ and Cl- contents increased in all plant tissues, while the NO3 - content was reduced and K+ content has not changed by salinity. The Na+ and Cl-fluxes increased with salinity; however Cl- seemed to be more harmful to plants, since this ion has been absorbed in a higher ratio than Na+. The growth reduction in dwarf cashew is intensified when exposure to salt stress is longer and it is more associated with uptake and excessive accumulation of Cl- than Na+.

  16. Influence of sediment organic enrichment and water alkalinity on growth of aquatic isoetid and elodeid plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Borum, Jens; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2010-01-01

    ) increasing alkalinity (from 0.17 to 3.20 meq. L-1) enhances growth and reduces inhibition of organic sediment enrichment for elodeids but not for isoetids. 2. In low organic sediments, higher oxygen release from roots of isoetids than elodeids generated oxic conditions to greater sediment depth for Lobelia...... two elodeids (Potamogeton crispus and P. perfoliatus), we test whether organic enrichment of lake sediments has a long-lasting influence by: (i) reducing plant growth because of oxygen stress on plant roots and (ii) inhibiting growth more for isoetids than elodeids. We also test whether (iii...... because of greater CO2 supply from sediments being their main CO2 source. At higher organic enrichment, isoetid biomass was reduced, leaf chlorophyll declined up to 10-fold, root length declined from 7 to <2 cm and mortality rose (up to 50%) signalling high plant stress. 4. Lobelia was not affected by HCO...

  17. Organizational Career Growth, Affective Occupational Commitment and Turnover Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qingxiong; McElroy, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Survey data, collected from the People's Republic of China, were used to test Weng's (2010) four facet model of career growth and to examine its effect on occupational commitment and turnover intentions. Weng conceptualized career growth as consisting of four factors: career goal progress, professional ability development, promotion speed, and…

  18. Effect of cadmium on growth, protein content and peroxidase activity in pea plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    n this study the effects of different cadmium chloride concentrations (5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mu M) on some physiological and biochemical processes including seed germination, root and shoot fresh and dry weight, protein content and peroxidase activity in peas (Cicer arietinum cv. pars) were investigated. Cadmium did not have any significant effect on the rate of pea seed germination. However, it affected the subsequent growth rate in these plants. Higher cadmium concentrations specially at 50 and 100 mu M reduced plant growth significantly. Leaf chlorosis, wilting and leaf abscission were observed in plants treated with cadmium. Protein content in pea roots reduced significantly in the presence of high cadmium concentrations. Low concentrations of CdCl/sub 2/ resulted in higher peroxidase activity both in roots and shoots of pea plants. (author)

  19. Effects of lead on plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiussello, N.; Molinari, M.T.

    1973-01-01

    The poisonousness of lead nitrate to seedlings of several plant species has been tested in Petri dishes, with 10/sup -1/, 10/sup -2/, 10/sup -3/, 10/sup -4/ M conc. Distilled water and KNO/sub 3/ solutions 2 X 10/sup -1/, 2 X 10/sup -2/, 2 X 10/sup -3/, 2 X 10/sup -4/ M were employed as controls. The tested species show a decreasing sensitivity: Capsicum annum > Beta vulgaris > Phalaris canariensis > Vicia sativa > Helianthus annuus > Oryza sativa > Triticum vulgare Avena sativa > Pisum sativum. Avena sativa shows a diminution of 34% in ww, 23% in dw, 26% in chlorophyll content in comparison with the controls after 21 days 10/sup -4/ M lead nitrate. The chlorophyll content, referred to dry weight, is related to lead concentration. Since the early stages of chlorophyll biosynthesis are similar, if not identical, with those for Haemoglobin, lead could interfere as it does in haemoglobin synthesis.

  20. Brevundimonas diminuta mediated alleviation of arsenic toxicity and plant growth promotion in Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Marwa, Naina; Mishra, Shashank K; Mishra, Jyoti; Verma, Praveen C; Rathaur, Sushma; Singh, Nandita

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As), a toxic metalloid adversely affects plant growth in polluted areas. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of improving phytostablization of arsenic through application of new isolated strain Brevundimonas diminuta (NBRI012) in rice plant [Oryza sativa (L.) Var. Sarju 52] at two different concentrations [10ppm (low toxic) and 50ppm (high toxic)] of As. The plant growth promoting traits of bacterial strains revealed the inherent ability of siderophores, phosphate solubilisation, indole acetic acid (IAA), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase production which may be associated with increased biomass, chlorophyll and MDA content of rice and thereby promoting plant growth. The study also revealed the As accumulation property of NBRI012 strain which could play an important role in As removal from contaminated soil. Furthermore, NBRI012 inoculation significantly restored the hampered root epidermal and cortical cell growth of rice plant and root hair elimination. Altogether our study highlights the multifarious role of B. diminuta in mediating stress tolerance and modulating translocation of As in edible part of rice plant. PMID:26650422

  1. The effects of plant growth on the temperature of paddy waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water temperature and the growth of rice plants are interrelated and influence each other. To elucidate this relationship, and in particular, to quantify the effects of the growth of rice plants on water temperature, this study focused on the difference between the temperature of paddy water and that of open shallow waters devoid of rice plants. Here, we simultaneously analyzed the seasonal changes in the difference of water temperatures and the growth of rice plants. A water temperature model based on the energy balance equation and the average climate data from 1971 to 2000 were used to estimate the daily mean temperature of paddy waters in conjunction with the growth of rice plants during the growing season in Japan at a spatial resolution of approximately 1 km x 1 km. The most notable result from the simulation experiment is the fact that the temperature of paddy waters increases by approximately 0.3degC from spring to early summer and decreases by approximately 1.5-2.0degC in mid-summer compared to that of open shallow waters. This is because the net radiation at the surface of paddy waters is affected not only by climate factors but also by the increase in the leaf area index of rice plants. The net radiation and the temperature of paddy waters during the growing season are significantly determined by the balance of the downward flux of long-wave radiation emitted from the plant layer and the extent to which short-wave radiation is intercepted by the foliage of rice plants. Therefore, even under identical climate conditions, a shift in the transplanting date could affect the temperature of paddy waters due to an increase in the leaf area

  2. Multiple effects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens volatile compounds: plant growth promotion and growth inhibition of phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Shashidar; Matzén, Staffan; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin; Bejai, Sarosh; Meijer, Johan

    2016-06-01

    Biotic interactions through volatile organic compounds (VOC) are frequent in nature. This investigation aimed to study the role of ITALIC! BacillusVOC for the beneficial effects on plants observed as improved growth and pathogen control. Four ITALIC! Bacillus amyloliquefacienssubsp. ITALIC! plantarumstrains were screened for VOC effects on ITALIC! Arabidopsis thalianaCol-0 seedlings and ITALIC! Brassicafungal phytopathogens. VOC from all four ITALIC! Bacillusstrains could promote growth of ITALIC! Arabidopsisplants resulting in increased shoot biomass but the effects were dependent on the growth medium. Dose response studies with UCMB5113 on MS agar with or without root exudates showed significant plant growth promotion even at low levels of bacteria. ITALIC! BacillusVOC antagonized growth of several fungal pathogens ITALIC! in vitro However, the plant growth promotion efficacy and fungal inhibition potency varied among the ITALIC! Bacillusstrains. VOC inhibition of several phytopathogens indicated efficient microbial antagonism supporting high rhizosphere competence of the ITALIC! Bacillusstrains. GC-MS analysis identified several VOC structures where the profiles differed depending on the growth medium. The ability of ITALIC! Bacillusstrains to produce both volatile and soluble compounds for plant growth promotion and disease biocontrol provides examples of rhizosphere microbes as an important ecosystem service with high potential to support sustainable crop production. PMID:27053756

  3. Do Corruption and Social Trust affect Economic Growth? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serritzlew, Søren; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2014-01-01

    Two separate literatures suggest that corruption and social trust, respectively, are related to economic growth, although the strengths of the relationships, and the direction of causality, are still debated. In this paper, we review these literatures and evaluate the evidence for causal effects of...... corruption and trust on economic growth, and discuss how corruption and trust are interrelated. The reviews show that absence of corruption and high levels of social trust foster economic growth. The literatures also indicate that corruption has a causal effect on social trust, while the opposite effect is...... more uncertain. In the conclusion, we offer the suggestion that fighting corruption may yield a “double dividend”, as reduced corruption is likely to have both direct and indirect effects on growth....

  4. Mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Myers, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce the chapter with a discussion of lessons from nature, agriculture, and landscapes; terms and definitions; and an historical perspective of mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development. Topics include developmental responses to mechanical stress; mechanical stress-environment interactions; metabolic, productivity, and compositional changes; hormonal involvement; mechanoperception and early transduction mechanisms; applications in agriculture; and research implications. The discussion of hormonal involvement in mechanical stress physiology includes ethylene, auxin, gibberellins, and other phytohormones. The discussion of applications in agriculture examines windbreaks, nursery practices, height control and conditioning, and enhancement of growth and productivity. Implications for research are related to handling plant materials, space biology, and future research needs.

  5. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  6. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (1) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (2) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (3) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (4) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (5) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (6) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  7. Bioaerosols from a Food Waste Composting Plant Affect Human Airway Epithelial Cell Remodeling Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Chang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The composting procedure in food waste plants generates airborne bioaerosols that have the potential to damage human airway epithelial cells. Persistent inflammation and repair responses induce airway remodeling and damage to the respiratory system. This study elucidated the expression changes of airway remodeling genes in human lung mucoepidermoid NCI-H292 cells exposed to bioaerosols from a composting plant. Different types of microorganisms were detectable in the composting plant, using the agar culture method. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the level of Aspergillus fumigatus and the profile of remodeling genes. The real-time PCR results indicated that the amount of A. fumigatus in the composting hall was less than 102 conidia. The endotoxins in the field bioaerosols were determined using a limulus amebocyte lysate test. The endotoxin levels depended on the type of particulate matter (PM, with coarse particles (2.5–10 μm having higher endotoxin levels than did fine particles (0.5–2.5 μm. After exposure to the conditioned medium of field bioaerosol samples, NCI-H292 cells showed increased pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL-6 release and activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21WAF1/CIP1 gene expression, but not of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP-9. Airborne endotoxin levels were higher inside the composting hall than they were in other areas, and they were associated with PM. This suggested that airborne bioaerosols in the composting plant contained endotoxins and microorganisms besides A. fumigatus that cause the inflammatory cytokine secretion and augment the expression of remodeling genes in NCI-H292 cells. It is thus necessary to monitor potentially hazardous materials from bioaerosols in food composting plants, which could affect the health of workers.

  8. Different shades of JAZ during plant growth and defense

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Pierik, Ronald; Van Wees, Saskia C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ever since their discovery as key regulators of the jasmonate (JA) signaling pathway, repressor proteins of the JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) family are rising stars in research on hormonal regulation of plant growth and defense. In plant cells, JAZ repressor proteins interact with an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex (SCFCOI1) that together functions as a JA receptor. In uninduced cells, JAZs block the activity of transcriptional regulators of JA responses by physically binding to them. Upon percepti...

  9. How labor market institutions affect job creation and productivity growth

    OpenAIRE

    Henrekson, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Economic growth requires factor reallocation across firms and continuous replacement of technologies. Labor market institutions influence economic dynamism by their impact on the supply of a key factor, skilled workers to new and expanding firms, and the shedding of workers from declining and failing firms. Growth-favoring labor market institutions include portable pension plans and other job tenure rights, health insurance untied to the current employer, individualized wage-setting, and publ...

  10. STRESS ETHYLENE EVOLUTION: A MEASURE OF OZONE AFFECTS ON PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if ethylene evolution by plants is correlated with the ozone stress, a range of plants species and cultivars was exposed to varying ozone concentrations. Following exposure, the plants were encapsulated in plastic bags and incubated for up to 22h. The stress-induced ...

  11. Dynamics of Plant Growth; A Theory Based on Riemannian Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pulwicki, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new model for macroscopic plant tissue growth based on dynamical Riemannian geometry is presented. We treat 1D and 2D tissues as continuous, deformable, growing geometries for sizes larger than 1mm. The dynamics of the growing tissue are described by a set of coupled tensor equations in non-Euclidean (curved) space. These coupled equations represent a novel feedback mechanism between growth and curvature dynamics. For 1D growth, numerical simulations are compared to two measures of root growth. First, modular growth along the simulated root shows an elongation zone common to many species of plant roots. Second, the relative elemental growth rate (REGR) calculated in silico exhibits temporal dynamics recently characterized in high-resolution root growth studies but which thus far lack a biological hypothesis to explain them. Namely, the REGR can evolve from a single peak localized near the root tip to a double-peak structure. In our model, this is a direct consequence of considering growth as b...

  12. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and endophytes accelerate phytoremediation of metalliferous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y; Prasad, M N V; Rajkumar, M; Freitas, H

    2011-01-01

    Technogenic activities (industrial-plastic, textiles, microelectronics, wood preservatives; mining-mine refuse, tailings, smelting; agrochemicals-chemical fertilizers, farm yard manure, pesticides; aerosols-pyrometallurgical and automobile exhausts; biosolids-sewage sludge, domestic waste; fly ash-coal combustion products) are the primary sources of heavy metal contamination and pollution in the environment in addition to geogenic sources. During the last two decades, bioremediation has emerged as a potential tool to clean up the metal-contaminated/polluted environment. Exclusively derived processes by plants alone (phytoremediation) are time-consuming. Further, high levels of pollutants pose toxicity to the remediating plants. This situation could be ameliorated and accelerated by exploring the partnership of plant-microbe, which would improve the plant growth by facilitating the sequestration of toxic heavy metals. Plants can bioconcentrate (phytoextraction) as well as bioimmobilize or inactivate (phytostabilization) toxic heavy metals through in situ rhizospheric processes. The mobility and bioavailability of heavy metal in the soil, particularly at the rhizosphere where root uptake or exclusion takes place, are critical factors that affect phytoextraction and phytostabilization. Developing new methods for either enhancing (phytoextraction) or reducing the bioavailability of metal contaminants in the rhizosphere (phytostabilization) as well as improving plant establishment, growth, and health could significantly speed up the process of bioremediation techniques. In this review, we have highlighted the role of plant growth promoting rhizo- and/or endophytic bacteria in accelerating phytoremediation derived benefits in extensive tables and elaborate schematic sketches. PMID:21147211

  13. Morphological Transformation of Plant Cells in vitro and Its Effect on Plant Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhigang; ZENG Zhaolin; LIU Ruizhi; DENG Ying

    2005-01-01

    Enhancement of cell growth in suspension cultures is urgently needed in plant cell culture engineering. This study investigates the relationship between morphological transformation and cell growth in callus and suspension cultures of saffron cells belonging to the cell line C96 induced from Crocus sativus L. In the suspension culture, an unbalanced osmotic pressure between the intracell and extracell regions induced a large morphological transformation which affected normal division of the saffron cells. An increase in osmotic pressure caused by the addition of sucrose inhibits the vacuolation and shrinkage of cytoplasm in the cells. As the sucrose concentration increases, the total amount of accumulated biomass also increases. Besides the sucrose concentration, increased ionic strength and inoculation ratio also help restrain to a large extent the vacuolation and shrinkage of the cytoplasm in the suspended cells, which results in increased biomass. The conditions for optimal biomass are: Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium with 40 g/L sucrose and 60% (v/v) inoculation ratio.

  14. Interactive effects of above- and belowground herbivory and plant competition on plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Jingying; Raaijmakers, Ciska; Kostenko, Olga; Kos, Martine; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Competition and herbivory are two major factors that can influence plant growth and plant defence. Although these two factors are often studied separately, they do not operate independently. We examined how aboveground herbivory by beet armyworm larvae (Spodoptera exigua) and belowground herbivory b

  15. Increased Plant Uptake of Nitrogen from 15N Depleted Fertilizer Using Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The techniques of 15N isotope have been very useful for determining the behavior and fate of N in soil, including the use efficiency of applied N fertilizers by plants. Our objective in this study was to use 15N isotope techniques to demonstrate that a model plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGP...

  16. Zn—Cu Interaction Affecting Zn Adsorption and Plant Availability in a Metal—Contaminated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.L.Rimmer; LuoYongming

    1996-01-01

    In a previous greenhouse experiment,we showed that there was an interaction between cu and Zn,which affected growth and metal uptake by young barley plants grown on soil to which Cd,Cu,Pb,and Zn had been added.We suggested that the underlying mechanism was the control of the amount of plant-available Zn by competitive adsorption between Cu and Zn,In order to test this hypothesis,the adsorption of Zn alone,and in the presence of added Cd,Cu and Pb,has been measured using the same soil.Following adsorption,the extractability of the Zn in CaCl2 solution was measured .The adsorption isotherms showed that of the added metals only Cu had a large effect on Zn adsorption.The effect of Cu was to reduce Zn adsoption and to increase the amount of CaCl2-extractable(i.e.plant-available) Zn,in agreement with the conclusions from the greenhouse experiment.The magnitude of the effect of Cu on plant-avalilable Zn was similar in both experiments.

  17. Temperature and water stress during conditioning and incubation phase affecting Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth

    OpenAIRE

    Moral , Juan; Lozano-Baena, María Dolores; Rubiales, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Orobanche crenata is a holoparasitic plant that is potentially devastating to crop yield of legume species. Soil temperature and humidity are known to affect seed germination, however, the extent of their influence on germination and radicle growth of those of O. crenata is largely unknown. In this work, we studied the effects of temperature, water potential (Ψt) and the type of water stress (matric or osmotic) on O. crenata seeds during conditioning and incubation periods. We found that seed...

  18. Influence of seasons, different plant parts, and plant growth stages on saponin quantity and distribution in Bacopa monnieri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watoo Phrompittayarat

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Brahmi or Bacopa monnieri (L. Wettst. is becoming popular as a food supplement due to its enhancing effect onmemory and intellect. Previous studies showed that a group of saponins are active compounds in this plant. However, untilnow little evidence has been obtained to indicate whether saponins are consistently present throughout the plant growthstages or the compounds are affected by the seasons. In order to answer those questions, we cultivated Brahmi under thenet house in three seasons. Influence of plant growth stages on saponin quantity and distribution was also investigated.In each season, treatments were plant ages with different plant parts having a factorial completely randomized design with 3replications. Five saponins, i.e. bacoside A3, bacopaside II, bacopaside X, bacopasaponin C and bacopaside I, were analyzedusing HPLC and reported as total saponins.The results showed that total saponin contents in Brahmi were the highest in rainy season while the weight yield ofBrahmi was the highest in summer. Ages of Brahmi (1-4 months slightly affected total saponin content. High level of totalsaponins (1.91±0.48% w/w was detected at the shoot of Brahmi. These findings indicate that the saponin quantity is affectedby seasons and the distribution of the saponins is different in each part of the plant. This information will be beneficial tothe production of Brahmi for both household and industry

  19. How Planting Density Affects Number and Yield of Potato Minitubers in a Commercial Glasshouse Production System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, van der A.J.H.; Lommen, W.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Commercial potato minituber production systems aim at high tuber numbers per plant. This study investigated by which mechanisms planting density (25.0, 62.5 and 145.8 plants/m2) of in vitro derived plantlets affected minituber yield and minituber number per plantlet. Lowering planting density result

  20. Growth Chambers on the International Space Station for Large Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Morrow, Robert C.; Levine, Howard G.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) now has platforms for conducting research on horticultural plant species under LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lighting, and those capabilities continue to expand. The Veggie vegetable production system was deployed to the ISS as an applied research platform for food production in space. Veggie is capable of growing a wide array of horticultural crops. It was designed for low power usage, low launch mass and stowage volume, and minimal crew time requirements. The Veggie flight hardware consists of a light cap containing red (630 nanometers), blue, (455 nanometers) and green (530 nanometers) LEDs. Interfacing with the light cap is an extendable bellowsbaseplate for enclosing the plant canopy. A second large plant growth chamber, the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH), is will fly to the ISS in 2017. APH will be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. APH will control light (quality, level, and timing), temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing any cabin or plant-derived ethylene and other volatile organic compounds. Additional capabilities include sensing of leaf temperature and root zone moisture, root zone temperature, and oxygen concentration. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs (4100K). There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations. Veggie and APH are available for research proposals.

  1. Affective imagery and acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Carmen; Visschers, Vivianne; Siegrist, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between the content of spontaneous associations with nuclear power plants and the acceptance of using new-generation nuclear power plants to replace old ones. The study also considered gender as a variable. A representative sample of the German- and French-speaking population of Switzerland (N= 1,221) was used. Log-linear models revealed significant two-way interactions between the association content and acceptance, association content and gender, and gender and acceptance. Correspondence analysis revealed that participants who were opposed to nuclear power plants mainly associated nuclear power plants with risk, negative feelings, accidents, radioactivity, waste disposal, military use, and negative consequences for health and environment; whereas participants favoring nuclear power plants mainly associated them with energy, appearance descriptions of nuclear power plants, and necessity. Thus, individuals opposing nuclear power plants had both more concrete and more diverse associations with them than people who were in favor of nuclear power plants. In addition, participants who were undecided often mentioned similar associations to those participants who were in favor. Males more often expressed associations with energy, waste disposal, and negative health effects. Females more often made associations with appearance descriptions, negative feelings, and negative environmental effects. The results further suggest that acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants was higher in the German-speaking part of the country, where all of the Swiss nuclear power plants are physically located. Practical implications for risk communication are discussed. PMID:21977961

  2. Effect of planting density on plant growth and camptothecin content of Camptotheca acuminata seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEIHuan-yong; WANGYang; WANGZhen-yue; YANXiu-feng

    2005-01-01

    C. acuminata seedlings cultivated in greenhouse were transplanted into the fields with 5 designed planting densities (11, 16, 25,44 and 100 plants·m-2) in May of 2004 and were harvested in the middle of September of 2004. The seedling growth indexes including plant height and crown width, biomass allocation, camptothecin (CPT) content and CPT yield of different organs (young leaf, old leaf, stem,and root) were studied. For the 5 selected planting densities, the plant biomass, height, crown width, and total leaf area of C. acuminata seedlings all showed highest values at the planting density of 25 plants ·m-2. CPT content in young leaves was higher than that in other organs of seedlings and presented an obvious change with the variation of planting densities and with the highest value at density of 100plants·m-2, while for other organs no significant variation in CPT content was found with change of planting density. The accumulation of CPT was enhanced significantly at the planting density of 25 plants·m-2. It is concluded that for the purpose to get raw materials with more CPT from C. acuminata, the optimal planting density of C. acuminata seedlings should be designed as 25 plants·m-2.

  3. Corn metabolites affect growth and virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahi, S. V.; Chilton, M D; Chilton, W S

    1990-01-01

    Homogenates of corn seedlings inhibit both growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and induction of its Ti plasmid virulence (vir) genes by acetosyringone (AS). The heat-labile inhibitor has been identified as 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA), present in 2-week-old seedlings (B73) at a concentration of 1.5 mM or greater. A concentration of 0.3 mM DIMBOA is sufficient to block growth of A. tumefaciens completely for 220 hr. DIMBOA at 0.1 mM concentration completely inhi...

  4. Influence of Plant Growth Regulators (PGRs) and Planting Method on Growth and Yield in Oil Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo var. styriaca)

    OpenAIRE

    Shirzad SURE; Hosein AROOIE; Majid AZIZI

    2012-01-01

    The effect of plant growth regulators IBA (indole butyric acid), GA3 (gibberellin) and ethylene (as ethephon) in two methods of planting was investigated (each method was considered as a separate experiment) on morphological characters and yield of medicinal pumpkin. The experiments were carried out in a factorial trial based on completely randomized block design, with four replicates. The treatments were combined with priming and spraying with the above PGRs. The first seed priming with cont...

  5. Photosynthate consumption and carbon turnover in the rhizosphere depending on plant species and growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The root tissue which can be isolated from soils represents only part of the total plant carbon incorporation. Between 20 and 40% of the photosynthetic production of plants is expended for root growth and root metabolism. This indicates a striking turnover of energy in the rhizosphere, because relatively litle root-derived organic matter remains there until harvest time. Plant species and variety, soil conditions and temperature were shown to be the most decisive factors governing the assimilate consumption of plant root systems. A special technique is described which enables to study how this extensive turnover affects the surrounding soil depending on its proximity to the roots. Plant-derived carbon can be detected up to 20mm away from the roots. A priming effect has been found on the decomposition of soil organic matter. This explains why, in spite of the rhizo-deposition mentioned, no net-accumulation of carbon in the rhizosphere has been found. (Author)

  6. Effect of Planting Term on Growth and Flowering of Two Cultivars of Lachenalia Produced in A Greenhouse as Potting Plants During Winter Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapczyńska Anna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse experiment was carried out on lachenalia plants to determine the effect of different bulb planting terms (from October to January on the growth and flowering of cultivars ‘Ronina’ and ‘Rupert’, in the natural light conditions. From every planted bulb emerged stems and flowers, but the time of flow–ering was dependent on the planting term and genotype. Irrespective of the planting term, plants of ‘Rupert’ were taller than those of ‘Ronina’. The planting term had an influence on the length of the inflorescence in ‘Rupert’, but did not affect in ‘Ronina’. The bulbs of ‘Rupert’ produced more than twice as many florets as ‘Ronina’ bulbs. Irrespective of the genotype, the bulbs planted the earliest produced the thinnest stems. The two tested cultivars were long-lasting flowering pot plants - their inflorescences remained decorative for over 20 days.

  7. Effects of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN throughout the life cycle of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Josefina Poupin

    Full Text Available Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR induce positive effects in plants, such as increased growth or reduced stress susceptibility. The mechanisms behind PGPR/plant interaction are poorly understood, as most studies have described short-term responses on plants and only a few studies have analyzed plant molecular responses under PGPR colonization. Here, we studied the effects of the PGPR bacterial model Burkholderiaphytofirmans PsJN on the whole life cycle of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. We reported that at different plant developmental points, strain PsJN can be found in the rhizosphere and also colonizing their internal tissues. In early ontogeny, strain PsJN increased several growth parameters and accelerated growth rate of the plants. Also, an Arabidopsis transcriptome analysis revealed that 408 genes showed differential expression in PsJN-inoculated plants; some of these genes are involved in stress response and hormone pathways. Specifically, genes implicated in auxin and gibberellin pathways were induced. Quantitative transcriptional analyses of selected genes in different developmental stages revealed that the beginning of these changes could be evidenced early in development, especially among the down-regulated genes. The inoculation with heat-killed bacteria provoked a more severe transcriptional response in plants, but was not able to induce plant growth-promotion. Later in ontogeny, the growth rates of inoculated plants decreased with respect to the non-inoculated group and, interestingly, the inoculation accelerated the flowering time and the appearance of senescence signs in plants; these modifications correlate with the early up-regulation of flowering control genes. Then, we show that a single inoculation with a PGPR could affect the whole life cycle of a plant, accelerating its growth rate and shortening its vegetative period, both effects relevant for most crops. Thus, these findings provide novel and interesting aspects

  8. Pectin Methylesterification Impacts the Relationship between Photosynthesis and Plant Growth1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Jin; Renna, Luciana; Brandizzi, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis occurs in mesophyll cells of specialized organs such as leaves. The rigid cell wall encapsulating photosynthetic cells controls the expansion and distribution of cells within photosynthetic tissues. The relationship between photosynthesis and plant growth is affected by leaf area. However, the underlying genetic mechanisms affecting carbon partitioning to different aspects of leaf growth are not known. To fill this gap, we analyzed Arabidopsis plants with altered levels of pectin methylesterification, which is known to modulate cell wall plasticity and plant growth. Pectin methylesterification levels were varied through manipulation of cotton Golgi-related (CGR) 2 or 3 genes encoding two functionally redundant pectin methyltransferases. Increased levels of methylesterification in a line over-expressing CGR2 (CGR2OX) resulted in highly expanded leaves with enhanced intercellular air spaces; reduced methylesterification in a mutant lacking both CGR-genes 2 and 3 (cgr2/3) resulted in thin but dense leaf mesophyll that limited CO2 diffusion to chloroplasts. Leaf, root, and plant dry weight were enhanced in CGR2OX but decreased in cgr2/3. Differences in growth between wild type and the CGR-mutants can be explained by carbon partitioning but not by variations in area-based photosynthesis. Therefore, photosynthesis drives growth through alterations in carbon partitioning to new leaf area growth and leaf mass per unit leaf area; however, CGR-mediated pectin methylesterification acts as a primary factor in this relationship through modulation of the expansion and positioning of the cells in leaves, which in turn drive carbon partitioning by generating dynamic carbon demands in leaf area growth and leaf mass per unit leaf area. PMID:27208234

  9. Parasitoid load affects plant fitness in a tritrophic system

    OpenAIRE

    Smallegange, R. C.; Loon, van, J.Th.; Blatt, S. E.; Harvey, J. A.; Dicke, M.

    2008-01-01

    Plants attacked by herbivorous insects emit volatile compounds that attract predators or parasitoids of the herbivores. Plant fitness increases when these herbivorous insects are parasitized by solitary parasitoids, but whether gregarious koinobiont parasitoids also confer a benefit to plant fitness has been disputed. We investigated the relationship between parasitoid load of the gregarious Cotesia glomerata (L.) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), food consumption by larvae of their host Pieris bras...

  10. Climate change effects on plant growth, crop yield and livestock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rötter, R.P.; Geijn, van de S.C.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given of the state of knowledge in the field of assessing climate change impacts on agricultural crops and livestock. Starting from the basic processes controlling plant growth and development, the possible impacts and interactions of climatic and other biophysical variables in different

  11. How various plasma sources may affect seed gemination and growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šerá, Božena; Gajdová, Iveta; Čermák, M.; Gavril, B.; Hnatiuc, E.; Kováčik, D.; Kříha, V.; Sláma, J.; Šerý, M.; Špatenka, P.

    Brasov: Universitatea Transilvania din Brasov, 2012 - (Clotea, L.; Cernat, M.), s. 1365-1370 ISBN 978-1-4673-1650-7. [Optimization of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (OPTIM), 2012 13th International Conference. Brasov (RO), 24.05.2012-26.05.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : non thermal plasma * atmospheric pressure * biotechnology * systems biology * seed germination * early growth Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  12. Factors affecting growth and pigmentation of Penicillium caseifulvum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Haasum, I.; Steenstrup, L.D.;

    2002-01-01

    Color formation, metabolite production and growth of Penicillium caseifulvum were studied in order to elucidate factors contributing to. yellow discoloration of Blue Cheese caused by the mold. A screening experiment was set up to study the effect of pH, concentration of salt (NaCl), P, K, N, S, M...

  13. Dissolved oxygen concentration affects hybrid striped bass growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. Three studies were conducted to quantify performance traits and metabolic responses of hybrid striped b...

  14. How does Labour Mobility affect the Performance of Plants? The importance of relatedness and geographical proximity

    OpenAIRE

    Ron Boschma; Eriksson, R; Lindgren, U.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of skill portfolios and labour mobility on plant performance by means of a unique database that connects attributes of individuals to features of plants for the whole Swedish economy. We found that a portfolio of related competences at the plant level increases significantly productivity growth of plants, in contrast to plant portfolios consisting of either similar or unrelated competences. Based on the analysis of 101,093 job moves, we found that inflows of ski...

  15. Effects of Different Substrate Composition on Growth of Gesneriaceae Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijing QIU; Chunqing ZOU; Zhengjun SHI; Yaoliang DAI; Ruixing XIE

    2014-01-01

    The cultivation experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of dif-ferent proportions of peat soil, perlite, vermiculite and yel ow mud on growth of Gesneriaceae species (Chirita gueilinensis, Sinningia speciosa, Lysionotus pauci-florus, Hemiboea henryi, Aeschynanthus acuminatus, Saintpaulia ionantha). The growth traits of each plant growing in 7 different matrix materials were investigated. The plant height, crown width and chlorophyl content of each plant were mea-sured. The results showed that the best substrate ratio was peat soil∶vermiculite=2∶1 for C. gueilinensis, L. pauciflorus and H. henryi; peat soil∶perlite∶vermiculite = 2∶1∶1 for S. ionantha; peat soil∶vermiculite∶yel ow mud=2∶1∶1 for S. speciosa; peat soil∶per-lite∶vermiculite∶yel ow mud=2∶1∶1∶1 for A. acuminatus.

  16. Differential growth responses of Brachypodium distachyon genotypes to inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral, Fernanda P; Pankievicz, Vânia C S; Arisi, Ana Carolina M; de Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fabio; Stacey, Gary

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can associate and enhance the growth of important crop grasses. However, in most cases, the molecular mechanisms responsible for growth promotion are not known. Such research could benefit by the adoption of a grass model species that showed a positive response to bacterial inoculation and was amenable to genetic and molecular research methods. In this work we inoculated different genotypes of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon with two, well-characterized PGPR bacteria, Azospirillum brasilense and Herbaspirillum seropedicae, and evaluated the growth response. Plants were grown in soil under no nitrogen or with low nitrogen (i.e., 0.5 mM KNO3). A variety of growth parameters (e.g., shoot height, root length, number of lateral roots, fresh and dry weight) were measured 35 days after inoculation. The data indicate that plant genotype plays a very important role in determining the plant response to PGPR inoculation. A positive growth response was observed with only four genotypes grown under no nitrogen and three genotypes tested under low nitrogen. However, in contrast, relatively good root colonization was seen with most genotypes, as measured by drop plate counting and direct, microscopic examination of roots. In particular, the endophytic bacteria H. seropedicae showed strong epiphytic and endophytic colonization of roots. PMID:26873699

  17. Mixed planting with a leguminous plant outperforms bacteria in promoting growth of a metal remediating plant through histidine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adediran, Gbotemi A; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Heal, Kate V; Harvie, Barbra A

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) in improving metal phytoremediation is still limited by stunted plant growth under high soil metal concentrations. Meanwhile, mixed planting with leguminous plants is known to improve yield in nutrient deficient soils but the use of a metal tolerant legume to enhance metal tolerance of a phytoremediator has not been explored. We compared the use of Pseudomonas brassicacearum, Rhizobium leguminosarum, and the metal tolerant leguminous plant Vicia sativa to promote the growth of Brassica juncea in soil contaminated with 400 mg Zn kg(-1), and used synchrotron based microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe Zn speciation in plant roots. B. juncea grew better when planted with V. sativa than when inoculated with PGPB. By combining PGPB with mixed planting, B. juncea recovered full growth while also achieving soil remediation efficiency of >75%, the maximum ever demonstrated for B. juncea. μXANES analysis of V. sativa suggested possible root exudation of the Zn chelates histidine and cysteine were responsible for reducing Zn toxicity. We propose the exploration of a legume-assisted-phytoremediation system as a more effective alternative to PGPB for Zn bioremediation. PMID:26682469

  18. Influence of Plant Growth Regulators (PGRs and Planting Method on Growth and Yield in Oil Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo var. styriaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirzad SURE

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant growth regulators IBA (indole butyric acid, GA3 (gibberellin and ethylene (as ethephon in two methods of planting was investigated (each method was considered as a separate experiment on morphological characters and yield of medicinal pumpkin. The experiments were carried out in a factorial trial based on completely randomized block design, with four replicates. The treatments were combined with priming and spraying with the above PGRs. The first seed priming with control (water, IBA 100 ppm, GA3 25 ppm and ethephon 200 ppm, and when seedling developed to 4 leaf stage sprayed there with control (water, IBA 100 ppm, GA3 25 ppm and ethephon 200 ppm for three times. In both planting methods, there were all of these treatments. The result showed that PGRs and planting method had significant effects on vegetative, flowering and yield characteristics including: leaf area %DM plant, number of male and female flowers per plant, number of fruit/plant, fruits fresh weight, seeds length and width, number of seed per fruit, seed yield, % seeds oil and oil yield. Hence spraying with GA3 25 ppm in four leaf stage at trellis method could be a suitable treatment for enhancing growth and yield of medicinal pumpkin.

  19. The effect of differential growth rates across plants on spectral predictions of physiological parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Rapaport

    Full Text Available Leaves of various ages and positions in a plant's canopy can present distinct physiological, morphological and anatomical characteristics, leading to complexities in selecting a single leaf for spectral representation of an entire plant. A fortiori, as growth rates between canopies differ, spectral-based comparisons across multiple plants--often based on leaves' position but not age--becomes an even more challenging mission. This study explores the effect of differential growth rates on the reflectance variability between leaves of different canopies, and its implication on physiological predictions made by widely-used spectral indices. Two distinct irrigation treatments were applied for one month, in order to trigger the formation of different growth rates between two groups of grapevines. Throughout the experiment, the plants were physiologically and morphologically monitored, while leaves from every part of their canopies were spectrally and histologically sampled. As the control vines were constantly developing new leaves, the water deficit plants were experiencing growth inhibition, resulting in leaves of different age at similar nodal position across the treatments. This modification of the age-position correlation was characterized by a near infrared reflectance difference between younger and older leaves, which was found to be exponentially correlated (R(2 = 0.98 to the age-dependent area of intercellular air spaces within the spongy parenchyma. Overall, the foliage of the control plant became more spectrally variable, creating complications for intra- and inter-treatment leaf-based comparisons. Of the derived indices, the Structure-Insensitive Pigment Index (SIPI was found indifferent to the age-position effect, allowing the treatments to be compared at any nodal position, while a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI-based stomatal conductance prediction was substantially affected by differential growth rates. As various

  20. Differential responses of onion and garlic against plant growth regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of Gibberellic acid-GA3, Prohexadione-Calcium, and Ethephon pre-harvest application on yield, biomass production, photosynthetic function, lipid peroxidation and quality characteristics of onion (Allium cepa L.) and garlic (Allium sativum L.) plants were investigated. Shoot length and biomass of onion and garlic, expressed either in fresh or dry weight, increased significantly under GA3, while a progressive decrease under Prohex-Ca and Ethephon occurred. Higher MDA (lipid peroxidation) values were recorded after Prohex-Ca and Ethephon supply on onion and garlic plants; it seems that GA3 treatment prevents lipid peroxidation as measured with the help of the TBARS method. Plants treated with Prohex-Ca and Ethephon revealed higher peroxidase activity compared to control and GA3 treated plants. Considering the results of MDA content and peroxidase activities it can be assumed that GA3 treated plants are slightly protected from the natural course of oxidative stress, which occurs during ageing as observed for control samples. The fluctuations of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters represent a general decline in chloroplasts function after plant growth regulators exposure, whereas in combination to the suppressed chlorophyll content, structural malformations of photo systems may also occur. The production of ascorbic acid, glucose and fructose content seems to be enhanced under GA3 in both species, while their values were depressed under Prohex-Ca and Ethephon. Overall, only GA3 supply leads to a vigorous onion and garlic growth and yield. (author)

  1. Problems Affecting the Growth of Microfinance Institutions in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    J.Mukama; Therese Fish; Jako Volschenk

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that inhibit growth in the microfinance sector in Tanzania by measuring the perceptions about such issues among Microfinance Institutions (MFIs). The most important include the educational levels of clients, lack of capital to lend to clients and staff related incentives and skills development. These findings indicate phenomena that deserve consideration from legislators. Also prominent is the dual nature of the finance sector, with the conventional banking ins...

  2. Does Religion Affect Economic Growth and Happiness? Evidence from Ramadan

    OpenAIRE

    Campante, Filipe; Yanagizawa-Drott, David

    2013-01-01

    We study the economic effects of religious practices in the context of the observance of Ramadan fasting, one of the central tenets of Islam. To establish causality, we exploit variation in the length of the fasting period due to the rotating Islamic calendar. We report two key, quantitatively meaningful results: 1) longer Ramadan fasting has a negative effect on output growth in Muslim countries, and 2) it increases subjective well-being among Muslims. We then examine labor market outcomes, ...

  3. Growth and aggressiveness factors affecting Monilinia spp. survival peaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarino, M; Melgarejo, P; De Cal, A

    2016-06-16

    Brown rot of stone fruit is caused by three species of Monilinia, Monilinia laxa, M. fructigena, and M. fructicola. Eleven components of 20 different isolates of each of the three Monilinia species were analyzed to determine distinct aggressiveness and growth characteristics among the three fungi. M. fructicola showed the greatest lesion diameter, and the lowest incubation and latency period on fruit postharvest, however isolates of M. fructigena exhibited less aggressiveness components. Five growth characteristics of M. fructicola could be used to distinguish M. fructicola from the other two species. The dendrogram generated from only the presence of sclerotia and lesion length on infected fruit separated the 60 isolates into two clusters (r=0.93). One cluster was composed of the M. laxa and M. fructigena isolates and the other cluster comprised the M. fructicola isolates. However, the dendrogram generated based on the presence of stromata and sclerotia in the same colony of the three species when they were grown on potato dextrose agar, and the lesion diameter on fruit infected with each species separated the 60 isolates into three clusters (r=0.81). Each cluster comprised the isolates of each of three Monilinia spp. We discussed the effect of M. fructicola growth and aggressiveness differences on the displacement of M. laxa and M. fructigena by M. fructicola recorded in Spanish peach orchards and their effect on brown rot at postharvest. PMID:27043383

  4. The effect of mycorrhiza on the growth and elemental composition of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii Roessler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowska, Elzbieta, E-mail: elo@mb.au.dk [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Przybylowicz, Wojciech; Orlowski, Dariusz [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Turnau, Katarzyna [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on growth and element uptake by Ni-hyperaccumulating plant, Berkheya coddii, was studied. Plants were grown under laboratory conditions on ultramafic soil without or with the AM fungi of different origin. The AM colonization, especially with the indigenous strain, significantly enhanced plants growth and their survival. AMF affected also the elemental concentrations that were studied with Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). AMF (i) increased K and Fe in shoots, Zn and Mn in roots, P and Ca both, in roots and shoots; (ii) decreased Mn in shoots, Co and Ni both, in shoots and roots. Due to higher biomass of mycorrhizal plants, total Ni content was up to 20 times higher in mycorrhizal plants compared to the non-mycorrhizal ones. The AMF enhancement of Ni uptake may therefore provide an improvement of a presently used technique of nickel phytomining. - Highlights: > The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Ni-hyperaccumulating plant was studied. > Growth of Berkheya coddii was significantly enhanced by mycorrhizal inoculation. > Mycorrhizal symbiosis increased Ni uptake to aboveground part of the plants. > Mycorrhizal colonization affected concentration and uptake of other elements. > Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could improve the techniques of nickel phytomining. - Inoculation of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly enhanced plant growth and increased Ni uptake.

  5. The effect of mycorrhiza on the growth and elemental composition of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii Roessler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on growth and element uptake by Ni-hyperaccumulating plant, Berkheya coddii, was studied. Plants were grown under laboratory conditions on ultramafic soil without or with the AM fungi of different origin. The AM colonization, especially with the indigenous strain, significantly enhanced plants growth and their survival. AMF affected also the elemental concentrations that were studied with Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). AMF (i) increased K and Fe in shoots, Zn and Mn in roots, P and Ca both, in roots and shoots; (ii) decreased Mn in shoots, Co and Ni both, in shoots and roots. Due to higher biomass of mycorrhizal plants, total Ni content was up to 20 times higher in mycorrhizal plants compared to the non-mycorrhizal ones. The AMF enhancement of Ni uptake may therefore provide an improvement of a presently used technique of nickel phytomining. - Highlights: → The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Ni-hyperaccumulating plant was studied. → Growth of Berkheya coddii was significantly enhanced by mycorrhizal inoculation. → Mycorrhizal symbiosis increased Ni uptake to aboveground part of the plants. → Mycorrhizal colonization affected concentration and uptake of other elements. → Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could improve the techniques of nickel phytomining. - Inoculation of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly enhanced plant growth and increased Ni uptake.

  6. Seed storage conditions change the germination pattern of clonal growth plants in Mediterranean salt marshes.

    OpenAIRE

    Espinar, José L.; García, Luis V.; Clemente Salas, Luis

    2005-01-01

    The effect of salinity level and extended exposure to different salinity and flooding conditions on germination patterns of three saltmarsh clonal growth plants (Juncus subulatus, Scirpus litoralis, and S. maritimus) was studied. Seed exposure to extended flooding and saline conditions significantly affected the outcome of the germination process in a different, though predictable, way for each species, after favorable conditions for germination were restored. Tolerance of the germination pro...

  7. Adjustment of plant growth regulators in source-sink relationship during grain filling of winter wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking relationship, translocation and distribution of photosynthesis assimilates as indexes, the adjustment of plant growth regulator in source-sink was investigated by 14C-tracer technique during grain filling of winter wheat. The results show that the application of ABA and GA3 affect the translocation and distribution of the 14C-assimilates. Application of ABA inhibits and GA3 stimulates effect on the translocation and distribution of 14C-assimilates. (authors)

  8. Experiments on Growth and Variation of Spaceship Loaded Plant Seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This educational experiment was designed (1)to obtain the basic information on the effects of the space environments on plant growth and mutagenesis, (2)to evaluate plant germination and seedling growth under the effect of microgravity and light conditions and (3)to improve a child's scientific mind through the real-time observations of a seedling growth for two plants conducted both in space and on earth. This project was implemented?as one of the missions in the Korean Astronaut Program. Seeds of eleven plant species (rice, soybean, rape, radish, hot pepper, perilla, arabidopsis, orchids, dandelion, hibiscus, cosmos) was vacuum-sealed in aluminium bags. Those seeds was loaded in the 'Progress' spaceship in Feb. 2008, traveled in the 'Progress', placed in the Russian Sector-International Space Station (RS-ISS), and then was brought by the Korean astronaut from the RS-ISS, and handed over to us at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI). The germination rate, plant growth and mutation type/frequency of the returned plants are under testing in the lab and field in KAERI now. The first Korean astronaut, Dr. So-Yeon Yi, who had returned to earth on April 19, 2008 after successfully completing her scientific mission for 12 days in Space, performed the experiment of plant germination and seedling growth in the International Space Station (ISS), and a similarly designed experiment kit was distributed to conduct the experiment by student and adult volunteers in Korea at the same time. The experiment was to observe the effects of microgravity and light on a seedling growth for soybean and radish. We designed a growth kit that was an all-in-one package consisting of seeds (12 seeds in each chamber) and rock wool as a growing medium filled in four polycarbonate growing chambers in a light proof textile bag or carton paper. The bottom of the chamber was filled with a tightly-fitted rock wool which can hold water and provide moisture during a seedling growth. The

  9. Experiments on Growth and Variation of Spaceship Loaded Plant Seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. Y.; Lee, G. J.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, J. B.

    2008-08-15

    This educational experiment was designed (1)to obtain the basic information on the effects of the space environments on plant growth and mutagenesis, (2)to evaluate plant germination and seedling growth under the effect of microgravity and light conditions and (3)to improve a child's scientific mind through the real-time observations of a seedling growth for two plants conducted both in space and on earth. This project was implemented?as one of the missions in the Korean Astronaut Program. Seeds of eleven plant species (rice, soybean, rape, radish, hot pepper, perilla, arabidopsis, orchids, dandelion, hibiscus, cosmos) was vacuum-sealed in aluminium bags. Those seeds was loaded in the 'Progress' spaceship in Feb. 2008, traveled in the 'Progress', placed in the Russian Sector-International Space Station (RS-ISS), and then was brought by the Korean astronaut from the RS-ISS, and handed over to us at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI). The germination rate, plant growth and mutation type/frequency of the returned plants are under testing in the lab and field in KAERI now. The first Korean astronaut, Dr. So-Yeon Yi, who had returned to earth on April 19, 2008 after successfully completing her scientific mission for 12 days in Space, performed the experiment of plant germination and seedling growth in the International Space Station (ISS), and a similarly designed experiment kit was distributed to conduct the experiment by student and adult volunteers in Korea at the same time. The experiment was to observe the effects of microgravity and light on a seedling growth for soybean and radish. We designed a growth kit that was an all-in-one package consisting of seeds (12 seeds in each chamber) and rock wool as a growing medium filled in four polycarbonate growing chambers in a light proof textile bag or carton paper. The bottom of the chamber was filled with a tightly-fitted rock wool which can hold water and provide moisture during a

  10. Water potential affects Coniothyrium minitans growth, germination and parasitism of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E Eirian; Stewart, Alison; Whipps, John M

    2011-09-01

    Water availability is an important environmental factor which has major effects on fungal activity. The effects of osmotic (KCl amended agar) and matric Polyethylene glycol ((PEG) 8000 amended agar) potentials over the range -0.1 to -5.0MPa on mycelial growth and conidial germination of eight isolates of the sclerotial parasite Coniothyrium minitans was assessed. The influence of soil water potential on the ability of three selected isolates (LU112, LU545, and T5R42i) to parasitise sclerotia of the plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was determined. For all eight C. minitans isolates, decreasing osmotic and matric potentials caused a reduction in mycelial growth and conidial germination. Isolates were more sensitive to decreasing matric potential than osmotic potential. Across the isolates, growth at an osmotic potential of -5.0MPa was 30-70% of the growth seen in the control, whereas less than 20% of the control growth was seen at the corresponding matric potential. Across all isolates no conidial germination was seen at matric potential of -5.0MPa. The C. minitans isolates varied in their sensitivity to decreasing water potentials. Mycelial growth and conidial germination of three isolates (LU112, Conio, and CH1) were more tolerant of low osmotic potential and matric potential with respect to mycelial growth. Isolates T5R42i and LU430 were least tolerant. In contrast, conidial germination of isolates Conio, LU545, and T5R42i were less sensitive to decreasing matric potential. Soil water potential was seen to affect infection and viability of sclerotia by the three C. minitans isolates. Isolate LU545 reduced sclerotial viability over a wider water potential range (-0.01 to -1.5MPa) compared with LU112 (-0.01 to -1.0MPa), with isolate T5R42i being intermediate. Indigenous soil fungi (Trichoderma spp. and Clonostachys rosea) were recovered from sclerotia but did not result in reduction in sclerotial viability. The relevance of these results in relation to

  11. 15. international conference on plant growth substances: Program -- Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Since the 14th Conference in Amsterdam in 1991, progress in plant hormone research and developmental plant biology has been truly astonishing. The five ``classical`` plant hormones, auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, ethylene, and abscisic acid, have been joined by a number of new signal molecules, e.g., systemin, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, whose biosynthesis and functions are being understood in ever greater detail. Molecular genetics has opened new vistas in an understanding of transduction pathways that regulate developmental processes in response to hormonal and environmental signals. The program of the 15th Conference includes accounts of this progress and brings together scientists whose work focuses on physiological, biochemical, and chemical aspects of plant growth regulation. This volume contains the abstracts of papers presented at this conference.

  12. Transcriptional responses to sucrose mimic the plant-associated life style of the plant growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiyh Taghavi

    Full Text Available Growth in sucrose medium was previously found to trigger the expression of functions involved in the plant associated life style of the endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638. Therefore, comparative transcriptome analysis between cultures grown in sucrose or lactate medium was used to gain insights in the expression levels of bacterial functions involved in the endophytic life style of strain 638. Growth on sucrose as a carbon source resulted in major changes in cell physiology, including a shift from a planktonic life style to the formation of bacterial aggregates. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in transcription of genes involved in motility (e.g., flagella biosynthesis and an increase in the transcription of genes involved in colonization, adhesion and biofilm formation. The transcription levels of functions previously suggested as being involved in endophytic behavior and functions responsible for plant growth promoting properties, including the synthesis of indole-acetic acid, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, also increased significantly for cultures grown in sucrose medium. Interestingly, despite an abundance of essential nutrients transcription levels of functions related to uptake and processing of nitrogen and iron became increased for cultures grown on sucrose as sole carbon source. Transcriptome data were also used to analyze putative regulatory relationships. In addition to the small RNA csrABCD regulon, which seems to play a role in the physiological adaptation and possibly the shift between free-living and plant-associated endophytic life style of Enterobacter sp. 638, our results also pointed to the involvement of rcsAB in controlling responses by Enterobacter sp. 638 to a plant-associated life style. Targeted mutagenesis was used to confirm this role and showed that compared to wild-type Enterobacter sp. 638 a ΔrcsB mutant was affected in its plant growth promoting ability.

  13. Plant-growth promoting effect of newly isolated rhizobacteria varies between two Arabidopsis ecotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Schwachtje, Jens; Karojet, Silke; Kunz, Sabine; Brouwer, Stephan; van Dongen, Joost T.

    2012-01-01

    Various rhizobacteria are known for their beneficial effects on plants, i. e. promotion of growth and induction of systemic resistance against pathogens. These bacteria are categorized as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and are associated with plant roots. Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of plant growth promotion in vivo is still very limited, but interference of bacteria with plant hormone metabolism is suggested to play a major role. To obtain new growth promoting bacteri...

  14. Improvements in plant growth rate using underwater discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drainage water from plant pots was irradiated by plasma and then recycled to irrigate plants for improving the growth rate by supplying nutrients to plants and inactivating the bacteria in the bed-soil. Brassica rapa var. perviridis (Chinese cabbage; Brassica campestris) plants were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included the use of chicken droppings as a fertiliser. The water was recycled once per day from a drainage water pool and added to the bed-soil in the pots. A magnetic compression type pulsed power generator was used to produce underwater discharge with repetition rate of 250 pps. The plasma irradiation times were set as 10 and 20 minutes per day over 28 days of cultivation. The experimental results showed that the growth rate increased significantly with plasma irradiation into the drainage water. The growth rate increased with the plasma irradiation time. The nitrogen concentration of the leaves increased as a result of plasma irradiation based on chlorophyll content analysis. The bacteria in the drainage water were inactivated by the plasma irradiation.

  15. Composition of hydroponic medium affects thorium uptake by tobacco plants

    OpenAIRE

    Soudek, P. (Petr); Kufner, D. (Daniel); Petrová, Š. (Šárka); Mihaljevič, M.; Vaněk, T. (Tomáš)

    2013-01-01

    The ability of thorium uptake as well as responses to heavy metal stress were tested in tobacco cultivar La Burley 21. Thorium was accumulated preferentially in the root system. The presence of citric, tartaric and oxalic acids in hydroponic medium increased thorium accumulation in all plant organs. On the other hand, the addition of diamines and polyamines, the important antioxidants in plants, resulted in decrease of thorium accumulation, especially in the root system. Negative correlation ...

  16. Effects of New Plant Growth Regulators on Growth and Quality in Potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Weiyan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This experiment aimed to explore the effects of new plant growth regulators on the growth and quality of potato, we conduct potato tubers with different concentrations of the regulators and cultivated in the seedling pot, with water as the control treatment. The results showed that sorbic amide (5%, sorbic amide quaternary ammonium salt (5%, Cinnamamide (5%, betaine Cinnamamide (5%, naphthalene dicarboxamide (5%, betaine naphthalenedicarboxamide (5% these 6 new regulators have good activity in improving and enhancing the content of chlorophyll, soluble protein, soluble sugar and free amino acids with 400 times dilution and 800 times dilution on potato seedling. At the same time, we compared the changes of the physiological indexes in different periods. As can be seen from the experiment, these 6 compounds have a strong role in promoting growth and improving the quality of the potato so that they can be called plant growth regulators.

  17. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  18. Fuel breaks affect nonnative species abundance in Californian plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, K.E.; Keeley, J.E.; Beyers, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the abundance of nonnative plants on fuel breaks and in adjacent untreated areas to determine if fuel treatments promote the invasion of nonnative plant species. Understanding the relationship between fuel treatments and nonnative plants is becoming increasingly important as federal and state agencies are currently implementing large fuel treatment programs throughout the United States to reduce the threat of wildland fire. Our study included 24 fuel breaks located across the State of California. We found that nonnative plant abundance was over 200% higher on fuel breaks than in adjacent wildland areas. Relative nonnative cover was greater on fuel breaks constructed by bulldozers (28%) than on fuel breaks constructed by other methods (7%). Canopy cover, litter cover, and duff depth also were significantly lower on fuel breaks constructed by bulldozers, and these fuel breaks had significantly more exposed bare ground than other types of fuel breaks. There was a significant decline in relative nonnative cover with increasing distance from the fuel break, particularly in areas that had experienced more numerous fires during the past 50 years, and in areas that had been grazed. These data suggest that fuel breaks could provide establishment sites for nonnative plants, and that nonnatives may invade surrounding areas, especially after disturbances such as fire or grazing. Fuel break construction and maintenance methods that leave some overstory canopy and minimize exposure of bare ground may be less likely to promote nonnative plants. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  19. Suitable Days for Plant Growth Disappear under Projected Climate Change: Potential Human and Biotic Vulnerability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Mora

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing climate change can alter conditions for plant growth, in turn affecting ecological and social systems. While there have been considerable advances in understanding the physical aspects of climate change, comprehensive analyses integrating climate, biological, and social sciences are less common. Here we use climate projections under alternative mitigation scenarios to show how changes in environmental variables that limit plant growth could impact ecosystems and people. We show that although the global mean number of days above freezing will increase by up to 7% by 2100 under "business as usual" (representative concentration pathway [RCP] 8.5, suitable growing days will actually decrease globally by up to 11% when other climatic variables that limit plant growth are considered (i.e., temperature, water availability, and solar radiation. Areas in Russia, China, and Canada are projected to gain suitable plant growing days, but the rest of the world will experience losses. Notably, tropical areas could lose up to 200 suitable plant growing days per year. These changes will impact most of the world's terrestrial ecosystems, potentially triggering climate feedbacks. Human populations will also be affected, with up to ~2,100 million of the poorest people in the world (~30% of the world's population highly vulnerable to changes in the supply of plant-related goods and services. These impacts will be spatially variable, indicating regions where adaptations will be necessary. Changes in suitable plant growing days are projected to be less severe under strong and moderate mitigation scenarios (i.e., RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5, underscoring the importance of reducing emissions to avoid such disproportionate impacts on ecosystems and people.

  20. High-Level Accumulation of Exogenous Small RNAs Not Affecting Endogenous Small RNA Biogenesis and Function in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wan-xia; Neil A Smith; ZHOU Chang-yong; WANG Ming-bo

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing is a fundamental plant defence and gene control mechanism in plants that are directed by 20-24 nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Infection of plants with viral pathogens or transformation of plants with RNA interference (RNAi) constructs is usually associated with high levels of exogenous siRNAs, but it is unclear if these siRNAs interfere with endogenous small RNA pathways and hence affect plant development. Here we provide evidence that viral satellite RNA (satRNA) infection does not affect siRNA and miRNA biogenesis or plant growth despite the extremely high level of satRNA-derived siRNAs. We generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that no longer develop the speciifc yellowing symptoms generally associated with infection by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat). We then used these plants to show that CMV Y-Sat infection did not cause any visible phenotypic changes in comparison to uninfected plants, despite the presence of high-level Y-Sat siRNAs. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of hairpin RNA (hpRNA)-derived siRNAs or miRNAs, and the level of siRNA-directed transgene silencing, are not signiifcantly affected by CMV Y-Sat infection. Taken together, our results suggest that the high levels of exogenous siRNAs associated with viral infection or RNAi-inducing transgenes do not saturate the endogenous RNA silencing machineries and have no signiifcant impact on normal plant development.

  1. Plant growth-promoting effects of native Pseudomonas strains on Mentha piperita (peppermint): an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M V; Cappellari, L R; Giordano, W; Banchio, E

    2015-11-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) affect growth of host plants through various direct and indirect mechanisms. Three native PGPR (Pseudomonas putida) strains isolated from rhizospheric soil of a Mentha piperita (peppermint) crop field near Córdoba, Argentina, were characterised and screened in vitro for plant growth-promoting characteristics, such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production, phosphate solubilisation and siderophore production, effects of direct inoculation on plant growth parameters (shoot fresh weight, root dry weight, leaf number, node number) and accumulation and composition of essential oils. Each of the three native strains was capable of phosphate solubilisation and IAA production. Only strain SJ04 produced siderophores. Plants directly inoculated with the native PGPR strains showed increased shoot fresh weight, glandular trichome number, ramification number and root dry weight in comparison with controls. The inoculated plants had increased essential oil yield (without alteration of essential oil composition) and biosynthesis of major essential oil components. Native strains of P. putida and other PGPR have clear potential as bio-inoculants for improving productivity of aromatic crop plants. There have been no comparative studies on the role of inoculation with native strains on plant growth and secondary metabolite production (specially monoterpenes). Native bacterial isolates are generally preferable for inoculation of crop plants because they are already adapted to the environment and have a competitive advantage over non-native strains. PMID:26012535

  2. Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

  3. Isolation and Identification of Indigenous Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria from Himalayan Region of Kashmir and their Effect on Improving Growth and Nutrient Contents of Maize (Zea Mays L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Mahwish eZahid

    2015-01-01

    IIntroduction and exploitation of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in agro-ecosystems enhance plant-microbes interactions that may affect ecosystems sustainability, agricultural productivity and environmental quality. The present study was conducted to isolate and identify PGPRs associated with maize (Zea mays L.) from twenty sites of Himalayan region of Hajira-Rawalakot, Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), Pakistan. A total of one hundred isolates were isolated from these sites, out of ...

  4. Growth-promotion of plants with depolymerized alginates by irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Nguyen Quoc; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Tham, Le Xuan; Yoshii, Fumio; Dang, Vo Huy; Mitomo, Hiroshi; Makuuchi, Keizo; Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-07-01

    Alginate has been degraded by gamma-ray irradiation from a Co-60 source in liquid state (aqueous solution) and in solid state (powder form). The irradiated alginate with a molecular weight less than 10 4 shows a strong effect on the growth-promotion of rice and peanut. Low concentration of degraded alginate from 4% solution irradiated at 100 kGy is effective for the growth-promotion of plants and the suitable concentrations are ca 50 ppm for rice and ca 100 ppm for peanut.

  5. In Vitro and In Vivo Plant Growth Promoting Activities and DNA Fingerprinting of Antagonistic Endophytic Actinomycetes Associates with Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ajit Kumar Passari; Vineet Kumar Mishra; Vijai Kumar Gupta; Mukesh Kumar Yadav; Ratul Saikia; Bhim Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic actinomycetes have shown unique plant growth promoting as well as antagonistic activity against fungal phytopathogens. In the present study forty-two endophytic actinomycetes recovered from medicinal plants were evaluated for their antagonistic potential and plant growth-promoting abilities. Twenty-two isolates which showed the inhibitory activity against at least one pathogen were subsequently tested for their plant-growth promoting activities and were compared genotypically using...

  6. Effects of photoperiod, plant growth regulators and culture media on in vitro growth of seedlings of Cyrtochilum loxense (Lindl. Kraenzl. an endemic and endangered orchid from Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira González

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyrtochilum loxense (Lindl. Kraenzl. is an endemic and seriously endangered orchid species endemic in the Loja Province (Southern Ecuador. The main goals of this research were to analyze how culture media, plant growth regulators and photoperiod affect the growth of C. loxense. Eight month old plants (approximate 1 – 1.5 cm in height obtained by in vitro germination, were cultivated on MS media or Knudson C; MS with three levels of naphthalene acetic acid (NAA and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP (2/0.5; 1/0.5 y 0.5/ 0.5 mg-1L; and three photoperiodic regimes (24/0, 16/8, 8/16 h on MS with and without plant growth regulators. No significant differences of shoot induction were observed on media with or without plant growth regulators, and all tested photoperiods. The highest growth (1.2 cm was observed in plantlets cultivated on growth regulator-free media with a 16/8 photoperiod. Also the shoot and root formation was better in this species in absence of plant growth regulators. Probably this response is due to the endogenous hormone levels in the tissues or due to the kind and concentrations of PGRs used were too low to induce positive morphogenetic responses.

  7. High incidence of plant growth-stimulating bacteria associated with the rhizosphere of wheat grown on salinated soil in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Kamilova, Faina; Validov, Shamil; Gafurova, Laziza; Kucharova, Zulfiya; Lugtenberg, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Soil salinization is increasing steadily in many parts of the world and causes major problems for plant productivity. Under these stress conditions, root-associated beneficial bacteria can help improve plant growth and nutrition. In this study, salt-tolerant bacteria from the rhizosphere of Uzbek wheat with potentially beneficial traits were isolated and characterized. Eight strains which initially positively affect the growth of wheat plants in vitro were investigated in detail. All eight strains are salt tolerant and have some of the following plant growth-beneficial properties: production of auxin, HCN, lipase or protease and wheat growth promotion. Using sequencing of part of the 16S rDNA, the eight new isolates were identified as Acinetobacter (two strains), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Bacillus cereus, Enterobacter hormaechei, Pantoae agglomerans and Alcaligenes faecalis. All these strains are potential human pathogens. Possible reasons for why these bacteria present in the rhizosphere and establish there are discussed. PMID:18211262

  8. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Langenecker, Tobias; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Barneche, Fredy; Weigel, Detlef; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Becker, Claude

    2015-11-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  9. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G.; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Barneche, Fredy; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Bitzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  10. Plant growth and leaf-spot severity on eucalypt at different CO2 concentrations in the air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira da Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of increased air-CO2 concentration on plant growth and on leaf-spot caused by Cylindrocladium candelabrum in Eucalyptus urophylla. Seedlings were cultivated for 30 days at 451, 645, 904, and 1,147 µmol mol-1 CO2 ; then, they were inoculated with the pathogen and kept under the same conditions for seven days. Increased CO2 concentration increased plant height and shoot dry matter mass, and decreased disease incidence and severity. Stem diameter was not affected by the treatments. Increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 favorably affect eucalypt growth and reduce leaf-spot severity.

  11. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoczky, E. [Pannon Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Keszthely (Hungary); Szabados, I.; Marth, P. [Plant Health and Soil Conservation Station, Higany (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Nitrogen for growth of stock plants and production of strawberry runner tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeimi Isabel Janisch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine growth and dry matter partitioning among organs of strawberry stock plants under five Nitrogen concentrations in the nutrient solution and its effects on emission and growth of runner tips. The experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions, from September 2010 to March 2011, in a soilless system with Oso Grande and Camino Real cultivars. Nitrogen concentrations of 5.12, 7.6, 10.12 (control, 12.62 and 15.12 mmol L-1 in the nutrient solution were studied in a 5x2 factorial randomised experimental design. All runner tips bearing at least one expanded leaf (patent requested were collected weekly and counted during the growth period. The number of leaves, dry matter (DM of leaves, crown and root, specific leaf area and leaf area index (LAI was determined at the final harvest. Increasing N concentration in the nutrient solution from 5.12 to 15.12 mmol L-1 reduces growth of crown, roots and LAI of strawberry stock plants but did not affect emission and growth of runner tips. It was concluded that for the commercial production of plug plants the optimal nitrogen concentration in the nutrient solution should be 5.12 mmol L-1.

  13. Colored Shade Cloth Affects the Growth of Basil, Cilantro, and Parsley

    OpenAIRE

    Appling, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary experiment evaluated the effect of plant growth regulators (PGRs) or mechanical stimulation (brushing) on branching of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), cilantro (Coriandrum sativium L.), and parsley (Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Nyman ex A.W. Hill). Dikegulac sodium increased branching in sweet basil up to 400 ppm and thereafter branching decreased compared to control plants. Ethephon increased branching in sweet basil as rate increased up to 500 mg/L compared to control plant...

  14. Cloning and analysis of genes regulating plant cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this work are to identify, clone and analyze genes involved in the regulation of plant cell growth. To do this, we have induced tumors on Arabidopsis thaliana by exposing seed or germinating seedlings to ionizing radiation. The tumors which developed on the plants derived from these seed were excised and established in culture. Unlike normal tissue explants, the tumors are able to grow on hormone-free medium suggesting changes in growth control (either hormonal or other) induced by the radiation exposure. This progress report describes work aimed at characterizing these tumors at the physiological and cellular levels and at determining the molecular basis of the changes leading to the tumorous phenotype

  15. Biochar and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria as Soil Amendments

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, Lauren Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The notion of introducing biochar into soil for carbon sequestration provides the impetus for studying these materials as inoculum carriers. For this goal I assessed the survival of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) introduced into natural soils after pre-inoculation onto biochar materials. First, molecular and culture-based methods, which involved the use of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) marker, were developed to track the introduced bacterial strain. The key findings of a case...

  16. Aromatic fluorine compounds. VIII. Plant growth regulators and intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, G.C.; Gortatowski, M.J.; Shiley, R.H.; White, R.H.

    1959-01-01

    The preparation and properties of 41 fluorophenoxyacetic acids, 4 fluorophenoxypropionic acids, 2 fluorobenzoic acids, several indole derivatives, and a number of miscellaneous compounds are described. Data are given for many intermediates such as new fluorinated phenols, anisoles, anilines and nitrobenzenes. Most of the subject compounds are related to a number of well-known herbicides or plant growth regulators such as 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T and others.

  17. THERMAL RADIATION LOAD ON TEMPERATURE REGIMES IN PLANT GROWTH CHAMBERS

    OpenAIRE

    Hamasaki, T; Okada, Masumi

    2000-01-01

    In enclosed environments such as a plant growth chamber, thermal radiation plays an important role in determining heat balance and therefore the resultant temperature regimes. In artificially illuminated chambers, a significant level of thermal radiation is emitted from the lamps and/or the lamp house surface. Though there are both shortwave and longwave components in thermal radiation, our measurements in two different chamber designs, with and without thermal radiation filters, showed the l...

  18. Herbivory by an introduced Asian weevil negatively affects population growth of an invasive Brazilian shrub in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Kerry Bohl; Stiling, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The enemy release hypothesis (ERH) is often cited to explain why some plants successfully invade natural communities while others do not. This hypothesis maintains that plant populations are regulated by coevolved enemies in their native range but are relieved of this pressure where their enemies have not been co-introduced. Some studies have shown that invasive plants sustain lower levels of herbivore damage when compared to native species, but how damage affects fitness and population dynamics remains unclear. We used a system of co-occurring native and invasive Eugenia congeners in south Florida (USA) to experimentally test the ERH, addressing deficiencies in our understanding of the role of natural enemies in plant invasion at the population level. Insecticide was used to experimentally exclude insect herbivores from invasive Eugenia uniflora and its native co-occurring congeners in the field for two years. Herbivore damage, plant growth, survival, and population growth rates for the three species were then compared for control and insecticide-treated plants. Our results contradict the ERH, indicating that E. uniflora sustains more herbivore damage than its native congeners and that this damage negatively impacts stem height, survival, and population growth. In addition, most damage to E. uniflora, a native of Brazil, is carried out by Myllocerus undatus, a recently introduced weevil from Sri Lanka, and M. undatus attacks a significantly greater proportion of E. uniflora leaves than those of its native congeners. This interaction is particularly interesting because M. undatus and E. uniflora share no coevolutionary history, having arisen on two separate continents and come into contact on a third. Our study is the first to document negative population-level effects for an invasive plant as a result of the introduction of a novel herbivore. Such inhibitory interactions are likely to become more prevalent as suites of previously noninteracting species continue to

  19. Disease resistance or growth: the role of plant hormones in balancing immune responses and fitness costs

    OpenAIRE

    Denancé, Nicolas; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Goffner, Deborah; Molina, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth and response to environmental cues are largely governed by phytohormones. The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) play a central role in the regulation of plant immune responses. In addition, other plant hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids, that have been thoroughly described to regulate plant development and growth, have recently emerged as key regulators of plant immunity. Plant hormones inter...

  20. Disease resistance or growth: the role of plant hormones in balancing immune responses and fitness costs

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas eDenancé; Andrea eSánchez-Vallet; Deborah eGoffner; Antonio eMolina

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth and response to environmental cues are largely governed by phytohormones. The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid (SA) play a central role in the regulation of plant immune responses. In addition, other plant hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, gibberellins and brassinosteroids, that have been thoroughly described to regulate plant development and growth, have recently emerged as key regulators of plant immunity. Plant hormones interac...

  1. Loblolly pine seedling growth after inoculation with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and ozone exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, B.L.; Enebak, S.A.; Chappelka, A.H. [Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (United States). School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

    2004-07-01

    The conifer tree species with the greatest economic importance in south eastern United States plantations is Loblolly pine. Plantations require intensive fertilization, pesticide application, and irrigation. In these cases growth-promoting rhizobacteria are useful in pest control. While it was once thought that ozone in the troposphere was limited to urban areas, it is now known that it is transported far from its place of origin. Ozone is known to impact plant growth negatively. There have been no previous studies on whether growth-promoting rhizobacteria can decrease the negative effects of ozone. In this study seedlings of Loblolly pine were inoculated with either Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenberg) Cohn or Paenibacillus macerans (Schardinger) Ash. These were exposed to controlled amounts of ozone for 8-12 weeks. All plants showed decreased biomass and increased foliar damage compared to plants that were not exposed to ozone. B. subtilis inoculated plants showed less foliar damage than un-inoculated ones and root dimensions were increased. The use of growth-promoting rhizobacteria is not ready for large-scale commercial application in forestry, but this demonstration of the possible beneficial effects on ozone exposure warrants further investigation. 44 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  2. Growth and Yield Performance of Amaranthus cruentus Influenced by Planting Density and Poultry Manure Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolawole Edomwonyi LAW-OGBOMO

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Field trials were conducted in 2007 and 2008 to determine the influence of planting density and poultry manure application on the growth and yield of Amaranthus cruentus (Linnaeus. This study was conducted at the teaching and research farms of Benson Idahosa University, Benin City using two planting densities (111111 and 62500 plants per hectare and three levels of poultry manure (0.0, 6.0 and 12.0 t ha-1 in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement fitted into randomized complete block design with three replicates. Results showed that planting density and poultry manure significantly (P = 0.05 affected the number of leaves, leaf area index, total dry matter and the crop growth rate positively in favour of increasing planting density and poultry manure application rate leading to higher herbage yield. The results showed that the combination of 62500 plants per hectare and application of poultry manure of 12 t ha-1 provided the highest yield (15.74 t ha-1.

  3. Growing Out of Stress: The Role of Cell- and Organ-Scale Growth Control in Plant Water-Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Lindner, Heike; Robbins, Neil E; Dinneny, José R

    2016-08-01

    Water is the most limiting resource on land for plant growth, and its uptake by plants is affected by many abiotic stresses, such as salinity, cold, heat, and drought. While much research has focused on exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular signaling events governing water-stress responses, it is also important to consider the role organismal structure plays as a context for such responses. The regulation of growth in plants occurs at two spatial scales: the cell and the organ. In this review, we focus on how the regulation of growth at these different spatial scales enables plants to acclimate to water-deficit stress. The cell wall is discussed with respect to how the physical properties of this structure affect water loss and how regulatory mechanisms that affect wall extensibility maintain growth under water deficit. At a higher spatial scale, the architecture of the root system represents a highly dynamic physical network that facilitates access of the plant to a heterogeneous distribution of water in soil. We discuss the role differential growth plays in shaping the structure of this system and the physiological implications of such changes. PMID:27503468

  4. Plant Growth Promotion Activity of Keratinolytic Fungi Growing on a Recalcitrant Waste Known as “Hair Waste”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavello, Ivana A.; Crespo, Juan M.; García, Sabrina S.; Zapiola, José M.; Luna, María F.; Cavalitto, Sebastián F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpureocillium lilacinum (Thom) Samsom is one of the most studied fungi in the control of plant parasitic nematodes. However, there is not specific information on its ability to inhibit some pathogenic bacteria, fungi, or yeast. This work reports the production of several antifungal hydrolytic enzymes by a strain of P. lilacinum when it is grown in a medium containing hair waste. The growth of several plant-pathogenic fungi, Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium culmorum, was considerably affected by the presence of P. lilacinum's supernatant. Besides antifungal activity, P. lilacinum demonstrates the capability to produce indoleacetic acid and ammonia during time cultivation on hair waste medium. Plant growth-promoting activity by cell-free supernatant was evidenced through the increase of the percentage of tomato seed germination from 71 to 85% after 48 hours. A 21-day plant growth assay using tomato plants indicates that crude supernatant promotes the growth of the plants similar to a reference fertilizer (p > 0.05). These results suggest that both strain and the supernatant may have potential to be considered as a potent biocontrol agent with multiple plant growth-promoting properties. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the antifungal, IAA production and tomato growth enhancing compounds produced by P. lilacinum LPSC #876. PMID:26697226

  5. Plant Growth Promotion Activity of Keratinolytic Fungi Growing on a Recalcitrant Waste Known as “Hair Waste”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana A. Cavello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpureocillium lilacinum (Thom Samsom is one of the most studied fungi in the control of plant parasitic nematodes. However, there is not specific information on its ability to inhibit some pathogenic bacteria, fungi, or yeast. This work reports the production of several antifungal hydrolytic enzymes by a strain of P. lilacinum when it is grown in a medium containing hair waste. The growth of several plant-pathogenic fungi, Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium culmorum, was considerably affected by the presence of P. lilacinum’s supernatant. Besides antifungal activity, P. lilacinum demonstrates the capability to produce indoleacetic acid and ammonia during time cultivation on hair waste medium. Plant growth-promoting activity by cell-free supernatant was evidenced through the increase of the percentage of tomato seed germination from 71 to 85% after 48 hours. A 21-day plant growth assay using tomato plants indicates that crude supernatant promotes the growth of the plants similar to a reference fertilizer (p>0.05. These results suggest that both strain and the supernatant may have potential to be considered as a potent biocontrol agent with multiple plant growth-promoting properties. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the antifungal, IAA production and tomato growth enhancing compounds produced by P. lilacinum LPSC #876.

  6. Feeding Experience of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Affects Their Performance on Different Host Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, M. Mostafizur Rahman; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2013-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B is extremely polyphagous with >600 species of host plants. We hypothesized that previous experience of the whitefly on a given host plant affects their host selection and performance on the plants without previous experience. We investigated the host selection for feeding and oviposition of adults and development and survival of immatures of three host-plant-experienced populations of B. tabaci, namely Bemisia-eggplant, Bemisia-tomato and Bem...

  7. Plant hydraulic traits govern forest water use and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Ashley; Bohrer, Gil; Fiorella, Rich; Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsadat

    2016-04-01

    Biophysical controls at the leaf, stem, and root levels govern plant water acquisition and use. Suites of sometimes co-varying traits afford plants the ability to manage water stress at each of these three levels. We studied the contrasting hydraulic strategies of red oaks (Q. rubra) and red maples (A. rubrum) in northern Michigan, USA. These two species differ in stomatal regulation strategy and xylem architecture, and are thought to root at different depths. Water use was monitored through sap flux, stem water storage, and leaf water potential measurements. Depth of water acquisition was determined on the basis of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes from xylem water samples taken from both species. Fifteen years of bole growth records were used to compare the influence of the trees' opposing hydraulic strategies on carbon acquisition and growth. During non-limiting soil moisture conditions, transpiration from red maples typically exceeded that of red oak. However, during a 20% soil dry down, transpiration from red maples decreased by more than 80%, while transpiration from red oaks only fell by 31%. Stem water storage in red maple also declined sharply, while storage in red oaks remained nearly constant. The more consistent isotopic compositions of xylem water samples indicated that oaks can draw upon a steady, deep supply of water which red maples cannot access. Additionally, red maple bole growth correlated strongly with mean annual soil moisture, while red oak bole growth did not. These results indicate that the deeper rooting strategy of red oaks allowed the species to continue transpiration and carbon uptake during periods of intense soil water limitation, when the shallow-rooted red maples ceased transpiration. The ability to root deeply could provide an additional buffer against drought-induced mortality, which may permit some anisohydric species, like red oak, to survive hydrologic conditions that would be expected to favor survival of more isohydric

  8. Corridors affect plants, animals, and their interactions in fragmented landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua J Tewksbury; Levey, Douglas J.; Haddad, Nick M.; Sargent, Sarah; Orrock, John L.; Weldon, Aimee; Brent J Danielson; Brinkerhoff, Jory; Damschen, Ellen I.; Townsend, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Among the most popular strategies for maintaining populations of both plants and animals in fragmented landscapes is to connect isolated patches with thin strips of habitat, called corridors. Corridors are thought to increase the exchange of individuals between habitat patches, promoting genetic exchange and reducing population fluctuations. Empirical studies addressing the effects of corridors have either been small in scale or have ignored confounding effects of increased habitat area creat...

  9. Composition of hydroponic medium affects thorium uptake by tobacco plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soudek, Petr; Kufner, Daniel; Petrová, Šárka; Mihaljevič, M.; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 9 (2013), s. 1090-1098. ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12162; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13029; GA MPO FR-TI3/778 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Thorium * Plant uptake * Polyamines Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.499, year: 2013

  10. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghavi, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Hoffman, A.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Walla, M. D.; Vangronsveld, J.; Newman, L.; Monchy, S.

    2010-05-13

    Enterobacter sp. 638 is an endophytic plant growth promoting gamma-proteobacterium that was isolated from the stem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides cv. H11-11), a potentially important biofuel feed stock plant. The Enterobacter sp. 638 genome sequence reveals the presence of a 4,518,712 bp chromosome and a 157,749 bp plasmid (pENT638-1). Genome annotation and comparative genomics allowed the identification of an extended set of genes specific to the plant niche adaptation of this bacterium. This includes genes that code for putative proteins involved in survival in the rhizosphere (to cope with oxidative stress or uptake of nutrients released by plant roots), root adhesion (pili, adhesion, hemagglutinin, cellulose biosynthesis), colonization/establishment inside the plant (chemiotaxis, flagella, cellobiose phosphorylase), plant protection against fungal and bacterial infections (siderophore production and synthesis of the antimicrobial compounds 4-hydroxybenzoate and 2-phenylethanol), and improved poplar growth and development through the production of the phytohormones indole acetic acid, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. Metabolite analysis confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR showed that, the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol is induced by the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. Interestingly, both the genetic determinants required for sucrose metabolism and the synthesis of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are clustered on a genomic island. These findings point to a close interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host, where the availability of sucrose, a major plant sugar, affects the synthesis of plant growth promoting phytohormones by the endophytic bacterium. The availability of the genome sequence, combined with metabolome and transcriptome analysis, will provide a better understanding of the synergistic interactions between poplar and its growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further exploited to

  11. Growth and flowering of Eustoma grandiflorum as affected by artificial reduction of direct solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to estimate the effect of topographic shading on growth and flowering of Eustoma grandiflorumin hilly and mountainous areas, 3 early-flowering cultivars and a late-flowering cultivar were planted close to artificial sheets (3.1 m high) facing east, west, south and north in November, June and September. Total photon flux density (TPFD) on the north side of the sheet was 21% of that on the south side during winter, whereas TPFD was 94% during summer. In the November planting, plants were exposed to low TPFD on the north side just after planting and flower quality of early-flowering cultivars on the north side was better than that on the south side. In the June planting, growth of Eustoma was similar in all plots. In the September planting, when TPFD decreased after planting, growth of Eustoma on the north side was reduced in comparison with that on the other three sides. On the east and west sides, all cultivars flowered normally irrespective of planting date, and the mean values of TPFD in December and January were larger than 10 μmol m-2 day-1. The results indicate that high quality flowers may be produced in hilly and mountainous areas where TPFD values of 10 mol m-2 day-1 are ensured. (author)

  12. Biochar Treatment Resulted in a Combined Effect on Soybean Growth Promotion and a Shift in Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    EGAMBERDIEVA, Dilfuza; Wirth, Stephan; Behrendt, Undine; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The application of biochar to soil is considered to have the potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration, as well as for improving plant growth and suppressing soil pathogens. In our study we evaluated the effect of biochar on the plant growth of soybeans, as well as on the community composition of root-associated bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. Two types of biochar, namely, maize biochar (MBC), wood biochar (WBC), and hydrochar (HTC) were used for pot experiments to monito...

  13. Effect of low doses of seed irradiation on plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stimulation effect has often been discussed in research papers. There were the results of Russian work which showed greater yield after seed irradiation, and other research which showed no significant stimulating effect of seed irradiation on plant growth. These different results may be due to varying conditions like temperature, rainfall, variety, etc., under which the experiments were carried out. In the present work of this establishment the effect of radiation at different growing periods is being studied to obtain more information on the stimulating effect of small doses of radiation. These studies cover: (1) Germination speed. In these experiments the breakthrough of the primary root is investigated in relation to time and dose. (2) Development of young plants. After a growing period of 14 d the length of the plants and their dry and fresh weight are measured. (3) Radiation effect on yield. In pot and field experiments several agricultural plants, such as barley, wheat, potatoes and maize, are investigated at harvest time. The total yield, and the yield in grain and straw, are then determined separately. The first experiments have shown that the effect depends very much on the variety of plant, the growing temperature and the water content of the seeds at the time of irradiation. 10 figs, 1 tab

  14. Isolation of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria of guava plants (Psidium guajava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Estela Gómez Luna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Guava production for 2008 in the state of Guanajuato was 177 ha in area planted and the same number of area harvested, production in 1,130.80 Ton. In traditional farming practices have made excessive use of mineral fertilizers, which, if it is true, ensure a good production are expensive and come to cause imbalances in agroecosystems by contamination of soil, water, and food. In this work we evaluated the effect of Bacillus subtilis strains as plant growth promoter rhizobacteria in guava plants under greenhouse conditions. We used three strains were inoculated potted plant with guava. We measured the height, number of branches and leaves. Guava orchards of 2 then display of soil were taken for the isolation andcharacterization of rhizobacteria. Selective medium was used with 1 - carboxylic acid, -1 - aminocyclopropane and selecting bacteria with ACC desaminase activity. For the isolates were determined antibiotic resistance, confrontation with fungal pathogens, plant growth tests in vitro and BIOLOG metabolic profiles. We found 30 isolates with ACC activities, 7 have the effect of biological control and 5 had effect on root development in vitro. The use of growth promotingrhizobacteria are an excellent alternative for improving the production of guavas, growing very little is known of themicroflora associated with the rhizosphere and the ecological role they have in the ground.

  15. Does Globalization Affect Growth? : evidence from a new Index of Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Axel Dreher

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents an index of globalization covering its three main dimensions: economic integration,social integration, and political integration. Using panel data for 123 countries in 1970-2000 it isanalyzed empirically whether the overall index of globalization as well as sub-indexes constructed tomeasure the single dimensions affect economic growth. As the results show, globalization indeedpromotes growth. The dimensions most robustly related with growth refer to actual economicflows and...

  16. Potential for Plant Growth Promotion of Rhizobacteria Associated with Salicornia Growing in Tunisian Hypersaline Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Mapelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity and drought are among the environmental stresses that most severely affect plant growth and production around the world. In this study the rhizospheres of Salicornia plants and bulk soils were collected from Sebkhet and Chott hypersaline ecosystems in Tunisia. Depiction of bacterial microbiome composition by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis unveiled the occurrence of a high bacterial diversity associated with Salicornia root system. A large collection of 475 halophilic and halotolerant bacteria was established from Salicornia rhizosphere and the surrounding bulk soil, and the bacteria were characterized for the resistance to temperature, osmotic and saline stresses, and plant growth promotion (PGP features. Twenty Halomonas strains showed resistance to a wide set of abiotic stresses and were able to perform different PGP activities in vitro at 5% NaCl, including ammonia and indole-3-acetic acid production, phosphate solubilisation, and potential nitrogen fixation. By using a gfp-labelled strain it was possible to demonstrate that Halomonas is capable of successfully colonising Salicornia roots in the laboratory conditions. Our results indicated that the culturable halophilic/halotolerant bacteria inhabiting salty and arid ecosystems have a potential to contribute to promoting plant growth under the harsh salinity and drought conditions. These halophilic/halotolerant strains could be exploited in biofertilizer formulates to sustain crop production in degraded and arid lands.

  17. Arsenic accumulation in Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi and its effects on plant growth and pharmaceutical components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant. The effects of arsenic (As) on the growth and the formation of pharmaceutical components of S. baicalensis, and the uptake and accumulation of As by S. baicalensis were investigated using a field pot-culture experiment. The results show that spiking low concentrations of As (≤100 mg kg-1) into soils can hasten the growth and development of the roots. High levels of As, however, reduced plant growth. The concentrations of five flavone components were not significantly affected by spiking low concentrations of As (≤200 mg kg-1) into soils. High levels of As inhibited the generation of baicalin and wogoninside, but facilitated the generation of baicalein, wogonin and oroxylin A in S. baicalensis Georgi. The concentration of As in each part of the plant was proportional to the concentration of As spiked into the soil. The application of phosphorus (P) to the soil promoted the uptake and accumulation of As in the roots of the plant, but this synergistic effect became weaker with the incremental addition of P. Dry biomass did not change in response to low levels of P addition (≤200 mg kg-1) to soils, but it increased significantly under high levels of P. Based on the results of both this pot-culture experiment and human health risk assessments, maximum safety limits of 2.0 mg kg-1 of As in the roots of S. baicalensis Georgi and 70 mg kg-1 of As in cultivated soils are suggested.

  18. Response of Phaseolus vulgaris L. plants to low-let ionizing radiation: Growth and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Aronne, G.; Pugliese, M.; Virzo De Santo, A.; De Maio, A.

    2013-10-01

    The scenarios for the long-term habitation of space platforms and planetary stations involve plants as fundamental part of Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) to support the crew needs. Several constraints may limit plant growth in space: among them ionizing radiation is recognized to severely affect plant cell at morphological, physiological and biochemical level. In this work, plants of Phaseolus vulgaris L. were subjected to four different doses of X-rays (0.3, 10, 50 and 100 Gy) in order to assess the effects of ionizing radiation on this species and to analyze possible mechanisms carried out to overcome the radiation injuries. The effects of X-rays on plant growth were assessed by measuring stem elongation, number of internodes and leaf dry weight. The integrity of photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by photosynthetic pigment composition and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) activity, whereas changes in total antioxidant pool and glutathione S transferase activity (GST) were utilized as markers of oxidative stress. The distribution of phenolic compounds in leaf tissues as natural shielding against radiation was also determined. Irradiation of plants at 0.3 and 10 Gy did not determine differences in all considered parameters as compared to control. On the contrary, at 50 and 100 Gy a reduction of plant growth and a decrease in photosynthetic pigment content, as well as an increase in phenolic compounds and a decrease in total antioxidant content and GST activity were found. Only a slight reduction of Rubisco activity in leaves irradiated at 50 and 100 Gy was found. The overall results indicate P. vulgaris as a species with a good potential to face ionizing radiation and suggest its suitability for utilization in BLSSs.

  19. In Vitro Morphogenesis of Arabidopsis to Search for Novel Endophytic Fungi Modulating Plant Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Dovana

    Full Text Available Fungal endophytes have shown to affect plant growth and to confer stress tolerance to the host; however, effects of endophytes isolated from water plants have been poorly investigated. In this study, fungi isolated from stems (stem-E and roots (root-E of Mentha aquatica L. (water mint were identified, and their morphogenetic properties analysed on in vitro cultured Arabidopsis (L. Heynh., 14 and 21 days after inoculation (DAI. Nineteen fungi were analysed and, based on ITS analysis, 17 isolates showed to be genetically distinct. The overall effect of water mint endophytes on Arabidopsis fresh (FW and dry weight (DW was neutral and positive, respectively, and the increased DW, mainly occurring 14 DAI, was possibly related to plant defence mechanism. Only three fungi increased both FW and DW of Arabidopsis at 14 and 21 DAI, thus behaving as plant growth promoting (PGP fungi. E-treatment caused a reduction of root depth and primary root length in most cases and inhibition-to-promotion of root area and lateral root length, from 14 DAI. Only Phoma macrostoma, among the water mint PGP fungi, increased both root area and depth, 21 DAI. Root depth and area 14 DAI were shown to influence DWs, indicating that the extension of the root system, and thus nutrient uptake, was an important determinant of plant dry biomass. Reduction of Arabidopsis root depth occurred to a great extent when plants where treated with stem-E while root area decreased or increased under the effects of stem-E and root-E, respectively, pointing to an influence of the endophyte origin on root extension. M. aquatica and many other perennial hydrophytes have growing worldwide application in water pollution remediation. The present study provided a model for directed screening of endophytes able to modulate plant growth in the perspective of future field applications of these fungi.

  20. Optimization of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria-Assisted Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandlic, Christopher J.; Palmer, Michael W.; Maier, Raina M.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) can improve revegetation of arid mine tailings as measured by increased biomass production. The goals of the present study were first to evaluate how mode of application of known PGPB affects plant growth, and second to evaluate the effect of this inoculation on rhizosphere microbial community structure. PGPB application strategies investigated include preliminary surface sterilization of seeds (a common practice in phytoremediation trials) followed by a comparison of two application methods; immersion and alginate encapsulation. Results with two native desert plant species, Atriplex lentiformis and Buchloe dactyloides, suggest that seed surface sterilization prior to inoculation is not necessary to achieve beneficial effects of introduced PGPB. Both PGPB application techniques generally enhanced plant growth although results were both plant and PGPB specific. These results demonstrate that alginate encapsulation, which allows for long-term storage and easier application to seeds, is an effective way to inoculate PGPB. In addition, the influence of PGPB application on B. dactyloides rhizosphere community structure was evaluated using PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) analysis of bacterial DNA extracted from rhizosphere samples collected 75 d following planting. A comparative analysis of DGGE profiles was performed using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). DGGE-CCA showed that rhizosphere community profiles from PGPB-inoculated treatments are significantly different from both uninoculated tailings rhizosphere profiles and profiles from the compost used to amend the tailings. Further, community profiles from B. dactyloides inoculated with the best performing PGPB (Arthro mix) were significantly different from two other PGPB tested. These results suggest that introduced PGPB have the potential to influence the development of the rhizosphere community structure found in

  1. Expert system for controlling plant growth in a contained environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, George A. (Inventor); Lanoue, Mark Allen (Inventor); Bethel, Matthew (Inventor); Ryan, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In a system for optimizing crop growth, vegetation is cultivated in a contained environment, such as a greenhouse, an underground cavern or other enclosed space. Imaging equipment is positioned within or about the contained environment, to acquire spatially distributed crop growth information, and environmental sensors are provided to acquire data regarding multiple environmental conditions that can affect crop development. Illumination within the contained environment, and the addition of essential nutrients and chemicals are in turn controlled in response to data acquired by the imaging apparatus and environmental sensors, by an "expert system" which is trained to analyze and evaluate crop conditions. The expert system controls the spatial and temporal lighting pattern within the contained area, and the timing and allocation of nutrients and chemicals to achieve optimized crop development. A user can access the "expert system" remotely, to assess activity within the growth chamber, and can override the "expert system".

  2. A native plant growth promoting bacterium, Bacillus megaterium B55, rescues growth performance of an ethylene insensitive plant genotype in nature

    OpenAIRE

    Dorothea Gertrud Meldau; Hoang Hoa Long; Ian Thomas Baldwin

    2012-01-01

    Many plants have intimate relationships with soil microbes that through a variety of mechanisms improve the plant’s growth and fitness. Bacillus megaterium is a natural endophyte isolated from Nicotiana attenuata plant roots growing in native soils. A particular isolate (B55), was found to have dramatic plant growth promoting (PGP) effects on wild type (WT) and transgenic plants impaired in ethylene (ET) perception (35S-etr1), the genotype from which this bacteria was first isolated. B55 not ...

  3. Habitats as complex odour environments: how does plant diversity affect herbivore and parasitoid orientation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Wäschke

    Full Text Available Plant diversity is known to affect success of host location by pest insects, but its effect on olfactory orientation of non-pest insect species has hardly been addressed. First, we tested in laboratory experiments the hypothesis that non-host plants, which increase odour complexity in habitats, affect the host location ability of herbivores and parasitoids. Furthermore, we recorded field data of plant diversity in addition to herbivore and parasitoid abundance at 77 grassland sites in three different regions in Germany in order to elucidate whether our laboratory results reflect the field situation. As a model system we used the herb Plantago lanceolata, the herbivorous weevil Mecinus pascuorum, and its larval parasitoid Mesopolobus incultus. The laboratory bioassays revealed that both the herbivorous weevil and its larval parasitoid can locate their host plant and host via olfactory cues even in the presence of non-host odour. In a newly established two-circle olfactometer, the weeviĺs capability to detect host plant odour was not affected by odours from non-host plants. However, addition of non-host plant odours to host plant odour enhanced the weeviĺs foraging activity. The parasitoid was attracted by a combination of host plant and host volatiles in both the absence and presence of non-host plant volatiles in a Y-tube olfactometer. In dual choice tests the parasitoid preferred the blend of host plant and host volatiles over its combination with non-host plant volatiles. In the field, no indication was found that high plant diversity disturbs host (plant location by the weevil and its parasitoid. In contrast, plant diversity was positively correlated with weevil abundance, whereas parasitoid abundance was independent of plant diversity. Therefore, we conclude that weevils and parasitoids showed the sensory capacity to successfully cope with complex vegetation odours when searching for hosts.

  4. UV-B radiation affects plant volatile emissions and shade avoidance responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gankema, P.

    2015-01-01

    Plants detect and integrate an assortment of signals from their environment, and use these signals to maximise their performance by adjusting their growth and development as well as their secondary metabolite production. In this thesis, we investigated how plants integrate visual and olfactory signa

  5. Analysis of Growth and Resistance to Different Population of Fusarium Solani in Soybean Legume Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *N. Hamid

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Experiment was conducted to study the effect of different concentrations (10,000, 100,000 and 1000, 000 cfu of Fusariumsolani on growth and resistance to soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr leguminous plant. Sterilized seeds of Glycine max were sown in 350g of acid washed sand. The plants were regularly watered with complete Nutrient Hoagland solution. Leaves samples were weekly collected for analysis of biochemical tests. The growth and morphology of G. max were adversely affected with F. solani which show damping off seedling root rot. The symptom was first appearing in root. Infected seedling of G. max showed a marked decreased in root, shoot length and discoloration and decay in roots. Stem diameter was also decreased in infected plants as compared with the control plants. There were not marked differences occurring in leaf area but the color of leaves turn yellowish green in infected plants. The infected tissues of soybean with different colonies of F. solani showed the highest level of total phenolic content as compared to healthy tissues

  6. Effect of abscisic acid and blue radiation on photosynthesis and growth of pea plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on the net photosynthetic rate (PN), the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activities, the chlorophyll (Chl) content and growth of pea plants (Pisum sativum) grown under ''white'' (WR) or blue radiation (BR), were investigated. BR as compared to WR enhanced PN, the activities of examined enzymes, and Chl content. In spite of higher PN of the plants grown under BR, dry matter of their shoots was lower in comparison with WR. ABA-treated plants grown under both WR and BR showed reduction in PN. ABA had no effect on the activities of both RuBPC and PEPC and the Chl content. Independent on the radiation quality, ABA reduced stem elongation, but did not affect the biomass of whole shoots

  7. Effect of Nutrient Amendments of Diesel Oil Polluted Soil on Plant Growth Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Akujobi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of nutrient amendments of diesel oil polluted soil on plant height, leaf area and leaf numbers of eggplant (Solanum melongena. Soil samples were polluted and amended separately with different weights of poultry waste, pig waste, cow dung and inorganic fertilizer. Soil samples were also polluted with diesel oil without amendment to achieve 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10% pollution. Samples were analyzed at two weeks interval for sixteen weeks. The plant growth parameters were affected adversely by the diesel oil pollution and the higher the level of pollution, the more the effect. The nutrient amendments were able to remedy the effect of the diesel oil pollution. The remediation effect was nutrient weight dependent and the best remediation effect was observed in poultry waste amended samples. This study has shown that diesel oil contaminated soil may have adverse effect on plants, but this can be remedied by addition of organic nutrient supplements especially poultry waste.

  8. Isolation and characterization of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria from wheat rhizosphere and their effect on plant growth promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaleem eABBASI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe present study was conducted to characterize the native plant growth promoting bacteria from wheat rhizosphere and root-endosphere in the Himalayan region of Rawalakot, Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK, Pakistan. Nine bacterial isolates were purified, screened in vitro for plant growth promoting (PGP characteristics and evaluated for their beneficial effects on the early growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Among nine bacterial isolates, seven were able to produce indole-3- acetic acid in tryptophan-supplemented medium; seven were nitrogen fixer, and four were able to solubilize inorganic phosphate in vitro. Four different morphotypes were genotypically identified based on IGS-RFLP fingerprinting and representative of each morphotype was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis except Gram positive putative Bacillus sp. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, bacterial isolates AJK–3 and AJK-9 showing multiple PGP-traits were identified as Stenotrophomonas spp. while AJK-7 showed equal homologies to Acetobacter pasteurianus and Stenotrophomonas specie. Plant inoculation studies indicated that these PGPR strains provided a significant increase in shoot and root length, and shoot and root biomass. A significant increase in shoot N contents (up to 76% and root N contents (up to 32% was observed over the un-inoculated control. The study indicates the potential of these PGPR for inoculums production or biofertilizers for enhancing growth and nutrient content of wheat and other crops under field conditions. The study is the first report of wheat associated bacterial diversity in the Himalayan region of Rawalakot, AJK.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF SEED SOAKING WITH PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS ON SEEDLING VIGOR OF WHEAT UNDER SALINITY STRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Afzal Irfan; Basra Shahzad M.A.; Iqbal Amir

    2005-01-01

    Effects of seed soaking with plant growth regulators (IAA, GA3, kinetin or prostart) on wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Auqab-2000) emergence and seedling growth under normal (4 dS/cm) and saline (15 dS/cm) conditions were studied to determine their usefulness in increasing relative salt-tolerance. During emergence test, emergence percentage and mean emergence time (MET) were significantly affected by most of priming treatments, however, root and shoot length, fresh and dry weight of seedlings w...

  10. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria improved growth, nutrient, and hormone content of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Turan, Metin; EKİNCİ, Melek; YILDIRIM, Ertan; GÜNEŞ, Adem; Karagöz, Kenan; KOTAN, Recep; Dursun, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to observe the effects of Bacillus megaterium strain TV-91C, Pantoea agglomerans strain RK-92, and B. subtilis strain TV-17C inoculation on the growth, nutrient, and hormone content of cabbage seedlings. The seeds of cabbage were incubated in flasks by shaking at 80 rpm for 2 h at 28 °C to coat the seeds with the rhizobacteria. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) treatments increased fresh and dry shoot and root weight, stem diameter, seedling hei...

  11. The affective tone of narration and posttraumatic growth in organ transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zięba Mariusz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that positive affective tone of narratives is connected to the experience of posttraumatic growth among transplant patients. Kidney transplant patients (N = 51 and liver transplant patients (N = 48 participated in the study. In the first stage, about 10 weeks after transplant, the participants told two stories about important, freely chosen events from their lives. During the second meeting 10-12 months later we measured posttraumatic growth. Results indicated that the affective tone of narratives about past events was associated with the level of post-traumatic growth measured 10-12 months later. This proves that the affective tone of narratives about life, understood as a relatively constant individual characteristic, promote posttraumatic growth.

  12. Radiation processing technology for production of plant growth promoter from brown seaweed and plant protector from shrimp shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two products (in solution state) namely plant growth promoter from brown seaweed (alginate) and plant protector from shrimp shell (chitosan) have been produced by the application of radiation processing technology. By foliar spraying, the irradiated alginate impacts the remarkable increase of the productivity of plant such as carrot, cabbage, onion, and the irradiated chitosan exhibits not only protection effect with highly antifungal activity but also growth promotion effect for plants. (author)

  13. Light and Plants. A Series of Experiments Demonstrating Light Effects on Seed Germination, Plant Growth, and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, R. J.; And Others

    A brief summary of the effects of light on plant germination, growth and development, including photoperiodism and pigment formation, introduces 18 experiments and demonstrations which illustrate aspects of these effects. Detailed procedures for each exercise are given, the expected results outlined, and possible sources of difficulty discussed.…

  14. Study the Effect of Triazophos as Plant Growth Regulator in Tissue Culture of Different Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith Ahmad Yaaqoub

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of triazophos in tissue cultures of three plants Catharanthus roseus, Zizyphus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus. Triazophos was compared with 2,4-D on Murashige and Skoog's (MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of them. Triazophos was tested for it is potential in callus induction and compared its activity with 2,4-D as plant growth regulator .There are no significant differences (p<0.05 in callus induction on leaf explants between Triazophos and 2,4-D of all plants. The best concentrations to initiation and maintenance callus were (0.1and 1 mg/L for Triazophos and 2,4-D respectively for all plants.

  15. Weijia Zhou Inspects the Advanced Astroculture plant growth unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Weijia Zhou, director of the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, inspects the Advanced Astroculture(tm) plant growth unit before its first flight last spring. Coating technology is used inside the miniature plant greenhouse to remove ethylene, a chemical produced by plant leaves that can cause plants to mature too quickly. This same coating technology is used in a new anthrax-killing device. The Space Station experiment is managed by the Space Product Development Program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. DuPont is partnering with NASA and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to grow soybeans aboard the Space Station to find out if they have improved oil, protein, carbohydrates or secondary metabolites that could benefit farmers and consumers. Principal Investigators: Dr. Tom Corbin, Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., a Dupont Company, with headquarters in Des Moines, Iowa, and Dr. Weijia Zhou, Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  16. Petroleum coke and plants : impact on growth and physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum coke, a by-product of the oil sand processing industry in Alberta, contains fairly significant concentrations of arsenic, boron, iron, nickel, sulphur, titanium, and vanadium embedded in a carbon matrix. Through weathering and biological degradation, these components may be released from coke and absorbed by plant tissues where they may restrict growth and interfere with physiological activities. In order to study the effects of petroleum coke on plants, several greenhouse experiments were conducted by growing Agropyron trachycaulum, Deschampsia caespitosa, Calamagrostis canadensis, Oryzopsis hymenoides, Triticum aestivum, Cornus sericea and Fragaria virginiana for 3 months in control soil, Syncrude Canada Ltd. coke; and Suncor Energy Inc.coke. It was found that in all coke treated plants, shoot biomass was lower than controls. Root biomass followed this same trend, with the exception of Triticum aestivum. Several results were presented in this study abstract. It was concluded that the short term effects of coke on plants are most likely due to water stress and nutrient deficiency and that further research is needed

  17. Effect of crop development on biogenic emissions from plant populations grown in closed plant growth chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, J. H.; Stutte, G. W.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Biomass Production Chamber at John F. Kennedy Space Center is a closed plant growth chamber facility that can be used to monitor the level of biogenic emissions from large populations of plants throughout their entire growth cycle. The head space atmosphere of a 26-day-old lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Waldmann's Green) stand was repeatedly sampled and emissions identified and quantified using GC-mass spectrometry. Concentrations of dimethyl sulphide, carbon disulphide, alpha-pinene, furan and 2-methylfuran were not significantly different throughout the day; whereas, isoprene showed significant differences in concentration between samples collected in light and dark periods. Volatile organic compounds from the atmosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Yecora Rojo) were analysed and quantified from planting to maturity. Volatile plant-derived compounds included 1-butanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, nonanal, benzaldehyde, tetramethylurea, tetramethylthiourea, 2-methylfuran and 3-methylfuran. Concentrations of volatiles were determined during seedling establishment, vegetative growth, anthesis, grain fill and senescence and found to vary depending on the developmental stage. Atmospheric concentrations of benzaldehyde and nonanal were highest during anthesis, 2-methylfuran and 3-methylfuran concentrations were greatest during grain fill, and the concentration of the tetramethylurea peaked during senescence.

  18. Pochonia chlamydosporia promotes the growth of tomato and lettuce plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Dallemole-Giaretta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia is one of the most studied biological agents used to control plant-parasitic nematodes. This study found that the isolates Pc-3, Pc-10 and Pc-19 of this fungus promote the growth of tomato and lettuce seedlings. The isolate Pc-19 colonized the rhizoplane of tomato seedlings in only 15 days and produced a large quantity of chlamydospores. This isolate was able to use cellulose as a carbon source, in addition to glucose and sucrose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed that hyphae of the P. chlamydosporia isolate Pc-10 penetrated the epidermal cells of the tomato roots. These three P. chlamydosporia isolates promote the growth of tomato and lettuce.

  19. Distribution System Optimization Planning Based on Plant Growth Simulation Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun; CHENG Hao-zhong; HU Ze-chun; WANG Yi

    2008-01-01

    An approach for the integrated optimization of the construction/expansion capacity of high-voltage/medium-voltage (HV/MV) substations and the configuration of MV radial distribution network was presented using plant growth simulation algorithm (PGSA). In the optimization process, fixed costs correspondent to the investment in lines and substations and the variable costs associated to the operation of the system were considered under the constraints of branch capacity, substation capacity and bus voltage. The optimization variables considerably reduce the dimension of variables and speed up the process of optimizing. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was tested by a distribution system planning.

  20. A Fungal Endosymbiont Affects Host Plant Recruitment Through Seed- and Litter-mediated Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Many grass species are associated with maternally transmitted fungal endophytes. Increasing evidence shows that endophytes enhance host plant success under varied conditions, yet studies have rarely considered alternative mechanisms whereby these mutualistic symbionts may affect regeneration from...

  1. Temperature extremes: Effect on plant growth and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry L. Hatfield

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is a primary factor affecting the rate of plant development. Warmer temperatures expected with climate change and the potential for more extreme temperature events will impact plant productivity. Pollination is one of the most sensitive phenological stages to temperature extremes across all species and during this developmental stage temperature extremes would greatly affect production. Few adaptation strategies are available to cope with temperature extremes at this developmental stage other than to select for plants which shed pollen during the cooler periods of the day or are indeterminate so flowering occurs over a longer period of the growing season. In controlled environment studies, warm temperatures increased the rate of phenological development; however, there was no effect on leaf area or vegetative biomass compared to normal temperatures. The major impact of warmer temperatures was during the reproductive stage of development and in all cases grain yield in maize was significantly reduced by as much as 80−90% from a normal temperature regime. Temperature effects are increased by water deficits and excess soil water demonstrating that understanding the interaction of temperature and water will be needed to develop more effective adaptation strategies to offset the impacts of greater temperature extreme events associated with a changing climate.

  2. Endogenous abscisic acid promotes hypocotyl growth and affects endoreduplication during dark-induced growth in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan F Humplík

    Full Text Available Dark-induced growth (skotomorphogenesis is primarily characterized by rapid elongation of the hypocotyl. We have studied the role of abscisic acid (ABA during the development of young tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. seedlings. We observed that ABA deficiency caused a reduction in hypocotyl growth at the level of cell elongation and that the growth in ABA-deficient plants could be improved by treatment with exogenous ABA, through which the plants show a concentration dependent response. In addition, ABA accumulated in dark-grown tomato seedlings that grew rapidly, whereas seedlings grown under blue light exhibited low growth rates and accumulated less ABA. We demonstrated that ABA promotes DNA endoreduplication by enhancing the expression of the genes encoding inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases SlKRP1 and SlKRP3 and by reducing cytokinin levels. These data were supported by the expression analysis of the genes which encode enzymes involved in ABA and CK metabolism. Our results show that ABA is essential for the process of hypocotyl elongation and that appropriate control of the endogenous level of ABA is required in order to drive the growth of etiolated seedlings.

  3. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Erica M.; Watson, Maxine A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry) were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized) or dead (sterilized) substrates. Contact between da...

  4. Manner of Apical Meristem Destruction Affects Growth, Reproduction, and Survival of Sea Oxeye Daisy

    OpenAIRE

    Spirko, Lisa S.; Rossi, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    Although herbivory may result in plant death, the mode and timing of damage may produce variable wounding responses in the attacked plant. In this study, effects of different types of apical meristem damage on growth and performance of sea oxeye daisy Borrichia frutescens (L.) DC were compared. Damage involved either clipping or galling of the apical meristem by the gall midge Asphondylia borrichiae Rossi and Strong. Apical dominance was relatively weak before flowering and stronger in short ...

  5. High temperatures limit plant growth but hasten flowering in root chicory (Cichorium intybus) independently of vernalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Vandoorne, Bertrand; Descamps, Christophe; Périlleux, Claire; Dielen, Vincent; Van Herck, Jean-Claude; Quinet, Muriel

    2014-01-15

    An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a major crop in northern Europe, and it is cultivated as a source of inulin. This polysaccharide is stored in the tap root during the first growing season when the plant grows as a leafy rosette, whereas bolting and flowering occur in the second year after winter vernalisation. The impact of heat stress on plant phenology, water status, photosynthesis-related parameters, and inulin content was studied in the field and under controlled phytotron conditions. In the field, plants of the Crescendo cultivar were cultivated under a closed plastic-panelled greenhouse to investigate heat-stress conditions, while the control plants were shielded with a similar, but open, structure. In the phytotrons, the Crescendo and Fredonia cultivars were exposed to high temperatures (35°C day/28°C night) and compared to control conditions (17°C) over 10 weeks. In the field, heat reduced the root weight, the inulin content of the root and its degree of polymerisation in non-bolting plants. Flowering was observed in 12% of the heat stressed plants during the first growing season in the field. In the phytotron, the heat stress increased the total number of leaves per plant, but reduced the mean leaf area. Photosynthesis efficiency was increased in these plants, whereas osmotic potential was decreased. High temperature was also found to induced flowering of up to 50% of these plants, especially for the Fredonia cultivar. In conclusion, high temperatures induced a reduction in the growth of root chicory, although photosynthesis is not affected. Flowering was also induced, which indicates that high temperatures can partly substitute for the vernalisation requirement for the flowering of root chicory. PMID:24331425

  6. Do soil fertilization and forest canopy foliage affect the growth and photosynthesis of Amazonian saplings?

    OpenAIRE

    Nilvanda dos Santos Magalhães; Ricardo Antonio Marenco; Miguel Angelo Branco Camargo

    2014-01-01

    Most Amazonian soils are highly weathered and poor in nutrients. Therefore, photosynthesis and plant growth should positively respond to the addition of mineral nutrients. Surprisingly, no study has been carried out in situ in the central Amazon to address this issue for juvenile trees. The objective of this study was to determine how photosynthetic rates and growth of tree saplings respond to the addition of mineral nutrients, to the variation in leaf area index of the forest canopy, and to ...

  7. Growth and Phosphorus Uptake of Oat (Arena nuda L.) as Affected by Mineral Nitrogen Forms Supplied in Hydroponics and Soil Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Ming-Shou; LI Zhen; WANG Feng-Mei; ZHANG Jian-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Plants show different growth responses to N sources supplied with either NH4+ or NO3-.The uptake of different N sources also affects the rhizosphere pH and therefore the bioavailability of soil phosphorus,particularly in alkaline soils.The plant growth,P uptake,and P availability in the rhizosphere of oat (Arena nuda L.) grown in hydroponics and in soil culture were investigated under supply with sole NH4+-N,sole NO3--N,or a combination.Sole NO3-fed oat plants accumulated more biomass than sole NH4+-fed ones.The highest biomass accumulation was observed when N was supplied with both NH4+-N and NO3--N.Growth of the plant root increased with the proportion of NO3-in the cultural medium.Better root growth and higher root/shoot ratio were consistently observed in NO3--fed plants.However,root vigor was the highest when N was supplied with NO3-+NH4+.NH4+ supply reduced the rhizosphere pH but did not affect P uptake by plants grown in soils with CaHPO4 added as P source.No P deficiency was observed,and plant P concentrations were generally above 2 g kg-1.P uptake was increased when N was supplied partly or solely as NO3--N,similarly as biomass accumulation.The results suggested that oat was an NO3-prcferring plant,and NO3--N was essential for plant growth and the maintenance of root absorption capacity.N supply with NH4+-N did not improve P nutrition,which was most likely due to the absence of P deficiency.

  8. Allocation, stress tolerance and carbon transport in plants: how does phloem physiology affect plant ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jessica A; Clearwater, Michael J; Haines, Dustin F; Klein, Tamir; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Sevanto, Sanna; Turgeon, Robert; Zhang, Cankui

    2016-04-01

    Despite the crucial role of carbon transport in whole plant physiology and its impact on plant-environment interactions and ecosystem function, relatively little research has tried to examine how phloem physiology impacts plant ecology. In this review, we highlight several areas of active research where inquiry into phloem physiology has increased our understanding of whole plant function and ecological processes. We consider how xylem-phloem interactions impact plant drought tolerance and reproduction, how phloem transport influences carbon allocation in trees and carbon cycling in ecosystems and how phloem function mediates plant relations with insects, pests, microbes and symbiotes. We argue that in spite of challenges that exist in studying phloem physiology, it is critical that we consider the role of this dynamic vascular system when examining the relationship between plants and their biotic and abiotic environment. PMID:26147312

  9. The response of leaves to heat stress in tomato plants with source-sink modulated by growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Starck

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The response to heat stress was investigated in heat-sensitive, Roma V. F. and heat-tolerant, Robin, cultivars whose fruit growth was stimulated by NOA + GA3 , or NOA + GA3 + zeatin. The treated plants were compared with untreated control plant. In each of these series half of the plants were subjected to one or three cycles of heat stress. A single cycle of 38°/25°C day and night did not significantly affect either the respiration rate or chlorophyll content. In PGR-untreated intact cv. Roma, heat stress inhibited starch formation during the day and strongly depressed night export from the blades. High temperature depressed the night transport less in plants having a higher sink demand of fruits in plant treated with PGR. In this case the amount of substances available for export was much higher and both sugars and starch were more intensively remobilized at night. In intact Robin plants, PGR and heat stress much less affected sugar and starch content. High temperature diminished noctural starch remobilization only in the NOA + GA3 series. Leaf disc growth was evaluated as a measure of response to heat stress after elimination of the direct effect of fruit demands. One cycle of high temperature did not negatively affect the growth of leaf discs; it even caused thermal low growth activation in both cultivars. Three cycles of heat stress depressed leaf disc growth after short-term stimulation, especially in Roma plants. Immediately after 3-day heat stress, there was no response of discs to GA3 or zeatin added to the solution on which the discs were floated. Leaf disc growth of Robin control and NOA + GA3 series was very similar in plants from optimal temperature conditions. High temperature inhibited only disc growth of the NOA + GA3 series owing to depression of starch break-down, diminishing the pool of sugars. In contrast, leaf discs of Roma cv. excided from NOA + GA3 treated plants from the optimal temperature series, grew more intensively

  10. Calf and disease factors affecting growth in female Holstein calves in Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, G A; Dohoo, I R; Montgomery, D M; Bennett, F L

    1998-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine calf-level factors that affect performance (growth) between birth and 14 months of age in a convenience sample of approximately 3300 female Holstein calves born in 1991 on two large Florida dairy farms. Data collected on each calf at birth included farm of origin, birth date, weight, height at the pelvis, and serum total protein (a measure of colostral immunoglobulin absorption). Birth season was dichotomized into summer and winter using meteorological data collected by University of Florida Agricultural Research Stations. Data collected at approximately 6 and 14 months of age included age, weight, height at the pelvis, and height at the withers. Growth in weight and stature (height) was calculated for each growth period; growth period 1 (GP1) = birth to 6 months, and growth period 2 (GP2) = 6 to 14 months. Health data collected included data of initial treatment and number of treatments for the diseases diarrhea, omphalitis, septicemia, pneumonia and keratoconjunctivitis. After adjusting for disease occurrence, passive transfer of colostral immunoglobulins had no significant effect on body weight gain or pelvic height growth. Season of birth and occurrence of diarrhea, septicemia and respiratory disease were significant variables decreasing heifer growth (height and weight) in GP1. These variables plus farm, birth weight and exact age when '6 month' data were collected explained 20% and 31% of the variation in body weight gain and pelvic height growth, respectively, in GP1. The number of days treated for pneumonia before 6 months of age significantly decreased average daily weight gain in GP2 (P < 0.025), but did not affect stature growth. Treatment for pneumonia after 6 months of age did not significantly affect weight or height gain after age 6 months. Neither omphalitis nor keratoconjunctivitis explained variability in growth in either of the growth periods. PMID:9500160

  11. Evaluation of regulatory processes affecting nuclear power plant early site approval and standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a survey and evaluation of existing federal, state and local regulatory considerations affecting siting approval of power plants in the United States. Those factors that may impede early site approval of nuclear power plants are identified, and findings related to the removal of these impediments and the general improvement of the approval process are presented. A brief evaluation of standardization of nuclear plant design is also presented

  12. Use of Plant Growth Regulators to Increase Branching of Clematis Spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Puglisi, Sadie Erica

    2002-01-01

    Clematis spp. L. is a twining vine covered in showy blooms. Typical growth of hybrids is from the main leader, producing a thin, unbranched plant with one cyme. Apical dominance is released by cutting back the vine during production. Cutting back, or pinching, of a plant is labor intensive and compromises bloom for vegetative growth at time of sales. The purpose of this project was to eliminate manual pinching by treating young plants with chemical plant growth regulators (PGRs) that enha...

  13. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  14. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for responsiveness to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Wintermans, P.C.A.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r stimulates lateral root formation and increases shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These plant growth-stimulating effects are partly caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the bacterium. Here, we performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study on natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for the ability to profit from rhizobacteria-mediated plant growth-promotion. To this end, 302 Arab...

  15. Biochar treatment resulted in a combined effect on soybean growth promotion and a shift in plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dilfuza eEgamberdieva; Stephan eWirth; Undine eBehrendt; Elsayed eAbd_Allah; Gabriele eBerg

    2016-01-01

    The application of biochar to soil is considered to have the potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration, as well as for improving plant growth and suppressing soil pathogens. In our study we evaluated the effect of biochar on the plant growth of soybeans, as well as on the composition of root-associated bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. Two types of biochar, namely, maize biochar (MBC), wood biochar (WBC), and hydrochar (HTC) were used for pot experiments to monitor plant gr...

  16. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA), and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above-, and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future. PMID:27625658

  17. Microbial composition in a deep saline aquifer in the North German Basin -microbiologically induced corrosion and mineral precipitation affecting geothermal plant operation and the effects of plant downtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerm, Stephanie; Westphal, Anke; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Alawi, Mashal; Seibt, Andrea; Wolfgramm, Markus; Würdemann, Hilke

    2013-04-01

    The microbial composition in fluids of a deep saline geothermal used aquifer in the North German Basin was characterized over a period of five years. The genetic fingerprinting techniques PCR-SSCP and PCR-DGGE revealed distinct microbial communities in fluids produced from the cold and warm side of the aquifer. Direct cell counting and quantification of 16S rRNA genes and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) genes by real-time PCR proved different population sizes in fluids, showing higher abundance of Bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in cold fluids compared to warm fluids. Predominating SRB in the cold well probably accounted for corrosion damage to the submersible well pump, and iron sulfide precipitates in the near wellbore area and topside facility filters. This corresponded to a lower sulfate content in fluids produced from the cold well as well as higher content of hydrogen gas that was probably released from corrosion, and maybe favoured growth of hydrogenotrophic SRB. Plant downtime significantly influenced the microbial biocenosis in fluids. Samples taken after plant restart gave indications about the processes occurring downhole during those phases. High DNA concentrations in fluids at the beginning of the restart process with a decreasing trend over time indicated a higher abundance of microbes during plant downtime compared to regular plant operation. It is likely that a gradual drop in temperature as well as stagnant conditions favoured the growth of microbes and maturation of biofilms at the casing and in pores of the reservoir rock in the near wellbore area. Furthermore, it became obvious that the microorganisms were more associated to particles then free-living. This study reflects the high influence of microbial populations for geothermal plant operation, because microbiologically induced precipitative and corrosive processes adversely affect plant reliability. Those processes may favourably occur during plant downtime due to enhanced

  18. Mosses like it rough-growth form specific responses of mosses, herbaceous and woody plants to micro-relief heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leutner, Benjamin F.; Steinbauer, Manuel; Müller, Carina M.; Früh, Andrea J.; Irl, Severin; Jentsch, Anke; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2012-01-01

    sampled 40 plots in laurel and pine forests at four altitudinal bands. Species richness was recorded separately for various growth forms (i.e., mosses, herbaceous and woody plants). Site conditions such as altitude, slope, aspect, and tree density were measured. Micro-relief heterogeneity was...... between growth forms. While moss richness was affected significantly by micro-relief heterogeneity, herbaceous and woody plants richness responded mainly to larger-scale site conditions such as aspect and tree density. Our results stress the importance of small-scale relief heterogeneity for the...

  19. Plant growth analysis and seed vigor expression: effects of soil waterlogging during rye plant development

    OpenAIRE

    Tiago Pedó; Emanuela Garbin Martinazzo; Tiago Zanatta Aumonde; Francisco Amaral Villela

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the growth, assimilate partitioning and seed vigor expression of rye seeds subjected to waterlogging during development. The experimental design was completely randomized with six replications and three treatments. The treatments involved different waterlogging periods: a) no waterlogging; b) single waterlogging of three days; and c) two soil waterlogging periods of three days. The plants were collected at regular intervals of 14 days after emergence until the end...

  20. Effect of Variety and Plant Growth Regulators in MS Medium on Callus Proliferation from Virus Infected Tomato Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Farid Uddin; Shah Md. Asraful Islam; Naznin Sultana; M.H. Kabir Shiragi

    2004-01-01

    The experiment was conducted in the Tissue Culture Laboratory of the Department of Crop Botany, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh for micropropagation of tomato plant to evaluate the effect of variety and Plant Growth Regulators (PGRs) in MS medium on callus proliferation from infected tomato plant. Three tomato varieties namely, Bahar, Binatomato-2 and Binatomato-3 were used as plant materials in the present study. Virus infected young internode segments of tomato plants were cu...

  1. Effect of plant growth-promoting bacteria on the growth and fructan production of Agave americana L.

    OpenAIRE

    De La Torre-Ruiz, Neyser; Ruiz-Valdiviezo, Víctor Manuel; Rincón-Molina, Clara Ivette; Rodríguez-Mendiola, Martha; Arias-Castro, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico Antonio; Palomeque-Dominguez, Héctor; Rincón-Rosales, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    The effect of plant growth-promoting bacteria inoculation on plant growth and the sugar content in Agave americana was assessed. The bacterial strains ACO-34A, ACO-40, and ACO-140, isolated from the A. americana rhizosphere, were selected for this study to evaluate their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The three bacterial strains were evaluated via plant inoculation assays, and Azospirillum brasilense Cd served as a control strain. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sh...

  2. Seed biopriming with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Ahmad; Turgay, Oğuz Can; Farooq, Muhammad; Hayat, Rifat

    2016-08-01

    Beneficial microbes are applied to the soil and plant tissues directly or through seed inoculation, whereas soil application is preferred when there is risk of inhibitors or antagonistic microbes on the plant tissues. Insufficient survival of the microorganisms, hindrance in application of fungicides to the seeds and exposure to heat and sunlight in subsequent seed storage in conventional inoculation methods force to explore appropriate and efficient bacterial application method. Seed priming, where seeds are hydrated to activate metabolism without actual germination followed by drying, increases the germination, stand establishment and stress tolerance in different crops. Seed priming with living bacterial inoculum is termed as biopriming that involves the application of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. It increases speed and uniformity of germination; also ensures rapid, uniform and high establishment of crops; and hence improves harvest quality and yield. Seed biopriming allows the bacteria to enter/adhere the seeds and also acclimatization of bacteria in the prevalent conditions. This review focuses on methods used for biopriming, and also the role in improving crop productivity and stress tolerance along with prospects of this technology. The comparison of methods being followed is also reviewed proposing biopriming as a promising technique for application of beneficial microbes to the seeds. PMID:27222220

  3. Does Foreign Direct Investment Affect Green Growth? Evidence from China’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Yue

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Foreign Direct Investment (FDI not only affects the economic growth but also affects the environmental protection of the host country. With China’s background of pursuing green growth, we need to consider the performance of FDI from the economic and environmental benefit aspects. On this basis, using slacks-based measure directional distance function (SBMDDF to build up green growth efficiency, economic efficiency and environmental efficiency indexes, empirical research on FDI in 104 Chinese cities from 2004 to 2011 has shown that: (1 Different cities have differences in their green growth efficiency. Shenzhen city is always efficient in green economic growth. (2 Overall, FDI is positive on Chinese cities’ green growth. (3 When the green growth efficiency is broken down into economic efficiency and environmental efficiency, FDI promotes China’s economic green growth through both environmental benefits and economic benefits. (4 The effect of FDI differs in different sectors. FDI in the emission-intensive sector promotes green efficiency mainly through the improvement of economic efficiency. FDI in the non-emission-intensive sector promotes economic efficiency, environmental efficiency and green efficiency.

  4. Do rhizome severing and shoot defoliation affect clonal growth of Leymus chinensis at ramet population level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengwen; Li, Linghao; Han, Xingguo; Dong, Ming

    2004-12-01

    Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvel. is a perennial species of Gramineae, usually subject to defoliation from grazing and mowing. We examined whether shoot defoliation and rhizome severing affected rhizome and ramet growth, and vegetative bud outgrowth of L. chinensis ramet populations. We also tested the hypothesis that clonal growth of the ramets subject to defoliation would benefit from clonal integration between interconnected ramets besides from possible compensatory growth. To 48 experimental plots, we applied six treatments resulting from interactions between two rhizome connection states (unsevered/severed) and three defoliation regimes (non-defoliated, mildly-defoliated and heavily-defoliated). Defoliation affected rhizome growth and bud outgrowth, but had little effect on shoot growth. Mild and heavy defoliation exerted similar effects on rhizome growth. Only heavy defoliation significantly reduced bud outgrowth while mild defoliation did not. The fact that shoot growth did not change after defoliation and that the bud numbers remained unchanged after mild defoliation suggest that the compensatory response enable the species to tolerate grazing to some extent. Neither rhizome severing nor the interaction of rhizome severing and defoliation had effect on any tested variables. Lack of the effect of rhizome severing falsified the first half of our hypothesis, that is, clonal integration was unimportant in our experiment. The probable reasons were suspected to be the short duration of the experiment and/or the buffer effect of carbohydrate reserves in rhizomes for shoot growth and bud production in time of defoliation.

  5. Polar fluxes of calcium ions and growth of plant tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied the action exerted by auxin transport inhibitors (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, 10-4 M; 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid, 10-4 M), inhibitors of membrane-bound ATPases (sodium orthovanadate, 10-4 M; diethylstilbestrol, 10-5 M), and a blocker of Ca-channels (verapamil, 1.3 x 10-4 M) on growth processes (lengthwise growth, the gravitropic response) and translocation of 45Ca in segments of corn (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles and pea (Pisum sativum L.) internodes. Calcium in vertically oriented and gravistimulated segments was polarly translocated in a direction opposite the vector of gravitational force. It is hypothesized that the polar fluxes of Ca2+ ions which arise in tissues with a change in position of the plant organism in space are capable of correcting the direction of active basipetal transport of IAA and thereby able to induce polarization of growth processes. In studying transport of Ca2+ ions on plasmalemma vesicles with the aid of chlorotetracycline, it was found that creation of a potassium diffusion potential on the membrane (as a results of valinomycin treatment) induces entry of calcium into the vesicles. Since this effect was removed by verapamil and ruthenium red, it is postulated that potential-dependent Ca-channels are present on the plasma membrane of corn coleoptile cells

  6. Biochar treatment resulted in a combined effect on soybean growth promotion and a shift in plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilfuza eEgamberdieva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of biochar to soil is considered to have the potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration, as well as for improving plant growth and suppressing soil pathogens. In our study we evaluated the effect of biochar on the plant growth of soybeans, as well as on the composition of root-associated bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. Two types of biochar, namely, maize biochar (MBC, wood biochar (WBC, and hydrochar (HTC were used for pot experiments to monitor plant growth. Soybean plants grown in soil amended with HTC char (2% showed the best performance and were collected for isolation and further characterization of root-associated bacteria for multiple plant growth promoting traits.Only HTC char amendment resulted in a statistically significant increase in the root and shoot dry weight of soybeans. Interestingly, rhizosphere isolates from HTC char amended soil showed higher diversity than the rhizosphere isolates from the control soil. In addition, a higher proportion of isolates from HTC char amended soil compared with control soil was found to express plant growth promoting properties and showed antagonistic activity against one or more phytopathogenic fungi. Our study provided evidence that improved plant growth by biochar incorporation into soil results from the combination of a direct effect that is dependent on the type of char and a microbiome shift in root-associated beneficial bacteria.

  7. Biochar Treatment Resulted in a Combined Effect on Soybean Growth Promotion and a Shift in Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Wirth, Stephan; Behrendt, Undine; Abd Allah, Elsayed F; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The application of biochar to soil is considered to have the potential for long-term soil carbon sequestration, as well as for improving plant growth and suppressing soil pathogens. In our study we evaluated the effect of biochar on the plant growth of soybeans, as well as on the community composition of root-associated bacteria with plant growth promoting traits. Two types of biochar, namely, maize biochar (MBC), wood biochar (WBC), and hydrochar (HTC) were used for pot experiments to monitor plant growth. Soybean plants grown in soil amended with HTC char (2%) showed the best performance and were collected for isolation and further characterization of root-associated bacteria for multiple plant growth promoting traits. Only HTC char amendment resulted in a statistically significant increase in the root and shoot dry weight of soybeans. Interestingly, rhizosphere isolates from HTC char amended soil showed higher diversity than the rhizosphere isolates from the control soil. In addition, a higher proportion of isolates from HTC char amended soil compared with control soil was found to express plant growth promoting properties and showed antagonistic activity against one or more phytopathogenic fungi. Our study provided evidence that improved plant growth by biochar incorporation into soil results from the combination of a direct effect that is dependent on the type of char and a microbiome shift in root-associated beneficial bacteria. PMID:26941730

  8. Plant water use efficiency over geological time--evolution of leaf stomata configurations affecting plant gas exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmuel Assouline

    Full Text Available Plant gas exchange is a key process shaping global hydrological and carbon cycles and is often characterized by plant water use efficiency (WUE - the ratio of CO2 gain to water vapor loss. Plant fossil record suggests that plant adaptation to changing atmospheric CO2 involved correlated evolution of stomata density (d and size (s, and related maximal aperture, amax . We interpreted the fossil record of s and d correlated evolution during the Phanerozoic to quantify impacts on gas conductance affecting plant transpiration, E, and CO2 uptake, A, independently, and consequently, on plant WUE. A shift in stomata configuration from large s-low d to small s-high d in response to decreasing atmospheric CO2 resulted in large changes in plant gas exchange characteristics. The relationships between gas conductance, gws , A and E and maximal relative transpiring leaf area, (amax ⋅d, exhibited hysteretic-like behavior. The new WUE trend derived from independent estimates of A and E differs from established WUE-CO2 trends for atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeding 1,200 ppm. In contrast with a nearly-linear decrease in WUE with decreasing CO2 obtained by standard methods, the newly estimated WUE trend exhibits remarkably stable values for an extended geologic period during which atmospheric CO2 dropped from 3,500 to 1,200 ppm. Pending additional tests, the findings may affect projected impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 on components of the global hydrological cycle.

  9. Mechanism of Growth Enhancement of Plants Induced by Active Species in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Plant growth enhances when seeds are irradiated by plasma. However the mechanism of the growth enhancement by plasma has not been clarified. In this study, growth enhancement of plants using various active species and variation of plant cells are investigated. RF plasma is generated under conditions where pressure is 60 Pa and input electrical power is 60 W. Irradiation period varies from 0 (control) to 75 min. Air plasma shows maximum growth of plants with irradiation period of 60 min on the other hand, oxygen plasma shows the maximum growth with irradiation period of 15 min. From change of gaseous species and pressure dependence, growth enhancing factor is expected to be active oxygen species produced in plasma. According to gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis, there are two speculated mechanism of plant growth enhancement. The first is acceleration of cell cycle by gene expressions of photosynthesis and glycolytic pathway, and the second is increase of cell size via plant hormone production.

  10. Preoperative ketoprofen administration to piglets undergoing castration does not affect subsequent growth performance

    OpenAIRE

    Cassar, Glen; Amezcua, Rocio; Tenbergen, Ryan; Friendship, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if treatment of pigs with ketoprofen (3 mg/kg body weight) before castration at 7 days of age would affect subsequent growth during the suckling period. Piglets from 301 litters were treated with ketoprofen or a placebo and weighed at castration and at weaning. There was no difference in growth rate between the 2 groups of pigs.

  11. Impact of plant growth promoting bacillus subtilis on growth and physiological parameters of bassia indica (indian bassia) grown udder salt stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the role of a salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPR), Bacillus subtilis, in the alleviation of salinity stress during the growth of Indian bassia (Bassia indica (Wight) A.J. Scott), was studied under ccontrolled growth chamber conditions following seed inoculation. Physiological parameters such as neutral and phospholipids, fatty acid composition as well as photosynthetic pigments, were investigated. Salinity inhibited shoot and root length by 16 and 42 percentage, dry weight by 37 and 23 percentage respectively and negatively affected physiological parameters. Inoculation of unstressed and salt-stressed Indian bassia with B. subtilis significantly improved root and shoot growth, total lipid content, the phospholipid fraction, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a and b and carotenoid contents) and also increased oleic (C 18:1 ), linoleic (C 18:2 ) and linolenic (C 18:3 ) acids in plant leaves compared to uninoculated plants. The salt-tolerant PGPR, B. subtilis could act synergistically to promote the growth and fitness of Indian bassia plants under salt stress by providing an additional supply of an auxin (IAA) and induce salt stress resistance by reducing stress ethylene levels. (author)

  12. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  13. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  14. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006

    OpenAIRE

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  16. Suppression of the External MitochondrialNADPH Dehydrogenase, NDB1, in Arabidopsisthaliana Affects Central Metabolism andVegetative Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent oxidation of cytosolic NADPH is mediated by NDB1, which is an external type II NADPHdehydrogenase in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. Using RNA interference, the NDB1 transcript wassuppressed by 80% in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, and external Ca2+-dependent NADPH dehydrogenase activity becameundetectable in isolated mitochondria. This was linked to a decreased level of NADP+ in rosettes of the transgenic lines.Sterile-grown transgenic seedlings displayed decreased growth specifically on glucose, and respiratory metabolism of 14C-glucose was increased. On soil, NDBl-suppressing plants had a decreased vegetative biomass, but leaf maximumquantum efficiency of photosystem Ⅱ and CO2 assimilation rates, as well as total respiration, were similar to the wild-type. The in vivo alternative oxidase activity and capacity were also similar in all genotypes. Metabolic profiling revealeddecreased levels of sugars, citric acid cycle intermediates, and amino acids in the transgenic lines. The NDBl-suppressioninduced transcriptomic changes associated with protein synthesis and glucosinolate and jasmonate metabolism. Thetranscriptomic changes also overlapped with changes observed in a mutant lacking ABAINSENSITIVE4 and in A. thalianaoverexpressing stress tolerance genes from rice. The results thus indicate that A. thaliana NDB1 modulates NADP(H)reduction levels, which in turn affect central metabolism and growth, and interact with defense signaling.

  17. Multitrait plant growth promoting (PGP) rhizobacterial isolates from Brassica juncea rhizosphere : Keratin degradation and growth promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mohmmad Shahbaz; Siddique, Mohammad Tahir; Verma, Amit; Rao, Yalaga Rama; Nailwal, Tapan; Ansari, Mohammad; Pande, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth promoting (PGP) rhizobacteria, a beneficial microbe colonizing plant roots, enhanced crop productivity and offers an attractive way to replace chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and supplements. The keratinous waste which comprises feathers, hairs, nails, skin and wool creates problem of solid waste management due to presence of highly recalcitrant keratin. The multi traits rhizobacteria effective to remove both keratine from the environment by producing keratinase enzyme and to eradicate the chemical fertilizer by providing different PGP activity is novel achievement. In the present study, the effective PM2 strain of PGPR was isolated from rhizospheric soil of mustard (Brassica juncea) field, Pantnagar and they were identified on the basis of different biochemical tests as belonging to Bacillus genera. Different plant growth promoting activity, feather degradation and keratinolytic activity was performed and found very effective toward all the parameters. Furthermore, the efficient strain PM2 was identified on the basis of 16s rRNA sequencing and confirmed as Bacillus cereus. The strain PM2 might be used efficiently for keratinous waste management and PGP activity. Therefore, the present study suggests that Bacillus cereus have multi traits activity which extremely useful for different PGP activity and biotechnological process involving keratin hydrolysis, feather biodegradation or in the leather industry. PMID:24778758

  18. Vegetative growth response of cotton plants due to growth regulator supply via seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vitor Ferrari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The global cotton industry is distinguished by its numerous industrial uses of the plume as well as by high production costs. Excessive vegetative growth can interfere negatively with productivity, and thus, applying growth regulators is essential for the development of the cotton culture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the development and yield of the cotton cultivar FMT 701 with the application of mepiquat chloride to seeds and leaves. The experimental design used a randomized block design with four replications, arranged in bands.The treatments consisted of mepiquat chloride rates (MC (0, 4, 6, 8 and 10 g a.i. kg-1 of seeds applied directly to the cotton seeds and MC management by foliar spray using a 250 mL ha-1 rates that was administered under the following conditions: divided into four applications (35, 45, 55 and 65 days after emergence; as a single application at 70 days; and without the application of the product. The mepiquat chloride applied to cotton seeds controls the initial plant height and stem diameter, while foliar application reduces the height of the plants. After application to seed, foliar spraying MC promotes increase mass of 20 bolls, however no direct influence amount bolls per plant and yield of cotton seed. Higher cotton seed yield was obtained with a rate of 3.4 g a.i. MC kg-1 seeds.

  19. Growth responses of five desert plants as influenced by biological soil crusts from a temperate desert, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanming; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    In almost all dryland systems, biological soil crusts (biocrusts) coexist alongside herbaceous and woody vegetation, creating landscape mosaics of vegetated and biocrusted patches. Results from past studies on the interaction between biocrusts and vascular plants have been contradictory. In the Gurbantunggut desert, a large temperate desert in northwestern China, well-developed lichen-dominated crusts dominate the areas at the base and between the sand dunes. We examined the influence of these lichen-dominated biocrusts on the germination, growth, biomass accumulation, and elemental content of five common plants in this desert: two shrubs (Haloxylon persicum, Ephedra distachya) and three herbaceous plants (Ceratocarpus arenarius, Malcolmia africana and Lappula semiglabra) under greenhouse conditions. The influence of biocrusts on seed germination was species-specific. Biocrusts did not affect percent germination in plants with smooth seeds, but inhibited germination of seeds with appendages that reduced or eliminated contact with the soil surface or prevented seeds from slipping into soil cracks. Once seeds had germinated, biocrusts had different influences on growth of shrub and herbaceous plants. The presence of biocrusts increased concentrations of nitrogen but did not affect phosphorus or potassium in tissue of all tested species, while the uptake of the other tested nutrients was species-specific. Our study showed that biocrusts can serve as a biological filter during seed germination and also can influence growth and elemental uptake. Therefore, they may be an important trigger for determining desert plant diversity and community composition in deserts.

  20. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for responsiveness to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermans, P.C.A.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r stimulates lateral root formation and increases shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These plant growth-stimulating effects are partly caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the bacterium. Her

  1. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil

  2. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier-Lamy, C. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: colette.munier@limos.uhp-nancy.fr; Deneux-Mustin, S. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Mustin, C. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: christian.mustin@limos.uhp-nancy.fr; Merlet, D. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: denis.merlet@limos.uhp-nancy.fr; Berthelin, J. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: jacques.berthelin@limos.uhp-nancy.fr; Leyval, C. [LIMOS, UMR 7137 CNRS-Nancy University, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: corinne.leyval@limos.uhp-nancy.fr

    2007-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil.

  3. Rooting, growth, and color mutation of poinsettias affected by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of gamma-radiation on the rooting, growth, and color mutation in poinsettia. Using 10 poinsettia varieties ('Lollipop', 'Little Peace', 'Happy Day', 'Early Bird', 'Pixy Red', 'Happy Time', 'Heidi', 'Red Bell', 'Clara', and 'Scarlet') bred by National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, 100 Gy of gamma ray was irradiated at the stage of callused cuttings. Four weeks after sticking cuttings in the rooting media, 8 cultivars showed 100% of root formation, but 'Early Bird' rooted 24.4% and even died off during the cutting propagation. After planting rooted cuttings, survival rate until flowering time varied among irradiated cultivars. While 'Pixy Red' and 'Heidi' survived about 98%, 'Clara', 'Happy Day', and 'Early Bird' survived lesser than 30%. All irradiated plants showed remarkably shorter plant height, lesser branch numbers than non-irradiated control plants. Thirty color mutants were obtained among 281 plants survived until flowering time. Nine were complete color mutated branches, whereas 21 mutants were partially color mutated bracts and transitional leaves. Color patterns mutated by 100 Gy of gamma ray were divided into pink, hot pink, light red and spotted (pink spots with red main color). Pink mutants were commonly obtained. Complete color mutants were discovered from 4 plants of 'Pixy Red', 2 plants of 'Red Bell' and 3 plants of Lollipop

  4. Trickle water and feeding system in plant culture and light-dark cycle effects on plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, T.; Inada, K.; Takanashi, J.

    1987-01-01

    Rockwool, as an inert medium covered or bagged with polyethylene film, can be effectively used for plant culture in space stations. The most important machine is the pump adjusting the dripping rate in the feeding system. Hydro-aeroponics may be adaptable to a space laboratory. The shortening of the light-dark cycles inhibits plant growth and induces an abnormal morphogenesis. A photoperiod of 12 hr dark may be needed for plant growth.

  5. Increased plant growth and copper uptake of host and non-host plants by metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Leni; Wang, Xiaohan; Li, Ya

    2016-05-01

    The effects of inoculation with two metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting endophytic bacteria (Burkholderia sp. GL12 and Bacillus megaterium JL35) were evaluated on the plant growth and Cu uptake in their host Elsholtzia splendens and non-host Brassica napus plants grown in natural Cu-contaminated soil. The two strains showed a high level of ACC deaminase activities. In pot experiments, inoculation with strain GL12 significantly increased root and above-ground tissue dry weights of both plants, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of E. splendens and Brassica napus by 132% and 48.2% respectively. Inoculation with strain JL35 was found to significantly increase not only the biomass of B. napus, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of B. napus by 31.3%, but Cu concentration of E. splendens for above-ground tissues by 318% and roots by 69.7%, consequently increasing the total Cu uptake of E. splendens by 223%. The two strains could colonize the rhizosphere soils and root interiors of both plants. Notably, strain JL35 could colonize the shoot tissues and significantly increase the translocation factors and bioaccumulation factors of E. splendens. These results suggested that Burkholderia sp. GL12 and B. megaterium JL35 were valuable bacterial resource which had the potential in improving the efficiency of Cu phytoextraction by E. splendens and B. napus in a natural Cu-contaminated soil. PMID:26587767

  6. Isolation and identification of indigenous plant growth promoting rhizobacteria from Himalayan region of Kashmir and their effect on improving growth and nutrient contents of maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Mahwish; Abbasi, M Kaleem; Hameed, Sohail; Rahim, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and exploitation of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in agro-ecosystems enhance plant-microbes interactions that may affect ecosystems sustainability, agricultural productivity, and environmental quality. The present study was conducted to isolate and identify PGPRs associated with maize (Zea mays L.) from twenty sites of Himalayan region of Hajira-Rawalakot, Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), Pakistan. A total of 100 isolates were isolated from these sites, out of which eight (HJR1, HJR2, HJR3, HJR4, HJR5, MR6, HJR7, HJR8) were selected in vitro for their plant growth promoting ability (PGPA) including phosphorus solubilization, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production and N2 fixation. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing technique was used for molecular identity and authentication. Isolates were then further tested for their effects on growth and nutrient contents of maize (Z. mays L.) under pouch and pot conditions. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis identified these isolates belong to Pseudomonas and Bacillus genera. The isolates promoted plant growth by solubilizing soil P which ranged between 19.2 and 35.6 μg mL(-1). The isolates HJR1, HJR2, HJR3, and HJR5 showed positive activity in acetylene reduction assay showing their N2-fixation potential. All eight isolates showed the potential to produce IAA in the range of 0.9-5.39 μg mL(-1) and promote plant growth. Results from a subsequent pot experiment indicated PGPRs distinctly increased maize shoot and root length, shoot and root dry weight, root surface area, leaf surface area, shoot and root N and P contents. Among the eight isolates, HR3 showed a marked P-solubilizing activity, plant growth-promoting attributes, and the potential to be developed as a biofertilizers for integrated nutrient management strategies. PMID:25852667

  7. Isolation and Identification of Indigenous Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria from Himalayan Region of Kashmir and their Effect on Improving Growth and Nutrient Contents of Maize (Zea Mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahwish eZahid

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available IIntroduction and exploitation of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR in agro-ecosystems enhance plant-microbes interactions that may affect ecosystems sustainability, agricultural productivity and environmental quality. The present study was conducted to isolate and identify PGPRs associated with maize (Zea mays L. from twenty sites of Himalayan region of Hajira-Rawalakot, Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK, Pakistan. A total of one hundred isolates were isolated from these sites, out of which eight (HJR1, HJR2, HJR3, HJR4, HJR5, MR6, HJR7, HJR8 were selected in vitro for their plant growth promoting ability (PGPA including phosphorus solubilization, indole acetic acid (IAA production and N2 fixation. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing technique was used for molecular identity and authentication. Isolates were then further tested for their effects on growth and nutrient contents of maize (Zea mays L. under pouch and pot conditions. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis identified these isolates belong to Pseudomonas and Bacillus genera. The isolates promoted plant growth by solubilizing soil P which ranged between 19.2 and 35.6 µgmL−1. The isolates HJR1, HJR2, HJR3 and HJR5 showed positive activity in acetylene reduction assay showing their N2-fixation potential. All eight isolates showed the potential to produce IAA in the range of 0.9−5.39 µgmL−1 and promote plant growth. Results from a subsequent pot experiment indicated PGPRs distinctly increased maize shoot and root length, shoot and root dry weight, root surface area, leaf surface area, shoot and root N and P contents. Among the eight isolates, HR3 showed a marked P-solubilizing activity, plant growth-promoting attributes, and the potential to be developed as a biofertilizers for integrated nutrient management strategies

  8. The effects of rare earth elements on the growth and nutrition of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    plant dry weight of mungbean by 44%. In another experiment, it was shown that not only did La and Ce at 0.2 - 5.0 ΩM (0.03 - 0.7 ppm) reduce the growth of mungbean, but also the uptake rates of all nutrients were reduced. For corn, growth was little affected by solution La or Ce concentrations up to 5 μM (0.7 ppm), however, the uptake of Ca was decreased consistent with the known function of REEs as Ca antagonists. The foliar and root applications of REEs did not result in beneficial effects on plant growth; rather, the overwhelming majority of the results demonstrate detrimental effects on plant growth. From these results it is concluded that the REEs are very unlikely to have a role to play in increasing agricultural plant production

  9. Spatial Heterogeneity in Light Supply Affects Intraspecific Competition of a Stoloniferous Clonal Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensit...

  10. Role of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in Growth and Salt Avoidance of Pistachio Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Shamshiri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a greenhouse experiment, plant growth and rates of uptake and root to shoot transport of chloride and sodium were investigated in seedlings of pistachio (Pistacia vera cv. Badami-Riz-Zarand inoculated with Glomus mosseae and exposed for 21 and 42 days with four salinity levels (0.5, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0 dSm-1. Mycorrhizal (+M plants maintained greater root and shoot biomass at all salinity levels compared to non-mycorrhizal (-M plants. In -M plants, salt intensity had no significant effect on shoot dry weight (SDW and leaf dry weight (LDW on each of harvesting dates but root dry weight (RDW showed a significant decrease at the highest salinity level 42 days after the start of salt treatment (DAT in comparison with control (EC of 0.5 dSm-1. In +M plants, SDW was increased with an increase in salt intensity especially in the first harvesting date. The same increase was observed in RDW of +M plants while LDW was not affected by salt stress levels. Rates of uptake and root to shoot transport of Cl- and Na+ were markedly lower in +M than in -M plants leading to decrease in accumulation of them. In conclusion, the study indicates that pistachio tolerance to salt stress is improved by mycorrhizal colonization, although the salinity levels used in this work could not induce biomass reduction in -M pistachio plants, higher levels of salinity should be investigated in order to optimize the effect of this symbiosis.

  11. Effects of nitrogen on development and growth of the leaves of vegetables. 2. Appearance, expansion growth and life span of leaves of leek plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Biemond, H.

    1995-01-01

    In greenhouse pot experiments and field trials, leek cv. Albana plants were supplied with different amounts of N fertilizer at various growth stages. Leaf emergence, expansion, size and senescence were monitored. The rate of leaf appearance was not affected by N treatments and almost constant across experiments at 0.15/day. The rate of leaf expansion and the mature leaf area increased with leaf number, reaching maximum values between leaf numbers 11 and 14 and decreasing with higher leaf numb...

  12. Effects of nitrogen on development and growth of the leaves of vegetables. 1. Appearance, expansion growth and life span of leaves of Brussels sprouts plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Biemond, H.; Vos, J.; Struik, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    In greenhouse pot experiments and field trials, leek cv. Albana plants were supplied with different amounts of N fertilizer at various growth stages. Leaf emergence, expansion, size and senescence were monitored. The rate of leaf appearance was not affected by N treatments and almost constant across experiments at 0.15/day. The rate of leaf expansion and the mature leaf area increased with leaf number, reaching maximum values between leaf numbers 11 and 14 and decreasing with higher leaf numb...

  13. Isolation and identification of indigenous plant growth promoting rhizobacteria from Himalayan region of Kashmir and their effect on improving growth and nutrient contents of maize (Zea mays L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Zahid, Mahwish; Abbasi, M. Kaleem; Hameed, Sohail; Rahim, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and exploitation of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in agro-ecosystems enhance plant–microbes interactions that may affect ecosystems sustainability, agricultural productivity, and environmental quality. The present study was conducted to isolate and identify PGPRs associated with maize (Zea mays L.) from twenty sites of Himalayan region of Hajira-Rawalakot, Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), Pakistan. A total of 100 isolates were isolated from these sites, out of which ei...

  14. Adaptation to altitude affects the senescence response to chilling in the perennial plant Arabis alpina

    OpenAIRE

    Wingler, Astrid; Juvany, Marta; Cuthbert, Caroline; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    In annual plants with determinate growth, sugar accumulation signals high carbon availability once growth has ceased, resulting in senescence-dependent nutrient recycling to the seeds. However, this senescence-inducing effect of sugars is abolished at cold temperature, where sugar accumulation is important for protection. Here, natural variation was exploited to analyse the effect of chilling on interactions between leaf senescence, sugars, and phytohormones in Arabis alpina, a perennial plan...

  15. Relative floral density of an invasive plant affects pollinator foraging behaviour on a native plant

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Marie Iler; Karen Goodell

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between invasive and native plants for pollinators vary from competition to facilitation of pollination of native plants. Theory predicts that relative floral densities should account for some of this variation in outcomes, with facilitation at low floral densities and competition at high floral densities of the invader. We tested this prediction by quantifying pollination and female reproductive success of a native herb, Geranium maculatum, in three experimental arrays that vari...

  16. Characterization of the bioactive metabolites from a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and their exploitation as antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Emrin; Kumar, S Nishanth; Jacob, Jubi; Bommasani, Bhaskara; Lankalapalli, Ravi S; Morang, P; Kumar, B S Dileep

    2015-05-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterial strain, PM 105, isolated from a tea plantation soil from the North Eastern region of India was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa through classical and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene sequencing. Further studies with this strain confirmed broad spectrum antifungal activity against ten human and plant pathogenic fungal pathogens viz. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Candida albicans, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium oxysporum, Pencillium expansum, Rhizoctonia solani, Trichophyton rubrum besides growth-promoting property in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). However, no antibacterial property was exhibited by this strain against the four test bacterial pathogens tested in agar overlay method. The crude bioactive metabolites produced by this strain were isolated with three different solvents that exhibited significant antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting activity. Chloroform extract recorded significant antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting activity. Three major compounds viz. 1-hydroxyphenazine, pyocyanin, and phenazine-1-carboxamide were purified and characterized from crude extracts of this strain by various spectral data. The purified compounds recorded prominent antimicrobial activity but failed to establish the plant growth promotion activity in test crop plants under gnotobiotic conditions. Pyocyanin recorded significant antimicrobial activity, and best activity was recorded against T. rubrum (29 mm), followed by P. expansum (28 mm). These results suggest the use of PM 105 as plant growth-promoting agent in crop plants after successful field trials. PMID:25832181

  17. A soil irrigation method for experimental plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, M. N.; Soran, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    An irrigation method developed in order to ensure periodic wetting of several batches of soil, for experimental plant growth, is proposed. An experimental irrigation installation, intended to perform real-time soil moisturizing, by adding known quantities (preset for a certain batch of soil) of aqueous solutions has been built and tested. The prototype installation comprises six miniature pumps for water dosage, each meant to moisturize a batch of soil. Each pump is actuated from the mains power supply, with zero-crossing synchronization. The administrated quantity of aqueous solution is a multiple of the minimum volume, 0.2±0.01 ml of fluid. Due to its structure, the system allows the administration of different aqueous solutions for each batch of soil. Due to its modular construction the experimental installation can be expanded in order to ensure water disposal over an increased number of soil batches and the method may be suited also for micro irrigation systems.

  18. Differential growth stimulation response of potato towards inoculation with taxonomically diverse plant growth promoting rhizobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir eNaqqash

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhizosphere engineering with beneficial plant growth promoting bacteria offers great promise for sustainable crop yield. Potato is an important food commodity that needs large inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers. To overcome high fertilizer demand (especially nitrogen, five bacteria, i.e. Azospirillum sp.TN10, Agrobacterium sp.TN14, Pseudomonas sp.TN36, Enterobactersp. TN38 and Rhizobium sp. TN42 were isolated from the potato rhizosphere on nitrogen-free malate medium and identified based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Three strains, i.e. TN10, TN38 and TN42, showed nitrogen fixation (92.67-134.54 nmol h-1mg-1protein, while all showed the production of indole acetic acid in the presence and/or absence of L-tryptophan. Azospirillum sp. TN10 produced the highest amount of IAA, as measured by spectrophotometry (312.14 µg mL-1 and HPLC (18.3 µg mL-1. Inoculation with these bacteria under axenic conditions resulted in differential growth responses of potato. Azospirillum sp. TN10 incited the highest increase in potato fresh and dry weight over control plants, along with increased N contents of shoot and roots. All strains were able to colonize and maintain their population densities in the potato rhizosphere for upto 60 days, with Azospirillum sp. and Rhizobium sp. showing the highest survival. Plant root colonization potential was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy of root sections inoculated with Azospirillum sp. TN10. Of the five test strains, Azospirillum sp. TN10 has the greatest potential to increase the growth and nitrogen uptake of potato. Hence, it is suggested as a good candidate for the production of potato biofertilizer for integrated nutrient management with potato.

  19. Selective pressure along a latitudinal gradient affects subindividual variation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Mar; Guitián, José; Guitián, Pablo; Larrinaga, Asier R

    2013-01-01

    Individual plants produce repeated structures such as leaves, flowers or fruits, which, although belonging to the same genotype, are not phenotypically identical. Such subindividual variation reflects the potential of individual genotypes to vary with micro-environmental conditions. Furthermore, variation in organ traits imposes costs to foraging animals such as time, energy and increased predation risk. Therefore, animals that interact with plants may respond to this variation and affect plant fitness. Thus, phenotypic variation within an individual plant could be, in part, an adaptive trait. Here we investigated this idea and we found that subindividual variation of fruit size of Crataegus monogyna, in different populations throughout the latitudinal gradient in Europe, was explained at some extent by the selective pressures exerted by seed-dispersing birds. These findings support the hypothesis that within-individual variation in plants is an adaptive trait selected by interacting animals which may have important implications for plant evolution. PMID:24069297

  20. Plant-microbe interactions promoting plant growth and health: perspectives for controlled use of microorganisms in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gabriele

    2009-08-01

    Plant-associated microorganisms fulfill important functions for plant growth and health. Direct plant growth promotion by microbes is based on improved nutrient acquisition and hormonal stimulation. Diverse mechanisms are involved in the suppression of plant pathogens, which is often indirectly connected with plant growth. Whereas members of the bacterial genera Azospirillum and Rhizobium are well-studied examples for plant growth promotion, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, and Streptomyces and the fungal genera Ampelomyces, Coniothyrium, and Trichoderma are model organisms to demonstrate influence on plant health. Based on these beneficial plant-microbe interactions, it is possible to develop microbial inoculants for use in agricultural biotechnology. Dependent on their mode of action and effects, these products can be used as biofertilizers, plant strengtheners, phytostimulators, and biopesticides. There is a strong growing market for microbial inoculants worldwide with an annual growth rate of approximately 10%. The use of genomic technologies leads to products with more predictable and consistent effects. The future success of the biological control industry will benefit from interdisciplinary research, e.g., on mass production, formulation, interactions, and signaling with the environment, as well as on innovative business management, product marketing, and education. Altogether, the use of microorganisms and the exploitation of beneficial plant-microbe interactions offer promising and environmentally friendly strategies for conventional and organic agriculture worldwide. PMID:19568745

  1. Corn Response as Affected by Planting Distance from the Center of Strip-Till Fertilized Rows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adee, Eric; Hansel, Fernando D; Ruiz Diaz, Dorivar A; Janssen, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Strip-till has been used at a large scale in east central Kansas as an alternative to earlier planting dates under a no-till system. To determine the effects of planting corn (Zea mays) under previously established strip-tilled fertilized rows, experiments were conducted on an Osage silty clay loam soil in 2006 and 2008 and on a Woodson silt loam soil in 2009, 2010, and 2011 using three different planting distances from the strip-tilled fertilized rows (0, 10, 20, and 38 cm) with a strip-till operation performed between 1 and 73 days before planting. The depth of the strip-till fertilizer application was 13-15 cm below the soil surface. Corn that was planted 10 cm from the fertilized row showed greater early season growth, higher plant population, and grain yield. Planting 20 and 38 cm from the center of the fertilized rows showed none of the benefits that are typically associated with strip-tillage system. Enough time should be allowed between the strip-till operation and planting to reach satisfactory soil conditions (e.g., moist and firm seedbed). Our results suggest that the best location for planting strip-tilled fertilized corn vary depending on soil and climatic conditions as well as the time between fertilizer application with the strip-till operation and planting. With fewer number of days, planting directly on the center of fertilized strip-till resulted in decreased plant population and lower grain yield. However, the greatest yield benefit across different planting conditions was attained when planting within 10 cm of the strip. PMID:27588024

  2. Relatedness among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi drives plant growth and intraspecific fungal coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Aurélien; Colard, Alexandre; Angelard, Caroline; Sanders, Ian R

    2013-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with most plant species. They are ecologically important determinants of plant growth and diversity. Considerable genetic variation occurs in AMF populations. Thus, plants are exposed to AMF of varying relatedness to each other. Very little is known about either the effects of coexisting AMF on plant growth or which factors influence intraspecific AMF coexistence within roots. No studies have addressed whether the genetics of coexisting AMF, and more specifically their relatedness, influences plant growth and AMF coexistence. Relatedness is expected to influence coexistence between individuals, and it has been suggested that decreasing ability of symbionts to coexist can have negative effects on the growth of the host. We tested the effect of a gradient of AMF genetic relatedness on the growth of two plant species. Increasing relatedness between AMFs lead to markedly greater plant growth (27% biomass increase with closely related compared to distantly related AMF). In one plant species, closely related AMF coexisted in fairly equal proportions but decreasing relatedness lead to a very strong disequilibrium between AMF in roots, indicating much stronger competition. Given the strength of the effects with such a shallow relatedness gradient and the fact that in the field plants are exposed to a steeper gradient, we consider that AMF relatedness can have a strong role in plant growth and the ability of AMF to coexist. We conclude that AMF relatedness is a driver of plant growth and that relatedness is also a strong driver of intraspecific coexistence of these ecologically important symbionts. PMID:23823490

  3. A chloroplast-localized protein LESION AND LAMINA BENDING affects defence and growth responses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiru, Muluneh; Takagi, Hiroki; Abe, Akira; Yokota, Takao; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Haruko; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fujisaki, Koki; Oikawa, Kaori; Uemura, Aiko; Natsume, Satoshi; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Umemura, Kenji; Terry, Matthew J; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how plants allocate their resources to growth or defence is of long-term importance to the development of new and improved varieties of different crops. Using molecular genetics, plant physiology, hormone analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)-based transcript profiling, we have isolated and characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) LESION AND LAMINA BENDING (LLB) gene that encodes a chloroplast-targeted putative leucine carboxyl methyltransferase. Loss of LLB function results in reduced growth and yield, hypersensitive response (HR)-like lesions, accumulation of the antimicrobial compounds momilactones and phytocassanes, and constitutive expression of pathogenesis-related genes. Consistent with these defence-associated responses, llb shows enhanced resistance to rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) and bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae). The lesion and resistance phenotypes are likely to be caused by the over-accumulation of jasmonates (JAs) in the llb mutant including the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. Additionally, llb shows an increased lamina inclination and enhanced early seedling growth due to elevated brassinosteroid (BR) synthesis and/or signalling. These findings show that LLB functions in the chloroplast to either directly or indirectly repress both JA- and BR-mediated responses, revealing a possible mechanism for controlling how plants allocate resources for defence and growth. PMID:26864209

  4. Silicon alleviates the adverse effects of salinity and drought stress on growth and endogenous plant growth hormones of soybean (glycine max L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agricultural industry is subjected to enormous environmental constraints, particularly due to salinity and drought. We evaluated the role of silicon (Si) in alleviating salinity and drought induced physio-hormonal changes in soybean grown in perlite. The plant growth attributes i.e., shoot length, plant fresh weight and dry weight parameters of soybean improved with elevated Si nutrition, while they decreased with NaCl and polyethylene glycol (PEG) application. The adverse effects of NaCl and PEG on plant growth were alleviated by adding 100 mg L/sup -1/ and 200 mg L/sup -1/ Si to salt and drought stressed treatments. It was observed that Si effectively mitigated the adverse effects of NaCl on soybean than that of PEG. The chlorophyll contents were found to be least affected as an insignificant increase was observed with Si application. Bioactive GA1 and GA4 contents of soybean leaves increased, when Si was added to control or stressed plants. Jasmonic acid (JA) contents sharply increased under salinity and drought stress but declined when the plants were supplemented with Si. Similarly, free salicylic acid (SA) level also increased with NaCl and PEG application. However, free SA level further increased with the addition of Si to salt treated plants, but decreased when Si was given to PEG treated plants. It was concluded that Si improves physio-hormonal attributes of soybean and mitigate adverse effects of salt and drought stress. (author)

  5. The Salicylic Acid-Mediated Release of Plant Volatiles Affects the Host Choice of Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaobin; Chen, Gong; Tian, Lixia; Peng, Zhengke; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) causes serious crop losses worldwide by transmitting viruses. We have previously shown that salicylic acid (SA)-related plant defenses directly affect whiteflies. In this study, we applied exogenous SA to tomato plants in order to investigate the interaction between SA-induced plant volatiles and nonviruliferous B. tabaci B and Q or B- and Q-carrying tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The results showed that exogenous SA caused plants to repel nonviruliferous whiteflies, but the effect was reduced when the SA concentration was low and when the whiteflies were viruliferous. Exogenous SA increased the number and quantity of plant volatiles-especially the quantity of methyl salicylate and δ-limonene. In Y-tube olfactometer assays, methyl salicylate and δ-limonene repelled the whiteflies, but the repellency was reduced for viruliferous Q. We suggest that the release of plant volatiles as mediated by SA affects the interaction between whiteflies, plants, and viruses. Further studies are needed to determine why viruliferous Q is less sensitive than nonviruliferous Q to repellent plant volatiles. PMID:27376280

  6. Activity screening of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from alfalfa rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    shahla pashapour; Hossein besharati; Mahmoud rezazadeh; Ahmad Alimadadi; Nadergholi Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Some rhizobacteria by various mechanisms influence plant growth as they are called plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Scientists identified some PGPR characters involved in promoting plant growth, while all these characters are not able to study. The aim of this study was to evaluate PGP activities of bacterial isolates, (45 isolates belonged to rhizobium and 2 bacterial isolates belonged to Pseudomonas fluorescens), which were isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa) r...

  7. Influence Of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (pgpr) On Thegrowth Of Maize (zea Mays L.)

    OpenAIRE

    T. Sheela; Usharani

    2013-01-01

    Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial bacteria that colonize plant roots and enhance plant growth by wide variety of mechanism these includes direct and indirect mechanisms like phosphate solubilization, phytohormone production, antifungal activity, etc. The bacteria, were successfully isolated and characterized by morphological and biochemical methods as P. polymyxa. Subsequently to investigate the effect of PGPR isolates on the growth of maize (zea mays L.), a pot cultu...

  8. The biotoxicity of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles to the plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mung bean sprouts were first used as the experimental model to research the cytotoxicity of the HAP nanomaterials. • The biotoxicity depends on the concentration and particle size of HAP nanomaterials. • The biotoxicity mechanism of HAP nanomaterials was discussed. - Abstract: In the present study, hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles of different particle sizes with high crystallinity and similiar structure were prepared by hydrothermal method. The crystal structure and particle size were characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Mung bean sprouts were first used as experimental models. Instead of by MTT assay, the cytoxicity of HAP nanoparticles were proved and evaluated by measuring the hypocotyle length of mung bean sprouts in the culture media. The result showed that the inhibition effect to the growth of mung bean sprouts enhanced when HAP nanoparticles existed. Culture media of HAP nanoparticles with different concentrations and particle sizes was prepared to investigate the level of inhibition effect to the growth of mung bean sprouts. The result found that hypocotyl length of mung bean sprouts were the shortest cultured in 5 mg/mL culture media in which the HAP nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method for 24 h. It was concluded the inhibition effect depended on the amount of intracellular HAP nanoparticles. The nanostructure and Ca2+ concentration were considered as the main factors to cause cell apoptosis which was the reason of inhibition. The study provided a preliminary perspective about biotoxicity of HAP nanomaterials to the plant growth

  9. Antiphase light and temperature cycles disrupt rhythmic plant growth : the Arabidopsis jetlag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bours, R.M.E.H.

    2014-01-01

      Light and temperature are important determinants of plant growth and development. Plant elongation is stimulated by positively increasing differences between day and night temperature (+DIF, phased cycles). In contrast, a negative temperature difference (-DIF, antiphased cycles) reduces

  10. PRODUCTION OF PLANT GROWTH PROMOTING SUBSTANCES IN BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM THE SEAGRASS RHIZOSPHERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants and rhizosphere bacteria have evolved chemical signals that enable their mutual growth. These relationships have been well investigated with agriculturally important plants, but not in seagrasses, which are important to the stability of estuaries. Seagrasses are rooted in ...

  11. Volatiles produced by soil-borne endophytic bacteria increase plant pathogen resistance and affect tritrophic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Marco; Erb, Matthias; Ton, Jurriaan; Brandenburg, Anna; Karlen, Danielle; Zopfi, Jakob; Turlings, Ted C J

    2014-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by soil microorganisms influence plant growth and pathogen resistance. Yet, very little is known about their influence on herbivores and higher trophic levels. We studied the origin and role of a major bacterial VOC, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), on plant growth, pathogen and herbivore resistance, and the attraction of natural enemies in maize. One of the major contributors to 2,3-BD in the headspace of soil-grown maize seedlings was identified as Enterobacter aerogenes, an endophytic bacterium that colonizes the plants. The production of 2,3-BD by E. aerogenes rendered maize plants more resistant against the Northern corn leaf blight fungus Setosphaeria turcica. On the contrary, E. aerogenes-inoculated plants were less resistant against the caterpillar Spodoptera littoralis. The effect of 2,3-BD on the attraction of the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris was more variable: 2,3-BD application to the headspace of the plants had no effect on the parasitoids, but application to the soil increased parasitoid attraction. Furthermore, inoculation of seeds with E. aerogenes decreased plant attractiveness, whereas inoculation of soil with a total extract of soil microbes increased parasitoid attraction, suggesting that the effect of 2,3-BD on the parasitoid is indirect and depends on the composition of the microbial community. PMID:24127750

  12. Changes in the salinity tolerance of sweet pepper plants as affected by nitrogen form and high CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, María C; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    The assimilation and availability of nitrogen in its different forms can significantly affect the response of primary productivity under the current atmospheric alteration and soil degradation. An elevated CO2 concentration (e[CO2]) triggers changes in the efficiency and efficacy of photosynthetic processes, water use and product yield, the plant response to stress being altered with respect to ambient CO2 conditions (a[CO2]). Additionally, NH4(+) has been related to improved plant responses to stress, considering both energy efficiency in N-assimilation and the overcoming of the inhibition of photorespiration at e[CO2]. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the response of sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) receiving an additional supply of NH4(+) (90/10 NO3(-)/NH4(+)) to salinity stress (60mM NaCl) under a[CO2] (400μmolmol(-1)) or e[CO2] (800μmolmol(-1)). Salt-stressed plants grown at e[CO2] showed DW accumulation similar to that of the non-stressed plants at a[CO2]. The supply of NH4(+) reduced growth at e[CO2] when salinity was imposed. Moreover, NH4(+) differentially affected the stomatal conductance and water use efficiency and the leaf Cl(-), K(+), and Na(+) concentrations, but the extent of the effects was influenced by the [CO2]. An antioxidant-related response was prompted by salinity, the total phenolics and proline concentrations being reduced by NH4(+) at e[CO2]. Our results show that the effect of NH4(+) on plant salinity tolerance should be globally re-evaluated as e[CO2] can significantly alter the response, when compared with previous studies at a[CO2]. PMID:27317970

  13. Microflora inside closed modules with plant growth facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyablova, Natalya V.; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Shanturin, Nikolai; Deshevaya, Elena; Smolyanina, Svetlana O.

    Currently, plant growth facility (PGF) is included in the LSS in many scenarios of Martian expedition. A number of investigators assume growing of crops can accelerate microflora re-production in closed ecological system. To estimate experimentally the change of density of microbiological community in the isolated module, Chinese cabbage Brassica hinensis L., cv. Vesnyanka, has been grown in the closed climatic chambers in volume 0.07 m3, 3 m3 and 250 m3 under continuous illumination in the range of values of temperature and relative humidity of air 23 -270 and 30 -60%, respectively. There were no differences in growth and develop-ment of plants grown during 30 days on the test-beds in the laboratory room (control) and in the closed chamber by 0.07 m3 volume (test). The microbiological analysis of root zone has revealed the presence of exclusively saprophytic species -the typical representatives of the soil microbiota. Then the plants were growing during 45 days in the prototype of the conveyor space PGF "Phytocycle LED" placed inside the chamber of 3 m3 volume. Every 3 days 50 -60 cm3 of liquid imitator of air condensate (IAC) from inhabited module had been injected to the chamber to simulate air pollution. The content of colony-forming units of the micromycetes in the air of the chamber, on the inner surfaces of the climate chamber, internal and external surfaces of the PGF and the leaves did not exceed the permissible values. When the PGF has been installed during 14 days inside the inhabited module with volume of 250 m3, the representatives of saprophytic and conditioned-pathogenic species of micromycetes (Trichethe-cium rozeum, Trichoderma sp., Fuzarrium sp., Mucor sp., Penicillium sp.) have been found out exclusively on the open surfaces of artificial soil and water-saturated porous passage. The obtained data shows that PGF inside closed modules can assure microbiological safety when all wet surfaces are isolated from the gas environment.

  14. Remediation and restoration of contaminated soils for plant growth and establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    Degradation and contamination of soils is a serious issue, affecting soil and water quality, human health, and plant health and productivity. Degradation of soils can result in the mobilisation of high concentrations of trace metals as a function of both anthropogenic activities which can also be exacerbated by natural processes. Sulfidic sediments frequently underlie coastal floodplains globally. Oxidation of sulfidic sediments can result in the formation of acid sulfate soils and acidification and mobilisation of associated trace metals in soils, sediments and water. The geochemical processes which occur in these environments can be similar to those in acid mine drainage environments. For example, oxidation of sulfides following surface mining for coal can also result in low pH and high concentrations of trace metals in waste material. Remediation and restoration of such sites for plant growth and establishment can be challenging due to the geochemical characteristics of the soils and sediments. Remediation of oxidised sulfidic sediments on coastal floodplains and mine sites both require an increase in soil pH via incorporation of alkaline materials, and addition of nutrients via organic amendments. This paper presents the findings from two case studies on the remediation of contaminated acidic environments on i) a coastal floodplain, and ii) a coal mine site. We found that addition of lime and organic material increased pH and decreased trace metal concentrations in the coastal floodplain sediments. Organic carbon increased due to the incorporation of additional organic material and increased plant growth. Similarly, pH decreased and trace metal concentrations in leachate also decreased following additions of alkaline wood chip waste and compost in the mine site rehabilitation trials. Plant growth increased with increasing volumes of compost addition. These results, and those presented in SSS8.3 highlight the importance of appropriate ameliorants in the

  15. Disease resistance or growth: the role of plant hormones in balancing immune responses and fitness costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denance, N.; Sanchez Vallet, A.; Goffner, D.; Molina, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth and response to environmental cues are largely governed by phytohormones. The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) play a central role in the regulation of plant immune responses. In addition, other plant hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid (ABA), cytokini

  16. Cytokinins as key regulators in plant–microbe–insect interactions: connecting plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giron, D.; Frago, E.; Glevarec, G.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Dicke, M.

    2013-01-01

    1. Plant hormones play important roles in regulating plant growth and defence by mediating developmental processes and signalling networks involved in plant responses to a wide range of parasitic and mutualistic biotic interactions. 2. Plants are known to rapidly respond to pathogen and herbivore at

  17. Induction of Drought Tolerance in Cucumber Plants by a Consortium of Three Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Juan Wang; Wei Yang; Chao Wang; Chun Gu; Dong-Dong Niu; Hong-Xia Liu; Yun-Peng Wang; Jian-Hua Guo

    2012-01-01

    Our previous work showed that a consortium of three plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) strains (Bacillus cereus AR156, Bacillus subtilis SM21, and Serratia sp. XY21), termed as BBS for short, was a promising biocontrol agent. The present study investigated its effect on drought tolerance in cucumber plants. After withholding watering for 13 days, BBS-treated cucumber plants had much darker green leaves and substantially lighter wilt symptoms than control plants. Compared to the cont...

  18. Effects of six selected antibiotics on plant growth and soil microbial and enzymatic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential impact of six antibiotics (chlortetracycline, tetracycline and tylosin; sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethazine and trimethoprim) on plant growth and soil quality was studied by using seed germination test on filter paper and plant growth test in soil, soil respiration and phosphatase activity tests. The phytotoxic effects varied between the antibiotics and between plant species (sweet oat, rice and cucumber). Rice was most sensitive to sulfamethoxazole with the EC10 value of 0.1 mg/L. The antibiotics tested inhibited soil phosphatase activity during the 22 days' incubation. Significant effects on soil respiration were found for the two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethazine) and trimethoprim, whereas little effects were observed for the two tetracyclines and tylosin. The effective concentrations (EC10 values) for soil respiration in the first 2 days were 7 mg/kg for sulfamethoxazole, 13 mg/kg for sulfamethazine and 20 mg/kg for trimethoprim. Antibiotic residues in manure and soils may affect soil microbial and enzyme activities. - Terrestrial ecotoxicological effects of antibiotics are related to their sorption and degradation behavior in soil.

  19. Effects of six selected antibiotics on plant growth and soil microbial and enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Feng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guangguo.ying@gmail.co [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tao Ran; Zhao Jianliang; Yang Jifeng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhao Lanfeng [College of Resource and Environmental Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2009-05-15

    The potential impact of six antibiotics (chlortetracycline, tetracycline and tylosin; sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethazine and trimethoprim) on plant growth and soil quality was studied by using seed germination test on filter paper and plant growth test in soil, soil respiration and phosphatase activity tests. The phytotoxic effects varied between the antibiotics and between plant species (sweet oat, rice and cucumber). Rice was most sensitive to sulfamethoxazole with the EC10 value of 0.1 mg/L. The antibiotics tested inhibited soil phosphatase activity during the 22 days' incubation. Significant effects on soil respiration were found for the two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethazine) and trimethoprim, whereas little effects were observed for the two tetracyclines and tylosin. The effective concentrations (EC10 values) for soil respiration in the first 2 days were 7 mg/kg for sulfamethoxazole, 13 mg/kg for sulfamethazine and 20 mg/kg for trimethoprim. Antibiotic residues in manure and soils may affect soil microbial and enzyme activities. - Terrestrial ecotoxicological effects of antibiotics are related to their sorption and degradation behavior in soil.

  20. Glucosinolates from Host Plants Influence Growth of the Parasitic Plant Cuscuta gronovii and Its Susceptibility to Aphid Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason D; Woldemariam, Melkamu G; Mescher, Mark C; Jander, Georg; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2016-09-01

    Parasitic plants acquire diverse secondary metabolites from their hosts, including defense compounds that target insect herbivores. However, the ecological implications of this phenomenon, including the potential enhancement of parasite defenses, remain largely unexplored. We studied the translocation of glucosinolates from the brassicaceous host plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) into parasitic dodder vines (Convolvulaceae; Cuscuta gronovii) and its effects on the parasite itself and on dodder-aphid interactions. Aliphatic and indole glucosinolates reached concentrations in parasite tissues higher than those observed in corresponding host tissues. Dodder growth was enhanced on cyp79B2 cyp79B3 hosts (without indole glucosinolates) but inhibited on atr1D hosts (with elevated indole glucosinolates) relative to wild-type hosts, which responded to parasitism with localized elevation of indole and aliphatic glucosinolates. These findings implicate indole glucosinolates in defense against parasitic plants. Rates of settling and survival on dodder vines by pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) were reduced significantly when dodder parasitized glucosinolate-producing hosts (wild type and atr1D) compared with glucosinolate-free hosts (cyp79B2 cyp79B3 myb28 myb29). However, settling and survival of green peach aphids (Myzus persicae) were not affected. M. persicae population growth was actually reduced on dodder parasitizing glucosinolate-free hosts compared with wild-type or atr1D hosts, even though stems of the former contain less glucosinolates and more amino acids. Strikingly, this effect was reversed when the aphids fed directly upon Arabidopsis, which indicates an interactive effect of parasite and host genotype on M. persicae that stems from host effects on dodder. Thus, our findings indicate that glucosinolates may have both direct and indirect effects on dodder-feeding herbivores. PMID:27482077

  1. Diversity, Biocontrol, and Plant Growth Promoting Abilities of Xylem Residing Bacteria from Solanaceous Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri A. Achari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eggplant (Solanum melongena L. is one of the solanaceous crops of economic and cultural importance and is widely cultivated in the state of Goa, India. Eggplant cultivation is severely affected by bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum that colonizes the xylem tissue. In this study, 167 bacteria were isolated from the xylem of healthy eggplant, chilli, and Solanum torvum Sw. by vacuum infiltration and maceration. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA grouped these xylem residing bacteria (XRB into 38 haplotypes. Twenty-eight strains inhibited growth of R. solanacearum and produced volatile and diffusible antagonistic compounds and plant growth promoting substances in vitro. Antagonistic strains XB86, XB169, XB177, and XB200 recorded a biocontrol efficacy greater than 85% against BW and exhibited 12%–22 % increase in shoot length in eggplant in the greenhouse screening. 16S rRNA based identification revealed the presence of 23 different bacterial genera. XRB with high biocontrol and plant growth promoting activities were identified as strains of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Enterobacter sp., and Agrobacterium sp. This study is the first report on identity of bacteria from the xylem of solanaceous crops having traits useful in cultivation of eggplant.

  2. Diversity, biocontrol, and plant growth promoting abilities of xylem residing bacteria from solanaceous crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achari, Gauri A; Ramesh, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is one of the solanaceous crops of economic and cultural importance and is widely cultivated in the state of Goa, India. Eggplant cultivation is severely affected by bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum that colonizes the xylem tissue. In this study, 167 bacteria were isolated from the xylem of healthy eggplant, chilli, and Solanum torvum Sw. by vacuum infiltration and maceration. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) grouped these xylem residing bacteria (XRB) into 38 haplotypes. Twenty-eight strains inhibited growth of R. solanacearum and produced volatile and diffusible antagonistic compounds and plant growth promoting substances in vitro. Antagonistic strains XB86, XB169, XB177, and XB200 recorded a biocontrol efficacy greater than 85% against BW and exhibited 12%-22 % increase in shoot length in eggplant in the greenhouse screening. 16S rRNA based identification revealed the presence of 23 different bacterial genera. XRB with high biocontrol and plant growth promoting activities were identified as strains of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Enterobacter sp., and Agrobacterium sp. This study is the first report on identity of bacteria from the xylem of solanaceous crops having traits useful in cultivation of eggplant. PMID:24963298

  3. Interspecific differences in growth response and tolerance to the antibiotic sulfadiazine in ten clonal wetland plants in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinfeng; Xu, Huilian; Sun, Yingbo; Huang, Lili; Zhang, Peixia; Zou, Chunping; Yu, Bo; Zhu, Genfa; Zhao, Chaoyi

    2016-02-01

    Pollution caused by residual antibiotics is a worldwide environmental issue. Antibiotic residues often occur in aquatic ecosystems, posing threats to the health of aquatic organisms. The effects of antibiotic residues on the growth of crop plants and on human health are reasonably well known. However, less is known about antibiotic effects on wetland plants. Therefore, we studied the response and tolerance of ten clonal wetland plants grown in soil spiked with sulfadiazine at 10 mg kg(-1) (an environmentally relevant concentration) and 100 mg kg(-1). At 10 mg kg(-1), ramet number was the least affected trait, while root number was the most affected among plant species. Plant shoot and total biomass were reduced in all species except in Cyperus malaccensis var. brevifolius and Panicum repens. Chlorophyll content was reduced in Alocasia macrorrhiza, Saururus chinensis, and Commelina diffusa. In general, Panicum paludosum and C. malaccensis var. brevifolius showed the least reduction of growth parameters, whereas growth of both A. macrorrhiza and S. chinensis was severely reduced. At 100 mg kg(-1), negative responses occurred in all species. Comprehensive tolerance analysis revealed that P. paludosum and C. malaccensis var. brevifolius were the species most resistant to sulfadiazine. These species are potential candidates for sulfadiazine polluted wetland restoration. A. macrorrhiza and S. chinensis were the most susceptible species and they should be protected from sulfadiazine pollution. Relative plant shoot biomass and height were the most useful indicators for evaluating plant tolerance to sulfadiazine. Plant tolerance to sulfadiazine was associated with the differences of plants in height and shoot biomass. PMID:26580742

  4. Effect of plant growth regulators on indices of growth analysis for sweet passion fruit seedlings (Passiflora alata Curtis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Fernandes Boaro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the effects of GA3 + IBA + cinetina on the growth of Passiflora alata Curtis plants through growth analysis. The experiment was carried out by completely randomized block design, with six treatments and four replications. The plant growth regulators, gibberellin (GA3, auxin (IBA and cytokinin (kinetin, were applied to leaves at concentrations of 0 (control, 25, 50, 75, 100, 125mL.L-1. The applications were performed at 48, 55, 52, 69, and 76 days after the emergence of the plants and the growths were evaluated five times at 7-day intervals. The first evaluations were accomplished 55 days after plant emergence. The leaf area ratio (RAF, specific leaf area (AFE, liquid assimilation rate (TCA, and relative growth rate (TCR were analyzed. The following data were also analyzed for P. alata Curtis plants: leaf area, leaf lamina dry mass and total leaves dry mass. The growth analysis, which employed the ANACRES computer program, indicated that the growth regulators increased plant productivity.

  5. A hyperparasite affects the population dynamics of a wild plant pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Tollenaere, C.; Pernechele, B; Mäkinen, H S; Parratt, S R; Németh, M Z; Kovács, G.M.; Kiss, L.; Tack, A. J. M.; Laine, A-L

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the impact of natural enemies of plant and animal pathogens on their host's population dynamics is needed to determine the role of hyperparasites in affecting disease dynamics, and their potential for use in efficient control strategies of pathogens. Here, we focus on the long-term study describing metapopulation dynamics of an obligate pathogen, the powdery mildew (Podosphaera plantaginis) naturally infecting its wild host plant (Plantago lanceolata) in the fragmented landscape of ...

  6. Selective Pressure along a Latitudinal Gradient Affects Subindividual Variation in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sobral, Mar; Guitián, José; Guitián, Pablo; Larrinaga, Asier R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual plants produce repeated structures such as leaves, flowers or fruits, which, although belonging to the same genotype, are not phenotypically identical. Such subindividual variation reflects the potential of individual genotypes to vary with micro-environmental conditions. Furthermore, variation in organ traits imposes costs to foraging animals such as time, energy and increased predation risk. Therefore, animals that interact with plants may respond to this variation and affect pla...

  7. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR): Their potential as antagonists and biocontrol agents

    OpenAIRE

    Anelise Beneduzi; Adriana Ambrosini; Luciana M.P. Passaglia

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria that colonize plant roots and promote plant growth are referred to as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). PGPR are highly diverse and in this review we focus on rhizobacteria as biocontrol agents. Their effects can occur via local antagonism to soil-borne pathogens or by induction of systemic resistance against pathogens throughout the entire plant. Several substances produced by antagonistic rhizobacteria have been related to pathogen control and indirect promotion of growt...

  8. Radiation Processed Carrageenan Improves Plant Growth, Physiological Activities, and Alkaloids Production in Catharanthus roseus L.

    OpenAIRE

    Naeem, M.; Mohd Idrees; Tariq Aftab; M. Masidur Alam; Khan, M. Masroor A.; Moin Uddin; Lalit Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (Apocynaceae) is a medicinal plant that produces indole alkaloids used in cancer chemotherapy. Commercially important antineoplastic alkaloids, namely, vinblastine and vincristine, are mainly present in the leaves of C. roseus. Gamma-rays irradiated carrageenan (ICR) has been proven as plant growth promoting substance for a number of medicinal and agricultural plants. Considering the importance of ICR as a promoter of plant growth and alkaloids production in C....

  9. Relatedness among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi drives plant growth and intraspecific fungal coexistence

    OpenAIRE

    Roger, Aurélien; Colard, Alexandre; Angelard, Caroline; Sanders, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with most plant species. They are ecologically important determinants of plant growth and diversity. Considerable genetic variation occurs in AMF populations. Thus, plants are exposed to AMF of varying relatedness to each other. Very little is known about either the effects of coexisting AMF on plant growth or which factors influence intraspecific AMF coexistence within roots. No studies have addressed whether the genetics of coexisting AMF, a...

  10. Effect of seaweed extracts on growth and yield of rice plants

    OpenAIRE

    ALUH NIKMATULLAH; NUR INDAH JULISANIAH; RINA KURNIANINGSIH; AHMAD JUPRI; SUNARPI

    2010-01-01

    Sunarpi, Jupri A, Kurnianingsih R, Julisaniah NI, Nikmatullah A 2010. Effect of seaweed extracts on growth and yield of rice plants. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 73-77. Application of liquid seaweed fertilizers on some plant specieshas been reported to decrease application doses of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on some crop plants, as well as stimulating growth and production of many plants. It has been reported that there are at least 59 species of seaweeds found in coastal zone of West Nusa...

  11. Efficacy of some plant extracts on the mycelial growth of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, A.; Khandker, S.; Islam, M. R.; Shahid, Sonia B.

    2011-01-01

    The anti fungal effects of some plants extracts namely tobacco leaf, keora seed, keora, mahogoni, gaint indian milky weed, garlic and ginger at different concentrations (30%, 40%, 50%, 60% and 70%) on the growth and development of C. gloeosporioides, causal agent of anthracnose of mango were evaluated. Radial growth of C. gloeosporioides was recorded. The growth inhibition increase with the increase of concentration of all the plant extracts. Highest mycelial growth inhibition (74.35%) was ob...

  12. Nitrogen doses on the initial growth and nutrition of guanandi plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Ciriello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of nitrogen doses on the initial development and nutrition of Guanandi (Calophyllum brasiliense Cambèss plants, a native Brazilian arboreal species. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse, in plastic containers with capacity of 50 L of dystrophic red Latosol (oxisol. The experimental design used was completely randomized, with six treatments and four repetitions. The treatments consisted of five N doses: 0, 40, 80, 120 and 160 mg dm-3, and the control (with no fertilization or liming of the soil, where urea was used as the fertilization source. With the exception of the control, all the treatments received liming to elevate saturation by bases of soil of 60% and fertilization with 150 mg dm-3 of P2O5, 80 mg dm-3 of K2O. There were monthly analysis of the plant's height and diameter of the connecting point of root and stem of the plant and at its 10 months age were also analyzed the leaves, stems, roots and total dry mass, the foliar area and the chemical analysis of leaves and stems. The N doses significantly affected the height, foliar area, stem and foliar dry mass data, observing a quadratic effect. The diameter and root dry mass data were affected on a negative linear way. The best growth response was obtained with the 40mg dm-3 N dose.

  13. Plant natriuretic peptides: Systemic regulators of plant homeostasis and defense that can affect cardiomyoblasts

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A

    2010-09-01

    Immunologic evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptide (NPs) hormones in plants because antiatrial NP antibodies affinity purify biologically active plant NPs (PNP). In the model plant, an Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) has been identified and characterized. AtPNP-A belongs to a novel class of molecules that share some similarity with the cell wall loosening expansins but do not contain the carbohydrate-binding wall anchor thus suggesting that PNPs and atrial natriuretic peptides are heterologs. AtPNP-A acts systemically, and this is consistent with its localization in the apoplastic extracellular space and the conductive tissue. Furthermore, AtPNP-A signals via the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate and modulates ion and water transport and homeostasis. It also plays a critical role in host defense against pathogens. AtPNP-A can be classified as novel paracrine plant hormone because it is secreted into the apoplastic space in response to stress and can enhance its own expression. Interestingly, purified recombinant PNP induces apo-ptosis in a dose-dependent manner and was most effective on cardiac myoblast cell lines. Because PNP is mimicking the effect of ANP in some instances, PNP may prove to provide useful leads for development of novel therapeutic NPs. Copyright © 2013 by The American Federation for Medical Research.

  14. Accumulation of heavy metals in sunflower and sorghum plants affected by the Guadiamar spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, J M; Marañón, T; Cabrera, F; López, R

    1999-12-01

    The collapse of a pyrite-mining, tailing dam on 25 April 1998 contaminated approximately 2000 ha of croplands along the Agrio and Guadiamar river valleys in southern Spain. This paper reports the accumulation of chemical elements in soil and in two crops--sunflower and sorghum--affected by the spill. Total concentrations of As, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn in spill-affected soils were greater than in adjacent, unaffected soils. Leaves of spill-affected crop plants had higher nutrient (K, Ca and Mg for sunflower and N and K for sorghum) concentrations than controls, indicating a 'fertilising' effect caused by the sludge. Seeds of spill-affected sunflower plants did accumulate more As, Cd, Cu and Zn than controls, but values were below toxic levels. Leaves of sorghum plants accumulated more As, Bi, Cd, Mn, Pb, Tl and Zn than controls, but these values were also below toxic levels for livestock consumption. In general, none of the heavy metals studied in both crops reached either phytotoxic or toxic levels for humans or livestock. Nevertheless, a continuous monitoring of heavy metal accumulation in soil and plants must be established in the spill-affected area. PMID:10635586

  15. Calcium Addition Affects Germination and Early Seedling Growth of Sweet Sorghum under Saline Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to determine the interactive effects of supple- mental Ca amendment and salinity on germination of sweet sorghum seeds in saline solution culture medium, and investigate the effects of different combinations of Na/Ca ratio in saline soils on the early growth of sweet sorghum plants. [Method] A germi- nation test and a greenhouse pot experiment were conducted to assess the interac- tive effects of calcium addition to culture medium on the germination and seedling growth of sweet sorghum (Sorghum saccharatum Moench) in saline soils with a range of NaYCa ratios. In the germination test, seeds were treated with different combinations of five calcium levels [0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mmol/L Ca(NO3)2] and five salinity levels (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 mmol/L NaCI). In the greenhouse experi- ment, seeds were sown in potting soils containing 3 salinity levels (2.3, 4.7 and 7.0 dS/m) and three Na:Ca ratios (10:0, 10:1, and 5:1). [Result] In the germination test, Ca addition at 5 mmol/L promoted germination by 5.5%, 9.9%, and 17.0% at the 3.4, 6.7 and 10.1 dS/m salinity levels. The higher Ca level (10 mmol/L) also in- creased germination by 9.1% and 7.8% at the 3.4 and 6.7 dS/m salinity levels. Then even higher Ca addition at 15 and 20 mmol/L appeared to promote germina- tion when culture media had high salinity (10.1 and 13.4 dS/m). In the greenhouse pot experiment, saline soil amended with supplemental Ca at the 2.3 and 4.7 dS/m salinity levels significantly promoted early seedling growth, with an increase of 6.8% to 28.2% in plant height and 14.3% to 67.9% in whole plant weight. From 28 to 42 d after seeding, the relative growth of seedling was increased by Ca addition, with a reduction of 49.5% to 66.0% in plant height and 4.8% to 61.9% in whole plant weight. From 42 to 56 d after seeding, however, the relative growth of seedling was significantly inhibited by Ca amendment. [Conclusion] Results of this study indicate that appropriate supplemental

  16. Nuclear power plant life extension: How aging affects performance of containments & other structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert A Dameron; Sun Junling

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on how aging can affect performance of safety-related structures in nuclear power plant (NPP).Knowledge and assessment of impacts of aging on structures are essential to plant life extension analysis,especially performance to severe loadings such as loss-of-coolant-accidents or major seismic events.Plant life extension issues are of keen interest in countries (like the United States) which have a large,aging fleet of NPPs.This paper addresses the overlap and relationship of structure aging to severe loading performance,with particular emphasis on containment structures.

  17. Effect of plant growth-promoting bacteria on the growth and fructan production of Agave americana L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre-Ruiz, Neyser; Ruiz-Valdiviezo, Víctor Manuel; Rincón-Molina, Clara Ivette; Rodríguez-Mendiola, Martha; Arias-Castro, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico Antonio; Palomeque-Dominguez, Héctor; Rincón-Rosales, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    The effect of plant growth-promoting bacteria inoculation on plant growth and the sugar content in Agave americana was assessed. The bacterial strains ACO-34A, ACO-40, and ACO-140, isolated from the A. americana rhizosphere, were selected for this study to evaluate their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The three bacterial strains were evaluated via plant inoculation assays, and Azospirillum brasilense Cd served as a control strain. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene showed that strains ACO-34A, ACO-40 and ACO-140 were Rhizobium daejeonense, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Pseudomonas mosselii, respectively. All of the strains were able to synthesize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), solubilize phosphate, and had nitrogenase activity. Inoculation using the plant growth-promoting bacteria strains had a significant effect (pagave plants with proper biological characteristics for agroindustrial and biotechnological use and to increase the sugar content in this agave species. PMID:27268113

  18. Controlled Cu nanoparticle growth on wrinkle affecting deposition of large scale graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohsin; Uddin, Md Jasim; Rahman, Muhammad Anisur; Kishi, Naoki; Soga, Tetsuo

    2016-09-01

    For Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) grown graphene on Cu substrate, deviation from atomic orientation in crystals may be resulted from diffusion of abnormalities in the form of Cu nanoparticle (NP) formation or defects and affects graphene quality and properties drastically. However, for the uniform graphene deposition, mechanism of nanoparticle formation and its suppression procedure need to be better understood. We report growth of graphene, affected by Cu nanoparticles (NPs) emergence on Cu substrates. In the current study, growth of these nanoparticles has been suppressed by fine tuning of carrier gas by two-fold gas insertion mechanism and hence, quality and uniformity of graphene is significantly improved. It has been also observed that during the deposition by CVD, Cu nanoparticles cluster preferentially on wrinkles or terrace of the Cu surface. Composition of NP is extensively studied and found to be the oxide nanoparticle of Cu. Our result, controlled NP growth affecting deposition of graphene layer would provide useful insight on the growth of uniform and high quality Single layer or bilayer graphene for numerous electronics applications.

  19. Seed storage conditions change the germination pattern of clonal growth plants in Mediterranean salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinar, J.L.; Garcia, L.V.; Clemente, L.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of salinity level and extended exposure to different salinity and flooding conditions on germination patterns of three saltmarsh clonal growth plants (Juncus subulatus, Scirpus litoralis, and S. maritimus) was studied. Seed exposure to extended flooding and saline conditions significantly affected the outcome of the germination process in a different, though predictable, way for each species, after favorable conditions for germination were restored. Tolerance of the germination process was related to the average salinity level measured during the growth/germination season at sites where established individuals of each species dominated the species cover. No relationship was found between salinity tolerance of the germination process and seed response to extended exposure to flooding and salinity conditions. The salinity response was significantly related to the conditions prevailing in the habitats of the respective species during the unfavorable (nongrowth/nongermination) season. Our results indicate that changes in salinity and hydrology while seeds are dormant affect the outcome of the seed-bank response, even when conditions at germination are identical. Because these environmental-history-dependent responses differentially affect seed germination, seedling density, and probably sexual recruitment in the studied and related species, these influences should be considered for wetland restoration and management.

  20. Seed storage conditions change the germination pattern of clonal growth plants in Mediterranean salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinar, José L; García, Luis V; Clemente, Luis

    2005-07-01

    The effect of salinity level and extended exposure to different salinity and flooding conditions on germination patterns of three salt-marsh clonal growth plants (Juncus subulatus, Scirpus litoralis, and S. maritimus) was studied. Seed exposure to extended flooding and saline conditions significantly affected the outcome of the germination process in a different, though predictable, way for each species, after favorable conditions for germination were restored. Tolerance of the germination process was related to the average salinity level measured during the growth/germination season at sites where established individuals of each species dominated the species cover. No relationship was found between salinity tolerance of the germination process and seed response to extended exposure to flooding and salinity conditions. The salinity response was significantly related to the conditions prevailing in the habitats of the respective species during the unfavorable (nongrowth/nongermination) season. Our results indicate that changes in salinity and hydrology while seeds are dormant affect the outcome of the seed-bank response, even when conditions at germination are identical. Because these environmental-history-dependent responses differentially affect seed germination, seedling density, and probably sexual recruitment in the studied and related species, these influences should be considered for wetland restoration and management. PMID:21646131

  1. ESM Calculations for Hydroponic Plant and Fungi Growth Chambers, Biosolids Dewatering Plant System, and Tilapia Growth System--EAC Presentation 2004

    OpenAIRE

    Aydogan, Selen; Blau, Gary; Pekny, Joseph; Reklaitis, Gintaras

    2004-01-01

    In this work, preliminary Equivalent System Mass (ESM) estimations of the Hydroponic Plant and Fungi Growth Chambers, Biosolids Dewatering Plant and Tilapia Growth Systems are presented. ESM may be used to evaluate a system or technology based on its mass, volume, power, cooling and manpower requirements. This ESM analysis focuses on a hypothetical device, instead of the anticipated technology that is system flight proven in mission operations. We have examined the Evolved Mars Base mission, ...

  2. Decoupling factors affecting plant diversity and cover on extensive green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIvor, J Scott; Margolis, Liat; Puncher, Curtis L; Carver Matthews, Benjamin J

    2013-11-30

    Supplemental irrigation systems are often specified on green roofs to ensure plant cover and growth, both important components of green roof performance and aesthetics. Properties of the growing media environment too can alter the assemblage of plant species able to thrive. In this study we determine how plant cover, above ground biomass and species diversity are influenced by irrigation and growing media. Grass and forb vegetative cover and biomass were significantly greater in organic based growing media but there was no effect of supplemental irrigation, with two warm season grasses dominating in those treatments receiving no supplemental irrigation. On the other hand, plant diversity declined without irrigation in organic media, and having no irrigation in inorganic growing media resulted in almost a complete loss of cover. Sedum biomass was less in inorganic growing media treatments and species dominance shifted when growing media organic content increased. Our results demonstrate that supplemental irrigation is required to maintain plant diversity on an extensive green roof, but not necessarily plant cover or biomass. These results provide evidence that planting extensive green roofs with a mix of plant species can ensure the survival of some species; maintaining cover and biomass when supplemental irrigation is turned off to conserve water, or during extreme drought. PMID:24100190

  3. Effects of metal lead on growth and mycorrhizae of an invasive plant species (Solidago canadensis L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ruyi; YU Guodong; TANG Jianjan; CHEN Xin

    2008-01-01

    It is less known whether and how soil metal lead (Pb) impacts the invasion of exotic plants.A greenhouse experiment was conducted to estimate the effects of lead on the growth and mycorrhizae of an invasive species(Solidago canadensis L.)in a microcosm system. Each microcosm unit was separated into HOST and TEST compartments by a replaceable mesh screen that allowed arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae rather than plant roots to grow into the TEST compartments.Three Pb levels(control,300,and 600 mg/kg soil)were used in this study to simulate ambient soil and two pollution sites where S. canadensis grows.Mycorrhizal inoculum comprised five indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species (Glomus mosseae,Glomus versiform,Glomus diaphanum,Glomus geosporum,and Glomus etunicatum).The 15N isotope tracer was used to quantify the mycorrhizally mediated nitrogen acquisition of plants.The results showed that S. canadensis was highly dependent on mvcOrrhizae.The Pb additions significantly decreased biomass and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization(root length colonized,RLC%) but did not affect spore numbers,N(including total N and 15N) and P uptake.The facilitating efficiency of mycorrhizae on nutrient acquisition was promoted by Pb treatments.The Pb was mostly sequestered in belowground of plant (root and rhizome).The results suggest that the high efficiency of mycorrhizae on nutrient uptake mightgive S. canadensis a great advantage over native species in Pb polluted softs.

  4. Effect of olive mill wastewater on growth and bulb production of tulip plants infected by bulb diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Lykas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of olive mill wastewater (OMW on growth of tulip plants infected by common diseases as well as on their new bulbs production is analyzed in this work. Filtered and sterilized OMW was tested as growth inhibitor of Botrytis tulipae, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium spp. mycelium. The effect of filtered OMW on uninfected tulip bulbs was also tested as well as on the growth of bulbs infected with the fungus B. tulipae and A. niger in vivo. The mycelium length, severity of scab-like lesions, plant height (PH, fresh mass (FM and dry mass (DM of plants and production of new bulbs were recorded. Only the filtered OMW inhibited the in vitro mycelium growth of all tested fungi. However filtered OMW caused infections when it sprayed on uninfected bulbs, malformations on 30% of the plants grown from these bulbs and decrease PH, FM and DM as well as new bulbs production at 75%, 72.4%, 79.1% and 50% respectively. The treatment of B. tulipae infected bulbs with filtered OMW reduced further the PH, FM, DM and the production of new bulbs in 92.1%, 81.4%, 78.7% and 97% respectively. In contrast the treatment of infected bulbs by B. tulipae + A. niger with filtered OMW did not affect PH, FM and the number of new bulbs produced and significantly improved plants DM and the mass of new bulbs.

  5. Effect of olive mill wastewater on growth and bulb production of tulip plants infected by bulb diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykas, C.; Vegalas, I.; Gougaulias, N.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of olive mill wastewater (OMW) on growth of tulip plants infected by common diseases as well as on their new bulbs production is analyzed in this work. Filtered and sterilized OMW was tested as growth inhibitor of Botrytis tulipae, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium spp. mycelium. The effect of filtered OMW on uninfected tulip bulbs was also tested as well as on the growth of bulbs infected with the fungus B. tulipae and A. niger in vivo. The mycelium length, severity of scab-like lesions, plant height (PH), fresh mass (FM) and dry mass (DM) of plants and production of new bulbs were recorded. Only the filtered OMW inhibited the in vitro mycelium growth of all tested fungi. However filtered OMW caused infections when it sprayed on uninfected bulbs, malformations on 30% of the plants grown from these bulbs and decrease PH, FM and DM as well as new bulbs production at 75%, 72.4%, 79.1% and 50% respectively. The treatment of B. tulipae infected bulbs with filtered OMW reduced further the PH, FM, DM and the production of new bulbs in 92.1%, 81.4%, 78.7% and 97% respectively. In contrast the treatment of infected bulbs by B. tulipae + A. niger with filtered OMW did not affect PH, FM and the number of new bulbs produced and significantly improved plants DM and the mass of new bulbs. (Author)

  6. Plant growth, development and change in GSH level in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. exposed to copper and lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shufen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of exposure to heavy metals, copper (Cu and lead (Pb in the soil, separately and in combination, were examined in Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.. Plant growth and development, GSH level and GSH2 expression at seedling, branching, and flowering stages were studied. Cu at lower concentrations had a stimulating effect on seedling height and root length. A significant positive correlation was observed between heavy metal concentrations and inhibition of plant growth. Plant height, root length and lateral root numbers decreased progressively with increasing concentrations of Cu and Pb. Except at the seedling stage, the metal mixture elicited a synergistic effect on safflower growth and development. The GSH content was significantly reduced in both safflower roots and leaves at increased concentrations of heavy metals, with the exception of the treatment with a low concentration of Cu that resulted in a slightl increase in GSH content at the seedling and branching stages. RT-PCR analysis revealed a negative correlation between GSH2 expression levels and metal concentration. Short exposure to low concentrations of Cu induce an increase in GSH synthesis to preserve normal plant growth, whereas prolonged exposure and large Cu and Pb concentrations affect the GSH metabolic chain, and are severely toxicity. The findings obtained in this study enhance our understanding of the role of the GSH pool in the response of plants to heavy metal-induced stress, and serve as a basis for improved cultivation of safflower.

  7. Effect of seaweed extracts on growth and yield of rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALUH NIKMATULLAH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Sunarpi, Jupri A, Kurnianingsih R, Julisaniah NI, Nikmatullah A 2010. Effect of seaweed extracts on growth and yield of rice plants. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 73-77. Application of liquid seaweed fertilizers on some plant specieshas been reported to decrease application doses of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on some crop plants, as well as stimulating growth and production of many plants. It has been reported that there are at least 59 species of seaweeds found in coastal zone of West Nusa Tenggara Province, 15 of those species weres able to stimulate germination, growth and production of some horticultural and legume plants. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of seaweed extracts obtained from ten species on growth and production of rice plants. To achive the goal, seaweed (100 g per species wasextracted with 100 mL of water, to obtain the concentration of 100%. Seaweed extract (15% was sprayed into the rice plants during vegetative and generative stages. Subsequently, the growth and yield parameters of rice plants were measured. The results shown that extracts of Sargassum sp.1, Sargassum sp.2, Sargassum polycistum, Hydroclathrus sp., Turbinaria ornata, and Turbinaria murayana, were able to induce growth of rice plants. However, only the Hydroclathrus sp. extract could enhance both growth and production of rice plants.

  8. FACTORS AFFECTING FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH RATES OF FIBER REINFORCED METAL LAMINATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Based upon an analytical model for predicting the crack growth in fiber reinforced metal laminates (FRMLs), some factors affecting the fatigue crack growth rates of FRMLs were analyzed, including the lay-up of FRMLs, the modulus of the fibers, the residual stresses in FRMLs, the bonding strength and the shear modulus of the adhesive, etc.It was shown from the present analysis that the interface number of the laminates, the modulus of the fibers and the residual stresses in FRMLs have very great effects on the fatigue lives of FRMLs, but the effects of the bonding strength and the shear modulus of the adhesive are relatively small.

  9. Growth, Cadmium Accumulation and Physiology of Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) as Affected by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling-Zhi; GONG Zong-Qiang; ZHANG Yu-Long; LI Pei-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to study the effects of three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), including Glomus intraradices, Glomus constrictum and Glomus mosseae, on the growth, root colonization and Cd accumulation of marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) at Cd addition levels of 0, 5 and 50 mg kg-1 in soil. The physiological characteristics, such as chlorophyll content, soluble sugar content, soluble protein content and antioxidant enzyme activity, of Tagetes erecta L. were also investigated. The symbiotic relationship between the marigold plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was well established under Cd stress. The symbiotic relationship was reflected by the better physiobiochemical parameters of the marigold plants inoculated with the three AMF isolates where the colonization rates in the roots were between 34.3% and 88.8%. Compared with the non-inoculated marigold plants, the shoot and root biomass of the inoculated marigold plants increased by 15.2%-47.5% and 47.8%-130.1%, respectively, and the Cd concentration and accumulation decreased. The chlorophyll and soluble sugar contents in the mycorrhizal marigold plants increased with Cd addition, indicating that AMF inoculation helped the marigold plants to grow by resisting Cd stress. The antioxidant enzymes reacted differently with the three AMF under Cd stress. For plants inoculated with G. constrictum and G. mosseae, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased with increasing Cd addition, but peroxidase (POD) activity decreased with increasing Cd addition. For plants inoculated with G. intruradices, three of the antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly decreased at high levels of Cd addition. Overall, the activities of the three antioxidant enzymes in the plants inoculated with AMF were higher than those of the plants without AMF inoculation under Cd stress. Our results support the view that antioxidant enzymes have a great influence on the biomass of plants

  10. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6-enriched bio-organic fertilizer suppressed Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Ruan, Yunze; Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Jian; Waseem, Raza; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2013-04-24

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain NJN-6 is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) which can produce secondary metabolites antagonistic to several soil-borne pathogens. In this study, the ability of a bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) containing NJN-6 strain to promote the growth and suppress Fusarium wilt of banana plants was evaluated in a pot experiment. The results showed that the application of BIO significantly decreased the incidence of Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants compared to that for the organic fertilizer (OF). To determine the beneficial mechanism of the strain, the colonization of NJN-6 strain on banana roots was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The plant growth-promoting hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), along with antifungal lipopeptides iturin A, were detected when the NJN-6 strain was incubated in both Landy medium with additional l-tryptophan and in root exudates of banana plants. In addition, some antifungal volatile organic compounds and iturin A were also detected in BIO. In summary, strain NJN-6 could colonize the roots of banana plants after the application of BIO and produced active compounds which were beneficial for the growth of banana plants. PMID:23541032

  11. High dilution of Belladonna affect the mycelial growth of Corynespora cassiicola in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Regina Freitas Schawan-Estrada

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The target spot is a disease caused by fungus Corynespora cassiicola (Berk. & Curt. Wei. This disease has occurred in several states of Brazil. It is a late season disease and causes economic losses in various crops such as soybeans [1]. Currently there is no adequate treatment for the control of C. cassiicola in organic cultivation of soybeans, since the application of fungicides for the control and management of diseases is not allowed by Brazilian legislation [2]. Thus, the purpose of this experiment was to test the effectiveness of high dilutions of Belladonna in vitro on mycelial growth of Corynespora cassiicola. Materials and Methods: The preliminary tests were conducted at the Laboratory of Plant Pathology, State University of Maringá (UEM. The fungal isolate of C. cassicola was obtained from Embrapa Soja. The fungus was peaked and grown on PDA (potato dextrose agar maintained at 25°C ± 2 and 12h photoperiod. Belladonna dilutions (6, 12, 18, 24 and 30dH were obtained according to the Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [3]. PDA culture medium plus Belladonna dilutions (6, 12, 24 and 30dH beyond the control containing distilled water were placed in petri dishes after filtration through a Millipore membrane (pore diameter of 0.45µm . After medium solidification, a disc of mycelium (4 mm diameter of C. cassiicola was peaked towards the center of each plate and sealed with plastic wrap and then incubated at 25°C with 12h photoperiod. The mycelial growth was measured daily for 8 days. The control consisted of distilled water. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and means were compared by Scott-Knott test (P ≤ 0.05. Results and Discussion: All dilutions of Belladonna (6, 12, 24, 30dH were effective (p <0.05 in reducing the mycelial growth of C. cassiicola compared to control (Figure 1. Belladonna 30dH was higher in all periods and the difference increased with time. Dilutions

  12. Relationship between in vitro characterization and comparative efficacy of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria for improving cucumber salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Sajid Mahmood; Ahmad, Maqshoof; Naveed, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Zahir, Zahir Ahmad; Crowley, David E

    2016-05-01

    Phosphate solubilization, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)-deaminase activity and production of siderophores and indole acetic acid (IAA) are well-known traits of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Here we investigated the expression of these traits as affected by salinity for three PGPR strains (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus megaterium and Variovorax paradoxus) at two salinity levels [2 and 5 % NaCl (w/v)]. Among the three strains, growth of B. megaterium was the least affected by high salinity. However, P. fluorescens was the best strain for maintaining ACC-deaminase activity, siderophore and IAA production under stressed conditions. V. paradoxus was the least tolerant to salts and had minimal growth and low PGPR trait expression under salt stress. Results of experiment examining the impact of bacterial inoculation on cucumber growth at three salinity levels [1 (normal), 7 and 10 dS m(-1)] revealed that P. fluorescens also had good rhizosphere competence and was the most effective for alleviating the negative impacts of salinity on cucumber growth. The results suggest that in addition to screening the PGPR regarding their effect on growth under salinity, PGPR trait expression is also an important aspect that may be useful for selecting the most promising PGPR bacterial strains for improving plant tolerance to salinity stress. PMID:26860842

  13. Growth and accumulation of phosphorus by bean plants treated with foliar phosphate and phosphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josinaldo Lopes Araujo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently the use of phosphite as fungicide in agriculture or as a supplementary source of phosphorus (P has been widespread, however little is known about its effects on phosphate nutrition of important crops such as bean plants. The present work aimed to evaluate the effect of foliar applied phosphite and phosphate on the growth and phosphated nutrition of the bean plant cultivated under low and adequate P supply conditions. The experiment was conducted in an entirely random layout, in factorial scheme 2 x 3 x 2, where two phosphate concentrations were combined in the nutrient solution (1.5 mg L-1 = low phosphorous and 20 mg L-1 = adequate phosphorous, three foliar application products: KH2PO3 (monobasic potassium phosphite, KH2PO4 (monobasic potassium phosphate and KCl (potassium chloride as control and two treatments referring to the number of applications (one application, at the appearance of the first trifoliolate leaf and two applications: one at the appearance of the first trifoliolate leaf and the other application at the pre-flowering, with four repetitions. Overall the dry matter, fosfatase activity, phosphorus content and phosphorus use efficiency was not were affected by the foliar application treatments. Under low readiness of that nutritient the application of foliar phosphite had a negative effect on these variables. It was concluded that foliar applied phosphite has a depressive effect on the growth of the bean plant under low supply of P. The foliar phosphite slightly affects the total concentration of P in the roots and shoots, especially under low P supply, and provides no changes in levels of soluble fractions of P in leaves under conditions of low or adequate supply this nutrient.

  14. Nitrogen Recovered By Sorghum Plants As Affected By Saline Irrigation Water And Organic/Inorganic Resources Using 15N Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pot experiment was conducted in the green house of Soil and Water Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Egypt, to follow up the effect of saline irrigation water, inorganic and organic fertilizers on sorghum growth and N fractions that recovered by plant organs. Two types of artificial water salinity were used; one has 3 dS m-1 salinity level with 4 and 8 SAR and the second one has 3 and 6 dS m-1 salinity levels with 6 SAR . Leucenae residue and chicken manure were applied as organic sources at rate of 2% v/v. Sorghum was fertilized with recommended doses of super phosphate and potassium sulfate at rate of 150 kg P and 50 kg K per feddan, respectively. Labelled ammonium sulfate with 5% 15N atom excess was applied to sorghum at rate of 100 kg N fed-1. Dry matter yield (stalks and roots) was negatively affected by increasing water salinity levels or SAR ratios. Similar trend was recorded with N uptake by either stalks or roots of sorghum plants. On the other hand, both the dry matter yield and N uptake were positively and significantly affected by incorporation of organic sources in comparison to the untreated control. In this regard, the dry matter yield and N uptake induced by incorporation of chicken manure was superior over those recorded with leucenae residues. It means, in general, that the incorporation of organic sources into the soil may maximize the plant ability to combat the hazards effects caused by irrigation with saline water. Nitrogen derived from fertilizer (% Ndff), soil (% Ndfs) and organic resources (% Ndfr) showed frequent trends as affected by water salinity and organic resources but in most cases, severe reduction of these values was recorded when plants were irrigated with saline water. In the same time, plants were more dependent on N derived from organic sources than those derived from mineral fertilizer. Superiority of one organic source over the other was related to water salinity levels and SAR ratios applied in

  15. Poisonous plants affecting the central nervous system of horses in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisoning by Indigofera pascuori was recently reported in horses in the state of Roraima. It causes chronic signs of sleepiness, unsteady gait, severe ataxia, and progressive weight loss. Some animals are blind. Young horses are more affected than adults. After the end of plant consumption the anima...

  16. Growth Response and Tolerance to Heavy Metals of two Swamp Species inoculated with a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Dorantes, A.; Labra-Cardon, D.; Guerrero-Zuniga, A.; Montes-Villafan, S.

    2009-07-01

    Due to the sensitivity and the sequestration ability of the microbial communities to heavy metals, microbes have been used for bioremediation. Recently the application of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) for the bioremediation of this kind of contaminants has been done. This study evaluated the growth response and the tolerance to heavy metals of two swamp species. (Author)

  17. Growth Response and Tolerance to Heavy Metals of two Swamp Species inoculated with a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the sensitivity and the sequestration ability of the microbial communities to heavy metals, microbes have been used for bioremediation. Recently the application of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) for the bioremediation of this kind of contaminants has been done. This study evaluated the growth response and the tolerance to heavy metals of two swamp species. (Author)

  18. In vitro zygotic embryo culture of Pinus peuce Gris.: Optimization of culture conditions affecting germination and early seedling growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojičić Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a protocol for the germination and early seedling growth of Pinus peuce Gris. using zygotic embryo culture. In order to overcome seed dormancy and optimize organogenesis, the effect of nutritional, plant growth regulatory and physical factors on in vitro germination and growth of isolated mature zygotic embryos of P. peuce were investigated.

  19. In vitro zygotic embryo culture of Pinus peuce Gris.: Optimization of culture conditions affecting germination and early seedling growth

    OpenAIRE

    Stojičić Dragana; Janošević Dušica; Uzelac Branka; Čokeša V.; Budimir Snežana

    2012-01-01

    This study reports a protocol for the germination and early seedling growth of Pinus peuce Gris. using zygotic embryo culture. In order to overcome seed dormancy and optimize organogenesis, the effect of nutritional, plant growth regulatory and physical factors on in vitro germination and growth of isolated mature zygotic embryos of P. peuce were investigated.

  20. Relative abundance of an invasive alien plant affects insect-flower interaction networks in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Jane C.; Casey, Leanne M.

    2014-02-01

    Invasive alien flowering plants may affect native plant pollinator interactions and have knock on impacts on populations of native plants and animals. The magnitude of these impacts, however, may be modified by the relative abundance of the invasive plant and the number of flowers it presents.We tested this by examining the structure of insect-flower interaction networks in six sites with increasing levels of invasion by Rhododendron ponticum in Ireland.Neither flower-visiting insect abundance, species richness nor diversity were related to R. ponticum flower abundance, but the composition of insect communities was. The total number of flowers in a site increased with the relative abundance of R. ponticum flowers but the number of co-flowering native plant species in these sites was low (interaction networks relatively small.As a result, changes in interaction network properties (connectance, interaction evenness and network level specialisation), which correlated with R. ponticum flower abundance, were a result of the small network size rather than due to changes in the resilience of networks.Overall, we conclude that the impacts of invasive alien plants on native plant-pollinator interactions are not only species specific, but site specific, according to the abundance of flowers produced by both the invasive and the native plants.

  1. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments. The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants.

  2. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Lei, Jing-Pin; Li, Mai-He; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition) or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition) of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity) and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments). The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length) of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants. PMID:22720041

  3. Cultivable endophytic bacteria from leaf bases of Agave tequilana and their role as plant growth promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Julia del C. Martínez-Rodríguez; Marcela De la Mora-Amutio; Plascencia-Correa, Luis A.; Esmeralda Audelo-Regalado; Francisco R. Guardado; Elías Hernández-Sánchez; Peña-Ramírez, Yuri J.; Adelfo Escalante; Miguel J. Beltrán-García; Tetsuya Ogura

    2015-01-01

    Agave tequilana Weber var. 'Azul' is grown for the production of tequila, inulin and syrup. Diverse bacteria inhabit plant tissues and play a crucial role for plant health and growth. In this study culturable endophytic bacteria were extracted from leaf bases of 100 healthy Agave tequilana plants. In plant tissue bacteria occurred at mean population densities of 3 million CFU/g of fresh plant tissue. Three hundred endophytic strains were isolated and 16s rDNA sequences grouped the bacteria in...

  4. Growth stimulation of ectomycorrhizal fungi by root exudates of Brassicaceae plants: role of degraded compounds of indole glucosinolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ren Sen; Mallik, Azim U; Setliff, Ed

    2003-06-01

    Brassicaceae plants are nonmycorrhizal. They were found to inhibit VA mycorrhizal infection in their host plants. We tested if they can influence growth of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. When roots and leaves of Brassicaceae plants and ECM fungi were cultured together in the same petri dishes, the root exudates of turnip (Brassica rapa), swede (B. napobrassica), cabbage (B. oleracea, var. capitata), broccoli (B. oleracea, var. italica Plenck), kohlrobi (B. caulorapa Pasq.), mustard (B. juncea), radish (Raphanus sativus), and choy (B. napus) significantly stimulated hyphal growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus. Root exudates of turnip and cabbage stimulated hyphal growth of Pisolithus tinctorius and two isolates of P. involutus. Colony area of P. involutus was increased by 452 and 414%, respectively, in the presence of turnip and cabbage germinants. Root exudates of turnip increased the biomass of P. involutus and P. tinctorius by 256 and 122% and cabbage by 220 and 82%, respectively. The stimulatory effect was not affected by autoclaving the root exudates. Root exudates had chemical reactions with glutathione and lysine, which resulted in a reduction of the growth stimulation of ECM fungi. Myrosinase enhanced further the stimulatory effects of turnip on the ECM colony diameter growth by 23%. Autoclaved roots and leaves of turnip did not stimulate fungal growth, but mechanically ground roots and leaves of turnip stimulated growth of P. involutus by 147 and 135%, respectively. After desulfuration with aryl sulphatuse, the glucosinolates (GLSs) in turnip roots and leaves were identified by HPLC. The major ones were indole GLSs. Prominent compounds identified were 1-methoxy-3-indolymethyl GLS and4-methoxy-3-indolymethyl GLS. The finding provides an opportunity to field test the use of Brassicaceae plants in enhancing ectomycorrhizal formation in conifers by interplanting conifers with Brassicaceae plants in forest tree nursery and agroforestry systems

  5. From the low past to the high future: Plant growth across CO2 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Andries; Cornwell, Will; Cornelissen, Hans; Aerts, Rien

    2014-05-01

    In today's atmosphere fossil fuel emissions and land use change since the industrial revolution have increased atmospheric CO2 concentration from 280 ppm to nearly 400 ppm, a value not experienced by plants for over 10 million years. In contrast, over the same period atmospheric CO2 levels have been much lower than preindustrial levels. Plants' recent evolutionary history has thus been under carbon starvation while over the next 90 years atmospheric CO2 is expected to rise to a bountiful ~800 ppm. Plants' response to this rapid increase is likely influenced by their long evolution in low CO2, but this has been hardly studied at all. Very little is known about how plant traits drove carbon cycling in the past and how these relationships may shift going from past to future CO2.In a climate chamber experiment we germinated and grew seedlings of 30 species (C3, C4, woody, herbaceous) at past low CO2 (150ppm), ambient CO2, and future high CO2(750ppm). Our aim was to understand how plant traits are affected by CO2 and if and why winners and losers in terms of growth performance shift going from past to future CO2 concentrations. Results show a great effect of low and high CO2 on specific leaf area, biomass and allocation shifts above and belowground but mixed results in patterns between species and plant types. Ongoing work focuses on leaf level chemistry and photosynthesis and the interaction between CO2 and drought stress with promising initial results.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor- I and factors affecting it in thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf T Soliman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvement of blood transfusion regimens and iron chelation therapy growth and maturational delay, cardiomyopathy, endocrinopathies and osteoporosis still occur in good number of thalassemic patients. Decreased IGF-1 secretion occurs in the majority of the thalassemic patients particularly those with growth and pubertal delay. Many factors contribute to this decreased synthesis of IGF-I including disturbed growth hormone (GH - insulin-like growth factor - I (IGF-I axis. The possible factors contributing to low IGF-I synthesis in thalassemia and the possible interaction between low IGF-I secretion and the occurrence of these complications is discussed in this mini-review. Improvement of IGF-I secretion in thalassemic patients should be intended to improve linear growth and bone mineral accretion in thalassemic patients. This can be attained through adequate correction of anemia and proper chelation, nutritional supplementation (increasing caloric intake, correction of vitamin D and zinc deficiencies, induction of puberty and correction of hypogonadism at the proper time and treating GH deficiency. This review paper provides a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding IGF-I and factors affecting it in patients with thalassaemia major (TM. Search on PubMed and reference lists of articles with the term ′IGF-I, GH, growth, thalassemia, thyroxine, anemia, vitamin D, and zinc′ was carried out. A hundred and forty-eight articles were found and used in the write up and the data analyzed was included in this report.

  7. Dissipation and effects of tricyclazole on soil microbial communities and rice growth as affected by amendment with alperujo compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jaramillo, M; Redondo-Gómez, S; Barcia-Piedras, J M; Aguilar, M; Jurado, V; Hermosín, M C; Cox, L

    2016-04-15

    The presence of pesticides in surface and groundwater has grown considerably in the last decades as a consequence of the intensive farming activity. Several studies have shown the benefits of using organic amendments to prevent losses of pesticides from runoff or leaching. A particular soil from the Guadalquivir valley was placed in open air ponds and amended at 1 or 2% (w/w) with alperujo compost (AC), a byproduct from the olive oil industry. Tricyclazole dissipation, rice growth and microbial diversity were monitored along an entire rice growing season. An increase in the net photosynthetic rate of Oryza sativa plants grown in the ponds with AC was observed. These plants produced between 1100 and 1300kgha(-1) more rice than plants from the unamended ponds. No significant differences were observed in tricyclazole dissipation, monitored for a month in soil, surface and drainage water, between the amended and unamended ponds. The structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities were also studied by the use of the polymerase chain reaction denaturing gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) from DNA extracted directly from soil samples. The banding pattern was similar for all treatments, although the density of bands varied throughout the time. Apparently, tricyclazole did not affect the structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities, and this was attributed to its low bioavailability. Rice cultivation under paddy field conditions may be more efficient under the effects of this compost, due to its positive effects on soil properties, rice yield, and soil microbial diversity. PMID:26849328

  8. Beyond plant defense: insights on the potential of salicylic and methylsalicylic acid to contain growth of the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea

    OpenAIRE

    Dieryckx, Cindy; Gaudin, Vanessa; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Girard, Vincent; Job, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Using Botrytis cinerea we confirmed in the present work several previous studies showing that salicylic acid, a main plant hormone, inhibits fungal growth in vitro. Such an inhibitory effect was also observed for the two salicylic acid derivatives, methylsalicylic and acetylsalicylic acid. In marked contrast, 5-sulfosalicylic acid was totally inactive. Comparative proteomics from treated vs. control mycelia showed that both the intracellular and extracellular proteomes were affected in the pr...

  9. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka eSteffens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism and nonenzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS.

  10. Plant growth-promoting and rhizosphere-competent Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae strain BIHB 723 from the cold deserts of the Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Arvind; Vyas, Pratibha; Rahi, Praveen; Kasana, Ramesh Chand

    2009-04-01

    A phosphate-solubilizing bacterial strain BIHB 723 isolated from the rhizosphere of Hippophae rhamnoides was identified as Acinetobacter rhizosphaerae on the basis of phenotypic characteristics, carbon source utilization pattern, fatty acid methyl esters analysis, and 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain exhibited the plant growth-promoting attributes of inorganic and organic phosphate solubilization, auxin production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity, ammonia generation, and siderophore production. A significant increase in the growth of pea, chickpea, maize, and barley was recorded for inoculations under controlled conditions. Field testing with the pea also showed a significant increment in plant growth and yield. The rifampicin mutant of the bacterial strain effectively colonized the pea rhizosphere without adversely affecting the resident microbial populations. PMID:19137371

  11. Solubility and Plant Availability of Nutrients as Affected by Soil Drainage Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn growth is affected due to oxygen deficiency and root death in a perched water table (PWT). The study objective was to evaluate a surface application of FGD gypsum (FGDG) and glyphosate (GLY) on nutrient uptake in corn with different drainage conditions. The experiment was conducted in greenhous...

  12. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1▿

    OpenAIRE

    Matilla, Miguel A.; Pizarro-Tobias, Paloma; Roca, Amalia; Fernández, Matilde; Duque, Estrella; Molina, Lázaro; WU, XIAO; van der Lelie, Daniel; Gómez, Manuel J.; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2010-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  13. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

    2011-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  14. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter radicincitans DSM16656T, a Plant Growth-Promoting Endophyte

    OpenAIRE

    Witzel, Katja; Gwinn-Giglio, Michelle; Nadendla, Suvarna; Shefchek, Kent; Ruppel, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Enterobacter radicincitans sp. nov. DSM16656T represents a new species of the genus Enterobacter which is a biological nitrogen-fixing endophytic bacterium with growth-promoting effects on a variety of crop and model plant species. The presence of genes for nitrogen fixation, phosphorous mobilization, and phytohormone production reflects this microbe's potential plant growth-promoting activity.

  15. Estimating plant stem emerging points (PSEPs) of sugar of beets in early growth stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtiby, Henrik; Mosgaard Giselsson, Thomas; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2012-01-01

    Successful intra--row mechanical weed control of sugar beet 
(beta vulgaris) in early growth stages requires precise 
knowledge about location of crop plants.
A computer vision system for locating Plant Stem Emerging Point (PSEP) 
of sugar beet in early growth stages was developed and tested.
The...

  16. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton: lessons from root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes. Before cel

  17. Growth and Nutrient Status of Foliage as Affected by Tree Species and Fertilization in a Fire-Disturbed Urban Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonsig Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the growth and macronutrient (C, N, P, K status in the foliage of four tree species (LT: Liriodendron tulipifera L.; PY: Prunus yedoensis Matsumura; QA: Quercus acutissima Carruth; PT: Pinus thunbergii Parl. in response to fertilization with different nutrient ratios in a fire-disturbed urban forest located in BongDaesan (Mt., Korea. Two fertilizers (N3P8K1 = 113:300:37 kg·ha−1·year−1; N6P4K1 = 226:150:37 ha−1·year−1 in four planting sites were applied in April 2013 and March 2014. The growth and nutrient responses of the foliage were monitored six times for two years. Foliar growth and nutrient concentrations were not significantly different (p > 0.05 in response to different doses of N or P fertilizer, but the foliage showed increased N and P concentrations and content after fertilization compared with the control (N0P0K0. Foliar C and K concentrations were little affected by fertilization. Foliar nutrient concentrations and contents were significantly higher in PY and LT than in PT. The results suggest that the foliar N and P concentration could be used as a parameter to assess the nutrient environments of tree species restored in a fire-disturbed urban forest.

  18. Does the economic integration of China affect growth and inflation in industrial countries?

    OpenAIRE

    Dreger, Christian; Zhang, Yanqun

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese economic development affects GDP growth and inflation in the advanced countries. A GVAR approach is used to model the interdependencies between the business cycles in China and industrial countries, including the US, the euro area and Japan. For robustness, the results are compared to those obtained by leading structural econometric models, such as NiGEM and OEF. Evidence is based on the responses to a Chinese shock stemming from the recent fiscal stimulus package. The results ind...

  19. Effect of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria on Growth,Nodulation and Nutrient Accumulation of Lentil Under Controlled Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.ZAFAR; M.K.ABBASI; M.A.KHAN; A.KHALIQ; T.SULTAN; M.ASLAM

    2012-01-01

    Application of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has been shown to increase legume growth and development under field and controlled environmental conditions.The present study was conducted to isolate plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) from the root nodules of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) grown in arid/semi-arid region of Punjab,Pakistan and examined their plant growth-promoting abilities.Five bacterial isolates were isolated,screened in vitro for plant growth-promoting (PGP)characteristics and their effects on the growth of lentil were assessed under in vitro,hydroponic and greenhouse (pot experiment)conditions.All the isolates were Gram negative,rod-shaped and circular in form and exhibited the plant growth-promoting attributes of phosphate solubilization and auxin (indole acetic acid,IAA) production.The IAA production capacity ranged in 0.5-11.0 μgmL-1and P solubilization ranged in 3 16 mg L-1.When tested for their effects on plant growth,the isolated strains had a stimulatory effect on growth,nodulation and nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake in plants on nutrient-deficient soil.In the greenhouse pot experiment,application of PGPR significantly increased shoot length,fresh weight and dry weight by 65%,43% and 63% and the increases in root length,fresh weight and dry weight were 74%,54% and 92%,respectively,as compared with the uninoculated control.The relative increases in growth characteristics under in vitro and hydroponic conditions were even higher.PGPR also increased the number of pods per plant,1000-grain weight,dry matter yield and grain yield by 50%,13%,28% and 29%,respectively,over the control.The number of nodules and nodule dry mass increased by 170% and 136%,respectively.After inoculation with effective bacterial strains,the shoot,root and seed N and P contents increased,thereby increasing both N and P uptake in plants. The root elongation showed a positive correlation (R2 =0.67) with the IAA

  20. Growth of Bacillus cereus on solid media as affected by agar, sodium chloride, and potassium sorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecchini, M L; Del Torre, M; Donda, S; Maltini, E

    2000-07-01

    The effect of two independent variables: microstructure, as modified by the agar content (1.0, 4.0, 7.0%), and water activity (a(w)), as modified by the NaCl content (0.5, 2.5, 4.5%), in the absence or in the presence of potassium sorbate (0.0; 2,000 ppm) on Bacillus cereus growth on solid media was studied. The time to visible growth (TVG) and the radial growth rate (RGR) of colonies were evaluated. TVG was not affected by microstructure and K-sorbate, although when a(w) was reduced, TVG tended to increase. RGR depended on linear effects of microstructure and a(w) variables and their interaction. When K-sorbate was added to cultural media, RGR was reduced significantly. However, in the presence of K-sorbate, RGR was found to change only when a(w) vas varied. PMID:10914662

  1. Vitamin D3 affects growth and Ca2+ uptake by Phaseolus vulgaris roots cultured in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitamin D3 at low concentration (10−9 M) inhibited the growth of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (cv. Contrancha) roots in vitro as measured by elongation (14 h) and [3H]-leucine incorporation into protein (2 h), and increased their labelling with 45Ca2+ (2 h). Cycloheximide and puromycin (50 u.M) blocked vitamin D3 stimulation of root 45Ca2+ labelling, indicating that it is mediated by de novo protein synthesis. The calcium ionophore X-537A (10−5JW) induced similar changes both in root elongation and 45Ca2+ uptake (14 h). This may indicate that the inhibitory effects of the sterol on root growth are mediated by changes in Ca2+ fluxes. However, this interpretation should be further strengthened by additional studies as the ionophore may have acted on root growth, affecting physiological processes other than Ca2+ transport. (author)

  2. Study of Plant Cell Wall Polymers Affected by Metal Accumulation Using Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shi-You [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-03-02

    This project aims to employ newly-developed chemical imaging techniques to measure, in real-time, the concentration, dynamics and spatial distribution of plant cell wall polymers during biomass growth with inoculation of transgenic symbiotic fungi, and to explore a new pathway of delivering detoxified metal to plant apoplast using transgenic symbiotic fungi, which will enhance metal accumulation from soil, and potentially these metals may in turn be used as catalysts to improve the efficiency of biomass conversion to biofuels. The proposed new pathway of biomass production will: 1) benefit metal and radionuclide contaminant mobility in subsurface environments, and 2) potentially improve biomass production and process for bioenergy

  3. Atmospheric CO2 level affects plants' carbon use efficiency: insights from a 13C labeling experiment on sunflower stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoying; Schäufele, Rudi; Schnyder, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration has been shown to stimulate plant photosynthesis and (to a lesser extent) growth, thereby acting as a possible sink for the additional atmospheric CO2. However, this effect is dependent on the efficiency with which plants convert atmospheric carbon into biomass carbon, since a considerable proportion of assimilated carbon is returned to the atmosphere via plant respiration. As a core parameter for carbon cycling, carbon use efficiency of plants (CUE, the ratio of net primary production to gross primary production) quantifies the proportion of assimilated carbon that is incorporated into plant biomass. CUE has rarely been assessed based on measurements of complete carbon balance, due to methodological difficulties in measuring respiration rate of plants in light. Moreover, foliar respiration is known to be inhibited in light, thus foliar respiration rate is generally lower in light than in dark. However, this phenomenon, termed as inhibition of respiration in light (IRL), has rarely been assessed at the stand-scale and been incorporated into the calculation of CUE. Therefore, how CUE responses to atmospheric CO2 levels is still not clear. We studied CUE of sunflower stands grown at sub-ambient CO2 level (200 μmol mol-1) and elevated CO2 level (1000 μmol mol-1) using mesocosm-scale gas exchange facilities which enabled continuous measurements of 13CO2/12CO2 exchange. Appling steady-state 13C labeling, fluxes of respiration and photosynthesis in light were separated, and tracer kinetic in respiration was analyzed. This study provides the first data on CUE at a mesocosm-level including respiration in light in different CO2 environments. We found that CUE of sunflower was lower at an elevated CO2 level than at a sub-ambient CO2 level; and the ignorance of IRL lead to erroneous estimations of CUE. Variation in CUE at atmospheric CO2 levels was attributed to several mechanisms. In this study, CO2 enrichment i) affected the

  4. Cholecystokinin and Somatostatin Negatively Affect Growth of the Somatostatin-RIN-14B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim El-Kouhen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exclusive presence of the pancreatic CCK-2 receptors on the pancreatic delta cells of six different species, this study was undertaken to determine the role of cholecystokinin and gastrin on growth of these somatostatin (SS cells. For this study, the SS-RIN-14B cells were used in culture and their growth was evaluated by cell counting. Results. To our surprise, we established by Western blot that these RIN cells possess the two CCK receptor subtypes, CCK-1 and CCK-2. Occupation of the CCK-1 receptors by caerulein, a CCK analog, led to inhibition of cell proliferation, an effect prevented by a specific CCK-1 receptor antagonist. Occupation of the CCK-2 receptors by the gastrin agonist pentagastrin had no effect on cell growth. Proliferation was not affected by SS released from these cells but was inhibited by exogenous SS. Conclusions. Growth of the SS-RIN-14B cells can be negatively affected by occupation of their CCK-1 receptors and by exogenous somatostatin.

  5. Gonadotropin ratio affects the in vitro growth of rhesus ovarian preantral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Young; Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Chung Gyu; Rosenwaks, Zev; Liu, Hung Ching; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Ku, Seung-Yup

    2016-04-01

    In vitro follicle growth (IVFG) strategy is critical in the fertility preservation of cancer survivors; however, its optimal protocol needs to be developed using primate models since the availability of human samples is limited. Only a few previous studies have reported the successful IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries using low-dose follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (0.3 or 3 ng/mL) and long-term culture (up to 5 weeks) and it is still uncertain in regard to the optimal culture duration and effective dose of treated gonadotropins applicable to the IVFG of rhesus preantral follicles. Recently, we have reported that the FSH to luteinizing hormone (LH) ratio affects the in vitro growth of murine ovarian follicles. We aimed to investigate whether gonadotropin ratios affect the efficiency of rhesus follicular growth in vitro Ovaries were collected from six necropsied rhesus macaques (4-9 years) and preantral follicles were retrieved and cultured for 14 days using 200 mIU/mL FSH. The characteristics of follicular growth were compared between the FSH:LH=1:1 (n=24) and FSH:LH=2:1 (n=24) groups. High concentration gonadotropin treatment shortened the duration required for in vitro maturation of rhesus preantral follicles. The FSH:LH=2:1 group showed a faster follicular growth and enabled the acquisition of mature oocytes, although the expression of growth differentiation factor (GDF)-9 and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) did not differ significantly between the two groups. Taken together, high dose gonadotropin treatment can shorten the duration of IVFG and the gonadotropin ratio is important in the IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries. PMID:26980777

  6. Gibberellins regulate the stem elongation rate without affecting the mature plant height of a quick development mutant of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Xie, Yong-Dun; Guo, Hui-Jun; Zhao, Lin-Shu; Xiong, Hong-Chun; Gu, Jia-Yu; Li, Jun-Hui; Kong, Fu-Quan; Sui, Li; Zhao, Zi-Wei; Zhao, Shi-Rong; Liu, Lu-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Gibberellin (GA) is essential for determining plant height. Alteration of GA content or GA signaling results in a dwarf or slender phenotype. Here, we characterized a novel wheat mutant, quick development (qd), in which GA regulates stem elongation but does not affect mature plant height. qd and wild-type plants did not exhibit phenotypic differences at the seedling stage. From jointing to heading stage, qd plants were taller than wild-type plants due to elongated cells. However, wild-type and qd plants were the same height at heading. Unlike wild-type plants, qd plants were sensitive to exogenous GA due to mutation of Rht-B1. With continuous GA stimulation, qd seedlings and adult plants were taller than wild-type. Thus, the GA content of qd plants might differ from that of wild-type during the growth process. Analysis of GA biosynthetic gene expression verified this hypothesis and showed that TaKAO, which is involved in catalyzing the early steps of GA biosynthesis, was differentially expressed in qd plants compared with wild-type. The bioactive GA associated gene TaGA20ox was downregulated in qd plants during the late growth stages. Measurements of endogenous GA content were consistent with the gene-expression analysis results. Consistent with the GA content variation, the first three basal internodes were longer and the last two internodes were shorter in qd than in wild-type plants. The qd mutant might be useful in dissecting the mechanism by which GA regulates stem-growing process, and it may be serve as a GA responsive semi-dwarf germplasm in breeding programs. PMID:27317908

  7. Influence of Nitrogen Sources and Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Inoculation on Growth, Crude Fiber and Nutrient Uptake in Squash (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne ex Poir. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice I. TCHIAZE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR, B have immense potential application in sustainable agriculture as ecofriendly biofertilizers and biopesticides. In this study, the effects of three nitrogen (N sources (NO3-, NH4+ and NO3NH4 and PGPR on growth, crude fiber and nutrient uptake were investigated in squash plants. Some growth parameters [root dry weight (RDW, shoot dry weight (SDW, total plant dry weight (PDW, number of leaves (NL, shoot length (SL, stem diameter (SD and number of ramifications (NR], crude fiber (cellulose content and nutrient uptake (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn were determined. Application of NO3-,NH4+ or NO3NH4 singly or in combination with PGPR inoculation led to a significant increase in RDW, SDW, PDW, NL, SL, SD and NR. Na, Cu and Zn contents, on the contrary, decreased in inoculated treated plants while no significant differences were recorded in cellulose contents (CE of leaves except in plants fed with NO3-. The leaf CE content ranged from 12.58 to 13.67%. The plants supplied with NO3+B, NH4+B and NO3NH4+B showed significantly higher plant biomass and accumulation of N, P, K and Mn concentrations in leaves compared to all other treatments. These results suggest that specific combinations of PGPR with NO3-, NH4+ or NO3NH4 fertilizers can be considered as efficient alternative biofertilizers to improve significantly the squash growth and nutrient uptake.

  8. Exploring the interactions between water and sediment fluxes, plant growth, and land surface form through modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Cervantes, J. H.; Bras, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    In a numerical model we explore the interactions between water fluxes, sediment fluxes, and plant growth, on a simulated land surface, and how these interactions shape the land surface in time. We hypothesize that the form of the land surface and the distribution of plants in space depends on the studied interactions. Our numerical model combines elements of an existing "landscape evolution model" where the land surface properties are assumed homogeneous, with: i) a model of soil thickness where a dynamic soil moisture is simulated; and ii) a model of vegetation growth and death as a function of soil moisture. Vegetation cover affects the land surface properties such as the critical shear stress and infiltration capacity. In the resulting model the land surface properties are spatially (and temporally) variable. Seasonality, runon, and the effects of differences in solar radiation in hillslopes with different inclination and orientation (with respect to the geographic north) in the evaporation and transpiration processes, are among the new elements incorporated into the new model. We compare this numerical model to field observations at a location in the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site, NM, where opposing hillslopes, one facing north and the other facing south, are clearly different. The south facing slope has a scarcer vegetation and signs of more fluvial erosion than the north facing slope, which receives less solar radiation and thus is likely to experience less water losses due to evaporation.

  9. Functional abilities of cultivable plant growth promoting bacteria associated with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fernanda da S; Costa, Pedro B da; Souza, Rocheli de; Beneduzi, Anelise; Lisboa, Bruno B; Vargas, Luciano K; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2016-03-01

    In the pursuit of sustainable agriculture, bioinoculants usage as providers of a crop's needs is a method to limit environmental damage. In this study, a collection of cultivable putative plant growth promoting (PGP) bacteria associated with wheat crops was obtained and this bacterial sample was characterized in relation to the functional diversity of certain PGP features. The isolates were obtained through classical cultivation methods, identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing and characterized for PGP traits of interest. Functional diversity characterization was performed using Categorical Principal Component Analysis (CatPCA) and Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA). The most abundant genera found among the 346 isolates were Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Enterobacter. Occurrence of PGP traits was affected by genus, niche, and sampling site. A large number of genera grouped together with the ability to produce indolic compounds; phosphate solubilization and siderophores production formed a second group related to fewer genera, in which the genus Burkholderia has a great importance. The results obtained may help future studies aiming prospection of putative plant growth promoting bacteria regarding the desired organism and PGP trait. PMID:27007904

  10. Functional abilities of cultivable plant growth promoting bacteria associated with wheat (Triticum aestivum L. crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda da S. Moreira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the pursuit of sustainable agriculture, bioinoculants usage as providers of a crop's needs is a method to limit environmental damage. In this study, a collection of cultivable putative plant growth promoting (PGP bacteria associated with wheat crops was obtained and this bacterial sample was characterized in relation to the functional diversity of certain PGP features. The isolates were obtained through classical cultivation methods, identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing and characterized for PGP traits of interest. Functional diversity characterization was performed using Categorical Principal Component Analysis (CatPCA and Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA. The most abundant genera found among the 346 isolates were Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Enterobacter. Occurrence of PGP traits was affected by genus, niche, and sampling site. A large number of genera grouped together with the ability to produce indolic compounds; phosphate solubilization and siderophores production formed a second group related to fewer genera, in which the genus Burkholderia has a great importance. The results obtained may help future studies aiming prospection of putative plant growth promoting bacteria regarding the desired organism and PGP trait.

  11. Functional Analysis of the Arabidopsis TETRASPANIN Gene Family in Plant Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Muto, Antonella; Van de Velde, Jan; Neyt, Pia; Himanen, Kristiina; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2015-11-01

    TETRASPANIN (TET) genes encode conserved integral membrane proteins that are known in animals to function in cellular communication during gamete fusion, immunity reaction, and pathogen recognition. In plants, functional information is limited to one of the 17 members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) TET gene family and to expression data in reproductive stages. Here, the promoter activity of all 17 Arabidopsis TET genes was investigated by pAtTET::NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION SIGNAL-GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN/β-GLUCURONIDASE reporter lines throughout the life cycle, which predicted functional divergence in the paralogous genes per clade. However, partial overlap was observed for many TET genes across the clades, correlating with few phenotypes in single mutants and, therefore, requiring double mutant combinations for functional investigation. Mutational analysis showed a role for TET13 in primary root growth and lateral root development and redundant roles for TET5 and TET6 in leaf and root growth through negative regulation of cell proliferation. Strikingly, a number of TET genes were expressed in embryonic and seedling progenitor cells and remained expressed until the differentiation state in the mature plant, suggesting a dynamic function over developmental stages. The cis-regulatory elements together with transcription factor-binding data provided molecular insight into the sites, conditions, and perturbations that affect TET gene expression and positioned the TET genes in different molecular pathways; the data represent a hypothesis-generating resource for further functional analyses. PMID:26417009

  12. The Interaction between Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Endophytic Bacteria Enhances Plant Growth of Acacia gerrardii under Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Huqail, Asma A.; Wirth, Stephan; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza

    2016-01-01

    Microbes living symbiotically in plant tissues mutually cooperate with each other by providing nutrients for proliferation of the partner organism and have a beneficial effect on plant growth. However, few studies thus far have examined the interactive effect of endophytic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in hostile conditions and their potential to improve plant stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated how the synergistic interactions of endophytic bacteria and AMF affect plant growth, nodulation, nutrient acquisition and stress tolerance of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress. Plant growth varied between the treatments with both single inoculants and was higher in plants inoculated with the endophytic B. subtilis strain than with AMF. Co-inoculated A. gerrardii had a significantly greater shoot and root dry weight, nodule number, and leghemoglobin content than those inoculated with AMF or B. subtilis alone under salt stress. The endophytic B. subtilis could alleviate the adverse effect of salt on AMF colonization. The differences in nitrate and nitrite reductase and nitrogenase activities between uninoculated plants and those inoculated with AMF and B. subtilis together under stress were significant. Both inoculation treatments, either B. subtilis alone or combined with AMF, enhanced the N, P, K, Mg, and Ca contents and phosphatase activities in salt-stressed A. gerrardii tissues and reduced Na and Cl concentration, thereby protecting salt-stressed plants from ionic and osmotic stress-induced changes. In conclusion, our results indicate that endophytic bacteria and AMF contribute to a tripartite mutualistic symbiosis in A. gerrardii and are coordinately involved in the plant adaptation to salt stress tolerance. PMID:27486442

  13. Physical mechanisms of plant roots affecting weathering and leaching of loess soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Yong; ZHANG; Qingwen; WAN; Guojiang; HUANG; Ronggui; PIAO; Hechun; BAI; Lingyu; LI; Lu

    2006-01-01

    Plant roots have potential impacts on soil mineral weathering and leaching. Our objective is to understand the physical mechanisms of plant roots affecting weathering and leaching of loess soil. Root densities were measured through the method of a large-size dug profile, and transport fluxes of soil elements were determined using an undisturbed monolith soil infiltration device on the hilly and gully regions of the Chinese Loess Plateau. The results show that the improvement effects of soil environment by plant roots are mainly controlled by the density and weight of the fibrous roots with the diameters less than 1 mm. Plant roots have the stronger effects on soil physical properties than chemical properties. The principal components analysis (PCA) indicates that soil physical properties by plant roots account for 56.7% of variations in soil environment whereas soil chemical properties and pH contribute about 24.2% of the soil variations. The roles of plant roots in controlling soil weathering and leaching increased in the following order: infiltration enhancement > increase of bioactive substance > stabilization of soil structure. The effects of plant roots on soil mineral weathering and leaching can be quantified using the multiple regression models with the high prediction accuracies developed in this study.

  14. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Enhance Salinity Stress Tolerance in Okra through ROS-Scavenging Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh Hasna Habib; Hossain Kausar; Halimi Mohd Saud

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major environmental stress that limits crop production worldwide. In this study, we characterized plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase and examined their effect on salinity stress tolerance in okra through the induction of ROS-scavenging enzyme activity. PGPR inoculated okra plants exhibited higher germination percentage, growth parameters, and chlorophyll content than control plants. Increased antioxidant enzym...

  15. Microbial Inoculation Improves Growth of Oil Palm Plants (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    OpenAIRE

    Om, Azlin Che; Ghazali, Amir Hamzah Ahmad; Keng, Chan Lai; Ishak, Zamzuri

    2009-01-01

    Introduction of diazotrophic rhizobacteria to oil palm tissues during the in vitro micropropagation process establishes an early associative interaction between the plant cells and bacteria. In the association, the diazotrophs provide the host plants with phytohormones and fixed nitrogen. This study was conducted to observe growth of bacterised tissue cultured oil palm plants under ex vitro conditions after 280 days of growth. Root dry weight, shoot dry weight, root volume, bacterial colonisa...

  16. Phenological growth stages of saffron plant (Crocus sativus L.) according to the BBCH Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Horacio Lopez-Corcoles; Antonio Brasa-Ramos; Francisco Montero-García; Miguel Romero-Valverde; Francisco Montero-Riquelme

    2015-01-01

    Phenological studies are important for understanding the influence of climate dynamics on vegetative growth, flowering and fruiting on plants and can be used in many scientific subjects, such as Agronomy, Botany and Plant Biology, but also Climatology as a result of the current global interest in climate change monitoring. The purpose of the detailed specific culture descriptions of the principal growth stages in plants is to provide an instrument for standardization of data recording. To dat...

  17. Biochar and compost amendments enhance copper immobilisation and support plant growth in contaminated soils

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Sarah; Bardos, R. Paul; Kidd, Petra S.; Mench, Michel; de Leij, Frans; Hutchings, Tony; Cundy, Andrew; Joyce, Chris; Soja, Gerhard; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Herzig, Rolf; Menger, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of soil with trace elements, such as Cu, is an important risk management issue. A pot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of three biochars and compost on plant growth and the immobilisation of Cu in a contaminated soil from a site formerly used for wood preservation. To assess Cu mobility, amended soils were analysed using leaching tests pre- and post-incubation, and post-growth. Amended and unamended soils were planted with sunflower, and the resulting plant mate...

  18. Growth conditions affect carotenoid-based plumage coloration of great tit nestlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hõrak, P.; Vellau, Helen; Ots, Indrek; Møller, Anders Pape

    Carotenoid-based integument colour in animals has been hypothesised to signal individual phenotypic quality because it reliably reflects either foraging efficiency or health status. We investigated whether carotenoid-derived yellow plumage coloration of fledgling great tits (Parus major) reflects their nestling history. Great tit fledglings reared in a poor year (1998) or in the urban habitat were less yellow than these reared in a good year (1999) or in the forest. The origin of nestlings also affected their coloration since nestlings from a city population did not improve their coloration when transferred to the forest. Brood size manipulation affected fledgling colour, but only in the rural population, where nestlings from reduced broods developed more yellow coloration than nestlings from increased and control broods. Effect of brood size manipulation on fledgling plumage colour was independent of the body mass, indicating that growth environment affects fledgling body mass and plumage colour by different pathways.

  19. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching th...

  20. Optimizing Greenhouse Corn Production: Can Growth Regulators Be Used to Keep Plants Short?

    OpenAIRE

    Schluttenhofer, Craig; Ross, Jeannie; Mason, Tyler; Eddy, Robert; Hahn, Daniel T

    2010-01-01

    This document is one entry in a series of questions and answers originally posted to the Purdue University Department of Horticulture & Landscape Architecture’s Plant Growth Facility Web site (http://www.hort.purdue.edu/hort/facilities/greenhouse/CornMethod.shtml) regarding best practices for corn plant growth in a greenhouse. Controlled studies were conducted with the goals of optimizing growth and yield; developing standardized methodology using readily available commercial materials; and p...

  1. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton: lessons from root hairs

    OpenAIRE

    Ruijter, de, A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes. Before cell growth takes place, a new cell is formed by cell division. The orientation of the division plane most often predicts the orientation of cell expansion, and a correct positioning of the division p...

  2. Exploring plant growth-promotion actinomycetes from vermicompost and rhizosphere soil for yield enhancement in chickpea

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sreevidya; Gopalakrishnan, S.; H. Kudapa; Varshney, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The main objective of the present study was to isolate and characterize actinomycetes for their plant growth-promotion in chickpea. A total of 89 actinomycetes were screened for their antagonism against fungal pathogens of chickpea by dual culture and metabolite production assays. Four most promising actinomycetes were evaluated for their physiological and plant growth-promotion properties under in vitro and in vivo conditions. All the isolates exhibited good growth at temperatures f...

  3. Shoot growth restriction in dry matter partitioning andminituber production of potato plants

    OpenAIRE

    Dilson Antônio Bisognin; Jacso Dellai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the effect of shoot growth restriction in the dry matter partitioning and minituber production of potato plants grown in a closed soilless system. Minitubers of the cultivars 'Macaca' and 'Asterix' were planted in the greenhouse in the density of 100 hills m-2, during autumn and spring growing seasons. Growth restriction levels were gotten by pruning shoots at 10, 20 and 30cm height or without pruning. The growth restriction levels were identified by ...

  4. Dual Effect of the Cubic Ag₃PO₄ Crystal on Pseudomonas syringae Growth and Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that the antibacterial activity of silver phosphate crystals on Escherichia coli depends on their structure. We here show that the cubic form of silver phosphate crystal (SPC can also be applied to inhibit the growth of a plant-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae bacterium. SPC pretreatment resulted in reduced in planta multiplication of P. syringae. Induced expression of a plant defense marker gene PR1 by SPC alone is suggestive of its additional plant immunity-stimulating activity. Since SPC can simultaneously inhibit P. syringae growth and induce plant defense responses, it might be used as a more effective plant disease-controlling agent.

  5. Complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilharter, Alexandra; Mitter, Birgit; Shin, Maria V; Chain, Patrick S G; Nowak, Jerzy; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-07-01

    Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN(T) is able to efficiently colonize the rhizosphere, root, and above-ground plant tissues of a wide variety of genetically unrelated plants, such as potatoes, canola, maize, and grapevines. Strain PsJN shows strong plant growth-promoting effects and was reported to enhance plant vigor and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the genome sequence of this strain, which indicates the presence of multiple traits relevant for endophytic colonization and plant growth promotion. PMID:21551308

  6. The influence of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR on the reduction of abiotic stresses in crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Alizadeh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants are always subjected to biotic and abiotic stresses in the environment which haveinfluences on the growth and development of the plants. Beneficial free-living soil bacteria are usuallyreferred as Plant-Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria or PGPR. Different plant growth-promotingRhizosphere bacteria, including associative bacteria such as: Azospirillum, Bacillus, Pseudomonas andEnterobacter group have been used for their beneficial influences on plants. Typically, PGPRs areassociated with plants root and augment plant productivity and immunity; however, recent worksshowed that PGPRs not have just induced the systemic tolerance to abiotic stress such as salt anddrought, but also they have increased the nutrient uptake from soils, and as a result the hazardousaccumulation of nitrates and phosphates in the agricultural soils can be reduced by usage of them.

  7. Rearing Tenebrio molitor in BLSS: Dietary fiber affects larval growth, development, and respiration characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Leyuan; Stasiak, Michael; Li, Liang; Xie, Beizhen; Fu, Yuming; Gidzinski, Danuta; Dixon, Mike; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Rearing of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) will provide good animal nutrition for astronauts in a bioregenerative life support system. In this study, growth and biomass conversion data of T. molitor larvae were tested for calculating the stoichiometric equation of its growth. Result of a respiratory quotient test proved the validity of the equation. Fiber had the most reduction in mass during T. molitor‧s consumption, and thus it is speculated that fiber is an important factor affecting larval growth of T. molitor. In order to further confirm this hypothesis and find out a proper feed fiber content, T. molitor larvae were fed on diets with 4 levels of fiber. Larval growth, development and respiration in each group were compared and analyzed. Results showed that crude-fiber content of 5% had a significant promoting effect on larvae in early instars, and is beneficial for pupa eclosion. When fed on feed of 5-10% crude-fiber, larvae in later instars reached optimal levels in growth, development and respiration. Therefore, we suggest that crude fiber content in feed can be controlled within 5-10%, and with the consideration of food palatability, a crude fiber of 5% is advisable.

  8. Effects of gasification biochar on plant-available water capacity and plant growth in two contrasting soil types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Petersen, Carsten Tilbæk;

    2016-01-01

    spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was conducted to investigate the effect of soil amendment by 1% straw and wood gasification biochar (SGB and WGB), respectively, on AWC and plant growth responses under two levels of water supply in a temperate sandy loam and a coarse sandy subsoil. In the sandy loam......Abstract Gasification biochar (GB) contains recalcitrant carbon that can contribute to soil carbon sequestration and soil quality improvement. However, the impact of GB on plant-available water capacity (AWC) and plant growth in diverse soil types still needs to be explored. A pot experiment with...

  9. Plant sterols: factors affecting their efficacy and safety as functional food ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abumweis Suhad S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plant sterols are naturally occurring molecules that humanity has evolved with. Herein, we have critically evaluated recent literature pertaining to the myriad of factors affecting efficacy and safety of plant sterols in free and esterified forms. We conclude that properly solubilized 4-desmetyl plant sterols, in ester or free form, in reasonable doses (0.8–1.0 g of equivalents per day and in various vehicles including natural sources, and as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle, are important dietary components for lowering low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and maintaining good heart health. In addition to their cholesterol lowering properties, plant sterols possess anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenicity, and anti-oxidation activities, and should thus be of clinical importance, even for those individuals without elevated LDL cholesterol. The carotenoid lowering effect of plant sterols should be corrected by increasing intake of food that is rich in carotenoids. In pregnant and lactating women and children, further study is needed to verify the dose required to decrease blood cholesterol without affecting fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoid status.

  10. Carrageenans from red seaweeds as promoters of growth and elicitors of defense response in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushp Sheel Shukla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants incessantly encounter abiotic and biotic stresses that limit their growth and productivity. However, conversely, plant growth can also be induced by treatments with various abiotic and biotic elicitors. Carrageenans are sulfated linear polysaccharides that represent major cellular constituents of seaweeds belonging to red algae (Rhodophyta. Recent research has unraveled the biological activity of carrageenans and of their oligomeric forms, the oligo carrageenans (OCs, as promoters of plant growth and as elicitors of defense responses against pests and diseases. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which carrageenans and OCs mediate plant growth and plant defense responses. Carrageenans and OCs improve plant growth by regulating various metabolic processes such as photosynthesis and ancillary pathways, cell division, purine and pyrimidine synthetic pathways as well as metabolic pathways involved in nitrogen and sulfur assimilation. Carrageenans and OCs also induce plant defense responses against viroids, viruses, bacteria, fungi and insects by modulating the activity of different defense pathways, including salicylate, jasmonate and ethylene signaling pathways. Further studies will likely substantiate the beneficial effects of carrageenans and of OCs on plant growth and plant defense responses and open new avenues for their use in agriculture and horticultural industry.

  11. Visualized modeling platform for virtual plant growth and monitoring on the internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, De-fu; Tian, Feng-qui; Ren, Ping

    2009-07-01

    Virtual plant growth is a key research topic in Agriculture Information Technique and Computer Graphics. It has been applied in botany, agronomy, environmental sciences, computre sciences and applied mathematics. Modeling leaf color dynamics in plant is of significant importance for realizing virtual plant growth. Using systematic analysis method and dynamic modeling technology, a SPAD-based leaf color dynamic model was developed to simulate time-course change characters of leaf SPAD on the plant. In addition, process of plant growth can be computer-stimulated using Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) to establish a vivid and visible model, including shooting, rooting, blooming, as well as growth of the stems and leaves. In the resistance environment, e.g., lacking of water, air or nutrient substances, high salt or alkaline, freezing injury, high temperature, suffering from diseases and insect pests, the changes from the level of whole plant to organs, tissues and cells could be computer-stimulated. Changes from physiological and biochemistry could also be described. When a series of indexes were input by the costumers, direct view and microcosmic changes could be shown. Thus, the model has a good performance in predicting growth condition of the plant, laying a foundation for further constructing virtual plant growth system. The results revealed that realistic physiological and pathological processes of 3D virtual plants could be demonstrated by proper design and effectively realized in the internet.

  12. Beneficial effect of the rhizosphere microbial community for plant growth and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihorimbere, V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant rhizosphere is the soil nearest to the plant root system where roots release large quantity of metabolites from living root hairs or fibrous root systems. These metabolites act as chemical signals for motile bacteria to move to the root surface but also represent the main nutrient sources available to support growth and persistence in the rhizosphere. Some of the microbes that inhabit this area are bacteria that are able to colonize very efficiently the roots or the rhizosphere soil of crop plants. These bacteria are referred to as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR. They fulfil important functions for plant growth and health by various manners. Direct plant growth promotion may result either from improved nutrient acquisition and/or from hormonal stimulation. Diverse mechanisms are involved in the suppression of plant pathogens, which is often indirectly connected with plant growth. This paper describes the different mechanisms commonly used by most PGPR in their natural habitats to influence plant-growth and health.

  13. Water soluble carbon nano-onions from wood wool as growth promoters for gram plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkar, Sumit Kumar; Roy, Manas; Babar, Dipak Gorakh; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2012-11-01

    Water-soluble carbon nano-onions (wsCNOs) isolated from wood wool--a wood-based pyrolysis waste product of wood, can enhance the overall growth rate of gram (Cicer arietinum) plants. Treatment of plants with upto 30 μg mL-1 of wsCNOs for an initial 10 day period in laboratory conditions led to an increase in the overall growth of the plant biomass. In order to examine the growth stimulating effects of wsCNOs under natural conditions, 10 day-old plants treated with and without wsCNOs were transplanted into soil of standard carbon and nitrogen composition. We observed an enhanced growth rate of the wsCNOs pre-treated plants in soil, which finally led to an increased productivity of plants in terms of a larger number of grams. On analyzing the carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) content for the shoot and fruit sections of the plants treated with and without wsCNOs, only a minor difference in the composition was noticed. However, a slight increase in the percentage of carbon and hydrogen in shoots reflects the synthesis of more organic biomass in the case of treated plants. This work shows that wsCNOs are non-toxic to plant cells and can act as efficient growth stimulants which can be used as benign growth promoters.

  14. Effect of arsenic on tolerance mechanisms of two plant growth-promoting bacteria used as biological inoculants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendariz, Ana L; Talano, Melina A; Wevar Oller, Ana L; Medina, María I; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial ability to colonize the rhizosphere of plants in arsenic (As) contaminated soils is highly important for symbiotic and free-living plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) used as inoculants, since they can contribute to enhance plant As tolerance and limit metalloid uptake by plants. The aim of this work was to study the effect of As on growth, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, biofilm formation and motility of two strains used as soybean inoculants, Bradyrhizobium japonicum E109 and Azospirillum brasilense Az39. The metabolism of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) and their removal and/or possible accumulation were also evaluated. The behavior of both bacteria under As treatment was compared and discussed in relation to their potential for colonizing plant rhizosphere with high content of the metalloid. B. japonicum E109 growth was reduced with As(III) concentration from 10 μM while A. brasilense Az39 showed a reduction of growth with As(III) from 500 μM. EPS and biofilm production increased significantly under 25 μM As(III) for both strains. Moreover, this was more notorious for Azospirillum under 500 μM As(III), where motility was seriously affected. Both bacterial strains showed a similar ability to reduce As(V). However, Azospirillum was able to oxidize more As(III) (around 53%) than Bradyrhizobium (17%). In addition, both strains accumulated As in cell biomass. The behavior of Azospirillum under As treatments suggests that this strain would be able to colonize efficiently As contaminated soils. In this way, inoculation with A. brasilense Az39 would positively contribute to promoting growth of different plant species under As treatment. PMID:26141894

  15. Affect of Main Ecological Factors on Growth of Pinus taeda%主要生态因子对火炬松生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄华明

    2011-01-01

    分析主要生态因子对火炬松生长的影响,结果表明:立地类型、海拔高度、坡度对火炬松的胸径、树高、单株材积、单位面积蓄积量等,均有极显著的影响;土壤的腐殖质、速N、速P含量与火炬松胸径、树高的生长密切相关,从而影响了单株材积和单位面积蓄积;土壤K含量对火炬松生长没有影响;年降水量、2~7月份的降水量对火炬松的胸径、树高生长有明显的影响,年积温对胸径生长有明显影响,对树高生长没有影响。%The affect of main ecological factors on growth of Pinus taeda was analyzed,the results showed that: site type,altitude,slope have very significant impact on the DBH,tree height,plant volume,stock volume per unit area of Pinus taeda,etc.;soil humus,content of available N and P were closely related with the growth of DBH and height of Pinus taeda,thus affected the volume and per unit area per plant accumulation;K content of soil has no affect on the growth of Pinus taeda;Annual precipitation and February-July precipitation have a significant impact on the growth of DBH and height of Pinus taeda,the annual accumulated temperature has a significant effect on growth of DBH,but tree height growth was not affected.

  16. Factors affecting callus and protoplast production and regeneration of plants from garlic tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five cultivars of garlic, two explants, six callusing media, six regeneration media, two kinds of light and several doses of gamma irradiation were used to determine the best conditions for callus induction and plant regeneration from garlic tissue cultures. Also, some experiments were conducted to study the possibility to isolate protoplast and regenerate plants. The experiment showed that medium MS9 was good for regenerating plant directly from basal plate without going through callus phase. ANOVA exhibited significant differences among used cultivars in their ability to form callus. No significant difference was observed between 16 hr light and complete darkness in callus growth. However, appearance of callus was generally better on darkness. Cultivar varied in their ability to regenerate and interaction between cultivars and media was observed. Cultivar kisswany was the best in regeneration (38%) and medium MS47 was the best among used media (35%). Light type played a significant role in regeneration of plants where red light was much better than white light in inducing regeneration (68% vs 36%). ANOVA revealed significant effect of low doses of gamma irradiation on stimulation regeneration of plant whereas high doses prevented regeneration. Many experiments were conducted to isolate protoplast and regenerate plants. The best method for culturing was the droplet and the best conditions for incubation were complete darkness at 25 Degreed centigrade. This lead to formation of cell wall but no cell division was observed (author)

  17. Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea A. Koch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5 directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5 on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation.

  18. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The acquisition of plant sterols, mediated via elicitins, is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. In this paper, we looked at the interaction between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. When ground leaf tissue was added to growth media, P. ramorum growth and sporulation was greates...

  19. The key factor limiting plant growth in cold and humid alpine areas also plays a dominant role in plant carbon isotope discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Wang, Guoan; Li, Xiaoliang; Cai, Xiaobu; Li, Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Junling

    2015-01-01

    Many environmental factors affect carbon isotope discrimination in plants, yet the predominant factor influencing this process is generally assumed to be the key growth-limiting factor. However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed. We therefore determined the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of plants growing in two cold and humid mountain regions where temperature is considered to be the key growth-limiting factor. Mean annual temperature (MAT) showed a significant impact on variation in carbon isotope discrimination value (Δ) irrespective of study area or plant functional type with either partial correlation or regression analysis, but the correlation between Δ and soil water content (SWC) was usually not significant. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, MAT was either the first or the only variable selected into the prediction model of Δ against MAT and SWC, indicating that the effect of temperature on carbon isotope discrimination was predominant. The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination. Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature. PMID:26579188

  20. Ecological occurrence of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus and nitrogen-fixing Acetobacteraceae members: their possible role in plant growth promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, V S; Madhaiyan, M; Osborne, Jabez; Thangaraju, M; Sa, T M

    2008-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus has a long-standing history of bacterial-plant interrelationship as a symbiotic endophyte capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. In low nitrogen fertilized sugarcane fields it plays a significant role and its occurrence was realised in most of the sugarcane growing countries. In this mini review, the association of G. diazotrophicus with sugarcane, other crop plants and with various hosts is discussed. The factors affecting survival in the rhizosphere and the putative soil mode of transmission are emphasized. In addition, other N(2)-fixing Acetobacteraceae members, including Gluconacetobacter azotocaptans, Gluconacetobacter johannae and Swaminathania salitolerans, occurring in coffee, corn and rice plants are also covered. Lastly, the plant-growth-promoting traits identified in this group of bacteria, including N(2) fixation, phytohormone synthesis, P and Zn solubilization and biocontrol, are analysed. PMID:17574542