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Sample records for affecting calcium deficiency

  1. The Effects of Dietary Calcium and/or Iron Deficiency upon Murine Intestinal Calcium Binding Protein Activity and Calcium Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Catherine M.

    1980-01-01

    Iron deficiency has been shown to impair calcium absorption, leading to decreased bone mass. Vitamin D3-dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP) has been demonstrated to be necessary for the active transport of calcium in the intestine of numerous species. Iron deficiency might affect the activity of the calcium binding protein. Four experimental diets were formulated as follows: Diet 1, iron adequate, calcium adequate; Diet 2, iron deficient, calcium adequate; Diet 3, iron adequate, calci...

  2. Dietary calcium deficiency in laying ducks impairs eggshell quality by suppressing shell biomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Fei; Tian, Zhi Mei; Zhang, Han Xing; Ruan, Dong; Li, Yan; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Chun Tian; Lin, Ying Cai

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary calcium deficiency on the process of shell formation. Four hundred and fifty female ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) at 22 weeks were randomly assigned to three groups. Ducks were fed one of two calcium-deficient diets (containing 1.8% or 0.38% calcium, respectively) or a calcium-adequate control diet (containing 3.6% calcium) for 67 days (depletion period) and then all ducks were fed a calcium-adequate diet for an additional 67 days (repletion period). Compared with the calcium-adequate control, the average shell thickness, egg shell weight, breaking strength, mammillae density and mammillary knob thickness of shell from ducks that consumed the diet with 0.38% calcium were significantly decreased (Pducks fed 0.38% calcium but not 1.8% calcium. Plasma estradiol concentration was decreased by both of the calcium-deficient diets (Pstudy suggest that dietary calcium deficiency negatively affects eggshell quality and microarchitecture, probably by suppressing shell biomineralization. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Vitamin D/dietary calcium deficiency rickets and pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Francis H; Pettifor, John M

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and biochemical perturbations found in privational (nutritional) rickets and pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets (PDDR), an autosomal recessive condition with loss of function mutations in CYP27B1. It may seem strange to combine a discussion on privational rickets and PDDR as a single topic, but privational rickets and PDDR present with similar clinical signs and symptoms and with similar perturbations in bone and mineral metabolism. Of interest is the characteristic lack of features of rickets at birth in infants with PDDR, a finding which has also been reported in infants born to vitamin D-deficient mothers. This highlights the independence of the fetus and neonate from the need for vitamin D to maintain calcium homeostasis during this period. The variable roles of vitamin D deficiency and dietary calcium deficiency in the pathogenesis of privational rickets are discussed and the associated alterations in vitamin D metabolism highlighted. Although PDDR is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, results of long-term follow-up are now available on the effect of treatment with calcitriol, and these are discussed. Areas of uncertainty, such as should affected mothers breastfeed their infants, are emphasized. PMID:24818008

  4. Calcium-deficiency assessment and biomarker identification by an integrated urinary metabonomics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcium deficiency is a global public-health problem. Although the initial stage of calcium deficiency can lead to metabolic alterations or potential pathological changes, calcium deficiency is difficult to diagnose accurately. Moreover, the details of the molecular mechanism of calcium deficiency remain somewhat elusive. To accurately assess and provide appropriate nutritional intervention, we carried out a global analysis of metabolic alterations in response to calcium deficiency. Methods The metabolic alterations associated with calcium deficiency were first investigated in a rat model, using urinary metabonomics based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis. Correlations between dietary calcium intake and the biomarkers identified from the rat model were further analyzed to confirm the potential application of these biomarkers in humans. Results Urinary metabolic-profiling analysis could preliminarily distinguish between calcium-deficient and non-deficient rats after a 2-week low-calcium diet. We established an integrated metabonomics strategy for identifying reliable biomarkers of calcium deficiency using a time-course analysis of discriminating metabolites in a low-calcium diet experiment, repeating the low-calcium diet experiment and performing a calcium-supplement experiment. In total, 27 biomarkers were identified, including glycine, oxoglutaric acid, pyrophosphoric acid, sebacic acid, pseudouridine, indoxyl sulfate, taurine, and phenylacetylglycine. The integrated urinary metabonomics analysis, which combined biomarkers with regular trends of change (types A, B, and C), could accurately assess calcium-deficient rats at different stages and clarify the dynamic pathophysiological changes and molecular mechanism of calcium deficiency in detail. Significant correlations between calcium intake and two biomarkers, pseudouridine (Pearson

  5. The influence of magnesium deficiency on calcium metabolism in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larvor, P.; Labat, M.-L.

    1978-01-01

    Calcium metabolism was studied in magnesium-deficient rats with an isotopic technique. 45 Ca was injected intravenously and the blood calcium radioactivity curve was analyzed mathematically to compute the kinetics of calcium exchange in the whole body. No important change was noticed after a 10-day magnesium deficiency; there was a significant reduction of the ratio calcium pool/total calcium output from the pool (P/Vsub(T)). After a 20-day deficiency, a dramatic decrease in the two compartments of exchangeable calcium (-40%), and a less important decrease of Vsub(T)(-15%) was noted. Blood plasma urea level increased during magnesium deficiency, while urea urinary clearance remained

  6. Depression of calcium pump activity in renal cortex of vitamin D-deficient rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Saitoh, Michiyo; Takita, Yumiko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Tamura, Teiichi

    1990-01-01

    To examine the hormonal regulation of the ATP-dependent Ca 2+ pump in the kidneys, the ATP-dependent Ca 2+ uptake by the basolateral membrane vesicles in the renal cortex was measured using radioactive calcium ( 45 Ca 2+ ) in rats with vitamin D deficiency or rats undergoing thyroparathyroidectomy. The V max of the Ca 2+ pump activity was increased not only by administering calcitriol, but also by normalizing the serum calcium level in vitamin D-deficient rats. PTH suppressed the Ca 2+ pump activity in normocalcemic vitamin D-deficient rats. Thyroparathyroidectomy did not affect the Ca 2+ pump activity in the kidneys of normal rats. It was concluded that the ATP-dependent Ca 2+ pump activity was depressed by secondary hyperparathyroidism in vitamin D-deficient rats. (author)

  7. Intact calcium signaling in adrenergic-deficient embryonic mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Jessica N; Taylor, David G; Katchman, Alexander N; Ebert, Steven N

    2018-01-22

    Mouse embryos that lack the ability to produce the adrenergic hormones, norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI), due to disruption of the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (Dbh -/- ) gene inevitably perish from heart failure during mid-gestation. Since adrenergic stimulation is well-known to enhance calcium signaling in developing as well as adult myocardium, and impairments in calcium signaling are typically associated with heart failure, we hypothesized that adrenergic-deficient embryonic hearts would display deficiencies in cardiac calcium signaling relative to adrenergic-competent controls at a developmental stage immediately preceding the onset of heart failure, which first appears beginning or shortly after mouse embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5). To test this hypothesis, we used ratiometric fluorescent calcium imaging techniques to measure cytosolic calcium transients, [Ca 2+ ] i in isolated E10.5 mouse hearts. Our results show that spontaneous [Ca 2+ ] i oscillations were intact and robustly responded to a variety of stimuli including extracellular calcium (5 mM), caffeine (5 mM), and NE (100 nM) in a manner that was indistinguishable from controls. Further, we show similar patterns of distribution (via immunofluorescent histochemical staining) and activity (via patch-clamp recording techniques) for the major voltage-gated plasma membrane calcium channel responsible for the L-type calcium current, I Ca,L , in adrenergic-deficient and control embryonic cardiac cells. These results demonstrate that despite the absence of vital adrenergic hormones that consistently leads to embryonic lethality in vivo, intracellular and extracellular calcium signaling remain essentially intact and functional in embryonic mouse hearts through E10.5. These findings suggest that adrenergic stimulation is not required for the development of intracellular calcium oscillations or extracellular calcium signaling through I Ca,L and that aberrant calcium signaling does not likely contribute

  8. Timing of the calcium intake and effect of calcium deficiency on behaviour and egg laying in captive great tits, Parus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graveland, J; Berends, A E

    1997-01-01

    The calcium demand of egg-laying birds is much higher than in other vertebrates during reproduction. We showed elsewhere that a low level of calcium availability can greatly affect the eggshell quality and reproduction of free-living passerines. However, there are few data on calcium demand and calcium intake in relation to egg laying and behaviour and egg-laying performance under conditions of calcium shortage in nondomesticated birds. We examined these aspects in an experiment with captive great tits, Parus major, on a diet deficient in calcium, with or without snail shells as an additional calcium source. More than 90% of the calcium intake for egg production took place during the egg-laying period. Females ingested about 1.7 times as much calcium as they deposited in eggshells. Removing the snail shells after the first egg resulted in eggshell defects and interruptions of laying after 1-3 d. Females without snail shells doubled their searching effort and started to burrow in the soil and to eat sand, small stones, and their own eggs. Most calcium was consumed in the evening, probably to supplement the calcium available from the medullary bone with an additional calcium source in the gut during eggshell formation. The results demonstrated that eggshell formation requires accurate timing of the calcium intake and that obtaining sufficient calcium is time-consuming, even in calcium-rich environments. These factors pertaining to calcium intake greatly affect the ability of birds to collect sufficient calcium for eggshell formation in calcium-poor areas.

  9. Effect of calcium deficiency on the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanath, B.; Shastry, V.V.; Ramamurty, U.; Ravishankar, N.

    2010-01-01

    The deterioration of the mechanical properties of bone with age is related to several factors including the structure, organization and chemistry of the constituent phases; however, the relative contribution of each of these factors is not well understood. In this study, we have investigated the effect of chemistry (calcium deficiency) on the mechanical properties of single crystals of hydroxyapatite. Single crystals of stoichiometric crystals grown by the flux method and calcium-deficient platelet crystals grown using wet chemical methods were used as model systems. Using nanoindentation, we show that calcium deficiency leads to an 80% reduction in the hardness and elastic modulus and at least a 75% reduction in toughness in plate-shaped hydroxyapatite crystals. Measurement of local mechanical properties using nanoindentation and nanoscale chemistry through elemental mapping in a transmission electron microscope points to a direct correlation between the observed spatial variation in composition and the large scatter in the measured hardness and modulus values.

  10. Baroreflex deficiency induces additional impairment of vagal tone, diastolic function and calcium handling proteins after myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostarda, Cristiano; Rodrigues, Bruno; Medeiros, Alessandra; Moreira, Edson D; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; Brum, Patricia C; Angelis, Katia De; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction has been considered an important mortality predictor after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the impact of baroreflex deficiency prior to MI on tonic autonomic control and cardiac function, and on the profile of proteins associated with intracellular calcium handling has not yet been studied. The aim of the present study was to analyze how the impairment of baroreflex induced by sinoaortic denervation (SAD) prior to MI in rats affects the tonic autonomic control, ventricular function and cardiomyocyte calcium handling proteins. After 15 days of following or SAD surgery, rats underwent MI. Echocardiographic, hemodynamic, autonomic and molecular evaluations were performed 90 days after MI. Baroreflex impairment led to additional damage on: left ventricular remodeling, diastolic function, vagal tonus and intrinsic heart rate after MI. The loss of vagal component of the arterial baroreflex and vagal tonus were correlated with changes in the cardiac proteins involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, additional increase in sodium calcium exchanger expression levels was associated with impaired diastolic function in experimental animals. Our findings strongly suggest that previous arterial baroreflex deficiency may induce additional impairment of vagal tonus, which was associated with calcium handling proteins abnormalities, probably triggering ventricular diastolic dysfunction after MI in rats. PMID:24936224

  11. Experimental rickets in broilers: gross, microscopic, and radiographic lesions. II. Calcium deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, P.H.; Lee, S.R.; Rowland, G.N.; Britton, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    Day-old broiler chicks were fed a calcium-deficient diet for 30 days. Gross, microscopic, and radiographic examinations of the proximal tibiotarsus were done at 2, 3, and 4 weeks of age. In 2-week-old chicks, the growth-plate proliferating-prehypertrophied zone (P-PHZ) was variably lengthened and disorganized, cartilage columns of the degenerating hypertrophied zone and metaphyseal primary spongiosa were shortened, and bone spicules of the secondary spongiosa were bordered by increased osteoid. In 3-week-old chicks, lesions were either similar or more pronounced, with the additional finding of metaphyseal peritrabecular fibrosis. In 4-week-old chicks, the P-PHZ decreased in relative length, osteoid seams and fibrous connective tissue were less prominent, and tibial dyschondroplasia-like lesions were present. Results demonstrated that dietary calcium deficiency produced rachitic lesions, that the lesions were very different from those of phosphorus deficiency or calcium excess, and that the lesions were variable over time. (author)

  12. Study of calcium-dependent lead-tolerance on plants differing in their level of Ca-deficiency tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    2005-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to determine the role of calcium in the amelioration of lead toxic effects in plants with accordingly high/low level of Pb-tolerance and high/low Ca-deficiency tolerance. The study was performed on maize, rye, tomato and mustard. Plants were cultivated in modified Knop's solution. They were subjected to Ca-deficiency, and to lead nitrate administered in the presence of four calcium nitrate concentrations 3.0, 2.4, 1.2, 0.3 mM. Lead-tolerance and tolerance to Ca-deficiency were determined, as were concentration of the studied elements in plant tissues, and the Pb deposition pattern at the ultrastructural level (electron microscopy study, X-ray microanalysis). In all studied plants, lead toxicity increased as medium calcium content decreased, however, only in the Ca-deficiency sensitive mustard with low Pb-tolerance was it accompanied by a rise in tissue lead concentration. In contrast, lead root and shoot levels did not increase in the highly Ca-deficiency tolerant tomato, mustard and rye with high Pb-tolerance irrespective of the Ca 2+ regimens applied. Thus, in these plants, lead's unfavourable effects resulted only from the higher toxicity of the same amount of lead in tissues at low calcium in the medium. Of particular relevance is the finding by electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis, that under low calcium in both highly Ca-deficiency tolerant and Ca-deficiency sensitive plants, less efficient Pb 2+ detoxification was accompanied by the restriction of the formation of large lead deposits in cell walls. Obtained results are novel in demonstrating calcium involvement in the lead deposition in the cell wall, thus in the regulation of the internal lead detoxification. - Calcium regulated lead deposition in cell walls of plants

  13. Calcium Deficiency in Bangladesh: Burden and Proposed Solutions for the First 1000 Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, Sabri; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bangladesh incurs among the highest prevalence of stunting and micronutrient deficiencies in the world, despite efforts against diarrheal disease, respiratory infections, and protein energy malnutrition which have led to substantial and continuous reductions in child mortality over the past 35 years. Although programs have generally paid more attention to other micronutrients, the local importance of calcium to health has been less recognized. Objective To synthesize available information on calcium deficiency in Bangladesh in order to inform the design of an effective national calcium program. Methods We searched 3 online databases and a multitude of survey reports to conduct a narrative review of calcium epidemiology in Bangladesh, including population intake, determinants and consequences of deficiency, and tested interventions, with particular reference to young children and women of childbearing age. This was supplemented with secondary analysis of a national household survey in order to map the relative extent of calcium adequacy among different demographics. Results Intake of calcium is low in the general population of Bangladesh, with potentially serious and persistent effects on public health. These effects are especially pertinent to young children and reproductive-age women, by virtue of increased physiologic needs, disproportionately poor access to dietary calcium sources, and a confluence of other local determinants of calcium status in these groups. Conclusion A tablet supplementation program for pregnant women is an appealing approach for the reduction in preeclampsia and preterm birth. Further research is warranted to address the comparative benefit of different promising approaches in children for the prevention of rickets. PMID:27307152

  14. Aromatase deficiency causes altered expression of molecules critical for calcium reabsorption in the kidneys of female mice *.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oz, O.K.; Hajibeigi, A.; Howard, K.; Cummins, C.L.; Abel, M. van; Bindels, R.J.M.; Word, R.A.; Kuro-o, M.; Pak, C.Y.; Zerwekh, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Kidney stones increase after menopause, suggesting a role for estrogen deficiency. ArKO mice have hypercalciuria and lower levels of calcium transport proteins, whereas levels of the klotho protein are elevated. Thus, estrogen deficiency is sufficient to cause altered renal calcium handling.

  15. Role of calcium deficiency in development of nutritional rickets in Indian children: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Varun; Seth, Anju; Aneja, Satinder; Sharma, Bhawna; Sonkar, Pitamber; Singh, Satveer; Marwaha, Raman K

    2012-10-01

    Nutritional rickets is usually attributed to vitamin D deficiency. Studies from some tropical countries have postulated low dietary intake of calcium as the cause of nutritional rickets. Both vitamin D and dietary calcium deficiency are highly prevalent in India. Information on their relative contribution in the development of rickets in Indian children is limited. The aim was to study the role of calcium and vitamin D deficiency in causation of nutritional rickets in young Indian children. In a case-control study, 67 children with nutritional rickets and 68 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were compared for demographic factors, nutritional status, sun exposure (UV score), dietary calcium and phytate intake (for subjects not breast-fed at presentation), and biochemical parameters [serum calcium, inorganic phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and PTH]. Mean intake of calcium (204±129 vs. 453±234 mg/d; Prickets, significant negative correlations were seen between dietary calcium intake and radiological score (r=-0.28; P=0.03) and PTH (r=-0.26; P=0.02). No correlation was found between serum 25OHD level and radiological score or biochemical parameters of rickets. Rickets develops when low dietary calcium intake coexists with a low or borderline vitamin D nutrition status.

  16. The calcium connection - deficient mothers with normal newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, S.; Hussain, F.; Khan, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study on blood calcium levels of pregnant women of low socioeconomic status was designed to find out the consequences of low levels on the outcome of pregnancy. Blood samples from 52 women and their cord were collected at the time of delivery. Calcium was analyzed calorimetrically in maternal as well as cord blood. For comparative analysis, levels of phosphorus were analyzed on atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results were compared with 24 non- pregnant age matched controls. Calcium levels were significantly low (p < 0.01), in maternal (8.13 +- 0.40 mg/dl) and cord blood (8.69 +- 0.28mg/dl) compared to controls (10.5 +- 0.6 mg/dl) and significantly higher in primiparous mothers (M= 8.2 +- 0.78 mg/dl, C= 8.1 +- 0.50 mg/dl) compared to multiparous (M=6.4 +- 0.59 mg/dl, C= 7.9 +- 0.53 mg/dl). Calcium levels were also found significantly lower in mothers who had a miscarriage (M=7.60 +- 0.37 mg/dl,C=9.1+-0.65 mg/dl) before this pregnancy than the primiparous and the controls. The results on the whole suggest that women tend to develop a marginal calcium deficiency after pregnancy. (author)

  17. Prevention and Treatment of Vitamin D and Calcium Deficiency in Children and Adolescents: Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP) Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Anuradha; Khadilkar, Vaman; Chinnappa, Jagdish; Rathi, Narendra; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Balasubramanian, S; Parekh, Bakul; Jog, Pramod

    2017-07-15

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is being increasingly reported from India from all age-groups. Reports suggest that VDD affects all age groups, from neonates to adolescents. Further, habitually low calcium intakes are also reported in Indian children. Given the multiple guidelines, peculiarities of Indian circumstances, changing lifestyles, and lack of fortification, the Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP) felt the need for a Practice Guideline for Pediatricians for the prevention and treatment of vitamin D and calcium deficiency in children and adolescents. The 'Guideline for Vitamin D and Calcium in Children' committee was formed by the IAP in September 2016. A consultative committee meeting was held in November 2016 in Mumbai. Evidence from Indian and international studies and other previous published recommendations, which were pertinent to the Indian circumstances, were collated for the preparation of these guidelines. To present a practice guideline for pediatricians for the prevention and treatment of deficiency of vitamin D and calcium in the Indian context. For the prevention of rickets in premature infants, 400 IU of vitamin D and 150-220 mg/kg of calcium, and in neonates, 400 IU of vitamin D and 200 mg of calcium are recommended daily. For prevention of rickets and hypocalcemia in infants (after neonatal period) upto 1 year of age, and from 1-18 years, 400 IU and 600 IU vitamin D/day and 250-500 mg/day and 600-800 mg/day of calcium, respectively, are recommended. For treatment of rickets in premature neonates, infants upto 1 year and from 1-18 years, 1000 IU, 2000 IU and 3000-6000 IU of vitamin D daily, respectively, and elemental calcium of 70-80 mg/kg/day in premature neonates and 500-800 mg daily for all children over that age are recommended. Larger doses of vitamin D may be given from 3 months to 18 years of age as 60,000 IU/week for 6 weeks.

  18. Effect of substrate nature on the electrochemical deposition of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdrón-Reyes, A. F.; Domínguez-Vélez, V.; Morales-Morales, J. A.; Cabanzo, R.; Meléndez, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Calcium phosphates were obtained by reducing nitrate ions to produce hydroxide ions on TiO2/stainless steel and TiO2/titanium electrodes. TiO2 coatings on metallic substrates were prepared by sol-gel dip-coating method. The morphology of deposits was observed by FESEM. Chemical nature of calcium phosphate deposits was identified by Raman micro-spectroscopy and FESEM/EDS microanalysis. Electrochemical behavior of nitrate and nitrite reduction on stainless steel and titanium electrodes was studied by linear sweep voltammetry. In addition, voltammetric study of the calcium phosphate electrodeposition on both electrodes was performed. From these measurements was selected the potential to form a calcium phosphate. A catalytic current associated to nitrate reduction reaction was obtained for stainless steel electrode, leading to significant deposition of calcium phosphate. Ca/P ratio for both substrates was less than 1.67. The formation of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Calcium absorption in vitamin D deficient chickens using radiocalcium as tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasangka, Bintara Her

    1984-01-01

    An experiment to study the absorption of calcium through the duodenum of vitamin D deficient chickens was conducted using radiocalcium as tracer. In this experiment twenty chickens were reared from one day old chicken until one month and maintained on rachitogenic diet. Vitamin D was given to ten chickens orally fourty eight hours prior to the administration of radiocalcium. The result of this experiment indicated that the absorption of calcium in the duodenum was higher in chickens provided with vitamin D compared to those without vitamin D (P≤0.01). (author)

  20. Effect of substrate nature on the electrochemical deposition of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualdrón-Reyes, A F; Cabanzo, R; Meléndez, A M; Domínguez-Vélez, V; Morales-Morales, J A

    2017-01-01

    Calcium phosphates were obtained by reducing nitrate ions to produce hydroxide ions on TiO 2 /stainless steel and TiO 2 /titanium electrodes. TiO 2 coatings on metallic substrates were prepared by sol-gel dip-coating method. The morphology of deposits was observed by FESEM. Chemical nature of calcium phosphate deposits was identified by Raman micro-spectroscopy and FESEM/EDS microanalysis. Electrochemical behavior of nitrate and nitrite reduction on stainless steel and titanium electrodes was studied by linear sweep voltammetry. In addition, voltammetric study of the calcium phosphate electrodeposition on both electrodes was performed. From these measurements was selected the potential to form a calcium phosphate. A catalytic current associated to nitrate reduction reaction was obtained for stainless steel electrode, leading to significant deposition of calcium phosphate. Ca/P ratio for both substrates was less than 1.67. The formation of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. (paper)

  1. Vitamin D treatment in calcium-deficiency rickets: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Fischer, Philip R; Pettifor, John M

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether children with calcium-deficiency rickets have a better response to treatment with vitamin D and calcium than with calcium alone. Randomised controlled trial. Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria. Nigerian children with active rickets treated with calcium carbonate as limestone (approximately 938 mg elemental calcium twice daily) were, in addition, randomised to receive either oral vitamin D2 50,000 IU (Ca+D, n=44) or placebo (Ca, n=28) monthly for 24 weeks. Achievement of a 10-point radiographic severity score ≤1.5 and serum alkaline phosphatase ≤350 U/L. The median (range) age of enrolled children was 46 (15-102) months, and baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. Mean (±SD) 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was 30.2±13.2 nmol/L at baseline, and 29 (43%) had values rickets, there is a trend for vitamin D to improve the response to treatment with calcium carbonate as limestone, independent of baseline 25(OH)D concentrations. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00949832. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Multi-Functions of Carbonated Calcium Deficient Hydroxyapatite (CDHA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan

    Natural bone is a complex composite mainly constituted of inorganic minerals and organic collagen molecules. Calcium phosphate (CaP) based materials have been proposed as the predominant bone substitute for bone tissue engineering applications due to their chemical similarity to bone mineral. Amorphous carbonated calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) is an important compound among CaP materials because of the amorphous crystallite structure. The presence of extra ions in its lattice structure not only influences cell attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts, but also helps in bone metabolism. Biomimetic coating approach is the most widely used approach to produce CDHA coatings to implant. It is a process using simulated body fluid (SBF) to deposit bone-like CDHA coating to various material surfaces. The CDHA formation mechanism, SBF compositions and reacting conditions of biomimetic coating have already been sufficiently studied and compared in the past 20 years. It is an attempt in this thesis to explore new applications of SBF in biomedical research, focusing on different biomaterial applications: 1) based on the low temperature reaction condition of SBF, bisphosphonate incorporated CDHA coatings were deposited onto Ti6Al4V surface for the treatment of osteoporosis; 2) amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres with extra elements in the lattice structure were prepared by a novel microwave assisted approach, providing a new potential of CaP materials production; 3) CDHA particles formed in SBF can be used as great fillers with biopolymers for preparing biocomposites for biomedical applications; 4) based on the high activity of CDHA amorphous structure and the stabilization ability of ethanol, yttrium and europium doped calcium phosphates were prepared using CDHA as a sacrificing template. In the end, future work based on these observations in the thesis is addressed, including areas of drug delivery, biocomposite fabrication and preparation of functionalized

  3. Evolution of the Calcium Paradigm: The Relation between Vitamin D, Serum Calcium and Calcium Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borje E. Christopher Nordin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is the index disease for calcium deficiency, just as rickets/osteomalacia is the index disease for vitamin D deficiency, but there is considerable overlap between them. The common explanation for this overlap is that hypovitaminosis D causes malabsorption of calcium which then causes secondary hyperparathyroidism and is effectively the same thing as calcium deficiency. This paradigm is incorrect. Hypovitaminosis D causes secondary hyperparathyroidism at serum calcidiol levels lower than 60 nmol/L long before it causes malabsorption of calcium because serum calcitriol (which controls calcium absorption is maintained until serum calcidiol falls below 20 nmol/L. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, probably due to loss of a “calcaemic” action of vitamin D on bone first described in 1957, destroys bone and explains why vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Vitamin D thus plays a central role in the maintenance of the serum (ionised calcium, which is more important to the organism than the preservation of the skeleton. Bone is sacrificed when absorbed dietary calcium does not match excretion through the skin, kidneys and bowel which is why calcium deficiency causes osteoporosis in experimental animals and, by implication, in humans.

  4. Harnessing Finger Millet to Combat Calcium Deficiency in Humans: Challenges and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Swati; Kam, Jason; Sahu, Pranav P; Yadav, Rama; Srivastava, Rakesh K; Ojulong, Henry; Yadav, Rattan

    2017-01-01

    Humans require more than 20 mineral elements for healthy body function. Calcium (Ca), one of the essential macromineral, is required in relatively large quantities in the diet for maintaining a sound overall health. Young children, pregnant and nursing women in marginalized and poorest regions of the world, are at highest risk of Ca malnutrition. Elderly population is another group of people most commonly affected by Ca deficiency mainly in the form of osteoporosis and osteopenia. Improved dietary intake of Ca may be the most cost-effective way to meet such deficiencies. Finger millet [ Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.], a crop with inherently higher Ca content in its grain, is an excellent candidate for understanding genetic mechanisms associated with Ca accumulation in grain crops. Such knowledge will also contribute toward increasing Ca contents in other staple crops consumed on daily basis using plant-breeding (also known as biofortification) methods. However, developing Ca-biofortified finger millet to reach nutritional acceptability faces various challenges. These include identifying and translating the high grain Ca content to an adequately bioavailable form so as to have a positive impact on Ca malnutrition. In this review, we assess some recent advancements and challenges for enrichment of its Ca value and present possible inter-disciplinary prospects for advancing the actual impact of Ca-biofortified finger millet.

  5. Harnessing Finger Millet to Combat Calcium Deficiency in Humans: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Puranik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans require more than 20 mineral elements for healthy body function. Calcium (Ca, one of the essential macromineral, is required in relatively large quantities in the diet for maintaining a sound overall health. Young children, pregnant and nursing women in marginalized and poorest regions of the world, are at highest risk of Ca malnutrition. Elderly population is another group of people most commonly affected by Ca deficiency mainly in the form of osteoporosis and osteopenia. Improved dietary intake of Ca may be the most cost-effective way to meet such deficiencies. Finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L. Gaertn.], a crop with inherently higher Ca content in its grain, is an excellent candidate for understanding genetic mechanisms associated with Ca accumulation in grain crops. Such knowledge will also contribute toward increasing Ca contents in other staple crops consumed on daily basis using plant-breeding (also known as biofortification methods. However, developing Ca-biofortified finger millet to reach nutritional acceptability faces various challenges. These include identifying and translating the high grain Ca content to an adequately bioavailable form so as to have a positive impact on Ca malnutrition. In this review, we assess some recent advancements and challenges for enrichment of its Ca value and present possible inter-disciplinary prospects for advancing the actual impact of Ca-biofortified finger millet.

  6. MODERN POSSIBILITIES OF THE DIET THERAPY FOR THE PREVENTION AND CORRECTION OF THE CALCIUM DEFICIENCY AMONG INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.E. Sannikova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The work studies the efficiency of the specialized milk formula inclusion into the diet to prevent and correct the calcium deficiency among infants (aged between 1 and 3 years old. The authors discovered the positive impact of the milk formula on the values of the phosphoric and calcic exchange: the level of the ionized calcium, daily excretion of calcium with urine, osteocalcin. They identified the significant effect of the diet therapy for the prevention of the pathologic symptoms on the part of the musculoskeletal system (bearing disorder, reduction of the muscular tonus and etc..Key words: children, milk formula, calcium, exchange, diet therapy.

  7. In vitro precipitation of electrodeposited calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti6Al4V substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumelie, N.; Benhayoune, H.; Richard, D.; Laurent-Maquin, D.; Balossier, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, electrodeposited calcium phosphate coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an EDAX detector, before and after immersion in DMEM (Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium). After 1, 7, 14, and 21 days of immersion, the calcium and phosphate contents in solution were measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results indicated that precipitation of the coating occurred. Before immersion in DMEM, the electrodeposited coating was a mixed crystalline and amorphous calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite with a Ca/P atomic ratio of about 1.5, but during the immersion period these phases rapidly disappeared and were followed by the precipitation of a crystalline apatite with a Ca/P atomic ratio near 1.65. On the basis of these results, we conclude that an electrodeposited calcium phosphate coating on roughened titanium alloy substrate may act as a precursor for newly precipitated calcium phosphate in in vitro experiments independent of cellular activities

  8. m-AAA proteases, mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patron, Maria; Sprenger, Hans-Georg; Langer, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    The function of mitochondria depends on ubiquitously expressed and evolutionary conserved m-AAA proteases in the inner membrane. These ATP-dependent peptidases form hexameric complexes built up of homologous subunits. AFG3L2 subunits assemble either into homo-oligomeric isoenzymes or with SPG7 (paraplegin) subunits into hetero-oligomeric proteolytic complexes. Mutations in AFG3L2 are associated with dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA28) characterized by the loss of Purkinje cells, whereas mutations in SPG7 cause a recessive form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP7) with motor neurons of the cortico-spinal tract being predominantly affected. Pleiotropic functions have been assigned to m-AAA proteases, which act as quality control and regulatory enzymes in mitochondria. Loss of m-AAA proteases affects mitochondrial protein synthesis and respiration and leads to mitochondrial fragmentation and deficiencies in the axonal transport of mitochondria. Moreover m-AAA proteases regulate the assembly of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) complex. Impaired degradation of the MCU subunit EMRE in AFG3L2-deficient mitochondria results in the formation of deregulated MCU complexes, increased mitochondrial calcium uptake and increased vulnerability of neurons for calcium-induced cell death. A reduction of calcium influx into the cytosol of Purkinje cells rescues ataxia in an AFG3L2-deficient mouse model. In this review, we discuss the relationship between the m-AAA protease and mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and its relevance for neurodegeneration and describe a novel mouse model lacking MCU specifically in Purkinje cells. Our results pledge for a novel view on m-AAA proteases that integrates their pleiotropic functions in mitochondria to explain the pathogenesis of associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M.; Martin, Berdine R.; Wastney, Meryl; McCabe, George P.; Moe, Sharon M.; Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus and reduce phosphorus retention, and to prevent negative calcium balance. Data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance in CKD to support this. The aim of this study was to determine calcium and phosphorus balance and calcium kinetics with and without calcium carbonate in CKD patients. Eight stage 3/4 CKD patients, eGFR 36 mL/min, participated in two 3-week balances in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of calcium carbonate (1500 mg/d calcium). Calcium and phosphorus balance were determined on a controlled diet. Oral and intravenous 45calcium with blood sampling and urine and fecal collections were used for calcium kinetics. Fasting blood and urine were collected at baseline and end of each week of each balance period for biochemical analyses. Results showed that patients were in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on placebo. Calcium carbonate produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance suggesting tissue deposition. Fasting biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. If they can be extrapolated to effects of chronic therapy, these data caution against the use of calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder. PMID:23254903

  10. IMPACT OF VITAMIN D AND CALCIUM DEFICIENCY IN THE BONES OF PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Jefry Alberto Vargas; Souza, Gabriela Pereira de; Nascimento, Juliana de Almeida; Simoneti, Luis Fernando; Marchese, Carolina; Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective tool in the control and treatment of severe obesity, but patients undergoing this procedure are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies by limiting the intake and absorption of many nutrients. To assess the impact of vitamin D deficiency and calcium in bone in patients after gastric bypass in Roux-en-Y, pointing directly at the type of administration, doses and effects after surgery. Was conducted a systematic review with articles related to the topic of the last 10 years searched in PubMed (US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Medline, Lilacs, Scielo and Cochrane using the headings "bariatric surgery", "bone", "obesity", "vitamin D '', "calcium" AND "absorption". Exclusion criteria to research on animals, smokers, pregnant women and patient treated with bisphosphonates. Five articles were included in this review. All refer that bariatric surgery can lead to nutritional deficiencies and poor absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins and other micronutrients such as calcium. Patients submitted to RYGB should make use of multivitamins and minerals especially vitamin D and calcium to prevent bone fractures. Monitoring, treatment and control of risk factors are essential to prevent complications after this operation. A cirurgia bariátrica é considerada o tratamento mais eficaz no controle e tratamento da obesidade severa; porém, indivíduos submetidos a este procedimento apresentam maior risco de desenvolver deficiências nutricionais pela limitação na ingestão e absorção de muitos nutrientes. Avaliar o impacto da deficiência de vitamina D e do cálcio ósseo de pacientes após gastroplastia em Y-de-Roux, relacionando tipo de administração, dose e efeito pós-cirúrgico. Realizou-se revisão sistemática com artigos relacionados ao tema dos últimos 10 anos e pesquisados na PubMed (US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Medline, Lilacs

  11. The Effects of Irradiation and Calcium-deficient Diet on the Expression of Interleukin-1 during Tooth Formation of Rat Molar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Joong; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2000-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of the irradiation and calcium-deficient diet on expression of interleukin (IL)-1 during tooth formation of rat molar. The pregnant three-week-old Spague-Dawley rats were used for the study. The control group was non-irradiation/normal diet group, and the experimental groups were irradiation/normal diet group and irradiation/calcium-diet group. The abdomen of the rats on the 9th day of pregnancy were irradiated with single dose of 350 cGy. The rat pups were sacrificed on the 14th day after delivery and the maxillae tooth germs were taken. The specimen were prepared to make sections for light microscopy, and some of tissue sections were stained immunohistochemically with anti-IL-1 antibody. In the irradiation/normal diet group, dental follicle showed fewer blood vessels, mononuclear cells, and fusions of mononuclear cells than in non-irradiation/normal diet group. Alveolar bone showed a few osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Periodontal ligament showed collagen fibers and fibroblasts with irregularity. Weak immunoreactivity for IL-1 was shown in dental follicle, alveolar bone, and periodontal ligament. In the irradiation/calcium-deficient diet group, dental follicle showed sparse cellularity. Alveolar bone showed diminished number of osteoblasts. Periodontal ligament showed irregular collagen fibers and atrophy of cementoblasts and fibroblasts. No immunoreactivity for IL-1 was shown in dental follicle, alveolar bone, and periodontal ligament. Irradiation and calcium-deficient diet seems to cause disturbance of the expression of interleukin-1 during tooth formation of rat molar.

  12. The Effects of Irradiation and Calcium-deficient Diet on the Expression of Interleukin-1 during Tooth Formation of Rat Molar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Joong; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To elucidate the effects of the irradiation and calcium-deficient diet on expression of interleukin (IL)-1 during tooth formation of rat molar. The pregnant three-week-old Spague-Dawley rats were used for the study. The control group was non-irradiation/normal diet group, and the experimental groups were irradiation/normal diet group and irradiation/calcium-diet group. The abdomen of the rats on the 9th day of pregnancy were irradiated with single dose of 350 cGy. The rat pups were sacrificed on the 14th day after delivery and the maxillae tooth germs were taken. The specimen were prepared to make sections for light microscopy, and some of tissue sections were stained immunohistochemically with anti-IL-1 antibody. In the irradiation/normal diet group, dental follicle showed fewer blood vessels, mononuclear cells, and fusions of mononuclear cells than in non-irradiation/normal diet group. Alveolar bone showed a few osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Periodontal ligament showed collagen fibers and fibroblasts with irregularity. Weak immunoreactivity for IL-1 was shown in dental follicle, alveolar bone, and periodontal ligament. In the irradiation/calcium-deficient diet group, dental follicle showed sparse cellularity. Alveolar bone showed diminished number of osteoblasts. Periodontal ligament showed irregular collagen fibers and atrophy of cementoblasts and fibroblasts. No immunoreactivity for IL-1 was shown in dental follicle, alveolar bone, and periodontal ligament. Irradiation and calcium-deficient diet seems to cause disturbance of the expression of interleukin-1 during tooth formation of rat molar.

  13. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  14. Osteopetrorickets due to Snx10 deficiency in mice results from both failed osteoclast activity and loss of gastric acid-dependent calcium absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ye

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in sorting nexin 10 (Snx10 have recently been found to account for roughly 4% of all human malignant osteopetrosis, some of them fatal. To study the disease pathogenesis, we investigated the expression of Snx10 and created mouse models in which Snx10 was knocked down globally or knocked out in osteoclasts. Endocytosis is severely defective in Snx10-deficient osteoclasts, as is extracellular acidification, ruffled border formation, and bone resorption. We also discovered that Snx10 is highly expressed in stomach epithelium, with mutations leading to high stomach pH and low calcium solubilization. Global Snx10-deficiency in mice results in a combined phenotype: osteopetrosis (due to osteoclast defect and rickets (due to high stomach pH and low calcium availability, resulting in impaired bone mineralization. Osteopetrorickets, the paradoxical association of insufficient mineralization in the context of a positive total body calcium balance, is thought to occur due to the inability of the osteoclasts to maintain normal calcium-phosphorus homeostasis. However, osteoclast-specific Snx10 knockout had no effect on calcium balance, and therefore led to severe osteopetrosis without rickets. Moreover, supplementation with calcium gluconate rescued mice from the rachitic phenotype and dramatically extended life span in global Snx10-deficient mice, suggesting that this may be a life-saving component of the clinical approach to Snx10-dependent human osteopetrosis that has previously gone unrecognized. We conclude that tissue-specific effects of Snx10 mutation need to be considered in clinical approaches to this disease entity. Reliance solely on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can leave hypocalcemia uncorrected with sometimes fatal consequences. These studies established an essential role for Snx10 in bone homeostasis and underscore the importance of gastric acidification in calcium uptake.

  15. Calcium - ionized

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diuretics Thrombocytosis (high platelet count) Tumors Vitamin A excess Vitamin D excess Lower-than-normal levels may be due to: Hypoparathyroidism Malabsorption Osteomalacia Pancreatitis Renal failure Rickets Vitamin D deficiency Alternative Names Free calcium; Ionized calcium ...

  16. Efficacy of supplemental natural zeolite in broiler chickens subjected to dietary calcium deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Bintaş

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural zeolite, or sodium aluminosilicate, influences calcium (Ca and phosphorus (P utilisation in chicks. A 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used to investigate the effect of dietary Ca (recommended and below recommended levels and zeolite (0 and 0.8% on growth, plasma, tibia and faeces in chickens from 1 to 42 days of age. Zeolite supplementation did not affect overall body weight (BW gain, feed intake (FI or feed conversion ratio (FCR of broiler chickens (P>0.05. Overall mortality of zeolite-fed chickens was lower than in untreated ones (P<0.01. Reduction of dietary Ca of approximately 10 to 18% decreased (P<0.05 BW at 14 and 42 days of age in association with reduced FI, but overall FCR was unchanged. Serum protein and sodium constituents were reduced in birds fed zeolite (P<0.05. Decreasing dietary Ca level increased (P<0.01 serum, total protein and glucose concentrations, but decreased Ca level. Zeolite decreased bone ash in birds fed a Ca-deficient diet while increased faecal excretion of ash, Ca, P and aluminum. However, zeolite increased tibia weight (P<0.05 and thickness (P<0.01. No significant response (P>0.05 in relative weight and gross lesion scores of liver or footpad lesion scores was found related to changes in dietary regimens. The results of the present study do not corroborate the hypothesis that the effectiveness of zeolite may be improved in Ca-deficient diets in association with its ion exchange capability.

  17. Degradable biocomposite of nano calcium- deficient hydroxyapatite-multi(amino acid copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li XD

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hong Li1, Min Gong1, Aiping Yang1, Jian Ma2, Xiangde Li3, Yonggang Yan11School of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu People’s Republic of China; 2Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, ShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China; 3Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground and methods: A nano calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (n-CDHA-multi(amino acid copolymer (MAC composite bone substitute biomaterial was prepared using an in situ polymerization method. The composition, structure, and compressive strength of the composite was characterized, and the in vitro degradability in phosphate-buffered solution and preliminary cell responses to the composite were investigated.Results: The composite comprised n-CDHA and an amide linkage copolymer. The compressive strength of the composite was in the range of 88–129 MPa, varying with the amount of n-CDHA in the MAC (ranging from 10 wt% to 50 wt%. Weight loss from the composite increased (from 32.2 wt% to 44.3 wt% with increasing n-CDHA content (from 10 wt% to 40 wt% in the MAC after the composite was soaked in phosphate-buffered solution for 12 weeks. The pH of the soaking medium varied from 6.9 to 7.5. MG-63 cells with an osteogenic phenotype were well adhered and spread on the composite surface. Viability and differentiation increased with time, indicating that the composite had no negative effects on MG-63 cells.Conclusion: The n-CDHA-MAC composite had good cytocompatibility and has potential to be used as a bone substitute.Keywords: calcium deficient hydroxyapatite, multi(amino acid copolymer, biocomposite, degradability, cytocompatibility

  18. Relationship of calcium absorption with 25(OH)D and calcium intake in children with rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional rickets has long been considered a disease caused by vitamin D deficiency, but recent data indicate that inadequate dietary calcium intake is an important cause of rickets, particularly in tropical countries. Children with rickets due to calcium deficiency do not have very low 25(OH) D c...

  19. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønø, Birgitte; Engelholm, Lars Henning; Lund, Leif Røge

    2013-01-01

    closure in female versus male plasmin deficient mice. Further studies showed that this gender effect could not be reversed by ovariectomy, suggesting that female sex-hormones did not mediate the accelerated skin wound healing in plasmin deficient female mice. Histological examination of healed wounds...... functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency...... or if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin accumulation...

  20. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Rønø

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic activity of plasmin plays a fundamental role in resolution of blood clots and clearance of extravascular deposited fibrin in damaged tissues. These vital functions of plasmin are exploited by malignant cells to accelerate tumor growth and facilitate metastases. Mice lacking functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency or if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin accumulation in neither wildtype nor plasmin deficient mice, and the existing differences in skin composition between males and females were unaffected by plasmin deficiency. In contrast, gender had a marked effect on the ability of plasmin deficient mice to heal skin wounds, which was seen as an accelerated wound closure in female versus male plasmin deficient mice. Further studies showed that this gender effect could not be reversed by ovariectomy, suggesting that female sex-hormones did not mediate the accelerated skin wound healing in plasmin deficient female mice. Histological examination of healed wounds revealed larger amounts of fibrotic scars in the provisional matrix of plasmin deficient male mice compared to female mice. These fibrotic scars correlated to an obstruction of cell infiltration of the granulation tissue, which is a prerequisite for wound healing. In conclusion, the presented data show that the gender dependent effect of plasmin deficiency is tissue specific and may be secondary to already established differences between genders, such as skin

  1. Calcium oxalate druses affect leaf optical properties in selenium-treated Fagopyrum tataricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, Aleksandra; Stibilj, Vekoslava; Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Kreft, Ivan; Hočevar, Anja; Gaberščik, Alenka; Germ, Mateja

    2018-03-01

    Plants of the genus Fagopyrum contain high levels of crystalline calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposits, or druses, that can affect the leaf optical properties. As selenium has been shown to modify the uptake and accumulation of metabolically important elements such as calcium, we hypothesised that the numbers of druses can be altered by selenium treatment, and this would affect the leaf optical properties. Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) was grown outdoors in an experimental field. At the beginning of flowering, plants were foliarly sprayed with sodium selenate solution at 10 mg selenium L -1 or only with water. Plant morphological, biochemical, physiological and optical properties were examined, along with leaf elemental composition and content. Se spraying did not affect leaf biochemical and functional properties. However, it increased leaf thickness and the contents of Se in the leaves, and decreased the density of calcium oxalate druses in the leaves. Except Se content, Se spraying did not affect contents of other elements in leaves, including total calcium per dry mass of leaf tissue. Redundancy analysis showed that of all parameters tested, only the calcium oxalate druses parameters were significant in explaining the variability of the leaf reflectance and transmittance spectra. The density of CaOx druses positively correlated with the reflectance in the blue, green, yellow and UV-B regions of the spectrum, while the area of CaOx druses per mm 2 of leaf transection area positively correlated with the transmittance in the green and yellow regions of the spectrum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Calcium-Deficient Diet in Rat Dams during Gestation Decreases HOMA-β% in 3 Generations of Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Junji; Yamanouchi, Sohsaku; Tanabe, Yuko; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal malnutrition can affect the phenotype of offspring by altering epigenetic regulation. Calcium (Ca) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance syndrome. We hypothesized that a Ca-deficient diet during pregnancy would alter insulin resistance and secretion in more than 1 generation of offspring. Female Wistar rats consumed either a Ca-deficient or a control diet ad libitum from 3 weeks before conception to 21 days after parturition and were mated with control males. Randomly selected F1 and F2 females were mated with males of each generation on postnatal day 70. The F1 and F2 dams were fed a control diet ad libitum during pregnancy and lactation. All offspring were fed a control diet starting at the time of weaning and were sacrificed on day 180. HOMA-β% decreased in F1 through F3, and levels in F2 and F3 males and females were significantly lower than in controls. The mean levels of insulin and HOMA-IR were higher in F1 males but lower in F3 males than in control males. The HOMA-IR did not differ between any of the female offspring and controls. Maternal Ca restriction during pregnancy and/or lactation influences insulin secretion in 3 generations of offspring. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. An experimental study of mandibular fracture wound healing in the calcium deficient rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Wang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of osteoporosis on fracture wound healing in the calcium deficient rat. To research the experiment some ten-week old Wistar strain rats with approximately 300 gms weight were selected. Then, the rats were divided into two groups : Normal diet group (rats given a normal diet before and after bone fracture) and Low calcium diet group (rats given a low calcium diet before and after bone fracture). Both groups had been provided with each diet for three weeks. When the rats became thirteen weeks old, the mandibular angle of rats in both groups was artificially fractured for test. The healing of fracture wounds was reviewed by using soft x-ray radiography and 99m Tc-MDP bone scan and also histopathologic examination. The obtained results were as follows : 1. The radiolucency of the fracture site for the Normal diet group started to decrease from the 14th day since the experiment was made, while the Low calcium diet group began decrease in the radiolucency from the 21st day of the experiment . The radiolucency for the normal diet group disappeared at the 42nd day, but one for the Low calcium diet group disappeared at the 56th day of the experiment. 2. The highest uptake rate of 99m Tc-MDP stood at the 14th day of the experiment in the Normal diet group and the Low calcium diet group's maximum rate was recorded at the 21st day of the experiment. These both groups were gradually experiencing decrease in the uptake rate as the experiment time was going on. However, the uptake rate in the Low calcium diet group was lower than one in the Normal diet group. 3. For the Normal diet group, the newly formed trabecular, which were similar to one of the surrounding bone, were seen at the 42nd day of the experiment. On the other hand, the Low claium diet group showed at the 56th day of the experiment that the osteoporotic findings looked weak, irregular trabecular, and also large bone marrow space were observed clearly. As a result

  4. Calcium signaling through CaMKII regulates hepatic glucose production in fasting and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Lale; Wong, Catherine C L; Li, Gang; Xu, Tao; Pajvani, Utpal; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Wronska, Anetta; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Backs, Johannes; Singer, Harold A; Yates, John R; Accili, Domenico; Tabas, Ira

    2012-05-02

    Hepatic glucose production (HGP) is crucial for glucose homeostasis, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that a calcium-sensing enzyme, CaMKII, is activated in a calcium- and IP3R-dependent manner by cAMP and glucagon in primary hepatocytes and by glucagon and fasting in vivo. Genetic deficiency or inhibition of CaMKII blocks nuclear translocation of FoxO1 by affecting its phosphorylation, impairs fasting- and glucagon/cAMP-induced glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, and lowers blood glucose levels, while constitutively active CaMKII has the opposite effects. Importantly, the suppressive effect of CaMKII deficiency on glucose metabolism is abrogated by transduction with constitutively nuclear FoxO1, indicating that the effect of CaMKII deficiency requires nuclear exclusion of FoxO1. This same pathway is also involved in excessive HGP in the setting of obesity. These results reveal a calcium-mediated signaling pathway involved in FoxO1 nuclear localization and hepatic glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bruton's tyrosine kinase is essential for hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, S; Chock, P B

    2001-07-10

    Using Btk-deficient DT40 cells and the transfectants expressing wild-type Btk or Btk mutants in either kinase (Arg(525) to Gln), Src homology 2 (SH2, Arg(307) to Ala), or pleckstrin homology (PH, Arg(28) to Cys) domains, we investigated the roles and structure-function relationships of Btk in hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium mobilization. Our genetic evidence showed that Btk deficiency resulted in a significant reduction in hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium response. This impaired calcium signaling is correlated with the complete elimination of IP3 production and the significantly reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma2 in Btk-deficient DT40 cells. All of these defects were fully restored by the expression of wild-type Btk in Btk-deficient DT40 cells. The data from the point mutation study revealed that a defect at any one of the three functional domains would prevent a full recovery of Btk-mediated hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular calcium mobilization. However, mutation at either the SH2 or PH domain did not affect the hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of Btk. Mutation at the SH2 domain abrogates both IP3 generation and calcium release, while the mutant with the nonfunctional PH domain can partially activate PLCgamma2 and catalyze IP3 production but fails to produce significant calcium mobilization. Thus, these observations suggest that Btk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma2 is required but not sufficient for hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium mobilization. Furthermore, hydrogen peroxide stimulates a Syk-, but not Btk-, dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of B cell linker protein BLNK. The overall results, together with those reported earlier [Qin et al. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 7118], are consistent with the notion that functional SH2 and PH domains are required for Btk to form a complex with PLCgamma2 through BLNK in order to position the Btk, PLCgamma2, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in close proximity for

  6. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  7. The Effects of Calcium, Vitamins D and K co-Supplementation on Markers of Insulin Metabolism and Lipid Profiles in Vitamin D-Deficient Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamali, Maryam; Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Razavi, Maryamalsadat; Jamilian, Mehri; Kashanian, Maryam; Akbari, Maryam; Asemi, Zatollah

    2017-05-01

    Data on the effects of calcium, vitamins D and K co-supplementation on markers of insulin metabolism and lipid profiles among vitamin D-deficient women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are scarce. This study was done to determine the effects of calcium, vitamins D and K co-supplementation on markers of insulin metabolism and lipid profiles in vitamin D-deficient women with PCOS. This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 55 vitamin D-deficient women diagnosed with PCOS aged 18-40 years old. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups to intake either 500 mg calcium, 200 IU vitamin D and 90 µg vitamin K supplements (n=28) or placebo (n=27) twice a day for 8 weeks. After the 8-week intervention, compared with the placebo, joint calcium, vitamins D and K supplementation resulted in significant decreases in serum insulin concentrations (-1.9±3.5 vs. +1.8±6.6 µIU/mL, P=0.01), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (-0.4±0.7 vs. +0.4±1.4, P=0.01), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated b cell function (-7.9±14.7 vs. +7.0±30.3, P=0.02) and a significant increase in quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01±0.01 vs. -0.008±0.03, P=0.01). In addition, significant decreases in serum triglycerides (-23.4±71.3 vs. +9.9±39.5 mg/dL, P=0.03) and VLDL-cholesterol levels (-4.7±14.3 vs. +2.0±7.9 mg/dL, P=0.03) was observed following supplementation with combined calcium, vitamins D and K compared with the placebo. Overall, calcium, vitamins D and K co-supplementation for 8 weeks among vitamin D-deficient women with PCOS had beneficial effects on markers of insulin metabolism, serum triglycerides and VLDL-cholesterol levels. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Effect of the calcium to phosphorus ratio on the setting properties of calcium phosphate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, M D; Gómez, S; Barracó, M; López, J; Fernández, E

    2012-09-01

    α-Tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) has become the main reactant of most experimental and commercial ceramic bone cements. It has calcium-to-phosphorus (Ca/P) ratio of 1.50. The present study expands and reports on the microstructures and mechanical properties of calcium phosphate (CP) cements containing sintered monolithic reactants obtained in the interval 1.29 properties as well as on their microstructure and crystal phase evolution. The results showed that: (a) CP-cements made with reactants with Ca/P ratio other than 1.50 have longer setting and lower hardening properties; (b) CP-cements reactivity was clearly affected by the Ca/P ratio of the starting reactant; (c) reactants with Ca/P calcium pyrophosphate and α- and β-TCP. Similarly, reactants with Ca/P > 1.50 were composed of α-TCP, tetracalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite; (d) only the reactant with Ca/P = 1.50 was monophasic and was made of α-TCP, which transformed during the setting into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite; (e) CP-cements developed different crystal microstructures with specific features depending on the Ca/P ratio of the starting reactant.

  9. Disorders of bone-mineral metabolism and their correction with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Shelestova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The processes in bone-mineral metabolism provide normal course of pregnancy, labour and fetus development, women with body weight deficiency are at risk reduction of bone tissue mineral density, progressing of osteopenia and osteoporosis. This shows the necessity of medical and preventive measures that have the aim to correct calcium- phosphorus and bone metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency. Aim. To elaborate and to evaluate medical and preventive measures that have the aim to correct disorders in bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy. Materials and methods. The efficiency of adding combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol and dietary nourishment to traditional treatment that affected the state of bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy was studied. Results. With women who have body weight deficiency at pregravid stage and during pregnancy it is noted statistically considerable reduction in blood of total calcium and bone tissue markers that grows with the course of gestation. The changes in mineral density of bone tissue can be seen from the existence of osteopenic syndrome at pregravid stage that occurs with every third woman who has body weight deficiency and with every second before labour. The use of elaborated medical and preventive measures including combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol allows to normalize the indexes of bone-mineral metabolism with women who have body weight deficiency. Conclusions. Women with body weight deficiency already at pregravid stage have disorders in bone metabolism and coming of pregnancy lead to aggravation of bone metabolism disorders. The additional use of combined medicine of calcium carbonate and cholecalciferol and dietary nourishment made the indexes of calcium-phosphorus and bone metabolism better and osteopenic

  10. Ion microscopic imaging of calcium transport in the intestinal tissue of vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete chickens: A 44Ca stable isotope study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, S.; Fullmer, C.S.; Smith, C.A.; Wasserman, R.H.; Morrison, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium includes at least three definable steps; transfer across the microvillar membrane, movement through the cytosolic compartment, and energy-dependent extrusion into the lamina propria, Tracing the movement of calcium through the epithelium has been hampered by lack of suitable techniques and, in this study, advantage was taken of ion microscopy in conjunction with cryosectioning and use of the stable isotope 44Ca to visualize calcium in transit during the absorptive process. The effect of vitamin D, required for optimal calcium absorption, was investigated. Twenty millimolar 44Ca was injected into the duodenal lumen in situ of vitamin D-deficient and vitamin D-replete chickens. At 2.5, 5.0, and 20.0 min after injection, duodenal tissue was obtained and processed for ion microscopic imaging. At 2.5 min. 44Ca was seen to be concentrated in the region subjacent to the microvillar membrane in tissue from both groups. At 5.0 and 20.0 min, a similar pattern of localization was evident in D-deficient tissues. In D-replete tissues, the distribution of 44Ca became more homogenous, indicating that vitamin D increased the rate of transfer of Ca2+ from the apical to the basolateral membrane, a function previously ascribed to the vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D). Quantitative aspects of the calcium absorptive process were determined in parallel experiments with the radionuclide 47Ca. Complementary information on the localization of the naturally occurring isotopes of calcium (40Ca) and potassium (39K) is also described

  11. Deficient plasticity in the primary visual cortex of alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J A; Cioffi, D; Silva, A J; Stryker, M P

    1996-09-01

    The recent characterization of plasticity in the mouse visual cortex permits the use of mutant mice to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent development. As calcium-dependent signaling pathways have been implicated in neuronal plasticity, we examined visual cortical plasticity in mice lacking the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha CaMKII). In wild-type mice, brief occlusion of vision in one eye during a critical period reduces responses in the visual cortex. In half of the alpha CaMKII-deficient mice, visual cortical responses developed normally, but visual cortical plasticity was greatly diminished. After intensive training, spatial learning in the Morris water maze was severely impaired in a similar fraction of mutant animals. These data indicate that loss of alpha CaMKII results in a severe but variable defect in neuronal plasticity.

  12. Calcium status in premenopausal and post menopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, H.J.; Hussain, G.; Bashir, M.U.; Latif, N.; Riaz, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In postmenopausal women, the two major causes of bone loss are oestrogen deficiency after menopause and age related processes. Bone turnover increases to high levels and oestrogen deficiency may induce calcium loss by indirect effects on extra skeletal calcium homeostasis. Objective of this study was to evaluate calcium status in pre-menopausal and postmenopausal women. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in 34 premenopausal women and 33 postmenopausal women, in Department of Physiology, Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore. Height and weight of each woman were taken to find out the body mass index (BMI). Serum calcium, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin levels of each subject were determined. Results: Premenopausal women were obese (BMI>30 Kg/m/sup 2/) while postmenopausal women were overweight (BMI>25 Kg/m/sup 2/). Serum calcium levels were significantly lower in postmenopausal women than in pre-menopausal women, while serum parathyroid hormone levels were significantly higher in postmenopausal woman. Serum calcitonin level was not significantly different in the two groups. Conclusion: Postmenopausal women are calcium deficient and have increased bone turnover as indicated by increased serum parathyroid hormone levels. (author)

  13. Susceptibility of Calcium-Deficient Hydroxapatite Collagen Composite to Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, M.; Yasuda, M.; Okamura, H.

    2001-01-01

    The ESR spectrum of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (DAp) has the peaks assigned to the hyperfine structure of dangling H + (hyperfine coupling constant = 50.8 mT, I = 1/2) due to the HPO 2- 4 ion which captured the hole released by X ray irradiation. This ESR peak intensity in DAp with collagen (c-DAp) decreased in an increase in the amount of collagen added into Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O (MCP) electrolytic solution, because dangling H + of HPO 2- 4 binds to the carboxyl group of collagen due to the hydrogen bond. The ESR signal intensities at near g=2 in DAp, c-DAp, and stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HAp) after X ray irradiation, were proportional to the absorbed dose in the range from 6 to 380 Gy. These ESR signal intensities decreased when the X ray-irradiated DAp, c-DAp, and HAp was suspended in the simulated body fluid. This fact suggests that the surface layer contained high density of ESR active species in DAp, c-DAp, and HAp dissolved in the simulated body fluid. Therefore, with the dosemeter utilising such biomaterials as tooth and bone, sufficient care must be paid to the effect of body fluid. (author)

  14. Dietary Calcium Intake May Contribute to the HOMA-IR Score in Korean Females with Vitamin D Deficiency (2008–2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ho Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background : Vitamin D and calcium are important factors involved in the regulation of blood glucose and insulin secretion. The Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR score is a useful variable for evaluating insulin resistance, and therefore we cross-sectionally compared HOMA-IR scores according to serum vitamin D levels and dietary calcium intake. Methods : We selected data from healthy males (n=5,163 and females (n=7,506 analyzed over 5 years (2008–2012 via the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES. We calculated HOMA-IR scores and compared them according to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD concentration classification (30 ng/mL and dietary calcium quintile after adjustment for relevant variables using complex sample analysis. Comparisons were done after data weighting. Results : The mean dietary calcium intake in males and females was 558.1 mg/day and 445.9 mg/day, respectively. The mean serum 25(OHD concentration in males and females was 19.4 ng/mL and 16.8 ng/mL, respectively. After adjustment for relevant variables, HOMA-IR score was significantly correlated with serum 25(OHD concentration and dietary calcium intake in females, whereas it was only correlated with serum 25(OHD concentration in males. HOMA-IR was significantly lower in the top quintile of dietary calcium intake (mean, 866 mg/day within females with vitamin D deficiency (P=0.047. Conclusion : Adequate dietary calcium intake may be important for normal HOMA-IR in females with vitamin D deficiency.

  15. The genetic background affects the vascular response in T-type calcium channels 3.2 deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Hansen, Pernille B L

    2016-01-01

    -type channels are the dominant Ca(2+) entry pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells, however, T-type calcium channels are also expressed in the cardiovascular system where they play a functional role in the regulation of both contraction and vasodilation in (Chen et al. 2003; Hansen et al. 2001). This article...... is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  16. Effects of calcium antagonists on isolated bovine cerebral arteries: inhibition of constriction and calcium-45 uptake induced by potassium or serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendling, W.W.; Harakal, C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which organic calcium channel blockers inhibit cerebral vasoconstriction. Isolated bovine middle cerebral arteries were cut into rings to measure contractility or into strips to measure radioactive calcium ( 45 Ca) influx and efflux. Calcium channel blockers (10(-5) M verapamil or 3.3 X 10(-7) M nifedipine) and calcium-deficient solutions all produced near-maximal inhibition of both potassium- and serotonin-induced constriction. In calcium-deficient solutions containing potassium or serotonin, verapamil and nifedipine each blocked subsequent calcium-induced constriction in a competitive manner. Potassium and serotonin significantly increased 45 Ca uptake into cerebral artery strips during 5 minutes of 45 Ca loading; for potassium 45 Ca uptake increased from 62 to 188 nmol/g, and for serotonin from 65 to 102 nmol/g. Verapamil or nifedipine had no effect on basal 45 Ca uptake but significantly blocked the increase in 45 Ca uptake induced by potassium or serotonin. Potassium, and to a lesser extent serotonin, each induced a brief increase in the rate of 45 Ca efflux into calcium-deficient solutions. Verapamil or nifedipine had no effect on basal or potassium-stimulated 45 Ca efflux. The results demonstrate that verapamil and nifedipine block 45 Ca uptake through both potential-operated (potassium) and receptor-operated (serotonin) channels in bovine middle cerebral arteries

  17. Common micronutrient deficiencies among food aid beneficiaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Vitamin A and iron deficiencies were the most prevalent micronutrient deficiencies among food aid beneficiaries. Other probable deficiencies prevailing were zinc, vitamins thiamine, riboflavin, niacin folate, cyano-cobalamine, ascorbic acid vitamin D and calcium because of the low intake of dairy products and meat.

  18. Potassium deficiency affects the carbon-nitrogen balance in cotton leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Coomer, Taylor D; Loka, Dimitra A; Oosterhuis, Derrick M; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2017-06-01

    Potassium (K) plays important roles in the metabolism of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), but studies of K deficiency affecting C-N balance are lacking. This study explored the influence of K deficiency on C-N interaction in cotton leaves by conducting a field experiment with cotton cultivar DP0912 under two K rates (K0: 0 kg K 2 O ha -1 and K67: 67 kg K 2 O ha -1 ) and a controlled environment experiment with K-deficient solution (K1: 0 mM K + ) and K-sufficient solution (K2: 6 mM K + ). The results showed that leaf K content, leaf number, leaf area, boll number, reproductive dry weight and total dry weight were significant lower under K deficiency (K0 or K1). Lower total chlorophyll content and Chl a/b ratio, and decreased Pn along with lower Gs and higher Ci were measured under K deficiency, suggesting that the decrease in Pn was resulted from non-stomatal limitation. Leaf glucose, fructose, sucrose and starch contents were higher under K deficiency, because lower sucrose export was detected in phloem. Although leaf nitrate and ammonium contents significantly decreased, free amino acid content was increased by 40-63% under K deficiency, since lower amino acid export was also measured in phloem. K deficiency also induced lower soluble protein content in leaves. Leaf ATP level was significantly increased under K deficiency, indicating ATP utilization was lower, so that less energy was supplied to C and N metabolism. The ratio of soluble sugar to free amino acid and the C/N ratio markedly increased under K deficiency, and one reason was that the phloem export reduced more prominent for sucrose (54.6-78.0%) than amino acid (36.7-85.4%) under K deficiency. In addition, lower phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity limited malate and citrate biosynthesis under K deficiency, causing a decrease of C flux into the amino acids, which was not beneficial for maintaining C-N balance. Sucrose phosphate synthase and nitrate reductase activities were lower under K deficiency

  19. Haploinsufficiency of the 22q11.2 microdeletion gene Mrpl40 disrupts short-term synaptic plasticity and working memory through dysregulation of mitochondrial calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraju, P; Yu, J; Eddins, D; Mellado-Lagarde, M M; Earls, L R; Westmoreland, J J; Quarato, G; Green, D R; Zakharenko, S S

    2017-09-01

    Hemizygous deletion of a 1.5- to 3-megabase region on chromosome 22 causes 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), which constitutes one of the strongest genetic risks for schizophrenia. Mouse models of 22q11DS have abnormal short-term synaptic plasticity that contributes to working-memory deficiencies similar to those in schizophrenia. We screened mutant mice carrying hemizygous deletions of 22q11DS genes and identified haploinsufficiency of Mrpl40 (mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit protein 40) as a contributor to abnormal short-term potentiation (STP), a major form of short-term synaptic plasticity. Two-photon imaging of the genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator GCaMP6, expressed in presynaptic cytosol or mitochondria, showed that Mrpl40 haploinsufficiency deregulates STP via impaired calcium extrusion from the mitochondrial matrix through the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This led to abnormally high cytosolic calcium transients in presynaptic terminals and deficient working memory but did not affect long-term spatial memory. Thus, we propose that mitochondrial calcium deregulation is a novel pathogenic mechanism of cognitive deficiencies in schizophrenia.

  20. Ion reactivity of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite in standard cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, J; Ginebra, M P; Engel, E; Planell, J

    2011-12-01

    Solution-mediated surface reactions occur for most calcium phosphate-based biomaterials and may influence cellular response. A reasonable extrapolation of such processes observed in vitro to in vivo performance requires a deep understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We therefore systematically investigated the nature of ion reactivity of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) by exposing it for different periods of time to standard cell culture media of different chemical composition (DMEM and McCoy medium, with and without osteogenic supplements and serum proteins). Kinetic ion interaction studies of principal extracellular ions revealed non-linear sorption of Ca²⁺ (∼50% sorption) and K⁺ (∼8%) as well as acidification of all media during initial contact with CDHA (48h). Interestingly, inorganic phosphorus (P(i)) was sorbed from McCoy medium (∼50%) or when using osteogenic media containing β-glycerophosphate, but not from DMEM medium. Non-linear sorption data could be perfectly described by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order sorption models. At longer contact time (21 days), and with frequent renewal of culture medium, sorption of Ca²⁺ remained constant throughout the experiment, while sorption of P(i) gradually decreased in McCoy medium. In great contrast, CDHA began to release P(i) slowly with time when using DMEM medium. Infrared spectra showed that CDHA exposed to culture media had a carbonated surface chemistry, suggesting that carbonate plays a key role in the ion reactivity of CDHA. Our data show that different compositions of the aqueous environment may provoke opposite ion reactivity of CDHA, and this must be carefully considered when evaluating the osteoinductive potential of the material. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  2. Resurrection of vitamin D deficiency and rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holick, Michael F.

    2006-01-01

    The epidemic scourge of rickets in the 19th century was caused by vitamin D deficiency due to inadequate sun exposure and resulted in growth retardation, muscle weakness, skeletal deformities, hypocalcemia, tetany, and seizures. The encouragement of sensible sun exposure and the fortification of milk with vitamin D resulted in almost complete eradication of the disease. Vitamin D (where D represents D2 or D3) is biologically inert and metabolized in the liver to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the major circulating form of vitamin D that is used to determine vitamin D status. 25(OH)D is activated in the kidneys to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], which regulates calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Vitamin D deficiency has again become an epidemic in children, and rickets has become a global health issue. In addition to vitamin D deficiency, calcium deficiency and acquired and inherited disorders of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphorus metabolism cause rickets. This review summarizes the role of vitamin D in the prevention of rickets and its importance in the overall health and welfare of infants and children. PMID:16886050

  3. Dietary Calcium Intake in Sample of School Age Children in City of Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Bouziani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is an important mineral playing a vital role to maintain bone health. Calcium intake is considered as one of the most important determinants to assess the calcium status and to evaluate the calcium deficiency in the human body. Our study aims at estimating calcium intake in a sample of children and adolescent to be used in the global strategy to reduce calcium deficiency disorders in Morocco. Thus, 131 children and adolescents were recruited from public schools at Rabat and its regions in the framework of a descriptive cross-sectional study. For each participant, anthropometric parameters were measured. Calcium status was assessed by 24 h dietary recall. Food frequency questionnaire was used to evaluate children’s nutritional habits and to assess the consumption of calcium-rich food. Overall, the mean calcium intake was 522.0 ± 297.0 mg/day, and 85.5% of subjects highlighted calcium deficiency, with no significant difference between boys and girls. Calcium intake was significantly different according to age groups, and high consumption of calcium was found in subjects aged from 14 to 18 years (776.86 ±290.07 mg/day, giving evidence of the low calcium status of the studied population. Daily food intake and food frequency analysis showed that bread, vegetables, and fruits are the most consumed food and the main source of daily calcium intake. Consumption of dairy products, considered as the best source of calcium, is lower and represents only 14% of total calcium intake. Our study clearly showed that calcium status is very lower in Moroccan children and adolescents and a large proportion of this population have inadequate calcium intake. Hence, there’s an urgent need of specific strategies, including children sensitisation and nutritional education, to increase calcium intake and therefore reduce calcium deficiency disorders impacting the whole body during childhood and in adult age.

  4. Description and evaluation of operative deformity correction in calcium-deficiency rickets in Kaduna, northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselsky, Viktor; Kitz, Christa; Jakob, Franz; Eulert, Jochen; Raab, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Rickets is a recurrent disease worldwide, especially in countries with limited resources (Nield et al Am Fam Physician 74(4):619-626, 2006; Thacher et al Ann Trop Paediatr 26(1):1-16, 2006). Medical therapy including orally administered calcium substitution is shown to improve a patients clinical symptoms and positively impact bone deformities, especially in the lower extremity. Even though orthopaedic intervention is necessary in a significant percentage of patients, few reports exist about operative deformity correction in patients wtih rickets. We describe our concept of operative treatment by single-stage, three-dimensional closing-wedge osteotomies on 45 deformed legs in 27 patients from the rural area of Kaduna, North Nigeria, with calcium-deficiency rickets and evaluate the early results in a 1.5-year follow-up. We found a significant improvement in parameters of quality of life, functionality, clinical and radiological angulation and angles following the definition of Paley et al., with a complication rate of 4 % under 88 osteotomies (Paley et al Orthop Clin North Am 25(3):425-65, 1994). The described operative therapy shows to be sufficient and with satisfactory results in correcting rickets-related leg deformities under rural circumstances with low availability of medical resources.

  5. Dietary calcium intake and sunlight exposure among children aged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional rickets can be caused by either or both calcium and vitamin D deficiencies, and can frequently occur in Africa. In Ethiopia, limited evidence exists regarding the calcium intake of children and their sunlight exposure practices. The purpose of this study was to assess information regarding dietary calcium intake and ...

  6. Vitamin D deficiency rickets in an adolescent with severe atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzutzky, Arturo; Grob, Francisca; Camargo, Carlos A; Martinez-Aguayo, Alejandro

    2014-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) affects 10% to 20% of children worldwide. Its severity may be inversely correlated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels. Although low levels of vitamin D (VD) can cause rickets in infants, VD deficiency rickets is an unusual presentation in teenagers. We report the case of a 14-year-old girl with severe AD and fish allergy since early childhood. She lived at high latitude (with less sun exposure) and, because of her atopic disorders, avoided sunlight and fish. Laboratory studies showed elevated alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone levels and low serum calcium; her serum 25OHD level was rickets due to VD deficiency. Treatment with VD increased her 25OHD level to 44 nmol/L, with normalization of alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, and calcium. Moreover, we observed a dramatic improvement in her AD severity with VD treatment. This case demonstrates the complex interaction between VD deficiency, AD, and food allergy. We advise a high index of suspicion of VD deficiency rickets in children of all ages with AD, particularly during accelerated growth periods and in the presence of other risk factors such as darker skin, living at high latitude, sun avoidance, and low intake of VD-rich foods. The concomitant improvement in bone-related parameters and AD severity may reflect a double benefit of VD treatment, a possibility that warrants research on VD as potential treatment for AD.

  7. The Effects of Irradiation and Calcium-deficient Diet on the Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2/4 during Early Tooth Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dai Hee; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 during early tooth development after irradiation and calcium-deficient diet. The pregnant three-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the study. The control group was non-irradiation/normal diet group (Group 1), and the experimental groups were irradiation/normal diet group (Group 2) and irradiation/calcium-diet group (Group 3). The abdomen of the rats at the 9th day of pregnancy were irradiated with single dose of 350 cGy. The rat pups were sacrificed at embryonic 18 days, 3 days and 14 days after delivery and the maxillae tooth germs were taken. The tissue sections of specimen were stained immunohistochemically with anti-BMP-2/4 antibody. At embryo-18 days, immunoreacivity for BMP-2/4 of the Group 1 was modetate in stratum intermedium of dental organ and weak in dental papilla and dental follicle, but that of Group 2 was weak in cell layer of dental organ, and no immunoreacivity was shown in dental papilla and dental follice of Group 2 and in all tissue components of the Group 3. At postnatal-3 days, immunoreacivity for BMP-2/4 of the Group 1 was strong in cell layer of dental organ, odontoblasts and developing alveolar bone, but that of Group of 2 and Group 3 was weak in odontoblasts and developing alveolar bone. At postnatal-14 days, immunoreacivity for BMP-2/4 of the Group 1 was strong in newly formed cementum, alveolar bone and odontoblasts, but that of Group 2 was weaker than that of Group 1. In the Group 3, tooth forming cell layer showed weak immunoreactivity, but other cell layers showed no immunoreactivity. The expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 during early tooth development was disturbed after irradiation and calcium-deficient diet.

  8. The Effects of Irradiation and Calcium-deficient Diet on the Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2/4 during Early Tooth Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dai Hee; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To investigate the expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 during early tooth development after irradiation and calcium-deficient diet. The pregnant three-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the study. The control group was non-irradiation/normal diet group (Group 1), and the experimental groups were irradiation/normal diet group (Group 2) and irradiation/calcium-diet group (Group 3). The abdomen of the rats at the 9th day of pregnancy were irradiated with single dose of 350 cGy. The rat pups were sacrificed at embryonic 18 days, 3 days and 14 days after delivery and the maxillae tooth germs were taken. The tissue sections of specimen were stained immunohistochemically with anti-BMP-2/4 antibody. At embryo-18 days, immunoreacivity for BMP-2/4 of the Group 1 was modetate in stratum intermedium of dental organ and weak in dental papilla and dental follicle, but that of Group 2 was weak in cell layer of dental organ, and no immunoreacivity was shown in dental papilla and dental follice of Group 2 and in all tissue components of the Group 3. At postnatal-3 days, immunoreacivity for BMP-2/4 of the Group 1 was strong in cell layer of dental organ, odontoblasts and developing alveolar bone, but that of Group of 2 and Group 3 was weak in odontoblasts and developing alveolar bone. At postnatal-14 days, immunoreacivity for BMP-2/4 of the Group 1 was strong in newly formed cementum, alveolar bone and odontoblasts, but that of Group 2 was weaker than that of Group 1. In the Group 3, tooth forming cell layer showed weak immunoreactivity, but other cell layers showed no immunoreactivity. The expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 during early tooth development was disturbed after irradiation and calcium-deficient diet.

  9. Mice deficient in carbonic anhydrase type 8 exhibit motor dysfunctions and abnormal calcium dynamics in the somatic region of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Matthew G; Weber, John T

    2015-06-01

    The waddles (wdl) mouse is characterized by a namesake "side-to-side" waddling gait due to a homozygous mutation of the Car8 gene. This mutation results in non-functional copies of the protein carbonic anhydrase type 8. Rota-rod testing was conducted to characterize the wdl mutations' effect on motor output. Results indicated that younger homozygotes outperformed their older cohorts, an effect not seen in previous studies. Heterozygotes, which were thought to be free of motor impairment, displayed motor learning deficiencies when compared with wild type performance. Acute cerebellar slices were then utilized for fluorescent calcium imaging experiments, which revealed significant alterations in cerebellar granule cell somatic calcium signaling when exposed to glutamate. The contribution of GABAergic signaling to these alterations was also verified using bath application of bicuculline. Changes in somatic calcium signals were found to be applicable to an in vivo scenario by comparing group responses to electrical stimulation of afferent mossy fiber projections. Finally, intracellular calcium store function was also found to be altered by the wdl mutation when slices were treated with thapsigargin. These findings, taken together with previous work on the wdl mouse, indicate a widespread disruption in cerebellar circuitry hampering proper neuronal communication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of dietary calcium on atherosclerosis, aortic calcification, and icterus in rabbits fed a supplemental cholesterol diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Culley Nathan C

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is implicated in myocardial infarction, instability and rigidity of the aortic wall, and bioprosthetic failures. Although an increase in the calcium (Ca content in atherogenic diets has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis in rabbits, whether Ca supplementation and deficiency can affect atherosclerosis-related aortic calcification remains unknown. Results New Zealand White male rabbit littermates were fed an atherogenic diet containing 0.5% cholesterol and 2% peanut oil. The Ca content of the diet, which normally contains 1%, was adjusted to 0.5 or 3%. Segments of thoracic aortas were dissected from rabbits for histological evaluations and Ca and Pi determinations. Rabbits with calcium supplementation were maintained for 4 months, whereas those with calcium deficiency were maintained for 2 1/2 months due to severe icterus beyond this stage. The ratios of intimal to medial areas and calcified to intimal areas were used to semi-quantify lesion accumulation and calcification, respectively. Icterus was estimated from the extent of yellowing of the skin, sclera, and mucous membranes along with gross evidence of hepatic lipidosis and/or biliary obstructions. Statistical analysis of 16 matched littermates shows that Ca supplementation significantly decreased the lesions by 41% (p Conclusion Ca supplementation to an atherogenic diet inhibits atherosclerosis, aortic calcification, and icterus, whereas a Ca deficient-diet promotes them.

  11. [Osteomalacia and vitamin D deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, C P; Corsten, N; Rolf, O

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin D and calcium deficiency has a higher incidence in the orthopedic-trauma surgery patient population than generally supposed. In the long term this can result in osteomalacia, a form of altered bone mineralization in adults, in which the cartilaginous, non-calcified osteoid does not mature to hard bone. The current value of vitamin D and its importance for bones and other body cells are demonstrated. The causes of vitamin D deficiency are insufficient sunlight exposure, a lack of vitamin D3 and calcium, malabsorption, and rare alterations of VDR signaling and phosphate metabolism. The main symptoms are bone pain, fatigue fractures, muscular cramps, muscle pain, and gait disorders, with an increased incidence of falls in the elderly. Osteopathies induced by pharmaceuticals, tumors, rheumatism or osteoporosis have to be considered as the main differential diagnoses. In addition to the recording of symptoms and medical imaging, the diagnosis of osteomalacia should be ensured by laboratory parameters. Adequate treatment consists of the high-dose intake of vitamin D3 and the replacement of phosphate if deficient. Vitamin D is one of the important hormone-like vitamins and is required in all human cells. Deficiency of vitamin D has far-reaching consequences not only for bone, but also for other organ systems.

  12. Contribution to the study of calcium metabolism in the deficiency of testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S.M.J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of calcium mobilization in rats were determined to estimate the role of testosterone in the metabolism of this ion. Calcium multicompartimental theory was combined to and used in measurements of metabolic balance (for 45 CaCl 2 or 40 CaCl 2 ). Three groups of 60 day old rats were used: G I-control; G II-castrated; G III-castrated and treated with testosterone propionate. Data were obtained from measurements of Ca ++ in samples of plasma, feces and urine. Balance studies suggest that calcium level in blood plasma remained constant in all groups, the increase of bone reabsorption in groups II and III being counterbalanced by the elevation of the urinary excrection. This result implies the equilibrium occurring at renal level. Intestinal calcium absorption remained the same in the three groups of animals, indicating that testosterone has no consistent effect at intestinal level. The increase of total calcium in feces of groups II and III arises from a great endogenous secretion. A significant negative balance of calcium was also observed in these groups. This fact permits the conclusion that in the absence of testosterone the organism doesn't retain calcium efficiently. (M.A.) [pt

  13. Tropical forests can suffer from a serious deficiency of calcium after logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nykvist, Nils

    2000-01-01

    All harvesting of biomass results in a loss of plant nutrients from the soil. The impact of this loss on forest productivity can be determined only if the total amounts of plant nutrients in logs, other biomass and soil are known. In investigations of tropical rain forest ecosystems the total analysis of calcium is common with regard to logs and other biomass, whereas for soils only the content of exchangeable calcium has been determined. This study, involving a calcium-poor bedrock area in Sabah, Malaysia, shows that the contents of total calcium in the soil can be estimated from figures of exchangeable calcium. In the state of Sabah, these estimated amounts were lower in 19 out of 115 soil profiles compared with the amount measured at our research area at Mendolong in Sabah where a sustainable forestry is not possible with the present rotation period without compensating for the harvest-related loss of calcium

  14. Probing the limit of magnesium uptake by β-tricalcium phosphate in biphasic mixtures formed from calcium deficient apatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. Nandha; Mishra, Sandeep K.; Kannan, S., E-mail: para_kanna@yahoo.com

    2015-11-15

    A series of magnesium doped non-stoichiometric calcium deficient apatites were synthesized through an aqueous precipitation route. The resultant structural changes during heat treatment were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and Rietveld refinement. The results confirmed the formation of biphasic mixtures comprising Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} and β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} after heat treatment at 1000 °C with the preferential occupancy of Mg{sup 2+} at the crystal lattice of β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. The concentration of Mg{sup 2+} uptake in β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} is limited till reaching the stoichiometric ratio of (Ca+Mg)/P=1.67 and beyond this stoichiometric value [(Ca+Mg)/P>1.67], Mg{sup 2+} precipitates as Mg(OH){sub 2} and thereafter gets converted to MgO during heat treatment. Any kind of Mg{sup 2+} uptake in the crystal lattice of Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} is discarded from the investigation. - Highlights: • Aqueous co-precipitation of calcium deficient apatites with excess magnesium (Mg{sup 2+}) additions. • Heat treatments beyond 800 °C results in the formation of biphasic apatite mixtures. • Mg{sup 2+} gets accommodated at the β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} lattice of biphasic mixtures. • Mg{sup 2+} additions exceeding stoichiometric value (Ca/P>1.67) results in its formation as MgO. • Mg{sup 2+} occupancy at β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} lattice delays its allotropic conversion α-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} till 1350 °C.

  15. Intermittent exposure to ethanol vapor affects osteoblast behaviour more severely than estrogen deficiency does

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torricelli, Paola; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Borsari, Veronica; Rimondini, Lia; Rimondini, Roberto; Carrassi, Antonio; Giardino, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    With rising rates of alcohol consumption acute and chronic damage from alcohol is expected to increase all over the world. Habitual excessive alcohol consumption is associated with pathological effects on bone. The aim of the present in vitro study was to investigate comparatively the proliferation and synthetic activity of osteoblasts (OB) isolated from the trabecular bone of rats previously exposed to 7-week intermittent exposure to ethanol vapor, sham-aged rats and long-term estrogen deficient rats. Cell proliferation (WST1) and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), collagen I (CICP), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNFα) were measured at 3, 7 and 14 days of culture. Osteoblast proliferation rate and TGF-β1, IL-6 and TNFα syntheses were significantly affected by alcohol exposure. Estrogen deficiency and alcohol consumption share many common pathophysiological mechanisms of damage to bone, but alcohol affects OB proliferation and TNFα synthesis significantly more than menopause does. Therefore, these in vitro data suggest that alcohol has even more deleterious effects on bone than estrogen deficiency does

  16. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P.; Mijares, Dindo Q.; Janal, Malvin N.; LeGeros, Raquel Z.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. PMID:26914814

  17. CALCIUM DEFICIENCY AND CAUSATION OF RICKETS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2005-03-03

    Mar 3, 2005 ... communication about the benefits of exposing children to sunlight is very important in preventing the ... of rickets was nutritional deficiency of vitamin D due either to ..... resulting from less time being spent outdoors is the cause.

  18. Nitrite-cured color and phosphate-mediated water binding of pork muscle proteins as affected by calcium in the curing solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Xiong, Youling L

    2012-07-01

    Calcium is a mineral naturally present in water and may be included into meat products during processing thereby influencing meat quality. Phosphates improve myofibril swelling and meat water-holding capacity (WHC) but can be sensitive to calcium precipitation. In this study, pork shoulder meat was used to investigate the impact of calcium at 0, 250, and 500 ppm and phosphate type [sodium pyrophosphate (PP), tripolyphosphate (TPP), and hexametaphopshate (HMP)] at 10 mM on nitrite-cured protein extract color at various pH levels (5.5, 6.0, and 6.5) and crude myofibril WHC at pH 6.0. Neither calcium nor phosphates present in the curing brines significantly affected the cured color. Increasing the pH tended to promote the formation of metmyoglobin instead of nitrosylmyoglobin. The ability of PP to enhance myofibril WHC was hampered (P meat products. Although not affecting nitrite-cured color, calcium hampers the efficacy of phosphates to promote water binding by muscle proteins, underscoring the importance of water quality for brine-enhanced meat products. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Influence of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Induced by Low Dietary Calcium, Vitamin D Deficiency, and Renal Failure on Circulating Rat PTH Molecular Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Pierre; Rousseau, Louise; Hornyak, Stephen; Yang, Zan; Cantor, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Rats(r) with secondary hyperparathyroidism were studied to define the relationship between vitamin D metabolites and rPTH levels measured by 3 different rat ELISAs. Controls and renal failure (RF) rats were on a normal diet, while 2 groups on a low-calcium (-Ca) or a vitamin D-deficient (-D) diet. RF was induced surgically. Mild RF rats had normal calcium and 25(OH)D but reduced 1,25(OH)(2)D levels (P < .001) with a 2.5-fold increased in rPTH (P < .001). Severe RF rats and those on a -Ca or -D diet had reduced calcium (P < .01) and 25(OH)D levels (P < .05), with rPTH increased by 2 (-Ca diet; P < .05), 4 (-D diet; P < .001), and 20-folds (RF; P < .001) while 1,25(OH)(2)D was high (-Ca diet: P < .001) or low (-D diet, RF: P < .001). 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)(2)D were positively and negatively related on the -Ca and -D diets, respectively. rPTH molecular forms behaved as expected in RF and on -Ca diet, but not on -D diet with more C-rPTH fragments when less were expected. This may be related to the short-time course of this study compared to prior studies.

  20. Altered calcium pump and secondary deficiency of γ-sarcoglycan and microspan in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from δ-sarcoglycan knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Álvarez, Rocío; Crosbie, Rachelle H.; Vega-Moreno, Jesús; Medina-Monares, Joel; Estrada, Francisco J.; Ortega, Alicia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoglycans (SGs) and sarcospan (SSPN) are transmembrane proteins of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Mutations in the genes encoding SGs cause many inherited forms of muscular dystrophy. In this study, using purified membranes of wild-type (WT) and δ-SG knockout (KO) mice, we found the specific localization of the SG-SSPN isoforms in transverse tubules (TT) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. Immunoblotting revealed that the absence of δ-SG isoforms in TT and SR results in a secondary deficiency of γ-SG and µSPN. Our results showed augmented ATP hydrolytic activity, ATP-dependent calcium uptake and passive calcium efflux, probably through SERCA1 in KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we found a conformational change in SERCA1 isolated from KO muscle as demonstrated by calorimetric analysis. Following these alterations with mechanical properties, we found an increase in force in KO muscle with the same rate of fatigue but with a decreased fatigue recovery compared to WT. Together our observations suggest, for the first time, that the δ-SG isoforms may stabilize the expression of γ-SG and µSPN in the TT and SR membranes and that this possible complex may play a role in the maintenance of a stable level of resting cytosolic calcium concentration in skeletal muscle. PMID:20638123

  1. An experimental study of extraction wound healing in the calcium deficient rat and maxillofacial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Young Sun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of osteoporosis on extraction wound healing in the calcium deficient rat. In order to carry out this study, ten-week old Wistar strain rats weighing about 300 gms were selected. When the ras reached thirteen-week old, rat's mandibular first molar were removed. The rats were then divided into three groups : Group 1(rats given a normal diet both before and after tooth extraction), Group 2(rats given a low calcium diet for three weeks before tooth extraction and a normal diet after tooth extraction), and Group 3(rats given a low calcium diet for three weeks before and after tooth extraction). The healing of extraction wounds, as assessed by microradiography, autoradiography, and histopathologic examination, were compared among these three groups. The obtained results were as follows : 1. In Group 1, newly formed bone and active uptake of 45 Ca around extraction wound were noted on the 3rd and the 7th day. On the 14th and the 21st day, the extraction wounds of this group showed the bone trabecular formation and active 45 Ca uptake in the extraction wound and alveolar crest. The more prominent bone trabuculae with a less uptake of 45 Ca were noted on the 42nd day. 2. In Group 2, newly formed bone and thinning of alveolar bone trabeculae with more extensive uptake of 45 Ca than that in Group 1 were noted on the 3rd and the 7th day. On the 14th day, bone trabeculae were less thicker than that in Group 1. the prominent bone trabeculae in the extraction wounds and alveolar crest were noted on the 21st and the 42nd days. 3. In Group 3, newly formed bone was noted on the 3rd and the 7th day, Alveolar bone trabeculae and uptake of 45 Ca were similar to that in Group 2. On the 14th and 21st day, bone trabeculae were less thicker than that in Group 2 and group 3. the osteoporotic change with active uptake of 45 Ca was markedly noted on the 42nd day.

  2. An experimental study of extraction wound healing in the calcium deficient rat and maxillofacial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Young Sun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of osteoporosis on extraction wound healing in the calcium deficient rat. In order to carry out this study, ten-week old Wistar strain rats weighing about 300 gms were selected. When the ras reached thirteen-week old, rat's mandibular first molar were removed. The rats were then divided into three groups : Group 1(rats given a normal diet both before and after tooth extraction), Group 2(rats given a low calcium diet for three weeks before tooth extraction and a normal diet after tooth extraction), and Group 3(rats given a low calcium diet for three weeks before and after tooth extraction). The healing of extraction wounds, as assessed by microradiography, autoradiography, and histopathologic examination, were compared among these three groups. The obtained results were as follows : 1. In Group 1, newly formed bone and active uptake of 45 Ca around extraction wound were noted on the 3rd and the 7th day. On the 14th and the 21st day, the extraction wounds of this group showed the bone trabecular formation and active 45 Ca uptake in the extraction wound and alveolar crest. The more prominent bone trabuculae with a less uptake of 45 Ca were noted on the 42nd day. 2. In Group 2, newly formed bone and thinning of alveolar bone trabeculae with more extensive uptake of 45 Ca than that in Group 1 were noted on the 3rd and the 7th day. On the 14th day, bone trabeculae were less thicker than that in Group 1. the prominent bone trabeculae in the extraction wounds and alveolar crest were noted on the 21st and the 42nd days. 3. In Group 3, newly formed bone was noted on the 3rd and the 7th day, Alveolar bone trabeculae and uptake of 45 Ca were similar to that in Group 2. On the 14th and 21st day, bone trabeculae were less thicker than that in Group 2 and group 3. the osteoporotic change with active uptake of 45 Ca was markedly noted on the 42nd day.

  3. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  4. A microstructural study of the degradation and calcium release from hydroxyapatite-calcium oxide ceramics made by infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghao; Schmelzer, Eva; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite pellets, partially densified in a low-temperature heat treatment, were infiltrated with calcium nitrate solution followed by in-situ precipitation of Ca(OH) 2 and CaCO 3 . The infiltrated bodies were then densified to high relative density and the calcium carbonate transformed to calcium oxide during sintering and resulted in biphasic hydroxyapatite-CaO ceramics. This work investigated the influence of the infiltration on surface morphology, weight change, and microstructural-level degradation caused by exposure to saline at pH=7.4 and a temperature of 20°C. The CaO rendered the materials more susceptible to degradation, and released calcium into the saline faster than single phase, calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) that were used as a control. In consequence, these ceramics could be used to release calcium into the culture microenvironments of bone tissue or bone marrow cells next to a scaffold surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood into the ductal lumen (milk. Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2 and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1 membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2. Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2 are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  6. Reversible Axonal Dystrophy by Calcium Modulation in Frataxin-Deficient Sensory Neurons of YG8R Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Mollá

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is a peripheral neuropathy involving a loss of proprioceptive sensory neurons. Studies of biopsies from patients suggest that axonal dysfunction precedes the death of proprioceptive neurons in a dying-back process. We observed that the deficiency of frataxin in sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG of the YG8R mouse model causes the formation of axonal spheroids which retain dysfunctional mitochondria, shows alterations in the cytoskeleton and it produces impairment of axonal transport and autophagic flux. The homogenous distribution of axonal spheroids along the neurites supports the existence of continues focal damages. This lead us to propose for FRDA a model of distal axonopathy based on axonal focal damages. In addition, we observed the involvement of oxidative stress and dyshomeostasis of calcium in axonal spheroid formation generating axonal injury as a primary cause of pathophysiology. Axonal spheroids may be a consequence of calcium imbalance, thus we propose the quenching or removal extracellular Ca2+ to prevent spheroids formation. In our neuronal model, treatments with BAPTA and o-phenanthroline reverted the axonal dystrophy and the mitochondrial dysmorphic parameters. These results support the hypothesis that axonal pathology is reversible in FRDA by pharmacological manipulation of intracellular Ca2+ with Ca2+ chelators or metalloprotease inhibitors, preventing Ca2+-mediated axonal injury. Thus, the modulation of Ca2+ levels may be a relevant therapeutic target to develop early axonal protection and prevent dying-back neurodegeneration.

  7. Dietary calcium levels and chemical treatments influencing radiostrontium uptake and release in mammalian bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roushdy, H.M.; Moloukhia, M.K.; Abdel-Fattah, A.T.

    1979-01-01

    Data obtained from in vivo studies on rats suggest that the rate of administered radiostrontium uptake and deposition in bones shows a negative correlation with the levels of dietary calcium in the following order: CR, CN, CP, CDP, where CR stands for calcium-rich diet (Ca% 1.728), CN for calcium-normal ( Ca% 1.442), CP for calcium-poor (Ca% 0.347(and CDP for both calcium-poor (Ca% 0.135) and vitamin D deficient. The uptake values for the administered radiostrontium were affected by the duration of the experimental feeding time in the following order: 10, 50 and 120 days. Administration of MgSO 4 or SrCl 2 experimentally fed animals showed a decrease in the magnitude of radiostrontium uptake, the effect being more pronounced with MgSO, whereas CaCl 2 showed an increase in the rate of uptake of the radionuclide. It has been also found that increasing the level of dietary calcium as well as administration of stable strontium or magnesium favoured more rapid elimination of the radiostrontium from the bones and helped the animals to discriminate more significantly against radiostrontium uptake. The data obtained were statistically evaluated and the results discussed in view of the relevant literature. (author)

  8. Supplemental calcium nutrition improves tuber yield and quality of native potatoes in the Peruvian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato tubers are known to be calcium deficient. This is because calcium moves with water and most water is transported to leaves and tubers being in soil do not have the draw for water and calcium. Calcium fertilizers are now routinely used to improve tuber quality and production in the US. Potatoe...

  9. [Recommendations on vitamin D and calcium supplements for adults in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigueira García, Ana Isabel

    2012-10-01

    Calcium supplements and vitamin D are involved in current debates of health, as cardiovascular safety of calcium, and correction of vitamin levels. The aim is to review the possibilities of making better use of supplements marketed in Spain, depending on their availability, information and related epidemiology. Analysis of comercial offer and available information about pharmacological aspects of Spanish medicinal supplements in data-sheets (39), guides and reports current institutional and professional, with additional search of this information and epidemiological data related Spanish in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews ®, PubMed ® (tool "Clinical Queries"), Dialnet database and hand search of Spanish journals directly related. There is no uniformity in terms of indication, expression of content, dosages, precautions and safety in data sheets or technical reports. The literature search found more recent publications volume for vitamin D than calcium, No evidence was found to establish appropriate dosing regimens indisputable or universal, or cholecalciferol bioavailability tests with aqueous vehiculización. In Spain nutritional situation is found generally suitable for the calcium but a status mostly unsuitable for vitamin D with several references for insufficiency and vitamin deficiency in adults. Corrective treatments primarily affect calcium supplements. There is an ample supply of calcium and vitamin D in Spain, whose drug design should rethink because don't respond to the needs identified or correction possibilities currently recommended. It should also improve and update their information, with particular interest in health status related to hypovitaminosis D.

  10. Preparation and characterization of bioceramics produced from calcium phosphate cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriotis, O.; Katsamenis, O.L. [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504, Patras (Greece); Mouzakis, D.E. [Technological Educational Institute of Larisa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, T.E.I of Larissa, 411 10, Larissa (Greece); Bouropoulos, N. [Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas, Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes, FORTH/ICE-HT, P.O. Box 1414, 26504 Rio Patras (Greece)

    2010-03-15

    The present work reports a method for preparing calcium phosphate ceramics by calcination of calcium phosphate cements composed mainly of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). It was found that hardened cements calcinied at temperatures from to 600 to 1300 C were transformed to tricalcium phosphates. Moreover the compressive strength was determined and porosity was estimated as a function of the calcination temperature. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Maternal vitamin D deficiency: Fetal and neonatal implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Christopher S

    2013-02-13

    Recent research efforts have focused on the roles that vitamin D may play in skeletal and non-skeletal health during pregnancy, lactation, and fetal or neonatal development. Animal and clinical studies have shown that the mother provides calcium to the fetus and neonate without requiring vitamin D, calcitriol, or the vitamin D receptor. Consequently, the blood calcium, calciotropic hormones, and skeleton are normal at birth despite severe vitamin D deficiency or genetic deletion of calcitriol or vitamin D receptor. After birth intestinal calcium absorption becomes dependent upon calcitriol, and this is when hypocalcemia and rickets can begin to develop. Breastfed infants are at especially high risk of vitamin D deficiency due to poor penetrance of vitamin D metabolites into milk. To maximize skeletal and non-skeletal health, vitamin D dosing recommendations should ensure that the baby is born vitamin D sufficient and maintained that way during infancy and beyond. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Y.J.; Dimke, H.; Schoeber, J.P.H.; Hsu, S.C.; Lin, S.H.; Chu, P.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had

  13. Intracellular calcium chelation and pharmacological SERCA inhibition of Ca2+ pump in the insular cortex differentially affect taste aversive memory formation and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, María Isabel; González-Cedillo, Francisco J; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2011-09-01

    Variation in intracellular calcium concentration regulates the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity and is associated with a variety of memory/retrieval and learning paradigms. Accordingly, impaired calcium mobilization from internal deposits affects synaptic plasticity and cognition in the aged brain. During taste memory formation several proteins are modulated directly or indirectly by calcium, and recent evidence suggests the importance of calcium buffering and the role of intracellular calcium deposits during cognitive processes. Thus, the main goal of this research was to study the consequence of hampering changes in cytoplasmic calcium and inhibiting SERCA activity by BAPTA-AM and thapsigargin treatments, respectively, in the insular cortex during different stages of taste memory formation. Using conditioned taste aversion (CTA), we found differential effects of BAPTA-AM and thapsigargin infusions before and after gustatory stimulation, as well as during taste aversive memory consolidation; BAPTA-AM, but not thapsigargin, attenuates acquisition and/or consolidation of CTA, but neither compound affects taste aversive memory retrieval. These results point to the importance of intracellular calcium dynamics in the insular cortex during different stages of taste aversive memory formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Deficiency in Cardiac Dystrophin Affects the Abundance of the α-/β-Dystroglycan Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lohan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Duchenne muscular dystrophy is primarily categorised as a skeletal muscle disease, deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin also affects the heart. The central transsarcolemmal linker between the actin membrane cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix is represented by the dystrophin-associated dystroglycans. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed no significant differences in the dimeric status of the α-/β-dystroglycan subcomplex in the dystrophic mdx heart as compared to normal cardiac tissue. In analogy to skeletal muscle fibres, heart muscle also exhibited a greatly reduced abundance of both dystroglycans in dystrophin-deficient cells. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the degree of reduction in α-dystroglycan is more pronounced in matured mdx skeletal muscle as contrasted to the mdx heart. The fact that the deficiency in dystrophin triggers a similar pathobiochemical response in both types of muscle suggests that the cardiomyopathic complications observed in x-linked muscular dystrophy might be initiated by the loss of the dystrophin-associated surface glycoprotein complex.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  16. Kit W-sh Mutation Prevents Cancellous Bone Loss during Calcium Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotinun, Sutada; Suwanwela, Jaijam; Poolthong, Suchit; Baron, Roland

    2018-01-01

    Calcium is essential for normal bone growth and development. Inadequate calcium intake increases the risk of osteoporosis and fractures. Kit ligand/c-Kit signaling plays an important role in regulating bone homeostasis. Mice with c-Kit mutations are osteopenic. The present study aimed to investigate whether impairment of or reduction in c-Kit signaling affects bone turnover during calcium deprivation. Three-week-old male WBB6F1/J-Kit W /Kit W-v /J (W/W v ) mice with c-Kit point mutation, Kit W-sh /HNihrJaeBsmJ (W sh /W sh ) mice with an inversion mutation in the regulatory elements upstream of the c-Kit promoter region, and their wild-type controls (WT) were fed either a normal (0.6% calcium) or a low calcium diet (0.02% calcium) for 3 weeks. μCT analysis indicated that both mutants fed normal calcium diet had significantly decreased cortical thickness and cancellous bone volume compared to WT. The low calcium diet resulted in a comparable reduction in cortical bone volume and cortical thickness in the W/W v and W sh /W sh mice, and their corresponding controls. As expected, the low calcium diet induced cancellous bone loss in the W/W v mice. In contrast, W sh /W sh cancellous bone did not respond to this diet. This c-Kit mutation prevented cancellous bone loss by antagonizing the low calcium diet-induced increase in osteoblast and osteoclast numbers in the W sh /W sh mice. Gene expression profiling showed that calcium deficiency increased Osx, Ocn, Alp, type I collagen, c-Fms, M-CSF, and RANKL/OPG mRNA expression in controls; however, the W sh mutation suppressed these effects. Our findings indicate that although calcium restriction increased bone turnover, leading to osteopenia, the decreased c-Kit expression levels in the W sh /W sh mice prevented the low calcium diet-induced increase in cancellous bone turnover and bone loss but not the cortical bone loss.

  17. Study on Different Forms of Calcium Metabolic Behavior in Normal and Osteoporosis Rats by ~(41)Ca Tracing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Because of calcium deficiency,there were about 90 million Chinese people suffering from osteoporosis which caused a great calcium supplement boom in 2009. However, recent studies have shown that excess calcium supplement may cause some other diseases

  18. Effects of Nutrient Deficiencies in Corn Plants on the In Vivo and In Vitro Metabolism of [14C] Diazinon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstman, J.L.; Lichtenstein, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    Full text: The effects of calcium, nitrogen, and magnesium deficiencies on the penetration, translocation, and the in vivo and in vitro metabolism of the insecticide [ 14 C] diazinon (diethyl-2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl) in corn plants were investigated. On a per gram fresh weight basis only roots from nitrogen-deficient solutions contained less C while tops from plants grown in calcium-deficient solutions contained nearly four times more radiocarbon than those from complete nutrient solutions. Due to calcium or nitrogen deficiencies a reduced degradation occurred in roots as indicated by the relatively higher recoveries of diazinon and the lower recoveries of an unidentified, more polar 14 C-ring compound. No differencies in [ 14 C] diazinon degradation due to nutrient deficiencies were noticeable with corn tops. The metabolic activity of corn roots was due to a soluble enzyme. In studies with subcellular components from roots, specific activities increased from the homogenate (4.09%/mg of protein) to the 105000 g supernatant (7.77%/mg of protein). Subcellular components from calcium-deficient roots produced significantly less water-soluble radiocarbon (sp act., 0.60) than did control roots (sp act., 1.60), results similar to those observed with in vivo experiments. However, the 10000 g supernatant from root material deficient in nitrogen produced significantly more water—soluble radiocarbon (sp act., 2.85) than subcellular fractions from control roots. (author)

  19. Letrozole induced low estrogen levels affected the expressions of duodenal and renal calcium-processing gene in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiao; Zhao, Xingkai; Wang, Shujie; Zhou, Zhenlei

    2018-01-01

    Estrogen regulates the calcium homeostasis in hens, but the mechanisms involved are still unclear fully. In this study, we investigated whether letrozole (LZ) induced low estrogen levels affected the calcium absorption and transport in layers. In the duodenum, we observed a significant decrease of mRNA expressions of Calbindin-28k (CaBP-28k) and plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase (PMCA 1b) while CaBP-28k protein expression was declined in birds with LZ treatment, and the mRNA levels of duodenal transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 (TRPV6) and Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) were not affected. Interestingly, we observed the different changes in the kidney. The renal mRNA expressions of TRPV6 and NCX1 were unregulated while the PMCA1b was down-regulated in low estrogen layers, however, the CaBP-28k gene and protein expressions were no changed in the kidney. Furthermore, it showed that the duodenal estradiol receptor 2 (ESR2) transcripts rather than parathyroid hormone 1 receptor (PTH1R) and calcitonin receptor (CALCR) played key roles to down-regulate calcium transport in LZ-treated birds. In conclusion, CaBP-28k, PMCA 1b and ESR2 genes in the duodenum may be primary targets for estrogen regulation in order to control calcium homeostasis in hens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of calcium and boron in the production of grain and sunflower silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Newton Martin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Boron and calcium are related to many physiological processes of the plant, which are affected by its deficiency, such as sugar transport, synthesis and cell wall structure, carbohydrate metabolism and plasma membrane integrity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of boron and calcium application via leaf and soil on the yield components in silage quality and content of macronutrients in leaves of sunflower. The experiment was conducted at Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná – UTFPR, Campus Dois Vizinhos, from September 2008 to April 2009, in a randomized block design with four replications, using the genotype Agrobel - La Tijereta. Morphological characteristics of the plants, the yield components (grain yield and weight of hundred grains, silage quality and content of nutrient uptake were evaluated. The sunflower crop did not respond to application of boron and calcium, to effects on yield components in silage quality and content of nutrients absorbed by plants. However, it was found increases in the partition dry grain and plant height.

  1. Isolation and identification of calcium-chelating peptides from Pacific cod skin gelatin and their binding properties with calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenfei; Li, Bafang; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhao, Xue

    2017-12-13

    A calcium-chelating peptide is considered to have the ability to improve calcium absorption. In this study, Pacific cod skin gelatin hydrolysates treated with trypsin for 120 min exhibited higher calcium-chelating activity. Sequential chromatography, involving hydroxyapatite affinity chromatography and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, was used for the purification of calcium-chelating peptides. Two novel peptides with the typical characteristics of collagen were sequenced as GDKGESGEAGER and GEKGEGGHR based on LC-HRMS/MS, which showed a high affinity to calcium. Calcium-peptide complexation was further characterized by ESI-MS (MS and MS/MS) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that the complexation of the two peptides with calcium was conducted mainly at the ratio of 1 : 1. The amino terminal group and the peptide bond of the peptide backbone as well as the amino group of the lysine side chain and the carboxylate of the glutamate side chain were the possible calcium binding sites for the two peptides. Meanwhile, several amino acid side chain groups, including the hydroxyl (Ser) and carboxylate (Asp) of GDKGESGEAGER and the imine (His) of GEKGEGGHR, were crucial in the complexation. The arginine residue in GEKGEGGHR also participated in the calcium coordination. Additionally, several active fragments with calcium-chelating activity were obtained using MS/MS spectra, including GDKGESGEAGE, GEAGER, GEK, EKG and KGE. This study suggests that gelatin-derived peptides have the potential to be used as a calcium-chelating ingredient to combat calcium deficiency.

  2. [Vitamin D-deficiency rickets: a case report from Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagna, Y; Ouédraogo, D-D; Dao, F; Diallo, O; Tiéno, H; Guira, O; Traoré, L O; Yanogo, A R D; Drabo, Y J

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency rickets results from a deficiency of vitamin D that is responsible for deficient calcium absorption, leading to failure of bone mineralization and cartilage bone growth, especially in children. We report the case of a 9-year-old girl who shows signs of rickets. Her family history, which includes similar malformations in several family members, led us to suggest vitamin D-resistant rickets, but all laboratory tests and response to treatment indicated deficiency rickets. Prophylaxis, at least for some very poor people, should be proposed for certain populations at risk, even in tropical zones.

  3. Foliar application of calcium chloride and borax affects the fruit skin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of foliar application of calcium chloride and borax calcium on fruit skin strength and cracking incidence in litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) fruit was investigated at 25 days interval and also the evaluation of fruit skin calcium and boron contents, skin strength, ion leakage from skin discs and fruit cracking in four ...

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  5. Functional Improvement in Geriatric Hip Fractures: Does Vitamin D Deficiency Affect the Functional Outcome of Patients With Surgically Treated Intertrochanteric Hip Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, W R D; Belani, M H; Ramason, R; Naidu, G; Doshi, H K

    2015-09-01

    The "Integrated Care Pathway" for geriatric intertrochanteric (IT) fractures in Singapore's Tan Tock Seng Hospital has shown significant functional recovery in patients' activities of daily living. However, the influence of preoperative vitamin D on functional recovery remains equivocal. This retrospective study therefore aims to determine whether patients with preoperative vitamin D deficiency have poorer functional outcomes. A total of 171 patients who had surgical treatment for IT fractures were recruited in the study. They were categorized into group A (vitamin D deficient) and group B (normal vitamin D). Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) score and nutritional parameters including hemoglobin, albumin, and adjusted calcium levels on admission were recorded. The Modified Barthel Index (MBI) score was used to measure functional recovery at the following time intervals: at pre-fall, at discharge after surgery, at 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. The mean age of both the groups (A: 79.7 years, n = 45; B: 83.0 years, n = 126) was statistically different (P < .05). However, the mean CCI (A: 9.42 and B: 10.13), hemoglobin (A: 12.4 and B 11.1), adjusted calcium (A: 2.39 and B: 2.38), and mean albumin (A: 33.6 and B: 33.0) of the groups were not significantly different. Furthermore, the MBI scores were not significantly different for both groups at preinjury (A: 91.5 and B: 89.4), at discharge (A: 55.2 and B: 58.9), at 6 months (A: 70.9 and B: 75.1), and at 1 year (A: 75.8 and B: 79.4). In our cohort, patients with vitamin D deficiency were younger. However, vitamin D deficiency at time of injury had no significant influence on functional recovery in patients with surgically treated hip fracture in our Integrated Care Pathway. In addition, patients who had a normal vitamin D levels had similar functional scores and improvement postoperatively and at 1 year (A: 82.8% and B: 88.9%).

  6. Iron Deficiency in Women and Its Potential Impact on Military Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    meal.6 Foods or beverages high in bran, dietary fiber, calcium, tannins (in tea and coffee), oxalates, phylates, and polyphenols (in certain plant...nationally Table 1 Laboratory analysis for identifying iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia Laboratory Test Normal Range Iron Deficiency Iron...for Military Readiness Policy Analysis . Why American servicewomen are serving at greater risk: women in land combat. CMR Report 2003;16:1–6. Avail

  7. Disruption of the IS6-AID linker affects voltage-gated calcium channel inactivation and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Minor, Daniel L

    2009-03-01

    Two processes dominate voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(V)) inactivation: voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) and calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI). The Ca(V)beta/Ca(V)alpha(1)-I-II loop and Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)/Ca(V)alpha(1)-C-terminal tail complexes have been shown to modulate each, respectively. Nevertheless, how each complex couples to the pore and whether each affects inactivation independently have remained unresolved. Here, we demonstrate that the IS6-alpha-interaction domain (AID) linker provides a rigid connection between the pore and Ca(V)beta/I-II loop complex by showing that IS6-AID linker polyglycine mutations accelerate Ca(V)1.2 (L-type) and Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) VDI. Remarkably, mutations that either break the rigid IS6-AID linker connection or disrupt Ca(V)beta/I-II association sharply decelerate CDI and reduce a second Ca(2+)/CaM/Ca(V)alpha(1)-C-terminal-mediated process known as calcium-dependent facilitation. Collectively, the data strongly suggest that components traditionally associated solely with VDI, Ca(V)beta and the IS6-AID linker, are essential for calcium-dependent modulation, and that both Ca(V)beta-dependent and CaM-dependent components couple to the pore by a common mechanism requiring Ca(V)beta and an intact IS6-AID linker.

  8. Melatonin synthesis under calcium constraint in gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, W.; Kulczkowska, E.; Kalamarz, H.; Guerreiro, P.M.G.; Flik, G.

    2008-01-01

    Brain or blood plasma melatonin was analysed as a measure for pineal melatonin production in sea bream. Access to calcium was limited by diluting the seawater to 2.5‰ and removing calcium from the diet or by prolonged feeding of vitamin D-deficient diet. Interactions/relations between melatonin and

  9. Strontium and calcium accumulation in fish as affected by food composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ophel, I.L.; Judd, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive tracers ( 85 Sr and 47 Ca) were used to investigate the effects of food composition on the accumulation of strontium and calcium by fish and their discrimination between these two elements. The total amount of calcium assimilated by fish was the same for all experimental conditions. Calcium not obtainable from food was absorbed from the water, even when the water concentration was less than 10 mg Ca/l. The major discriminatory process occurred during direct (gill) uptake from water. Gut uptake provided least discrimination against strontium. Strontium content of fish was closely related to the Sr/Ca ratio in their food. Strontium assimilation was found to be a function of: the Sr/Ca ratios of food and water, the amounts of calcium derived from each source and the biological discrimination against strontium relative to calcium

  10. Tumoral calcinosis with vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman presented with recurrent calcified mass in the left gluteal region. The clinical, radiological, and biochemical profile confirmed the diagnosis of tumoral calcinosis. She also had associated vitamin D deficiency. The patient underwent surgical removal of the mass to relieve the sciatic nerve compression and was managed with acetazolamide, calcium carbonate, and aluminium hydroxide gel with which she showed significant improve-ment. The management implications and effect of vitamin D deficiency on phosphate metabolism in the setting of tumoral calcinosis is discussed.

  11. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  12. Study on the Effect of Calcium and Potassium Spray on Date Bunch Fading Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Shekofteh

    2017-09-01

    weight, fruit length, fruit diameter, stone weight, stone diameter, and bunch fading percentage at 1℅ level. The highest wet fruit weight, fruit length, fruit diameter, stone weight, and stone diameter were attained in the treatment containing combined application of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate. Furthermore, the lowest amounts of these traits were obtained in control. The lowest and highest percentage of date bunch fading belonged to the combined treatment of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate, and control, respectively. In general, application of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate with each other improved fruit traits and reduced bunch fading percentage. Calcium mobility in the plant takes place mainly in the xylem, together with water. Therefore, calcium uptake is directly related to plant transpiration rate. Conditions of high humidity, cold and low transpiration rates may result in calcium deficiency. Salinity might also cause calcium deficiency because it decreases water uptake by the plant. Since calcium mobility in plants is limited, calcium deficiency appears in younger leaves and in fruits, because they have a very low transpiration rate. Therefore, it is necessary to have a constant supply of calcium for continued growth. Calcium deficiency is usually caused by low calcium availability or water stress which results in low transpiration rates. Calcium is an essential plant nutrient with many roles including participation in metabolic processes of other nutrients uptake, promotion of proper plant cell elongation, and improvement of cell wall structure – calcium is an essential part of plant cell wall. It forms calcium pectate compounds which give stability to cell walls and bind cells together. It also helps protecting the plant against heat stress - calcium improves stomata function and participates in induction of heat shock proteins. In addition, it helps protecting the plant against diseases - numerous fungi and bacteria secret enzymes

  13. Deficiency of Carbonic Anhydrase II Results in a Urinary Concentrating Defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnan, Devishree; Pan, Wanling; Beggs, Megan R

    2018-01-01

    (TDL); however, the physiological role of a CAII-AQP1 interaction in this nephron segment is not known. To determine if CAII was required for urinary concentration, we studied water handling in CAII-deficient mice. CAII-deficient mice demonstrate polyuria and polydipsia as well as an alkaline urine...... and bicarbonaturia, consistent with a type III renal tubular acidosis. Natriuresis and hypercalciuria cause polyuria, however, CAII-deficient mice did not have increased urinary sodium nor calcium excretion. Further examination revealed dilute urine in the CAII-deficient mice. Urinary concentration remained reduced...

  14. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  15. Does vitamin C deficiency affect cognitive development and function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(-/-) mice...... and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age......-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies....

  16. Vitamin D deficiency and low ionized calcium are linked with semen quality and sex steroid levels in infertile men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Blomberg; Lawaetz, Jacob Gerner; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Are low vitamin D levels linked with semen quality and sex steroids in infertile men? SUMMARY ANSWER: Infertile men with vitamin D deficiency had lower sperm motility, total numbers of motile sperm, Inhibin B, sex-hormone-binding-globulin (SHBG) and testosterone/estradiol ratio......, but higher levels of free sex steroids, than infertile men with normal vitamin D levels. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Low vitamin D levels have been associated with decreased sperm motility in healthy men, but a relationship between vitamin D and calcium with semen quality and especially sex steroids has not been...... infertile men, consecutively referred to our tertiary andrological centre for fertility workup, underwent a physical examination and had semen quality assessed based on two samples and blood analysed for serum testosterone, SHBG, estradiol, inhibin B, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH...

  17. Factors affecting the precipitation of pure calcium carbonate during the direct aqueous carbonation of flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyungsun; Jang, Young-Nam; Kim, Wonbaek; Lee, Myung Gyu; Shin, Dongbok; Bang, Jun-Hwan; Jeon, Chi Wan; Chae, Soo Chun

    2014-01-01

    The mineral carbonation of FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum was carried out through CO 2 sorption into ammonia solution containing FGD gypsum. High-purity calcium carbonate was precipitated from DCC (dissolved calcium carbonate) solution which was extracted during the induction period. The factors affecting the preparation of pure calcium carbonate were examined under the following conditions: CO 2 flow rate (1–3 L/min), ammonia content (4–12%), and S/L (solid-to-liquid) ratio (5–300 g/L). X-Ray diffraction study revealed that the PCC (precipitated calcium carbonate) was round-shaped vaterite. The induction time for PCC decreased as the CO 2 flow rate increased. The maximum formation efficiency for pure PCC was seen to increase linearly with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure PCC was the highest (90%) for S/L ratio of 5 g/L but it decreased as S/L ratio increased. On the other hand, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of DCC. It is believed that the pure PCC would add an economic value to the FGD gypsum carbonation for industrial CO 2 sequestration. - Highlights: • Pure and white CaCO 3 was synthesized using induction period during direct carbonation of FGD gypsum. • Its formation efficiency was increased with ammonia content but decreased with solid-to-liquid ratio. • This method is expected to extend to other industrial CO 2 sequestration for the enhanced economic value of precipitated CaCO 3

  18. Mechanisms of calcium transport in small intestine. Overall review of the contract, September 1, 1972--March 1, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, H.F.

    1975-01-01

    During the past three years considerable advance has been registered in our understanding of the mechanism of intestinal calcium transport, which is activated in response to 1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 , the active form of the vitamin in the system. In brush borders isolated from vitamin D-deficient chicks, a 200,000 molecular weight protein has been found by disc gel electrophoresis which is not present in chicks given vitamin D. This protein does not bind calcium and does not possess calcium dependent adenosine triphosphatase activity. Following the administration of 1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 to the deficient chicks this protein disappears from the disc gel profiles and a protein of molecular weight 220,000 appears in the gel profiles. This protein has been isolated and shown to possess calcium adenosine triphosphatase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity and it binds calcium. Work is progressing on the purification of these proteins with the ultimate aim of discerning what role they have in intestinal calcium transport. (U.S.)

  19. Monitoring the progression of calcium and protein solubilisation as affected by calcium chelators during small-scale manufacture of casein-based food matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Irene; O'Sullivan, Michael; O'Riordan, Dolores

    2017-12-15

    Calcium and protein solubilisation during small-scale manufacture of semi-solid casein-based food matrices was investigated and found to be very different in the presence or absence of calcium chelating salts. Calcium concentrations in the dispersed phase increased and calcium-ion activity (A Ca ++ ) decreased during manufacture of the matrices containing calcium chelating salts; with ∼23% of total calcium solubilised by the end of manufacture. In the absence of calcium chelating salts, these concentrations were significantly lower at equivalent processing times and remained unchanged as did A Ca ++ , throughout manufacture. The protein content of the dispersed phase was low (≤3% of total protein), but was significantly higher for matrices containing calcium chelating salts. This study elucidates the critical role of calcium chelating salts in modulating casein hydration and dispersion and gives an indication of the levels of soluble calcium and protein required to allow matrix formation during manufacture of casein-based food structures e.g. processed and analogue cheese. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Calcium homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation: role of vitamin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    skinned but also even Caucasian women tend to go into vitamin D deficiency during ... homeostasis in this phase of life is still controversial. Studies are .... calcium balance in lactating women. .... work on vitamin D. In general these authors.

  1. Vitamin D deficiency among healthy Egyptian females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botros, Raif M; Sabry, Inas M; Abdelbaky, Rania S; Eid, Yara M; Nasr, Merihan S; Hendawy, Laila M

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is becoming endemic in many parts of the world. To study vitamin D status in Egyptian females of different age groups. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 404 females, who were categorized into group 1 (51 nursing females); group 2 (50 pregnant females); group 3 (208 females of childbearing age); group 4 (38 elderly females); and group 5 (57 geriatric females). Females completed a questionnaire regarding dietary calcium and vitamin D intake, sun exposure, and clothing habits, and performed laboratory tests including calcium, PO4, alkaline phosphatase, intact PTH, and 25-OH vitamin D levels. Median and IQR of vitamin D levels across groups 1, 2, 3 and 5 were in the deficient range, being lowest in groups 3, 5, and 1, respectively. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 72.6% of the nursing group, 54% of the pregnant group, 72% of the childbearing age group, 39.5% of the elderly group, and 77.2% of the geriatric group. Vitamin D was significantly higher in non-veiled females [23ng/dl] as compared to veiled females [16.7ng/dl]. Vitamin D levels with poor, fair, and good sun exposure were 14.1, 14, and 37ng/dl, respectively. These results show a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among healthy Egyptian females. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Maternal vitamin D deficiency associated with neonatal hypocalcaemic convulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibbott Rebecca

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maternal vitamin D insufficiency is not uncommon. Infants born to mothers who are deficient in vitamin D and or calcium, usually due to cultural modifications in their diets or clothing habits, and in addition are breastfed, are at risk of developing vitamin D deficiency and hypocalcaemia. We present a case of neonatal hypocalcaemic seizures secondary to vitamin D deficiency. Rickets in children resulting from vitamin D deficiency is well documented. It is also becoming clear that there is a positive correlation between maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy and lactation and the development of rickets both in infancy and childhood. The correlation between maternal vitamin D, neonatal vitamin D and hypocalcaemia is not well documented.

  3. Iron deficiency anemia in sports and preventive dietetic and nutrition interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aritz Urdampilleta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia in athletes is a very common condition that leads to reduced physical performance. Athletes are susceptible of falling iron deposits, mainly by an increase in its use, by its loss, or by insufficient intake. The present review aims to establish the basis of current knowledge environment: sports-athletes who have increased risk of anemia, etiology of iron deficiency anemia in the sporting group, providing dietary and nutritional guidelines for its prevention. The databases searched were Pubmed, Scirus and Scielo, as well as the official pages of prestigious organizations, recovering items by keywords: “iron-deficiency anemia”, “sports”, “athletic performance”, “iron intake “or Spanish counterparts. Iron deficiency anemia affects mainly endurance athletes (especially women and marathon and the members of team sports with high impact (volleyball and handball. Usually secondary anemias from hemolysis and oxidative stress resulting from the practice of sport, but it cases have also been documented by increased iron losses associated with exercise. Dietary and nutritional practices to prevent iron deficiency anemia in athletes should aim to ensure: carbohydrate intake between 60-65% of total energy daily minimum intake of 1.4 g of protein per day and a consumption of 20-40 mg iron daily, separating the intake of the main absorption inhibitors (phytate, tanetos and calcium. You need assessed by analytical iron status of the athlete every 2-3 months.

  4. Vitamin E deficiency fails to affect myocardial performance during in vivo ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, J S; Powers, S K; Demirel, H A; Hamilton, K L; Jessup, J; Vincent, H K; Shanely, R A

    2000-12-01

    Vitamin E content of cardiac tissue has been proposed to play a major role in the damage caused by myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I-R). Previous studies using in vitro models have examined vitamin E deficiency and I-R-induced myocardial damage with equivocal results. The purpose of this study was to use an in vivo model of myocardial I-R to determine the effects of vitamin E deficiency on myocardial I-R-induced damage. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (4-mo old) were assigned to either: 1) control diet (CON), or 2) vitamin E deficient diet (VE-DEF). The CON diet was prepared to meet AIN-93M standards, which contains 75 IU vitamin E/kg diet. The VE-DEF diet was the AIN-93M diet prepared with tocopherol stripped corn oil and no vitamin E. Following a 14-week feeding period, significant differences (p CON = 48.2 +/- 3.5; VE-DEF = 12.4 +/- 1.4 micrograms VE/g wet weight). Animals from both experimental groups were subjected to an in vivo I-R protocol consisting of 25 minutes of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 10 minutes of reperfusion. No group differences (p > 0.05) existed in cardiac performance (peak arterial pressure or ventricular work) or the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias during the I-R protocol. VE-DEF animals had significantly higher (p CON animals. These data suggest that although vitamin E deficiency increases oxidative damage resulting from myocardial I-R, it does not affect cardiac performance during the insult.

  5. Nutritional rickets: vitamin D, calcium, and the genetic make-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kholy, Mohamed; Elsedfy, Heba; Fernández-Cancio, Monica; Hamza, Rasha Tarif; Amr, Nermine Hussein; Ahmed, Alaa Youssef; Toaima, Nadin Nabil; Audí, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D (vitD) deficiency presenting as rickets is increasing worldwide. Insufficient sun exposure, vitD administration, and/or calcium intake are the main causes. However, vitD system-related genes may also have a role. Prospective study: 109 rachitic children completed a 6-mo study period or until rachitic manifestations disappeared. Thirty children were selected as controls. Clinical and biochemical data were evaluated at baseline in patients and controls and biochemistry re-evaluated at radiological healing. Therapy was stratified in three different protocols. Fifty-four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of five vitD system genes (VDR, CP2R1, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, and GC) were genotyped and their association with clinical and biochemcial data was analyzed. Therapy response was similar in terms of radiological healing although it was not so in terms of biochemical normalization. Only VDR gene (promoter, start-codon, and intronic genotypes) was rickets-associated in terms of serum 25-OH-D, calcium, radiological severity and time needed to heal. Eight patients with sufficient calcium intake and 25-OH-D levels carried a VDR genotype lacking minor allele homozygous genotypes at SNPs spread along the gene. Although patients presented epidemiologic factors strongly contributing to rickets, genetic modulation affecting predisposition, severity, and clinical course is exerted, at least in part, by VDR gene polymorphic variation.

  6. Calcium and Vitamin D Metabolism in Pediatric Nephrotic Syndrome; An Update on the Existing Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeeili

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available  Minimal Change Disease (MCD is the leading cause of childhood Nephrotic Syndrome (NS. Therefore in pediatrics nephrotic syndrome, most children beyond the first year of life will be treated with corticosteroids without an initial biopsy. Children with NS often display a number of calcium homeostasis disturbances causing abnormal bone histology, including hypocalcemia, reduced serum vitamin D metabolites, impaired intestinal absorption of calcium, and elevated levels of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH. These are mainly attributed to the loss of a variety of plasma proteins and minerals in the urine as well as steroid therapy. Early diagnosis and management of these abnormalities, could prevent the growth retardation and renal osteodystrophy that affects children with nephrotic syndrome. Here we reviewed the literature for changes of calcium and vitamin D metabolism in nephrotic syndrome and its consequences on bones, also the effect of corticosteroid and possible preventive strategies that could be done to avoid long term outcomes in children. Although the exact biochemical basis for Changes in levels of calcium and vitamin D metabolites in patients with NS remains speculative; Because of the potential adverse effects of these changes among growing children, widespread screening for vitamin D deficiency or routine vitamin D supplementation should be considered.

  7. Resting Tension Affects eNOS Activity in a Calcium-Dependent Way in Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschalis-Adam Molyvdas

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The alteration of resting tension (RT from 0.5 g to 2.5 g increased significantly airway smooth muscle contractions induced by acetylcholine (ACh in rabbit trachea. The decrease in extracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]o from 2 mM to 0.2 mM reduced ACh-induced contractions only at 2.5 g RT with no effect at 0.5 g RT. The nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME increased ACh-induced contractions at 2.5 g RT. The inhibitor of inducible NOS, S-methylsothiourea or neuronal NOS, 7-nitroindazole had no effect. At 2.5 g RT, the reduction of [Ca2+]o from 2 mM to 0.2 mM abolished the effect of L-NAME on ACh-induced contractions. The NO precursor L-arginine or the tyrosine kinase inhibitors erbstatin A and genistein had no effect on ACh-induced contractions obtained at 2.5 g RT. Our results suggest that in airways, RT affects ACh-induced contractions by modulating the activity of epithelial NOS in a calcium-dependent, tyrosine-phosphorylation-independent way.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  10. Association of some specific nutrient deficiencies with periodontal disease in elderly people: A systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, G.J. van der; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Visschere, L. De; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Baat, C. de

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Deficiency of vitamin B complex, vitamin C, vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium has been associated with periodontal disease. This article systematically reviews the currently available literature on the feasible association of vitamin B complex, vitamin C, vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium

  11. Rickets–vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal. PMID:22470851

  12. Rickets-vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Sahay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  14. [Aging and homeostasis. Management of disorders in bone and calcium metabolism associated with ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    Disorders in bone and calcium metabolism associated with aging are based on secondary hyperparathyroidism due to impaired intestinal calcium absorption caused by insufficient vitamin D actions and augmented bone resorption due to sex hormone deficiency. Both of them are involved in the development of osteoporosis that increases risk of fractures. Therefore, the most important thing for management of disorders in bone and calcium metabolism associated with aging is to prevent fractures with appropriate drugs for osteoporosis.

  15. Assessment of Lactose-Free Diet on the Phalangeal Bone Mineral Status in Italian Adolescents Affected by Adult-Type Hypolactasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliati, Sylvie; Saccomandi, Daniela; Brusaferro, Andrea; Busoli, Laura; Scala, Andrea; Malaventura, Cristina; Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina

    2018-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia (ATH) is a clinical syndrome of primary lactase deficiency. A lactose-free diet is advisable to avoid the symptoms linked to the condition, but this potentially creates problems for optimal bone mineralization due to reduced calcium intake. To evaluate the effect of the lactose-free diet on the bone mineral status (BMS), we compared the phalangeal BMS of adolescents with ATH to that of peers on a normal diet. Also, we analyzed the correlations between BMS and dietary behavior, physical exercise, and calcium and vitamin D intake. A total of 102 cases and 102 healthy controls filled out a diet record and underwent phalangeal Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS). No difference in BMS was observed. The time spent on lactose-free diet (4.8 ± 3.1 years) was inversely correlated to the BMS. More than 98% of cases consumed lactose-free milk, but calcium and vitamin D intake were significantly lower. Calcium intake was correlated to physical exercise but not to BMS. Our results suggest that a lactose-free diet does not affect the phalangeal BMS of adolescents with primary lactase deficiency when their diet includes lactose-free cow’s milk. However, there is still a significantly lower calcium intake than in the population reference. The inverse correlation observed between the BMS and the time spent on a lactose-free diet suggests that a long-term follow-up is advisable. PMID:29723971

  16. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... remain debated. Management depends on B12 supplementation, either via high-dose oral routes or via parenteral administration. This Primer describes the current knowledge surrounding B12 deficiency, and highlights improvements in diagnostic methods as well as shifting concepts about the prevalence, causes...

  17. Meals and dephytinization affect calcium and zinc absorption in Nigerian children with rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional rickets resulting from calcium insufficiency is common in Nigeria, and high dietary phytate is thought to inhibit calcium and zinc absorption. We compared the effects of a high-phytate meal and enzymatic dephytinization on calcium and zinc absorption in Nigerian children with and without...

  18. Calcium as a cardiovascular toxin in CKD-MBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Sharon M

    2017-07-01

    Disordered calcium balance and homeostasis are common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Such alterations are commonly associated with abnormal bone remodeling, directly and indirectly. Similarly, positive calcium balance may also be a factor in the pathogenesis of extra skeletal soft tissue and arterial calcification. Calcium may directly affect cardiac structure and function through direct effects to alter cell signaling due to abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis 2) extra-skeletal deposition of calcium and phosphate in the myocardium and small cardiac arterioles, 3) inducing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through calcium and hormone activation of NFAT signaling mechanisms, and 4) increased aorta calcification resulting in chronic increased afterload leading to hypertrophy. Similarly, calcium may alter vascular smooth muscle cell function and affect cell signaling which may predispose to a proliferative phenotype important in arteriosclerosis and arterial calcification. Thus, disorders of calcium balance and homeostasis due to CKD-MBD may play a role in the high cardiovascular burden observed in patients with CKD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Calcium response to vitamin D supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Spivacow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies show the importance of serum vitamin D sufficient levels to prevent multiple chronic diseases. However, vitamin D supplementation and its effects on urine calcium excretion remain controversial. The objective of this prospective and interventional study was to evaluate urine calcium excretion in women with normal calciuria or hypercalciuria, once serum vitamin D sufficiency was achieved. We studied 63 women with idiopathic hypercalciuria, (9 with renal lithiasis and 50 normocalciuric women. Both groups had serum vitamin D levels low (deficiency or insufficiency. Baseline urine calcium excretion was measured before being supplemented with vitamin D2 or D3 weekly or vitamin D3 100.000 IU monthly. Once serum vitamin D levels were corrected achieving at least 30 ng/ml, a second urine calcium excretion was obtained. Although in the whole sample we did not observe significant changes in urine calcium excretion according to the way of supplementation, some of those with weekly supplementation had significant higher urine calcium excretion, 19% (n = 12 of hypercalciuric women and 12% (n = 6 of the normocalciuric group. Monthly doses, also showed higher urine calcium excretion in 40% of hypercalciuric women (n = 4/10 and in 44% (n = 4/9 of the renal lithiasis hypercalciuric patients. In conclusion, different ways of vitamin D supplementation and adequate serum levels are safe in most patients, although it should be taken into account a subgroup, mainly with monthly loading doses, that could increase the calciuria significantly eventually rising renal lithiasis risk or bone mass loss, if genetically predisposed.

  20. [The concentration of ionized and total calcium in the blood of female dogs with uterine inertia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, A; Schwab, A

    1990-12-01

    Blood values of calcium, inorganic phosphate and magnesium were estimated in 26 bitches one day before parturition, on the day of parturition and daily for 6 days post partum. In 17 of these 26 animals the diagnosis was dystocia because of uterine inertia. A comparison of calcium levels between those bitches giving birth spontaneously and those requiring assistance gave no indication that blood calcium deficiency was the cause of uterine inertia.

  1. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  2. Something more to say about calcium homeostasis: the role of vitamin K2 in vascular calcification and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flore, R; Ponziani, F R; Di Rienzo, T A; Zocco, M A; Flex, A; Gerardino, L; Lupascu, A; Santoro, L; Santoliquido, A; Di Stasio, E; Chierici, E; Lanti, A; Tondi, P; Gasbarrini, A

    2013-09-01

    Vascular calcification and osteoporosis share similar etiopathogenetic mechanisms. Vitamin K2 deficiency could be responsible of the so called "calcium paradox", that is the lack of calcium in the bone and its storage in the vessel wall. These events may have clinically relevant consequences, such as cardiovascular accidents, and bone fractures. To review the biological function of vitamin K2 metabolism, the main factors related to its deficiency and the consequent clinical significance. Vitamin K2 is essential for the function of several proteins, involved in the maintenance of the normal structure of arterial wall, osteoarticular system, teeth, and for the regulation of cell growth. It has been demonstrated to have a pivotal role in the inhibition of vascular foci of calcification, and in the regulation of calcium deposition in the bone. Vitamin K2 deficiency is often subclinic in a large part of healthy population. This deficiency is related to the interaction of various factors, such as the reduced dietary intake, the alteration of intestinal absorption or production, with a possible role of intestinal microbiota and the increased consumption at the vessel wall. Vitamin K2 deficiency has recently been recognized as a protagonist in the development of vascular calcification and osteoporosis. Data reported so far are promising and, dietary supplementation seems a useful tool to contrast these diseases. However, large studies or solid clinical correlations regarding vitamin K2 deficiency and its pathologic consequences are needed to confirm these preliminary experiences.

  3. Development of a degradable cement of calcium phosphate and calcium sulfate composite for bone reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, H; Wei, J; Liu, C S

    2006-01-01

    A new type of composite bone cement was prepared and investigated by adding calcium sulfate (CS) to calcium phosphate cement (CPC). This composite cement can be handled as a paste and easily shaped into any contour, which can set within 5-20 min, the setting time largely depending on the liquid-solid (L/S) ratio; adding CS to CPC had little effect on the setting time of the composite cements. No obvious temperature increase and pH change were observed during setting and immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The compressive strength of the cement decreased with an increase in the content of CS. The degradation rate of the composite cements increased with time when the CS content was more than 20 wt%. Calcium deficient apatite could form on the surface of the composite cement because the release of calcium into SBF from the dissolution of CS and the apatite of the cement induced the new apatite formation; increasing the content of CS in the composite could improve the bioactivity of the composite cements. The results suggested that composite cement has a reasonable setting time, excellent degradability and suitable mechanical strength and bioactivity, which shows promising prospects for development as a clinical cement

  4. Iodine deficiency disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S M [Pakistan Council for Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1994-12-31

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.).

  5. The Effects of Annatto Tocotrienol on Bone Biomechanical Strength and Bone Calcium Content in an Animal Model of Osteoporosis Due to Testosterone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Yong Chin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis reduces the skeletal strength and increases the risk for fracture. It is an underdiagnosed disease in men. Annatto tocotrienol has been shown to improve bone structural indices and increase expression of bone formation genes in orchidectomized rats. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of annatto tocotrienol on biomechanical strength and calcium content of the bone in orchidectomized rats. Thirty three-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups. The baseline control (BC group was sacrificed at the onset of the study. The sham-operated group (SHAM received olive oil (the vehicle of tocotrienol orally daily and peanut oil (the vehicle of testosterone intramuscularly weekly. The remaining rats were orchidectomized and treated with three different regimens, i.e., (1 daily oral olive oil plus weekly intramuscular peanut oil injection; (2 daily oral annatto tocotrienol at 60 mg/kg plus weekly intramuscular peanut oil injection; (3 daily oral olive oil plus weekly intramuscular testosterone enanthate injection at 7 mg/kg. Blood, femur and tibia of the rats were harvested at the end of the two-month treatment period for the evaluation of serum total calcium and inorganic phosphate levels, bone biomechanical strength test and bone calcium content. Annatto-tocotrienol treatment improved serum calcium level and tibial calcium content (p < 0.05 but it did not affect femoral biomechanical strength (p > 0.05. In conclusion, annatto-tocotrienol at 60 mg/kg augments bone calcium level by preventing calcium mobilization into the circulation. A longer treatment period is needed for annatto tocotrienol to exert its effects on bone strength.

  6. An Unusual Case of Hypercalcemia Associated with Graves’ Disease and Vitamin D Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Korytnaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To present a case of hypercalcemia associated with thyrotoxicosis in a patient with vitamin D deficiency and review biochemical changes during the course of treatment. Methods We report a case, describe the changes in serum calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone in Graves’ disease and concomitant Vitamin D deficiency. We compare our findings to those reported in literature. Results Our patient had hypercalcemia secondary to thyrotoxicosis alone, which was confirmed by low parathyroid hormone level and resolution of hypercalcemia with treatment of thyrotoxicosis. The case was complicated by a concomitant vitamin D deficiency. Serum calcium elevation in patients with thyrotoxicosis occurs secondary to hyperthyroidism alone or due to concurrent hyperparathyroidism. Hypercalcemia from thyrotoxicosis is usually asymptomatic and is related to bone resorption. Vitamin D deficiency can be seen in patients with thyrotoxicosis because of accelerated metabolism, poor intestinal absorption and increased demand during bone restoration phase. Coexistence of hypercalcemia and Vitamin D deficiency in patients with thyrotoxicosis is rare, but possible, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels should be checked. The definite treatment for hypercalcemia in thyrotoxicosis is correction of thyroid function. Conclusion Hypercalcemia in thyrotoxicosis should be distinguished from concomitant hyperparathyroidism and confirmed by resolution of hypercalcemia with control of thyrotoxicosis. Patients with hypercalcemia and thyrotoxicosis may also have vitamin D deficiency and 25-OH Vitamin D levels should be checked.

  7. Effect of calcium chloride spraying on BER in two varieties of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb Matsum and Nakai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad salahifarahi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Watermelon, originated from warm regions of Africa, is one of the most important vegetable crops used as human food, forage and for producing alcohol. The area under its cultivation in our province was 1031 ha as irrigated and 3829 ha as rainfed. The average fruit yields under above-mentioned conditions were 23784 and 14888kg ha-1, respectively. Watermelon fruits suffer from a nutritional disorder that is attributed to shortage of calcium in developing fruits. The adsorption and uptake process of calcium by plants is comprised of three main stages; the first stage is passing through root cortex into xylem, the second one is its transport within xylem, and the last one is its distribution into leaves and fruits. Plants obtain calcium preferably from soil solution. Calcium moves upward in apoplastic pathways (with transpiration flow, and reaches different organs of the plants through xylem. Blossom-end rot (BER is a nutritional disorder of watermelon, tomato and pepper that is caused by a shortage of calcium in enlarging fruits. Blossom-end rot of watermelon commonly occurs in our province when fruits are growing rapidly. BER is frequently seen in watermelon genotypes with long fruits, Charleston gray type in particular. Calcium requirement increases at rapidly developing stage of fruit. BER might happen as a result of increased demand of blossom-end rot of fruit (rapidly growing section of the fruits for calcium. It can occur even when there is abundant calcium in the soil, because demand exceeds supply. Since fruits do not transpire as much as leaves, less calcium is deposited when calcium containing water is transpired, resulting in a localized calcium deficiency in the fruit. Materials and methods: In order to investigate the effects of foliar application of calcium on BER of watermelon, an experiment was carried out at the agricultural research station of Gonbad, Gonbad-e Qabus, Iran, in 2008. The soil of the experiment site was

  8. Calcium and vitamin D metabolism in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Chen Hsing; Yang, Chweishiun; Patel, S.R.; Stevens, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have studied the effect of dietary vitamin D restriction on serum levels of vitamin D metabolites, measured by radioreceptor assay and radioimmunoassay in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Both WKY and SHR were fed a vitamin D-deficient or a vitamin D-supplemented diet beginning at 4 wk of age. In vitamin D-supplemented animals, the serum 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ] concentration of WKY was similar to the level of SHR. Plasma calcium concentration was not different between WKY and SHR. In animals fed a vitamin D-deficient diet, the serum concentration of 1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 of SHR was significantly lower than that of WKY. Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol level was markedly decreased in both WKY and SHR. The SHR, but not the WKY, developed hypocalcemia. Despite hypocalcemia, fasting urinary Ca 2+ excretion of SHR exceeded that of WKY. They conclude that the lower 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 level in SHR fed a vitamin D-deficient diet may be due to a defect in the synthesis of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 . The low level of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 is associated with renal wasting of calcium and hypocalcemia in SHR

  9. The effect of an induced copper deficiency on the total plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of a copper deficiency on certain aspects of reproduction in ewes was ... induced by using the copper antagonists cadmium, calcium and sulphate. .... sodium (Na), magnesium (MG), potassium (K), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and ...

  10. Calcium in drinking water: effect on iron stores in Danish blood donors-results from the Danish Blood Donor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Andreas S; Ejsing, Benedikte H; Sørensen, Erik; Pedersen, Ole B; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Erikstrup, Christian; Ullum, Henrik

    2018-03-25

    Studies confirm that calcium inhibits iron absorption. Danish tap water comes from groundwater, which contains varying amounts of calcium depending on the subsoil. We investigated the association of calcium in drinking water with iron levels in Danish blood donors. We used data on Danish blood donors including dietary and lifestyle habits, blood donation history, and physiologic characteristics including measures of ferritin levels along with information on area of residence from The Danish Blood Donor Study. Data on calcium levels in groundwater ("water hardness") were obtained through the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland. We performed multiple linear and logistic regression analyses to evaluate the effect of water hardness on ferritin levels and risk of having iron deficiency (defined as ferritin levels water hardness and ferritin levels in both men and women. Risk of iron deficiency was correspondingly increased in both men (odds ratio [OR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-2.12) and women (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03-1.40) with increasing water hardness. In analyses restricted to individuals who received supplemental iron tablets no significant association between groundwater hardness and ferritin levels was observed. As measured by ferritin levels, residential drinking water calcium content is associated with blood donors- iron levels and risk of iron deficiency. However, effect sizes are small. © 2018 AABB.

  11. Effect of absorbable and nonabsorbable sugars on intestinal calcium absorption in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griessen, M.; Speich, P.V.; Infante, F.; Bartholdi, P.; Cochet, B.; Donath, A.; Courvoisier, B.; Bonjour, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of glucose, galactose, and lactitol on intestinal calcium absorption and gastric emptying were studied in 9, 8, and 20 healthy subjects, respectively. Calcium absorption was measured by using a double-isotope technique and the kinetic parameters were obtained by a deconvolution method. The gastric emptying rate was determined with /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and was expressed as the half-time of the emptying curve. Each subject was studied under two conditions: (a) with calcium alone and (b) with calcium plus sugar. Glucose and galactose increased the calcium mean transit time and improved the total fractional calcium absorption by 30% (p less than 0.02). Lactitol decreased the mean rate of absorption (p less than 0.001) and reduced the total fractional calcium absorption by 15% (p less than 0.001). The gastric emptying rate did not appear to influence directly the kinetic parameters of calcium absorption. These results show that both glucose and galactose exert the same stimulatory effect as lactose on calcium absorption in subjects with normal lactase whereas lactitol mimics the effects of lactose in lactase-deficient patients. Thus the absorbability of sugars determines their effect on calcium absorption

  12. Mertk deficiency affects macrophage directional migration via disruption of cytoskeletal organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tang

    Full Text Available Mertk belongs to the Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and plays a pivotal role in regulation of cytoskeletal rearrangement during phagocytosis. Phagocytosis by either professional or non-professional phagocytes is impaired in the Mertk deficient individual. In the present study, we further investigated the effects of Mertk mutation on peritoneal macrophage morphology, attachment, spreading and movement. Mertk-mutated macrophages exhibited decreased attachment, weak spreading, loss of spindle-like body shape and lack of clear leading and trailing edges within the first few hours of culture, as observed by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Time-lapse video photography recording showed that macrophage without Mertk conducted mainly random movement with oscillating swing around the cell body, and lost the directional migration action seen on the WT cells. Western blotting showed a decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. Immunocytochemistry revealed that actin filaments and dynamic protein myosin II failed to concentrate in the leading edge of migrating cells. Microtubules were localized mainly in one side of mutant cell body, with no clear MTOC and associated radially-distributed microtubule bundles, which were clearly evident in the WT cells. Our results suggest that Mertk deficiency affects not only phagocytosis but also cell shape and migration, likely through a common regulatory mechanism on cytoskeletons.

  13. Bioactivation of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite with foamed gelatin gel. A new injectable self-setting bone analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessì, M; Alvarez-Perez, M A; De Santis, R; Ginebra, M P; Planell, J A; Ambrosio, L

    2014-02-01

    An alternative approach to bone repair for less invasive surgical techniques, involves the development of biomaterials directly injectable into the injury sites and able to replicate a spatially organized platform with features of bone tissue. Here, the preparation and characterization of an innovative injectable bone analogue made of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite and foamed gelatin is presented. The biopolymer features and the cement self-setting reaction were investigated by rheological analysis. The porous architecture, the evolution of surface morphology and the grains dimension were analyzed with electron microscopy (SEM/ESEM/TEM). The physico-chemical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analysis. Moreover, an injection test was carried out to prove the positive effect of gelatin on the flow ensuing that cement is fully injectable. The cement mechanical properties are adequate to function as temporary substrate for bone tissue regeneration. Furthermore, MG63 cells and bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were able to migrate and proliferate inside the pores, and hMSCs differentiated to the osteoblastic phenotype. The results are paving the way for an injectable bone substitute with properties that mimic natural bone tissue allowing the successful use as bone filler for craniofacial and orthopedic reconstructions in regenerative medicine.

  14. Efficacy of desensitizing products containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate for hypersensitivity relief in MIH-affected molars: an 8-week clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekes, Katrin; Heinzelmann, Karolin; Lettner, Stefan; Schaller, Hans-Günter

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy in reducing hypersensitivity in molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH)-affected molars immediately and over 8 weeks combining a single in-office application and a homed-based program with desensitizing products containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate. Nineteen children with at least one MIH-affected molar with hypersensitivity were included. Hypersensitivity was assessed with an evaporative (air) stimulus and a tactile stimulus. Each child received a single in-office treatment with a desensitizing paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate (elmex Sensitive Professional desensitizing paste), followed by 8 weeks of brushing twice daily with a desensitizing toothpaste containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate with 1450 ppm fluoride (elmex Sensitive Professional toothpaste), using the elmex Sensitive Professional toothbrush. Additionally, the corresponding mouthwash (elmex Sensitive Professional mouthwash) was used. Clinical assessments were made at baseline, immediately after the in-office treatment and after 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks of brushing twice daily. Fifty-six molars with an air blast hypersensitivity score of 2 or 3 (Schiff Cold Air Sensitivity Scale) were included. Application of the desensitizing paste decreased hypersensitivity significantly immediately and throughout the 8 weeks recalls (p MIH. This is the first study evaluating the desensitizing effect of a desensitizing paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate in patients with MIH.

  15. Links between Vitamin D Deficiency and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper was to review the most important mechanisms explaining the possible association of vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular diseases, focusing on recent experimental and clinical data. Low vitamin D levels favor atherosclerosis enabling vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, formation of foam cells, and proliferation of smooth muscle cells. The antihypertensive properties of vitamin D include suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, renoprotective effects, direct effects on endothelial cells and calcium metabolism, inhibition of growth of vascular smooth muscle cells, prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism, and beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. Vitamin D is also involved in glycemic control, lipid metabolism, insulin secretion, and sensitivity, explaining the association between vitamin D deficiency and metabolic syndrome. Vitamin D deficit was associated in some studies with the number of affected coronary arteries, postinfarction complications, inflammatory cytokines and cardiac remodeling in patients with myocardial infarction, direct electromechanical effects and inflammation in atrial fibrillation, and neuroprotective effects in stroke. In peripheral arterial disease, vitamin D status was related to the decline of the functional performance, severity, atherosclerosis and inflammatory markers, arterial stiffness, vascular calcifications, and arterial aging. Vitamin D supplementation should further consider additional factors, such as phosphates, parathormone, renin, and fibroblast growth factor 23 levels.

  16. Effects of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol on 47calcium absorption in post-menopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniggia, A; Vattimo, A

    1979-07-01

    Measurement of 47Calcium absorption was performed on eleven women with post-menopausal osteoporosis. The study was repeated after 10 days treatment with 1 microgram daily of 1,25(OH)2D3. These patients showed a statistically significant improvement of fractional calcium absorption that was inversely correlated to the basal values. The prompt improvement of the intestinal calcium transport in post-menopausal osteoporotic women, a few days after the administration of physiological doses of 1,25(OH)2D3, suggests that these patients synthesize inappropriately small amounts of 1,25(OH)2D3 because of their oestrogen deficiency. This could be an important pathogenetic factor in post-menopausal osteoporosis, as the efficiency of the adaptation of calcium absorption to low calcium intakes is dependent on 1,25(OH)2D3.

  17. Calcium, phosphorus and magnesium metabolism, with particular reference to milk fever (parturient hypocalcaemia) and grass tetany (hypomagnesaemic tetany) in ruminant animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium and phosphorus are taken together and their metabolism and interrelationship with vitamin D reviewed, together with the clinical effects of deficiencies of one or more of these nutrients. An account is given of milk fever, a disease affecting high-producing dairy cows at calving. Studies of the effects of calcium and phosphorus intakes on parathyroid function would tend to indicate that high calcium levels in the diet of dairy cows prepartum is a predisposing cause of milk fever, and recent studies would indicate that prevention of milk fever may be possible by limiting calcium intakes in the weeks before calving and increasing immediately after calving. This procedure has the effect of stimulating parathyroid function and enables the cow to withstand the sudden drain of calcium and phosphorus into colostrum at the initiation of lactation. Magnesium metabolism is considered separately and particular reference is given to ruminant animals since they are the species mainly affected by hypomagnesaemic tetany. The incidence and aetiology of hypomagnesaemic tetany are outlined and methods of control reviewed. In general, control methods depend upon increasing the intake of magnesium by susceptible animals during the danger periods. Supplementary magnesium can be supplied directly to animals in the concentrate ration or as magnesium compounds incorporated in molasses licks or in blocks for free-access feeding. Alternatively the pasture content of magnesium may be increased by 'dusting' magnesium oxide on to the pasture before grazing, or by soil applications of magnesium compounds to raise the magnesium content of the resulting pasture above 0.20% in the dry matter. (author)

  18. Protein expression in the nucleus accumbens of rats exposed to developmental vitamin D deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGrath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Developmental vitamin D (DVD deficiency is a candidate risk factor for schizophrenia. Animal models have confirmed that DVD deficiency is associated with a range of altered genomic, proteomic, structural and behavioural outcomes in the rat. Because the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, in the current study we examined protein expression in this region in adult rats exposed to DVD deficiency METHODS: Female Sprague Dawley rats were maintained on a vitamin D deficient diet for 6 weeks, mated and allowed to give birth, after which a diet containing vitamin D was reintroduced. Male adult offspring (n = 8 were compared to control male (n = 8. 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics and mass spectroscopy were used to investigate differential protein expression. RESULTS: There were 35 spots, mapped to 33 unique proteins, which were significantly different between the two groups. Of these, 22 were down-regulated and 13 up-regulated. The fold changes were uniformly small, with the largest FC being -1.67. Within the significantly different spots, three calcium binding proteins (calbindin1, calbindin2 and hippocalcin were altered. Other proteins associated with DVD deficiency related to mitochondrial function, and the dynamin-like proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Developmental vitamin D deficiency was associated with subtle changes in protein expression in the nucleus accumbens. Disruptions in pathways related to calcium-binding proteins and mitochondrial function may underlie some of the behavioural features associated with animal models of developmental vitamin D deficiency.

  19. Vanadium oxide V2O5 reaction with calcium metavanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnenko, T.I.; Slobodin, B.V.; Zhilyaev, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Complex physicochemical studies on the V 2 O 5 Ca(VO 3 ) 2 mixtures, annealed under different conditions, were conducted. It was established that the V 2 O 5 -Ca(VO 3 ) 2 system is characterized by the following features: defective structure of initial components, which are in equilibrium state; irreversible structural transformation without changes in the macrosymmetry (530 deg C) of calcium metavanadate, deficient in calcium and oxygen; melting of eutectic mixture of components which are in equilibrium at 616+-3 deg C; Ca(VO 3 ) 2 melting with decomposition at 775+-3 deg C. Besides this, the formation of oxide vanadium bronze of β-type calcium is possible under some conditions (narrow temperature range, certain partial oxygen pressure, etc)

  20. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    of the receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect...... the receptor calcium sites....

  1. The effect of vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 on intestinal calcium absorption in Nigerian children with rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children with calcium-deficiency rickets have high 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D values. The objective of the study was to determine whether vitamin D increased calcium absorption. This was an experimental study. The study was conducted at a teaching hospital. Participants included 17 children with nutrit...

  2. Prion protein misfolding affects calcium homeostasis and sensitizes cells to endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Torres

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Prion-related disorders (PrDs are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive neuronal impairment as well as the accumulation of an abnormally folded and protease resistant form of the cellular prion protein, termed PrP(RES. Altered endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis is associated with the occurrence of neurodegeneration in sporadic, infectious and familial forms of PrDs. The ER operates as a major intracellular calcium store, playing a crucial role in pathological events related to neuronal dysfunction and death. Here we investigated the possible impact of PrP misfolding on ER calcium homeostasis in infectious and familial models of PrDs. Neuro2A cells chronically infected with scrapie prions showed decreased ER-calcium content that correlated with a stronger upregulation of UPR-inducible chaperones, and a higher sensitivity to ER stress-induced cell death. Overexpression of the calcium pump SERCA stimulated calcium release and increased the neurotoxicity observed after exposure of cells to brain-derived infectious PrP(RES. Furthermore, expression of PrP mutants that cause hereditary Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or fatal familial insomnia led to accumulation of PrP(RES and their partial retention at the ER, associated with a drastic decrease of ER calcium content and higher susceptibility to ER stress. Finally, similar results were observed when a transmembrane form of PrP was expressed, which is proposed as a neurotoxic intermediate. Our results suggest that alterations in calcium homeostasis and increased susceptibility to ER stress are common pathological features of both infectious and familial PrD models.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of wheat calcium ATPases and potential role of selected ACAs and ECAs in calcium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Roohi; Williams, Lorraine E; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Virk, Nasar

    2017-10-27

    P 2 - type calcium ATPases (ACAs-auto inhibited calcium ATPases and ECAs-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases) belong to the P- type ATPase family of active membrane transporters and are significantly involved in maintaining accurate levels of Ca 2+ , Mn 2+ and Zn 2+ in the cytosol as well as playing a very important role in stress signaling, stomatal opening and closing and pollen tube growth. Here we report the identification and possible role of some of these ATPases from wheat. In this study, ACA and ECA sequences of six species (belonging to Poaceae) were retrieved from different databases and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. A high degree of evolutionary relatedness was observed among P 2 sequences characterized in this study. Members of the respective groups from different plant species were observed to fall under the same clade. This pattern highlights the common ancestry of P 2- type calcium ATPases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR was used to analyse the expression of selected ACAs and ECAs from Triticum aestivum (wheat) under calcium toxicity and calcium deficiency. The data indicated that expression of ECAs is enhanced under calcium stress, suggesting possible roles of these ATPases in calcium homeostasis in wheat. Similarly, the expression of ACAs was significantly different in plants grown under calcium stress as compared to plants grown under control conditions. This gives clues to the role of ACAs in signal transduction during calcium stress in wheat. Here we concluded that wheat genome consists of nine P 2B and three P 2A -type calcium ATPases. Moreover, gene loss events in wheat ancestors lead to the loss of a particular homoeolog of a gene in wheat. To elaborate the role of these wheat ATPases, qRT-PCR was performed. The results indicated that when plants are exposed to calcium stress, both P 2A and P 2B gene expression get enhanced. This further gives clues about the possible role of these ATPases in wheat in calcium management. These findings can be

  4. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  5. A mild phenotype of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency and developmental retardation associated with a missense mutation affecting cofactor binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weidensee, Sabine; Goettig, Peter; Bertone, Marko; Haas, Dorothea; Magdolen, Viktor; Kiechle, Marion; Meindl, Alfons; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; Gross, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of a non-synonymous mutation associated with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency. DPD enzyme analysis, mutation analysis and molecular dynamics simulations based on the 3D-model of DPD. The substitution Lys63Glu is likely to affect the FAD binding pocket within the DPD

  6. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... in the char conversion process. Comprehensive global equilibrium calculations predicted important characteristics of the inorganic ash residue. Equilibrium calculations predict the formation of liquid salt if sufficient amounts of Ca are added and according to experiments as well as calculations calcium binds...

  7. [Can I have some sunshine to cheer me up? vitamin D deficiency and depression in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers-Konijnenburg, S.C.; Marijnissen, R.M.; Gaasbeek, A.B.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is very common in the elderly, and the geriatric patient is probably at even greater risk. Vitamin D plays an important role in calcium homeostasis; recent studies point to a possible causal link between vitamin D deficiency and the development and severity of depression. In

  8. Calcium and bone disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriraam Mahadevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant transplacental calcium transfer occurs during pregnancy, especially during the last trimester, to meet the demands of the rapidly mineralizing fetal skeleton. Similarly, there is an obligate loss of calcium in the breast milk during lactation. Both these result in considerable stress on the bone mineral homeostasis in the mother. The maternal adaptive mechanisms to conserve calcium are different in pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy, increased intestinal absorption of calcium from the gut mainly due to higher generation of calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D helps in maintaining maternal calcium levels. On the other hand, during lactation, the main compensatory mechanism is skeletal resorption due to increased generation of parathormone related peptide (PTHrP from the breast. Previous studies suggest that in spite of considerable changes in bone mineral metabolism during pregnancy, parity and lactation are not significantly associated with future risk for osteoporosis. However, in India, the situation may not be the same as a significant proportion of pregnancies occur in the early twenties when peak bone mass is not yet achieved. Further, malnutrition, anemia and vitamin D deficiency are commonly encountered in this age group. This may have an impact on future bone health of the mother. It may also probably provide an opportunity for health care providers for prevention. Other metabolic bone diseases like hypoparathyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism are rarely encountered in pregnancy. Their clinical implications and management are also discussed.

  9. Prevention of nutritional rickets in Nigerian children with dietary calcium supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Fischer, Philip R; Isichei, Christian O; Zoakah, Ayuba I; Pettifor, John M

    2012-05-01

    Nutritional rickets in Nigerian children usually results from dietary calcium insufficiency. Typical dietary calcium intakes in African children are about 200mg daily (approximately 20-28% of US RDAs for age). We sought to determine if rickets could be prevented with supplemental calcium or with an indigenous food rich in calcium. We enrolled Nigerian children aged 12 to 18months from three urban communities. Two communities were assigned calcium, either as calcium carbonate (400mg) or ground fish (529±109mg) daily, while children in all three communities received vitamin A (2500IU) daily as placebo. Serum markers of mineral homeostasis and forearm bone density (pDEXA) were measured and radiographs were obtained at enrollment and after 18months of supplementation. The overall prevalence of radiographic rickets at baseline was 1.2% and of vitamin D deficiency [serum 25(OH)DRickets developed in 1, 1, and 2 children assigned to the calcium tablet, ground fish, and control groups, respectively (approximate incidence 6.4/1000 children/year between 1 and 3years of age). Children who developed rickets in the calcium-supplemented groups had less than 50% adherence. Compared with the group that received no calcium supplementation, the groups that received calcium had a greater increase in areal bone density of the distal and proximal 1/3 radius and ulna over time (Prickets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Studies on radiocalcium metabolism in pigs which suffer from a hereditary form of rickets (pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabe, C. von; Harmeyer, J.; Schmitt, R.; Veterinary School, Hannover

    1983-01-01

    Intestinal calcium absorption and calcium kinetics of plasma have been studied in pigs which suffer from pseudovitamin D deficiency rickets using 45 Ca. 200-250 μCi of 45 CaCl 2 administered either orally or intravenously on two consecutive days. The experiments were carried out in order to find out: (1) if kinetic measurements can provide suitable information on possible changes in calcium hemostasis during the development of the rachitic symptoms; (2) whether kinetic parameters of calcium metabolism can be used as indices to characterize the metabolic disturbance of calcium hemostasis. (author)

  11. Better functional mobility in community-dwelling elderly is related to D-hormone serum levels and to daily calcium intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukas, L; Staehelin, H B; Schacht, E; Bischoff, H A

    2005-01-01

    The influence of calcitropic hormones on functional mobility has been studied in vitamin D (calcidiol) deficient elderly or elderly with a history of falls, however, data in community-dwelling independent vitamin D replete elderly are missing. We therefore assessed in an observational survey the association of calcidiol (25(OH)D3) and calcitriol (D-hormone / 1,25(OH)2D3) status as well as of daily calcium intake on functional mobility in older subjects We evaluated 192 women and 188 men, aged superior 70 years and living independently. Average Timed-up and go test (TUG-test) in seconds was taken as measure of functional mobility. Calcidiol and D-hormone serum concentrations and daily calcium intake were studied in multivariate controlled linear regression models with TUG-test performance as the dependent variable and/or as dichotomous variables (deficient vs. non-deficient, above vs. below the median, respectively). Subjects with low D-hormone serum concentrations took significantly more time to perform the TUG-test (low = 7.70s +/- 2.52 SD ; high = 6.70s +/- 1.29 SD; p = 0.004). In the linear multivariate controlled regression model increased D-hormone serum concentrations predicted better TUG-test performance (estimate -0.0007, p = 0.044). Participants with a calcium intake of > or =512 mg/day were significantly faster to perform the TUG-test than participants with a daily calcium intake of better TUG-test performance in both models were: male gender, less comorbid conditions, younger age, lower BMI, iPTH serum levels and creatinine clearance. Calcidiol serum levels were not associated with TUG-test performance. Higher D-hormone status and a calcium intake of > or =512 mg/day in community-dwelling independent older persons are significant determinants of better functional mobility. Therefore, to ensure optimal functional mobility, the care of older persons should address correction of D-hormone deficiency and increasing daily calcium intake.

  12. Vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, serum calcium and phosphorus in patients with schizophrenia and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilian, Hamidreza; Bagherzadeh, Kamran; Nazeri, Zeinab; Hassanijirdehi, Marzieh

    2013-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with an increased risk of depression and schizophrenia. The aim was to compare serum levels of vitamin D, calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone in schizophrenics, depressed patients and healthy subjects in an Iranian population. In a cross-sectional study, 100 patients with schizophrenia and 100 with major depression were enrolled. A questionnaire was filled by using medical records of patients. After that a serum sample was taken and levels of vitamin D, calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone were assessed and then compared between the three groups. Post-hoc analysis of Tukey showed that vitamin D level in healthy participants was significantly higher than depressed patients and schizophrenics while there was no significant difference between vitamin D level in depressed and schizophrenic patients. The findings suggest that vitamin D affects the brain independent of hormonal pathways which regulate serum level of calcium. Non-significant difference in the serum level of vitamin D between the schizophrenics and the depressed patients suggests that the independent effect of vitamin D in brain is a general effect and is not specialized to a specific region or pathway in the brain; however, differences between psychiatric and non-psychiatric patients might be resulted from differences in psychosocial backgrounds.

  13. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with either rheumatic diseases or inflammatory bowel diseases on biologic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Zullo, Angelo; Picchianti Diamanti, Andrea; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Marrese, Cinzia; Scolieri, Palma; De Francesco, Vincenzo; Hassan, Cesare; Migliore, Alberto; Laganà, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been reported in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatic and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We evaluated the role of biologic therapy on vitamin D, calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels. This cross-sectional study enrolled consecutive patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD who underwent an ambulatory visit. Patients receiving vitamin D/calcium supplementation were excluded. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was diagnosed when values were rheumatic disease (M/F 37/99; mean age 60.7 ± 12.9 years) and 64 with IBD (M/F 41/23; Mean age 49.6 ± 13.1 years) were enrolled. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was detected in as many as 63.5 % patients, being 61.8 and 67.2 % in patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was higher in those receiving biologics than other therapies (78.3 vs 43.2 %; p rheumatic diseases (78.7 vs 41 %; p rheumatic diseases or IBD receiving a biologic therapy.

  14. Deficiency symptoms of nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium and sulphur in pepper (Capsicum spp) cv malagueta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruca, F.A.; Gouveia, P.R.; Teixeira, N.T.

    1989-01-01

    The pepper (Capsium spp) was cultivated in sand and nutritive solution to describe the deficiency symptoms of N, P, Ca and S. The deficiency symptoms and the first lack signals were clear to P and N nutrient. (author) [pt

  15. Factors affecting sustainable iodine deficiency elimination in Pakistan: A global perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Mehmood Khattak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Iodine deficiency remains a considerable challenge worldwide, even after decades of efforts to address the problem. The aim of this review is to present the current situation in historically iodine-deficient Pakistan regarding iodine nutritional status and place it in a global perspective. We collected relevant articles from online bibliographic databases and websites of concerned organizations that addressed prevalence of goiter/iodine deficiency and barriers to sustainable control. We divided the studies into pre- and post-1994, a landmark year when Pakistan formally adopted the universal salt iodization (USI programme. Overall, 56 studies reported goiter/iodine deficiency prevalence in Pakistan. Before 1994, six studies (30% reported a goiter prevalence ≥70%, while nine studies (45% reported a goiter prevalence between 30% and 70%. Only five studies (25% found a goiter prevalence less than 30%, of which only two studies reported prevalence <10%. From 1994 onwards, 15 studies (41.7% reported a goiter/iodine deficiency (ID prevalence ≥50%, of which seven studies reported prevalence ≥70%, while three studies (8.3% found a goiter prevalence of 30%–49%, nine studies (25% found a goiter prevalence of 10%–29%, and five studies (13.9% reported prevalence of <10%. Four studies (11.1% reported lower goiter prevalence but higher prevalence of iodine deficiency. The efforts in the past two decades resulted in up to a 50% decline in iodine deficiency disorders (IDD. Variable remaining factors and the recent results, however, indicate that this decline may be non-uniform and even over-estimated. Coordinated and regionally adopted efforts for eradication of IDD from all stakeholders should be pursued. Policy makers should take steps to protect future generations and alert concerned organizations about the importance of careful assessments and estimates of iodine nutritional status.

  16. Global dietary calcium intake among adults: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Low calcium intake may adversely affect bone health in adults. Recognizing the presence of low calcium intake is necessary to develop national strategies to optimize intake. To highlight regions where calcium intake should be improved, we systematically searched for the most representative ...

  17. Calcium and bone metabolism disorders during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Christopher S

    2011-12-01

    Pregnancy and lactation cause a substantial increase in demand for calcium that is met by different maternal adaptations within each period. Intestinal calcium absorption more than doubles during pregnancy, whereas the maternal skeleton resorbs to provide most of the calcium content of breast milk during lactation. These maternal adaptations also affect the presentation, diagnosis, and management of disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. Although some women may experience fragility fractures as a consequence of pregnancy or lactation, for most women, parity and lactation do not affect the long-term risks of low bone density, osteoporosis, or fracture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  19. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked creatine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions X-linked creatine deficiency X-linked creatine deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked creatine deficiency is an inherited disorder that primarily affects ...

  1. Effect of magnesium deficiency on renal magnesium and calcium transport in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Carney, S L; Wong, N L; Quamme, G A; Dirks, J H

    1980-01-01

    Recollection of micropuncture experiments were performed on acutely thyroparathyroidectomized rats rendered magnesium deficient by dietary deprivation. Urinary magnesium excretion fell from a control of 15 to 3% of the filtered load after magnesium restriction. The loop of Henle, presumably the thick ascending limb, was the major modulator for renal magnesium homeostasis. The transport capacity for magnesium, however, was less in deficient rats than control animals. Absolute magnesium reabsor...

  2. Calcium and Bone Metabolism Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Calcium and inorganic phosphate are of critical importance for many body functions, thus the regulations of their plasma concentrations are tightly controlled by the concerted actions of reabsorption/excretion in the kidney, absorption in the intestines, and exchange from bone, the major reservoir for calcium and phosphate in the body. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D) control calcium homeostasis, whereas PTH, 1,25(OH) 2 D, and bone-derived fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF 23) control phosphate homeostasis. Hypoparathyroidism can cause hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, whereas deficient vitamin D actions can cause osteomalacia in adults and rickets in children. Hyperparathyroidism, alternatively, can cause hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia. Laboratory tests of calcium, phosphate, PTH, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D are very useful in the diagnosis of abnormalities associated with calcium and/or phosphate metabolisms. Bone is constantly remodeled throughout life in response to mechanical stress and a need for calcium in extracellular fluids. Metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis, osteomalacia in adults or rickets in children, and renal osteodystrophy develop when bone resorption exceeds bone formation. Bone turnover markers (BTM) such as serum N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP) and C-terminal collagen cross-link (CTX) may be useful in predicting future fracture risk or monitoring the response to anti-resorptive therapy. There is a need to standardize sample collection protocols because certain BTMs exhibit large circadian variations and tend to be influenced by food intakes. In the United States, a project to standardize BTM sample collection protocols and to establish the reference intervals for serum P1NP and serum CTX is ongoing. We anticipate the outcome of this project to shine lights on the standardization of BTM assays, sample collection protocols, reference intervals in relation to age, sex, and ethnic

  3. Mechanistic Bases of Neurotoxicity Provoked by Fatty Acids Accumulating in MCAD and LCHAD Deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre U. Amaral PhD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid oxidation defects (FAODs are inherited metabolic disorders caused by deficiency of specific enzyme activities or transport proteins involved in the mitochondrial catabolism of fatty acids. Medium-chain fatty acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD deficiencies are relatively common FAOD biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of medium-chain fatty acids and long-chain 3-hydroxy fatty acids and their carnitine derivatives, respectively. Patients with MCAD deficiency usually have episodic encephalopathic crises and liver biochemical alterations especially during crises of metabolic decompensation, whereas patients with LCHAD deficiency present severe hepatopathy, cardiomyopathy, and acute and/or progressive encephalopathy. Although neurological symptoms are common features, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the brain damage in these disorders are still under debate. In this context, energy deficiency due to defective fatty acid catabolism and hypoglycemia/hypoketonemia has been postulated to contribute to the pathophysiology of MCAD and LCHAD deficiencies. However, since energetic substrate supplementation is not able to reverse or prevent symptomatology in some patients, it is presumed that other pathogenetic mechanisms are implicated. Since worsening of clinical symptoms during crises is accompanied by significant increases in the concentrations of the accumulating fatty acids, it is conceivable that these compounds may be potentially neurotoxic. We will briefly summarize the current knowledge obtained from patients with these disorders, as well as from animal studies demonstrating deleterious effects of the major fatty acids accumulating in MCAD and LCHAD deficiencies, indicating that disruption of mitochondrial energy, redox, and calcium homeostasis is involved in the pathophysiology of the cerebral damage in these diseases. It is presumed that these findings based on the

  4. Studies on radiocalcium metabolism in pigs which suffer from a hereditary form of rickets (pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabe, C. von; Harmeyer, J.; Schmitt, R. (Veterinary School Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Inst. of Physiology; Veterinary School, Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Dept. of Medical Physics)

    1983-05-01

    Intestinal calcium absorption and calcium kinetics of plasma have been studied in pigs which suffer from pseudovitamin D deficiency rickets using /sup 45/Ca. On two consecutive days 200-250 ..mu..Ci of /sup 45/CaCl/sub 2/ was administered either orally or intravenously. The experiments were carried out in order to find out: (1) if kinetic measurements can provide suitable information on possible changes in calcium hemostasis during the development of the rachitic symptoms; (2) whether kinetic parameters of calcium metabolism can be used as indices to characterize the metabolic disturbance of calcium hemostasis.

  5. Influence of calcium acetate on rye bread volume

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    Katharina FUCKERER

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The positive accepted savoury taste of rye bread is dependent on acetate concentration in the dough of such breads. In order to study how calcium acetate influences rye bread properties, the pH of rye doughs fortified with calcium acetate and the resulting volume of the breads were measured. Furthermore, CO2 formation of yeast with added calcium acetate and yeast with different pH levels (4, 7, 9 were measured. Thereby, it was determined that the addition of calcium acetate increased the pH of dough from 4.42 to 5.29 and significantly reduced the volume of the breads from 1235.19 mL to 885.52 mL. It could be proven that bread volume was affected by a 30.9% lower CO2 amount production of yeast, although bread volume was not affected by changing pH levels. Due to reduced bread volume, high concentrations of calcium acetate additions are not recommended for improving rye bread taste.

  6. Status of Dietary Intake of Calcium in Women of Reproductive Age in Delhi, India

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    Nighat Yaseen Sofi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium (Ca plays an important role in bone formation. Attaining optimal bone mass and peak bone densities is essential to prevent osteoporotic fractures in future life. In conditions of Ca deficiency, Ca from the bones maintains the blood levels of Ca leading to its depletion in bones. Calcium depletion leads to poor bone density and a higher risk of osteoporosis particularly in women who have repeated episodes of pregnancy and lactation.Aim & Objective: To assess the dietary intake of calcium.Material Methods: the study was conducted among 200 healthy women of reproductive age group of 20-49 years.Result: The dietary intake of calcium was less than the Recommended Dietary Allowances of 600mg/day. Women from upper socioeconomic class had a higher intake of dietary calcium 435±268 mg/day as compared to women from low socioeconomic class with a dietary intake of 295±163 mg/day.Conclusion: The dietary intake of calcium improved with an increase in socioeconomic class.

  7. Calcium Solubility and Cation Exchange Properties in Zeoponic Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, Raymond E.

    1999-01-01

    An important aspect of a regenerative life support system at a Lunar or Martian outpost is the ability to produce food. Essential plant nutrients, as well as a solid support substrate, can be provided by: (1) treated Lunar or Martian regolith; (2) a synthetic soil or (3) some combination of both. A synthetic soil composed of ammonium- and potassium-saturated chinoptlolite (a zeolite mineral) and apatite, can provide slow-release fertilization of plants via dissolution and ion-exchange reactions. Previous equilibrium studies (Beiersdorfer, 1997) on mixtures of synthetic hydroxyapatite and saturated-clinoptilolite indicate that the concentrations of macro-nutrients such as ammonium, phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, and calcium are a function of the ratio of chinoptilolite to apatite in the sample and to the ratio of potassium to ammonium on the exchange sites in the clinoptilolite. Potassium, ammonium, phosphorous, and magnesium are available to plants at sufficient levels. However, calcium is deficient, due to the high degree of calcium adsorption by the clinoptilolite. Based on a series of batch-equilibration experiments, this calcium deficiency can be reduced by (1) treating the clinoptilolite with CaNO3 or (2) adding a second Ca-bearing mineral (calcite, dolomite or wollastonite) to the soil. Treating the Cp with CaNO3 results in increased Ca in solution, decreased P in solution and decreased NH4 in solution. Concentrations of K were not effected by the CaNO3 treatment. Additions of Cal, Dol and Wol changed the concentrations of Ca and P in solution in a systematic fashion. Cal has the greatest effect, Dol the least and Wol is intermediate. The changes are consistent with changes expected for a common ion effect with Ca. Higher concentrations of Ca in solution with added Cal, Dol or Wol do not result in changes in K or NH4 concentrations.

  8. Vitamin D and Calcium Status in South African Adolescents with Alcohol Use Disorders

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    George Fein

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Adequate vitamin D and calcium are essential for optimal adolescent skeletal development. Adolescent vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency and poor calcium intake have been reported worldwide. Heavy alcohol use impacts negatively on skeletal health, which is concerning since heavy adolescent drinking is a rising public health problem. This study aimed to examine biochemical vitamin D status and dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D in 12–16 year-old adolescents with alcohol use disorders (AUD, but without co-morbid substance use disorders, compared to adolescents without AUD. Substance use, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OHD concentrations, energy, calcium and vitamin D intakes were assessed in heavy drinkers (meeting DSM-IV criteria for AUD (n = 81 and in light/non-drinkers without AUD (non-AUD (n = 81, matched for age, gender, language, socio-economic status and education. Lifetime alcohol dose was orders of magnitude higher in AUD adolescents compared to non-AUD adolescents. AUD adolescents had a binge drinking pattern and “weekends-only” style of alcohol consumption. Significantly lower (p = 0.038 s-25(OHD (adjusted for gender, smoking, vitamin D intake were evident in AUD adolescents compared to non-AUD adolescents. High levels of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency (s-25(OHD < 29.9 ng/mL were prevalent in both groups, but was significantly higher (p = 0.013 in the AUD group (90% compared to the non-AUD group (70%. All participants were at risk of inadequate calcium and vitamin D intakes (Estimated Average Requirement cut-point method. Both groups were at risk of inadequate calcium intake and had poor biochemical vitamin D status, with binge drinking potentially increasing the risk of the latter. This may have negative implications for peak bone mass accrual and future osteoporosis risk, particularly with protracted binge drinking.

  9. Preparation and bioavailability of calcium-chelating peptide complex from tilapia skin hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Qiu, Xujian; Hao, Gengxin; Zhang, Meng; Weng, Wuyin

    2017-11-01

    With the continuous improvement in material life, the generation of fish by-products and the market demand for calcium supplements have been increasing in China. Therefore a calcium-chelating peptide complex (CPC) from tilapia skins was prepared and its effect on calcium (Ca)-deficient mice was investigated. The molecular weight distribution of CPC mainly ranged from 2000 to 180 Da, and its contents of complete amino acids and free amino acids were 85.30 and 8.67% (w/w) respectively. Scanning electron microscopy images and Fourier transform infrared data revealed that Ca crystals were bound with gelatin hydrolysates via interaction between Ca ions and NH/CN groups. When Ca-deficient mice were fed CPC and CaCO 3 respectively for 4 weeks, no significant differences in serum biochemistry or bone mineral density were found. However, the length, weight, Ca content and hydroxyproline content of the femur, Ca absorption and body weight gain of mice fed CPC were significantly higher than those of mice fed CaCO 3 . It is concluded that the prepared CPC could promote bone formation via better bioavailability of Ca and an increase in bone collagen. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Vitamins and bone health: beyond calcium and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Arabi, Asma

    2011-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health disorder associated with an increased risk of fracture. Nutrition is among the modifiable factors that influence the risk of osteoporosis and fracture. Calcium and vitamin D play important roles in improving bone mineral density and reducing the risk of fracture. Other vitamins appear to play a role in bone health as well. In this review, the findings of studies that related the intake and/or the status of vitamins other than vitamin D to bone health in animals and humans are summarized. Studies of vitamin A showed inconsistent results. Excessive, as well as insufficient, levels of retinol intake may be associated with compromised bone health. Deficiencies in vitamin B, along with the consequent elevated homocysteine level, are associated with bone loss, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. Deficiencies in vitamins C, E, and K are also associated with compromised bone health; this effect may be modified by smoking, estrogen use or hormonal therapy after menopause, calcium intake, and vitamin D. These findings highlight the importance of adequate nutrition in preserving bone mass and reducing the risk of osteoporosis and fractures. © 2011 International Life Sciences Institute.

  11. Proper Calcium Use: Vitamin K2 as a Promoter of Bone and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresz, Katarzyna

    2015-02-01

    Inadequate calcium intake can lead to decreased bone mineral density, which can increase the risk of bone fractures. Supplemental calcium promotes bone mineral density and strength and can prevent osteoporosis. Recent scientific evidence, however, suggests that elevated consumption of calcium supplements may raise the risk for heart disease and can be connected with accelerated deposit of calcium in blood-vessel walls and soft tissues. In contrast, vitamin K2 is associated with the inhibition of arterial calcification and arterial stiffening. An adequate intake of vitamin K2 has been shown to lower the risk of vascular damage because it activates matrix GLA protein (MGP), which inhibits the deposits of calcium on the walls. Vitamin K, particularly as vitamin K2, is nearly nonexistent in junk food, with little being consumed even in a healthy Western diet. Vitamin K deficiency results in inadequate activation of MGP, which greatly impairs the process of calcium removal and increases the risk of calcification of the blood vessels. An increased intake of vitamin K2 could be a means of lowering calcium-associated health risks.

  12. Mechanisms of calcium transport in small intestine. Overall review of the contract, September 1, 1972--March 1, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuca, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research: role of high molecular weight protein in calcium transport in vitamin D deficient chicks; subcellular localization of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/; receptor proteins for 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/; effects of high calcium diet, strontium diet, EHDP, and parathyroidectomy on intestinal calcium transport in chicks; effects of analogs of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ on intestinal calcium transport; discrimination by chicks against vitamin D/sub 2/ compounds by metabolism; effects of extract of Solanum malacoxylan on intestinal calcium absorption in nephrectomized rats; and role of vitamin D in phosphate transport reactions in the intestine. (HLW)

  13. Nicotine reward and affective nicotine withdrawal signs are attenuated in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kia J Jackson

    Full Text Available The influx of Ca(2+ through calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs leads to activation of various downstream processes that may be relevant to nicotine-mediated behaviors. The calcium activated protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV phosphorylates the downstream transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB, which mediates nicotine responses; however the role of CaMKIV in nicotine dependence is unknown. Given the proposed role of CaMKIV in CREB activation, we hypothesized that CaMKIV might be a crucial molecular component in the development of nicotine dependence. Using male CaMKIV genetically modified mice, we found that nicotine reward is attenuated in CaMKIV knockout (-/- mice, but cocaine reward is enhanced in these mice. CaMKIV protein levels were also increased in the nucleus accumbens of C57Bl/6 mice after nicotine reward. In a nicotine withdrawal assessment, anxiety-related behavior, but not somatic signs or the hyperalgesia response are attenuated in CaMKIV -/- mice. To complement our animal studies, we also conducted a human genetic association analysis and found that variants in the CaMKIV gene are associated with a protective effect against nicotine dependence. Taken together, our results support an important role for CaMKIV in nicotine reward, and suggest that CaMKIV has opposing roles in nicotine and cocaine reward. Further, CaMKIV mediates affective, but not physical nicotine withdrawal signs, and has a protective effect against nicotine dependence in human genetic association studies. These findings further indicate the importance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in mediating behaviors associated with drugs of abuse.

  14. Effect of exhausting exercise and calcium supplementation on potassium, magnesium, copper, zinc and calcium levels in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinar, V.; Baltaci, A.K.; Mogulkoc, R.

    2009-01-01

    Present study was performed to determine four week calcium supplementation and athleticism exercise on plasma potassium, calcium, magnesium, cupper and zinc levels in resting and exhaustion. Research was carried out on 30 healthy male people. Group 1; Exercise, Group 2; Exercise + Calcium supplementation, Group 3; Sedentary + Calcium supplemented. All elements levels increased by exhausting exercise (P<0.05). Plasma K and Ca levels increased in exercise group after supplementation (P<0.05). Ca levels increased in exercise + supplemented group (P<0.05). This increase was much more in group three (P<0.05). Plasma Cu levels increased by Ca supplementation in sedentary (P<0.05). Exhausting exercise increased Zn levels in sedentary after supplementation (P<0.05). The results of present study show that calcium supplementation for 4 week does not have clear affect on potassium and Mg. However, calcium levels were increased by supplementation and Cu after the supplementation. It was also exhausting exercise that caused increase in all parameters. (author)

  15. [Calcium and vitamin D in bone metabolism: Clinical importance for fracture treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amling, M

    2015-12-01

    A balanced calcium homeostasis is of critical importance not only for bone remodeling, the physiological process of bone resorption and bone formation that constantly renews bone throughout life but also for normal fracture healing. Given that disturbances of calcium homeostasis are present in 50 % of the German population and that this might result in delayed fracture healing after correct surgical treatment, this paper focusses on calcium and vitamin D in the daily practice in orthopedics and trauma surgery. To ensure the required enteral calcium uptake the following three conditions are required: (1) sufficient calcium intake via the nutrition, (2) a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum level > 30 µg/l and (3) the presence of sufficient gastric acidification. Given the endemic vitamin D deficiency in Germany as well as the constantly increasing number of people using proton pump inhibitors on a regular basis, it is necessary to closely connect trauma orthopedic surgery and osteological treatment. The first issue to be dealt with is to control and if needed normalize calcium homeostasis in order to allow a normal undisturbed fracture healing process after both conservative as well as operative treatment of fractures.

  16. Rapid coating of AZ31 magnesium alloy with calcium deficient hydroxyapatite using microwave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Yufu; Zhou, Huan; Nabiyouni, Maryam; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their unique biodegradability, magnesium alloys have been recognized as suitable metallic implant materials for degradable bone implants and bioresorbable cardiovascular stents. However, the extremely high degradation rate of magnesium alloys in physiological environment has restricted its practical application. This paper reports the use of a novel microwave assisted coating technology to improve the in vitro corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of Mg alloy AZ31. Results indicate that a dense calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) layer was uniformly coated on a AZ31 substrate in less than 10 min. Weight loss measurement and SEM were used to evaluate corrosion behaviors in vitro of coated samples and of non-coated samples. It was seen that CDHA coatings remarkably reduced the mass loss of AZ31 alloy after 7 days of immersion in SBF. In addition, the prompt precipitation of bone-like apatite layer on the sample surface during immersion demonstrated a good bioactivity of the CDHA coatings. Proliferation of osteoblast cells was promoted in 5 days of incubation, which indicated that the CDHA coatings could improve the cytocompatibility of the AZ31 alloy. All the results suggest that the CDHA coatings, serving as a protective layer, can enhance the corrosion resistance and biological response of magnesium alloys. Furthermore, this microwave assisted coating technology could be a promising method for rapid surface modification of biomedical materials. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted coating process for biodegradable Mg alloy. • CDHA coatings were successfully developed on AZ31 alloy in minutes. • The as-deposited CDHA coatings significantly reduced the degradation rate of AZ31 alloy. • The CDHA coated AZ31 alloy showed good bioactivity and biocompatibility in vitro. • The microwave assisted coating process can be used as rapid surface modification for bioimplants

  17. Rapid coating of AZ31 magnesium alloy with calcium deficient hydroxyapatite using microwave energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yufu, E-mail: Yufu.Ren@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Zhou, Huan [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Nabiyouni, Maryam [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Due to their unique biodegradability, magnesium alloys have been recognized as suitable metallic implant materials for degradable bone implants and bioresorbable cardiovascular stents. However, the extremely high degradation rate of magnesium alloys in physiological environment has restricted its practical application. This paper reports the use of a novel microwave assisted coating technology to improve the in vitro corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of Mg alloy AZ31. Results indicate that a dense calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) layer was uniformly coated on a AZ31 substrate in less than 10 min. Weight loss measurement and SEM were used to evaluate corrosion behaviors in vitro of coated samples and of non-coated samples. It was seen that CDHA coatings remarkably reduced the mass loss of AZ31 alloy after 7 days of immersion in SBF. In addition, the prompt precipitation of bone-like apatite layer on the sample surface during immersion demonstrated a good bioactivity of the CDHA coatings. Proliferation of osteoblast cells was promoted in 5 days of incubation, which indicated that the CDHA coatings could improve the cytocompatibility of the AZ31 alloy. All the results suggest that the CDHA coatings, serving as a protective layer, can enhance the corrosion resistance and biological response of magnesium alloys. Furthermore, this microwave assisted coating technology could be a promising method for rapid surface modification of biomedical materials. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted coating process for biodegradable Mg alloy. • CDHA coatings were successfully developed on AZ31 alloy in minutes. • The as-deposited CDHA coatings significantly reduced the degradation rate of AZ31 alloy. • The CDHA coated AZ31 alloy showed good bioactivity and biocompatibility in vitro. • The microwave assisted coating process can be used as rapid surface modification for bioimplants.

  18. Arctigenin exhibits relaxation effect on bronchus by affecting transmembrane flow of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenying; Yin, Yongqiang; Wang, Zengyong; Fang, Runping; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Min; Bai, Gang; Luo, Guo'an

    2013-12-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan extract from Arctium lappa (L.), exhibits anti-inflammation, antioxidation, vasodilator effects, etc. However, the effects of arctigenin on bronchus relaxation are not well investigated. This study aimed to investigate how arctigenin regulates bronchus tone and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) flow. Trachea strips of guinea pigs were prepared for testing the relaxation effect of arctigenin to acetylcholine, histamine, KCl, and CaCl2, respectively. Furthermore, L-type calcium channel currents were detected by patch-clamp, and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was detected by confocal microscopy. The results showed that arctigenin exhibited relaxation effect on tracheae to different constrictors, and this was related to decreasing cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration by inhibiting Ca(2+) influx partly through L-type calcium channel as well as promoting Ca(2+) efflux. In summary, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms by which arctigenin exhibits relaxation effect on bronchus and suggests its potential use for airway disease therapy.

  19. Calcium-binding capacity of centrin2 is required for linear POC5 assembly but not for nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago J Dantas

    Full Text Available Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC, stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER.

  20. Micronutrient deficiencies and gender: social and economic costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnton-Hill, Ian; Webb, Patrick; Harvey, Philip W J; Hunt, Joseph M; Dalmiya, Nita; Chopra, Mickey; Ball, Madeleine J; Bloem, Martin W; de Benoist, Bruno

    2005-05-01

    Vitamin and mineral deficiencies adversely affect a third of the world's people. Consequently, a series of global goals and a serious amount of donor and national resources have been directed at such micronutrient deficiencies. Drawing on the extensive experience of the authors in a variety of institutional settings, the article used a computer search of the published scientific literature of the topic, supplemented by reports and published and unpublished work from the various agencies. In examining the effect of sex on the economic and social costs of micronutrient deficiencies, the paper found that: (1) micronutrient deficiencies affect global health outcomes; (2) micronutrient deficiencies incur substantial economic costs; (3) health and nutrition outcomes are affected by sex; (4) micronutrient deficiencies are affected by sex, but this is often culturally specific; and finally, (5) the social and economic costs of micronutrient deficiencies, with particular reference to women and female adolescents and children, are likely to be considerable but are not well quantified. Given the potential impact on reducing infant and child mortality, reducing maternal mortality, and enhancing neuro-intellectual development and growth, the right of women and children to adequate food and nutrition should more explicitly reflect their special requirements in terms of micronutrients. The positive impact of alleviating micronutrient malnutrition on physical activity, education and productivity, and hence on national economies suggests that there is also an urgent need for increased effort to demonstrate the cost of these deficiencies, as well as the benefits of addressing them, especially compared with other health and nutrition interventions.

  1. Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Avenell, Alison; Masud, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Vitamin D may affect multiple health outcomes. If so, an effect on mortality is to be expected. Using pooled data from randomized controlled trials, we performed individual patient data (IPD) and trial level meta-analyses to assess mortality among participants randomized to either...... vitamin D alone or vitamin D with calcium. Subjects and Methods: Through a systematic literature search, we identified 24 randomized controlled trials reporting data on mortality in which vitamin D was given either alone or with calcium. From a total of 13 trials with more than 1000 participants each......,528 randomized participants (86.8% females) with a median age of 70 (interquartile range, 62-77) yr. Vitamin D with or without calcium reduced mortality by 7% [hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-0.99]. However, vitamin D alone did not affect mortality, but risk of death was reduced if vitamin...

  2. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN JAMMU IN SUBJECTS WITH NO COMORBIDITY- A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Kapoor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Deficiency of the vitamin D may result in metabolic bone diseases leading to rickets in children or osteomalacia in adults.1,2 The vitamin D may provide protection against hypertension, cancer and multiple sclerosis.3 The vitamin D level is regulated through the interaction of various factors including intestinal absorption, renal function, serum calcium level and Parathyroid Hormone (PTH.3 The 2 main sources for vitamin D are synthesis in the skin on exposure to Ultraviolet-B (UVB light from sunlight and dietary intake. The aim of the study is to evaluate status of the vitamin D of a cohort of Jammu population with no comorbidity. A questionnaire was given to 119 patients (77 males and 42 females where information regarding intake of calcium and vitamin D supplementation, intake of calcium rich food and exposure to vitamin D was sought. MATERIALS AND METHODS Estimation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH3 and plasma Parathyroid Hormone (PTH intact levels was done the subjects. Serum 25 (OH 2D3 levels did not differ significantly between males and females, although the levels were low (males 9.72 ng/mL ± 4.2 and females 8.5 ng/mL ± 4.7. RESULTS The vitamin D was still in the deficiency range even after excluding the subjects with very high PTH levels. CONCLUSION There was a high prevalence of a vitamin D deficiency in this sample of Jammu despite >70% of participants having adequate exposure to sunlight and >80% reporting adequate intake of dairy products.

  3. Assessing the effect of dietary calcium intake and 25 OHD status on bone turnover in women in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aysha Habib; Naureen, Ghazala; Iqbal, Romaina; Dar, Farhan Javed

    2013-01-01

    Bone health assessed in three towns of Karachi, Pakistan in females showed poor calcium intake, vitamin D deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and high bone turnover. Correlates of high bone turnover included females residing in Saddar Town, underweight females less than 30 years of age from low socio-economic status, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. To assess bone health and association of dietary calcium and 25 hydroxy vitamin D with bone turnover in the community-dwelling females of Karachi. Bone health was assessed in three randomly selected towns of Karachi, Pakistan. One premenopausal female fulfilling the inclusion criteria from each household was included in the study. Dietary calcium was assessed through a food frequency questionnaire and biochemical markers including calcium, phosphates, albumin, magnesium, creatinine, and SGPT, intact parathyroid hormone, 25 hydroxy vitamin D, and N-telopeptide of type I collagen were measured to assess the bone health. Three hundred and five females were included from three towns. Overall, 90.5% of females had vitamin D deficiency with 42.6 and 23.3% having secondary hyperparathyroidism and high bone turn over respectively. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and high bone turnover was significantly different among towns. Mean vitamin D levels were significantly low and iPTH levels significantly high in females with high bone turnover. Calcium intake was not significantly different among females with normal, high, and low bone turnover. Correlates of high bone turnover included females residing in Saddar Town, underweight females less than 30 years of age belonging to low socio-economic status, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Compromised bone health is seen in community-dwelling females of Karachi. There is a need to perform large-scale community-based studies in all age groups to understand the interplay of markers in our population to understand the impact of these variables

  4. MICU1 Serves as a Molecular Gatekeeper to Prevent In Vivo Mitochondrial Calcium Overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia C. Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available MICU1 is a component of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter, a multiprotein complex that also includes MICU2, MCU, and EMRE. Here, we describe a mouse model of MICU1 deficiency. MICU1−/− mitochondria demonstrate altered calcium uptake, and deletion of MICU1 results in significant, but not complete, perinatal mortality. Similar to afflicted patients, viable MICU1−/− mice manifest marked ataxia and muscle weakness. Early in life, these animals display a range of biochemical abnormalities, including increased resting mitochondrial calcium levels, altered mitochondrial morphology, and reduced ATP. Older MICU1−/− mice show marked, spontaneous improvement coincident with improved mitochondrial calcium handling and an age-dependent reduction in EMRE expression. Remarkably, deleting one allele of EMRE helps normalize calcium uptake while simultaneously rescuing the high perinatal mortality observed in young MICU1−/− mice. Together, these results demonstrate that MICU1 serves as a molecular gatekeeper preventing calcium overload and suggests that modulating the calcium uniporter could have widespread therapeutic benefits.

  5. Long-Term Blocking of Calcium Channels in mdx Mice Results in Differential Effects on Heart and Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Blain, Alison; Greally, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    in older mice. However, streptomycin treatment did not show positive effects in diaphragm or heart muscle, and heart pathology was worsened. Thus, blocking calcium channels even before disease onset does not prevent dystrophy, making this an unlikely treatment for DMD. These findings highlight......The disease mechanisms underlying dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy are complex, involving not only muscle membrane fragility, but also dysregulated calcium homeostasis. Specifically, it has been proposed that calcium channels directly initiate a cascade of pathological events by allowing...... calcium ions to enter the cell. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of chronically blocking calcium channels with the aminoglycoside antibiotic streptomycin from onset of disease in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Treatment in utero onwards delayed onset...

  6. Impact of congenital calcitonin deficiency due to dysgenetic hypothyroidism on bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daripa M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of chronic calcitonin deficiency on bone mass development. The results of 11 patients with thyroid dysgenesis (TD were compared to those of 17 normal individuals (C and of 9 patients with other forms of hypothyroidism (OH: 4 with hypothyroidism due to inborn errors of thyroid hormone synthesis and 5 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The subjects received an intravenous calcium stimulus and blood was collected for the determination of ionized calcium (Ca2+, calcitonin, and intact parathyroid hormone. Bone mineral density (BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. After calcium administration the levels of Ca2+ in the two groups of hypothyroidism were significantly higher than in the normal control group (10 min after starting calcium infusion: C = 1.29 ± 0.08 vs TD = 1.34 ± 0.03 vs OH = 1.34 ± 0.02 mmol/l; P < 0.05, and only the TD group showed no calcitonin response (5 min after starting calcium infusion: C = 27.9 ± 5.8 vs TD = 6.6 ± 0.3 vs OH = 43.0 ± 13.4 ng/l. BMD values did not differ significantly between groups (L2-L4: C = 1.116 ± 0.02 vs TD = 1.109 ± 0.03 vs OH = 1.050 ± 0.04 g/cm². These results indicate that early deficiency of calcitonin secretion has no detrimental effect on bone mass development. Furthermore, the increased calcitonin secretion observed in patients with inborn errors of thyroid hormone biosynthesis does not confer any advantage in terms of BMD.

  7. Vitamin D is positively associated with sperm motility and increases intracellular calcium in human spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Bjerrum, Poul J; Jessen, Torben E

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human spermatozoa, and VDR-knockout mice and vitamin D (VD) deficiency in rodents results in impaired fertility, low sperm counts and a low number of motile spermatozoa. We investigated the role of activated VD (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) in human...... spermatozoa and whether VD serum levels are associated with semen quality. METHODS Cross-sectional association study of semen quality and VD serum level in 300 men from the general population, and in vitro studies on spermatozoa from 40 men to investigate the effects of VD on intracellular calcium, sperm......M). 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased intracellular calcium concentration in human spermatozoa through VDR-mediated calcium release from an intracellular calcium storage, increased sperm motility and induced the acrosome reaction in vitro. CONCLUSIONS 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased intracellular calcium...

  8. Observations on intestinal secretions of calcium by strontium-85 in normal Indian subjects and patients of nutritiond osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, S.N.A.; Sumesh Chandra; Vaishnava, H.

    1979-01-01

    Fifty cases of nutritional osteomalacia were studied and compared with 25 adult subjects of comparable age, sex and socio-economic status without any suspicion of metabolic bone disease. The diagnosis of nutritional osteomalacia was established by clinical, biochemical, radiological and histopathological studies. 15 of the 50 patients were restudied after treatment with vitamin D. Total digestive juice calcium (TDJCa), true absorption of calcium and endogenous faecal calcium (EFCa) were measured in all by the intravenous administration of strontium 85 and balance studies for the stable calcium were carried out simultaneously. In nutritional osteomalacia there was no evidence of more active secretions of calcium into the intestines and endogenous loss of calcium was not high. It was interesting to note that absorption of calcium from the gut was normal even with relative vitamin D deficiency. It was also observed that vitamin D increased the bidirectional (absorption and secretion) permeability of calcium into the gut. (author)

  9. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C; Dalzell, Danielle R; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (2  nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2  kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  10. Nutrition knowledge, outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and eating behaviors by calcium intake level in Korean female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ju; Kim, Kyung Won

    2015-10-01

    Calcium is important but deficient in diets of young adult women. This study aimed to examine if cognitive factors and eating behaviors differ according to calcium intake based on the Social Cognitive Theory. Subjects were female college students in Seoul, Korea. Three hundred students completed the questionnaire regarding calcium intake, nutrition knowledge, outcome expectations, self-efficacy and eating behaviors. Data on 240 students were analyzed using t-test or χ(2)-test. Subjects were categorized into two groups, high calcium intake (HC, ≥ 650 mg/day) and low calcium intake (LC, benefits of consuming calcium-rich foods, including 'taste' (P eating dairy foods for snacks' (P eating dairy foods every day' (P eating calcium-rich side dishes at meals' (P Eating behaviors including more frequent consumption of dairy foods, fruits or fruit juice (P foods (P foods, and eating behaviors are important in explaining calcium intake. Nutrition education needs to address practical benefits, reduce negative expectations of calcium-rich foods, increase self-efficacy, and modify eating behaviors contributing to calcium intake.

  11. Neutron activation analysis of the calcium content in vivo, using a 50μg source of californium 252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guey, A.; Zech, P.Y.; Meary, M.F.; Leitienne, P.

    1975-01-01

    Owing to the recent commercialisation of californium 252 it is now possible to obtain neutron fluxes strong enough for precise activation of the calcium content of biological targets. After the preliminary measurements necessary to establish the most suitable conditions for irradiating 3 to 5cm thick targets, two parallel sets of experiments were developed. In the first the medium-term total calcium variation was studied in 20 rats, 16 suffering from chronic kidney deficiency. In the second the precision expected as a function of the calcium content of the irradiated target was examined, using 3 sets of tissue equivalent standards of calcium contents 5, 20 and 50g respectively. The first results obtained on calcium 49 in vivo show that a calcium content variation can be followed with a sensitivity threshold below that obtained by conventional methods [fr

  12. Calcium-Induced calcium release during action potential firing in developing inner hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J

    2015-03-10

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  13. [Can I have some sunshine to cheer me up? vitamin D deficiency and depression in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers-Konijnenburg, S C; Marijnissen, R M; Gaasbeek, A B; Oude Voshaar, R C

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is very common in the elderly, and the geriatric patient is probably at even greater risk. Vitamin D plays an important role in calcium homeostasis; recent studies point to a possible causal link between vitamin D deficiency and the development and severity of depression. In this article we focus on an 80-year-old patient with depression and severe vitamin D deficiency and give advice on the diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. To supplement the current multidisciplinary guidelines on depression, we recommend routine testing of serum vitamin D level prior to confirming the diagnosis of depression in the elderly.

  14. Similar calcium status is present in infants fed formula with and without prebiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides can increase calcium absorption in adolescents and adults. Whether they affect calcium absorption in infants has not been assessed. Few data are available to compare the calcium status of infants fed modern infant formulas to that of breast fed infants. To evaluate calcium...

  15. Association of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Deficiency: A Case Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Abdullah; Acar Yüceant, Gülşah; Yüce, Turgut; Hacı, Cemal; Cebi, Işıl Taylan; Salviz, Mehti

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common type of vertigo caused by the peripheral vestibular system. The majority of cases are accepted as idiopathic. Calcium metabolism also plays a primary role in the synthesis/absorption of otoconia made of calcium carbonate and thus might be an etiological factor in the onset of BPPV. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of osteoporosis and vitamin D in the etiology of BPPV by comparing BPPV patients with hospital-based controls. This is a case-control study comparing the prevalence of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency in 78 BPPV patients and 78 hospital-based controls. The mean T-scores and serum vitamin D levels were compared. The risk factors of osteoporosis, physical activity, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and blood pressure were all compared between the groups. To avoid selection bias, the groups were stratified as subgroups according to age, sex, and menopausal status. In this study, the rates of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency detected in BPPV patients were reasonably high. But there was no significant difference in mean T-scores and vitamin D levels, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency prevalence between the BPPV group and controls. The prevalence of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency is reasonably high in the general population. Unlike the general tendencies in the literature, our study suggests that osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency are not risk factors for BPPV; we conclude that the coexistence of BPPV with osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency is coincidental.

  16. Drug Release Profile from Calcium-Induced Alginate-Phosphate Composite Gel Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Murata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-induced alginate-phosphate composite gel beads were prepared, and model drug release profiles were investigated in vitro. The formation of calcium phosphate in the alginate gel matrix was observed and did not affect the rheological properties of the hydrogel beads. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the calcium phosphate does not exist in crystalline form in the matrix. The initial release amount and release rate of a water-soluble drug, diclofenac, from the alginate gel beads could be controlled by modifying the composition of the matrix with calcium phosphate. In contrast, the release profile was not affected by the modification for hydrocortisone, a drug only slightly soluble in water.

  17. Impact of air pollution on vitamin D deficiency and bone health in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizabad, Elham; Hossein-Nezhad, Arash; Maghbooli, Zhila; Ramezani, Majid; Hashemian, Roxana; Moattari, Syamak

    2017-12-01

    The association between air pollution and bone health was evaluated in adolescents in the city of Tehran. This study is essentially ecological. Vitamin D deficiency among adolescents has been reported at higher rates in polluted areas than in non-polluted areas. Additionally, residence in polluted areas is associated with lower levels of bone alkaline phosphatase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between ambient air pollution and bone turnover in adolescents and to compare the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency between polluted and non-polluted areas of Tehran. This cross-sectional population-based study was conducted on 325 middle- and high-school students (both girls and boys) in Tehran in the winter. During the study period, detailed daily data on air pollution were obtained from archived data collected by Tehran Air Quality Control Company (AQCC). Serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone (PTH), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, 25(OH) vitamin D, osteocalcin, cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX), total protein, albumin, and creatinine were obtained from the study group. Vitamin D deficiency was more prevalent in polluted areas than in non-polluted areas. After adjustment for age and sex, residence in the polluted area showed a statistically significant positive association with vitamin D deficiency and a statistically significant negative association with bone turnover. Interestingly, high calcium intake (>5000 mg/week) protects against the effects of air pollution on bone turnover. Air pollution is a chief factor determining the amount of solar UVB that reaches the earth's surface. Thus, atmospheric pollution may play a significant independent role in the development of vitamin D deficiency.

  18. Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets in an urban informal settlement in Kenya and is associated with malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Hachmeister, C Ulrich; Khasira, Maureen; Cox, Lorna; Schoenmakers, Inez; Munyi, Caroline; Nassir, H Samira; Hünten-Kirsch, Barbara; Prentice, Ann; Berkley, James A

    2018-01-01

    The commonest cause of rickets worldwide is vitamin D deficiency, but studies from sub-Saharan Africa describe an endemic vitamin D-independent form that responds to dietary calcium enrichment. The extent to which calcium-deficiency rickets is the dominant form across sub-Saharan Africa and in other low-latitude areas is unknown. We aimed to characterise the clinical and biochemical features of young children with rickets in a densely populated urban informal settlement in Kenya. Because malnutrition may mask the clinical features of rickets, we also looked for biochemical indices of risk in children with varying degrees of acute malnutrition. Twenty one children with rickets, aged 3 to 24 months, were identified on the basis of clinical and radiologic features, along with 22 community controls, and 41 children with either severe or moderate acute malnutrition. Most children with rickets had wrist widening (100%) and rachitic rosary (90%), as opposed to lower limb features (19%). Developmental delay (52%), acute malnutrition (71%), and stunting (62%) were common. Compared to controls, there were no differences in calcium intake, but most (71%) had serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels below 30 nmol/L. These results suggest that rickets in young children in urban Kenya is usually driven by vitamin D deficiency, and vitamin D supplementation is likely to be required for full recovery. Wasting was associated with lower calcium (p = .001), phosphate (p < .001), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p = .049), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (p = 0.022) levels, the clinical significance of which remain unclear. © 2017 The Authors Maternal & Child Nutrition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Calcium levels and calcium: available phosphorus ratios in diets for white egg layers from 42 to 58 weeks of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Marques Pastore

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to determine the nutritional requirement of calcium and the best calcium:available phosphorus ratio for commercial layers at the post-laying peak. A total of 324 Hy-Line W-36 laying hens were utilized in the period from 42 to 58 weeks of age, distributed in a completely randomized design in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement, composed of three levels of calcium (39, 42 and 45 g/kg and three calcium:phosphorus ratios (12.12:1; 10.53:1; and 9.30:1, totaling nine treatments with six replications and six birds per experimental unit. There was no significant effect from the calcium levels × calcium:phosphorus ratio interaction for any of the variables studied. The calcium levels and the calcium:phosphorus ratios did not affect the variables performance or egg and bone quality. At the evaluation of the calcium:phosphorus balance, as the levels of calcium of the diet were raised, the intake of calcium and phosphorus and the contents of mineral matter and calcium in the excreta increased linearly, and the retention of calcium by birds decreased linearly. With the reduction of the calcium:phosphorus ratios of the diet, intake, retention and excretion of phosphorus by layers increased. Diets containing calcium at 39 g/kg and a calcium:phosphorus ratio of 12.12:1, corresponding to an increase in calcium of 3.51 g/bird/day and available phosphorus of 289 mg/bird/day, meet the requirements of calcium and available phosphorus of white egg layers in the period from 42 to 58 weeks of age.

  20. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  1. Carbohydrate metabolism in erythrocytes of copper deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S P J; Cockell, K A; Dawson, B A; Ratnayake, W M N; Lampi, B J; Belonje, B; Black, D B; Plouffe, L J

    2003-11-01

    Dietary copper deficiency is known to adversely affect the circulatory system of fructose-fed rats. Part of the problem may lie in the effect of copper deficiency on intermediary metabolism. To test this, weanling male Long-Evans rats were fed for 4 or 8 weeks on sucrose-based diets containing low or adequate copper content. Copper deficient rats had significantly lower plasma and tissue copper as well as lower plasma copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase activity. Copper deficient rats also had a significantly higher heart:body weight ratio when compared to pair-fed controls. Direct measurement of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway flux in erythrocytes using (13)C NMR showed no differences in carbon flux from glucose or fructose to pyruvate but a significantly higher flux through the lactate dehydrogenase locus in copper deficient rats (approximately 1.3 times, average of glucose and glucose + fructose measurements). Copper-deficient animals had significantly higher erythrocyte concentrations of glucose, fructose, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and NAD(+). Liver metabolite levels were also affected by copper deficiency being elevated in glycogen and fructose 1-phosphate content. The results show small changes in carbohydrate metabolism of copper deficient rats.

  2. Molecular characterization of FXI deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ergul

    2011-02-01

    Factor XI (FXI) deficiency is a rare autosomal bleeding disease associated with genetic defects in the FXI gene. It is a heterogeneous disorder with variable tendency in bleeding and variable causative FXI gene mutations. It is characterized as a cross-reacting material-negative (CRM-) FXI deficiency due to decreased FXI levels or cross-reacting material-positive (CRM+) FXI deficiency due to impaired FXI function. Increasing number of mutations has been reported in FXI mutation database, and most of the mutations are affecting serine protease (SP) domain of the protein. Functional characterization for the mutations helps to better understand the molecular basis of FXI deficiency. Prevalence of the disease is higher in certain populations such as Ashkenazi Jews. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the molecular basis of congenital FXI deficiency.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency in Fibromyalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatty, S.A.; Shaikh, N.A.; Irfan, M.; Kashif, S.M.; Vaswani, A.S.; Sumbhai, A.; Gunpat

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To check the Vitamin D levels in patients diagnosed as fibromyagia in our population. Methods: Study was done at Medical OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi, from January to March 2009. Female patients diagnosed as Fibromyalgia according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and exclusion of systemic illness on examination, and normal reports of blood CP, ESR, serum calcium, phosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase, were asked to get Vitamin D levels in their serum. Vitamin D deficiency is defined as 30 ng/ml. Result: Forty female patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.65 +- 11.5 years. Mean Vitamin D level was 17.41 +- 5.497 ng/ml. Thirty two (80%) of patients had Vitamin D deficiency, mean levels of 15.855 +- 4.918 ng/ml and 8(20%) had Vitamin D insufficiency, mean levels of 23.64 +- 2.39 ng/ml. Patients with vitamin D deficiency and age less than 45 years were 22 (68.75%), had mean vitamin D level 16.87 +- 4.48 ng/ml whereas in age ranging from 46-75 years were 10 (31.25%) had mean vitamin D level 16.09 +- 6.45 ng/ml. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is frequently seen in patients diagnosed as fibromyalgia and nonspecific musculoskeletal pain in our population. Although the sample size of the study is small, but the figures are so alarming that it is an eye opener towards the need of a population based study, including normal population as well as those presenting with musculoskeletal pain. (author)

  4. Many physiogene problems due to poor calcium distribution : Balance can be restored at night

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, E.; Kierkels, T.

    2013-01-01

    Dry, brown areas (blossom end rot) on tomatoes and peppers; tipburn on lettuce and Chinese cabbage; dry edges on the young leaves and flower leaves of poinsettias; malformed spathe leaves on anthurium. Many such physiogene deviations are related to calcium. They aren’t always caused by a deficiency

  5. Intra-Amniotic Administration (Gallus gallus) of Cicer arietinum and Lens culinaris Prebiotics Extracts and Duck Egg White Peptides Affects Calcium Status and Intestinal Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tao; Kolba, Nikolai; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad

    2017-07-21

    Calcium (Ca) is one of the most abundant inorganic elements in the human body and has many important physiological roles. Prebiotics and bioactive peptides are two important substances used to promote calcium uptake. However, the difference in mechanisms of the calcium uptake from these two supplements is not clear. By using the Gallus gallus model and the intra-amniotic administration procedure, the aim of this study was to investigate whether Ca status, intestinal functionality, and health-promoting bacterial populations were affected by prebiotics extracted from chickpea and lentil, and duck egg white peptides (DPs). Eleven groups (non-injected; 18 MΩ H₂O; 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 50 mg/mL chickpea + 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 50 mg/mL lentil + 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 40 mg/mL DPs + 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 5 mg/mL Val-Ser-Glu-Glu (VSEE) + 4 mmol/L CaCl₂; 50 mg/mL chickpea; 50 mg/mL lentil; 40 mg/mL DPs; 5 mg/mL VSEE) were utilized. Upon hatch, blood, cecum, small intestine, liver and bone were collected for assessment of serum bone alkaline phosphate level (BALP), the relative abundance of intestinal microflora, expression of Ca-related genes, brush border membrane (BBM) functional genes, and liver and bone mineral levels, respectively. The BALP level increased in the presence of lentil, DPs and VSEE ( p Prebiotics and DPs beneficially affected the intestinal microflora and duodenal villus surface area. This research expands the understanding of the prebiotics' properties of chickpea and lentil extracts, and peptides' effects on calcium metabolism and gut health.

  6. Serum ionized calcium, intact PTH and novel markers of bone turnover in bedridden elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorva, A; Välimäki, M; Risteli, J; Risteli, L; Elfving, S; Takkunen, H; Tilvis, R

    1994-12-01

    Chronic immobilization could markedly affect calcium and bone metabolism in elderly people. To investigate this, and to test the theory of 'type II' osteoporosis in bedridden elderly patients with low vitamin D status, 55 such subjects were examined. Serum concentrations of ionized calcium (Ca++), intact parathyrin (PTH) and two novel markers of bone collagen formation (carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen; PICP) and resorption (carboxyterminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen; ICTP) were measured. The effects on these parameters after 40 weeks of supplementation with vitamin D (1000 IU d-1) and/or calcium (1 g d-1) were subsequently prospectively evaluated. Despite low (mean 11.6 nmoll-1) serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (25-OHD), those of 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) were mostly normal. Neither correlated with Ca++ or PTH. PTH correlated negatively not only with Ca++ (r = -0.328, P r = -0.306, P r = 0.268, P = 0.06). Vitamin D supplementation did not change PICP or ICTP considerably, despite slightly increased 1,25-(OH)2D and slightly decreased PTH. Ca++ values were normal and remained stable. In conclusion, Ca++ and PTH are poor indicators of vitamin D status in chronically immobilized elderly subjects. Furthermore, the results suggest that the increased bone resorption is not due to 'type II' secondary hyperparathyroidism; rather the resorption is primarily increased. Correction of vitamin D deficiency does not seem to benefit ageing bones unless adequate mechanical loading is provided.

  7. The effect of organic ligands on the crystallinity of calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Houwen, Jacqueline A. M.; Cressey, Gordon; Cressey, Barbara A.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2003-03-01

    Calcium phosphate phases precipitated under critical supersaturation were identified and studied in detail using X-ray powder diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and transmission electron microscopy. These synthetic calcium phosphates formed by spontaneous precipitation at pH 7, 25°C and 0.1 M ionic strength (NaCl as the background electrolyte). The combination of several methods allowed detailed characterisation of the calcium phosphates. The purpose of the work was to assess the influence of carboxylate ligands, specifically acetate and citrate, on the quality of the calcium phosphate precipitate. All precipitates were identified as non-stoichiometric, calcium-deficient hydroxylapatites (HAPs), containing carbonate, HPO 42-, sodium and chloride impurities. No other phases were found to be present in any of the precipitates. The presence of citrate resulted in a decrease in crystal size and a higher degree of apatite lattice imperfection in the precipitated HAP. Furthermore, IR spectroscopy showed a higher amount of carbonate present in that HAP, compared with the ones formed in the control and acetate experiments. An additional absorption band, in the infrared spectrum of the HAP formed in the presence of citrate, was observed at 1570 cm -1; this is interpreted as carboxyl groups bound to HAP.

  8. Bone mineral density in patients with growth hormone deficiency: does a gender difference exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette Friberg; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Eskildsen, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to clarify whether a gender difference exists with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: A case-control design. METHODS: Blood sampling for measurements of calcium...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  15. All 25-hydroxyvitamin D-deficient Indian postmenopausal women do not have secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vivek; Tripathi, R L; Dhanwal, Dinesh Kumar

    2018-05-27

    This study shows a high 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency among postmenopausal women accompanying secondary hyperparathyroidism. However, a sizable number of subjects did not have secondary hyperparathyroidism despite having low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. This condition arises a research question in clinical practice needed to be addressed in the future. The present study was attempted to determine the prevalence of secondary hyperparathyroidism and also to analyze the mean value (cutoff) of 25-hydroxyvitamin D from where the PTH begins to rise in Indian postmenopausal women. A cross-sectional study including 334 postmenopausal women attending the outpatient department (MOPD) of Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi, between July 2008 and June 2010. Institutional ethical approval was obtained for this study. The apparently healthy postmenopausal women and attendees of the patients were included in the study. Post-thyroidectomy, thyroid illness, pregnant women, subjects taking drugs that can affect bone mineral metabolism, such as glucocorticoids, antitubercular therapy, antiepileptic, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D supplement were excluded from the study. BMD parameters such as PTH and 25(OH)D were measured by using commercial kits from DiaSorin, USA, and blood chemistry was evaluated by standard methods from the central facility of the center. Dietary calcium was analyzed by applying a food frequency questionnaire by a trained dietician. Mean (SD) age of the subjects was 56.4 ± 7.7 years. The mean BMI was 24.7 ± 5.5 kg/m 2 . The baseline biochemical investigations such as total bilirubin, liver function test (LFT), kidney function test (KFT), calcium, phosphorous, total protein, and serum albumin were in reference range except alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The mean values of 25(OH)D and PTH were 12.95 ± 8.08 ng/ml and 91.60 ± 75.56 pg/ml respectively. The 24-h dietary calcium intake was 487.06 ± 239.36 mg/24 h. 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency was found

  16. Vitamin D and its relation with ionic calcium, parathyroid hormone, maternal and neonatal characteristics in pregnancy after roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Marina; Matos, Andréa C; Pereira, Silvia E; Saboya, Carlos; Ramalho, Andréa

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate vitamin D nutritional status and its relation with ionic calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), maternal anthropometry and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women who previously underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. In a clinic specialized in obesity control located in the city of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), the following information were collected for adult women who underwent RYGB before pregnancy: serum concentrations of vitamin D [25(OH)D], calcium and PTH per gestational trimester and data on maternal anthropometry, gestational intercurrences and perinatal outcomes. The present study included 46 post-RYGB pregnant women. The prevalence of pregnant women with deficiency (≤20 ng/mL) or insufficiency (≥21 and 29 ng/mL) of vitamin D was above 70% in all trimesters. The prevalence of calcium deficiency was 15.2% in the first and in the second trimesters and 20% in the third trimester, while the prevalence of excess PTH was 19.6, 30.4 and 32.6% in the first, the second and the third trimesters, respectively. In the second and the third trimesters, a significant difference was observed between concentrations of 25(OH)D, and a negative correlation was observed between concentrations of calcium and PTH. Association of 25(OH)D with urinary tract infection (UTI) was found, but there was no association with calcium, PTH, maternal anthropometry, type of delivery and weight and gestational age at birth The post-RYGB pregnant women showed an elevated serum inadequacy (deficiency or insufficiency) of 25(OH)D during pregnancy. Maternal vitamin D status showed no association with maternal variables, except UTI, and the neonatal variables analyzed.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  19. Role of polyhydroxybutyrate in mitochondrial calcium uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithen, Matthew; Elustondo, Pia A.; Winkfein, Robert; Zakharian, Eleonora; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Pavlov, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a biological polymer which belongs to the class of polyesters and is ubiquitously present in all living organisms. Mammalian mitochondrial membranes contain PHB consisting of up to 120 hydroxybutyrate residues. Roles played by PHB in mammalian mitochondria remain obscure. It was previously demonstrated that PHB of the size similar to one found in mitochondria mediates calcium transport in lipid bilayer membranes. We hypothesized that the presence of PHB in mitochondrial membrane might play a significant role in mitochondrial calcium transport. To test this, we investigated how the induction of PHB hydrolysis affects mitochondrial calcium transport. Mitochondrial PHB was altered enzymatically by targeted expression of bacterial PHB hydrolyzing enzyme (PhaZ7) in mitochondria of mammalian cultured cells. The expression of PhaZ7 induced changes in mitochondrial metabolism resulting in decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 but not in U87 and HeLa cells. Furthermore, it significantly inhibited mitochondrial calcium uptake in intact HepG2, U87 and HeLa cells stimulated by the ATP or by the application of increased concentrations of calcium to the digitonin permeabilized cells. Calcium uptake in PhaZ7 expressing cells was restored by mimicking calcium uniporter properties with natural electrogenic calcium ionophore - ferutinin. We propose that PHB is a previously unrecognized important component of the mitochondrial calcium uptake system. PMID:23702223

  20. Trace mineral interactions during elevated calcium consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.T.; Luhrsen, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Elevated calcium consumption is reported to affect trace mineral bioavailability. The authors examined this phenomenon in both single dose radio-label test meals and an eight week feeding trial in rats. In the single dose studies, human milk, cows milk, and various calcium sources were examined in relation to radio-iron and radio-zinc retention. 59 Fe retention was greater from human milk than cows milk. However, when the calcium content of human milk was adjusted (with CaHPO 4 or CaCO 3 ) to equal the level in cows milk, iron retention was depressed. Similarly, when calcium sources (CaCO 3 , CaHPO 4 , hydroxy-apatite, bone meal) were examined at different calcium:metal molar ratios, the degree of inhibition on metal retention varied. In general, phosphate salts were more inhibiting than carbonates. In the feeding trial, calcium was fed in diets at normal (0.5%) or elevated (1.5%) levels. Serum, liver, kidney, and bone trace mineral profiles were obtained. In general, most trace elements showed decreased levels in the tissues. Zinc and iron were most striking, followed by magnesium with minor changes in copper. A high calcium:high mineral supplemented group was also fed. Mixed mineral supplementation prevented all calcium interactions. These data indicate the importance of calcium mineral interactions in bioavailability considerations in both milk sources and in mineral supplementation

  1. Characterization of a calcium phosphate cement based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate obtained by wet precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurmer, M.B.; Diehl, C.E.; Vieira, R.S.; Coelho, W.T.G.; Santos, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    There are several systems of calcium phosphate cements being studied. Those based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate are of particular interest. After setting they produce calcium deficient hydroxyapatite similar to bone like hydroxyapatite. This work aims to obtain alpha-tricalcium phosphate powders by the wet precipitation process, using calcium nitrate and phosphoric acid as reagents. This powder was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. In order to prepare the calcium phosphate cement, the powder was mixed with an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The mechanical properties of the cement were assessed and it was evaluated by means of apparent density, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The described method produced crystalline alpha-tricalcium phosphate as the major phase. The calcium phosphate cement showed high values of compression strength (50 MPa). The soaking of the cement in a simulated body fluid (SBF) formed a layer of hydroxyapatite like crystals in the surface of the samples. (author)

  2. Magnesium deficiency and metabolic syndrome: stress and inflammation may reflect calcium activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayssiguier, Yves; Libako, Patrycja; Nowacki, Wojciech; Rock, Edmond

    2010-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) intake is inadequate in the western diet and metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in populations around the world. Epidemiological studies suggest that high Mg intake may reduce the risk but the possibility of confounding factors exists, given the strong association between Mg and other beneficial nutriments (vegetables, fibers, cereals). The concept that metabolic syndrome is an inflammatory condition may explain the role of Mg.Mg deficiency results in a stress effect and increased susceptibility to physiological damage produced by stress. Stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. The activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is a factor in the development of insulin resistance by increasing oxidative stress. In both humans and rats, aldosteronism results in an immunostimulatory state and leads to an inflammatory phenotype. Stress response induces the release of large quantities of excitatory amino acids and activates the nuclear factor NFkappaB, promoting translation of molecules involved in cell regulation, metabolism and apoptosis. The rise in neuropeptides is also well documented. Stress-induced HPA activation has been identified to play an important role in the preferential body fat accumulation but evidence that Mg is involved in body weight regulation is lacking. One of the earliest events in the acute response to stress is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial cells actively contribute to inflammation by elaborating cytokines, synthesizing chemical mediators and expressing adhesion molecules. Experimental Mg deficiency in rats induces a clinical inflammatory syndrome characterized by leukocyte and macrophage activation, synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins, extensive production of free radicals. An increase in extracellular Mg concentration decreases inflammatory effects, while reduction in extracellular Mg results in cell activation. The

  3. A saposin deficiency model in Drosophila: Lysosomal storage, progressive neurodegeneration and sensory physiological decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J; Hebbar, Sarita; Schwudke, Dominik; Elliott, Christopher J H; Sweeney, Sean T

    2017-02-01

    Saposin deficiency is a childhood neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) that can cause premature death within three months of life. Saposins are activator proteins that promote the function of lysosomal hydrolases that mediate the degradation of sphingolipids. There are four saposin proteins in humans, which are encoded by the prosaposin gene. Mutations causing an absence or impaired function of individual saposins or the whole prosaposin gene lead to distinct LSDs due to the storage of different classes of sphingolipids. The pathological events leading to neuronal dysfunction induced by lysosomal storage of sphingolipids are as yet poorly defined. We have generated and characterised a Drosophila model of saposin deficiency that shows striking similarities to the human diseases. Drosophila saposin-related (dSap-r) mutants show a reduced longevity, progressive neurodegeneration, lysosomal storage, dramatic swelling of neuronal soma, perturbations in sphingolipid catabolism, and sensory physiological deterioration. Our data suggests a genetic interaction with a calcium exchanger (Calx) pointing to a possible calcium homeostasis deficit in dSap-r mutants. Together these findings support the use of dSap-r mutants in advancing our understanding of the cellular pathology implicated in saposin deficiency and related LSDs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Vitamin D deficiency and its risk factors in Malaysian children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Choong Yi; Kong, Ann Nie; Poh, Bee Koon; Mohamed, Ahmad Rithauddin; Khoo, Teik Beng; Ng, Rui Lun; Noordin, Mazidah; Nadarajaw, Thiyagar; Ong, Lai Choo

    2016-08-01

    Long-term use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a significant risk factor for vitamin D deficiency in children with epilepsy. The aims of our study were to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for vitamin D deficiency among Malaysian children with epilepsy. Cross-sectional study of ambulant children with epilepsy on long-term AEDs for >1 year seen in three tertiary hospitals in Malaysia from April 2014 to April 2015. Detailed assessment of pubertal status, skin pigmentation, sunshine exposure behavior, physical activity, dietary vitamin D and calcium intake, anthropometric measurements and bone health blood tests (vitamin D, alkaline phosphatase, calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone levels) were obtained on all patients. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels ≤35 nmol/L and insufficiency as 25(OH)D levels of 36-50 nmol/L. A total of 244 children (146 male) participated in the study. Ages ranged between 3.7 and 18.8 years (mean 12.3 years). 25(OH)D levels ranged between 7.5 and 140.9 nmol/L (mean 53.9 nmol/L). Vitamin D deficiency was identified in 55 patients (22.5%), and a further 48 (19.7%) had vitamin D insufficiency. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified polytherapy >1 AED (odds ratio [OR] 2.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-4.36), age >12 years (OR 4.16, 95% CI 1.13-15.30), Indian ethnicity (OR 6.97, 95% CI 2.48-19.55), sun exposure time 30-60 min/day (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.05-5.67), sun exposure time <30 min/day (OR 3.83, 95% CI 1.61-9.09), and female (OR 2.61, 95% CI 1.31-5.20) as statistically significant (p < 0.05) risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. Despite living in the tropics, a high proportion of Malaysian children with epilepsy are at risk of vitamin D deficiency. Targeted strategies including vitamin D supplementation and lifestyle advice of healthy sunlight exposure behavior should be implemented among children with epilepsy, particularly for those at high risk of having vitamin D

  5. A model of propagating calcium-induced calcium release mediated by calcium diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, P. H.; de Tombe, P. P.; van Deen, J. H.; Mulder, B. J.; ter Keurs, H. E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of sudden local fluctuations of the free sarcoplasmic [Ca++]i in cardiac cells on calcium release and calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was calculated with the aid of a simplified model of SR calcium handling. The model was used to evaluate whether propagation of calcium

  6. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  7. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed

  8. Interaction between neuronal nitric oxide synthase signaling and temperature influences sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak: role of nitroso-redox balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulce, Raul A; Mayo, Vera; Rangel, Erika B; Balkan, Wayne; Hare, Joshua M

    2015-01-02

    Although nitric oxide (NO) signaling modulates cardiac function and excitation-contraction coupling, opposing results because of inconsistent experimental conditions, particularly with respect to temperature, confound the ability to elucidate NO signaling pathways. Here, we show that temperature significantly modulates NO effects. To test the hypothesis that temperature profoundly affects nitroso-redox equilibrium, thereby affecting sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium (Ca(2+)) leak. We measured SR Ca(2+) leak in cardiomyocytes from wild-type (WT), NO/redox imbalance (neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice-1 [NOS1(-/-)]), and hyper S-nitrosoglutathione reductase-deficient (GSNOR(-/-)) mice. In WT cardiomyocytes, SR Ca(2+) leak increased because temperature decreased from 37°C to 23°C, whereas in NOS1(-/-) cells, the leak suddenly increased when the temperature surpassed 30°C. GSNOR(-/-) cardiomyocytes exhibited low leak throughout the temperature range. Exogenously added NO had a biphasic effect on NOS1(-/-) cardiomyocytes; reducing leak at 37°C but increasing it at subphysiological temperatures. Oxypurinol and Tempol diminished the leak in NOS1(-/-) cardiomyocytes. Cooling from 37°C to 23°C increased reactive oxygen species generation in WT but decreased it in NOS1(-/-) cardiomyocytes. Oxypurinol further reduced reactive oxygen species generation. At 23°C in WT cells, leak was decreased by tetrahydrobiopterin, an essential NOS cofactor. Cooling significantly increased SR Ca(2+) content in NOS1(-/-) cells but had no effect in WT or GSNOR(-/-). Ca(2+) leak and temperature are normally inversely proportional, whereas NOS1 deficiency reverses this effect, increasing leak and elevating reactive oxygen species production because temperature increases. Reduced denitrosylation (GSNOR deficiency) eliminates the temperature dependence of leak. Thus, temperature regulates the balance between NO and reactive oxygen species which in turn has a major effect on SR

  9. Inherited Variation in Cytokine, Acute Phase Response, and Calcium Metabolism Genes Affects Susceptibility to Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V. Ponasenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is a septic inflammation of the endocardium. Recognition of microbial patterns, cytokine and acute phase responses, hemostasis features, and alterations in plasma lipid and calcium profile all have been reported to affect pathogenesis and clinical course of IE. Having recruited 123 patients with IE and 300 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy blood donors, we profiled their genomic DNA for 35 functionally significant polymorphisms within the 22 selected genes involved in the abovementioned pathways, with the further genetic association analysis. We found that the G/A genotype of the rs1143634 polymorphism within the IL1B gene, the G/T genotype of the rs3212227 polymorphism within the IL12B gene, the A/G genotype of the rs1130864 polymorphism within the CRP gene, and the G allele of the rs1801197 polymorphism within the CALCR gene were associated with a decreased risk of IE whereas the T/T genotype of the rs1205 polymorphism within the CRP gene was associated with a higher risk of IE. Furthermore, heterozygous genotypes of the rs1143634 and rs3212227 polymorphisms were associated with the higher plasma levels of IL-1β and IL-12, respectively. Our results indicate that inherited variation in the cytokine, acute phase response, and calcium metabolism pathways may be linked to IE.

  10. Inherited Variation in Cytokine, Acute Phase Response, and Calcium Metabolism Genes Affects Susceptibility to Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkovskaya, Natalia V.; Kondyukova, Natalia V.; Odarenko, Yuri N.; Kazachek, Yana V.; Tsepokina, Anna V.; Barbarash, Leonid S.

    2017-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a septic inflammation of the endocardium. Recognition of microbial patterns, cytokine and acute phase responses, hemostasis features, and alterations in plasma lipid and calcium profile all have been reported to affect pathogenesis and clinical course of IE. Having recruited 123 patients with IE and 300 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy blood donors, we profiled their genomic DNA for 35 functionally significant polymorphisms within the 22 selected genes involved in the abovementioned pathways, with the further genetic association analysis. We found that the G/A genotype of the rs1143634 polymorphism within the IL1B gene, the G/T genotype of the rs3212227 polymorphism within the IL12B gene, the A/G genotype of the rs1130864 polymorphism within the CRP gene, and the G allele of the rs1801197 polymorphism within the CALCR gene were associated with a decreased risk of IE whereas the T/T genotype of the rs1205 polymorphism within the CRP gene was associated with a higher risk of IE. Furthermore, heterozygous genotypes of the rs1143634 and rs3212227 polymorphisms were associated with the higher plasma levels of IL-1β and IL-12, respectively. Our results indicate that inherited variation in the cytokine, acute phase response, and calcium metabolism pathways may be linked to IE. PMID:28659664

  11. Calcium Overload Accelerates Phosphate-Induced Vascular Calcification Via Pit-1, but not the Calcium-Sensing Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Asuka; Sonou, Tomohiro; Ohya, Masaki; Yashiro, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Yuri; Okuda, Kouji; Iwashita, Yuko; Mima, Toru; Negi, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder is an important problem in patients with renal failure. Abnormal levels of serum phosphate and calcium affect CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder and contribute to bone disease, VC, and cardiovascular disease. Hypercalcemia is a contributing factor in progression of VC in patients with CKD. However, the mechanisms of how calcium promotes intracellular calcification are still unclear. This study aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcification in a rat aortic tissue culture model. Aortic segments from 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in serum-supplemented medium for 10 days. We added high calcium (HiCa; calcium 3.0 mM) to high phosphate (HPi; phosphate 3.8 mM) medium to accelerate phosphate and calcium-induced VC. We used phosphonoformic acid and the calcimimetic R-568 to determine whether the mechanism of calcification involves Pit-1 or the calcium-sensing receptor. Medial VC was significantly augmented by HPi+HiCa medium compared with HPi alone (300%, p<0.05), and was associated with upregulation of Pit-1 protein. Pit-1 protein concentrations in HPi+HiCa medium were greater than those in HPi medium. Phosphonoformic acid completely negated the augmentation of medial VC induced by HPi+HiCa. R-568 had no additive direct effect on medial VC. These results indicated that exposure to HPi+HiCa accelerates medial VC, and this is mediated through Pit-1, not the calcium-sensing receptor.

  12. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores facilitates the influx of extracellular calcium in platelet derived growth factor stimulated A172 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereb, G; Szöllösi, J; Mátyus, L; Balázs, M; Hyun, W C; Feuerstein, B G

    1996-05-01

    Calcium signaling in non-excitable cells is the consequence of calcium release from intracellular stores, at times followed by entry of extracellular calcium through the plasma membrane. To study whether entry of calcium depends upon the level of saturation of intracellular stores, we measured calcium channel opening in the plasma membrane of single confluent A172 glioblastoma cells stimulated with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and/or bradykinin (BK). We monitored the entry of extracellular calcium by measuring manganese quenching of Indo-1 fluorescence. PDGF raised intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after a dose-dependent delay (tdel) and then opened calcium channels after a dose-independent delay (tch). At higher doses (> 3 nM), BK increased [Ca2+]i after a tdel approximately 0 s, and tch decreased inversely with both dose and peak [Ca2+]i. Experiments with thapsigargin (TG), BK, and PDGF indicated that BK and PDGF share intracellular Ca2+ pools that are sensitive to TG. When these stores were depleted by treatment with BK and intracellular BAPTA, tdel did not change, but tch fell to almost 0 s in PDGF stimulated cells, indicating that depletion of calcium stores affects calcium channel opening in the plasma membrane. Our data support the capacitative model for calcium channel opening and the steady-state model describing quantal Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  13. Toxicity and deficiency of copper in Elsholtzia splendens affect photosynthesis biophysics, pigments and metal accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hongyun; Kroneck, Peter M H; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-06-18

    Elsholtzia splendens is a copper-tolerant plant species growing on copper deposits in China. Spatially and spectrally resolved kinetics of in vivo absorbance and chlorophyll fluorescence in mesophyll of E. splendens were used to investigate the copper-induced stress from deficiency and toxicity as well as the acclimation to excess copper stress. The plants were cultivated in nutrient solutions containing either Fe(III)-EDTA or Fe(III)-EDDHA. Copper toxicity affected light-acclimated electron flow much stronger than nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) or dark-acclimated photochemical efficiency of PSIIRC (Fv/Fm). It also changed spectrally resolved Chl fluorescence kinetics, in particular by strengthening the short-wavelength (<700 nm) part of NPQ altering light harvesting complex II (LHCII) aggregation. Copper toxicity reduced iron accumulation, decreased Chls and carotenoids in leaves. During acclimation to copper toxicity, leaf copper decreased but leaf iron increased, with photosynthetic activity and pigments recovering to normal levels. Copper tolerance in E. splendens was inducible; acclimation seems be related to homeostasis of copper and iron in E. splendens. Copper deficiency appeared at 10 mg copper per kg leaf DW, leading to reduced growth and decreased photosynthetic parameters (F0, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII). The importance of these results for evaluating responses of phytoremediation plants to stress in their environment is discussed.

  14. Deficiency of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Dyslipidemia in Indian Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaydip Ray Chaudhuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vitamin D deficiency is widespread throughout the world. Several reports have incriminated vitamin D deficiency as the cause of rickets, osteomalacia, and other chronic diseases. Recent studies have suggested a possible link between deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and dyslipidemia. Aim. To investigate the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and dyslipidemia in Indian subjects. Methodology. We recruited 150 asymptomatic consecutive subjects from patients’ attendees at the Departments of Neurology and Medicine in Yashoda Hospital, Hyderabad, India. Study period was from October 2011 to March 2012. All subjects underwent 25-hydroxyvitamin D assay by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay, fasting blood sugar and lipid profile, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Results. Out of 150 subjects, men were 82 (54.6%, and mean age was 49.4 (±15.6 years. Among risk factors, hypertension was noted in 63/150 (42%, 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency in 59/150 (39.3%, diabetes in 45/150 (30%, dyslipidemia in 60 (40%, smoking in 35/150 (23.3%, and alcoholism in 27/150 (18%. Deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly associated with dyslipidemia (P=0.0001, mean serum glucose (P=0.0002 mean CRP (P=0.04, and mean alkaline phosphatase (P=0.01. Multivariate analysis showed that 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency was independently associated with dyslipidemia (odds ratio: 1.9; 95% CI : 1.1–3.5. Conclusions. We found that deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was independently associated with dyslipidemia in Indian subjects.

  15. Metabolismo do cálcio na fenilcetonúria Calcium metabolism in phenilke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Ferreira Martins

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A Fenilcetonúria é um erro inato do metabolismo do aminoácido fenilalanina. O tratamento é essencialmente dietético e envolve uma restrição severa no consumo de alimentos contendo aminoácido fenilalanina. Embora a alimentação seja complementada com fórmulas a fim de suprir as necessidades de vitaminas, minerais e aminoácidos essenciais, carências nutricionais ainda ocorrem. Isto se deve, principalmente, à restrição de fontes protéicas, que acarreta deficiência na ingestão de diversos nutrientes, dentre eles o cálcio. O cálcio possui importante relação com a formação mineral óssea. Estudos recentes demonstram que portadores de fenilcetonúria apresentam freqüentemente osteopenia e fraturas, sendo a maior incidência em crianças acima de 8 anos de idade. O rápido aumento da estatura, a dieta deficiente em cálcio e níveis de aminoácido fenilalanina elevados têm sido descritos como os principais fatores para a aquisição de massa óssea inadequada. A suplementação de cálcio em crianças saudáveis mostrou um efeito positivo sobre a aquisição de massa óssea na fase da pré-puberdade. Assim, torna-se relevante compreender a necessidade da suplementação de cálcio em pacientes fenilcetonúria, a fim de favorecer o desenvolvimento ósseo esperado.Phenylketonuria is an inborn error of the metabolism of the amino acid phenylalanine. The treatment is essentially dietetic and involves a severe restriction in the consumption of foods containing aminoacid phenylalanine. Although the diet is complemented with supplements in order to meet the vitamin, mineral and essential amino acid requirements, nutritional deficiencies still occur. This is mainly due to restricting the consumption of protein sources, which results in low intake of several nutrients, including calcium. Calcium is strongly related to bone mineral formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that patients with phenylketonuria often present osteopenia and

  16. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake toge...

  17. CALHM1 deficiency impairs cerebral neuron activity and memory flexibility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Chang, Eric H; Frattini, Stephen A; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Adrien, Leslie; Strohl, Joshua J; Gibson, Elizabeth L; Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Huerta, Patricio T; Marambaud, Philippe

    2016-04-12

    CALHM1 is a cell surface calcium channel expressed in cerebral neurons. CALHM1 function in the brain remains unknown, but recent results showed that neuronal CALHM1 controls intracellular calcium signaling and cell excitability, two mechanisms required for synaptic function. Here, we describe the generation of Calhm1 knockout (Calhm1(-/-)) mice and investigate CALHM1 role in neuronal and cognitive functions. Structural analysis revealed that Calhm1(-/-) brains had normal regional and cellular architecture, and showed no evidence of neuronal or synaptic loss, indicating that CALHM1 deficiency does not affect brain development or brain integrity in adulthood. However, Calhm1(-/-) mice showed a severe impairment in memory flexibility, assessed in the Morris water maze, and a significant disruption of long-term potentiation without alteration of long-term depression, measured in ex vivo hippocampal slices. Importantly, in primary neurons and hippocampal slices, CALHM1 activation facilitated the phosphorylation of NMDA and AMPA receptors by protein kinase A. Furthermore, neuronal CALHM1 activation potentiated the effect of glutamate on the expression of c-Fos and C/EBPβ, two immediate-early gene markers of neuronal activity. Thus, CALHM1 controls synaptic activity in cerebral neurons and is required for the flexible processing of memory in mice. These results shed light on CALHM1 physiology in the mammalian brain.

  18. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate PTHrP secretion and milk calcium transport with calcium availability. To test this idea genetically, we bred BLG-Cre mice with CaSR-floxed mice to ablate the CaSR specifically from mammary epithelial cells only at the onset of lactation (CaSR-cKO mice). Loss of the CaSR in the lactating mammary gland did not disrupt alveolar differentiation or milk production. However, it did increase the secretion of PTHrP into milk and decreased the transport of calcium from the circulation into milk. CaSR-cKO mice did not show accelerated bone resorption, but they did have a decrease in bone formation. Loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in hypercalcemia, decreased PTH secretion, and increased renal calcium excretion in lactating mothers. Finally, loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in decreased calcium accrual by suckling neonates, likely due to the combination of increased milk PTHrP and decreased milk calcium. These results demonstrate that the mammary gland CaSR coordinates maternal bone and calcium metabolism, calcium transport into milk, and neonatal calcium accrual during lactation. PMID:23782944

  19. Are macroinvertebrates in high altitude streams affected by oxygen deficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Dean; Rostgaard, S.; Vásconez, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    1. The solubility of oxygen in water increases with decreasing temperature. This has led to a general perception of cold, high mountain streams as more oxygen rich than warmer lowland streams, and that macroinvertebrates inhabiting high altitude streams have had no need to adapt to critical oxygen...... conditions. However, this fails to take into account that oxygen solubility declines with decreasing atmospheric pressure, which may be of importance at high altitudes. 2. Based on samples of macroinvertebrate benthos and in situ measurements of respiratory oxygen demand of macroinvertebrates in small...... the mean weight-specific respiratory rate of macroinvertebrates declined by only 50%, from 400 to 3800 m. We suggest that this disproportionately large gap between availability and demand of oxygen at high altitudes may imply a potential oxygen deficiency for the fauna, and we discuss how oxygen deficiency...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  1. Refeeding syndrome in a young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuy, M; Chen, G-F; Masonek, J M; Scharschmidt, B F

    2015-09-01

    A severely chronically protein and calorie restricted young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency developed transient refeeding syndrome (RFS) and hyperammonemia after modest diet liberalization following initiation of glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB). The patient required IV supportive care and supplementation with potassium, magnesium and calcium. She is now doing well on GPB and an appropriate maintenance diet. Susceptibility to RFS should be considered in chronically nutritionally restricted patients with metabolic disorders after liberalization of diet.

  2. Mercury exposure, nutritional deficiencies and metabolic disruptions may affect learning in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Lyn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among dietary factors, learning and behavior are influenced not only by nutrients, but also by exposure to toxic food contaminants such as mercury that can disrupt metabolic processes and alter neuronal plasticity. Neurons lacking in plasticity are a factor in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and mental retardation. Essential nutrients help maintain normal neuronal plasticity. Nutritional deficiencies, including deficiencies in the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, the amino acid methionine, and the trace minerals zinc and selenium, have been shown to influence neuronal function and produce defects in neuronal plasticity, as well as impact behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Nutritional deficiencies and mercury exposure have been shown to alter neuronal function and increase oxidative stress among children with autism. These dietary factors may be directly related to the development of behavior disorders and learning disabilities. Mercury, either individually or in concert with other factors, may be harmful if ingested in above average amounts or by sensitive individuals. High fructose corn syrup has been shown to contain trace amounts of mercury as a result of some manufacturing processes, and its consumption can also lead to zinc loss. Consumption of certain artificial food color additives has also been shown to lead to zinc deficiency. Dietary zinc is essential for maintaining the metabolic processes required for mercury elimination. Since high fructose corn syrup and artificial food color additives are common ingredients in many foodstuffs, their consumption should be considered in those individuals with nutritional deficits such as zinc deficiency or who are allergic or sensitive to the effects of mercury or unable to effectively metabolize and eliminate it from the body.

  3. Atxn2 Knockout and CAG42-Knock-in Cerebellum Shows Similarly Dysregulated Expression in Calcium Homeostasis Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Melanie Vanessa; Gispert, Suzana; Stehning, Tanja; Damrath, Ewa; Walter, Michael; Auburger, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder with preferential affection of Purkinje neurons, which are known as integrators of calcium currents. The expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) domain in the RNA-binding protein ataxin-2 (ATXN2) is responsible for this disease, but the causal roles of deficient ATXN2 functions versus aggregation toxicity are still under debate. Here, we studied mouse mutants with Atxn2 knockout (KO) regarding their cerebellar global transcriptome by microarray and RT-qPCR, in comparison with data from Atxn2-CAG42-knock-in (KIN) mouse cerebellum. Global expression downregulations involved lipid and growth signaling pathways in good agreement with previous data. As a novel effect, downregulations of key factors in calcium homeostasis pathways (the transcription factor Rora, transporters Itpr1 and Atp2a2, as well as regulator Inpp5a) were observed in the KO cerebellum, and some of them also occurred subtly early in KIN cerebellum. The ITPR1 protein levels were depleted from soluble fractions of cerebellum in both mutants, but accumulated in its membrane-associated form only in the SCA2 model. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated no association of ITPR1 with Q42-expanded or with wild-type ATXN2. These findings provide evidence that the physiological functions and protein interactions of ATXN2 are relevant for calcium-mediated excitation of Purkinje cells as well as for ATXN2-triggered neurotoxicity. These insights may help to understand pathogenesis and tissue specificity in SCA2 and other polyQ ataxias like SCA1, where inositol regulation of calcium flux and RORalpha play a role.

  4. Effects of multi-deficiencies-diet on bone parameters of peripheral bone in ovariectomized mature rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaqif El Khassawna

    Full Text Available Many postmenopausal women have vitamin D and calcium deficiency. Therefore, vitamin D and calcium supplementation is recommended for all patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. We used an experimental rat model to test the hypothesis that induction of osteoporosis is more efficiently achieved in peripheral bone through combining ovariectomy with a unique multi-deficiencies diet (vitamin D depletion and deficient calcium, vitamin K and phosphorus. 14-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats served as controls to examine the initial bone status. 11 rats were bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX and fed with multi-deficiencies diet. Three months later the treated group and the Sham group (n = 8 were euthanized. Bone biomechanical competence of the diaphyseal bone was examined on both, tibia and femur. Image analysis was performed on tibia via µCT, and on femur via histological analysis. Lower torsional stiffness indicated inferior mechanical competence of the tibia in 3 month OVX+Diet. Proximal metaphyseal region of the tibia showed a diminished bone tissue portion to total tissue in the µCT despite the increased total area as evaluated in both µCT and histology. Cortical bone showed higher porosity and smaller cross sectional thickness of the tibial diaphysis in the OVX+Diet rats. A lower ALP positive area and elevated serum level of RANKL exhibited the unbalanced cellular interaction in bone remodeling in the OVX+Diet rat after 3 month of treatment. Interestingly, more adipose tissue area in bone marrow indicated an effect of bone loss similar to that observed in osteoporotic patients. Nonetheless, the presence of osteoid and elevated serum level of PTH, BGP and Opn suggest the development of osteomalacia rather than an osteoporosis. As the treatment and fracture management of both osteoporotic and osteomalacia patients are clinically overlapping, this study provides a preclinical animal model to be utilized in local supplementation of minerals, drugs

  5. Effects of multi-deficiencies-diet on bone parameters of peripheral bone in ovariectomized mature rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khassawna, Thaqif; Böcker, Wolfgang; Govindarajan, Parameswari; Schliefke, Nathalie; Hürter, Britta; Kampschulte, Marian; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Alt, Volker; Lips, Katrin Susanne; Faulenbach, Miriam; Möllmann, Henriette; Zahner, Daniel; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Bauer, Natali; Wenisch, Sabine; Langheinrich, Alexander Claus; Schnettler, Reinhard; Heiss, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Many postmenopausal women have vitamin D and calcium deficiency. Therefore, vitamin D and calcium supplementation is recommended for all patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. We used an experimental rat model to test the hypothesis that induction of osteoporosis is more efficiently achieved in peripheral bone through combining ovariectomy with a unique multi-deficiencies diet (vitamin D depletion and deficient calcium, vitamin K and phosphorus). 14-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats served as controls to examine the initial bone status. 11 rats were bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) and fed with multi-deficiencies diet. Three months later the treated group and the Sham group (n = 8) were euthanized. Bone biomechanical competence of the diaphyseal bone was examined on both, tibia and femur. Image analysis was performed on tibia via µCT, and on femur via histological analysis. Lower torsional stiffness indicated inferior mechanical competence of the tibia in 3 month OVX+Diet. Proximal metaphyseal region of the tibia showed a diminished bone tissue portion to total tissue in the µCT despite the increased total area as evaluated in both µCT and histology. Cortical bone showed higher porosity and smaller cross sectional thickness of the tibial diaphysis in the OVX+Diet rats. A lower ALP positive area and elevated serum level of RANKL exhibited the unbalanced cellular interaction in bone remodeling in the OVX+Diet rat after 3 month of treatment. Interestingly, more adipose tissue area in bone marrow indicated an effect of bone loss similar to that observed in osteoporotic patients. Nonetheless, the presence of osteoid and elevated serum level of PTH, BGP and Opn suggest the development of osteomalacia rather than an osteoporosis. As the treatment and fracture management of both osteoporotic and osteomalacia patients are clinically overlapping, this study provides a preclinical animal model to be utilized in local supplementation of minerals, drugs and growth factors

  6. Maternal vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of adverse neonatal outcomes in the Chinese population: A prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanliu Wang

    Full Text Available Although vitamin D (vitD deficiency is a common problem in pregnant women, in China, few studies have focused on the relationship between maternal vitD deficiency throughout the three trimesters and subsequent neonatal outcomes in China.Between 2015 and 2016, maternal serum and neonate cord blood samples were collected from 1978 mother-neonate pairs from Liuzhou city.The mean concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitD (25(OHD were 16.17±6.27 and 15.23±5.43 ng/ml in the mother and neonate groups, respectively, and the prevalence values of vitD deficiency in the two groups were 78.18% and 83.27%, respectively. Logistic regression showed that maternal vitD deficiency independently increased the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM (adjust OR, aOR 1.08; P = 0.026. A relatively lower risk of vitD deficiency was observed in the third trimester than in the first and second trimester (aOR 0.80; P = 0.004. VitD-calcium cosupplementation during pregnancy improves the vitD deficiency in both the maternal and neonatal groups (aOR 0.56, 0.66; P<0.001 and 0.021, respectively. Maternal vitD deficiency significantly increased the risk of neonatal low birth weight (LBW (aOR 2.83; P = 0.005 and small-for-gestational-age (SGA (aOR 1.17; P = 0.015. There was a positive correlation between maternal and neonatal vitD deficiency (r = 0.879, P<0.001. VitD supplementation during pregnancy significantly reduced the risk of giving birth to LBW infants (OR = 0.47, 95%CI = 0.33-0.68, P<0.001.Further research focusing on the consumption of vitD with calcium during pregnancy and the consequential clinical outcomes in Chinese pregnant women is warranted.

  7. Duodenal histopathology and laboratory deficiencies related to bone metabolism in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthumus, Lotte; Al-Toma, Abdul

    2017-08-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated small intestine enteropathy precipitated by gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Adult presentation is often atypical and malabsorption of vitamins and minerals is common, with a consequent disturbance of bone metabolism. We aim to evaluate laboratory deficiencies related to bone metabolism and the relationship between severity of histological damage and degree of bone mass loss at diagnosis of CD. A retrospective cross-sectional study of 176 adult coeliac patients was carried out. All patients fulfilled the histopathological criteria for CD. Biochemical data were analysed (calcium/phosphate/alkaline-phosphatase/vitamin D/parathormone). Duodenal histology was classified according to the Marsh classification. Bone mass density (BMD) at the lumbar and femoral regions measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. No correlation was found between the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the Marsh histopathological stage (P>0.05). Vitamin D deficiency was most common (44.5%), whereas only 5.7% had hypocalcaemia. Calcium was lower (Pcoeliac patients older than 30 years, evaluation of bone biomarkers and dual X-ray absorptiometry examination should be considered.

  8. Case report of an infant with severe vitamin D deficiency rickets manifested as hypocalcemic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuletić Biljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hypocalcemic seizures are uncommon in the post-neonatal period. We report an infant with hypocalcemic seizures caused by severe deficiency of vitamin D. Case Outline. A five-month-old male infant was admitted to hospital in March 2013 with recurrent generalized afebrile seizures resistant to clonazepam therapy. At the clinical examination, the infant showed characteristic rachitic signs, so that after a blood sample was taken for laboratory testing, the infant was given infusion of 2 ml/kg of 10% of calcium gluconate at a rate of 0.5 ml/min. The treatment resulted in immediate termination of seizures and normalization of the consciousness of the infant. Blood sample analysis showed extremely low levels of free and total calcium (0.36/1.24 mmol/l and 25(OHD (<3 ng/ml, elevated alkaline phosphatase (878 U/l and parathyroid hormone (283 pg/ml, and low calcium/creatinine ratio (mg/mg in a portion of urine (0.03, while the levels of serum phosphorus, pH, total protein, albumin and creatinine were within the reference range. Wrist X-ray showed typical signs of rickets. In order to fully stabilize calcium homeostasis, along with 2,000 IU of vitamin D3 daily and standard cow’s milk formula, calcium gluconate (80 mg/kg daily was given orally over a period of two weeks. The treatment resulted in complete stabilization of the infant’s condition and rapid improvement in laboratory, radiological and clinical findings of rickets. Conclusion. Generalized convulsions in the afebrile infant represent a serious and etiopathogenically very heterogeneous problem. Extremely rare, as in the case of our patient, it may be due to severe hypocalcemia caused by a deficiency of vitamin D.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  11. Radioisotope techniques in studies on the metabolism of calcium, iodine and iron in ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengemann, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    A short review is presented of radioisotopic procedures useful in research on calcium, iodine and iron studies with tropical ruminants. The procedures discussed can be useful in determining the availability of the mineral from feedstuffs, the faecal endogenous losses by the animal, detection of deficiency states, and responses to physiological and environmental stress. Methods that entail the use of radioisotopes in the laboratory or the use of stable isotopes in the animal are mentioned as alternatives to the administration of radioisotopes to the animal. While the review focuses on calcium, iodine and iron, the principles of the methods presented can be employed in the study of many other trace minerals. (author)

  12. The effects of ionizing radiation in the rat's mandibular bone freeding the hypernomic calcium-deficient diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Gen; Kurita, Akihiko; Nasu, Masanori; Furumoto, Keiichi

    1994-01-01

    The mandibles of rats in a group maintained on the Ca-deficient diet for a long period were irradiated with 30 Gy. To study the effects of radiation, serum Ca and inorganic phosphorus levels were determined for 3 weeks, and the data were compared with findings obtained from rats maintained on a standard diet by autoradiography using 45 Ca and microradiography. The serum Ca level tended to decrease with time after irradiation in the irradiated group maintained on the Ca-deficient diet, but there was no significant difference between the group maintained on the Ca-deficient diet and the group maintained on the standard diet. The serum inorganic phosphorus levels were almost constant throughout the observation period in both the non-irradiated and radiated groups regardless of diet. Uptake of 45 Ca was examined by autoradiography. Both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups maintained on the Ca-deficient diet showed intense 45 Ca uptake, there was almost no difference between these groups in photographic density or in weekly changes after irradiation. The microradiographic study of bone trabeculae revealed only slight changes in the bone cortex after irradiation in the group maintained on the standard diet. On day 3 after irradiation both thinning and roughness of the trabeculae were observed in the interradicular septa and incisal inferior margin and on day 7 in cancellous bone. In the groups maintained on the Ca-deficient diet, marked thinning and roughness of the trabeculae were observed mainly in the cancellous bone. (author)

  13. Vitamin d deficiency in healthy female medical students of a public sector hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanani, F.H.; Noor, F.; Jamil, F.; Khanani, R.; Hossein, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine Vitamin D levels in healthy female medical students. Setting and duration of study:Public sector university in Karachi during the month of November 2010. Subjects and Methods: A total of 84 healthy, female medical students were included in the study. 25(OH) Vitamin D, serum calcium, phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase levels were determined in their blood samples.Vitamin D was analyzed by chemiluminesence technique, while serum calcium, phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase were determined photometrically. A comprehensive questionnaire was also filled out by 57 students which included biometrics, dietary habits, sun exposure and physical activity details. Results Almost all (98.8%) subjects had low levels of vitamin D, with 96.4% having values less than 10 ng/ml. There was no correlation of low Vitamin D levels with calcium, phosphorous or alkaline phosphatase levels or with biometric measurements. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency was very common even in apparently healthy young females with no correlation to calcium, phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase levels. Nationwide studies are needed to see the cases for low levels of vitamins D. (author)

  14. Calcium signal communication in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braet, Katleen; Cabooter, Liesbet; Paemeleire, Koen; Leybaert, Luc

    2004-02-01

    The communication of calcium signals between cells is known to be operative between neurons where these signals integrate intimately with electrical and chemical signal communication at synapses. Recently, it has become clear that glial cells also exchange calcium signals between each other in cultures and in brain slices. This communication pathway has received utmost attention since it is known that astrocytic calcium signals can be induced by neuronal stimulation and can be communicated back to the neurons to modulate synaptic transmission. In addition to this, cells that are generally not considered as brain cells become progressively incorporated in the picture, as astrocytic calcium signals are reported to be communicated to endothelial cells of the vessel wall and can affect smooth muscle cell tone to influence the vessel diameter and thus blood flow. We review the available evidence for calcium signal communication in the central nervous system, taking into account a basic functional unit -the brain cell tripartite- consisting of neurons, glial cells and vascular cells and with emphasis on glial-vascular calcium signaling aspects.

  15. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  16. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  17. Factors Affecting 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration in Response to Vitamin D Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Mazahery

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sun exposure is the main source of vitamin D. Due to many lifestyle risk factors vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is becoming a worldwide health problem. Low 25(OHD concentration is associated with adverse musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal health outcomes. Vitamin D supplementation is currently the best approach to treat deficiency and to maintain adequacy. In response to a given dose of vitamin D, the effect on 25(OHD concentration differs between individuals, and it is imperative that factors affecting this response be identified. For this review, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify those factors and to explore their significance in relation to circulating 25(OHD response to vitamin D supplementation. The effect of several demographic/biological factors such as baseline 25(OHD, aging, body mass index(BMI/body fat percentage, ethnicity, calcium intake, genetics, oestrogen use, dietary fat content and composition, and some diseases and medications has been addressed. Furthermore, strategies employed by researchers or health care providers (type, dose and duration of vitamin D supplementation and environment (season are other contributing factors. With the exception of baseline 25(OHD, BMI/body fat percentage, dose and type of vitamin D, the relative importance of other factors and the mechanisms by which these factors may affect the response remains to be determined.

  18. Factors Affecting 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration in Response to Vitamin D Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazahery, Hajar; von Hurst, Pamela R

    2015-06-25

    Sun exposure is the main source of vitamin D. Due to many lifestyle risk factors vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is becoming a worldwide health problem. Low 25(OH)D concentration is associated with adverse musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal health outcomes. Vitamin D supplementation is currently the best approach to treat deficiency and to maintain adequacy. In response to a given dose of vitamin D, the effect on 25(OH)D concentration differs between individuals, and it is imperative that factors affecting this response be identified. For this review, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify those factors and to explore their significance in relation to circulating 25(OH)D response to vitamin D supplementation. The effect of several demographic/biological factors such as baseline 25(OH)D, aging, body mass index(BMI)/body fat percentage, ethnicity, calcium intake, genetics, oestrogen use, dietary fat content and composition, and some diseases and medications has been addressed. Furthermore, strategies employed by researchers or health care providers (type, dose and duration of vitamin D supplementation) and environment (season) are other contributing factors. With the exception of baseline 25(OH)D, BMI/body fat percentage, dose and type of vitamin D, the relative importance of other factors and the mechanisms by which these factors may affect the response remains to be determined.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  20. Refeeding syndrome in a young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stuy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A severely chronically protein and calorie restricted young woman with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency developed transient refeeding syndrome (RFS and hyperammonemia after modest diet liberalization following initiation of glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB. The patient required IV supportive care and supplementation with potassium, magnesium and calcium. She is now doing well on GPB and an appropriate maintenance diet. Susceptibility to RFS should be considered in chronically nutritionally restricted patients with metabolic disorders after liberalization of diet.

  1. Dietary phytate, zinc and hidden zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstead, Harold H; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological data suggest at least one in five humans are at risk of zinc deficiency. This is in large part because the phytate in cereals and legumes has not been removed during food preparation. Phytate, a potent indigestible ligand for zinc prevents it's absorption. Without knowledge of the frequency of consumption of foods rich in phytate, and foods rich in bioavailable zinc, the recognition of zinc deficiency early in the illness may be difficult. Plasma zinc is insensitive to early zinc deficiency. Serum ferritin concentration≤20μg/L is a potential indirect biomarker. Early effects of zinc deficiency are chemical, functional and may be "hidden". The clinical problem is illustrated by 2 studies that involved US Mexican-American children, and US premenopausal women. The children were consuming home diets that included traditional foods high in phytate. The premenopausal women were not eating red meat on a regular basis, and their consumption of phytate was mainly from bran breakfast cereals. In both studies the presence of zinc deficiency was proven by functional responses to controlled zinc treatment. In the children lean-mass, reasoning, and immunity were significantly affected. In the women memory, reasoning, and eye-hand coordination were significantly affected. A screening self-administered food frequency questionnaire for office might help caregiver's identify patients at risk of zinc deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharyngeal arch deficiencies affect taste bud development in the circumvallate papilla with aberrant glossopharyngeal nerve formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Tadashi; Takada, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    The pharyngeal arches (PAs) generate cranial organs including the tongue. The taste placodes, formed in particular locations on the embryonic tongue surface, differentiate into taste buds harbored in distinct gustatory papillae. The developing tongue also has a complex supply of cranial nerves through each PA. However, the relationship between the PAs and taste bud development is not fully understood. Ripply3 homozygous mutant mice, which have impaired third/fourth PAs, display a hypoplastic circumvallate papilla and lack taste buds, although the taste placode is normally formed. Formation of the glossopharyngeal ganglia is defective and innervation toward the posterior tongue is completely missing in Ripply3 mutant embryos at E12.5. Moreover, the distribution of neuroblasts derived from the epibranchial placode is severely, but not completely, atenuated, and the neural crest cells are diminished in the third PA region of Ripply3 mutant embryos at E9.5-E10.5. In Tbx1 homozygous mutant embryos, which exhibit another type of deficiency in PA development, the hypoplastic circumvallate papilla is observed along with abnormal formation of the glossopharyngeal ganglia and severely impaired innervation. PA deficiencies affect multiple aspects of taste bud development, including formation of the cranial ganglia and innervation to the posterior tongue. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. In vitro degradation of calcium phosphates: Effect of multiscale porosity, textural properties and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Escudero, A; Espanol, M; Beats, S; Ginebra, M-P

    2017-09-15

    The capacity of calcium phosphates to be replaced by bone is tightly linked to their resorbability. However, the relative importance of some textural parameters on their degradation behavior is still unclear. The present study aims to quantify the effect of composition, specific surface area (SSA), and porosity at various length scales (nano-, micro- and macroporosity) on the in vitro degradation of different calcium phosphates. Degradation studies were performed in an acidic medium to mimic the osteoclastic environment. Small degradations were found in samples with interconnected nano- and micropores with sizes below 3µm although they were highly porous (35-65%), with maximum weight loss of 8wt%. Biomimetic calcium deficient hydroxyapatite, with high SSA and low crystallinity, presented the highest degradation rates exceeding even the more soluble β-TCP. A dependence of degradation on SSA was indisputable when porosity and pore sizes were increased. The introduction of additional macroporosity with pore interconnections above 20µm significantly impacted degradation, more markedly in the substrates with high SSA (>15m 2 /g), whereas in sintered substrates with low SSA (calcium deficient hydroxyapatite did not increase its degradation rate. Overall, the study highlights the importance of textural properties, which can modulate or even outweigh the effect of other features such as the solubility of the compounds. The physicochemical features of calcium phosphates are crucial to tune biological events like resorption during bone remodeling. Understanding in vitro resorption can help to predict the in vivo behavior. Besides chemical composition, other parameters such as porosity and specific surface area have a strong influence on resorption. The complexity of isolating the contribution of each parameter lies in the close interrelation between them. In this work, a multiscale study was proposed to discern the extent to which each parameter influences degradation in

  4. Effect of Silicon Supplementation on Bone Status in Ovariectomized Rats Under Calcium-Replete Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, So Young; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Choi, Mi-Kyeong

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that silicon (Si) had positive effects on bone, but such benefits from Si may be dependent on calcium status. Also, several biochemical roles of Si in osteoblastic mineralization, the regulation of gene expression related to bone matrix synthesis, and the decrease in reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory mediators were reported, but these effects were mostly shown in cell culture studies. Hence, we tested the effect of Si supplementation on bone status and the gene expression related to bone metabolism and inflammatory mediators in young estrogen-deficient rats under calcium-replete condition (0.5 % diet). Results showed that 15-week supplementation of both high and very high doses of Si (0.025 and 0.075 % diet, respectively) could not restore the ovariectomy (OVX)-induced decrease of bone mineral density (BMD) of vertebrae, femur, and tibia. Also, several bone biochemical markers (ALP, osteocalcin, CTx) and mRNA expression of COL-I, RANKL, IL-6, and TNF-α in femur metaphysis were not significantly changed by Si in OVX rats. However, a very high dose (0.075 %) of Si supplementation significantly increased OPG expression and decreased the ratio of RANKL/OPG in mRNA expression comparable to that of sham-control animals. Taken together, Si supplementation did not increase BMD under calcium-replete condition but the decrease in the ratio of RANKL/OPG expression to the normal level suggests the possibility of a bone health benefit of Si in estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss.

  5. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: aromatase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to impaired female sexual development, unusual bone growth, insulin resistance, and other signs and symptoms of aromatase deficiency . In women who are pregnant with an affected fetus, excess androgens in the ...

  7. Effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza extract with supplemental liquefied calcium on osteoporosis in calcium-deficient ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bongkyun; Song, Hae Seong; Kwon, Jeong Eun; Cho, Se Min; Jang, Seon-A; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kang, Se Chan

    2017-12-20

    Extracts from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge have been used in traditional Asian medicine to treat coronary heart disease, chronic renal failure, atherosclerosis, myocardial infraction, angina pectoris, myocardial ischemia, dysmenorrheal, neurasthenic insomnia, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-RANK signal effect of the combination of S.miltiorrhiza Bunge (SME) and liquefied calcium (LCa) supplement with ovariectomized (OVX-SML) mice, a osteoporosis animal model. Results were compared to 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) treatment. A total of 70 female ICR strain mice (7 weeks) were randomly divided into 10 groups with 7 mice in each group as follows: (1) sham-operated control mice (sham) received daily oral phosphate-buffered-saline (PBS) of equal volumes through oral administration. (2) OVX mice received a daily oral administration of PBS (OVX). (3) OVX mice treated daily with 50 mg/kg b.w./ day of SME (4) with 100 mg/kg b.w./day of SME or (5) with 200 mg/kg b.w./day of SME via oral administration. (6) OVX mice treated daily with 50 mg/kg b.w./day of SML (7) with 100 mg/kg b.w./day of SML or (8) with 200 mg/kg b.w./day of SML via oral administration. (9) OVX mice treated daily with 10 ml/kg b.w./day of LCa (10) OVX mice received i.p. injections of 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) (0.1 mg/kg b.w./day) three times per week for 12 weeks. micro-CT analysis revealed that oral administration of SML inhibited tibial bone loss, sustained trabecular bone state, and ameliorated bone biochemical markers. In addition, SML administration compared to SEM and LCa reduced serum levels of RANKL, osteocalcin and BALP through increased serum levels of OPG and E 2 in OVX mice. SML also had more beneficial effects on protection of estrogen-dependent bone loss through blocking expression of TRAF6 and NFTAc1 and produces cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor to develop osteoclast differentiation. These data suggest that S. miltiorrhiza Bunge combined with

  8. Heat stability and acid gelation properties of calcium-enriched reconstituted skim milk affected by ultrasonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrapala, Jayani; Bui, Don; Kentish, Sandra; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-05-01

    The aggregation of proteins after heating of calcium-fortified milks has been an ongoing problem in the dairy industry. This undesirable effect restricts the manufacture of calcium rich dairy products. To overcome this problem, a completely new approach in controlling the heat stability of dairy protein solutions, developed in our lab, has been employed. In this approach, high intensity, low frequency ultrasound is applied for a very short duration after a pre-heating step at ⩾70 °C. The ultrasound breaks apart whey/whey and whey/casein aggregates through the process of acoustic cavitation. Protein aggregates do not reform on subsequent post-heating, thereby making the systems heat stable. In this paper, the acid gelation properties of ultrasonicated calcium-enriched skim milks have also been investigated. It is shown that ultrasonication alone does not change the gelation properties significantly whereas a sequence of preheating (72 °C/1 min) followed by ultrasonication leads to decreased gelation times, decreased gel syneresis and increased skim milk viscosity in comparison to heating alone. Overall, ultrasonication has the potential to provide calcium-fortified dairy products with increased heat stability. However, enhanced gelation properties can only be achieved when ultrasonication is completed in conjunction with heating.

  9. Developmental vitamin D deficiency causes abnormal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, D W; Feron, F; Cui, X; Kesby, J P; Harms, L H; Ko, P; McGrath, J J; Burne, T H J

    2009-12-01

    There is now clear evidence that vitamin D is involved in brain development. Our group is interested in environmental factors that shape brain development and how this may be relevant to neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia. The origins of schizophrenia are considered developmental. We hypothesised that developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency may be the plausible neurobiological explanation for several important epidemiological correlates of schizophrenia namely: (1) the excess winter/spring birth rate, (2) increased incidence of the disease in 2nd generation Afro-Caribbean migrants and (3) increased urban birth rate. Moreover we have published two pieces of direct epidemiological support for this hypothesis in patients. In order to establish the "Biological Plausibility" of this hypothesis we have developed an animal model to study the effect of DVD deficiency on brain development. We do this by removing vitamin D from the diet of female rats prior to breeding. At birth we return all dams to a vitamin D containing diet. Using this procedure we impose a transient, gestational vitamin D deficiency, while maintaining normal calcium levels throughout. The brains of offspring from DVD-deficient dams are characterised by (1) a mild distortion in brain shape, (2) increased lateral ventricle volumes, (3) reduced differentiation and (4) diminished expression of neurotrophic factors. As adults, the alterations in ventricular volume persist and alterations in brain gene and protein expression emerge. Adult DVD-deficient rats also display behavioural sensitivity to agents that induce psychosis (the NMDA antagonist MK-801) and have impairments in attentional processing. In this review we summarise the literature addressing the function of vitamin D on neuronal and non-neuronal cells as well as in vivo results from DVD-deficient animals. Our conclusions from these data are that vitamin D is a plausible biological risk factor for neuropsychiatric disorders and that

  10. Filamin and phospholipase C-ε are required for calcium signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismar Kovacevic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue.

  11. Vitamin D deficiency plays an important role in cardiac disease and affects patient outcome: Still a myth or a fact that needs exploration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Fanari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that a low vitamin D status may be an important and hitherto neglected factor of cardiovascular disease. This review is an overview of the current body of literature, and presents evidence of the mechanisms through which vitamin D deficiency affects the cardiovascular system in general and the heart in particular. Available data indicate that the majority of congestive heart failure patients have 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, the low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level has a higher impact on hypertension, coronary artery disease an on the occurrence of relevant cardiac events. A serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level below 75 nmol/l (30 ng/l is generally regarded as vitamin D insufficiency in both adults and children, while a level below 50 nmol/l (20 ng/l is considered deficiency. Levels below 50 nmol/l (20 ng/l are linked independently to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  12. Determination of percent calcium carbonate in calcium chromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    The precision, accuracy and reliability of the macro-combustion method is superior to the Knorr alkalimetric method, and it is faster. It also significantly reduces the calcium chromate waste accrual problem. The macro-combustion method has been adopted as the official method for determination of percent calcium carbonate in thermal battery grade anhydrous calcium chromate and percent calcium carbonate in quicklime used in the production of calcium chromate. The apparatus and procedure can be used to measure the percent carbonate in inorganic materials other than calcium chromate. With simple modifications in the basic apparatus and procedure, the percent carbon and hydrogen can be measured in many organic material, including polymers and polymeric formulations. 5 figures, 5 tables

  13. Affective and cognitive behavior in the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mouse model of Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Hofmann

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked inherited lysosomal storage disorder with intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 due to α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A deficiency. Fabry patients frequently report of anxiety, depression, and impaired cognitive function. We characterized affective and cognitive phenotype of male mice with α-Gal A deficiency (Fabry KO and compared results with those of age-matched male wildtype (WT littermates. Young (3 months and old (≥ 18 months mice were tested in the naïve state and after i.pl. injection of complete Freund`s adjuvant (CFA as an inflammatory pain model. We used the elevated plus maze (EPM, the light-dark box (LDB and the open field test (OF to investigate anxiety-like behavior. The forced swim test (FST and Morris water maze (MWM were applied to assess depressive-like and learning behavior. The EPM test revealed no intergroup difference for anxiety-like behavior in naïve young and old Fabry KO mice compared to WT littermates, except for longer time spent in open arms of the EPM for young WT mice compared to young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05. After CFA injection, young Fabry KO mice showed increased anxiety-like behavior compared to young WT littermates (p<0.05 and naïve young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05 in the EPM as reflected by shorter time spent in EPM open arms. There were no relevant differences in the LDB and the OF test, except for longer time spent in the center zone of the OF by young WT mice compared to young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05. Complementary to this, depression-like and learning behavior were not different between genotypes and age-groups, except for the expectedly lower memory performance in older age-groups compared to young mice. Our results indicate that genetic influences on affective and cognitive symptoms in FD may be of subordinate relevance, drawing attention to potential influences of environmental and epigenetic factors.

  14. Vitamin D status did not related to calcium status in active tuberculosis patients in North Sumatera, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keumala Sari, Dina; Khairina Arrasyid, Nurfida

    2018-03-01

    Background: Tuberculosis is one of the highest mortality caused in a tropical country with abundant sunlight such Indonesia. Vitamin D and calcium plays important roles in tuberculosis pathogenesis. Objective:We sought to determine whether there is an association between vitamin D status and calcium status in tuberculosis patients. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 32 man and women aged 18-60 years with active tuberculosis in North Sumatera, Indonesia. Parameters were 25(OH)D and calcium serum level, body mass index, fat mass, and others lifestyles factors also assessed. The association was analysis using chi-square or fischer test. Results: the mean of study subjects age were 37.2±14.9 years old and BMI were 20.8±4.4 kg/m2 There were 81.2% subjects categorized into vitamin D deficiency-insufficiency and 18.8% categorized into vitamin D sufficiency. There were 29% subjects categorized into normal calcium level, and 3% were hypocalcemia. Based on food recall analysis, there were found lower vitamin D and calcium intake. There is no association between vitamin D and calcium classification. Conclusions: based on this result, although there is no association between vitamin D and calcium, but there could be altered by lower food intake and tuberculosis progression.

  15. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 3—Calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Sterling; Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Blandford, Edward D, E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Howe, Kerry [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Calcium leaching from NUKON fiberglass in borated TSP-buffered solution is independent of the level of fiberglass destruction. • The initial calcium release rate and the maximum calcium concentration increases with increased fiber concentration. • The calcium release in solution has a repeatable pattern of four distinct regions (prompt release, metastable, autocatalytic drop, and stable region) for all experiments. • Magnesium plays a significant role in initiating calcium precipitation in TSP-buffered environment. • Head loss through multi-constituents debris beds was found to increase progressively in all calcium concentration regions. - Abstract: Calcium that leaches from damaged or destroyed NUKON fiberglass in containment post a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) could lead to the formation of chemical precipitates. These precipitates could be filtered through the accumulated fibrous debris on the sump screen and compromising the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) sump pump performance. Reduced-scale leaching experiments were conducted on three solution inventory scales—bench (0.5 L), vertical column (31.5 L), and tank (1136 L) using three different flow conditions, and fiberglass concentrations (1.18–8 g/L) to investigate calcium release from NUKON fiber. All experiments were conducted in simulated post-LOCA water chemistry. (∼220 mM boric acid with ∼5.8 mM trisodium phosphate (TSP) buffer). Prior to the leaching tests, a preliminary experiment was carried out on the bench scale to determine the effect of the fiber preparation (unaltered and blended) method on calcium leaching. Results indicate that the extent of fiberglass destruction does not affect the amount of calcium released from fiberglass. Long-term calcium leach testing at constant temperature (80 °C) in borated TSP-buffered solution had repeatable behavior on all solution scales for different fiberglass concentrations. The calcium-leaching pattern can be divided into

  16. Calcium regulation of EGF-induced ERK5 activation: role of Lad1-MEKK2 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Yao

    Full Text Available The ERK5 cascade is a MAPK pathway that transmits both mitogenic and stress signals, yet its mechanism of activation is not fully understood. Using intracellular calcium modifiers, we found that ERK5 activation by EGF is inhibited both by the depletion and elevation of intracellular calcium levels. This calcium effect was found to occur upstream of MEKK2, which is the MAP3K of the ERK5 cascade. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that EGF increases MEKK2 binding to the adaptor protein Lad1, and this interaction was reduced by the intracellular calcium modifiers, indicating that a proper calcium concentration is required for the interactions and transmission of EGF signals to ERK5. In vitro binding assays revealed that the proper calcium concentration is required for a direct binding of MEKK2 to Lad1. The binding of these proteins is not affected by c-Src-mediated phosphorylation on Lad1, but slightly affects the Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2, suggesting that the interaction with Lad1 is necessary for full Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels affect the EGF-induced nuclear translocation of MEKK2 and thereby its effect on the nuclear ERK5 activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that calcium is required for EGF-induced ERK5 activation, and this effect is probably mediated by securing proper interaction of MEKK2 with the upstream adaptor protein Lad1.

  17. Vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia due to excessive self-restrictions for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikino, Kiyoshi; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Yamashita, Tomoko

    2014-07-04

    A 34-year-old Japanese woman presented with a 2-year history of generalised bone pain, muscle weakness and gait disturbance. The patient had been following a restricted diet (without fish or dairy products) and avoiding ultraviolet exposure for 8 years to manage her worsening atopic dermatitis. Physical examination revealed generalised bone tenderness and bilateral symmetric proximal muscle weakness. Vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia was diagnosed based on the laboratory examination findings, which indicated high serum alkaline phosphatase, high intact parathyroid hormone, and low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Her symptoms improved after oral active vitamin D and calcium administration. To the best our knowledge, this case is the first report of vitamin D-deficient osteomalacia in an adult patient due to excessive dietary restriction for managing atopic dermatitis. We emphasise the importance of increasing awareness of vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for the development of osteomalacia, and caution against excessive avoidance of sun exposure and dietary restriction. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Sivasaravanaparan, Mithula

    2012-01-01

    The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+) channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether...... genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice....

  19. Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets in an urban informal settlement in Kenya and is associated with malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachmeister, C. Ulrich; Khasira, Maureen; Cox, Lorna; Schoenmakers, Inez; Munyi, Caroline; Nassir, H. Samira; Hünten‐Kirsch, Barbara; Prentice, Ann; Berkley, James A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The commonest cause of rickets worldwide is vitamin D deficiency, but studies from sub‐Saharan Africa describe an endemic vitamin D‐independent form that responds to dietary calcium enrichment. The extent to which calcium‐deficiency rickets is the dominant form across sub‐Saharan Africa and in other low‐latitude areas is unknown. We aimed to characterise the clinical and biochemical features of young children with rickets in a densely populated urban informal settlement in Kenya. Because malnutrition may mask the clinical features of rickets, we also looked for biochemical indices of risk in children with varying degrees of acute malnutrition. Twenty one children with rickets, aged 3 to 24 months, were identified on the basis of clinical and radiologic features, along with 22 community controls, and 41 children with either severe or moderate acute malnutrition. Most children with rickets had wrist widening (100%) and rachitic rosary (90%), as opposed to lower limb features (19%). Developmental delay (52%), acute malnutrition (71%), and stunting (62%) were common. Compared to controls, there were no differences in calcium intake, but most (71%) had serum 25‐hydroxyvitamin D levels below 30 nmol/L. These results suggest that rickets in young children in urban Kenya is usually driven by vitamin D deficiency, and vitamin D supplementation is likely to be required for full recovery. Wasting was associated with lower calcium (p = .001), phosphate (p < .001), 25‐hydroxyvitamin D (p = .049), and 1,25‐dihydroxyvitamin D (p = 0.022) levels, the clinical significance of which remain unclear. PMID:28470840

  20. Use of electron microprobe x-ray analysis for determination of low calcium concentrations across leaves deficient in calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, D. J.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An electron microprobe with wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (WDS) was found to be useful for the determination of Ca concentrations in leaf tissue deficient in Ca. WDS effectively detected Ca concentrations as low as 0.2 mg/g dry wt in the presence of high levels of K and Mg (120 and 50 mg/g dry wt, respectively). Leaf specimens were prepared for analysis by quick-freezing in liquid nitrogen and freeze-drying at -20 degrees C to maintain elemental integrity within the tissue. Because dry material was analyzed, sample preparation was simple and samples could be stored for long periods before analysis. A large beam diameter of 50 gm was used to minimize tissue damage under the beam and analyze mineral concentrations within several cells at one time. Beam penetration was between 50 and 55 microns, approximately one-third of the thickness of the leaf. For analysis of concentrations in interveinal areas, analyses directed into the abaxial epidermis were found most useful. However, because of limited beam penetration, analyses of veinal areas would require use of cross sections [correction of crosssections]. Solid mineral standards were used for instrument standardization. To prevent measurement errors resulting from differences between the matrix of the mineral standards and the analyzed tissue, concentrations in leaves were corrected using gelatin standards prepared and analyzed under the same conditions. WDS was found to be useful for documenting that very low Ca levels occur in specific areas of lettuce leaves exhibiting the Ca deficiency injury termed tipburn.

  1. ATP-dependent calcium transport across basal plasma membranes of human placental trophoblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G.J.; Kelley, L.K.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    As a first step in understanding the cellular basis of maternal-fetal calcium transfer, the authors examined the characteristics of calcium uptake by a highly purified preparation of the syncytiotrophoblast basal (fetal facing) plasma membrane. In the presence of nanomolar concentrations of free calcium, basal membranes demonstrated substantial ATP-dependent calcium uptake. This uptake required magnesium, was not significantly affected by Na + or K + (50 mM), or sodium azide (10 mM). Intravesicular calcium was rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore A23187. Calcium transport was significantly stimulated by the calcium-dependent regulatory protein calmodulin. Placental membrane fractions enriched in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria also demonstrated ATP-dependent calcium uptake. In contrast to basal membrane, mitochondrial calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake by the ER was only 20% of that of basal membranes. They conclude that the placental basal plasma membrane possesses a high-affinity calcium transport system similar to that found in plasma membranes of a variety of cell types. This transporter is situated to permit it to function in vivo in maternal-fetal calcium transfer

  2. Synthesis of calcium-deficient by hydroxyapatite-collage composite by the electrolytic deposition method; Denkai sekishutsu ho ni yoru karushiumu kesson hidorokishiapataito-coragen fukugotai no gosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, H. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan). Graduate School Of Science and Technology; Yasuda, M.; Oota, M. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    1997-07-05

    Hydroxyapatite is known as that it has a good joining property with teeth and bone, and a study on the application to the living body was conducted by using this property. Its application examples were given as the cement used in dentistry, the artificial tooth root, the artificial bone, the bone cement and the artificial joint. However, they were a sinter heated at more than 1000degC, and were put into use by means of reinforcement using a titanium alloy since their mechanical strength was low. In this study, synthesis of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (DAp) and collagen composite by the electrolytic deposition method was attempted in order to develop bionic materials, and the correlation of various physical properties of the obtained composite and the electrolytic deposition conditions were investigated. When the electrolytic voltage is more than 22.0V, a single phase of DAp could be obtained. It was clarified that a DAp and collagen composite was synthesized from results of IR and ESR. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Vitamin B12: a novel indicator of bone health in vulnerable groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: A number of modifiable predictors for osteoporosis and fractures have been identified, including nutritional factors, such as vitamin D deficiency and low calcium intake. Cobalamin deficiency has been suggested to affect bone metabolism. Pernicious anaemia, which can result in cobalamin

  4. Clinical management of salivary deficiency: A review article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlSaif, K. M

    1991-01-01

    The physical, chemical and antibacterial properties of saliva provide protection to human dentition against dental diseases, Therefore, salivary deficiency has to be managed carefully. The causes of saliva deficiency are many and varied. It is worth mentioning that saliva flow rate is normally affected by physiologic condition, such as eating, resting, sleeping, cold or hot season etc. In this paper the protective role of saliva, etiologiy of saliva deficiency and its clinical management are discussed. (author

  5. Studies on the mechanisms underlying the transfer of calcium and phosphate from bone to blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brommage, Jr., Robert J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The skeleton is recognized as a crucial organ in the minute-to-minute regulation of the blood levels of calcium and phosphate. The fluxes of calcium and phosphate to and from bone greatly exceed the entry and exit of these ions occurring in the intestine and kidneys. Parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3 are known to influence the transfer of calcium and phosphate from bone to blood. Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain the hormonal control of the calcium and phosphate effluxes from bone. The concept of a bone membrane maintaining a distinct bone extracellular fluid composition has led to the pump and pH gradient theories. An alternate solubilizer theory proposes that bone cells secrete a substance which increases the solubility of the bone mineral. The bone membrane concept was originally proposed to explain the presence of the apparent anomalously high concentrations of potassium in the bone extracellular fluid. However, the available evidence does not allow an unambiguous decision concerning the presence of a bone membrane. Calvarial lactate production was unaltered by 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment and consequently 1,25-(OH)2D3 does not appear to promote the mobilization of bone mineral through a lactate-mediated pH gradient mechanism. 1,25-(OH)2D3 did increase the solubility of non-vital bone, clearly demonstrating that the solubilizer mechanism is at least partially responsible for the mobilization of bone mineral and the regulation of blood levels of calcium and phosphate. Vitamin D-deficient female rats fed a 0.2% calcium, 0.4% phosphorous diet and supplemented with daily injections of 0.75 pmole of 1,25-(OH)2D3 were shown to be capable of bearing young. When the injections of 1,25-(OH)2D3 were terminated at delivery, the dams and pups showed signs of vitamin D deficiency

  6. Spirituality, Illness Unpredictability, and Math Anxiety Effects on Negative Affect and Affect-Management Coping for Individuals Diagnosed with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Amber K; Parrott, Roxanne L; Smith, Rachel A

    2018-04-01

    A growing number of genetic tests are included in diagnostic protocols associated with many common conditions. A positive diagnosis associated with the presence of some gene versions in many instances predicts a range of possible outcomes, and the uncertainty linked to such results contributes to the need to understand varied responses and plan strategic communication. Uncertainty in illness theory (UIT; Mishel, 1988, 1990) guided the investigation of efforts to feel in control and hopeful regarding genetic testing and diagnosis for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). Participants included 137 individuals with AATD recruited from the Alpha-1 Research Registry who were surveyed about their subjective numeracy, anxiety about math, spirituality, perceptions of illness unpredictability, negative affect regarding genetic testing, and coping strategies about a diagnosis. Results revealed that experiencing more fear and worry contributed both directly and indirectly to affect-management coping strategies, operating through individual perceptions of illness unpredictability. The inability to predict the symptoms and course of events related to a genetic illness and anxiety regarding math heightened fear and worry. Spirituality lessened both illness unpredictability and negative affective responses to a diagnosis. Results affirm the importance of clinician and counselor efforts to incorporate attention to patient spirituality. They also illustrate the complexity associated with strategic efforts to plan communication about the different versions of a gene's effects on well-being, when some versions align with mild health effects and others with severe effects.

  7. Hypopituitarism: growth hormone and corticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Wass, John A H

    2015-03-01

    This article presents an overview of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) and corticotropin deficiency (central adrenal failure, CAI). Both conditions can result from various ailments affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (most frequently a tumor in the area or its treatment). Clinical manifestations are subtle in AGHD but potentially life-threatening in CAI. The diagnosis needs dynamic testing in most cases. Treatment of AGHD is recommended in patients with documented severe deficiency, and treatment of CAI is mandatory in all cases. Despite significant progress in replacement hormonal therapy, more physiologic treatments and more reliable indicators of treatment adequacy are still needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  9. Deficient fear conditioning in psychopathy as a function of interpersonal and affective disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eVeit

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The diminished fear reactivity is one of the most valid physiological findings in psychopathy research. In a fear conditioning paradigm, with faces as conditioned stimulus (CS and electric shock as unconditioned stimulus (US, we investigated a sample of 14 high psychopathic violent offenders. Event related potentials, skin conductance responses (SCR as well as subjective ratings of the CSs were collected. This study assessed to which extent the different facets of the psychopathy construct contribute to the fear conditioning deficits observed in psychopaths. Participants with high scores on the affective facet subscale of the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R showed weaker conditioned fear responses and lower N100 amplitudes compared to low scorers. In contrast, high scorers on the affective facet rated the CS+ (paired more negatively than low scorers regarding the CS- (unpaired. Regarding the P300, high scores on the interpersonal facet were associated with increased amplitudes to the CS+ compared to the CS-, while the opposed pattern was found with the antisocial facet. Both, the initial and terminal contingent negative variation indicated a divergent pattern: participants with pronounced interpersonal deficits, showed increased cortical negativity to the CS+ compared to the CS-, whereas a reversed CS+/CS- differentiation was found in offenders scoring high on the antisocial facet. The present study revealed that deficient fear conditioning in psychopathy was most pronounced in offenders with high scores on the affective facet. Event related potentials suggest that participants with distinct interpersonal deficits showed increased information processing, whereas the antisocial facet was linked to decreased attention and interest to the CS+. These data indicate that an approach to the facets of psychopathy can help to resolve ambiguous findings in psychopathy research and enables a more precise and useful description of this disorder.

  10. Hypovitaminosis D and mild hypocalcaemia are highly prevalent among young Vietnamese children and women and related to low dietary intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Laillou

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In many developing countries including Vietnam, data are lacking on vitamin D and calcium deficiencies whereas those deficiencies can play an important role in the development of bone health and possibly non-communicable diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the overall prevalence of vitamin D and calcium deficiencies in women and young children and their nutritional related risk factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional study conducted among 595 women of reproductive age and 532 children <5 years from 19 provinces of Vietnam. For each individual, data concerning daily diet, socioeconomic group, anthropometric status were obtained, and plasma concentrations of calcium and vitamin D were measured. RESULTS: The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D status was very high, with the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (25(OHD<30 nmol/L and insufficiency (25(OHD between 30-49.9 nmol/L being 17% and 40% in women and 21% and 37% in children, respectively. Using more liberal cut-off of 75 nmol/L, approximately 90% of the women and children were classified as having hypovitaminosis D. Overweight/obese women had a 2 times lower risk (OR = 0.46, [0.24-0.90] for vitamin D deficiency than non-overweight and non-obese women. No participant had severe calcium deficiency but moderate and mild hypocalcaemia (plasma calcium concentrations between 1.15-0.9 mmol/L for mild deficiency and between 0.9-0.8 mmol/L for moderate deficiency affected respectively 14% and 83% of the women with 97% of the children having mild hypocalcaemia. Women and children consumed about 1% of the Institute of Medicine (IOM recommended nutrient intake (RNI for vitamin D and less than 43% of the RNI for calcium. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that calcium and vitamin D deficiencies represent a major public health concern in Vietnam. Thus, actions to improve the vitamin D and calcium status of the Vietnamese population should be considered.

  11. Factors affecting the absorption and excretion of lead in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, M.E.; Barton, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A reliable method for studying lead absorption and excretion in rats is described. Lead absorption occurs primarily in the duodenum where lead enters the epithelial mucosal cells. There is a relative mucosal block for lead with increasing intraluminal doses. Certain substances which bind lead and increase its solubility enhance its absorption. Iron, zinc, and calcium decrease the absorption of lead without affecting its solubility, probably by competing for shared absorptive receptors in the intestinal mucosa. The total body burden of lead does not affect lead absorption. Thus, lead does not have a feedback mechanism which limits absorption. Lead absorption is increased during rapid periods of growth and in iron-deficient animals. It is diminished with starvation and in iron-overloaded animals. The excretion and kinetics of tracer doses of radiolead were quantified. Erythrocytes seem to serve an important role in transport. Excretion occurs in urine and stool. Bile is an important route of excretion in the gut. Although most of a tracer dose is rapidly excreted, the excretory process is limited permitting lead accumulation primarily in bone

  12. Effects of adding chymosin to milk on calcium homeostasis: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liendgaard, Ulla Kristine Møller; Jensen, L.T.; Mosekilde, Leif

    2015-01-01

    either chymosin or similar placebo was added. Compared with placebo, chymosin did not affect 24-h urinary calcium, calcium/creatinine ratio, plasma parathyroid hormone, calcitonin or ionized calcium levels. However, during the first 4 h after intake of milk with chymosin, urinary calcium-creatinine ratio...... was significantly increased (17%) compared with placebo. Stratification by daily calcium intake showed effect of chymosin in participant with a habitual intake above the median (>1,050 mg/day) in whom both urinary calcium and calcium/creatinine ratio were significantly increased compared with placebo. Effects did...

  13. Calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlmark, B.; Reizenstein, P.; Dudley, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The methods most commonly used to measure the absorption and retention of orally administered calcium are reviewed. Nearly all make use of calcium radioisotopes. The magnitude of calcium absorption and retention depends upon the chemical form and amount of calcium administered, and the clinical and nutritional status of the subject; these influences are briefly surveyed. (author)

  14. Testosterone deficiency syndrome: cellular and molecular mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Malcolm

    2013-02-01

    There is virtually no correlation between what are generally accepted to be the symptoms of deficient androgen in men and levels of androgens as measured in the laboratory. Now that androgen deficiency is being shown to play a part in conditions as diverse as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, a hypothesis is needed to explain this apparent discrepancy between measured androgen levels and our understanding of the symptoms of androgen deficiency. When the possible mechanisms for androgen actions are considered, one explanation emerges that androgen may act much like insulin in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the degree of androgen resistance may be variable depending on the organs or systems considered. Therefore, the symptoms can result from altered or damaged synthesis of androgen synthesis or regulation, elevated androgen binding, a reduction in tissue response, or decreased as a result of polymorphism and aging. Genomic transcription and translation may also be affected. As with diabetes, in adult male androgen deficiency, it is suggested that the definition of androgen deficiency should be based on individual physiology, with the requirements of the individual at a particular stage of life setting the baseline against which any deficiency of androgens or androgen metabolites, either absolute or relative, is determined. This approach will affect the terminology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of androgen deficiency.

  15. Vitamin D deficiency and its relationship with cardiac iron and function in patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia at Chiang Mai University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejkhamron, Prapai; Wejaphikul, Karn; Mahatumarat, Tuanjit; Silvilairat, Suchaya; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Saekho, Suwit; Unachak, Kevalee

    2018-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with thalassemia. Vitamin D deficiency could be related to cardiac dysfunction. Increased parathyroid hormone (PTH) is also known to be associated with heart failure. To determine the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency and to explore the impact of Vitamin D deficiency on cardiac iron and function in patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. A cross-sectional study in patients with Transfusion-dependent thalassemia was conducted. Patients with liver disease, renal disease, type 1 diabetes, malabsorption, hypercortisolism, malignancy, and contraindication for MRI were excluded. Calcium, phosphate, PTH, vitamin D-25OH were measured. CardiacT2 * and liver iron concentration (LIC) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were determined. Results Sixty-one (33M/28F) patients with Transfusion-dependent thalassemia were enrolled. The prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency was 50.8%. Patients with cardiac siderosis had tendency for lower D-25OH than those without siderosis (15.9 (11.7-20.0) vs. 20.2 (15.85-22.3) ng/mL); p = 0.06). Serum calcium, phosphate, PTH, LIC, cardiac T2 * , and LVEF were not different between the groups with or without Vitamin D deficiency. Patients with Vitamin D deficiency had significantly lower hemoglobin levels compared to those without Vitamin D deficiency (7.5 (6.93-8.33) vs. 8.1 (7.30-8.50) g/dL; p = 0.04). The median hemoglobin in the last 12 months was significantly correlated with D-25OH. Cardiac T2 * had significant correlation with PTH. Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in patients with Transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Vitamin D level is correlated with hemoglobin level. Vitamin D status should be routinely assessed in these patients. Low PTH is correlated with increased cardiac iron. This study did not demonstrate an association between Vitamin D deficiency and cardiac iron or function in patients with Transfusion-dependent thalassemia.

  16. Amelioration of boron toxicity in sweet pepper as affected by calcium management under an elevated CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, María Carmen; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2017-04-01

    We investigated B tolerance in sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuun L.) under an elevated CO 2 concentration, combined with the application of calcium as a nutrient management amelioration technique. The data show that high B affected the roots more than the aerial parts, since there was an increase in the shoot/root ratio, when plants were grown with high B levels; however, the impact was lessened when the plants were grown at elevated CO 2 , since the root FW reduction caused by excess B was less marked at the high CO 2 concentration (30.9% less). Additionally, the high B concentration affected the membrane permeability of roots, which increased from 39 to 54% at ambient CO 2 concentration, and from 38 to 51% at elevated CO 2 concentration, producing a cation imbalance in plants, which was differentially affected by the CO 2 supply. The Ca surplus in the nutrient solution reduced the nutritional imbalance in sweet pepper plants produced by the high B concentration, at both CO 2 concentrations. The medium B concentration treatment (toxic according to the literature) did not result in any toxic effect. Hence, there is a need to review the literature on critical and toxic B levels taking into account increases in atmospheric CO 2 .

  17. Radioisotope 45Ca labeling four calcium chemical compounds and tracing calcium bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hui; Zhen Rong; Niu Huisheng; Li Huaifen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To build up a new method of the radioisotope 45 Ca labeling four calcium chemical compounds, observe and tracing bioavailability change of calcium labeled with radioisotope 45 Ca. Methods: The calcium gluconate (Ca-Glu), calcium citrate (Ca-Cit), calcium carbonate (Ca-Car) and calcium L-threonate (Ca-Thr)were labeled by radioisotope 45 Ca. Four calcium chemical compounds of 45 Ca labeling were used of calcium content 200 mg/kg in the rats and measure the absorption content and bioavailability of calcium in tissue of heart, lever spleen, stomach, kidney, brain, intestine, whole blood, urine, faeces. Results: 1) Radioisotope 45 Ca labeling calcium chemical compound has high radio intensity, more steady standard curve and recover rate. 2) The absorption of organic calcium chemical compounds is higher than the inorganic calcium chemical compound in the study of calcium bioavailability. Conclusion: The method of tracing with radioisotope 45 Ca labeling calcium chemical compounds has the characteristic of the sensitive, objective, accurate and steady in the study of calcium bioavailability

  18. The impact of calcium assay change on a local adjusted calcium equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah L; Hill, Charlotte; Bailey, Lisa M; Davison, Andrew S; Milan, Anna M

    2016-03-01

    Deriving and validating local adjusted calcium equations is important for ensuring appropriate calcium status classification. We investigated the impact on our local adjusted calcium equation of a change in calcium method by the manufacturer from cresolphthalein complexone to NM-BAPTA. Calcium and albumin results from general practice requests were extracted from the Laboratory Information Management system for a three-month period. Results for which there was evidence of disturbance in calcium homeostasis were excluded leaving 13,482 sets of results for analysis. The adjusted calcium equation was derived following least squares regression analysis of total calcium on albumin and normalized to the mean calcium concentration of the data-set. The revised equation (NM-BAPTA calcium method) was compared with the previous equation (cresolphthalein complexone calcium method). The switch in calcium assay resulted in a small change in the adjusted calcium equation but was not considered to be clinically significant. The calcium reference interval differed from that proposed by Pathology Harmony in the UK. Local adjusted calcium equations should be re-assessed following changes in the calcium method. A locally derived reference interval may differ from the consensus harmonized reference interval. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Deficiency of Carbonic Anhydrase II Results in a Urinary Concentrating Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devishree Krishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII is expressed along the nephron where it interacts with a number of transport proteins augmenting their activity. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1 interacts with CAII to increase water flux through the water channel. Both CAII and aquaporin-1 are expressed in the thin descending limb (TDL; however, the physiological role of a CAII-AQP1 interaction in this nephron segment is not known. To determine if CAII was required for urinary concentration, we studied water handling in CAII-deficient mice. CAII-deficient mice demonstrate polyuria and polydipsia as well as an alkaline urine and bicarbonaturia, consistent with a type III renal tubular acidosis. Natriuresis and hypercalciuria cause polyuria, however, CAII-deficient mice did not have increased urinary sodium nor calcium excretion. Further examination revealed dilute urine in the CAII-deficient mice. Urinary concentration remained reduced in CAII-deficient mice relative to wild-type animals even after water deprivation. The renal expression and localization by light microscopy of NKCC2 and aquaporin-2 was not altered. However, CAII-deficient mice had increased renal AQP1 expression. CAII associates with and increases water flux through aquaporin-1. Water flux through aquaporin-1 in the TDL of the loop of Henle is essential to the concentration of urine, as this is required to generate a concentrated medullary interstitium. We therefore measured cortical and medullary interstitial concentration in wild-type and CAII-deficient mice. Mice lacking CAII had equivalent cortical interstitial osmolarity to wild-type mice: however, they had reduced medullary interstitial osmolarity. We propose therefore that reduced water flux through aquaporin-1 in the TDL in the absence of CAII prevents the generation of a maximally concentrated medullary interstitium. This, in turn, limits urinary concentration in CAII deficient mice.

  20. Dietary magnesium deficiency affects gut microbiota and anxiety-like behaviour in C57BL/6N mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyndt Jørgensen, Bettina; Winther, Gudrun; Kihl, Pernille; Nielsen, Dennis S; Wegener, Gregers; Hansen, Axel K; Sørensen, Dorte B

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium deficiency has been associated with anxiety in humans, and rodent studies have demonstrated the gut microbiota to impact behaviour. We investigated the impact of 6 weeks of dietary magnesium deficiency on gut microbiota composition and anxiety-like behaviour and whether there was a link between the two. A total of 20 C57BL/6 mice, fed either a standard diet or a magnesium-deficient diet for 6 weeks, were tested using the light-dark box anxiety test. Gut microbiota composition was analysed by denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis. We demonstrated that the gut microbiota composition correlated significantly with the behaviour of dietary unchallenged mice. A magnesium-deficient diet altered the gut microbiota, and was associated with altered anxiety-like behaviour, measured by decreased latency to enter the light box. Magnesium deficiency altered behavior. The duration of magnesium deficiency is suggested to influence behaviour in the evaluated test.

  1. TACI deficiency enhances antibody avidity and clearance of an intestinal pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Shoichiro; Stein, Lucas; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Nuñez, Gabriel; Bram, Richard; Vallance, Bruce A.; Sousa, Ana E.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2014-01-01

    © 2014, The American Society for Clinical Investigation The transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) controls differentiation of long-lived plasma cells, and almost 10% of individuals with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) express either the C104R or A181E variants of TACI. These variants impair TACI function, and TACI-deficient mice exhibit a CVID-like disease. However, 1%-2% of normal individuals harbor the C140R or A181E TACI variants and...

  2. Dysregulation of Nutrient Sensing and CLEARance in Presenilin Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavya Reddy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated auto-lysosomal system has been associated with Alzheimer disease (AD, yet all underlying molecular mechanisms leading to this impairment are unknown. We show that the amino acid sensing of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is dysregulated in cells deficient in presenilin, a protein associated with AD. In these cells, mTORC1 is constitutively tethered to lysosomal membranes, unresponsive to starvation, and inhibitory to TFEB-mediated clearance due to a reduction in Sestrin2 expression. Normalization of Sestrin2 levels through overexpression or elevation of nuclear calcium rescued mTORC1 tethering and initiated clearance. While CLEAR network attenuation in vivo results in buildup of amyloid, phospho-Tau, and neurodegeneration, presenilin-knockout fibroblasts and iPSC-derived AD human neurons fail to effectively initiate autophagy. These results propose an altered mechanism for nutrient sensing in presenilin deficiency and underline an importance of clearance pathways in the onset of AD.

  3. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  4. In vivo biocompatibility of new nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid complex biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenyu; Li, Yue; Lu, Weizhong; Jiang, Dianming; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Lv, Guoyu; Yang, Aiping

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the compatibility of novel nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid (n-CDHA/PAA) complex biomaterials with muscle and bone tissue in an in vivo model. Methods Thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. Biomaterials were surgically implanted into each rabbit in the back erector spinae and in tibia with induced defect. Polyethylene was implanted into rabbits in the control group and n-CDHA/PAA into those of the experimental group. Animals were examined at four different points in time: 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after surgery. They were euthanized after embolization. Back erector spinae muscles with the surgical implants were examined after hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining at these points in time. Tibia bones with the surgical implants were examined by X-ray and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at these points in time to evaluate the interface of the bone with the implanted biomaterials. Bone tissues were sectioned and subjected to HE, Masson, and toluidine blue staining. Results HE staining of back erector spinae muscles at 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after implantation of either n-CDHA/PAA or polyethylene showed disappearance of inflammation and normal arrangement in the peripheral tissue of implant biomaterials; no abnormal staining was observed. At 2 weeks after implantation, X-ray imaging of bone tissue samples in both experimental and control groups showed that the peripheral tissues of the implanted biomaterials were continuous and lacked bone osteolysis, absorption, necrosis, or osteomyelitis. The connection between implanted biomaterials and bone tissue was tight. The results of HE, Masson, toluidine blue staining and SEM confirmed that the implanted biomaterials were closely connected to the bone defect and that no rejection had taken place. The n-CDHA/PAA biomaterials induced differentiation of a large number of chondrocytes. New bone trabecula began to form at 4 weeks after

  5. In vivo biocompatibility of new nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid complex biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenyu; Li, Yue; Lu, Weizhong; Jiang, Dianming; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Lv, Guoyu; Yang, Aiping

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the compatibility of novel nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid (n-CDHA/PAA) complex biomaterials with muscle and bone tissue in an in vivo model. Thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. Biomaterials were surgically implanted into each rabbit in the back erector spinae and in tibia with induced defect. Polyethylene was implanted into rabbits in the control group and n-CDHA/PAA into those of the experimental group. Animals were examined at four different points in time: 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after surgery. They were euthanized after embolization. Back erector spinae muscles with the surgical implants were examined after hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining at these points in time. Tibia bones with the surgical implants were examined by X-ray and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at these points in time to evaluate the interface of the bone with the implanted biomaterials. Bone tissues were sectioned and subjected to HE, Masson, and toluidine blue staining. HE staining of back erector spinae muscles at 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after implantation of either n-CDHA/PAA or polyethylene showed disappearance of inflammation and normal arrangement in the peripheral tissue of implant biomaterials; no abnormal staining was observed. At 2 weeks after implantation, X-ray imaging of bone tissue samples in both experimental and control groups showed that the peripheral tissues of the implanted biomaterials were continuous and lacked bone osteolysis, absorption, necrosis, or osteomyelitis. The connection between implanted biomaterials and bone tissue was tight. The results of HE, Masson, toluidine blue staining and SEM confirmed that the implanted biomaterials were closely connected to the bone defect and that no rejection had taken place. The n-CDHA/PAA biomaterials induced differentiation of a large number of chondrocytes. New bone trabecula began to form at 4 weeks after implanting n

  6. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation prevents severe falls in elderly community-dwelling women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Roj; Mosekilde, Leif; Foldspang, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: We evaluated the effect of two programs for the prevention of falls leading to acute hospital admission in a population of elderly community-dwelling Danish residents. Methods: This was a factorial, pragmatic, intervention study. We included 9605 community-dwelling city......, or no intervention. Results: The Calcium and Vitamin D program was followed by 50.3% and the Environmental and Health Program by 46.4%. According to a multivariate analysis including age, marital status and intervention program, female residents who followed the Calcium and Vitamin D Program had a 12% risk reduction...... in severe falls (RR 0.88; 95% CI 0.79-0.98; pfalls leading to acute hospitalization in community-dwelling elderly females in a northern European region known to be deficient in vitamin D....

  7. Calcium Stone Growth in Urine from Cystic Fibrosis Patients and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, Anita; Jones, Andrew M.; Webb, A. Kevin; Rao, P. Nagaraj; Kavanagh, John P.

    2007-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients have an increased risk of renal stone disease. There is some evidence that this may be related to a different excretory pattern of stone risk factors, but an alternative hypothesis, that the urine of cystic fibrosis patients is deficient in urinary inhibitors of crystallization and stone formation has not been tested. Here we have grown calcium stones, in vitro, in the presence of urine from healthy controls and compared this with growth in the presence of urine from cystic fibrosis patients. A stone farm was used to grow twelve calcium stones simultaneously, firstly in artificial urine for about 200 hours and then in 90% whole human urine for another 500 hours. Six of the stones received urine from healthy controls and six received urine from adult cystic fibrosis patients. There were no significant differences in stone mass at any of the key time points or in the overall growth pattern (p>0.05) between stones destined for, or treated with, urine from CF patients and the controls. Human urine greatly inhibited stone growth in vitro but there was no difference in the growth rate in urine from healthy controls and CF patients. This refutes the hypothesis that a tendency for a higher prevalence of urinary stones in CF patients is related to a deficiency in inhibitory activity.

  8. Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts by reinforcing intracellular calcium transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jie; Sun, Lijun; Zhu, Bin; Fan, Yun; Ma, Xingfeng; Yu, Liyin; Zhang, Jianbao

    2017-10-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) can be used to treat bone-related diseases, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear, especially the process by which PEMFs initiate biological effects. In this study, we demonstrated the effects of PEMF on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts using the model of calcium transients induced by high extracellular calcium. Our results showed that PEMF can increase both the percentage of responding cells and amplitude of intracellular calcium transients induced by high extracellular calcium stimulation. Compared with corresponding extracellular calcium levels, PEMF stimulation increased proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts and related gene expressions, such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and osteocalcin (OCN), which can be completely abolished by BAPTA-AM. Moreover, PEMF did not affect proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts if no intracellular calcium transient was present in osteoblasts during PEMF exposure. Our results revealed that PEMF affects osteoblast proliferation and differentiation through enhanced intracellular calcium transients, which provided a cue to treat bone-related diseases with PEMF. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:541-549, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Calcium ions affect the hepatitis B virus core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yongwook; Gyoo Park, Sung; Yoo, Jun-hi; Jung, Guhung

    2005-01-01

    Previous report showed that cytosolic Ca 2+ induced by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) promotes HBV replication. In this study, in vitro experiments showed that (i) HBV core assembly in vitro was promoted by Ca 2+ through the sucrose density gradient and the analytical ultracentrifuge analysis. Also (ii) transmission electron microscope analysis demonstrated these assembled HBV core particles were the capsids. Ex vivo experiments showed that the treatment of BAPTA-AM and cyclosporine A (CsA) reduced HBV capsids in the transfected HepG2 cells. In addition to that, the treatment of Thapsigargin (TG) increased HBV capsids in the transfected HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we investigated the increased HBV core assembly by HBx. The results show that the increased cytosolic calcium ions by HBx promote the HBV core assembly

  10. Iodine deficiency, thyroid function and hearing deficit: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.; MacKenzie, I.

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency affects an estimated 241 million school-aged children in the world. Little is known about iodine deficiency in relation to auditory function, except for the fact that deaf-mutism is one of the features of cretinism. In the present review, we documented the scientific knowledge on

  11. Calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  12. Absorbability of calcium from calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides in comparison with that from various calcium compounds in the rat ligated jejunum loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To-o, Kenji; Kamasaka, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takahisa; Kuriki, Takashi; Saeki, Shigeru; Nakabou, Yukihiro

    2003-08-01

    Calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides (POs-Ca) were prepared from potato starch. Their solubility and in situ absorbability as a calcium source were investigated by comparing with the soluble calcium compounds, calcium chloride and calcium lactate, or insoluble calcium compounds, calcium carbonate and dibasic calcium phosphate. The solubility of POs-Ca was as high as that of calcium chloride and about 3-fold higher than that of calcium lactate. An in situ experiment showed that the intestinal calcium absorption rate of POs-Ca was almost comparable with that of the soluble calcium compounds, and was significantly higher (pcalcium groups. Moreover, the total absorption rate of a 1:1 mixture of the calcium from POs-Ca and a whey mineral complex (WMC) was significantly higher (psoluble calcium source with relatively high absorption in the intestinal tract.

  13. dNTP deficiency induced by HU via inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase affects neural tube development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Zhen; Wang, Xiuwei; Dong, Yanting; Xu, Lin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Murine NTDs were successfully induced by means of hydroxyurea (HU). • The impairment of dNTP was induced via inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase. • dNTP deficiency induced by HU caused defective DNA synthesis and repair. • Abnormal apoptosis and proliferation induced by HU affected neural tube development. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental toxic chemicals in utero during the neural tube development period can cause developmental disorders. To evaluate the disruption of neural tube development programming, the murine neural tube defects (NTDs) model was induced by interrupting folate metabolism using methotrexate in our previous study. The present study aimed to examine the effects of dNTP deficiency induced by hydroxyurea (HU), a specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor, during murine neural tube development. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with various doses of HU on gestation day (GD) 7.5, and the embryos were checked on GD 11.5. RNR activity and deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels were measured in the optimal dose. Additionally, DNA damage was examined by comet analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Cellular behaviors in NTDs embryos were evaluated with phosphorylation of histone H3 (PH-3) and caspase-3 using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results showed that NTDs were observed mostly with HU treatment at an optimal dose of 225 mg/kg b/w. RNR activity was inhibited and dNTP levels were decreased in HU-treated embryos with NTDs. Additionally, increased DNA damage, decreased proliferation, and increased caspase-3 were significant in NTDs embryos compared to the controls. Results indicated that HU induced murine NTDs model by disturbing dNTP metabolism and further led to the abnormal cell balance between proliferation and apoptosis

  14. ECONOMICAL BASIS TO ADDRESS MICRONUTRIENT DEFICIENCIES IN DEVELOPING WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirul Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition has been called by economists at the World Bank as the “non-human face” of poverty,1 Adults who were malnourished as children earn at least 20% less on average than those who weren’t , 2.Malnutrition is often caused by underlying economics, i.e. the lack of money. Economics is very important in regards to malnutrition; it allows an individual to purchase nutrients. In many places around the world, a lack of money prevents the purchase of a variety of foods. The lack in variety usually leads to micronutrient malnutrition. Economics also decides the production of food in all countries around the world and the ability of a country to overcome difficult times. Thus economics affects ALL people at ALL levels of society, 3.Micronutrient deficiencies also known as ‘hidden hunger’ are determining and aggravating factors for health status and quality of life. It is estimated half of anaemia cases are due to iron deficiency , 4.  Almost half of children in low- and middle-income countries – 47% of under-fives are affected by anaemia, impairing cognitive and physical development,5. Iodine deficiency is the greatest single cause of mental retardation and brain damage. Coincidently,  the number of countries in which iodine-deficiency disorders were considered a public health concern reduced by 43% between 1993 and 2007,6.  Zinc deficiency affects children’s health and physical growth; it is also essential for mothers during pregnancy. It is estimated to cause 4% of deaths in pre-school aged children in lower-income countries. 7 . The Global Burden of Disease estimates showed that among the 26 major risk factors of the global burden of disease,8 iron deficiency ranks ninth overall, zinc deficiency is eleventh, and vitamin A deficiency, is thirteenth. Annually each developing country of the world are losing over millions or billions US $ in Gross Domestic Product (GDP to vitamins and minerals deficiencies. But scaling up core

  15. Intensified Vegetation Water Use due to Soil Calcium Leaching under Acid Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, M.; Wang, L.; Scanlon, T. M.; Vadeboncoeur, M. A.; Adams, M. B.; Epstein, H. E.; Druckenbrod, D.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the important role vegetation plays in the global water cycle, the exact controls of vegetation water use, especially the role of soil biogeochemistry, remain elusive. Nitrate and sulfate deposition from fossil fuel burning has caused significant soil acidification, leading to the leaching of soil base cations. From a physiological perspective, plants require various soil cations as signaling and regulatory ions as well as integral parts of structural molecules; a depletion of soil cations can cause reduced productivity and abnormal responses to environmental change. A deficiency in calcium could also potentially prolong stomatal opening, leading to increased transpiration until enough calcium had been acquired to stimulate stomatal closure. Based on the plant physiology and the nature of acidic deposition, we hypothesize that depletion of the soil calcium supply, induced by acid deposition, would intensify vegetation water use at the watershed scale. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing a long-term and unique data set (1989-2012) of soil lysimeter data along with stream flow and evapotranspiration data at the Fernow Experimental Forest. We show that depletion of soil calcium by acid deposition can intensify vegetation water use ( 10% increase in evapotranspiration and depletion in soil water) for the first time. These results are critical to understanding future water availability, biogeochemical cycles, and surficial energy flux and may help reduce uncertainties in terrestrial biosphere models.

  16. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  17. De-masking oxytocin-deficiency in craniopharyngioma and assessing its link with affective function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Dorothea; Auer, Matthias K; Stieg, Mareike R; Freitag, Martin T; Lahne, Madlén; Fuss, Johannes; Schilbach, Katharina; Schopohl, Jochen; Stalla, Günter K; Kopczak, Anna

    2018-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus in patients with craniopharyngioma (CP), little is known about the functioning of the neuropeptide oxytocin in these patients. This is of special interest as tumor-associated lesions often impair sites critical for oxytocin production and release, and affective dysfunction in CP links with elsewhere reported prosocial, antidepressant and anxiolytic oxytocin effects. Using a prospective study-design, we tested whether oxytocin is reduced in CP-patients, and whether altered oxytocin levels account for affective and emotional dysfunction. 26 adult CP-patients and 26 healthy controls matched in sex and age underwent physical exercise, a stimulus previously shown to induce oxytocin release. Baseline and stimulated salivary oxytocin levels, as well as empathy, depression and anxiety scores were measured. Results showed that patients overall did not present with lower baseline oxytocin levels than controls (F[1,30]=0.21, p=0.649), but baseline oxytocin levels were indeed reduced in patients with hypothalamic damage, as assessed by MRI-based grading (F[2,9.79]=4.54, p=0.040). In response to exercise-induced stimulation, all CP-patients showed a blunted oxytocin-release compared to controls (F[1,30]=9.36, p=0.005). DI was not associated with oxytocin levels. Regarding affective function, unexpectedly, higher baseline oxytocin was related to higher trait anxiety (b=2.885, t(43)=2.421, p=0.020, CI[.478; 5.292]); the positive link with higher depression failed to reach statistical significance (b=1.928, t(43)=1.949, p=0.058, CI[-0.070; 3.927]). A blunted oxytocin-release was linked with higher state anxiety (b=-0.133, t(43)=-2.797, p=0.008, CI[-0.230; -0.037]). Empathy was not associated with oxytocin measures. In conclusion, we observed reduced baseline oxytocin levels only in CP-patients with hypothalamic damage. Exercise-induced stimulation de-masked an oxytocin-deficiency in all CP-patients. Baseline

  18. Can Stoss Therapy Be Used in Children with Vitamin D Deficiency or Insufficiency without Rickets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçyiğit, Cemil; Çatlı, Gönül; İnce, Gülberat; Özkan, Elif Büşra; Dündar, Bumin Nuri

    2017-06-01

    Stoss vitamin D treatment has been recommended for its non-skeletal benefits in adults, but there is a lack of data on the optimal dose of vitamin D stoss therapy in children with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency without rickets. This study aimed to compare efficiency/side effects of two different stoss therapy regimens (10 000 IU/kg and 300 000 IU vitamin D3) administered in children with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency without rickets. Sixty-four children who had vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency were studied. A serum 25-hydroxyvitamin-D (25-OH-D) level of 15-20 ng/mL was considered as vitamin D insufficient and <15 ng/mL was considered as vitamin D deficient. The patients were divided into two groups according to the stoss therapy doses they received. Serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-OH-D, parathyroid hormone levels, and spot urine calcium/creatinine ratios before/after treatment were recorded. Wrist radiography and renal ultrasonography were performed. The mean age of the subjects was 10.6±4.4 years. Thirty-two children were treated with a single vitamin D3 dose of 10 000 IU/kg and 32 patients received 300 000 IU. No difference was found in 25-OH-D levels between the two groups at presentation. The mean level of 25-OH-D was higher in the 10 000 IU/kg group at the second week of therapy. There was no difference between the groups at post-treatment weeks 4 and 12. The 25-OH-D was found to be below optimal levels (≥30 ng/mL) in 66.5% and <20 ng/mL in 21.8% of patients at the third month in both groups. None developed hypercalcemia and/or hypercalciuria. Nephrolithiasis was not detected in any patient. This study showed that both doses of stoss therapy used in the treatment of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency are effective and safe. However, an optimal level of 25-OH-D cannot be maintained for more than three months.

  19. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  20. CD36 Protein Influences Myocardial Ca2+ Homeostasis and Phospholipid Metabolism CONDUCTION ANOMALIES IN CD36-DEFICIENT MICE DURING FASTING

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pietka, T. A.; Sulkin, M.S.; Kuda, Ondřej; Wang, W.; Zhou, D.; Yamada, K. A.; Yang, K.; Su, X.; Gross, R. W.; Nerbonne, J. M.; Efimov, I. R.; Abumrad, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 46 (2012), s. 38901-38912 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : calcium * cyclic AMP (cAMP) * heart * phospholipid * phospholipid metabolism * polyunsaturated fatty acids * CD36 deficiency * SERCA2a * sudden death Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2012

  1. Chemokine-like receptor 1 deficiency does not affect the development of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Gruben

    Full Text Available The adipokine chemerin and its receptor, chemokine-like receptor 1 (Cmklr1, are associated with insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which covers a broad spectrum of liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. It is possible that chemerin and/or Cmklr1 exert their effects on these disorders through inflammation, but so far the data have been controversial. To gain further insight into this matter, we studied the effect of whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency on insulin resistance and NAFLD. In view of the primary role of macrophages in hepatic inflammation, we also transplanted bone marrow from Cmklr1 knock-out (Cmklr1-/- mice and wild type (WT mice into low-density lipoprotein receptor knock-out (Ldlr-/- mice, a mouse model for NASH. All mice were fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet containing 21% fat from milk butter and 0.2% cholesterol for 12 weeks. Insulin resistance was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, an insulin tolerance test, and by measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels. Liver pathology was determined by measuring hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, lipid accumulation and the NAFLD activity score (NAS. Whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency did not affect body weight gain or food intake. In addition, we observed no differences between WT and Cmklr1-/- mice for hepatic inflammatory and fibrotic gene expression, immune cell infiltration, lipid accumulation or NAS. In line with this, we detected no differences in insulin resistance. In concordance with whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency, the absence of Cmklr1 in bone marrow-derived cells in Ldlr-/- mice did not affect their insulin resistance or liver pathology. Our results indicate that Cmklr1 is not involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or NAFLD. Thus, we recommend that the associations reported between Cmklr1 and insulin resistance or NAFLD should be interpreted with caution.

  2. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release

  3. Altered balance of vasoactive systems in experimental hypertension: The role of relative NO deficiency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jaroslav; Hojná, Silvie; Kadlecová, Michaela; Dobešová, Zdenka; Rauchová, Hana; Vokurková, Martina; Loukotová, Jana; Pecháňová, Olga; Zicha, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl.1 (2004), s. S23-S34 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/03/0769; GA ČR GP305/02/P066; GA AV ČR IAA7011805; GA MŠk LN00A069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : NO deficiency * reactive oxygen species * calcium influx Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  4. Effect of high calcium concentration influents on enhanced biological phosphorus removal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya Martinez, T.; Aguado Garcia, D.; Ferrer Polo, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the effect of calcium concentration in wastewater on the polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) is investigated as well as its influence in PAO metabolism, specifically in the Y P O4 (ratio between phosphorus release and acetic acid uptake). For this study a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) anaerobic-aerobic was used, in which the PAO enriched biomass was exposed to different calcium concentrations in the influent wastewater. The results indicate that until a given calcium level in the influent wastewater (35 mg Ca/l) the metabolism is not affect, but higher calcium concentrations lead to significant Y P O4 decline. (Author) 18 refs.

  5. Effects of diphosphonate on kidney calcium content and duodenal absorption of 45calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, A.; Cameron, V.

    1978-01-01

    In rats the relationships between EHDP-induced changes in serum calcium concentration, kidney calcium content and duodenal transport of 45 calcium were studied. Body weights and kidney weights were similar in all groups. EHDP administration was associated with an increase in serum calcium concentration and kidney calcium content, and a decrease in duodenal 45 calcium transport. In the EHDP-treated rats, there was a significant negative correlation between kidney calcium concentration and duodenal 45 calcium transport but no correlation between either kidney calcium content and serum calcium concentration (r = 0.116) or between serum calcium concentration and duodenal 45 calcium transport (r = 0.02). Further experiments will be needed to determine whether the demonstrated increase in kidney calcium content induced by EHDP administration was the cause of, or was secondary to, inhibition of 1, 25(OH) 2 D 3 synthesis. (orig./AJ) [de

  6. Effect of lowering dietary calcium intake on fractional whole body calcium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson-Hughes, B.; Stern, D.T.; Shipp, C.C.; Rasmussen, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Although fractional calcium absorption is known to vary inversely with calcium intake, the extent and timing of individual hormonal and calcium absorption responses to altered calcium intake have not been defined. We measured fractional whole body retention of orally ingested 47 Ca, an index of calcium absorption, in nine normal women after they had eaten a 2000-mg calcium diet for 8 weeks and a 300-mg calcium diet for 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. After the diet change, serum intact PTH (32.2% increase; P = 0.005), serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D; 43.8% increase; P = 0.003], and fractional whole body calcium retention (42.8% increase; P = 0.004) increased within 1 week. Although the PTH and calcium retention responses remained fairly constant throughout the low calcium intake period, serum 1,25-(OH)2D concentrations declined toward baseline after week 1. Thus, the late increase in calcium retention may have resulted from calcium absorption that was independent of 1,25-(OH)2D stimulation

  7. Ensuring effective prevention of iodine-deficiency disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Völzke, Henry; Caron, Philippe Jean; Dahl, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Programs initiated to prevent iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) may not remain effective due to changes in government policies, commercial factors, and human behavior that may affect the efficacy of IDD prevention programs in unpredictable directions. Monitoring and outcome studies...... by the lack of centralized standardization procedures. In addition, data on outcomes and the cost of achieving them are needed in order to provide evidence of the beneficial effects of IDD prevention in countries with mild iodine deficiency. CONCLUSION: Monitoring studies can be optimized by including...... in mildly iodine-deficient areas and that it should include populations from regions with different environmental, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds....

  8. Organometallics and quaternary ammonium salts affect calcium ion desorption from lecithin liposome membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, T.E.; Kuczera, J.; Przestalski, S.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to compare the effects of groups of tin and lead organometallic compounds and their mixtures with amphiphilic quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) on the process of calcium ion desorption from lecithin liposome membranes, as dependent on the properties of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts of QAS. In the investigations the method of radioactive labels was applied. Synergism and antagonism in the action of both groups of compounds were found. The effectiveness of the cooperation depended more on chain length of QAS compounds than on the size and polarity of their hydrophobic parts. The most effective of all compounds studied was a the mixture of benzyldimethylammonium chloride in a mixture with tripropyltin. Since the rate of calcium desorption proved to be a good measure of efficacy of biologically active surfactants, it seems that the conclusions reached in this paper may be useful for choosing compounds which are able to decontaminate the environment polluted with heavy metals. (orig.)

  9. Interactions of vitamin A and iodine deficiencies: effects on the pituitary-thyroid axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA) deficiency (VAD) and the iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) affect > 30% of the global population and these deficiencies often coexist in vulnerable groups. VAD has multiple effects on the pituitary-thyroid axis; VA status modulates thyroid gland metabolism, peripheral metabolism of

  10. Sulfur amino acids metabolism in magnesium deficient rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tojo, H.; Kosokawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1984-01-01

    Effect of magnesium (Mg) deficiency on sulfur amino acid metabolism was investigated in rats. Young male rats were fed on the diet containing either 2.26 (deficient rats) or 63.18 mg Mg/100g diet (control and low protein rats) for 2 weeks. A remarkable decrease of body weight gain, serum Mg contents and a slight decreases in the hematological parameters such as Hb, Ht and RBC was observed, while the hepatic Mg and Ca was not significantly changed. Erythema and cramps were observed 5 days after feeding on the Mg-depleted diet. The hepatic glutathione and cysteine contents increased in Mg-deficient rats. However, no significant change of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) activity and taurine content in Mg-deficient rat liver was observed. These results suggest that Mg deficiency affects the utilization and biosynthesis of hepatic glutathione but not the cysteine catabolism.

  11. Effect of cholecalciferol and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol on the intestinal absorption of zinc in the chick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, S.I.; Fullmer, C.S.; Wasserman, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of cholecalciferol on the intestinal absorption of 65 Zn was assessed in zinc-deficient and zinc-replete rachitic chicks, using the in situ ligated loop techniques. Cholecalciferol did not significantly affect 65 Zn absorption in either group, although the synthesis of the intestinal calcium-binding protein (CaBP) in both groups was similar. In an analogous study, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol increased 47 Ca absorption and induced the synthesis of CaBP but exerted no effect on 65 Zn absorption in zinc-deficient rachitic chicks. When fed a diet adequate in cholecalciferol, more CaBP was present in the intestine of the zinc-adequate group than in the zinc-deficient group, possibly due to the greater rate of growth and therefore the greater need for calcium by the former group. These results suggest that cholecalciferol and its most active metabolite do not directly affect zinc absorption and, by inference, that the vitamin D-dependent transport mechanism is not involved in zinc homeostasis, or in the interaction between calcium and zinc

  12. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eHagmeyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies.

  13. Recovery of calcium from the effluent of direct oxide reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, P.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Moore, J.J.; Averill, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the production of plutonium by Direct Oxide Reduction [DOR] process using calcium generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated slat mix [CaCl 2 + 15 wt. pct. CaO] is being carried out to election calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR rector along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in an combined DOR and electrowinning process. The technology will resolve a major contaminated waste disposal problem, besides improving the cost and process efficiency in radioactive metal production. The process is being optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Scattered information is available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the present of calcium oxide. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material. A porous ceramic sheath is being used around the anode to prevent the dissolution of electrowon calcium as oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon. The electrode reactions are affected by the electrolyte composition and its viscosity which varies with time in this process and, therefore, electrochemical impedance is being measured to understand this time-dependent mechanisms

  14. GADS is required for TCR-mediated calcium influx and cytokine release, but not cellular adhesion, in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Zhang, Elizabeth Y; Dinkel, Brittney; Hardy, Daimon; Yankee, Thomas M; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-04-01

    GRB2 related adaptor protein downstream of Shc (GADS) is a member of the GRB2 family of adaptors and is critical for TCR-induced signaling. The current model is that GADS recruits SLP-76 to the LAT complex, which facilitates the phosphorylation of SLP-76, the activation of PLC-γ1, T cell adhesion and cytokine production. However, this model is largely based on studies of disruption of the GADS/SLP-76 interaction and murine T cell differentiation in GADS deficient mice. The role of GADS in mediating TCR-induced signals in human CD4+ T cells has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we have suppressed the expression of GADS in human CD4+ HuT78 T cells. GADS deficient HuT78 T cells displayed similar levels of TCR-induced SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 phosphorylation but exhibited substantial decrease in TCR-induced IL-2 and IFN-γ release. The defect in cytokine production occurred because of impaired calcium mobilization due to reduced recruitment of SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 to the LAT complex. Surprisingly, both GADS deficient HuT78 and GADS deficient primary murine CD8+ T cells had similar TCR-induced adhesion when compared to control T cells. Overall, our results show that GADS is required for calcium influx and cytokine production, but not cellular adhesion, in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the current model for T cell regulation by GADS is incomplete. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  16. Calcium hydroxide isotope effect in calcium isotope enrichment by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.; Shockey, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    The enrichment of calcium isotopes has been observed in ion-exchange chromatography with an aqueous phase of calcium hydroxide and a solid phase of sulfonic acid resin. The band front was exceedingly sharp as a result of the acid-base reaction occuring at the front of the band. Single-stage separation coefficients were found to be epsilon( 44 Ca/ 40 Ca) = 11 x 10 -4 and epsilon( 48 Ca/ 40 Ca) = 18 x 10 -4 . The maximum column separation factors achieved were 1.05 for calcium-44 and 1.09 for calcium-48 with the heavy isotopes enriching in the fluid phase. The calcium isotope effect between fully hydrated aqueous calcium ions and undissociated aqueous calcium hydroxide was estimated. For the calcium-44/40 isotope pair the separation coefficient was 13 x 10 -4 . 20 references, 2 figures

  17. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You can get decent amounts of calcium from baked beans, navy beans, white beans, and others. Canned fish. You're in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. Working Calcium Into Your ...

  18. Effect of curd washing on the properties of reduced-calcium and standard-calcium Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jia; McSweeney, Paul L H; Beresford, Thomas P; Guinee, Timothy P

    2014-10-01

    Washed (W) and nonwashed (NW) variants of standard (SCa) and reduced-calcium (RCa) Cheddar cheeses were made in triplicate, ripened for a 270-d period, and analyzed for composition and changes during maturation. Curd washing was applied to cheeses to give a target level of lactose plus lactic acid in cheese moisture of 3.9 g/100 g in the W cheese, compared with a value of 5.3 g/100 g of lactose plus lactic acid in cheese moisture in the control NW cheeses. The 4 cheese types were denoted standard calcium nonwashed (SCaNW), standard calcium washed (SCaW), reduced-calcium nonwashed (RCaNW), and reduced-calcium washed (RCaW). The mean calcium level was 760 mg/100 g in the SCaNW and SCaW and 660 mg/100 g in the RCaNW and RCaW cheeses. Otherwise the gross composition of all cheeses was similar, each with protein, fat, and moisture levels of ~26, 32, and 36 g/100 g, respectively. Curd washing significantly reduced the mean level of lactic acid in the SCaW cheese and residual lactose in both SCaW and RCaW cheeses. The mean pH of the standard-calcium cheese over the 270-d ripening period increased significantly with curd washing and ripening time, in contrast to the reduced-calcium cheese, which was not affected by the latter parameters. Otherwise curd washing had little effect on changes in populations of starter bacteria or nonstarter lactic acid bacteria, proteolysis, rheology, or color of the cheese during ripening. Descriptive sensory analysis at 270 d indicated that the SCaW cheese had a nuttier, sweeter, less fruity, and less rancid taste than the corresponding SCaNW cheese. In contrast, curd washing was not as effective in discriminating between the RCaW and RCaNW cheeses. The RCaW cheese had a more buttery, caramel odor and flavor, and a more bitter, less sweet, and nutty taste than the SCaW cheese, whereas the RCaNW had a more pungent and less fruity flavor, a less fruity odor, a saltier, more-bitter, and less acidic taste, and a more astringent mouthfeel than

  19. Influence of dietary calcium on bone calcium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.; Roland, D.A. Sr.; Clark, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    In Experiment 1, 10 microCi 45 Ca/day were administered to 125 hens for 10 days. Hens were then allocated to five treatments with calcium levels ranging from .08 to 3.75% of the diet. In Experiment 2, hens with morning oviposition times were randomly allocated to 11 treatments that were periods of time postoviposition ranging from 6 hr to 24 hr, in 2-hr increments (Experiment 2). At the end of each 2-hr period, eggs from 25 hens were removed from the uterus. The 18-, 20-, and 22-hr treatments were replicated three times. In Experiment 3, hens were fed either ad libitum or feed was withheld the last 5 or 6 hr before oviposition. In Experiment 4, hens were fed 10 microCi of 45 Ca for 15 days to label skeletal calcium. Hens were divided into two groups and fed a .08 or 3.75% calcium diet for 2 days. On the second day, 25 hens fed the 3.75% calcium diet were intubated with 7 g of the same diet containing .5 g calcium at 1700, 2100, 0100, 0500, and 0700 hr. The measurements used were egg weight, shell weight, and 45 Ca content of the egg shell. Results indicated a significant linear or quadratic regression of dietary calcium levels on 45 Ca accumulation in eggshells and eggshell weight (Experiment 1). As the calcium level of the diet increased, eggshell weight increased and 45 Ca recovery decreased. Utilization of skeletal calcium for shell formation ranged from 28 to 96%. In Experiment 2, the rate of shell calcification was not constant throughout the calcification process but varied significantly

  20. Parallel Stochastic discrete event simulation of calcium dynamics in neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishlam Patoary, Mohammad Nazrul; Tropper, Carl; McDougal, Robert A; Zhongwei, Lin; Lytton, William W

    2017-09-26

    The intra-cellular calcium signaling pathways of a neuron depends on both biochemical reactions and diffusions. Some quasi-isolated compartments (e.g. spines) are so small and calcium concentrations are so low that one extra molecule diffusing in by chance can make a nontrivial difference in its concentration (percentage-wise). These rare events can affect dynamics discretely in such way that they cannot be evaluated by a deterministic simulation. Stochastic models of such a system provide a more detailed understanding of these systems than existing deterministic models because they capture their behavior at a molecular level. Our research focuses on the development of a high performance parallel discrete event simulation environment, Neuron Time Warp (NTW), which is intended for use in the parallel simulation of stochastic reaction-diffusion systems such as intra-calcium signaling. NTW is integrated with NEURON, a simulator which is widely used within the neuroscience community. We simulate two models, a calcium buffer and a calcium wave model. The calcium buffer model is employed in order to verify the correctness and performance of NTW by comparing it to a serial deterministic simulation in NEURON. We also derived a discrete event calcium wave model from a deterministic model using the stochastic IP3R structure.

  1. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  2. Strontium hydroxyapatite and strontium carbonate as templates for the precipitation of calcium-phosphates in the absence and presence of fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternitzke, Vanessa; Janousch, Markus; Heeb, Michèle B.; Hering, Janet G.; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation of calcium-phosphates on calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 or HAP) in the presence and absence of fluoride is important in the formation of bone and teeth, protection against tooth decay, dental and skeletal fluorosis and defluoridation of drinking water. Strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr10(PO4)6(OH)2 or SrHAP) and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) were used as calcium-free seed templates in precipitation experiments conducted with varying initial calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) or calcium-to-phosphate-to-fluoride (Ca/P/F) ratios. Suspensions of SrHAP or SrCO3 seed templates (which were calcium-limited for both templates and phosphate-limited in the case of SrCO3) were reacted at pH 7.3 (25 °C) over 3 days. The resulting solids were examined with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Calcium apatite was the predominant phase identified by all techniques independent of the added Ca/P ratios and of the presence of fluoride. It was not possible to make an unambiguous distinction between HAP and fluorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6F2, FAP). The apatite was calcium-deficient and probably contained some strontium.

  3. Ryanodine receptor gating controls generation of diastolic calcium waves in cardiac myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovič, Pavol; Valent, Ivan; Cocherová, Elena; Pavelková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating in the initiation and propagation of calcium waves was investigated using a mathematical model comprising a stochastic description of RyR gating and a deterministic description of calcium diffusion and sequestration. We used a one-dimensional array of equidistantly spaced RyR clusters, representing the confocal scanning line, to simulate the formation of calcium sparks. Our model provided an excellent description of the calcium dependence of the frequency of diastolic calcium sparks and of the increased tendency for the production of calcium waves after a decrease in cytosolic calcium buffering. We developed a hypothesis relating changes in the propensity to form calcium waves to changes of RyR gating and tested it by simulation. With a realistic RyR gating model, increased ability of RyR to be activated by Ca2+ strongly increased the propensity for generation of calcium waves at low (0.05–0.1-µM) calcium concentrations but only slightly at high (0.2–0.4-µM) calcium concentrations. Changes in RyR gating altered calcium wave formation by changing the calcium sensitivity of spontaneous calcium spark activation and/or the average number of open RyRs in spontaneous calcium sparks. Gating changes that did not affect RyR activation by Ca2+ had only a weak effect on the propensity to form calcium waves, even if they strongly increased calcium spark frequency. Calcium waves induced by modulating the properties of the RyR activation site could be suppressed by inhibiting the spontaneous opening of the RyR. These data can explain the increased tendency for production of calcium waves under conditions when RyR gating is altered in cardiac diseases. PMID:26009544

  4. Status of serum vitamin D and calcium levels in women of reproductive age in national capital territory of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nighat Yaseen Sofi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In India, Vitamin D deficiency is a major public health problem, associated with lack of sunlight exposure in spite of abundant sunshine usually accompanied by reduced dietary intake. In women of reproductive age, Vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Aims: The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to evaluate the levels of serum Vitamin D 25(OH D and calcium in women of reproductive age from India. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was carried on a total of 224 healthy nonpregnant and nonlactating women in the reproductive age group of 20–49 years. Materials and Methods: Demographic, socioeconomic class, and biochemical parameters for the estimation of serum 25(OHD and calcium levels in women of reproductive age were studied. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20.0 was utilized for conducting the statistical analysis of the data. Results: Vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/ml was present in 88% of women. Women from middle socioeconomic class had the lowest mean serum 25(OH D levels (9.6 ± 6 ng/ml as compared to women from upper middle (11.4 ± 8 ng/ml, lower (11.2 ± 8 ng/ml, and upper (10 ± 8.6 ng/ml socioeconomic class. Serum calcium levels were found in the normal range of 8.5–10.5 mg/dl for all the study subjects. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D among women of reproductive age. These women may possibly have a higher risk of development of osteoporosis and pregnancy-related complications in future life.

  5. Carnitine palmityl transferase I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Aqeel, A. I.; Rashed, M. S.; Ruiter, J. P.; Al-Husseini, H. F.; Al-Amoudi, M. S.; Wanders, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Carnitine palmityl transferase I is the key enzyme in the carnitine dependent transport of long chain fatty acids across the mitochondrial inner membrane and its deficiency results in a decrease rate of fatty acids beta-oxidation with decreased energy production. We reported a family of 3 affected

  6. Iron mediates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent stimulation of calcium-induced pathways and hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Pablo; Humeres, Alexis; Elgueta, Claudio; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Núñez, Marco T

    2011-04-15

    Iron deficiency hinders hippocampus-dependent learning processes and impairs cognitive performance, but current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique role of iron in neuronal function is sparse. Here, we investigated the participation of iron on calcium signal generation and ERK1/2 stimulation induced by the glutamate agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and the effects of iron addition/chelation on hippocampal basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). Addition of NMDA to primary hippocampal cultures elicited persistent calcium signals that required functional NMDA receptors and were independent of calcium influx through L-type calcium channels or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors; NMDA also promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Iron chelation with desferrioxamine or inhibition of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium release with ryanodine-reduced calcium signal duration and prevented NMDA-induced ERK1/2 activation. Iron addition to hippocampal neurons readily increased the intracellular labile iron pool and stimulated reactive oxygen species production; the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or the hydroxyl radical trapper MCI-186 prevented these responses. Iron addition to primary hippocampal cultures kept in calcium-free medium elicited calcium signals and stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation; RyR inhibition abolished these effects. Iron chelation decreased basal synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices, inhibited iron-induced synaptic stimulation, and impaired sustained LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by strong stimulation. In contrast, iron addition facilitated sustained LTP induction after suboptimal tetanic stimulation. Together, these results suggest that hippocampal neurons require iron to generate RyR-mediated calcium signals after NMDA receptor stimulation, which in turn promotes ERK1/2 activation, an essential step of sustained LTP.

  7. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca2+ signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders. PMID:26296072

  8. Awareness regarding the importance of calcium and vitamin D among the undergraduate pharmacy students in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Riaz; Huda, Naz Hasan; Jhanker, Yeakuty Marzan; Jesmeen, Tasbira; Imam, Mohammad Zafar; Akter, Saleha

    2013-04-05

    Calcium and vitamin D are two important micronutrients required for maintaining proper bone health. Previous works intended to determine the status of these micronutrients in local population have reported that the people in Bangladesh are at high risk of calcium insufficiency and hypovitaminosis D related health complications. Lack of awareness and insufficient knowledge of the essentiality of these two nutrients are assumed to cause this problem in Bangladesh. The present study was designed and conducted to establish a basic understanding on the level of gap of knowledge and awareness among pharmacy students at undergraduate level in Bangladesh. A total of 713 students of Bachelor of Pharmacy course participated in the study. The students were asked about basic idea related to calcium and vitamin D and the disorders due to their deficiency, name of common foods containing calcium and vitamin D, their perception regarding the essentiality of the said nutrients etc. It was found that most of the students were familiar with the importance of calcium (98.9%) and vitamin D (99.3%) in bone health. 82.2% students know about the term osteoporosis. Unfortunately, 10.7% and 18.8% students failed to mention at least one food that is rich in calcium and vitamin D, respectively. Most of the students got familiar about the nutrients from their teachers (48.9%) and textbooks (32.8%). Being a student of pharmacy, the students should have more comprehensive knowledge about calcium and vitamin D. The present study indicates that the pharmacy students have lack of knowledge about calcium and vitamin D and thus it can be clearly predicted that the condition of general people may be worse.

  9. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennick, A.; McLaughlin, A.C.; Grey, A.A.; Madapallimattam, G.

    1981-01-01

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing 45 Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH 2 -terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 μM and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 μM and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 μM. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that β-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids

  10. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2014-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers-which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal-has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca(2+) currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 pA and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 μM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  11. Zinc transporter 7 deficiency affects lipid synthesis in adipocytes by inhibiting insulin-dependent Akt activity and glucose uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mice deficient for zinc transporter 7 (Znt7) are mildly zinc deficient, accompanied with low body weight gain and body fat accumulation. To investigate the underlying mechanism of Znt7 deficiency in body adiposity, we investigated fatty acid composition and insulin sensitivity in visceral (epididyma...

  12. Storage Pool Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  13. Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Three Calcium Phosphate on Enamel Microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghgou, En Hr; Haghgoo, Roza; Roholahi, Mohamad R; Ghorbani, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of casein phos-phopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and three calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP and TCP) on increasing the microhardness of human enamel after induction of erosion. A total of 26 healthy human-impacted third molar teeth were chosen, and their hardness measured using a microhardness testing machine. The samples were immersed in Coca Cola (pH = 4.7) for 8 minutes. Then, micro-hardness was measured again, and these samples were randomly divided into four groups (two control groups and two experimental groups). (1) Negative control group: Artificial saliva was used for 10 minutes, (2) positive control group: Fluoride gel was used for 10 minutes, (3) β-TCP group: TCP was used for 10 minutes, (4) CCP-ACP group: CCP-ACP was used for 10 minutes. The final microhardness of those samples was measured, and the changes in microhardness of teeth within group and between groups were analyzed using the paired and analysis of variance tests respectively. Results were considered statistically significant at a level of p < 0.05. No significant difference was observed in microhard-ness between CPP-ACP group and TCP group (p = 0.368) during the time microhardness significantly dropped after soaking in soda. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and TCP increased the microhardness of teeth. The increase in hardness in the TCP group was higher than in the CPP-ACP group, but this difference was not significant (p = 0.36). Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and TCP can affect the remineralization of erosive lesions.

  14. Large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channels prevent dendritic excitability in neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhassine, Narimane; Berger, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channels (BK channels) are homogeneously distributed along the somatodendritic axis of layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat somatosensory cortex. The relevance of this conductance for dendritic calcium electrogenesis was studied in acute brain slices using somatodendritic patch clamp recordings and calcium imaging. BK channel activation reduces the occurrence of dendritic calcium spikes. This is reflected in an increased critical frequency of somatic spikes necessary to activate the distal initiation zone. Whilst BK channels repolarise the somatic spike, they dampen it only in the distal dendrite. Their activation reduces dendritic calcium influx via glutamate receptors. Furthermore, they prevent dendritic calcium electrogenesis and subsequent somatic burst discharges. However, the time window for coincident somatic action potential and dendritic input to elicit dendritic calcium events is not influenced by BK channels. Thus, BK channel activation in layer 5 pyramidal neurons affects cellular excitability primarily by establishing a high threshold at the distal action potential initiation zone.

  15. Magnesium deficiency and increased inflammation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen FH

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Forrest H Nielsen Research Nutritionist Consultant, Grand Forks, ND, USA Abstract: Animal studies have shown that magnesium deficiency induces an inflammatory response that results in leukocyte and macrophage activation, release of inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins, and excessive production of free radicals. Animal and in vitro studies indicate that the primary mechanism through which magnesium deficiency has this effect is through increasing cellular Ca2+, which is the signal that results in the priming of cells to give the inflammatory response. Primary pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL-1; the messenger cytokine IL-6; cytokine responders E-selectin, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1; and acute-phase reactants C-reactive protein and fibrinogen have been determined to associate magnesium deficiency with chronic low-grade inflammation (inflammatory stress. When magnesium dietary intake, supplementation, and/or serum concentration suggest/s the presence of magnesium deficiency, it often is associated with low-grade inflammation and/or with pathological conditions for which inflammatory stress is considered a risk factor. When magnesium intake, supplementation, and/or serum concentration suggest/s an adequate status, magnesium generally has not been found to significantly affect markers of chronic low-grade inflammation or chronic disease. The consistency of these findings can be modified by other nutritional and metabolic factors that affect inflammatory and oxidative stress. In spite of this, findings to date provide convincing evidence that magnesium deficiency is a significant contributor to chronic low-grade inflammation that is a risk factor for a variety of pathological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Because magnesium deficiency commonly occurs in countries where foods rich in magnesium are not consumed in

  16. Deficiency of RITA results in multiple mitotic defects by affecting microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhäuser, K; Klöble, P; Kreis, N-N; Ritter, A; Friemel, A; Roth, S; Reichel, J M; Michaelis, J; Rieger, M A; Louwen, F; Oswald, F; Yuan, J

    2017-04-01

    Deregulation of mitotic microtubule (MT) dynamics results in defective spindle assembly and chromosome missegregation, leading further to chromosome instability, a hallmark of tumor cells. RBP-J interacting and tubulin-associated protein (RITA) has been identified as a negative regulator of the Notch signaling pathway. Intriguingly, deregulated RITA is involved in primary hepatocellular carcinoma and other malignant entities. We were interested in the potential molecular mechanisms behind its involvement. We show here that RITA binds to tubulin and localizes to various mitotic MT structures. RITA coats MTs and affects their structures in vitro as well as in vivo. Tumor cell lines deficient of RITA display increased acetylated α-tubulin, enhanced MT stability and reduced MT dynamics, accompanied by multiple mitotic defects, including chromosome misalignment and segregation errors. Re-expression of wild-type RITA, but not RITA Δtub ineffectively binding to tubulin, restores the phenotypes, suggesting that the role of RITA in MT modulation is mediated via its interaction with tubulin. Mechanistically, RITA interacts with tubulin/histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and its suppression decreases the binding of the deacetylase HDAC6 to tubulin/MTs. Furthermore, the mitotic defects and increased MT stability are also observed in RITA -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts. RITA has thus a novel role in modulating MT dynamics and its deregulation results in erroneous chromosome segregation, one of the major reasons for chromosome instability in tumor cells.

  17. ECONOMICAL BASIS TO ADDRESS MICRONUTRIENT DEFICIENCIES IN DEVELOPING WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirul Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition has been called by economists at the World Bank as the “non-human face” of poverty,1 Adults who were malnourished as children earn at least 20% less on average than those who weren’t , 2.Malnutrition is often caused by underlying economics, i.e. the lack of money. Economics is very important in regards to malnutrition; it allows an individual to purchase nutrients. In many places around the world, a lack of money prevents the purchase of a variety of foods. The lack in variety usually leads to micronutrient malnutrition. Economics also decides the production of food in all countries around the world and the ability of a country to overcome difficult times. Thus economics affects ALL people at ALL levels of society, 3.Micronutrient deficiencies also known as ‘hidden hunger’ are determining and aggravating factors for health status and quality of life. It is estimated half of anaemia cases are due to iron deficiency , 4.  Almost half of children in low- and middle-income countries – 47% of under-fives are affected by anaemia, impairing cognitive and physical development,5. Iodine deficiency is the greatest single cause of mental retardation and brain damage. Coincidently,  the number of countries in which iodine-deficiency disorders were considered a public health concern reduced by 43% between 1993 and 2007,6.  Zinc deficiency affects children’s health and physical growth; it is also essential for mothers during pregnancy. It is estimated to cause 4% of deaths in pre-school aged children in lower-income countries. 7 . The Global Burden of Disease estimates showed that among the 26 major risk factors of the global burden of disease,8 iron deficiency ranks ninth overall, zinc deficiency is eleventh, and vitamin A deficiency, is thirteenth. Annually each developing country of the world are losing over millions or billions US $ in Gross Domestic Product (GDP to vitamins and minerals deficiencies. But scaling up

  18. Genetics Home Reference: myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme is an inherited disorder that primarily affects muscles ...

  19. Research of calcium oxide hydration in calcium nitrate solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Oliynyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mineral fertilizers are one of the important factors of agriculture intensification and increasing of food products quantity. The volume of fertilizers production and its domestic consumption in Ukraine indicate that nitrogen fertilizer using only comes nearer to the required number of science-based. One of the most widespread artificial fertilizers is the calcium nitrate. Aim: The aim is to study and theoretically substantiate the processes occurring in the preparation of suspensions of calcium hydroxide Са(ОН2 in solution of calcium nitrate Ca(NО32. Materials and Methods: The technical calcium oxide (quicklime DSTU BV.2.7-90-99, solutions of calcium nitrate of 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40% Ca(NО32 concentrations were used in the work. The content of lime in the preparation of a suspension in the solution changed (in terms of calcium oxide CaO from 150 g/dm3 to the maximum possible. Each of these solutions saturated at 40°С in lime to maximum concentration. Suitable for use in these experiments and in the technology of calcium nitrate obtaining are considered the solutions (suspensions that within 12 hours did not lose their mobility (transportability. Results: The experimental results show that increasing of the concentration of calcium nitrate in solution within the range 15...40%, the amount of lime that you can put into the solution without loss of transportability decreases. Further increasing of lime quantity in solutions concentrations causes to its solidifying, loss of mobility (transportability. Calculations showed that in the presence of calcium nitrate the solubility of Са(ОН2 is reduced nearly by order that can lead to the formation of calcium oxide CaO the solid phase Са(ОН2 on the surface, which also can form hydrogen bonds with the components of the solution. As the probability of formation of hydrogen bonds in solutions is high, there is a possibility of formation of clusters.

  20. Calcium and vitamin D in post menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and Vitamin D are widely used therapies for Osteoporosis. Vitamin D is not a vitamin in true sense since it is produced in response to the action of sunlight on skin. Vitamin D has multiple roles in the body, not all of them well-understood. Vitamin D supplementation must be considered a form of hormone replacement therapy. Therefore it raises all the questions about efficacy, dose, and side effects. The Efficacy of use of Calcium and Vitamin D in all post menopausal women in terms of the prevention of fracture is uncertain. The Annual worldwide sales of these supplements have been several billion dollars. The variation of the results from various studies of Calcium and Vitamin D supplementation in elderly women suggest that benefit of calcium plus vitamin D on bone mineral density or the risk of fracture is small and may vary from group to group and baseline Vitamin D status. Women taking supplemental vitamin D and calcium have a statistically increased incidence of renal stones, according to evidence from the Women′s Health Initiative. Studies have shown association between calcium use and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In a recent review of evidence from 6 randomized trials evaluating the use of vitamin D and calcium to prevent fractures in postmenopausal women who are not living in a nursing home or other institution, the United States Preventive Task Force (USPTF found no evidence of a benefit from supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D3 and 1000 mg or less of calcium. Also in a report from institute of Medicine Committee, there was insufficient evidence, particularly from randomized trials, that vitamin D treatment affected the risk of non skeletal outcomes like risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, infections, autoimmune disease, and other extra skeletal outcomes.

  1. Reduced metastasis of transgenic mammary cancer in urokinase-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Lund, L.R.; Rygaard, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    A prominent phenotype of plasmin deficiency in mice is reduced metastasis in the MMTV-PymT transgenic breast cancer model. Proteolytically active plasmin is generated from inactive plasminogen by one of 2 activators, uPA or tPA. We now find that uPA deficiency alone significantly reduces metastasis...... >7-fold in the MMTV-PymT model. We studied a cohort of 55 MMTV-PymT transgenic mice, either uPA-deficient or wild-type controls. Tumor incidence, latency, growth rate and final primary tumor burden were not significantly affected by uPA deficiency. In contrast, average lung metastasis volume...

  2. Effects of early vitamin D deficiency rickets on bone and dental health, growth and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerofsky, Melissa; Ryder, Mark; Bhatia, Suruchi; Stephensen, Charles B; King, Janet; Fung, Ellen B

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with adverse health outcomes, including impaired bone growth, gingival inflammation and increased risk for autoimmune disease, but the relationship between vitamin D deficiency rickets in childhood and long-term health has not been studied. In this study, we assessed the effect of early vitamin D deficiency on growth, bone density, dental health and immune function in later childhood to determine if children previously diagnosed with rickets were at greater risk of adverse health outcomes compared with healthy children. We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, parathyroid hormone, bone mineral density, anthropometric measures, dietary habits, dental health, general health history, and markers of inflammation in 14 previously diagnosed rickets case children at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Center. We compared the findings in the rickets cases with 11 healthy children selected from the population of CHO staff families. Fourteen mothers of the rickets cases, five siblings of the rickets cases, and seven mothers of healthy children also participated. Children diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency rickets had a greater risk of fracture, greater prevalence of asthma, and more dental enamel defects compared with healthy children. Given the widespread actions of vitamin D, it is likely that early-life vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk of disease later in childhood. Further assessment of the long-term health effects of early deficiency is necessary to make appropriate dietary recommendations for infants at risk of deficiency. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from calcium silicates and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teir, Sebastian; Eloneva, Sanni; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the pulp and paper industry by calcium carbonation are presented. The current precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production uses mined, crushed calcium carbonate as raw materials. If calcium silicates were used instead, carbon dioxide emissions from the calcination of carbonates would be eliminated. In Finland, there could, thus, be a potential for eliminating 200 kt of carbon dioxide emissions per year, considering only the PCC used in the pulp and paper industry. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility to produce PCC from calcium silicates and the potential to replace calcium carbonate as the raw material was made. Calcium carbonate can be manufactured from calcium silicates by various methods, but only a few have been experimentally verified. The possibility and feasibility of these methods as a replacement for the current PCC production process was studied by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using HSC software and process modelling using Aspen Plus[reg]. The results from the process modelling showed that a process that uses acetic acid for extraction of the calcium ions is a high potential option for sequestering carbon dioxide by mineral carbonation. The main obstacle seems to be the limited availability and relatively high price of wollastonite, which is a mineral with high calcium silicate content. An alternative is to use the more common, but also more complex, basalt rock instead

  4. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  5. Variations in Urine Calcium Isotope: Composition Reflect Changes in Bone Mineral Balance in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulan, Joseph; Anbar, Ariel; Bullen, Thomas; Puzas, J. Edward; Shackelford, Linda; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in bone mineral balance cause rapid and systematic changes in the calcium isotope composition of human urine. Urine from subjects in a 17 week bed rest study was analyzed for calcium isotopic composition. Comparison of isotopic data with measurements of bone mineral density and metabolic markers of bone metabolism indicates the calcium isotope composition of urine reflects changes in bone mineral balance. Urine calcium isotope composition probably is affected by both bone metabolism and renal processes. Calcium isotope. analysis of urine and other tissues may provide information on bone mineral balance that is in important respects better than that available from other techniques, and illustrates the usefulness of applying geochemical techniques to biomedical problems.

  6. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    offers several advantages over standard treatment options: calcium is inexpensive and may readily be applied without special precautions, as is the case with cytostatic drugs. Therefore, details on the use of calcium electroporation are essential for carrying out clinical trials comparing calcium...

  7. Transcellular transport of calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terepka, A R; Coleman, J R; Armbrecht, H J; Gunter, T E

    1976-01-01

    Studies of two calcium transporting epithelia, embryonic chick chorioallantoic membrane and the small intestine of rat and chick, have strongly suggested that the transfer of calcium across a cell involves processes distinctly different from intracellular calcium ion regulation. In the proposed model, transcellular calcium transport is considered as a specialized process developed only by certain cells in those tissues charged with bulk transfer of calcium. The overall effect of the endocytotic mechanism is bulk calcium movement across a cell, protection of mitochondria from exposure to high concentrations of calcium, and the avoidance of wide and potentially toxic fluctuations in cytosol ionic calcium levels. (MFB)

  8. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children with cholestasis in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Bahram; Najafi, Mehri; Farahmand, Fateme; Motamed, Farzaneh; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadi, Jamshid; Eshagh Roze, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children with cholestatic liver diseases. Forty eight children with established cholestatic liver disease who referred to gastrointestinal clinic of Children Medical Center (Tehran, Iran) between April 2010 and March 2011 were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Laboratory analysis including calcium, phosphate, albumin, total and direct bilirubin, aminotransferases, alkalinephosphatase (ALP), prothrombin time (PT), parathyroid hormone (PTH), total protein determined by routine laboratory techniques. Mean age of participants was 299.1 ± 676.8 days (range 2-3600 days) whereas twenty one were female (43.8%) and 27 (56.3%) were male. Twenty two (45.8%) had evidences of rickets in X-ray evaluation. Three children with rickets and two with normal X-ray had vitamin D deficiency while ten in rickets group and 16 in normal group had vitamin D insufficiency. The main underlying diseases were anatomical biliary atresia in cases with rickets and idiopathic in other group. Rickets and vitamin D deficiency should be considered in chronic cholestatic children.

  9. Characterization of the effects of macronutrient deficiencies in mangabeira seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layara Alexandre Bessa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the mineral nutrition requirements of mangabeira (Hancornia speciosa Gomes is relatively scarce and rudimentary because there is a lack of consistent data concerning its nutritional demands at different developmental stages. The aim of this research was to characterize the visual symptoms of macronutrient deficiencies and to evaluate the effects of these deficiencies on the growth, the production of dry matter, and the leaf content of mangabeira. To achieve this goal, a greenhouse experiment was conducted at the Goiano Federal Institute (Instituto Federal Goiano in Rio Verde - GO, from January to June 2011 in which mangabeira plants were arranged in a random block design and grown in nutrient solutions. This experiment was replicated four times. The plants were treated with either a complete nutrient solution or a nutrient solution from which the individual macronutrient of interest (nitrogen (N, phosphorous (P, potassium (K, magnesium (Mg, calcium (Ca, or sulfur (S had been omitted. The omission of a macronutrient from the nutrient solution resulted in morphological alterations that were characteristic symptoms of the particular nutritional deficiency and caused decreases in growth and dry matter mass production. The accumulation of macronutrients displayed the following order in mangabeira leaves: N>K>Ca>P>S>Mg.

  10. Serum calcium and magnesium level in dairy cows at calving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Pulimeno

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Milk fever and hypocalcaemia are post-partum metabolic diseases affecting about 6% of dairy cows and are due to a fail of the homeostatic metabolism regulating the calcium blood level around 9 and 10mg/100mL. The calcium drainage to the mammary gland along with the reduced capacity of the animal to mobilize calcium from bone reserve lead to a drop of the calcium blood level under 5-6mg/100mL with paresis like clinical symptoms known as milk fever. The incidence of the clinical milk fever is low, however the occurrence of mild hypocalcaemia (subclinical could be as high as 15- 20% within few days after calving, particularly in multiparous cows. The hypocalcaemia status as for the reduced bone calcium mobilization and intestinal absorption leads to reduced feed intake and make it a good start for ketosis, retained placenta, displaced abomasums and mastitis problems (Beede, 1991. The acid-base balance of the cow in the late pregnancy is determinant for hypocalcaemia............

  11. Bioavailability of essential trace elements in the presence of phytate, fiber and calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, A.G.; Mohseni, S.G.; Gharib, M.

    2006-01-01

    Bioavailability and/or homeostasis of some essential trace elements such as zinc, iron, etc., in the presence of phytate, fiber and calcium are subject to alteration. These factors were measured in this study for Iranian diets in a frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP). However, the most prominent dietary factor in this regard is phytate. The phytate effect on zinc homeostasis is a chemical phenomenon dependent physiologically on pH in the gastrointestinal tract at or near the sites of absorption. Calcium is a synergistic coprecipitating factor in the complexation of zinc by phytate. Fiber has also a tendency to absorb insoluble compounds in gastrointestinal tract including zinc, iron and many other trace elements. One of the most known clinical observations regarding zinc deficiency was found in the rural area of the Fars province of Iran in the late 1950s at Shiraz University. However, the molar ratio of [phytate] : [zinc] and [calcium] [phytate] : [zinc] in Iranian Diets in a recent study are 7-17 and 150-800, respectively. The critical ratios of [phytate] : [zinc] of 10 or less will provide adequate zinc to sustain homeostasis. (author)

  12. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of human nails to find correlation between nutrients and vitamin D deficiency using LIBS and ICP-AES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almessiere, M A; Altuwiriqi, R; Gondal, M A; AlDakheel, R K; Alotaibi, H F

    2018-08-01

    In this work, we analysed human fingernails of people who suffer from vitamin D deficiency using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy(LIBS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES)techniques. The measurements have been conducted on 71 nail samples collected randomly from volunteers of different genders and ages ranged between 20 and 50 years. The main aim of this study is to find the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and the intensity of some dominated lines in the LIBS spectra. A LIBS spectrum consists of dominant lines of fifteen elements including calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, titanium, iron, chloride, sulphur, copper, chromium, zinc, nitrogen, phosphor, and oxygen. By recording the spectrum in specific ranges and focusing on calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium, we found a correlation between the intensity of the potassium (K) lines at (766.5 and 769.9 nm)and vitamin D level in both age groups (20 and 25 years old), with weak correlation for the calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sodium (Na) lines. To verify the validity of the LIBS results, we analysed the nail samples with ICP, a standard analytical technique. The elements detected with our LIBS technique are in a good agreement with those identified by ICP-AES. From the health and physiological perspectives, the LIBS system, which is used for spectral analysis in this work, is appropriate for diagnostic purposes such as to find the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and potassium content, especially for hypertensive patients who simultaneously take potassium-based medication and vitamin D supplement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Practical Approach to Vitamin D Deficiency and Rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgrove, Jeremy; Shaw, Nick J

    2015-01-01

    Rickets is a condition in which there is failure of the normal mineralisation (osteomalacia) of growing bone. Whilst osteomalacia may be present in adults, rickets cannot occur. It is generally caused by a lack of mineral supply, which can either occur as a result of the deficiency of calcium (calciopaenic rickets, now known as parathyroid hormone-dependent rickets) or of phosphate (phosphopaenic rickets, now called FGF23-dependent rickets). Renal disorders may also interfere with the process of mineralisation and cause rickets. Only parathyroid hormone-dependent rickets and distal renal tubular disorders will be discussed in this chapter. The most common cause of rickets is still vitamin D deficiency, which is also responsible for other problems. Disorders of vitamin D metabolism or responsiveness may also cause similar issues. Distal renal tubular acidosis may also be caused by a variety of metabolic errors similar to those of osteoclasts. One form of distal renal tubular acidosis also causes a type of osteopetrosis. This chapter describes these conditions in detail and sets out a logical approach for treatment. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  15. Calcium balance in young adults on a vegan and lactovegetarian diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlenberg-Mueller, Kathrin; Raschka, Ladislav

    2003-01-01

    For people in Western countries, the vegan diet has the advantage of low energy intake, but the calcium status of this strictly plant-based diet is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the calcium balance of individuals on a vegan diet in comparison with a lactovegetarian diet in a short-term investigation. Seven women and one man, ranging in age from 19 to 24 years, received during the first 10 days a vegan diet based on plant foods and calcium-rich mineral water and a lactovegetarian diet during the following 10 days. Portion size was adapted to the subjects' individual energy requirements. Calcium status was assessed by means of calcium intake in food and calcium output in feces and urine as measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In addition, deoxypyridinoline was measured in urine as a marker of bone resorption. The results show a significantly smaller daily calcium intake with an average of 843 +/- 140 mg in the vegan versus 1322 +/- 303 mg in the lactovegetarian diet. Apparent calcium absorption rates were calculated as 26% +/- 15% in the vegan and 24% +/- 8% in the lactovegetarian group (NS). The calcium balance was positive both in the vegan diet (119 +/- 113 mg/day) and in the lactovegetarian diet (211 +/- 136 mg/day) (NS). Deoxypyridinoline excretion showed no significant difference between the two diets (105 +/- 31 and 98 +/- 23 nmol/day). The present results indicate that calcium balance and a marker of bone turnover are not affected significantly when calcium is provided either solely by plant foods or by a diet including dairy products, despite the significantly different calcium intake levels in the diets. We conclude that a well-selected vegan diet maintains calcium status, at least for a short-term period.

  16. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  17. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes.

  18. Iron and zinc deficiencies in China: existing problems and possible solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guansheng Ma,

    2007-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies affect the health and development of the population of China as well as its socia] and economic development. Iron and zinc deficiencies are quite prevalent, while insufficient intake and poor bioavailability are the major causes. Phytate is be!ieved to bc a potent

  19. Effect of Calcium Ions on the Disintegration of Enteric-Coated Solid Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gousous, Jozef; Langguth, Peter

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effect of calcium ions on the disintegration of enteric-coated dosage forms, disintegration testing was performed on enteric-coated aspirin tablets in the presence and absence of calcium in the test media. The results show that the presence of calcium ions retards the disintegration of enteric-coated dosage forms. This finding, which has not been reported in scientific literature, sheds light on the importance of conducting well-designed detailed investigations into the potential of calcium from dietary sources, calcium supplements, antacids, and/or phosphate binders affecting the absorption of drugs formulated into enteric-coated dosage forms. Moreover, it shows the necessity to investigate the potential of the occurrence of additional nutrient-excipient interactions. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate formation from tricalcium aluminate, calcium sulfate and calcium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xuerun; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Qianqian; Pan, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    The formation kinetics of tricalcium aluminate (C 3 A) and calcium sulfate yielding calcium sulfoaluminate (C 4 A 3 $) and the decomposition kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate were investigated by sintering a mixture of synthetic C 3 A and gypsum. The quantitative analysis of the phase composition was performed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis using the Rietveld method. The results showed that the formation reaction 3Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 + CaSO 4 → Ca 4 Al 6 O 12 (SO 4 ) + 6CaO was the primary reaction 4 Al 6 O 12 (SO 4 ) + 10CaO → 6Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 + 2SO 2 ↑ + O 2 ↑ primarily occurred beyond 1350 °C with an activation energy of 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. The optimal formation region for C 4 A 3 $ was from 1150 °C to 1350 °C and from 6 h to 1 h, which could provide useful information on the formation of C 4 A 3 $ containing clinkers. The Jander diffusion model was feasible for the formation and decomposition of calcium sulfoaluminate. Ca 2+ and SO 4 2− were the diffusive species in both the formation and decomposition reactions. -- Highlights: •Formation and decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate were studied. •Decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate combined CaO and yielded C 3 A. •Activation energy for formation was 231 ± 42 kJ/mol. •Activation energy for decomposition was 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. •Both the formation and decomposition were controlled by diffusion

  1. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations, e.g. magnesium. Its free concentration within cells can thus be maintained at the very low levels demanded by the signaling function. A large cadre of proteins has evolved to bind or transport calcium. They all contribute to buffer it within cells, but a number of them also decode its message for the benefit of the target. The most important of these “calcium sensors” are the EF-hand proteins. Calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Although essential to the correct functioning of cell processes, if not carefully controlled spatially and temporally within cells, it generates variously severe cell dysfunctions, and even cell death. PMID:27462077

  2. Codissolution of calcium hydrogenphosphate and sodium hydrogencitrate in water. Spontaneous supersaturation of calcium citrate increasing calcium bioavailability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Danielsen, Bente Pia; Garcia, André Castilho

    2018-01-01

    The sparingly soluble calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate, co-dissolving in water during dissolution of freely soluble sodium hydrogencitrate sesquihydrate as caused by proton transfer from hydrogencitrate to hydrogenphosphate, was found to form homogenous solutions supersaturated by a factor up...... to 8 in calcium citrate tetrahydrate. A critical hydrogencitrate concentration for formation of homogeneous solutions was found to depend linearly on dissolved calcium hydrogenphosphate: [HCitr2-] = 14[CaHPO4] - 0.05 at 25 °C. The lag phase for precipitation of calcium citrate tetrahydrate......, as identified from FT-IR spectra, from these spontaneously formed supersaturated solutions was several hours, and the time to reach solubility equilibrium was several days. Initial calcium ion activity was found to be almost independent of the degree of supersaturation as determined electrochemically...

  3. Effect of calcium on the salt tolerance of different wheat (triticum aestivum l.) genotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, M.; Saqib, M.; Akhtar, J.

    2012-01-01

    In saline soil conditions the availability and uptake of Ca/sup 2+/ is reduced that results in the loss of membrane integrity and other disorders associated with Ca/sup 2+/ deficiency in plants. A wheat genotype efficient in uptake and utilization of calcium under saline conditions may be better able to withstand saline conditions in the field. Very little information is available on wheat response to salinity and low Ca/sup 2+/ as screening of wheat genotypes has usually been done against salinity alone. The present study was designed to evaluate the performance of different wheat genotypes against salinity at low and adequate calcium supply. The experiment was conducted in hydroponics with four treatments including T1: non-saline with adequate Ca/sup 2+/, T2: non-saline with low Ca/sup 2+/ (level of calcium was 1/4 of the adequate level), T3: saline (125 mM NaCl) with adequate Ca/sup 2+/ and T4: saline with low calcium. All the physical growth parameters including shoot length, root length, and shoot and root fresh weights were decreased significantly due to salinity and low calcium alone as well as in combination. Reduction was more pronounced under the combined stress of salinity and low calcium and different genotypes differed significantly in different stress treatments for shoot and root fresh weight production. In saline treatment (T3), the genotypes 25-SAWSN-39 and 25-SAWSN-31 showed better growth performance and accumulated lower Na+ and higher Ca/sup 2+/ where as the genotypes 25-SAWSN-35 and 25-SAWSN-47 showed less growth and had less accumulation of Ca/sup 2+/ and high accumulation of Na+. In salinity + low calcium treatment the genotype 25-SAWSN-39 behaved as a tolerant genotype where as 25-SAWSN-31 behaved similar to the sensitive genotype and these differences were due to high accumulation of Ca/sup 2+/ in 25-SAWSN-39 and vice versa. This study shows that the salt tolerance of wheat genotypes differs with the availability and accumulation of calcium

  4. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  5. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: Antacids (Tums, Chooz) Mineral supplements Hand lotions Vitamin and mineral supplements Other products may also contain ...

  6. Composite mathematical modeling of calcium signaling behind neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Bobby; Chong, Ket Hing; Zheng, Jie

    2018-04-11

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder, recognized as the most common cause of dementia affecting people aged 65 and above. AD is characterized by an increase in amyloid metabolism, and by the misfolding and deposition of β-amyloid oligomers in and around neurons in the brain. These processes remodel the calcium signaling mechanism in neurons, leading to cell death via apoptosis. Despite accumulating knowledge about the biological processes underlying AD, mathematical models to date are restricted to depicting only a small portion of the pathology. Here, we integrated multiple mathematical models to analyze and understand the relationship among amyloid depositions, calcium signaling and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) related cell apoptosis in AD. The model was used to simulate calcium dynamics in the absence and presence of AD. In the absence of AD, i.e. without β-amyloid deposition, mitochondrial and cytosolic calcium level remains in the low resting concentration. However, our in silico simulation of the presence of AD with the β-amyloid deposition, shows an increase in the entry of calcium ions into the cell and dysregulation of Ca 2+ channel receptors on the Endoplasmic Reticulum. This composite model enabled us to make simulation that is not possible to measure experimentally. Our mathematical model depicting the mechanisms affecting calcium signaling in neurons can help understand AD at the systems level and has potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  7. Nutrition treatment of deficiency and malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2010-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis results in exocrine and endocrine dysfunction, affecting normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. In individuals with chronic pancreatitis, nutrition status may be further affected by poor dietary intake, often related to alcoholism. However, some deficiencies may be overlooked, potentially leading to nutrition-related problems with bone health and fatigue. The aim of this article is to describe the deficiencies that occur and to propose an evidence-based algorithm for the nutrition assessment and treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  9. A Review of Vitamin D Deficiency in the Critical Care Population

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Massey; Roland N. Dickerson; Rex O. Brown

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that a large percentage of the general population is either vitamin D insufficient or deficient. Vitamin D deficiency adversely affects bone health. More recently, it has been reported that vitamin D is an important component in immune function and glycemic control Substantial data exist that demonstrate an association between vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency and mortality/clinical outcomes of critically ill patients. The larger clinical trials addressing this associat...

  10. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: a family report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [Vitamin D deficiency prediction by patient questionnaire and secondary hyperparathyroidism in a cohort of 526 healthy subjects in their fifties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, Michel; Nigon, Delphine; Gennero, Isabelle; Lassoued, Slim; Pouilles, Jean-Michel; Trémolières, Florence; Vallet, Marion; Tack, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Can vitamin D deficiency be predicted by patient questionnaire? Does it lead to secondary hyperparathyroidism that may cause excessive bone resorption? We studied non-osteoporotic subjects in their fifties, in whom vitamin D levels are often tested. Patients hospitalised for degenerative osteoarthritis or consulting for assessment of menopause, without renal failure and not treated with vitamin D, completed a questionnaire on sun exposure and underwent measurement of serum calcium, creatinine, 25OH vitamin D, PTH and CTX. Five hundred and twenty-six subjects, mean age 54.6 years (71% women), were investigated throughout the year. 25OH vitamin D levels were correlated with sun exposure and varied according to the month of the year, unlike PTH and CTX levels. From November to May, over 90% of subjects had 25OH vitamin D levelssecondary hyperparathyroidism, characterised by serum calcium65pg/mL, associated with increased CTX levels. Vitamin D deficiency can be predicted by patient questionnaire. It very rarely leads to secondary hyperparathyroidism. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For preparing calcium ferrite, calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III) precursor was prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of iron(III) maleate, calcium maleate and maleic acid. Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to ...

  13. Mineralization of alpha-1-antitrypsin inclusion bodies in Mmalton alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callea, Francesco; Giovannoni, Isabella; Francalanci, Paola; Boldrini, Renata; Faa, Gavino; Medicina, Daniela; Nobili, Valerio; Desmet, Valeer J; Ishak, Kamal; Seyama, Kuniaki; Bellacchio, Emanuele

    2018-05-16

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) of Z, Mmalton, Siiyama type is associated with liver storage of the mutant proteins and liver disease. The Z variant can be diagnosed on isoelectric focusing (IEF) while Mmalton and Siiyama may be missed or misdiagnosed with this technique. Therefore, molecular analysis is mandatory for their characterization. In particular, that holds true for the Mmalton variant as on IEF profile it resembles the wild M2 subtype. This is a retrospective analysis involving review of medical records and of liver biopsy specimens from a series of Mmalton, Z and Siiyama Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency patients. The review has been implemented by additional histological stains, electron microscopic observations and 3-D modeling studies of the sites of the mutations. Z, Mmalton and Siiyama liver specimen contained characteristic intrahepatocytic PAS-D globules. The globules differed in the three variants as only Mmalton cases showed dark basophilic precipitates within the AAT inclusions. The precipitates were visualized in haematoxylin-eosin (H.E.) stained preparations and corresponded to calcium precipitates as demonstrated by von Kossa staining. On immunohistochemistry, ZAAT inclusions were stained by polyclonal as well as monoclonal noncommercial anti-AAT antibody (AZT11), whilst Mmalton and Siiyama inclusion bodies remained negative with the monoclonal anti-Z antibody. 3-D protein analysis allowed to predict more severe misfolding of the Mmalton molecule as compared to Z and Siiyama that could trigger anomalous interaction with endoplasmic reticulum chaperon proteins, namely calcium binding proteins. Mmalton AAT inclusion bodies contain calcium precipitates inside them that allow the differential diagnosis with Siiyama and ZAAT inclusions in routine histological sections. The study has confirmed the specificity of the monoclonal AZT11 for the Z mutant. Thus, the combination of these two features is crucial for the distinction between the

  14. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cements

  15. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta......- (28kDa) subunits encoded by the ETFA and ETFB genes, respectively. In the present study, we have analysed tissue samples from 16 unrelated patients with ETF deficiency, and we report the results of ETF activity, Western blot analysis and mutation analysis. The ETF assay provides a reliable diagnostic...... tool to confirm ETF deficiency in patients suspected to suffer from MADD. Activity ranged from less than 1 to 16% of controls with the most severely affected patients disclosing the lowest activity values. The majority of patients had mutations in the ETFA gene while only two of them harboured...

  16. Iodine deficiency and thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Boelaert, Kristien

    2015-04-01

    Iodine deficiency early in life impairs cognition and growth, but iodine status is also a key determinant of thyroid disorders in adults. Severe iodine deficiency causes goitre and hypothyroidism because, despite an increase in thyroid activity to maximise iodine uptake and recycling in this setting, iodine concentrations are still too low to enable production of thyroid hormone. In mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency, increased thyroid activity can compensate for low iodine intake and maintain euthyroidism in most individuals, but at a price: chronic thyroid stimulation results in an increase in the prevalence of toxic nodular goitre and hyperthyroidism in populations. This high prevalence of nodular autonomy usually results in a further increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism if iodine intake is subsequently increased by salt iodisation. However, this increase is transient because iodine sufficiency normalises thyroid activity which, in the long term, reduces nodular autonomy. Increased iodine intake in an iodine-deficient population is associated with a small increase in the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity; whether these increases are also transient is unclear. Variations in population iodine intake do not affect risk for Graves' disease or thyroid cancer, but correction of iodine deficiency might shift thyroid cancer subtypes toward less malignant forms. Thus, optimisation of population iodine intake is an important component of preventive health care to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of habitat geology on calcium intake and calcium status of wild rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, R F; Balment, R J; Yalden, D W

    1991-12-01

    Calcium is essential for normal physiological function, reproduction and growth in mammals but its distribution in the natural environment is heterogeneous. Spatial variation in calcium soil content is especially marked in the Peak District, United Kingdom, where both calcium-rich limestone and calcium-poor gritstone rock types occur. Wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus (L) and bank voles Clethrionomys glareolus (Schreber 1780) from limestone areas had significantly higher calcium concentrations in stomach contents and in faeces compared with their counterparts from gritstone areas. Calcium status was assessed from serum calcium concentration, femur weight, ash content of the body, calcium concentration in the femur and body ash. There was no significant difference in serum calcium concentration, femur calcium concentration and body ash calcium concentration between animals from the limestone and the gritstone. However, on the limestone, bank voles, but not wood mice, had significantly heavier femora and a greater proportion of ash in the body compared with their gritstone counterparts.

  18. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. PMID:24549172

  19. Zinc Deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cediel, Gustavo; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Cori, Héctor; López de Romaña, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Zinc deficiency affects multiple vital functions in the life cycle, especially growth. Limited information is available on the magnitude of zinc deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean. To examine the latest available information on both the prevalence of zinc deficiency and the risk of zinc deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean. The prevalence of zinc deficiency was identified through a systematic review looking for the latest available data on serum zinc concentrations from surveys or studies with national representativeness conducted in Latin America and the Caribbean. The risk of zinc deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean was estimated based on dietary zinc inadequacy (according to the 2011 National Food Balance Sheets) and stunting in children under 5 years of age. Only four countries had available national biochemical data. Mexican, Colombian, Ecuadorian, and Guatemalan children under 6 years of age and women 12 to 49 years of age had a high prevalence of zinc deficiency (19.1% to 56.3%). The countries with the highest risk of zinc deficiency (estimated prevalence of inadequate zinc intake > 25% plus prevalence of stunting > 20%) were Belize, Bolivia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Zinc dietary inadequacy was directly correlated with stunting (r = 0.64, p zinc deficiency in children under 6 years of age and women 12 to 49 years of age. High rates of both estimated zinc dietary inadequacy and stunting were also reported in most Latin America and Caribbean countries.

  20. Thyroid function and deiodinase activities in rats with marginal iodine deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.P.L.T.M.K. Janssen (Karin); D. van der Heide (Daan); T.J. Visser (Theo); E. Kaptein (Ellen); A.C. Beynen (Anton)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe hypothesis tested was whether marginal iodine deficiency for a period of 6 wk affects iodothyronine deiodinase activities in liver and brain of rats. Male rats were fed purified diets either deficient or sufficient in iodine; the diets were fed on a restricted basis (60% of ad

  1. The examination of calcium ion implanted alumina with energy filtered transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, E.M.; Hampikian, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Ion implantation can be used to alter in the optical response of insulators through the formation of embedded nano-sized particles. Single crystal alumina has been implanted at ambient temperature with 50 keV Ca + to a fluence of 5 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Ion channeling, Knoop microhardness measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicate that the alumina surface layer was amorphized by the implant. TEM also revealed nano-sized crystals ∼7--8 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals are randomly oriented, and exhibit a face-centered cubic structure (FCC) with a lattice parameter of 0.409 nm ± 0.002 nm. The similarity between this crystallography and that of pure aluminum suggests that they are metallic aluminum nanocrystals with a slightly dilated lattice parameter, possibly due to the incorporation of a small amount of calcium. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) provides an avenue by which to confirm the metallic nature of the aluminum involved in the nanocrystals. EFTEM has confirmed that the aluminum present in the particles is metallic in nature, that the particles are oxygen deficient in comparison with the matrix material and that the particles are deficient in calcium, and therefore not likely to be calcia. The particles thus appear to be FCC Al (possibly alloyed with a few percent Ca) with a lattice parameter of 0.409nm. A similar result was obtained for yttrium ion implantation into alumina

  2. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  3. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-09-30

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations, e.g. magnesium. Its free concentration within cells can thus be maintained at the very low levels demanded by the signaling function. A large cadre of proteins has evolved to bind or transport calcium. They all contribute to buffer it within cells, but a number of them also decode its message for the benefit of the target. The most important of these "calcium sensors" are the EF-hand proteins. Calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Although essential to the correct functioning of cell processes, if not carefully controlled spatially and temporally within cells, it generates variously severe cell dysfunctions, and even cell death. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. [Role of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency rickets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Jin, Chun-Hua; Wu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Zhuo; Li, Mei; Li, Na

    2012-10-01

    To study the role of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the early diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency rickets. Concentrations of serum 25(OH)D, calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase were measured in normal control (n=73), suspected rickets (n=45) and confirmed rickets groups (n=65). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum 25(OH)D for rickets. Serum 25(OH)D levels in the suspected and confirmed rickets groups were 83±30 and 72±31 nmol/L respectively, which was lower than in the normal control group (112±37 nmol/L) (Prickets groups (P>0.05). Vitamin D deficiency rates in the suspected and confirmed rickets groups were higher than in the control group (Prickets was 0.760 (95%CI 0.692-0.820, P0.05). Serum 25(OH)D levels in infants with suspected and confirmed rickets are significantly reduced and this may reflect vitamin D deficiency . Therefore, it may be useful to check serum 25(OH)D levels in screening for rickets.

  5. Unusual carbon partitioning during phosphate deficiency in celery, a mannitol-synthesizing species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyson, R.H.; Loescher, W.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Mannitol and sucrose are the main photosynthetic products and translocated carbon compounds in celery (Apium graveolens L.). Carbon partitioning was studied in greenhouse-grown celery plants supplied with a nutrient solution containing or lacking phosphate (P). P-deficient plants developed new leaves at about the same rate as control plants, but showed greatly reduced growth of leaves and petioles; root growth was apparently unaffected. P-deficient leaves contained less mannitol and more sucrose than control leaves. Starch content increased with P-deficiency only in mature (the most photosynthetically-active) leaves, and then amounted to less than 10 mg/g fresh weight. Similarly, when {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was supplied to intact plants, P-deficient leaves contained less label in mannitol and more in sucrose than did control leaves; labeling of starch changed little. The P-status of celery leaves apparently affects the partitioning of carbon between mannitol and sucrose more than it affects starch accumulation. This is in marked contrast to the large increase in starch content commonly observed during P-deficiency in species that produce and translocate predominantly sucrose.

  6. Caregiver perceptions of iron deficiency anemia and iron replacement therapies in young children with nutritional iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S., approximately 3% of young children develop iron deficiency anemia (IDA), with Hispanic/Latino children disproportionately affected. IDA is associated with inferior neurodevelopmental outcomes. Treatment with oral iron mitigates its consequences yet non-adherence often results in treatme...

  7. The Impacts of Phosphorus Deficiency on the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Andreas; Herdean, Andrei; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Sharma, Anurag; Spetea, Cornelia; Pribil, Mathias; Husted, Søren

    2018-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient, and P deficiency limits plant productivity. Recent work showed that P deficiency affects electron transport to photosystem I (PSI), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we present a comprehensive biological model describing how P deficiency disrupts the photosynthetic machinery and the electron transport chain through a series of sequential events in barley ( Hordeum vulgare ). P deficiency reduces the orthophosphate concentration in the chloroplast stroma to levels that inhibit ATP synthase activity. Consequently, protons accumulate in the thylakoids and cause lumen acidification, which inhibits linear electron flow. Limited plastoquinol oxidation retards electron transport to the cytochrome b 6 f complex, yet the electron transfer rate of PSI is increased under steady-state growth light and is limited under high-light conditions. Under P deficiency, the enhanced electron flow through PSI increases the levels of NADPH, whereas ATP production remains restricted and, hence, reduces CO 2 fixation. In parallel, lumen acidification activates the energy-dependent quenching component of the nonphotochemical quenching mechanism and prevents the overexcitation of photosystem II and damage to the leaf tissue. Consequently, plants can be severely affected by P deficiency for weeks without displaying any visual leaf symptoms. All of the processes in the photosynthetic machinery influenced by P deficiency appear to be fully reversible and can be restored in less than 60 min after resupply of orthophosphate to the leaf tissue. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. An overview of techniques for the measurement of calcium distribution, calcium fluxes, and cytosolic free calcium in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borle, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    An array of techniques can be used to study cell calcium metabolism that comprises several calcium compartments and many types of transport systems such as ion channels, ATP-dependent pumps, and antiporters. The measurement of total call calcium brings little information of value since 60 to 80% of total cell calcium is actually bound to the extracellular glycocalyx. Cell fractionation and differential centrifugation have been used to study intracellular Ca 2+ compartmentalization, but the methods suffer from the possibility of Ca 2+ loss or redistribution among cell fractions. Steady-state kinetic analyses of 45 Ca uptake or desaturation curves have been used to study the distribution of Ca 2+ among various kinetic pools in living cells and their rate of Ca 2+ exchange, but the analyses are constrained by many limitations. Nonsteady-state tracer studies can provide information about rapid changes in calcium influx or efflux in and out of the cell. Zero-time kinetics of 45 Ca uptake can detect instantaneous changes in calcium influx, while 45 Ca fractional efflux ratio, can detect rapid stimulations or inhibitions of calcium efflux out of cells. The best strategy to study cell calcium metabolism is to use several different methods that focus on a specific problem from widely different angles

  9. Development of iron and zinc enriched mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) cultivars with agronomic traits in consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, R.

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition in India, particularly among women, children and adolescents is an emergency that needs immediate attention in this fast growing and developing country. Micronutrient deficiencies are threatening public health in India more and more. Deficiencies of micronutrients drastically affect growth, metabolism and reproductive phase in humans as it does in plants and animals. Cereal and pulse based Indian diets are qualitatively deficient in micronutrients such as iron, calcium, vitamin ...

  10. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  11. The order of draw of blood specimens into additive containing tubes not affect potassium and calcium measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, A; Heaney, D C; Padmanabhan, N; Spooner, R

    1996-12-01

    The effect of order of draw when taking blood into tubes containing additive was investigated in 47 medical inpatients; 12 of these patients acted as a control group. The samples were analysed in the order in which they were withdrawn. The results of potassium and calcium concentrations did not differ significantly between groups. Manufacturers recommend a specific order of draw when taking blood using vacuum based blood collection systems, which are routinely used in many hospitals. The results of this study, however, show that order of draw has no effect on calcium or potassium concentrations.

  12. Hake fish bone as a calcium source for efficient bone mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammini, Lisa; Martuzzi, Francesca; Vivo, Valentina; Ghirri, Alessia; Salomi, Enrico; Bignetti, Enrico; Barocelli, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is recognized as an essential nutritional factor for bone health. An adequate intake is important to achieve or maintain optimal bone mass in particular during growth and old age. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of hake fish bone (HBF) as a calcium source for bone mineralization: in vitro on osteosarcoma SaOS-2 cells, cultured in Ca-free osteogenic medium (OM) and in vivo on young growing rats fed a low-calcium diet. Lithotame (L), a Ca supplement derived from Lithothamnium calcareum, was used as control. In vitro experiments showed that HBF supplementation provided bone mineralization similar to standard OM, whereas L supplementation showed lower activity. In vivo low-Ca HBF-added and L-added diet similarly affected bone deposition. Physico-chemical parameters concerning bone mineralization, such as femur breaking force, tibia density and calcium/phosphorus mineral content, had beneficial effects from both Ca supplementations, in the absence of any evident adverse effect. We conclude HBF derived from by-product from the fish industry is a good calcium supplier with comparable efficacy to L.

  13. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Iodine Deficiency Leer en Español Iodine Deficiency Iodine is an element that is needed ... world’s population remains at risk for iodine deficiency. Iodine Deficiency FAQs WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND? The ...

  14. Visual search in the real world: Color vision deficiency affects peripheral guidance, but leaves foveal verification largely unaffected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter eKugler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: People with color vision deficiencies report numerous limitations in daily life. However, they use basic color terms systematically and in a similar manner as people with people with normal color vision. We hypothesize that a possible explanation for this discrepancy between color perception and behavioral consequences might be found in the gaze behavior of people with color vision deficiency.Methods: A group of participants with color vision deficiencies and a control group performed several search tasks in a naturalistic setting on a lawn.Results: Search performance was similar in both groups in a color-unrelated search task as well as in a search for yellow targets. While searching for red targets, color vision deficient participants exhibited a strongly degraded performance. This was closely matched by the number of fixations on red objects shown by the two groups. Importantly, once they fixated a target, participants with color vision deficiencies exhibited only few identification errors. Conclusions: Participants with color vision deficiencies are not able to enhance their search for red targets on a (green lawn by an efficient guiding mechanism. The data indicate that the impaired guiding is the main influence on search performance, while foveal identification (verification largely unaffected.

  15. Evaluation of Iranian Household\\'s Diet in terms of Calcium and Iron Density in the Seven Provinces of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Valaei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imbalanced diet, as it may cause micronutrient malnutrition has been known as a causal factor for several chronic diseases. Several studies in Iran have shown that some micro-nutrient deficiencies are prevalent and of high concern. Minerals such as calcium and iron can supply physical and mental health as well as survival, and growth development. In this study, Nutrient density analysis was used to display Iranian households' diet quality. Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, the diet quality of seven provinces, namely Eastern Azarbaijan, Isfahan, Tehran, Khorasan, Khouzestan, Sistan Balochestan and Fars was assessed in terms of calcium and iron. To do so, the data were obtained through national household food consumption survey conducted by National Nutrition & Food Technology Research Institute, 2000-02, in Iran. Results: Generally, 80% of households' calcium density was less than the standard value and this rate was 40-70% for iron. Index of nutrition quality (INQ for calcium and iron were respectively almost 1/2 and 1/3 of requirements in all provinces. Conclusions: There were significant differences in calcium intake density between the rural and urban households however; there were no differences between the selective provinces and all over the country

  16. Calcium ion binding properties of Medicago truncatula calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainsbury, David J K; Zhou, Liang; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Bornemann, Stephen

    2012-09-04

    A calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is essential in the interpretation of calcium oscillations in plant root cells for the establishment of symbiotic relationships with rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi. Some of its properties have been studied in detail, but its calcium ion binding properties and subsequent conformational change have not. A biophysical approach was taken with constructs comprising either the visinin-like domain of Medicago truncatula CCaMK, which contains EF-hand motifs, or this domain together with the autoinhibitory domain. The visinin-like domain binds three calcium ions, leading to a conformational change involving the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and a change in tertiary but not net secondary or quaternary structure. The affinity for calcium ions of visinin-like domain EF-hands 1 and 2 (K(d) = 200 ± 50 nM) was appropriate for the interpretation of calcium oscillations (~125-850 nM), while that of EF-hand 3 (K(d) ≤ 20 nM) implied occupancy at basal calcium ion levels. Calcium dissociation rate constants were determined for the visinin-like domain of CCaMK, M. truncatula calmodulin 1, and the complex between these two proteins (the slowest of which was 0.123 ± 0.002 s(-1)), suggesting the corresponding calcium association rate constants were at or near the diffusion-limited rate. In addition, the dissociation of calmodulin from the protein complex was shown to be on the same time scale as the dissociation of calcium ions. These observations suggest that the formation and dissociation of the complex between calmodulin and CCaMK would substantially mirror calcium oscillations, which typically have a 90 s periodicity.

  17. Vitamin D-deficient mice have more invasive urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Olof; Lüthje, Petra; Sullivan, Devin; Aspenström, Pontus; Brauner, Annelie

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a common health problem with consequences not limited to bone and calcium hemostasis. Low levels have also been linked to tuberculosis and other respiratory infections as well as autoimmune diseases. We have previously shown that supplementation with vitamin D can induce the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin during ex vivo infection of human urinary bladder. In rodents, however, cathelicidin expression is not linked to vitamin D and therefore this vitamin D-related effect fighting bacterial invasion is not relevant. To determine if vitamin D had further protective mechanisms during urinary tract infections, we therefore used a mouse model. In vitamin D-deficient mice, we detected more intracellular bacterial communities in the urinary bladder, higher degree of bacterial spread to the upper urinary tract and a skewed cytokine response. Furthermore, we show that the vitamin D receptor was upregulated in the urinary bladder and translocated into the cell nucleus after E. coli infection. This study supports a more general role for vitamin D as a local immune response mediator in the urinary tract.

  18. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium is needed by the body for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  19. The persistence of maternal vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency during pregnancy and lactation irrespective of season and supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Caroline K; Ye, Chang; Swaminathan, Balakumar; Hanley, Anthony J; Connelly, Philip W; Sermer, Mathew; Zinman, Bernard; Retnakaran, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancy and lactation comprise a critical window spanning all seasons during which maternal vitamin D status potentially may influence the long-term health of the newborn. Women typically receive calcium/vitamin D supplementation through antenatal vitamins, but there has been limited serial evaluation of maternal vitamin D status across this critical window. In this prospective observational cohort study, 467 women in Toronto, Canada, underwent measurement of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OH-D) at mean 29·7 ± 2·9 weeks' gestation, 3 months postpartum and 12 months postpartum, enabling serial assessment across 3 seasons. At each assessment, vitamin D status was classified as deficiency (25-OH-Dl), insufficiency (25-OH-D≥50 nmol/l and l) or sufficiency (25-OH-D≥75 nmol/l). The prevalence rates of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were 31·5% and 35·1% in pregnancy, 33·4% and 35·3% at 3 months, and 35·6% and 33·8% at 12 months postpartum, respectively. These high rates remained stable over time (P = 0·49) despite declining usage of antenatal calcium/vitamin D supplementation from pregnancy to 3 months to 12 months postpartum (P vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in pregnancy were independently associated with decrements in average 25-OH-D over time of 49·6 nmol/l and 26·4 nmol/l, respectively (both P vitamin D supplements were independently associated with changes in 25-OH-D in the range of 3-5 nmol/l (both P vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency during pregnancy and lactation, irrespective of season and supplementation, supports the emerging concept that current vitamin D supplementation in antenatal care is likely inadequate. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of

  1. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  2. Inference of neuronal network spike dynamics and topology from calcium imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry eLütcke

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-photon calcium imaging enables functional analysis of neuronal circuits by inferring action potential (AP occurrence ('spike trains' from cellular fluorescence signals. It remains unclear how experimental parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and acquisition rate affect spike inference and whether additional information about network structure can be extracted. Here we present a simulation framework for quantitatively assessing how well spike dynamics and network topology can be inferred from noisy calcium imaging data. For simulated AP-evoked calcium transients in neocortical pyramidal cells, we analyzed the quality of spike inference as a function of SNR and data acquisition rate using a recently introduced peeling algorithm. Given experimentally attainable values of SNR and acquisition rate, neural spike trains could be reconstructed accurately and with up to millisecond precision. We then applied statistical neuronal network models to explore how remaining uncertainties in spike inference affect estimates of network connectivity and topological features of network organization. We define the experimental conditions suitable for inferring whether the network has a scale-free structure and determine how well hub neurons can be identified. Our findings provide a benchmark for future calcium imaging studies that aim to reliably infer neuronal network properties.

  3. Is zinc deficiency a risk factor for atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, John H; Kwun, In-Sook

    2004-02-01

    The development of atherosclerosis is influenced by genetic, lifestyle and nutritional risk factors. Zn and metallothionein deficiency can enhance oxidative-stress-related signalling processes in endothelial cells, and since changes in available plasma Zn may affect the Zn status of the endothelium, Zn deficiency could be a risk factor for IHD. Although the association of Zn with many proteins is essential for their function, three key signalling processes are highlighted as being principal targets for the effect of Zn deficiency: the activation of NF-kappaB, the activation of caspase enzymes and the signalling of NO. The need to develop a reliable indicator of Zn status is critical to any epidemiological approach for studying the relationship between Zn status and disease incidence. Studies using appropriate animal models and investigating how the plasma Zn pool influences endothelial intracellular labile Zn would be helpful in appreciating the importance of Zn deficiency in atherogenesis.

  4. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on ageing and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth hormone (IGF)1 deficiency on ageing and lifespan are reviewed. Evidence is presented that isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) including GH, as well as primary IGE1 deficiency (GH resistance, Laron syndrome) present signs of early ageing such as thin and wrinkled skin, obesity, hyperglycemia and osteoporosis. These changes do not seem to affect the lifespan, as patients reach old age. Animal models of genetic MPHD (Ames and Snell mice) and GH receptor knockout mice (primary IGF1 deficiency) also have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting large amounts of GH have premature death. In conclusion longstanding GH/IGF1 deficiency affects several parameters of the ageing process without impairing lifespan, and as shown in animal models prolongs longevity. In contrast high GH/IGF1 levels accelerate death.

  5. Complications, Reoperations, and Nutrient Deficiencies Two Years after Sleeve Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Pech

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to investigate patient outcomes and nutritional deficiencies following sleeve gastrectomy (SG during a follow-up of two years. Methods. Over a period of 56 months, all consecutive patients who underwent SG were documented in this prospective, single-center, observational study. The study endpoints included operative time, complication rates, nutritional deficiencies and percentage of excess weight loss (%EWL. Results. From September 26, 2005 to May 28, 2009, 82 patients (female : male = 48 : 34 with a mean age of 43.3 years (range: 22–64 and a preoperative BMI of 52.5 kg/m² (range: 36.8–77.0 underwent SG. Major complications were observed in 9.8% of the patients, with 1 death. During follow up 51.2% of patients were supplemented with iron, 36.6% with zinc, 37.8% with calcium, 26.8% with vitamin D, 46.3% with vitamin B12 and 41.5% with folic acid. %EWL was 54.3, 65.3 and 62.6% after 6, 12 and 24 months. Conclusion. SG as a single step procedure is an effective bariatric intervention. Nutritional deficiencies after SG can be detected by routine nutritional screening. Our results show that Vitamin B12 supplementation should suggest routinely after SG.

  6. Effect of calcium intake on urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone-forming patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary calcium lowers the risk of nephrolithiasis due to a decreased absorption of dietary oxalate that is bound by intestinal calcium. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxaluria in normocalciuric and hypercalciuric lithiasic patients under different calcium intake. Fifty patients (26 females and 24 males, 41 ± 10 years old, whose 4-day dietary records revealed a regular low calcium intake (<=500 mg/day, received an oral calcium load (1 g/day for 7 days. A 24-h urine was obtained before and after load and according to the calciuria under both diets, patients were considered as normocalciuric (NC, N = 15, diet-dependent hypercalciuric (DDHC, N = 9 or diet-independent hypercalciuric (DIHC, N = 26. On regular diet, mean oxaluria was 30 ± 14 mg/24 h for all patients. The 7-day calcium load induced a significant decrease in mean oxaluria compared to the regular diet in NC and DIHC (20 ± 12 vs 26 ± 7 and 27 ± 18 vs 32 ± 15 mg/24 h, respectively, P<0.05 but not in DDHC patients (22 ± 10 vs 23 ± 5 mg/24 h. The lack of an oxalate decrease among DDHC patients after the calcium load might have been due to higher calcium absorption under higher calcium supply, with a consequent lower amount of calcium left in the intestine to bind with oxalate. These data suggest that a long-lasting regular calcium consumption <500 mg was not associated with high oxaluria and that a subpopulation of hypercalciuric patients who presented a higher intestinal calcium absorption (DDHC tended to hyperabsorb oxalate as well, so that oxaluria did not change under different calcium intake.

  7. Comparison of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and Calcium Levels between Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and Normal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Moini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given the relationship of vitamin D deficiency with insulin resistance syndrome as the component of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, the main aim of this study was to compare serum level of 25- hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] between PCOS patients and normal individuals. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted to compare 25(OHD level between117 normal and 125 untreated PCOS cases at our clinic in Arash Hospital, Tehran, Iran, during 2011-2012. The obtained levels of 25(OHD were classified as follows: lower than 25 nmol/ml as severe deficiency, between 25-49.9 nmol/ml as deficiency, 50-74.9 nmol/ml as insufficiency, and above 75 nmol/ml asnormal. In addition, endocrine and metabolic variables were evaluated. Results: Among PCOS patients, our findings shows 3(2.4% normal, 7(5.6% with insufficiency, 33(26.4% with deficiency and 82(65.6% with severe deficiency, whereas in normal participants, 5(4.3% normal, 4(3.4% with insufficiency, 28(23.9% with deficiency and 80(68.4% with severe deficiency. Comparison of 25(OHD level between two main groups showed no significant differences (p= 0.65. Also, the calcium and 25(OHD levels had no significant differences in patients with overweight (p=0.22 and insulin resistance (p=0.64. But we also found a relationship between 25(OHD level and metabolic syndrome (p=0.01. Furthermore, there was a correlation between 25(OHD and body mass index (BMI in control group (p=0.01, while the C-reactive protein (CRP level was predominantly higher in PCOS group (p<0.001. Conclusion: Although the difference of 25(OHD level between PCOS and healthy women is not significant, the high prevalence of 25(OHD deficiency is a real alarm for public health care system and may influence our results.

  8. Effects of inorganic phosphate and ADP on calcium handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum in rat skinned cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, J Z; Kentish, J C

    1995-03-01

    The aim was to investigate whether, and how, increases in inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ADP, similar to those occurring intracellularly during early myocardial ischaemia, affect the calcium handling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Rat ventricular trabeculae were permeabilised with saponin. The physiological process of calcium induced calcium release (CICR) from the muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum was triggered via flash photolysis of the "caged Ca2+", nitr-5. Alternatively, calcium release was induced by rapid application of caffeine to give an estimate of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading. The initial rate of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium pumping was also assessed by photolysis of caged ATP at saturating [Ca2+]. Myoplasmic [Ca2+] (using fluo-3) and isometric force were measured. Pi (2-20 mM) significantly depressed the magnitude of CICR and the associated force transient. Sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading was inhibited even more than CICR by Pi, suggesting that reduced calcium loading could account for all of the inhibitory effect of Pi on CICR and that Pi may slightly activate the calcium release mechanism. The reduced sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading seemed to be due to a fall in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis (delta GATP) available for the calcium pump, since equal decreases in delta GATP produced by adding both Pi and ADP in various ratios caused similar falls in the calcium loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The caged ATP experiments indicated that Pi (20 mM) did not affect the rate constant of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium uptake. ADP (10 mM) alone, or with 1 mM Pi, inhibited calcium loading. In spite of this, ADP (10 mM) did not alter CICR and, when 1 mM Pi was added, ADP increased CICR above control. An increase in intracellular Pi reduces sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading and thus depresses the CICR. This could be an important contributing factor in the hypoxic or ischaemic contractile failure of the myocardium. However the

  9. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coating of additively manufactured porous CoCr implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, Carl [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Xia, Wei, E-mail: wei.xia@angstrom.uu.se [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Engqvist, Håkan [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Snis, Anders [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Arcam AB, Krokslätts Fabriker 27 A, SE-431 37 Mölndal (Sweden); Lausmaa, Jukka [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Borås (Sweden); Palmquist, Anders [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Biomaterials, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • A route for coating complex shaped electron beam melted implants is presented. • Biomimetic HA coatings were deposited on CoCr alloys using a solution method. • Deposited biomimetic coating was partially crystalline, slightly calcium deficient. • Coating morphology was plate-like with crystallites forming roundish flowers. • Present coating procedure could be useful for porous implants made by EBM. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study the feasibility to use a biomimetic method to prepare biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on CoCr substrates with short soaking times and to characterize the properties of such coatings. A second objective was to investigate if the coatings could be applied to porous CoCr implants manufactured by electron beam melting (EBM). The coating was prepared by immersing the pretreated CoCr substrates and EBM implants into the phosphate-buffered solution with Ca{sup 2+} in sealed plastic bottles, kept at 60 °C for 3 days. The formed coating was partially crystalline, slightly calcium deficient and composed of plate-like crystallites forming roundish flowers in the size range of 300–500 nm. Cross-section imaging showed a thickness of 300–500 nm. In addition, dissolution tests in Tris–HCl up to 28 days showed that a substantial amount of the coating had dissolved, however, undergoing only minor morphological changes. A uniform coating was formed within the porous network of the additive manufactured implants having similar thickness and morphology as for the flat samples. In conclusion, the present coating procedure allows coatings to be formed on CoCr and could be used for complex shaped, porous implants made by additive manufacturing.

  10. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coating of additively manufactured porous CoCr implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, Carl; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan; Snis, Anders; Lausmaa, Jukka; Palmquist, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A route for coating complex shaped electron beam melted implants is presented. • Biomimetic HA coatings were deposited on CoCr alloys using a solution method. • Deposited biomimetic coating was partially crystalline, slightly calcium deficient. • Coating morphology was plate-like with crystallites forming roundish flowers. • Present coating procedure could be useful for porous implants made by EBM. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study the feasibility to use a biomimetic method to prepare biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on CoCr substrates with short soaking times and to characterize the properties of such coatings. A second objective was to investigate if the coatings could be applied to porous CoCr implants manufactured by electron beam melting (EBM). The coating was prepared by immersing the pretreated CoCr substrates and EBM implants into the phosphate-buffered solution with Ca"2"+ in sealed plastic bottles, kept at 60 °C for 3 days. The formed coating was partially crystalline, slightly calcium deficient and composed of plate-like crystallites forming roundish flowers in the size range of 300–500 nm. Cross-section imaging showed a thickness of 300–500 nm. In addition, dissolution tests in Tris–HCl up to 28 days showed that a substantial amount of the coating had dissolved, however, undergoing only minor morphological changes. A uniform coating was formed within the porous network of the additive manufactured implants having similar thickness and morphology as for the flat samples. In conclusion, the present coating procedure allows coatings to be formed on CoCr and could be used for complex shaped, porous implants made by additive manufacturing.

  11. Vascular calcification in diabetic foot and its association with calcium homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayshree Swain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vascular calcification (VC, long thought to result from passive degeneration, involves a complex process of biomineralization resembling osteogenesis, frequently observed in diabetes and is an indicator of diabetic peripheral vascular disease with variable implications. Aim and Objective : To study the association between vascular calcification and calcium homeostasis in diabetic patients with foot ulcers without stage 4, 5 chronic kidney disease. Materials and Methods : A total of 74 patients with diabetic foot ulcer were enrolled, and VC was detected by X-ray and Doppler methods. Serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (ALKP, fasting and post-prandial glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C were recorded. Serum iPTH and 25 (OH vitamin D were estimated by immune radiometric assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Data was analyzed by SPSS 16.0. Results: Vascular calcification was present in 42% of patients. Significant difference in the mean (±SD of vitamin D, HbA1C, and eGFR was observed in VC +ve compared to VC -ve. There was no significant association of age, duration, BMI, PTH, Ca, PO4, ALKP with that of VC incidence. Severe vitamin D deficiency was more common in VC +ve (51.6% compared to in VC -ve (18.6%. Sub-group analysis showed that the risk of VC was significantly higher (RR = 2.4, P < 0.05, 95% C.I. = 0.058-2.88 in patients with vitamin D < 10 ng/ml compared to others. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency could be a risk for vascular calcification, which possibly act through receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells or modulates osteoprotegerin/RANKL system like other factors responsible for VC in diabetic foot patients.

  12. Constraining Calcium Production in Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pranjal; C. Fry, C. Wrede Team; A. Chen, J. Liang Collaboration; S. Bishop, T. Faestermann, D. Seiler Collaboration; R. Hertenberger, H. Wirth Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Calcium is an element that can be produced by thermonuclear reactions in the hottest classical novae. There are discrepancies between the abundance of Calcium observed in novae and expectations based on astrophysical models. Unbound states 1 MeV above the proton threshold affect the production of Calcium in nova models because they act as resonances in the 38 K(p , γ) 39 Ca reaction present. This work describes an experiment to measure the energies of the excited states of 39 Ca . We will bombard a thin target of 40 Ca with a beam of 22 MeV deuterons, resulting in tritons and 39Ca. We will use a Q3D magnetic spectrograph from the MLL in Garching, Germany to momenta analyze the tritons to observe the excitation energies of the resulting 39 Ca states. Simulations have been run to determine the optimal spectrograph settings. We decided to use a chemically stable target composed of CaF2 , doing so resulted in an extra contaminant, Fluorine, which is dealt with by measuring the background from a LiF target. These simulations have led to settings and targets that will result in the observation of the 39 Ca states of interest with minimal interference from contaminants. Preliminary results from this experiment will be presented. National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and U.S. National Science Foundation.

  13. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  14. Diagnosis, Treatment and Follow-Up in Four Children with Biotinidase Deficiency from Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afroze, B.; Wasay, M.

    2013-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an inherited disorder in which the vitamin biotin is not recycled. If untreated, affected individuals develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms. Untreated individuals with biotinidase deficiency either succumb to disease or are left with significant morbidity. We describe clinical course and follow-up of 4 children from Pakistan. All 4 presented with classical symptoms of biotinidase deficiency and responded dramatically to oral biotin within days to weeks. Biotinidase deficiency is reported in Pakistani children from different part of world, however; there is no such report from Pakistan. This highlights lack of awareness of biotinidase deficiency among physicians in Pakistan. (author)

  15. Study of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate purification on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, L.V.; Knyazeva, A.N.; Fakeev, A.A.; Belyaeva, N.A.; Morozov, V.I.; Kucherova, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    Purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate from iron, chromium, manganese and cobalt impurities by sorption on some inorganic collectors are considered in this article. Study was conducted by means of radioactive-tracer technique at concurrent use of several γ-radioactive isotopes. As a collectors were used hydrated aluminium and zirconium oxides. Dependence of effectiveness of precipitation by collectors on ph-value of medium, quantity of collector, nature and concentration of components is studied. Optimal parameters of purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate are defined.

  16. The practice of vitamin D deficiency assessment in a geriatric day hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Osuafor, C

    2016-04-01

    There has been no clear consensus on the assessment and treatment of vitamin D deficiency prior to the publication of the National Osteoporosis Society (NOS) Vitamin D Guideline in 2014. The aim of our study was to assess the practice in a medicine for the older person day hospital setting relative to this guideline. A 6-month retrospective analysis of all new patients who attended service from January to July 2013 was carried out. Seventy-six patients were included in the final analysis. Mean age was 83 years. 39 (51%) patients had sufficient levels while 37 (49%) patients had insufficient levels; 14 (19%) being inadequate and 23 (30%) deficient. Eighteen patients who had insufficient levels were subsequently prescribed supplements; 13 (72%) received vitamin D3 in combination with calcium while 5 (28%) received vitamin D3 alone. Based on the findings of this study, we have made some recommendations and adopted the guideline

  17. Calcium-activated butyrylcholinesterase in human skin protects acetylcholinesterase against suicide inhibition by neurotoxic organophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; University of Bradford; Elwary, Souna M.; Parkin, Susan M.; Wood, John M.

    2007-01-01

    The human epidermis holds an autocrine acetylcholine production and degradation including functioning membrane integrated and cytosolic butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE). Here we show that BuchE activities increase 9-fold in the presence of calcium (0.5 x 10 -3 M) via a specific EF-hand calcium binding site, whereas acetylcholinesterase (AchE) is not affected. 45 Calcium labelling and computer simulation confirmed the presence of one EF-hand binding site per subunit which is disrupted by H 2 O 2 -mediated oxidation. Moreover, we confirmed the faster hydrolysis by calcium-activated BuchE using the neurotoxic organophosphate O-ethyl-O-(4-nitrophenyl)-phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). Considering the large size of the human skin with 1.8 m 2 surface area with its calcium gradient in the 10 -3 M range, our results implicate calcium-activated BuchE as a major protective mechanism against suicide inhibition of AchE by organophosphates in this non-neuronal tissue

  18. Phytate/calcium molar ratio does not predict accessibility of calcium in ready-to-eat dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erba, Daniela; Manini, Federica; Meroni, Erika; Casiraghi, Maria C

    2017-08-01

    Phytic acid (PA), a naturally occurring compound of plant food, is generally considered to affect mineral bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of the PA/calcium molar ratio as a predictive factor of calcium accessibility in composed dishes and their ingredients. Dishes were chosen whose ingredients were rich in Ca (milk or cheese) or in PA (whole-wheat cereals) in order to consider a range of PA/Ca ratios (from 0 to 2.4) and measure Ca solubility using an in vitro approach. The amounts of soluble Ca in composed dishes were consistent with the sum of soluble Ca from ingredients (three out of five meals) or higher. Among whole-wheat products, bread showed higher Ca accessibility (71%, PA/Ca = 1.1) than biscuits (23%, PA/Ca = 0.9) and pasta (15%, PA/Ca = 1.5), and among Ca-rich ingredients, semi-skimmed milk displayed higher Ca accessibility (64%) than sliced cheese (50%) and Parmesan (38%). No significant correlation between the PA/Ca ratio and Ca accessibility was found (P = 0.077). The reliability of the PA/Ca ratio for predicting the availability of calcium in composed dishes is unsatisfactory; data emphasized the importance of the overall food matrix influence on mineral accessibility. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  20. Effects of Fe and Mn deficiencies on the protein profiles of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) xylem sap as revealed by shotgun analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos-Laita, Laura; Gutierrez-Carbonell, Elain; Takahashi, Daisuke; Abadía, Anunciación; Uemura, Matsuo; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana Flor

    2018-01-06

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of Fe and Mn deficiencies on the xylem sap proteome of tomato using a shotgun proteomic approach, with the final goal of elucidating plant response mechanisms to these stresses. This approach yielded 643 proteins reliably identified and quantified with 70% of them predicted as secretory. Iron and Mn deficiencies caused statistically significant and biologically relevant abundance changes in 119 and 118 xylem sap proteins, respectively. In both deficiencies, metabolic pathways most affected were protein metabolism, stress/oxidoreductases and cell wall modifications. First, results suggest that Fe deficiency elicited more stress responses than Mn deficiency, based on the changes in oxidative and proteolytic enzymes. Second, both nutrient deficiencies affect the secondary cell wall metabolism, with changes in Fe deficiency occurring via peroxidase activity, and in Mn deficiency involving peroxidase, Cu-oxidase and fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins. Third, the primary cell wall metabolism was affected by both nutrient deficiencies, with changes following opposite directions as judged from the abundances of several glycoside-hydrolases with endo-glycolytic activities and pectin esterases. Fourth, signaling pathways via xylem involving CLE and/or lipids as well as changes in phosphorylation and N-glycosylation also play a role in the responses to these stresses. Biological significance In spite of being essential for the delivery of nutrients to the shoots, our knowledge of xylem responses to nutrient deficiencies is very limited. The present work applies a shotgun proteomic approach to unravel the effects of Fe and Mn deficiencies on the xylem sap proteome. Overall, Fe deficiency seems to elicit more stress in the xylem sap proteome than Mn deficiency, based on the changes measured in proteolytic and oxido-reductase proteins, whereas both nutrients exert modifications in the composition of the primary and secondary

  1. Pre-harvest calcium sulfate application improves postharvest quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of cut rose flowers at the postharvest stage is affected by pre-harvest conditions. The present study was conducted to examine the possible involvement of calcium sulfate (CaSO4) in regulation of rose flower senescence. Roses (Rosa hybrida L.) cultivars 'Cool Water' and 'Pretty Blinda', were treated with either ...

  2. Atomic layer deposition of calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide films using calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukli, Kaupo; Ritala, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo; Haenninen, Timo; Leskelae, Markku

    2006-01-01

    Calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition on borosilicate glass and silicon substrates in the temperature range of 205-300 o C. The calcium oxide films were grown from novel calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor and water. Calcium oxide films possessed refractive index 1.75-1.80. Calcium oxide films grown without Al 2 O 3 capping layer occurred hygroscopic and converted to Ca(OH) 2 after exposure to air. As-deposited CaO films were (200)-oriented. CaO covered with Al 2 O 3 capping layers contained relatively low amounts of hydrogen and re-oriented into (111) direction upon annealing at 900 o C. In order to examine the application of CaO in high-permittivity dielectric layers, mixtures of Ca and Hf oxides were grown by alternate CaO and HfO 2 growth cycles at 230 and 300 o C. HfCl 4 was used as a hafnium precursor. When grown at 230 o C, the films were amorphous with equal amounts of Ca and Hf constituents (15 at.%). These films crystallized upon annealing at 750 o C, showing X-ray diffraction peaks characteristic of hafnium-rich phases such as Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 or Ca 6 Hf 19 O 44 . At 300 o C, the relative Ca content remained below 8 at.%. The crystallized phase well matched with rhombohedral Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 . The dielectric films grown on Si(100) substrates possessed effective permittivity values in the range of 12.8-14.2

  3. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...... current understanding of calcium sensing in neurotransmitter release and hormone secretion....

  4. Newborn screening for dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency: Citrulline as a useful analyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane C. Quinonez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency, also known as maple syrup urine disease (MSUD type III, is caused by the deficiency of the E3 subunit of branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (αKGDH, and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH. DLD deficiency variably presents with either a severe neonatal encephalopathic phenotype or a primarily hepatic phenotype. As a variant form of MSUD, it is considered a core condition recommended for newborn screening. The detection of variant MSUD forms has proven difficult in the past with no asymptomatic DLD deficiency patients identified by current newborn screening strategies. Citrulline has recently been identified as an elevated dried blood spot (DBS metabolite in symptomatic patients affected with DLD deficiency. Here we report the retrospective DBS analysis and second-tier allo-isoleucine testing of 2 DLD deficiency patients. We show that an elevated citrulline and an elevated allo-isoleucine on second-tier testing can be used to successfully detect DLD deficiency. We additionally recommend that DLD deficiency be included in the “citrullinemia/elevated citrulline” ACMG Act Sheet and Algorithm.

  5. CALCIUM-RICH GAP TRANSIENTS: SOLVING THE CALCIUM CONUNDRUM IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulchaey, John S.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray measurements suggest that the abundance of calcium in the intracluster medium is higher than can be explained using favored models for core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae alone. We investigate whether the ''calcium conundrum'' in the intracluster medium can be alleviated by including a contribution from the recently discovered subclass of supernovae known as calcium-rich gap transients. Although the calcium-rich gap transients make up only a small fraction of all supernovae events, we find that their high calcium yields are sufficient to reproduce the X-ray measurements found for nearby rich clusters. We find the χ 2 goodness-of-fit metric improves from 84 to 2 by including this new class. Moreover, calcium-rich supernovae preferentially occur in the outskirts of galaxies making it easier for the nucleosynthesis products of these events to be incorporated in the intracluster medium via ram-pressure stripping. The discovery of calcium-rich gap transients in clusters and groups far from any individual galaxy suggests that supernovae associated with intracluster stars may play an important role in enriching the intracluster medium. Calcium-rich gap transients may also help explain anomalous calcium abundances in many other astrophysical systems including individual stars in the Milky Way, the halos of nearby galaxies, and the circumgalactic medium. Our work highlights the importance of considering the diversity of supernovae types and corresponding yields when modeling the abundance of the intracluster medium and other gas reservoirs

  6. Treatment with Potassium Bicarbonate Lowers Calcium Excretion and Bone Resorption in Older Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Harris, Susan S.; Palermo, Nancy J.; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen; Rasmussen, Helen M.; Dallal, Gerard E.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Bicarbonate has been implicated in bone health in older subjects on acid-producing diets in short-term studies. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of potassium bicarbonate and its components on changes in bone resorption and calcium excretion over 3 months in older men and women. Design, Participants, and Intervention: In this double-blind, controlled trial, 171 men and women age 50 and older were randomized to receive placebo or 67.5 mmol/d of potassium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or potassium chloride for 3 months. All subjects received calcium (600 mg of calcium as triphosphate) and 525 IU of vitamin D3 daily. Main Outcome Measures: Twenty-four-hour urinary N-telopeptide and calcium were measured at entry and after 3 months. Changes in these measures were compared across treatment groups in the 162 participants included in the analyses. Results: Bicarbonate affected the study outcomes, whereas potassium did not; the two bicarbonate groups and the two no bicarbonate groups were therefore combined. Subjects taking bicarbonate had significant reductions in urinary N-telopeptide and calcium excretion, when compared with subjects taking no bicarbonate (both before and after adjustment for baseline laboratory value, sex, and changes in urinary sodium and potassium; P = 0.001 for both, adjusted). Potassium supplementation did not significantly affect N-telopeptide or calcium excretion. Conclusions: Bicarbonate, but not potassium, had a favorable effect on bone resorption and calcium excretion. This suggests that increasing the alkali content of the diet may attenuate bone loss in healthy older adults. PMID:18940881

  7. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  8. Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency - Does a Gender Difference Exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Eskildsen, PC

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to clarify whether a gender difference exists with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: A case-control design. METHODS: Blood sampling for measurements of calcium......, phosphate, creatinine, PTH, vitamin D, IGF-1, markers of bone formation and bone resorption, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), to determine BMD and BMC of the lumbar spine, hip, distal arm and total body, were performed in 34 patients with GHD (19 females) and 34 sex-, age- and weight...... identical BMD values at all regions. This gender difference was even more obvious when BMD values were expressed as Z-scores or as three-dimensional BMD of the total body. The bone formation and bone resorption markers, as well as calcium and vitamin D, were all at the same levels in GH...

  9. Bone mineral density in patients with growth hormone deficiency: does a gender difference exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette Friberg; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Eskildsen, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to clarify whether a gender difference exists with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: A case-control design. METHODS: Blood sampling for measurements of calcium......, phosphate, creatinine, PTH, vitamin D, IGF-1, markers of bone formation and bone resorption, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), to determine BMD and BMC of the lumbar spine, hip, distal arm and total body, were performed in 34 patients with GHD (19 females) and 34 sex-, age- and weight...... identical BMD values at all regions. This gender difference was even more obvious when BMD values were expressed as Z-scores or as three-dimensional BMD of the total body. The bone formation and bone resorption markers, as well as calcium and vitamin D, were all at the same levels in GH...

  10. Membrane properties involved in calcium-stimulated microparticle release from the plasma membranes of S49 lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lauryl E; Nelson, Jennifer; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Judd, Allan M; Bell, John D

    2014-01-01

    This study answered the question of whether biophysical mechanisms for microparticle shedding discovered in platelets and erythrocytes also apply to nucleated cells: cytoskeletal disruption, potassium efflux, transbilayer phospholipid migration, and membrane disordering. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, disrupted the actin cytoskeleton of S49 lymphoma cells and produced rapid release of microparticles. This release was significantly inhibited by interventions that impaired calcium-activated potassium current. Microparticle release was also greatly reduced in a lymphocyte cell line deficient in the expression of scramblase, the enzyme responsible for calcium-stimulated dismantling of the normal phospholipid transbilayer asymmetry. Rescue of the scrambling function at high ionophore concentration also resulted in enhanced particle shedding. The effect of membrane physical properties was addressed by varying the experimental temperature (32-42°C). A significant positive trend in the rate of microparticle release as a function of temperature was observed. Fluorescence experiments with trimethylammonium diphenylhexatriene and Patman revealed significant decrease in the level of apparent membrane order along that temperature range. These results demonstrated that biophysical mechanisms involved in microparticle release from platelets and erythrocytes apply also to lymphocytes.

  11. Estimation of ionized calcium, total calcium and albumin corrected calcium for the diagnosis of hypocalcaemia of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijaz, A.; Mehmood, T.; Qureshi, A.H.; Anwar, M.; Dilawar, M.; Hussain, I.; Khan, F.A.; Khan, D.A.; Hussain, S.; Khan, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To measure levels of ionized calcium, total calcium and albumin corrected calcium in patients with different malignant disorders for the diagnosis of hypercalcaemia of malignancy. Design: A case control comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in the Department of Pathology, Army Medical College Rawalpindi, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and Department of Oncology CMH, Rawalpindi from March 2003 to December 2003. Subjects and Methods: Ninety-seven patients of various malignant disorders, admitted in the Department of Oncology, CMH, Rawalpindi, and 39 age and gender-matched disease-free persons (as control) were included in the study. Blood ionized calcium (Ca/sup ++/), pH, sodium (Na/sup +/) and potassium (K/sup +/) were analysed by Ion selective electrode (ISE) on Easylyte> auto analyser. Other related parameters were measured by colorimetric methods. Results: Blood Ca/sup ++/ levels in patients suffering from malignant disorders were found significantly high (mean +- j 1.30+017 mmoV/L) as compared to control subjects (mean +- 1.23+0.03 mmoV/L) (p<0.001). The number of patients with hypercalcaemia of malignancy detected by Ca/sup ++/ estimation was significantly higher (38%) as compared to total calcium (8.4%) and albumin corrected calcium ACC (10.6%) (p<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in other parameters e.g. phosphate, urea, creatinine, pH, Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/ levels in study subjects and controls. Conclusion: Detection of hypercalcaemia can be markedly improved if ionized calcium estimation is used in patients with malignant disorders. (author)

  12. SR calcium handling and calcium after-transients in a rabbit model of heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartscheer, Antonius; Schumacher, Cees A.; Belterman, Charly N. W.; Coronel, Ruben; Fiolet, Jan W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: After-depolarization associated arrhythmias are frequently observed in heart failure and associated with spontaneous calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), calcium after-transients. We hypothesize that disturbed SR calcium handling underlies calcium after-transients in heart

  13. Calcium absorption from fortified ice cream formulations compared with calcium absorption from milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hee, Regine M; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Rietveld, Anton G; Wilkinson, Joy E; Quail, Patricia J; Berry, Mark J; Dainty, Jack R; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%+/-8%, 28%+/-5%, and 31%+/-9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium.

  14. Uptake of radiactive calcium by groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. ) and efficiency of utilisation of applied calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loganathan, S; Krishnamoorthy, K K [Tamil Nadu Agricultural Univ., Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry

    1977-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted with groundnut applying labelled calcium as its sulphate and carbonate at two levels namely 75 and 150 kg Ca per ha with varying levels of P, K and Mg. Plant samples were taken at different stages of crop growth and analysed for the content of radioactive calcium. Calcium sulphate treatment has resulted in larger uptake of calcium compared to calcium carbonate. An application of 150 kg Ca per ha has caused significantly higher uptake by groundnut plant than 75 kg Ca per ha. The percentage of utilisation of added calcium ranged from 2.2 to 5.4 Recovery of calcium by plants was more in calcium sulphate treatment rather than in calcium carbonate. The plants showed a preference for absorbing applied calcium rather than native calcium.

  15. Uptake of radiactive calcium by groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and efficiency of utilisation of applied calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loganathan, S.; Krishnamoorthy, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted with groundnut applying labelled calcium as its sulphate and carbonate at two levels namely 75 and 150 kg Ca per ha with varying levels of P, K and Mg. Plant samples were taken at different stages of crop growth and analysed for the content of radioactive calcium. Calcium sulphate treatment has resulted in larger uptake of calcium compared to calcium carbonate. An application of 150 kg Ca per ha has caused significantly higher uptake by groundnut plant than 75 kg Ca per ha. The percentage of utilisation of added calcium ranged from 2.2 to 5.4 Recovery of calcium by plants was more in calcium sulphate treatment rather than in calcium carbonate. The plants showed a preference for absorbing applied calcium rather than native calcium

  16. Absence of the ER Cation Channel TMEM38B/TRIC-B Disrupts Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis and Dysregulates Collagen Synthesis in Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Wayne A.; Ishikawa, Masaki; Garten, Matthias; Makareeva, Elena N.; Sargent, Brandi M.; Weis, MaryAnn; Barnes, Aileen M.; Webb, Emma A.; Shaw, Nicholas J.; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Lacbawan, Felicitas L.; Högler, Wolfgang; Leikin, Sergey; Blank, Paul S.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Eyre, David R.; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Marini, Joan C.

    2016-01-01

    Recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by defects in proteins involved in post-translational interactions with type I collagen. Recently, a novel form of moderately severe OI caused by null mutations in TMEM38B was identified. TMEM38B encodes the ER membrane monovalent cation channel, TRIC-B, proposed to counterbalance IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The molecular mechanisms by which TMEM38B mutations cause OI are unknown. We identified 3 probands with recessive defects in TMEM38B. TRIC-B protein is undetectable in proband fibroblasts and osteoblasts, although reduced TMEM38B transcripts are present. TRIC-B deficiency causes impaired release of ER luminal Ca2+, associated with deficient store-operated calcium entry, although SERCA and IP3R have normal stability. Notably, steady state ER Ca2+ is unchanged in TRIC-B deficiency, supporting a role for TRIC-B in the kinetics of ER calcium depletion and recovery. The disturbed Ca2+ flux causes ER stress and increased BiP, and dysregulates synthesis of proband type I collagen at multiple steps. Collagen helical lysine hydroxylation is reduced, while telopeptide hydroxylation is increased, despite increased LH1 and decreased Ca2+-dependent FKBP65, respectively. Although PDI levels are maintained, procollagen chain assembly is delayed in proband cells. The resulting misfolded collagen is substantially retained in TRIC-B null cells, consistent with a 50–70% reduction in secreted collagen. Lower-stability forms of collagen that elude proteasomal degradation are not incorporated into extracellular matrix, which contains only normal stability collagen, resulting in matrix insufficiency. These data support a role for TRIC-B in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and demonstrate that absence of TMEM38B causes OI by dysregulation of calcium flux kinetics in the ER, impacting multiple collagen-specific chaperones and modifying enzymes. PMID:27441836

  17. Absence of the ER Cation Channel TMEM38B/TRIC-B Disrupts Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis and Dysregulates Collagen Synthesis in Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne A Cabral

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is caused by defects in proteins involved in post-translational interactions with type I collagen. Recently, a novel form of moderately severe OI caused by null mutations in TMEM38B was identified. TMEM38B encodes the ER membrane monovalent cation channel, TRIC-B, proposed to counterbalance IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The molecular mechanisms by which TMEM38B mutations cause OI are unknown. We identified 3 probands with recessive defects in TMEM38B. TRIC-B protein is undetectable in proband fibroblasts and osteoblasts, although reduced TMEM38B transcripts are present. TRIC-B deficiency causes impaired release of ER luminal Ca2+, associated with deficient store-operated calcium entry, although SERCA and IP3R have normal stability. Notably, steady state ER Ca2+ is unchanged in TRIC-B deficiency, supporting a role for TRIC-B in the kinetics of ER calcium depletion and recovery. The disturbed Ca2+ flux causes ER stress and increased BiP, and dysregulates synthesis of proband type I collagen at multiple steps. Collagen helical lysine hydroxylation is reduced, while telopeptide hydroxylation is increased, despite increased LH1 and decreased Ca2+-dependent FKBP65, respectively. Although PDI levels are maintained, procollagen chain assembly is delayed in proband cells. The resulting misfolded collagen is substantially retained in TRIC-B null cells, consistent with a 50-70% reduction in secreted collagen. Lower-stability forms of collagen that elude proteasomal degradation are not incorporated into extracellular matrix, which contains only normal stability collagen, resulting in matrix insufficiency. These data support a role for TRIC-B in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and demonstrate that absence of TMEM38B causes OI by dysregulation of calcium flux kinetics in the ER, impacting multiple collagen-specific chaperones and modifying enzymes.

  18. Relationship between mycotoxicosis and calcium during preproduction period in layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Qubih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine field cases of mycotoxicosis (A flatoxicosis and ochratoxicosis and their effects on calcium during the preproduction period of 1SA brown pullets. Birds were 12-15 weeks of age. The feed was subjected to analysis for mycotoxin and blood samples were laboratory diagnosed for infectious bronchitis and infectious bursal viruses antibody titer and for determination calcium level. Clinical signs of affected birds were rubbery bone, ruffled feather, paleness and high mortality. Necropsy findings of sick birds were characterized by muscle dehydration, enlarged livers yellowished, kidney enlargement and urate deposition. Histopathological features of liver consisted of capsular thickening hepatocellular necrosis, subcapsular infiltration with inflammatory kidneys cells showed swelling of tubular cells, deposition of calcium between kidney tubules with infiltration of inflammatory cells. ELISA test revealed the presence of 800 ppb aflatoxin and 100 ppb ochratoxin. Normal titers of infectious bronchitis virus and infectious bursal diseases antibodies were recorded. Low blood calcium level of 8.2 mg/dl was registered in the tested blood samples.

  19. Iodine deficiency status of school going children in coastal region of bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayedur Rahman Miah; Chowdhury Habibur Rasul; Ashoke Kumar Paul

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Bangladesh is an iodine deficient zone, affected mainly in the northern part i.e., in Himalayan belt along Brahmaputra and Jamuna River. Severity of' iodine deficiency can be assessed by prevalence of goitre and urinary iodine excretion. The latest nationwide survey of Iodine Deficiency Disorders of' Bangladesh in 1993 showed prevalence of goitre 47.1% in all age and sex group and 69% of the population had urinary iodine excretion 100 mcg/L. Conclusion: On the basis of goitre prevalence and urinary iodine excretion, coastal region of Bangladesh is a mild iodine deficient zone. (authors)

  20. Phytoplankton calcification as an effective mechanism to prevent cellular calcium poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M. N.; Ramos, J. Barcelos e.; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U.; Kaźmierczak, J.; Gallo, F.; Mackinder, L.; Li, Y.; Nesterenko, P. N.; Trull, T. W.; Hallegraeff, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    Marine phytoplankton has developed the remarkable ability to tightly regulate the concentration of free calcium ions in the intracellular cytosol at a level of ~ 0.1 μmol L-1 in the presence of seawater Ca2+ concentrations of 10 mmol L-1. The low cytosolic calcium ion concentration is of utmost importance for proper cell signalling function. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the tight control of intracellular Ca2+ concentration are not completely understood, phytoplankton taxonomic groups appear to have evolved different strategies, which may affect their ability to cope with changes in seawater Ca2+ concentrations in their environment on geological time scales. For example, the Cretaceous (145 to 66 Ma ago), an era known for the high abundance of coccolithophores and the production of enormous calcium carbonate deposits, exhibited seawater calcium concentrations up to four times present-day levels. We show that calcifying coccolithophore species (Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Coccolithus braarudii) are able to maintain their relative fitness (in terms of growth rate and photosynthesis) at simulated Cretaceous seawater calcium concentrations, whereas these rates are severely reduced under these conditions in some non-calcareous phytoplankton species (Chaetoceros sp., Ceratoneis closterium and Heterosigma akashiwo). Most notably, this also applies to a non-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi which displays a calcium-sensitivity similar to the non-calcareous species. We hypothesize that the process of calcification in coccolithophores provides an efficient mechanism to prevent cellular calcium poisoning and thereby offered a potential key evolutionary advantage, responsible for the proliferation of coccolithophores during times of high seawater calcium concentrations.

  1. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian

    Oftentimes caries lesions develop in protected sites that are difficult to access by self-performed mechanical tooth cleaning. At present, there is a growing interest in chemical adjuncts to mechanical procedures of oral hygiene that aim at biofilm control rather than biofilm eradication. Calcium......-phosphate-osteopontin particles are a new promising therapeutic approach to caries control. They are designed to bind to dental biofilms and interfere with biofilm build-up, lowering the bacterial burden on the tooth surface without affecting bacterial viability in the oral cavity. Moreover, they dissolve when pH in the biofilm...... drops to 6 or below and release buffering phosphate ions that stabilize biofilm pH above the critical level for enamel dissolution. With that twofold approach, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles may make a relevant contribution to clinical caries control....

  2. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  3. Vitamin D Deficiency Prevalence and Predictors in Early Pregnancy among Arab Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Al-Musharaf

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Data regarding the prevalence and predictors of vitamin D deficiency during early pregnancy are limited. This study aims to fill this gap. A total of 578 Saudi women in their 1st trimester of pregnancy were recruited between January 2014 and December 2015 from three tertiary care antenatal clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Information collected includes socio-economic, anthropometric, and biochemical data, including serum vitamin D (25(OHD levels, intake of calcium and vitamin D, physical activity, and sun exposure indices. Pregnant women with 25(OHD levels <50 nmol/L were considered vitamin D deficient. The majority of participants (n = 468 (81% were vitamin D deficient. High levels of indoor activity, whole body clothing, multiparity, total cholesterol/HDL ratio(>3.5, low HDL-cholesterol, and living in West Riyadh were significant independent predictors for vitamin D deficiency, with odds ratios (ORs (95% confidence interval of 25.4 (5.5–117.3, 17.8 (2.3–138.5, 4.0 (1.7–9.5, 3.3 (1.4–7.9, 2.8 (1.2–6.4, and 2.0 (1.1–3.5, respectively. Factors like increased physical activity, sun exposure at noon, sunrise or sunset, high educational status, and residence in North Riyadh were protective against vitamin D deficiency with ORs 0.2 (0.1–0.5; 0.2 (0.1–0.6; 0.3 (0.1–0.9; and 0.4 (0.2–0.8, respectively. All ORs were adjusted for age, BMI, sun exposure, parity, summer season, vitamin D intake, multivitamin intake, physical activity, education, employment, living in the north, and coverage with clothing. In conclusion, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among Saudi women during early pregnancy was high (81%. Timely detection and appropriate supplementation with adequate amounts of vitamin D should reduce the risks of vitamin D deficiency and its complications during pregnancy.

  4. An Exploration of the Calcium-Binding Mode of Egg White Peptide, Asp-His-Thr-Lys-Glu, and In Vitro Calcium Absorption Studies of Peptide-Calcium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Jin, Ziqi; Li, Dongmei; Yin, Hongjie; Lin, Songyi

    2017-11-08

    The binding mode between the pentapeptide (DHTKE) from egg white hydrolysates and calcium ions was elucidated upon its structural and thermodynamics characteristics. The present study demonstrated that the DHTKE peptide could spontaneously bind calcium with a 1:1 stoichiometry, and that the calcium-binding site corresponded to the carboxyl oxygen, amino nitrogen, and imidazole nitrogen atoms of the DHTKE peptide. Moreover, the effect of the DHTKE-calcium complex on improving the calcium absorption was investigated in vitro using Caco-2 cells. Results showed that the DHTKE-calcium complex could facilitate the calcium influx into the cytosol and further improve calcium absorption across Caco-2 cell monolayers by more than 7 times when compared to calcium-free control. This study facilitates the understanding about the binding mechanism between peptides and calcium ions as well as suggests a potential application of egg white peptides as nutraceuticals to improve calcium absorption.

  5. Molecular imaging of in vivo calcium ion expression in area postrema of total sleep deprived rats: Implications for cardiovascular regulation by TOF-SIMS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Ling, Yong-Chien; Chen, Bo-Jung; Wu, Un-In; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2010-05-01

    Excessive calcium influx in chemosensitive neurons of area postrema (AP) is detrimental for sympathetic activation and participates in the disruption of cardiovascular activities. Since total sleep deprivation (TSD) is a stressful condition known to harm the cardiovascular function, the present study is aimed to determine whether the in vivo calcium expression in AP would significantly alter following TSD by the use of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and calretinin (a specific calcium sensor protein in AP neurons) immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that in normal rats, the calcium intensity was estimated to be 0.5 × 10 5 at m/ z 40.08. However, following TSD, the intensity for calcium ions was greatly increased to 1.2 × 10 5. Molecular imaging revealed that after TSD, various strongly expressed calcium signals were distributed throughout AP with clear identified profiles instead of randomly scattered within this region in normal rats. Immunohistochemical staining corresponded well with ionic image in which a majority of calcium-enriched gathering co-localized with calretinin positive neurons. The functional significance of TSD-induced calcium augmentation was demonstrated by increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, clinical markers for cardiovascular dysfunction. Considering AP-mediated sympathetic activation is important for cardiovascular regulation, exaggerated calcium influx in AP would render this neurocircuitry more vulnerable to over-excitation, which might serve as the underlying mechanism for the development of TSD-relevant cardiovascular deficiency.

  6. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2016-02-06

    Feb 6, 2016 ... Hemolytic anemia; ... G6PD deficiency is the commonest hemolytic X-linked genetic disease, which affects .... tain drugs or infection, can elicit acute hemolysis. ..... down syndrome risk: a meta-analysis from 34 studies.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There may also be other genetic or environmental factors that influence whether an affected individual is more likely to develop pain or fatigue. Learn more about the gene associated with corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency SERPINA6 Related Information What is a gene? What is a ...