WorldWideScience

Sample records for affect yeast growth

  1. Parameters affecting methanol utilization by yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, M.S.; El-Masry, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Screening of 28 yeast cultures, representing 22 species of various yeasts, with respect to their capabilities to assimilate methanol, has shown that this property was mostly found in certain species of the two genera Hansenula and Candida. When methanol was used as a sole carbon source for a methanol-adapted strain of Hansenula polymorpha, a linear yield response could be obtained with increasing alcohol up to 2% concentration. The amount of inoculum proved to be the decisive factor in determining a priori the ability of the organism to grow at 6% methanol as final concentration. The optimum pH values for growth ranged between 4.5-5.5 with no growth at pH 6.5 or higher. A marked growth stimulation was obtained when the medium was supplied with phosphate up to 0.08 M as final concentration. Within the nitrogen sources tested, corn steep liquor concentrate gave the highest yield of cells. The significance of the obtained results are discussed with reference to feasibilities of application.

  2. Long Telomeres Do Not Affect Cellular Fitness in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Yaniv; Zadok-Laviel, Shira; Kupiec, Martin

    2017-08-29

    Telomeres, the ends of the eukaryotic chromosomes, help to maintain the genome's integrity and thus play important roles in aging and cancer. Telomere length is strictly controlled in all organisms. In humans, telomeres shorten with age, and it has been proposed that telomere shortening may play a causal role in aging. We took advantage of the availability of yeast strains with genetically or physiologically generated differences in telomere length to measure the effect that telomere length may have on cellular growth. By comparing the growth rates affecting telomere length of various yeast mutants we show that there is no correlation between their telomere length and cellular fitness. We also show that wild-type yeast cells carrying extremely long telomeres (~5 times longer than the average) showed no signs of mitotic or meiotic defects, and competition experiments found no differences in growth between strains with normal telomeres and strains with long telomeres. No advantage or disadvantage of cells with long telomeres was detected under stress conditions either. Finally, telomere length had no effect in a chronological life span assay, which measures survival of post-mitotic-stage cells. We conclude that extreme telomere length has no effects (positive or negative) on the fitness of yeast cells.IMPORTANCE Telomeres protect the chromosomal ends from fusion, degradation, and unwanted repair. Therefore, telomeres preserve genome stability and cell viability. In humans, telomeres shorten with each cell duplication event and with age. It has thus been proposed that telomere shortening may be responsible for human aging and that elongation of telomeres may be a way to rejuvenate cells and to combat aging. However, it is difficult to prove this hypothesis in human cells. Yeasts are easy to manipulate and have telomeres whose length is strictly maintained. Here we show that yeast cells manipulated to have extremely long telomeres (~5-fold those of normal cells) did

  3. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Organic growth factor requirements of some yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, M; Gulati, N

    1980-01-01

    Some sporogenous yeasts (Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hansenula ciferrii, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia polymorpha, Saccharomycopsis guttulata, and Saccharomyces chevalieri), isolated from various fruits have been examined for their organic growth factor requisites. H. ciferrii was completely deficient in thiamine, biotin, inositol, riboflavin, niacin, and partially deficient in pantothenic acid. It required an external supply of 0.1-1.0 ppm thiamine, 0.01-0.1 ppm biotin, 10.0 ppm inositol, 0.10 ppm niacin and riboflavin for its optimum growth. H. polymorpha showed partial deficiency only in xanthine. P. polymorpha gave indications of partial deficiencies in thiamine and biotin. S. guttulata was completely deficient in biotin, and partially deficient in adenine sulphate. It required 0.01 ppm biotin for optimum growth. S chevalieri was completely deficient in pyridoxine and partially deficient in thiamine. It required 0.1 ppm pyridoxine for maximum growth. D. hansenii and B bruxellensis were auxoautotrophic for the various growth factors studied.

  6. Growth requirements of san francisco sour dough yeasts and bakers' yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, N

    1976-03-01

    The growth requirements of several yeasts isolated from San Francisco sour dough mother sponges were compared with those of bakers' yeast. The sour dough yeasts studied were one strain of Saccharomyces uvarum, one strain of S. inusitatus, and four strains of S. exiguus. S. inusitatus was the only yeast found to have an amino acid requirement, namely, methionine. All of the yeasts had an absolute requirement for pantothenic acid and a partial requirement for biotin. Inositol was stimulatory to all except bakers' yeast. All strains of S. exiguus required niacin and thiamine. Interestingly, S. inusitatus, the only yeast that required methionine, also needed folic acid. For optimal growth of S. exiguus in a molasses medium, supplementation with thiamine was required.

  7. Biochemical characterization and growth patterns of new yeast isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djegui, Kadjogbé Y; Gachomo, Emma W; Hounhouigan, Djidjoho J; Kayodé, Adéchola P P; Kotchoni, Simeon O

    2014-08-01

    African sorghum opaque beers play a vital role in the diet of millions of consumers. In the current study we investigated the growth profiles of yeast strains isolated from kpete-kpete, a traditional starter used to produce tchoukoutou, an opaque sorghum beer in Benin. 10 yeast strains were isolated from sorghum beer starters and cultivated under both liquid and solid media for phenotypic growth characterization. All yeast isolates were able to grow both on solid and liquid media. Based on their growth profiles, the isolates were clustered into three groups: (i) the aggressive growth pattern (30%), (ii) the moderate growth pattern (50%), and (iii) the slow growth pattern (20%). Based on gene expression pattern, absorbance (A(600 nm)) and diameter of growth in both liquid and solid media respectively, yeast strains YK34, YK15 and YK48 were clustered in the first group, and referred to as the most aggressive growth strains, followed by group 2 (YK24, YK5, YK12, YK20, YK2) and group 3 (YK37, YK41). This growth pattern was confirmed by Invertase gene expression profiling of the yeasts showing group 1 with high level of Invertase gene expression followed by group 2 and group 3 respectively. Our results suggest that YK34, YK15 and YK48 and YK2 yeast strains constitute the best candidates in fermentation of sorghum beer production based on growth rate and assimilation of carbon and nitrogen sources.

  8. Deletion of PdMit1, a homolog of yeast Csg1, affects growth and Ca(2+) sensitivity of the fungus Penicillium digitatum, but does not alter virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Congyi; Wang, Weili; Wang, Mingshuang; Ruan, Ruoxin; Sun, Xuepeng; He, Meixian; Mao, Cungui; Li, Hongye

    2015-04-01

    GDP-mannose:inositol-phosphorylceramide (MIPC) and its derivatives are important for Ca(2+) sensitization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and for the virulence of Candida albicans, but its role in the virulence of plant fungal pathogens remains unclear. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of PdMit1, the gene encoding MIPC synthase in Penicillium digitatum, one of the most important pathogens of postharvest citrus fruits. To understand the function of PdMit1, a PdMit1 deletion mutant was generated. Compared to its wild-type control, the PdMit1 deletion mutant exhibited slow radial growth, decreased conidia production and delayed conidial germination, suggesting that PdMit1 is important for the growth of mycelium, sporulation and conidial germination. The PdMit1 deletion mutant also showed hypersensitivity to Ca(2+). Treatment with 250 mmol/l Ca(2+) induced vacuole fusion in the wild-type strain, but not in the PdMit1 deletion mutant. Treatment with 250mmol/lCaCl2 upregulated three Ca(2+)-ATPase genes in the wild-type strain, and this was significantly inhibited in the PdMit1 deletion mutant. These results suggest that PdMit1 may have a role in regulating vacuole fusion and expression of Ca(2+)-ATPase genes by controlling biosynthesis of MIPC, and thereby imparts P. digitatum Ca(2+) tolerance. However, we found that PdMit1 is dispensable for virulence of P. digitatum.

  9. Effects of penconazole on two yeast strains: growth kinetics and molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawich, Dalal; Lteif, Roger; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Strehaiano, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study consisted to evaluate the impact of a pesticide (penconazole) on the growth kinetics and genotoxicity on two yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima). When the penconazole was added at different phases of the growth of M. pulcherrima, no effect was noticed on the kinetics of yeast growth but DNA adducts were observed when penconazole was added in the exponential phase. Increasing doses (1-15 maximum residue limit) of the pesticide added at the beginning of the fermentation did not induce DNA adducts while kinetics were affected.

  10. Effects of Selenium Yeast on Oxidative Stress, Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chih-Hung; Hsia, Simon; Shih, Min-Yi; Hsieh, Fang-Chin; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that selenium (Se) yeast may exhibit potential anti-cancer properties; whereas the precise mechanisms remain unknown. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Se yeast on oxidative stress, growth inhibition, and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Treatments of ER-positive MCF-7 and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with Se yeast (100, 750, and 1500 ng Se/mL), methylseleninic acid (MSA, 1500 ng Se/mL), or methylselenocysteine (MSC, 1500 ng Se/mL) at a time course experiment (at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h) were analyzed. Se yeast inhibited the growth of these cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with the same level of MSA, cancer cells exposure to Se yeast exhibited a lower growth-inhibitory response. The latter has also lower superoxide production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activities. Furthermore, MSA (1500 ng Se/mL)-exposed non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) have a significant growth inhibitory effect, but not Se yeast and MSC. Compared with MSA, Se yeast resulted in a greater increase in the early apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as well as a lower proportion of early and late apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, nuclear morphological changes and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed. In conclusion, a dose of 100 to 1500 ng Se/mL of Se yeast can increase oxidative stress, and stimulate growth inhibitory effects and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell lines, but does not affect non-tumorigenic cells.

  11. Growth of marine yeast on different strength of stress solutes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, R.

    excellent growth at 4% and good growth at 65% NaCl. Species of red yeast Rhodotorula lost its pigment production at 6%, except R. rubra which grew up to 16% NaCl with faint pigmentation. Six species of genera Debaryomyces, Saccharomyces and Rhodotorula were...

  12. Peroxisomal catalase deficiency modulates yeast lifespan depending on growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawalek, Adam; Lefevre, Sophie D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the role of peroxisomal catalase in chronological aging of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha in relation to various growth substrates. Catalase-deficient (cat) cells showed a similar chronological life span (CLS) relative to the wild-type control upon growth on carbon and nitrogen sources th

  13. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  14. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  15. Harvesting yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) at different physiological phases significantly affects its functionality in bread dough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Dornez, Emmie; Jacobs, Pieter; Parsi, Anali; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2014-05-01

    Fermentation of sugars into CO2, ethanol and secondary metabolites by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) during bread making leads to leavening of dough and changes in dough rheology. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of the impact of yeast on dough related aspects by investigating the effect of harvesting yeast at seven different points of the growth profile on its fermentation performance, metabolite production, and the effect on critical dough fermentation parameters, such as gas retention potential. The yeast cells harvested during the diauxic shift and post-diauxic growth phase showed a higher fermentation rate and, consequently, higher maximum dough height than yeast cells harvested in the exponential or stationary growth phase. The results further demonstrate that the onset of CO2 loss from fermenting dough is correlated with the fermentation rate of yeast, but not with the amount of CO2 that accumulated up to the onset point. Analysis of the yeast metabolites produced in dough yielded a possible explanation for this observation, as they are produced in different levels depending on physiological phase and in concentrations that can influence dough matrix properties. Together, our results demonstrate a strong effect of yeast physiology at the time of harvest on subsequent dough fermentation performance, and hint at an important role of yeast metabolites on the subsequent gas holding capacity.

  16. Growth Culture Conditions and Nutrient Signaling Modulating Yeast Chronological Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of nutrient-signaling pathways in yeast has uncovered the impact of environmental growth conditions in longevity. Studies using calorie restriction show that reducing glucose concentration of the culture media is sufficient to increase replicative and chronological lifespan (CLS. Other components of the culture media and factors such as the products of fermentation have also been implicated in the regulation of CLS. Acidification of the culture media mainly due to acetic acid and other organic acids production negatively impacts CLS. Ethanol is another fermentative metabolite capable of inducing CLS reduction in aged cells by yet unknown mechanisms. Recently, ammonium was reported to induce cell death associated with shortening of CLS. This effect is correlated to the concentration of NH4+ added to the culture medium and is particularly evident in cells starved for auxotrophy-complementing amino acids. Studies on the nutrient-signaling pathways regulating yeast aging had a significant impact on aging-related research, providing key insights into mechanisms that modulate aging and establishing the yeast as a powerful system to extend knowledge on longevity regulation in multicellular organisms.

  17. Affected chromosome homeostasis and genomic instability of clonal yeast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Yeast cells originating from one single colony are considered genotypically and phenotypically identical. However, taking into account the cellular heterogeneity, it seems also important to monitor cell-to-cell variations within a clone population. In the present study, a comprehensive yeast karyotype screening was conducted using single chromosome comet assay. Chromosome-dependent and mutation-dependent changes in DNA (DNA with breaks or with abnormal replication intermediates) were studied using both single-gene deletion haploid mutants (bub1, bub2, mad1, tel1, rad1 and tor1) and diploid cells lacking one active gene of interest, namely BUB1/bub1, BUB2/bub2, MAD1/mad1, TEL1/tel1, RAD1/rad1 and TOR1/tor1 involved in the control of cell cycle progression, DNA repair and the regulation of longevity. Increased chromosome fragility and replication stress-mediated chromosome abnormalities were correlated with elevated incidence of genomic instability, namely aneuploid events-disomies, monosomies and to a lesser extent trisomies as judged by in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The tor1 longevity mutant with relatively balanced chromosome homeostasis was found the most genomically stable among analyzed mutants. During clonal yeast culture, spontaneously formed abnormal chromosome structures may stimulate changes in the ploidy state and, in turn, promote genomic heterogeneity. These alterations may be more accented in selected mutated genetic backgrounds, namely in yeast cells deficient in proper cell cycle regulation and DNA repair.

  18. Air-drying kinetics affect yeast membrane organization and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemetais, Guillaume; Dupont, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Gervais, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) is a key structure for the survival of cells during dehydration. In this study, we focused on the concomitant changes in survival and in the lateral organization of the PM in yeast strains during desiccation, a natural or technological environmental perturbation that involves transition from a liquid to a solid medium. To evaluate the role of the PM in survival during air-drying, a wild-type yeast strain and an osmotically fragile mutant (erg6Δ) were used. The lateral organization of the PM (microdomain distribution) was observed using a fluorescent marker related to a specific green fluorescent protein-labeled membrane protein (Sur7-GFP) after progressive or rapid desiccation. We also evaluated yeast behavior during a model dehydration experiment performed in liquid medium (osmotic stress). For both strains, we observed similar behavior after osmotic and desiccation stresses. In particular, the same lethal magnitude of dehydration and the same lethal kinetic effect were found for both dehydration methods. Thus, yeast survival after progressive air-drying was related to PM reorganization, suggesting the positive contribution of passive lateral rearrangements of the membrane components. This study also showed that the use of glycerol solutions is an efficient means to simulate air-drying desiccation.

  19. Effects of Lactobacillus spp. on mould and yeast growth in the ensiling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Tijana P.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper includes the results of effect of preparations Biomax SI (Lactobacillus plantarum and Biomax WS (L. plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus on mould and yeast growth in the ensiling process. The following has been analyzed: total number of mould and yeast, specific rate of mould and yeast growth, pH, content acid (lactic, acetic and butyric acid, moisture and temperature in bales during 30 days of lucerne ensiling.

  20. Cell differentiation within a yeast colony: metabolic and regulatory parallels with a tumor-affected organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáp, Michal; Stěpánek, Luděk; Harant, Karel; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2012-05-25

    Nutrient sensing and metabolic reprogramming are crucial for metazoan cell aging and tumor growth. Here, we identify metabolic and regulatory parallels between a layered, multicellular yeast colony and a tumor-affected organism. During development, a yeast colony stratifies into U and L cells occupying the upper and lower colony regions, respectively. U cells activate a unique metabolism controlled by the glutamine-induced TOR pathway, amino acid-sensing systems (SPS and Gcn4p) and signaling from mitochondria with lowered respiration. These systems jointly modulate U cell physiology, which adapts to nutrient limitations and utilize the nutrients released from L cells. Stress-resistant U cells share metabolic pathways and other similar characteristics with tumor cells, including the ability to proliferate. L cells behave similarly to stressed and starving cells, which activate degradative mechanisms to provide nutrients to U cells. Our data suggest a nutrient flow between both cell types, resembling the Cori cycle and glutamine-NH(4)(+) shuttle between tumor and healthy metazoan cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of live yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on postweaning diarrhea, immune response, and growth performance in weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trckova, M; Faldyna, M; Alexa, P; Sramkova Zajacova, Z; Gopfert, E; Kumprechtova, D; Auclair, E; D'Inca, R

    2014-02-01

    The effects of live yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain CNCM I-4407, 10(10) cfu/g; Actisaf; Lesaffre Feed Additives, Marcq-en-Baroeul, France) on the severity of diarrhea, immune response, and growth performance in weaned piglets orally challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain O149:K88 were investigated. Live yeast was fed to sows and their piglets in the late gestation, suckling, and postweaning periods. Sows were fed a basal diet without (Control; n = 2) or with (Supplemented; n = 2) 1 g/kg of live yeast from d 94 of gestation and during lactation until weaning of the piglets (d 28). Suckling piglets of the supplemented sows were orally treated with 1 g of live yeast in porridge carrier 3 times a week until weaning. Weaned piglets were fed a basal starter diet without (Control; n = 19) or with (Supplemented; n = 15) 5 g of live yeast/kg feed for 2 wk. Significantly lower daily diarrhea scores (P diarrhea (P diarrhea in yeast-fed weaned piglets positively affected their growth capacity in the postweaning period (P diarrhea caused by ETEC.

  2. Characterization of dependencies between growth and division in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Michael B; Iversen, Edwin S; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2017-02-01

    Cell growth and division are processes vital to the proliferation and development of life. Coordination between these two processes has been recognized for decades in a variety of organisms. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this coordination or 'size control' appears as an inverse correlation between cell size and the rate of cell-cycle progression, routinely observed in G1 prior to cell division commitment. Beyond this point, cells are presumed to complete S/G2/M at similar rates and in a size-independent manner. As such, studies of dependence between growth and division have focused on G1 Moreover, in unicellular organisms, coordination between growth and division has commonly been analysed within the cycle of a single cell without accounting for correlations in growth and division characteristics between cycles of related cells. In a comprehensive analysis of three published time-lapse microscopy datasets, we analyse both intra- and inter-cycle dependencies between growth and division, revisiting assumptions about the coordination between these two processes. Interestingly, we find evidence (i) that S/G2/M durations are systematically longer in daughters than in mothers, (ii) of dependencies between S/G2/M and size at budding that echo the classical G1 dependencies, and (iii) in contrast with recent bacterial studies, of negative dependencies between size at birth and size accumulated during the cell cycle. In addition, we develop a novel hierarchical model to uncover inter-cycle dependencies, and we find evidence for such dependencies in cells growing in sugar-poor environments. Our analysis highlights the need for experimentalists and modellers to account for new sources of cell-to-cell variation in growth and division, and our model provides a formal statistical framework for the continued study of dependencies between biological processes.

  3. The effects of ethanol on growth rate and passive proton diffusion in yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, S.G.; Preez, J.C. du; Gericke, M. (University of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa). Dept. of Microbiology and Biochemistry)

    1989-11-01

    When cell suspensions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL-Y132 and Kluyveromyces marxianus IGC-2771 were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of ethanol, the final stable pH values (pH{sub f}) reached in these suspensions increased with increasing ethanol concentration, indicating that ethanol enhanced passive proton diffusion into the cells. The plots of pH{sub f} as a function of ethanol concentration were linear but biphasic, displaying different slopes below and above the transition ethanol concentrations. When S. cerevisiae NRRL-Y132 and K. marxianus IGC-2771 were grown in the presence of different concentrations of ethanol, the specific growth rate (mu) similarly depended upon ethanol concentration in a linear, biphasic way. Plots of mu at each ethanol concentration against pH{sub f} reached in cell suspensions at that ethanol concentration were linear and monophasic for S. cerevisiae NRRL-Y132 but biphasic for K. marxianus IGC-2771. Ethanol inhibition of growth and enhancement of proton diffusion are therefore correlated in these yeasts. Whereas ethanol inhibition of growth and enhancement of transmembrane proton diffusion were affected to the same degree by ethanol below and above the transition ethanol concentration in S. cerevisiae NRRL-Y132, these two parameters of ethanol inhibition were affected to different degrees below and above the transition in K. marxianus IGC-2771 as indicated by the inflection point in the plot of mu vs pH{sub f}. Attempts to extent these findings to other yeasts showed that the correlation between the effects of ethanol on pH{sub f} and mu is not a universal phenomenon among yeasts. (orig.).

  4. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance of different wine yeast species during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Viana, Tiago; Ardö, Ylva; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the influence of twenty different single (i.e. 19 amino acids and ammonium sulphate) and two multiple nitrogen sources (N-sources) on growth and fermentation (i.e. glucose consumption and ethanol production) performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of four wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeast species (Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Torulaspora delbrueckii) was investigated during alcoholic fermentation. Briefly, the N-sources with beneficial effects on all performance parameters (or for the majority of them) for each yeast species were alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, isoleucine, ammonium sulphate, serine, valine and mixtures of 19 amino acids and of 19 amino acids plus ammonium sulphate (for S. cerevisiae), serine (for L. thermotolerans), alanine (for H. uvarum), alanine and asparagine (for M. pulcherrima), arginine, asparagine, glutamine, isoleucine and mixture of 19 amino acids (for T. delbrueckii). Furthermore, our results showed a clear positive effect of complex mixtures of N-sources on S. cerevisiae and on T. delbrueckii (although to a lesser extent) as to all performance parameters studied, whereas for L. thermotolerans, H. uvarum and M. pulcherrima, single amino acids affected growth and fermentation performance to the same extent as the mixtures. Moreover, we found groups of N-sources with similar effects on the growth and/or fermentation performance of two or more yeast species. Finally, the influences of N-sources observed for T. delbrueckii and H. uvarum resembled those of S. cerevisiae the most and the least, respectively. Overall, this work contributes to an improved understanding of how different N-sources affect growth, glucose consumption and ethanol production of wine-related yeast species under oxygen-limited conditions, which, in turn, may be used to, e.g. optimize growth and fermentation performance of the given yeast upon N-source supplementation during

  5. Evaluation of brewers' spent grain as a novel media for yeast growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Sachindra T; Lee, Jaslyn J L; Chen, Wei Ning

    2017-12-01

    Brewers' spent grain (BSG) is a by-product generated from the beer manufacturing industry, which is extremely rich in protein and fiber. Here we use low cost BSG as the raw material for the production of a novel growth media, through a bioconversion process utilizing a food grade fungi to hydrolyze BSG. The novel fermentation media was tested on the yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides, a natural yeast producing carotenoid. The yeast growth was analysed using the growth curve and the production of intracellular fatty acids and carotenoids. Untargeted GCMS based metabolomics was used to analyse the constituents of the different growth media, followed by multivariate data analysis. Growth media prepared using fermented BSG was found to be able to support the growth in R. toruloides (21.4 mg/ml) in comparable levels to YPD media (24.7 mg/ml). Therefore, the fermented BSG media was able to fulfill the requirement as a nitrogen source for R. toruloides growth. This media was able to sustain normal metabolomics activity in yeast, as indicated by the level of fatty acid and carotenoid production. This can be explained by the fact that, in the fermented BSG media metabolites and amino acids were found to be higher than in the unfermented media, and close to the levels in YPD media. Taken together, our study provided evidence of a growth media for yeast using BSG. This should have potential in replacing components in the current yeast culture media in a sustainable and cost effective manner.

  6. Occurrence and growth of yeasts in processed meat products - implications for potential spoilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Jacobsen, Tomas; Jespersen, Lene

    2008-01-01

    Spoilage of meat products is in general attributed to bacteria but new processing and storage techniques inhibiting growth of bacteria may provide opportunities for yeasts to dominate the microflora and cause spoilage of the product. With the aim of obtaining a deeper understanding of the potential...... role of yeast in spoilage of five different processed meat products (bacon, ham, salami and two different liver patés), yeasts were isolated, enumerated and identified during processing, in the final product and in the final product at the end of shelf life. Yeasts were isolated along the bacon...... of the processed meat products. The yeast microflora was complex with 4-12 different species isolated from the different production sites. In general, Candida zeylanoides, Debaryomyces hansenii and the newly described Candida alimentaria were found to be the dominant yeast species. In addition, three putatively...

  7. Interactive optical trapping shows that confinement is a determinant of growth in a mixed yeast culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arneborg, N.; Siegumfeldt, H.; Andersen, G.H.;

    2005-01-01

    Applying a newly developed user-interactive optical trapping system, we controllably surrounded individual cells of one yeast species, Hanseniaspora uvarum, with viable cells of another yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thus creating a confinement of the former. Growth of surrounded and no...... of the latter. This study is the first to demonstrate that confinement is a determinant of growth in a microbial ecosystem. (c) 2005 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. The yeast TUM1 affects production of hydrogen sulfide from cysteine treatment during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Wei; Walker, Michelle E; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Roncoroni, Miguel; Gardner, Richard C; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    The undesirable rotten-egg odour of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) produced by yeast shortly after yeast inoculation of grape musts might be an important source of desirable varietal thiols, which contribute to tropical aromas in varieties such as Sauvign-on Blanc. In this study, we observed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains produce an early burst of H2S from cysteine. Both Δmet2 and Δmet17 strains produce a larger burst, likely because they are unable to utilise the H2S in the sulfate assimilation pathway. For the first time, we show that TUM1 is partly responsible for the early production of H2S from cysteine. Overex-pressing TUM1 elevated production of H2S, whilst its deletion yields only half of the H2S. We further confirmed that yeast convert cysteine to H2S by analysing growth of mutants lacking components of the transsulfuration pathway. High concent-rations of cysteine overcame this growth block, but required TUM1 Collectively, the data indicate that S. cerevisiae does not convert cysteine to sulfate or sulfite, but rather to sulfide via a novel pathway that requires the action of Tum1p. The findi-ngs of this study may allow the improvement of commercial yeasts through the manipulation of sulfur metabolism that are better suited towards production of fruit-driven styles.

  9. Technological steps and yeast biomass as factors affecting the lipid content of beer during the brewing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, Elisabetta; Perretti, Giuseppe; Buzzini, Pietro; Della Sera, Rolando; Fantozzi, Paolo

    2009-07-22

    Knowledge of lipid content and composition in the brewing process enables the quality control of the final product. Lipids have a beneficial effect on yeast growth during fermentation as well as deleterious effects on end-product quality. The lipid content of a beer affects its ability to form a stable head of foam and plays an important role in beer staling. Lipid oxidation during wort production is of great interest because of its effect on beer quality: both lipids and their oxidation products are known to have adverse effects on beer flavor, whereas interactions between lipids and protein films stabilizing the gas bubbles are thought to cause the collapse of foam. In this background, the aim of this research was the characterization of the lipid content during a brewing process for evaluating the influence of both technological steps and yeast biomass in the lipid composition of beer. Lipid contents and their fatty acid profile were evaluated in brewing raw materials, wort, and beer. A high-resolution gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (HRGC-FID) system was used for fatty acid determination in lipid extracts. The results of the present study highlighted that the main technological steps influencing the lipid content in brewing byproduct and beer were clarification in a whirlpool and filtration. Moreover, the presence of metabolically active yeast cells (used as starter culture) were found to have a great influence on the fatty acids composition of lipids.

  10. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, S M; Rostagno, M H; Patterson, J A; Yoon, I; Fitzner, G; Eicher, S D

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on innate immunity and intestinal microbial ecology after weaning and transport stress. In a randomized complete block design, before weaning and in a split-plot analysis of a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of yeast culture (YY) and transport (TT) after weaning, 3-d-old pigs (n = 108) were randomly assigned within litter (block) to either a control (NY, milk only) or yeast culture diet (YY; delivered in milk to provide 0.1 g of yeast culture product/kg of BW) from d 4 to 21. At weaning (d 21), randomly, one-half of the NY and YY pigs were assigned to a 6-h transport (NY-TT and YY-TT) before being moved to nursery housing, and the other one-half were moved directly to nursery housing (NY-NT and YY-NT, where NT is no transport). The yeast treatment was a 0.2% S. cerevisiae fermentation product and the control treatment was a 0.2% grain blank in feed for 2 wk. On d 1 before transport and on d 1, 4, 7, and 14 after transport, blood was collected for leukocyte assays, and mesenteric lymph node, jejunal, and ileal tissue, and jejunal, ileal, and cecal contents were collected for Toll-like receptor expression (TLR); enumeration of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, and lactobacilli; detection of Salmonella; and microbial analysis. After weaning, a yeast × transport interaction for ADG was seen (P = 0.05). Transport affected (P = 0.09) ADFI after weaning. Yeast treatment decreased hematocrit (P = 0.04). A yeast × transport interaction was found for counts of white blood cells (P = 0.01) and neutrophils (P = 0.02) and for the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (P = 0.02). Monocyte counts revealed a transport (P = 0.01) effect. Interactions of yeast × transport (P = 0.001) and yeast × transport × day (P = 0.09) for TLR2 and yeast × transport (P = 0.08) for TLR4 expression in the mesenteric lymph node were detected. Day affected lactobacilli, total coliform, and E

  11. Temperature profiles of ethanol tolerance: effects of ethanol on the minimum and the maximum temperatures for growth of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces fragilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa-Correia, I.; Van Uden, N.

    1983-06-01

    Difficulties experienced by brewers with yeast performance in the brewing of lager at low temperatures has led the authors to study the effect of ethanol on the minimum temperature for growth (T. min). It has been found that both the maximum temperature (T max) and T min were adversely affected by ethanol and that ethanol tolerance prevailed at intermediate temperatures. (Refs. 8).

  12. Detection of plant growth enhancing features in psychrotolerant yeasts from Patagonia (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, María Cecilia; Fontenla, Sonia; Bruzone, María Clara; Fernández, Natalia Veronica; Dames, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    This study explores the biotechnological potential for plant production of twelve psychrotolerant yeasts strains from Northwest-Patagonia. These strains were isolated from different substrates associated with Nothofagus sp. in native forests and Vaccinium sp. in a commercial plantation. Yeasts characterization was performed using in vitro assays to evaluate the production of auxin-like compounds and siderophores, ability to solubilize inorganic phosphate and to reduce common plant pathogen growth. Strain YF8.3 identified as Aureobasidium pullullans was the main producer of auxin-like and siderophores compounds. Phosphate solubilization was a characteristic observed by strains L8.12 and CRUB1775 identified as Holtermaniella takashimae and Candida maritima, respectively. Different yeast strains were able to inhibit the growth of Verticillium dahliae PPRI5569 and Pythium aphanidermatum PPRI 9009, but they all failed to inhibit the growth of Fusarium oxysporum PPRI5457. The present study, suggests that yeasts present in different environments in Northwestern-Patagonian have physiological in vitro features which may influence plant growth. These results are promising for the developing of biological products based on Patagonian yeasts for plant production in cold-temperate regions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Main and interaction effects of acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on growth and ethanol productivity of yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmqvist, E.; Grage, H.; Meinander, N.Q.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden)

    1999-04-05

    The influence of the factors acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on the ethanol yield (Y{sub EtOH}) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers` yeast, S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581, and Candida shehatae NJ 23 was investigated using a 2{sup 3}-full factorial design with 3 centerpoints. The results indicated that acetic acid inhibited the fermentation by C. shehatae NJ 23 markedly more than by bakers` yeast, whereas no significant difference in tolerance towards the compounds was detected between the S. cerevisiae strains. Furfural and the lignin derived compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid did not affect any of the yeasts at the cell mass concentration used. The results indicated that the linear model was not adequate to describe the experimental data. Based on the results from the 2{sup 3}-full factorial experiment, an extended experiment was designed based on a central composite design to investigate the influence of the factors on the specific growth rate ({mu}), biomass yield (Y{sub x}), volumetric ethanol productivity (Q{sub EtOH}), and Y{sub EtOH}. Bakers` yeast was chosen in the extended experiment due to its better tolerance towards acetic acid, which makes it a more interesting organism for use in industrial fermentations of lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  14. Inhibition of yeast growth during long term exposure to laser light around 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Thomas; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the effect of a 1070 nm continuous wave Ytterbium fiber laser on exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells over a span of 4 hours. The cells were immobilized onto Concanavalin A covered microscope slides and the growth was measured using the area increase of the c......We have studied the effect of a 1070 nm continuous wave Ytterbium fiber laser on exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells over a span of 4 hours. The cells were immobilized onto Concanavalin A covered microscope slides and the growth was measured using the area increase...

  15. Does Political Ideology Affect Economic Growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2005-01-01

    their political ideology, affect economic performance. The paper presents evidence suggesting that rightwing societies have grown faster in the last decades than other democratic societies. Further analysis suggests that these societies develop better legal systems and less government intervention, which in turn......This paper asks the question whether political ideology affects economic growth. Voters may demand inefficient levels of redistribution and government intervention, and they may care too little for aspects that really matter for the economy. Their norms and perceptions of society might, via...

  16. Early growth trajectories affect sexual responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Who-Seung; Metcalfe, Neil B; Réale, Denis; Peres-Neto, Pedro R

    2014-02-22

    The trajectory of an animal's growth in early development has been shown to have long-term effects on a range of life-history traits. Although it is known that individual differences in behaviour may also be related to certain life-history traits, the linkage between early growth or development and individual variation in behaviour has received little attention. We used brief temperature manipulations, independent of food availability, to stimulate compensatory growth in juvenile three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus. Here, we examine how these manipulated growth trajectories affected the sexual responsiveness of the male fish at the time of sexual maturation, explore associations between reproductive behaviour and investment and lifespan and test whether the perceived time stress (until the onset of the breeding season) influenced such trade-offs. We found a negative impact of growth rate on sexual responsiveness: fish induced (by temperature manipulation) to grow slowest prior to the breeding season were consistently quickest to respond to the presence of a gravid female. This speed of sexual responsiveness was also positively correlated with the rate of development of sexual ornaments and time taken to build a nest. However, after controlling for effects of growth rate, those males that had the greatest sexual responsiveness to females had the shortest lifespan. Moreover, the time available to compensate in size before the onset of the breeding season (time stress) affected the magnitude of these effects. Our results demonstrate that developmental perturbations in early life can influence mating behaviour, with long-term effects on longevity.

  17. Occurrence and growth of yeasts in processed meat products - Implications for potential spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Dennis S; Jacobsen, Tomas; Jespersen, Lene; Koch, Anette Granly; Arneborg, Nils

    2008-11-01

    Spoilage of meat products is in general attributed to bacteria but new processing and storage techniques inhibiting growth of bacteria may provide opportunities for yeasts to dominate the microflora and cause spoilage of the product. With the aim of obtaining a deeper understanding of the potential role of yeast in spoilage of five different processed meat products (bacon, ham, salami and two different liver patés), yeasts were isolated, enumerated and identified during processing, in the final product and in the final product at the end of shelf life. Yeasts were isolated along the bacon production line in numbers up to 4.2 log (CFU/g). Smoking of the bacon reduced the yeast counts to lower than 1.0 log (CFU/g) or non-detectable levels. In general, yeasts were only isolated in low numbers during the production of salami, cooked ham and liver paté. In the final products yeasts were detected in low numbers in a few samples (3 out of 30) samples, 1.0-1.3 log (CFU/g). By the end of storage, yeasts were only detected in 1 out of 25 investigated samples 1.8 log (CFU/g). A combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods was used to identify the yeast microflora present during production of the processed meat products. The yeast microflora was complex with 4-12 different species isolated from the different production sites. In general, Candida zeylanoides, Debaryomyces hansenii and the newly described Candida alimentaria were found to be the dominant yeast species. In addition, three putatively previously undescribed yeast species were isolated. Fourteen isolates, representing seven different species isolated during the production of the processed meat products and one species isolated from spoiled, modified atmosphere packed, sliced ham, were screened for their ability to grow in a meat model substrate under a low oxygen/high carbon-dioxide atmosphere (0.5% O(2), 20% CO(2), 79.5% N(2)) at two different temperatures (5 and 8°C). Eleven out of the tested 14 strains were

  18. Plant growth-promoting traits of yeasts isolated from the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of Drosera spatulata Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shih-Feng; Sun, Pei-Feng; Lu, Hsueh-Yu; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Xiao, Hong-Su; Fang, Wei-Ta; Cheng, Bai-You; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms can promote plant growth through direct and indirect mechanisms. Compared with the use of bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi, the use of yeasts as plant growth-promoting (PGP) agents has not been extensively investigated. In this study, yeast isolates from the phyllosphere and rhizosphere of the medicinally important plant Drosera spatulata Lab. were assessed for their PGP traits. All isolates were tested for indole-3-acetic acid-, ammonia-, and polyamine-producing abilities, calcium phosphate and zinc oxide solubilizing ability, and catalase activity. Furthermore, the activities of siderophore, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase, and fungal cell wall-degrading enzymes were assessed. The antagonistic action of yeasts against pathogenic Glomerella cingulata was evaluated. The cocultivation of Nicotiana benthamiana with yeast isolates enhanced plant growth, indicating a potential yeast-plant interaction. Our study results highlight the potential use of yeasts as plant biofertilizers under controlled and field conditions. Copyright © 2016 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of growth conditions on adhesion of yeast Candida spp. and Pichia spp. to stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomičić, Ružica; Raspor, Peter

    2017-08-01

    An understanding of adhesion behavior of Candida and Pichia yeast under different environmental conditions is key to the development of effective preventive measures against biofilm-associated infection. Hence in this study we investigated the impact of growth medium and temperature on Candida and Pichia adherence using stainless steel (AISI 304) discs with different degrees of surface roughness (Ra = 25.20-961.9 nm), material typical for the food processing industry as well as medical devices. The adhesion of the yeast strains to stainless steel surfaces grown in Malt Extract broth (MEB) or YPD broth at three temperatures (7 °C, 37 °C, 43 °C for Candida strains and 7 °C, 27 °C, 32 °C for Pichia strains) was assessed by crystal violet staining. The results showed that the nutrient content of medium significantly influenced the quantity of adhered cells by the tested yeasts. Adhesion of C. albicans and C. glabrata on stainless steel surfaces were significantly higher in MEB, whereas for C. parapsilosis and C. krusei it was YPD broth. In the case with P. pijperi and P. membranifaciens, YPD broth was more effective in promoting adhesion than MEB. On the other hand, our data indicated that temperature is a very important factor which considerably affects the adhesion of these yeast. There was also significant difference in cell adhesion on all types of stainless steel surfaces for all tested yeast. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A multiplex culture system for the long-term growth of fission yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Céline; Coelho, Nelson C; Miller, Aaron W; Sananes, Maria Rosa Domingo; Dunham, Maitreya J; Denoual, Matthieu; Coudreuse, Damien

    2017-08-01

    Maintenance of long-term cultures of yeast cells is central to a broad range of investigations, from metabolic studies to laboratory evolution assays. However, repeated dilutions of batch cultures lead to variations in medium composition, with implications for cell physiology. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, powerful miniaturized chemostat setups, or ministat arrays, have been shown to allow for constant dilution of multiple independent cultures. Here we set out to adapt these arrays for continuous culture of a morphologically and physiologically distinct yeast, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, with the goal of maintaining constant population density over time. First, we demonstrated that the original ministats are incompatible with growing fission yeast for more than a few generations, prompting us to modify different aspects of the system design. Next, we identified critical parameters for sustaining unbiased vegetative growth in these conditions. This requires deletion of the gsf2 flocculin-encoding gene, along with addition of galactose to the medium and lowering of the culture temperature. Importantly, we improved the flexibility of the ministats by developing a piezo-pump module for the independent regulation of the dilution rate of each culture. This made it possible to easily grow strains that have different generation times in the same assay. Our system therefore allows for maintaining multiple fission yeast cultures in exponential growth, adapting the dilution of each culture over time to keep constant population density for hundreds of generations. These multiplex culture systems open the door to a new range of long-term experiments using this model organism. © 2017 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Murine FATP alleviates growth and biochemical deficiencies of yeast fat1Delta strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirusso, C C; Connell, E J; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2000-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ideal model eukaryote for studying fatty-acid transport. Yeast are auxotrophic for unsaturated fatty acids when grown under hypoxic conditions or when the fatty-acid synthase inhibitor cerulenin is included in the growth media. The FAT1 gene encodes a protein, Fat1p...

  2. Growth pattern of single fission yeast cells is bilinear and depends on temperature and DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgärtner, Stephan; Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva M

    2009-05-20

    Cell growth and division have to be tightly coordinated to keep the cell size constant over generations. Changes in cell size can be easily studied in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe because these cells have a cylindrical shape and grow only at the cell ends. However, the growth pattern of single cells is currently unclear. Linear, exponential, and bilinear growth models have been proposed. Here we measured the length of single fission yeast cells with high spatial precision and temporal resolution over the whole cell cycle by using time-lapse confocal microscopy of cells with green fluorescent protein-labeled plasma membrane. We show that the growth profile between cell separation and the subsequent mitosis is bilinear, consisting of two linear segments separated by a rate-change point (RCP). The change in growth rate occurred at the same relative time during the cell cycle and at the same relative extension for different temperatures. The growth rate before the RCP was independent of temperature, whereas the growth rate after the RCP increased with an increase in temperature, leading to clear bilinear growth profiles at higher temperatures. The RCP was not directly related to the initiation of growth at the new end (new end take-off). When DNA synthesis was inhibited by hydroxyurea, the RCP was not detected. This result suggests that completion of DNA synthesis is required for the increase in growth rate. We conclude that the growth of fission yeast cells is not a simple exponential growth, but a complex process with precise rates regulated by the events during the cell cycle.

  3. Replenishment and mobilization of intracellular nitrogen pools decouples wine yeast nitrogen uptake from growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Alicia; Sancho, Marta; Beltran, Gemma; Guillamon, José Manuel; Warringer, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    Wine yeast capacity to take up nitrogen from the environment and catabolize it to support population growth, fermentation, and aroma production is critical to wine production. Under nitrogen restriction, yeast nitrogen uptake is believed to be intimately coupled to reproduction with nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) suggested mediating this link. We provide a time- and strain-resolved view of nitrogen uptake, population growth, and NCR activity in wine yeasts. Nitrogen uptake was found to be decoupled from growth due to early assimilated nitrogen being used to replenish intracellular nitrogen pools rather than being channeled directly into reproduction. Internally accumulated nitrogen was later mobilized to support substantial population expansion after external nitrogen was depleted. On good nitrogen sources, the decoupling between nitrogen uptake and growth correlated well with relaxation of NCR repression, raising the potential that the latter may be triggered by intracellular build-up of nitrogen. No link between NCR activity and nitrogen assimilation or growth on poor nitrogen sources was found. The decoupling between nitrogen uptake and growth and its influence on NCR activity is of relevance for both wine production and our general understanding of nitrogen use.

  4. The Effect of Proanthocyanidins on Growth and Alcoholic Fermentation of Wine Yeast under Copper Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bo; Liu, Xingyan; Zhan, Jicheng; Li, Jingyuan; Huang, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) derived from the grape skin, as well as from grape seeds, grape stems, are an important group of polyphenols in wine. The aim of this study was to understand the effect of PAs (0.1, 1.0 g/L) on growth and alcoholic fermentation of 2 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commercial strain FREDDO and newly selected strain BH8) during copper-stress fermentation, using a simple model fermentation system. Our results showed that both PAs and Cu(2+) could pose significant inhibition effects on the growth of yeast cells, CO2 release, sugar consumption, and ethanol production during the initial phase of the fermentation. Compared to PAs, Cu(2+) performed more obvious inhibition on the yeast growth and fermentation. However, adding 1.0 g/L PAs increased in the vitality and metabolism activity of yeast cells at the mid-exponential phase of fermentation in the mediums with no copper and 0.1 mM Cu(2+) added, shortened the period of wine fermentation, and decreased the copper residues. It indicated that PAs could improve the ability of wine yeast to resist detrimental effects under copper-stress fermentation condition, maintaining cells metabolic activity, and fermentation could be controlled by manipulating PAs supplementation.

  5. Oxygen Consumption by Postfermentation Wine Yeast Lees: Factors Affecting Its Rate and Extent under Oenological Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Volker; Müller, Jonas; Schmidt, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Postfermentation wine yeast lees show antioxidant properties based on their ability to consume dissolved oxygen. The oxygen consumption capacity of suspended yeast lees obtained after fermentations with six commercial active dry yeast strains was investigated in model, white and red wines using fluorescence-based oxygen sensors operating in a nondestructive way. In model solution, the oxygen consumption rate of yeast lees was shown to depend on their amount, yeast strain, sulfur dioxide and t...

  6. Growth/no growth interfaces of table olive related yeasts for natamycin, citric acid and sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-López, F N; Bautista-Gallego, J; Romero-Gil, V; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2012-04-16

    The present work uses a logistic/probabilistic model to obtain the growth/no growth interfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Candida boidinii (three yeast species commonly isolated from table olives) as a function of the diverse combinations of natamycin (0-30 mg/L), citric acid (0.00-0.45%) and sodium chloride (3-6%). Mathematical models obtained individually for each yeast species showed that progressive concentrations of citric acid decreased the effect of natamycin, which was only observed below 0.15% citric acid. Sodium chloride concentrations around 5% slightly increased S. cerevisiae and C. boidinii resistance to natamycin, although concentrations above 6% of NaCl always favoured inhibition by this antimycotic. An overall growth/no growth interface, built considering data from the three yeast species, revealed that inhibition in the absence of citric acid and at 4.5% NaCl can be reached using natamycin concentrations between 12 and 30 mg/L for growth probabilities between 0.10 and 0.01, respectively. Results obtained in this survey show that is not advisable to use jointly natamycin and citric acid in table olive packaging because of the observed antagonistic effects between both preservatives, but table olives processed without citric acid could allow the application of the antifungal.

  7. Yeasts isolated from industrial maltings can suppress Fusarium growth and formation of gushing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitila, Arja; Sarlin, Tuija; Kotaviita, Erja; Huttunen, Timo; Home, Silja; Wilhelmson, Annika

    2007-11-01

    Fusarium infection of barley and malt can cause severe problems in the malting and brewing industry. In addition to being potential mycotoxin producers, Fusarium fungi are known to cause beer gushing (spontaneous overfoaming of beer). Cereal-derived bacteria and yeasts are potential biocontrol agents. In this study, the antifungal potential of selected yeasts (12 strains) derived from the industrial malting ecosystem was studied in vitro with a plate-screening assay. Several ascomycetous yeast strains showed antagonistic activity against field and storage moulds, Pichia anomala being the most effective strain. The effects of P. anomala VTT C-04565 (C565) were examined in laboratory scale malting with naturally contaminated barley exhibiting gushing potential. P. anomala C565 restricted Fusarium growth and hydrophobin production during malting and prevented beer gushing. Grain germination was not disturbed by the presence of yeast. Addition of P. anomala C565 into the steeping seemed to retard wort filtration, but the filtration performance was recovered when yeast culture was combined with Lactobacillus plantarum VTT E-78076. Well-characterized microbial cultures could be used as food-grade biocontrol agents and they offer a natural tool for tailoring of malt properties.

  8. Genetic Regulation of Phenotypic Plasticity and Canalisation in Yeast Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anupama; Dhole, Kaustubh; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a genotype to show diverse phenotypes in different environments is called phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity helps populations to evade extinctions in novel environments, facilitates adaptation and fuels evolution. However, most studies focus on understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic regulation in specific environments. As a result, while it's evolutionary relevance is well established, genetic mechanisms regulating phenotypic plasticity and their overlap with the environment specific regulators is not well understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly sensitive to the environment, which acts as not just external stimulus but also as signalling cue for this unicellular, sessile organism. We used a previously published dataset of a biparental yeast population grown in 34 diverse environments and mapped genetic loci regulating variation in phenotypic plasticity, plasticity QTL, and compared them with environment-specific QTL. Plasticity QTL is one whose one allele exhibits high plasticity whereas the other shows a relatively canalised behaviour. We mapped phenotypic plasticity using two parameters-environmental variance, an environmental order-independent parameter and reaction norm (slope), an environmental order-dependent parameter. Our results show a partial overlap between pleiotropic QTL and plasticity QTL such that while some plasticity QTL are also pleiotropic, others have a significant effect on phenotypic plasticity without being significant in any environment independently. Furthermore, while some plasticity QTL are revealed only in specific environmental orders, we identify large effect plasticity QTL, which are order-independent such that whatever the order of the environments, one allele is always plastic and the other is canalised. Finally, we show that the environments can be divided into two categories based on the phenotypic diversity of the population within them and the two categories have differential regulators of

  9. Growth control of the eukaryote cell: a systems biology study in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrillo Juan I

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell growth underlies many key cellular and developmental processes, yet a limited number of studies have been carried out on cell-growth regulation. Comprehensive studies at the transcriptional, proteomic and metabolic levels under defined controlled conditions are currently lacking. Results Metabolic control analysis is being exploited in a systems biology study of the eukaryotic cell. Using chemostat culture, we have measured the impact of changes in flux (growth rate on the transcriptome, proteome, endometabolome and exometabolome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each functional genomic level shows clear growth-rate-associated trends and discriminates between carbon-sufficient and carbon-limited conditions. Genes consistently and significantly upregulated with increasing growth rate are frequently essential and encode evolutionarily conserved proteins of known function that participate in many protein-protein interactions. In contrast, more unknown, and fewer essential, genes are downregulated with increasing growth rate; their protein products rarely interact with one another. A large proportion of yeast genes under positive growth-rate control share orthologs with other eukaryotes, including humans. Significantly, transcription of genes encoding components of the TOR complex (a major controller of eukaryotic cell growth is not subject to growth-rate regulation. Moreover, integrative studies reveal the extent and importance of post-transcriptional control, patterns of control of metabolic fluxes at the level of enzyme synthesis, and the relevance of specific enzymatic reactions in the control of metabolic fluxes during cell growth. Conclusion This work constitutes a first comprehensive systems biology study on growth-rate control in the eukaryotic cell. The results have direct implications for advanced studies on cell growth, in vivo regulation of metabolic fluxes for comprehensive metabolic engineering, and for

  10. Growth promoting effects of prebiotic yeast cell wall products in starter broilers under an immune stress and Clostridium perfringens challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to investigate the growth promoting effects of supplementing different sources and concentrations of prebiotic yeast cell wall (YCW) products containing mannanoligosaccharides in starter broilers under an immune stress and Clostridium perfringens challenge. Through a series ...

  11. Combined effects of sugarcane bagasse extract and Zinc(II) ions on the growth and bioaccumulation properties of yeast isolates.

    OpenAIRE

    Geetanjali Basak; CHARUMATHI D; NILANJANA DAS

    2011-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of zinc(II) ions by yeast isolates viz. Candida rugosa and Cryptococcus laurentii was investigated in different growth media. Both the isolates showed maximum bioaccumulation of zinc(II) in the medium prepared from sugarcane bagasse extract. The growth and zinc(II) bioaccumulation properties of yeasts in sugar cane bagasse extract were tested as a function of pH, temperature and initial metal concentrations. The combined effects of sugar extracted from bagasse and initial zinc...

  12. Modeling tumor predisposing FH mutations in yeast: effects on fumarase activity, growth phenotype and gene expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Antti; Ylisaukko-Oja, Sanna S K; Kiuru, Maija; Takatalo, Maarit S; Salmikangas, Paula; Tuimala, Jarno; Arango, Diego; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Jäntti, Jussi

    2006-03-15

    Heterozygous mutations in the fumarase (FH) gene cause the tumor predisposition syndrome hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (MIM 605839). While most families segregate a benign phenotype of multiple leiomyomas, others display a phenotype with early-onset renal cancer and leiomyosarcoma. Modifier genes may play a role in this, but an alternative explanation is simple genotype-phenotype association. FH mutations predisposing to cancer appear to be truncating or in fully conserved amino acids, suggesting that mutations severely affecting FH activity might predispose to malignancy. In the present study, we analyzed 2 conserved fumarase mutations in yeast. H153R has been described in 3 cancer predisposition families; whereas all 3 reported K187R families have displayed the benign phenotype. Examining H153R and K187R should clarify whether cancer-related FH mutations differ from their benign phenotype-associated counterparts. Yeast strains containing the 2 mutations, and knockout and wild type (WT) references, were created and the growth phenotypes studied on selected carbon sources to assess mitochondrial function. Additionally, Fum1 protein production and activity were measured, and the strains were subjected to transcriptional profiling. On nonfermentable lactate medium, the fumarase knockout strains did not grow, whereas the mutants showed no differences, as compared to WT yeast. Although both mutant strains produced fumarase, a considerable decrease in enzyme activity was seen in mutants with respect to WT. Transcription of the majority of Krebs cycle enzymes was downregulated in response to mutations in fumarase. In conclusion, both mutants displayed some, albeit greatly reduced, fumarase activity. This activity was sufficient to support normal growth on nonfermentable carbon source, unlike the deletion phenotype, demonstrating the significance of the residual activity. The findings support the hypothesis that modifier gene(s), rather than phenotype

  13. The expression of glycerol facilitators from various yeast species improves growth on glycerol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mathias; Islam, Zia ul; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen;

    2016-01-01

    of predicted glycerol facilitators (Fps1 homologues) from superior glycerol-utilizing yeast species such as Pachysolen tannophilus, Komagataella pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica and Cyberlindnera jadinii significantly improves the growth performance on glycerol of the previously selected glycerol-consuming S....... cerevisiae wild-type strain (CBS 6412-13A). The maximum specific growth rate increased from 0.13 up to 0.18 h−1 and a biomass yield coefficient of 0.56 gDW/gglycerol was observed. These results pave the way for exploiting the assets of glycerol in the production of fuels, chemicals and pharmaceuticals based...

  14. Divergence of the yeast transcription factor FZF1 affects sulfite resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth K Engle

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression are commonly observed during evolution. However, the phenotypic consequences of expression divergence are frequently unknown and difficult to measure. Transcriptional regulators provide a mechanism by which phenotypic divergence can occur through multiple, coordinated changes in gene expression during development or in response to environmental changes. Yet, some changes in transcriptional regulators may be constrained by their pleiotropic effects on gene expression. Here, we use a genome-wide screen for promoters that are likely to have diverged in function and identify a yeast transcription factor, FZF1, that has evolved substantial differences in its ability to confer resistance to sulfites. Chimeric alleles from four Saccharomyces species show that divergence in FZF1 activity is due to changes in both its coding and upstream noncoding sequence. Between the two closest species, noncoding changes affect the expression of FZF1, whereas coding changes affect the expression of SSU1, a sulfite efflux pump activated by FZF1. Both coding and noncoding changes also affect the expression of many other genes. Our results show how divergence in the coding and promoter region of a transcription factor alters the response to an environmental stress.

  15. Divergence of the yeast transcription factor FZF1 affects sulfite resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Elizabeth K; Fay, Justin C

    2012-01-01

    Changes in gene expression are commonly observed during evolution. However, the phenotypic consequences of expression divergence are frequently unknown and difficult to measure. Transcriptional regulators provide a mechanism by which phenotypic divergence can occur through multiple, coordinated changes in gene expression during development or in response to environmental changes. Yet, some changes in transcriptional regulators may be constrained by their pleiotropic effects on gene expression. Here, we use a genome-wide screen for promoters that are likely to have diverged in function and identify a yeast transcription factor, FZF1, that has evolved substantial differences in its ability to confer resistance to sulfites. Chimeric alleles from four Saccharomyces species show that divergence in FZF1 activity is due to changes in both its coding and upstream noncoding sequence. Between the two closest species, noncoding changes affect the expression of FZF1, whereas coding changes affect the expression of SSU1, a sulfite efflux pump activated by FZF1. Both coding and noncoding changes also affect the expression of many other genes. Our results show how divergence in the coding and promoter region of a transcription factor alters the response to an environmental stress.

  16. The main determinants affecting economic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Teodor BOLDEANU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Growth theories highlight the evolution and trends in economic thought that shaped the way economic growth is perceived. From the early works of Adam Smith and Malthus to the present day researchers have tried to find the most important determinates that influence growth by formulating new and improved theories and models. In this article we try to offer our point of view in the evolution of the main factors that have an impact on economic growth. There is still not a consensus on the key determinants of growth and an all-encompassing model that includes all the influences has not yet been elaborated.

  17. Use of an acidophilic yeast strain to enable the growth of leaching bacteria on solid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Yi; Yin, Huaqun; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a Candida digboiensis strain was isolated from a heap leaching plant in Zambia and used in double-layer agar plate to efficiently isolate and purify leaching bacteria. Unlike Acidiphilium sp., the yeast strain was tetrathionate tolerant and could metabolize a great range of organic compounds including organic acids. These properties allowed the yeast strain to enable and fasten the growth of iron and sulfur oxidizers on double-layer agar plate. The isolates were identified as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans FOX1, Leptospirillun ferriphilum BN, and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZMB. These three leaching bacteria were inhibited by organic acids such as acetic and propionic acids; however, their activities were enhanced by Candida digboiensis NB under dissolved organic matter stress.

  18. Aureobasidin A arrests growth of yeast cells through both ceramide intoxication and deprivation of essential inositolphosphorylceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerantola, Vanessa; Guillas, Isabelle; Roubaty, Carole

    2009-01-01

    , 2Delta.YDC1 cells stop growing when exposed to Aureobasidin A (AbA), an inhibitor of the inositolphosphorylceramide synthase AUR1, yet their ceramide levels remain very low. This finding argues against a current hypothesis saying that yeast cells do not require inositolphosphorylceramides and die...... in the presence of AbA only because ceramides build up to toxic concentrations. Moreover, W303lag1Delta lac1Delta ypc1Delta ydc1Delta cells, reported to be AbA resistant, stop growing on AbA after a certain number of cell divisions, most likely because AbA blocks the biosynthesis of anomalous...... inositolphosphorylsphingosides. Thus, data argue that inositolphosphorylceramides of yeast, the equivalent of mammalian sphingomyelins, are essential for growth. Data also clearly confirm that wild-type strains, when exposed to AbA, immediately stop growing because of ceramide intoxication, long before...

  19. Oscillatory, stochastic and chaotic growth rate fluctuations in permittistatically controlled yeast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, H M; Davey, C L; Woodward, A M; Edmonds, A N; Lee, A W; Kell, D B

    1996-01-01

    We describe a continuous culture system related to the turbidostat, but using a feedback system based on biomass estimation from the dielectric permittivity of the cell suspension rather than its optical density. It is shown that this system provides an excellent method of maintaining a constant biomass level within a fermentor. The computer-controlled system was able to effect the essentially continuous registration of growth rate by monitoring the rate of medium addition via the time-dependent activity of the pump. At some biomass setpoints for aerobically grown cultures of baker's yeast substantial time-dependent fluctuations in the growth rate of the culture were thereby observed. At some biomass setpoints, however, or under anaerobic conditions, or when using a non-Crabtree yeast, the growth rate was constant, indicating that the fluctuations were inherent to the biological system and not simply a property of the fermentor and control system. A variety of time series analyses (Fourier transformations, Hurst and Lyapunov exponents, the determination of embedding dimension, and non-linear time series predictions based on the methodology of Sugihara and May) were used to demonstrate, for the first time, that as well as stochastic and periodic components these fluctuations exhibited deterministic chaos. 'Trivial predictors' were unable to give accurate predictions of the growth rate in these cultures. The growth rate fluctuations were studied further by means of offline measurements of changes in percentage viability, bud count, and in the external ethanol and glucose concentrations; these data and other evidence suggested that the growth rate fluctuations were closely linked to the primary respiro-fermentative metabolism of this organism. The identification of chaotic growth rates in cell cultures suggests that there may be novel methods for controlling the growth of such cultures.

  20. GROWTH RATE AND IDENTIFICATION OF YEASTS IN THREE DIFFERENT MEDIA: FLOUR, SPROUT OF CEREALS AND COMMERCIAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P DEHGHAN

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The yeasts are a large group of fungi. In addition to their different uses in food industries and pharmacology they can also cause human and animal infections under predisposing factors. For investigating the yeast"s growth phases and diagnosis of the species, they should culture in media from natural sources like the seeds on the commercial media. According to yeast"s nutritinal requierments and considering the various nutritional materials of seeds like wheat, rice, barney and better use of these seed"s compounds during sprouting, this research was done with the aim of measurment of growth rate and yeasts characterization in such media. Methods. For making seeds media, a fixed quantity of seed"s flour or sprout"s flour was added to a certain amount of agar in acidotic condition (pH=5.8. The germination of seeds was done by Hus method and for colony counting Mc, Farland tubes were used and microscopic and macroscopic characteristics were investigated and compared in both synthetic and seed media Results. The results showed that the rate of yeasts growth in all germinated seeds was more than the seeds themeselves. Statistical analysis showed no significal difference between the growth rate of yeasts in both wheat and barney sprout compared to the commercial media. In the microscopic studies, the species of Candida albicans in wheat flour has produced more chlamydoconidia than the synthetic medium of corn meal agar. Also production of the capsule in C.neoformans in the seed"s media has been better than the synthetic media. Discussion. According to the promising results obtained from the present study regard to the growth rate and differentiation of the fungal species in such media, standardization and mass production of them in our country would seem to be an productive step towards self sufficiency.

  1. Expression of Bax in yeast affects not only the mitochondria but also vacuolar integrity and intracellular protein traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrova, Irina; Toby, Garabet G; Tili, Esmerina

    2004-01-01

    Bax-induced lethality in yeast is accompanied by morphological changes in mitochondria, giving rise to a reduced number of swollen tubules. Although these changes are completely abolished upon coexpression of the Bax inhibitor, Bcl-2, coexpression of Bax with Bax inhibiting-glutathione S-transfer......Bax-induced lethality in yeast is accompanied by morphological changes in mitochondria, giving rise to a reduced number of swollen tubules. Although these changes are completely abolished upon coexpression of the Bax inhibitor, Bcl-2, coexpression of Bax with Bax inhibiting-glutathione S......-transferase (BI-GST) leads to aggregation, but not fusion of the mitochondria. In addition, Bax affects the integrity of yeast vacuoles, resulting in the disintegration and eventual loss of the organelles, and the disruption of intracellular protein traffic. While Bcl-2 coexpression only partially corrects...

  2. Oxygen Consumption by Postfermentation Wine Yeast Lees: Factors Affecting Its Rate and Extent under Oenological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Müller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postfermentation wine yeast lees show antioxidant properties based on their ability to consume dissolved oxygen. The oxygen consumption capacity of suspended yeast lees obtained after fermentations with six commercial active dry yeast strains was investigated in model, white and red wines using fluorescence-based oxygen sensors operating in a nondestructive way. In model solution, the oxygen consumption rate of yeast lees was shown to depend on their amount, yeast strain, sulfur dioxide and temperature. It is slightly lower in red than in white wines. It is strongly decreased by current levels of free sulfur dioxide, thus excluding the complementary use of both as antioxidants in wine. However, in 25 randomly sampled white wines produced under commercial conditions, the rate and extent of oxygen consumption during the first six months of postfermentation had no significant correlation with any of these interacting factors, making it difficult to predict the actual antioxidant effect of yeast lees. In these wines, yeast lees consumed 0 to 47 % of the dissolved oxygen. Although total oxygen consumption capacity of yeast lees is not a limiting factor under commercial winemaking conditions, their oxygen consumption proceeds at a limited rate that reduces but cannot totally prevent concomitant chemical oxidation of the wine.

  3. Oxygen Consumption by Postfermentation Wine Yeast Lees: Factors Affecting Its Rate and Extent under Oenological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jonas; Schmidt, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Summary Postfermentation wine yeast lees show antioxidant properties based on their ability to consume dissolved oxygen. The oxygen consumption capacity of suspended yeast lees obtained after fermentations with six commercial active dry yeast strains was investigated in model, white and red wines using fluorescence-based oxygen sensors operating in a nondestructive way. In model solution, the oxygen consumption rate of yeast lees was shown to depend on their amount, yeast strain, sulfur dioxide and temperature. It is slightly lower in red than in white wines. It is strongly decreased by current levels of free sulfur dioxide, thus excluding the complementary use of both as antioxidants in wine. However, in 25 randomly sampled white wines produced under commercial conditions, the rate and extent of oxygen consumption during the first six months of postfermentation had no significant correlation with any of these interacting factors, making it difficult to predict the actual antioxidant effect of yeast lees. In these wines, yeast lees consumed 0 to 47% of the dissolved oxygen. Although total oxygen consumption capacity of yeast lees is not a limiting factor under commercial winemaking conditions, their oxygen consumption proceeds at a limited rate that reduces but cannot totally prevent concomitant chemical oxidation of the wine. PMID:28115896

  4. High-throughput screening for growth inhibitors using a yeast model of familial paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancos, Irina; Bida, John Paul; Tian, Defeng; Bundrick, Mary; John, Kristen; Holte, Molly Nelson; Her, Yeng F; Evans, Debra; Saenz, Dyana T; Poeschla, Eric M; Hook, Derek; Georg, Gunda; Maher, L James

    2013-01-01

    Classical tumor suppressor genes block neoplasia by regulating cell growth and death. A remarkable puzzle is therefore presented by familial paraganglioma (PGL), a neuroendocrine cancer where the tumor suppressor genes encode subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), an enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of central metabolism. Loss of SDH initiates PGL through mechanisms that remain unclear. Could this metabolic defect provide a novel opportunity for chemotherapy of PGL? We report the results of high throughput screening to identify compounds differentially toxic to SDH mutant cells using a powerful S. cerevisiae (yeast) model of PGL. Screening more than 200,000 compounds identifies 12 compounds that are differentially toxic to SDH-mutant yeast. Interestingly, two of the agents, dequalinium and tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), are anti-malarials with the latter reported to be a glycolysis inhibitor. We show that four of the additional hits are potent inhibitors of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Because alcohol dehydrogenase regenerates NAD(+) in glycolytic cells that lack TCA cycle function, this result raises the possibility that lactate dehydrogenase, which plays the equivalent role in human cells, might be a target of interest for PGL therapy. We confirm that human cells deficient in SDH are differentially sensitive to a lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor.

  5. Ethanol and Acetate Acting as Carbon/Energy Sources Negatively Affect Yeast Chronological Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Orlandi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chronological lifespan (CLS is defined as the length of time that a population of nondividing cells can survive in stationary phase. In this phase, cells remain metabolically active, albeit at reduced levels, and responsive to environmental signals, thus simulating the postmitotic quiescent state of mammalian cells. Many studies on the main nutrient signaling pathways have uncovered the strong influence of growth conditions, including the composition of culture media, on CLS. In this context, two byproducts of yeast glucose fermentation, ethanol and acetic acid, have been proposed as extrinsic proaging factors. Here, we report that ethanol and acetic acid, at physiological levels released in the exhausted medium, both contribute to chronological aging. Moreover, this combined proaging effect is not due to a toxic environment created by their presence but is mainly mediated by the metabolic pathways required for their utilization as carbon/energy sources. In addition, measurements of key enzymatic activities of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis, together with respiration assays performed in extreme calorie restriction, point to a long-term quiescent program favoured by glyoxylate/gluconeogenesis flux contrary to a proaging one based on the oxidative metabolism of ethanol/acetate via TCA and mitochondrial respiration.

  6. The fission yeast inhibitor of growth (ING) protein Png1p functions in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yang; Pan, Xian; Lei, Bing-Kun; Chang, Cheng; Liu, Zheng-Xun; Lu, Hong

    2010-05-21

    In budding yeast and human cells, ING (inhibitor of growth) tumor suppressor proteins play important roles in response to DNA damage by modulating chromatin structure through collaborating with histone acetyltransferase or histone deacetylase complexes. However, the biological functions of ING family proteins in fission yeast are poorly defined. Here, we report that Png1p, a fission yeast ING homolog protein, is required for cell growth under normal and DNA-damaged conditions. Png1p was further confirmed to regulate histone H4 acetylation through collaboration with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase 1 (Mst1). Additionally, both fission yeast PNG1 and MST1 can functionally complement their budding yeast correspondence homologs YNG2 and ESA1, respectively. These results suggest that ING proteins in fission yeast might also conserve function, similar to ING proteins in budding yeast and human cells. We also showed that decreased acetylation in Deltapng1 cells resulted in genome-wide down-regulation of 756 open reading frames, including the central DNA repair gene RAD22. Overexpression of RAD22 partially rescued the png1 mutant phenotype under both normal and DNA-damaged conditions. Furthermore, decreased expression of RAD22 in Deltapng1 cells was confirmed to be caused by decreased H4 acetylation at its promoter. Altogether, these results indicate that Png1p is required for histone H4 acetylation and functions upstream of RAD22 in the DNA damage response pathway.

  7. YODA: Software to facilitate high-throughput analysis of chronological life span, growth rate, and survival in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Christopher J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most widely studied model organisms in aging-related science. Although several genetic modifiers of yeast longevity have been identified, the utility of this system for longevity studies has been limited by a lack of high-throughput assays for quantitatively measuring survival of individual yeast cells during aging. Results Here we describe the Yeast Outgrowth Data Analyzer (YODA, an automated system for analyzing population survival of yeast cells based on the kinetics of outgrowth measured by optical density over time. YODA has been designed specifically for quantification of yeast chronological life span, but can also be used to quantify growth rate and survival of yeast cells in response to a variety of different conditions, including temperature, nutritional composition of the growth media, and chemical treatments. YODA is optimized for use with a Bioscreen C MBR shaker/incubator/plate reader, but is also amenable to use with any standard plate reader or spectrophotometer. Conclusions We estimate that use of YODA as described here reduces the effort and resources required to measure chronological life span and analyze the resulting data by at least 15-fold.

  8. Effect of inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate and immune parameters in Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutchanee Chotikachinda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of dietary inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate, and immune parameters in pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated. Three dosages of inactive yeast cell wall (0, 1, and 2 g kg-1 were tested in three replicate groups of juvenile shrimps with an average initial weight of 7.15±0.05 g for four weeks. There was no significant difference in final weight, survival rate, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, feed intake, protein efficiency ratio, and apparent net protein utilization of each treatments. However, different levels of inactive yeast cell wall showed an effect on certain immune parameters (p<0.05. Total hemocyte counts, granular hemocyte count, and bacterial clearance were better in shrimp fed diets supplemented with 1 and 2 g kg-1 inactive yeast cell wall as compared with thecontrol group.

  9. The effect of growth conditions on production and excretion of extracellular antigens by three ascomycetous yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelhoven, W J; Slingerland, R J; Notermans, S

    1988-01-01

    Ascomycetous yeasts produce extracellular antigens that are almost specific for the species. The antigen production by Hansenula wickerhamii and Stephanoascus ciferrii was independent of the carbon source and was proportional to the final cell density of the cultures. The same was true of chemostat cultures of Stephanoascus ciferrii, irrespective of the dilution rate and whether glucose or ammonia was the limiting nutrient. In cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, antigen excretion mainly took place in the late exponential growth phase. Large amounts of antigen were extracted from the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A small amount was detected in the cytoplasm.

  10. Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by an engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Bhawna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recalcitrant nature of cellulosic materials and the high cost of enzymes required for efficient hydrolysis are the major impeding steps to their practical usage for ethanol production. Ideally, a recombinant microorganism, possessing the capability to utilize cellulose for simultaneous growth and ethanol production, is of great interest. We have reported recently the use of a yeast consortium for the functional presentation of a mini-cellulosome structure onto the yeast surface by exploiting the specific interaction of different cohesin-dockerin pairs. In this study, we engineered a yeast consortium capable of displaying a functional mini-cellulosome for the simultaneous growth and ethanol production on phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC. Results A yeast consortium composed of four different populations was engineered to display a functional mini-cellulosome containing an endoglucanase, an exoglucanase and a β-glucosidase. The resulting consortium was demonstrated to utilize PASC for growth and ethanol production. The final ethanol production of 1.25 g/L corresponded to 87% of the theoretical value and was 3-fold higher than a similar yeast consortium secreting only the three cellulases. Quantitative PCR was used to enumerate the dynamics of each individual yeast population for the two consortia. Results indicated that the slight difference in cell growth cannot explain the 3-fold increase in PASC hydrolysis and ethanol production. Instead, the substantial increase in ethanol production is consistent with the reported synergistic effect on cellulose hydrolysis using the displayed mini-cellulosome. Conclusions This report represents a significant step towards the goal of cellulosic ethanol production. This engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome demonstrated not only the ability to grow on the released sugars from PASC but also a 3-fold higher ethanol production than a similar yeast

  11. How Does Social Trust Affect Economic Growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    Social capital in the form of generalized trust has been shown to be a determinant of economic growth in a number of studies. Other studies have explored other consequences of trust, such as its effects on governance, corruption, education and investment. This paper connects the two strands...

  12. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  13. Effect of ultrafiltration of yeast extracts on their ability to promote lactic acid bacteria growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, H; Champagne, C P; Conway, J; Degré, R

    1999-11-01

    Five yeast extracts (YE) were fractionated by ultrafiltration (UF) with 1, 3, and 10 kDa molecular weight cutoff membranes, concentrated by freeze-drying, and the resulting powders of yeast extract filtrates (YEF) were evaluated for their growth-promoting properties on nine cultures of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). There was an increase in alpha-amino nitrogen content of the YEF powders as the pore size of the UF membranes used to filter the YE solutions decreased. The source of YE had a much greater effect than UF on the growth of LAB. This was also the case for the YEF contents in total and alpha-amino nitrogen. Growth curves of the LAB showed that maximum growth rate (mumax) data were on average 30% higher with bakers' YE than with brewers' YE, while maximum optical density (ODmax) values were on average 16% higher with bakers' YE. This could be related to the higher nitrogen content of the bakers' YE used in this study. Modification by UF of the YE had no significant influence on the growth of 4 of the 9 LAB strains. The three strains of Lactobacillus casei were negatively influenced by UF, as they did not grow as well in the media containing the YEF obtained after filtering with 1 and 3 kDa membranes. On a total solids basis, the 2.5 x retentates from the 10 kDa membrane gave, on average, 4% lower mumax and 5% lower ODmax values as compared to cultures where the corresponding YEF was used as medium supplement. This could also be partially related to the different nitrogen contents of the filtrates and retentates.

  14. Does Political Ideology Affect Economic Growth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2005-01-01

    their political ideology, affect economic performance. The paper presents evidence suggesting that rightwing societies have grown faster in the last decades than other democratic societies. Further analysis suggests that these societies develop better legal systems and less government intervention, which in turn...

  15. Validation of a predictive model for the growth of chalk yeasts on bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgain, Anaïs; Bensoussan, Maurice; Dantigny, Philippe

    2015-07-02

    The present study focused on the effects of temperature, T, and water activity, aw, on the growth of Hyphopichia burtonii, Pichia anomala, and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera on Sabouraud Agar Medium. Cardinal values were estimated by means of cardinal models with inflection. All the yeasts were xerophilic, and they exhibited growth at 0.85 aw. The combined effects of T, aw, and pH on the growth of these species were described by the gamma-concept and validated on bread in the range of 15-25 °C, 0.91-0.97 aw, and pH 4.6-6.8. The optimum growth rates on bread were 2.88, 0.259, and 1.06 mm/day for H. burtonii, P. anomala, and S. fibuligera, respectively. The optimal growth rate of S. fibuligera on bread was about 2 fold that obtained on Sabouraud. Due to reproduction by budding, P. anomala exhibited low growth on Sabouraud and bread. However, this species is of major concern in the baker's industry because of the production of ethyl acetate in bread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth on Alpha-Ketoglutarate Increases Oxidative Stress Resistance in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bayliak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG is an important intermediate in cell metabolism, linking anabolic and catabolic processes. The effect of exogenous AKG on stress resistance in S. cerevisiae cells was studied. The growth on AKG increased resistance of yeast cells to stresses, but the effects depended on AKG concentration and type of stressor. Wild-type yeast cells grown on AKG were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide, menadione, and transition metal ions (Fe2+ and Cu2+ but not to ethanol and heat stress as compared with control ones. Deficiency in SODs or catalases abolished stress-protective effects of AKG. AKG-supplemented growth led to higher values of total metabolic activity, level of low-molecular mass thiols, and activities of catalase and glutathione reductase in wild-type cells compared with the control. The results suggest that exogenous AKG may enhance cell metabolism leading to induction of mild oxidative stress. It turn, it results in activation of antioxidant system that increases resistance of S. cerevisiae cells to H2O2 and other stresses. The presence of genes encoding SODs or catalases is required for the expression of protective effects of AKG.

  17. Divergence of the yeast transcription factor FZF1 affects sulfite resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Engle, Elizabeth K; Fay, Justin C

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we use a genome-wide screen for promoters that are likely to have diverged in function and identify a yeast transcription factor, FZF1, that has evolved substantial differences in its ability...

  18. Effect of organic acids on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipids have drawn increasing attention in recent years as promising raw materials for biodiesel production, and the use of lignocellulosic hydrolysates as carbon sources seems to be a feasible strategy for cost-effective lipid fermentation with oleaginous microorganisms on a large scale. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials with dilute acid, however, various kinds of inhibitors, especially large amounts of organic acids, will be produced, which substantially decrease the fermentability of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. To overcome the inhibitory effects of organic acids, it is critical to understand their impact on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous microorganisms. Results In our present work, we investigated for the first time the effect of ten representative organic acids in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on the growth and lipid accumulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans cells. In contrast to previous reports, we found that the toxicity of the organic acids to the cells was not directly related to their hydrophobicity. It is worth noting that most organic acids tested were less toxic than aldehydes to the cells, and some could even stimulate the growth and lipid accumulation at a low concentration. Unlike aldehydes, most binary combinations of organic acids exerted no synergistic inhibitory effects on lipid production. The presence of organic acids decelerated the consumption of glucose, whereas it influenced the utilization of xylose in a different and complicated way. In addition, all the organic acids tested, except furoic acid, inhibited the malic activity of T. fermentans. Furthermore, the inhibition of organic acids on cell growth was dependent more on inoculum size, temperature and initial pH than on lipid content. Conclusions This work provides some meaningful information about the effect of organic acid in lignocellulosic hydrolysates on the lipid production of

  19. Plant growth-promoting and antifungal activity of yeasts from dark chestnut soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Lyudmila V; Brazhnikova, Yelena V; Berzhanova, Ramza Z; Mukasheva, Togzhan D

    2015-06-01

    538 yeast strains were isolated from dark chestnut soil collected from under the plants of the legume family (Fabaceae). The greatest number of microorganisms is found at soil depth 10-20 cm. Among the 538 strains of yeast 77 (14.3%) strains demonstrated the ability to synthesize IAA. 15 strains were attributed to high IAA-producing yeasts (above 10 μg/ml). The most active strains were YA05 with 51.7 ± 2.1 μg/ml of IAA and YR07 with 45.3 ± 1.5 μg/ml. In the study of effect of incubation time on IAA production the maximum accumulation of IAA coincided with maximum rates of biomass: at 120 h for YR07 and at 144 h for strain YA05. IAA production increased when medium was supplemented with the L-tryptophan. 400 μg/ml of L-tryptophan showed maximum IAA production. 10 strains demonstrated the ability to inhibit the growth and development of phytopathogenic fungi. YA05 and YR07 strains formed the largest zones of inhibition compared to the other strains--from 21.6 ± 0.3 to 30.6 ± 0.5 mm. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed for YA05 against Phytophtora infestans and YR07 strains against Fusarium graminearum. YA05 and YR07 strains were identified as Aureobasidium pullulans YA05 (GenBank accession No JF160955) and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa YR07 (GenBank accession No JF160956).

  20. How Does Human Capital Affect on Growth in Different Economies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Safdari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The main objective of this study was to investigate how human capital can affect growth in different economies. Approach: For this purpose, we investigated the model, which the growth rate of total factor productivity depends on human capital stock level using a cross-country panel approach for 104 countries in five-year intervals during the 1980-2005. Results: The finding of this study showed that human capital through its effect on the speed of technology adoption from abroad has positive effect and significantly on growth in total samples of countries while human capital directly in developed countries enter negatively inverse developing countries. Conclusion: Moreover human capital affects growth in different ways it has more effects on per capital growth through technology/catch-up component than domestic innovation component. Moreover human capital of different ways has different effects on growth but in total it has positive effect on economic growth.

  1. How will Population Aging Affect Economic Growth?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡昉; 王美艳

    2007-01-01

    Not long ago,the problem of an aging population only emerged in developed countries once per capita GDP had reached a relatively high level.However,in today’s China,although the per capita GDP has remained low,the problem of growing old before becoming rich is looming.As China is not yet prosperous,economic development needs to be persistently upheld;however,will the aging problem cause economic growth to be challenged by labour shortages in the future? From a structural perspective,although continuous rural labour transfer can ease demand for urban labour,the problem now is that rural labourers are not always qualified to take on positions requiring ever-advancing skills,resulting in a skills drought.It could be claimed that this skills drought is due to a lack of education on the part of rural workers,yet university students with a formal education also encounter difficulties when hunting for a job.Does this indicate that the current education structure should be revised? The above questions suggest that China is currently facing a complicated and delicate situation with regard to the interrelated problems of economy,population,employment and education,and will continue to do so for a long period in the future.These problems require the cautious planning of overall and sustainable policies.The two"Domestic Column"articles this issue offer in-depth analyses of these problems and provide valuable policy suggestions.

  2. Methylation of yeast ribosomal protein S2 is elevated during stationary phase growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladror, Daniel T; Frey, Brian L; Scalf, Mark; Levenstein, Mark E; Artymiuk, Jacklyn M; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-03-14

    Ribosomes, as the center of protein translation in the cell, require careful regulation via multiple pathways. While regulation of ribosomal synthesis and function has been widely studied on the transcriptional and translational "levels," the biological roles of ribosomal post-translational modifications (PTMs) are largely not understood. Here, we explore this matter by using quantitative mass spectrometry to compare the prevalence of ribosomal methylation and acetylation for yeast in the log phase and the stationary phase of growth. We find that of the 27 modified peptides identified, two peptides experience statistically significant changes in abundance: a 1.9-fold decrease in methylation for k(Me)VSGFKDEVLETV of ribosomal protein S1B (RPS1B), and a 10-fold increase in dimethylation for r(DiMe)GGFGGR of ribosomal protein S2 (RPS2). While the biological role of RPS1B methylation has largely been unexplored, RPS2 methylation is a modification known to have a role in processing and export of ribosomal RNA. This suggests that yeast in the stationary phase increase methylation of RPS2 in order to regulate ribosomal synthesis. These results demonstrate the utility of mass spectrometry for quantifying dynamic changes in ribosomal PTMs.

  3. Lipid engineering reveals regulatory roles for membrane fluidity in yeast flocculation and oxygen-limited growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degreif, Daniel [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany); de Rond, Tristan [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bertl, Adam [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany); Keasling, Jay D. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Budin, Itay [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-03-18

    Cells modulate lipid metabolism in order to maintain membrane homeostasis. In this paper, we use a metabolic engineering approach to manipulate the stoichiometry of fatty acid unsaturation, a regulator of cell membrane fluidity, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, reduced lipid unsaturation triggered cell-cell adhesion (flocculation), a phenomenon characteristic of industrial yeast but uncommon in laboratory strains. We find that ER lipid saturation sensors induce expression of FLO1 – encoding a cell wall polysaccharide binding protein – independently of its canonical regulator. In wild-type cells, Flo1p-dependent flocculation occurs under oxygen-limited growth, which reduces unsaturated lipid synthesis and thus serves as the environmental trigger for flocculation. Transcriptional analysis shows that FLO1 is one of the most highly induced genes in response to changes in lipid unsaturation, and that the set of membrane fluidity-sensitive genes is globally activated as part of the cell's long-term response to hypoxia during fermentation. Finally, our results show how the lipid homeostasis machinery of budding yeast is adapted to carry out a broad response to an environmental stimulus important in biotechnology.

  4. Growth and nutrient uptake of Citrus rootstock varieties as affected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and nutrient uptake of Citrus rootstock varieties as affected poultry manure and NPK fertilizer in Ibadan, Southwestern Nigeria. ... Since plant height and stem diameter determine the quality of rootstock seedlings, poultry manure at 9 ...

  5. On the growth of scientific knowledge: yeast biology as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xionglei He

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The tempo and mode of human knowledge expansion is an enduring yet poorly understood topic. Through a temporal network analysis of three decades of discoveries of protein interactions and genetic interactions in baker's yeast, we show that the growth of scientific knowledge is exponential over time and that important subjects tend to be studied earlier. However, expansions of different domains of knowledge are highly heterogeneous and episodic such that the temporal turnover of knowledge hubs is much greater than expected by chance. Familiar subjects are preferentially studied over new subjects, leading to a reduced pace of innovation. While research is increasingly done in teams, the number of discoveries per researcher is greater in smaller teams. These findings reveal collective human behaviors in scientific research and help design better strategies in future knowledge exploration.

  6. Growth of Probiotic Bacteria in Trypticase Phytone Yeast Medium Supplemented with Crude Polysaccharides From Ganoderma lucidum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hamim, H. M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is a fungus usually used in traditional Chinese medicine. The high value of G. lucidum is related to its polysaccharides content. Crude polysaccharides from G. lucidum (GLCP were obtained using hot water extraction method. There is about 0.57 g of GLCP in 1 g crude of G. lucidum. The prebiotic potential of GLCP was tested against probiotic bacteria namely: Bifidobacterium longum BB536, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum G4, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei Shirota. The prebiotic potentials were studied in 10 mL basal Trypticase Phytone Yeast (abbreviated as bTPY medium (without glucose supplemented with various concentrations of GLCP (abbreviated as bTPYglcp (0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0%. bTPY medium supplemented with glucose (abbreviated as bTPYglu and inulin (abbreviated bTPYinu were used as comparison. Viable cell counts of the bacteria and the pH of the medium were determined during anaerobic incubation period of 0 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h at 37 °C. In the presence of carbohydrate source, cultures showed various degree of growth increment. With regards to the growth supporting property: bTPYglu, bTPYglu+glcp, bTPYglcp and bTPYinu were ranked first, second, third and fourth respectively. Interestingly, in bTPYglcp medium, bacterial growth increased with increasing GLCP concentrations when incubated until 24 h. B. longum BB536 was ranked first (10.53 log cfu/mL in term of their growth in this medium. Growth of B. pseudocatenulatum G4 was ranked second with 10.40 log cfu/mL. This study shows that, GLCP could support the growth of the bacteria tested.

  7. Intestinal microbial affects of yeast products on weaned and transport stressed pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Study objectives were to determine effects of a commercially available yeast product (XPC, Diamond-V Mills) and stress of transportation on total Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, coliforms, and Lactobacilli populations in the intestine of weaning pigs. In a RCB design with a 2 x 2 factorial ar...

  8. Relevant and selective activity of Pancratium illyricum L. against Candida albicans clinical isolates: a combined effect on yeast growth and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Antognoni, Fabiana; Iannello, Carmelina; Maxia, Andrea; Poli, Ferruccio; Gentilomi, Giovanna Angela

    2014-10-23

    Alkaloids present in plants of the Amaryllidaceae family are secondary metabolites of high biological interest, possessing a wide range of pharmacological activities. In the search for new plant-derived compounds with antimicrobial activities, two alkaloid extracts obtained from bulbs and leaves of Pancratium illyricum L., a plant of the Amarillydaceae family, were tested for their effect on bacterial and yeast growth. The broth microdilution susceptibility test was applied to study the effect of plant extracts on the growth of reference bacterial strains and Candida albicans reference and clinical isolates strains. Extracts obtained from the different parts of the plant were tested and compared with the pure components identified in the extracts. Since matrix metalloproteinase enzymes play a role in the dissemination process of Candida albicans, the effect of the bulb extract and pure alkaloids on in vitro collagenase activity was tested. Cell viability test was carried out on human embryo lung fibroblasts (HEL 299). Whilst both extracts did not show any inhibitory activity against neither Gram positive nor Gram negative bacteria, a strong antifungal activity was detected, in particular for the bulb extract. All clinical isolates were susceptible to the growth inhibitory activity of the bulb extract, with endpoint IC50 values ranging from 1.22 to 78 μg/mL. The pure alkaloids lycorine and vittatine, identified as components of the extract, were also assayed for their capacity of inhibiting the yeast growth, and lycorine turned very active, with endpoint IC50 values ranging from 0.89 to 28.5 μg/mL. A potent inhibition of the in vitro collagenase activity was found in the presence of the bulb extract, and this effect was much higher than that exerted by the pure alkaloids. Viability of cell lines tested was not affected by the extract. Taken together, results suggest that the extract of Pancratium illyricum may act as antifungal agent both directly on the yeast

  9. Supplemental diets containing yeast, sucrose, and soy powder enhance the survivorship, growth, and development of prey-limited cursorial spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the effects of a food spray mixture (‘wheast’) and its individual ingredients (sucrose, yeast, and toasted soy flour) on the survivorship, growth, and development of a cursorial spider, Hibana futilis Banks (Anyphaenidae). Some treatments included eggs of Helicoverpa zea, a favored prey...

  10. More Ideas for Monitoring Biological Experiments with the BBC Computer: Absorption Spectra, Yeast Growth, Enzyme Reactions and Animal Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presented are five ideas for A-level biology experiments using a laboratory computer interface. Topics investigated include photosynthesis, yeast growth, animal movements, pulse rates, and oxygen consumption and production by organisms. Includes instructions specific to the BBC computer system. (CW)

  11. Imp2, the PSTPIP homolog in fission yeast, affects sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506 and membrane trafficking in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Ayako; Higa, Mari [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Doi, Akira [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko, E-mail: sugiurar@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2015-02-13

    Cytokinesis is a highly ordered process that divides one cell into two cells, which is functionally linked to the dynamic remodeling of the plasma membrane coordinately with various events such as membrane trafficking. Calcineurin is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein phosphatase, which regulates multiple biological functions, such as membrane trafficking and cytokinesis. Here, we isolated imp2-c3, a mutant allele of the imp2{sup +} gene, encoding a homolog of the mouse PSTPIP1 (proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1), using a genetic screen for mutations that are synthetically lethal with calcineurin deletion in fission yeast. The imp2-c3 mutants showed a defect in cytokinesis with multi-septated phenotypes, which was further enhanced upon treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Notably, electron micrographs revealed that the imp2-c3 mutant cells accumulated aberrant multi-lamella Golgi structures and putative post-Golgi secretory vesicles, and exhibited fragmented vacuoles in addition to thickened septa. Consistently, imp2-c3 mutants showed a reduced secretion of acid phosphatase and defects in vacuole fusion. The imp2-c3 mutant cells exhibited a weakened cell wall, similar to the membrane trafficking mutants identified in the same genetic screen such as ypt3-i5. These findings implicate the PSTPIP1 homolog Imp2 in Golgi/vacuole function, thereby affecting various cellular processes, including cytokinesis and cell integrity. - Highlights: • We isolated imp2-c3, in a synthetic lethal screen with calcineurin in fission yeast. • The imp2{sup +} gene encodes a component of the actin contractile ring similar to Cdc15. • The imp2-c3 mutants showed defects in cytokinesis, which were exacerbated by FK506. • The imp2-c3 mutants were defective in membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. • Our study revealed a novel role for Imp2 in the Golgi/vacuolar membrane trafficking.

  12. Interactions Between Industrial Yeasts and Chemical Contaminants in Grape Juice Affect Wine Composition Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etjen Bizaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between four industrial wine yeast strains and grape juice chemical contaminants during alcoholic fermentation was studied. Industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AWRI 0838, S. cerevisiae mutant with low H2S production phenotype (AWRI 1640, interspecies hybrid of S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii (AWRI 1539 and a hybrid of AWRI 1640 and AWRI 1539 (AWRI 1810 were exposed separately to fungicides pyrimethanil (Pyr, 10 mg/L and fenhexamid (Fhx, 10 mg/L, as well as to the most common toxin produced by moulds on grapes, ochratoxin A (OTA, 5 μg/L, during alcoholic fermentation of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sauvignon blanc juice. Contaminants were found to strongly impair fermentation performance and metabolic activity of all yeast strains studied. The chemical profile of wine was analyzed by HPLC (volatile acidity, concentrations of ethanol, fructose, glucose, glycerol and organic acids and the aromatic profile was analyzed using a stable isotope dilution technique using GC/MS (ethyl esters, acetates and aromatic alcohols and Kitagawa tubes (H2S. The chemical composition of wine with added contaminants was in all cases significantly different from the control. Of particular note is that the quantity of aromatic compounds produced by yeast was significantly lower. Yeast’s capacity to remove contaminants from wine at the end of the alcoholic fermentation, and after extended contact (7 days was determined. All the strains were able to remove contaminants from the media, moreover, after extended contact, the concentration of contaminants was in most cases lower.

  13. Organelle Size Scaling of the Budding Yeast Vacuole by Relative Growth and Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yee-Hung M; Reyes, Lorena; Sohail, Saba M; Tran, Nancy K; Marshall, Wallace F

    2016-05-09

    It has long been noted that larger animals have larger organs compared to smaller animals of the same species, a phenomenon termed scaling [1]. Julian Huxley proposed an appealingly simple model of "relative growth"-in which an organ and the whole body grow with their own intrinsic rates [2]-that was invoked to explain scaling in organs from fiddler crab claws to human brains. Because organ size is regulated by complex, unpredictable pathways [3], it remains unclear whether scaling requires feedback mechanisms to regulate organ growth in response to organ or body size. The molecular pathways governing organelle biogenesis are simpler than organogenesis, and therefore organelle size scaling in the cell provides a more tractable case for testing Huxley's model. We ask the question: is it possible for organelle size scaling to arise if organelle growth is independent of organelle or cell size? Using the yeast vacuole as a model, we tested whether mutants defective in vacuole inheritance, vac8Δ and vac17Δ, tune vacuole biogenesis in response to perturbations in vacuole size. In vac8Δ/vac17Δ, vacuole scaling increases with the replicative age of the cell. Furthermore, vac8Δ/vac17Δ cells continued generating vacuole at roughly constant rates even when they had significantly larger vacuoles compared to wild-type. With support from computational modeling, these results suggest there is no feedback between vacuole biogenesis rates and vacuole or cell size. Rather, size scaling is determined by the relative growth rates of the vacuole and the cell, thus representing a cellular version of Huxley's model.

  14. Factors affecting growth and pigmentation of Penicillium caseifulvum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Haasum, I.; Steenstrup, L.D.;

    2002-01-01

    Color formation, metabolite production and growth of Penicillium caseifulvum were studied in order to elucidate factors contributing to. yellow discoloration of Blue Cheese caused by the mold. A screening experiment was set up to study the effect of pH, concentration of salt (NaCl), P, K, N, S, Mg...... and the trace metals Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn on yellow color formation, metabolite production and mold growth. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that the most important factor affecting yellow color formation was pH. The most pronounced formation of yellow color, supported by highest amount of colored metabolites......, appeared at low pH (pH 4). Mold growth was not correlated to the yellow color formation. Salt concentration was the most important factor affecting mold growth and length of lag phase. Production of secondary metabolites was strongly influenced by both pH and salt concentration. The screening results were...

  15. Effect of diet supplementation with live yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth performance, caecal ecosystem and health of growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Belhassen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the live yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the growth performance, caecal ecosystem and overall health of growing rabbits. A control diet was formulated (crude protein: 15.9%; neutral detergent fibre: 31.6% and another diet obtained by supplementing the control diet with 1 g of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (6.5×109 colony-forming units per kg of diet. Ninety 35-d old rabbits were allotted into 3 groups: TT (rabbits offered the supplemented diet from 17 d of age onwards, CT (rabbits offered supplemented diet from 35 d and CC (rabbits fed non-supplemented diet. Body weight (BW and feed intake were measured weekly and mortality was controlled daily. At 35, 42 and 77 d of age, 6 rabbits from each group were slaughtered and digestive physiological traits, serum clinical chemistry parameters, fermentation traits, and the composition of caecal microbiota examined. At 42 and 56 d of age, 10 rabbits from each group were injected intraperitoneally with 100 μg/animal of ovalbumin and blood samples were collected for examination of plasma immunological parameters. Throughout the experiment (5-11 wk, weight gain and feed intake (37.8 and 112.6 g/d, on av. were not affected by yeast, except for weight gain in the first week after weaning, which was the highest in TT animals among the 3 groups (48.1 vs. 43.9 and 44.2 g/d for TT, CC and CT, respectively; P=0.012. This may be due to the increased trend in feed intake (P=0.072 in the TT group (96.4 g/d compared to the others. Mortality (5/90 was low and did not differ among the 3 groups. Treatments had no effect on slaughter traits at the 3 sampling dates (35, 42 and 77 d. Only the weight of the empty caecum (% BW was higher (P=0.02 in CC (2.2% and CT (2.3% than in TT group (1.8% at 77 d of age. Treatments did not overtly affect the caecal microbiota, although the number of total anaerobic bacteria and Bacteroides were lower (108 and 107/g caecal digesta

  16. Discerning environmental factors affecting current tree growth in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienciala, Emil; Russ, Radek; Šantrůčková, Hana; Altman, Jan; Kopáček, Jiří; Hůnová, Iva; Štěpánek, Petr; Oulehle, Filip; Tumajer, Jan; Ståhl, Göran

    2016-12-15

    We examined the effect of individual environmental factors on the current spruce tree growth assessed from a repeated country-level statistical landscape (incl. forest) survey in the Czech Republic. An extensive set of variables related to tree size, competition, site characteristics including soil texture, chemistry, N deposition and climate was tested within a random-effect model to explain growth in the conditions of dominantly managed forest ecosystems. The current spruce basal area increment was assessed from two consecutive landscape surveys conducted in 2008/2009 and six years later in 2014/2015. Tree size, age and competition within forest stands were found to be the dominant explanatory variables, whereas the expression of site characteristics, environmental and climatic drives was weaker. The significant site variables affecting growth included soil C/N ratio and soil exchangeable acidity (pH KCl; positive response) reflecting soil chemistry, long-term N-deposition (averaged since 1975) in combination with soil texture (clay content) and Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), a drought index expressing moisture conditions. Sensitivity of growth to N-deposition was positive, although weak. SPI was positively related to and significant in explaining tree growth when expressed for the growth season. Except SPI, no significant relation of growth was determined to altitude-related variables (temperature, growth season length). We identified the current spruce growth optimum at elevations about 800ma.s.l. or higher in the conditions of the country. This suggests that at lower elevations, limitation by a more pronounced water deficit dominates, whereas direct temperature limitation may concern the less frequent higher elevations. The mixed linear model of spruce tree growth explained 55 and 65% of the variability with fixed and random effects included, respectively, and provided new insights on the current spruce tree growth and factors affecting it within the

  17. Screening the budding yeast genome reveals unique factors affecting K2 toxin susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Servienė

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how biotoxins kill cells is of prime importance in biomedicine and the food industry. The budding yeast (S. cerevisiae killers serve as a convenient model to study the activity of biotoxins consistently supplying with significant insights into the basic mechanisms of virus-host cell interactions and toxin entry into eukaryotic target cells. K1 and K2 toxins are active at the cell wall, leading to the disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequent cell death by ion leakage. K28 toxin is active in the cell nucleus, blocking DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression, thereby triggering apoptosis. Genome-wide screens in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae identified several hundred effectors of K1 and K28 toxins. Surprisingly, no such screen had been performed for K2 toxin, the most frequent killer toxin among industrial budding yeasts. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted several concurrent genome-wide screens in S. cerevisiae and identified 332 novel K2 toxin effectors. The effectors involved in K2 resistance and hypersensitivity largely map in distinct cellular pathways, including cell wall and plasma membrane structure/biogenesis and mitochondrial function for K2 resistance, and cell wall stress signaling and ion/pH homeostasis for K2 hypersensitivity. 70% of K2 effectors are different from those involved in K1 or K28 susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE: Our work demonstrates that despite the fact that K1 and K2 toxins share some aspects of their killing strategies, they largely rely on different sets of effectors. Since the vast majority of the host factors identified here is exclusively active towards K2, we conclude that cells have acquired a specific K2 toxin effectors set. Our work thus indicates that K1 and K2 have elaborated different biological pathways and provides a first step towards the detailed characterization of K2 mode of action.

  18. Mutant allele of rna14 in fission yeast affects pre-mRNA splicing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUDHANSHU YADAV; AMIT SONKAR; NAFEES AHAMAD; SHAKIL AHMED

    2016-06-01

    complex removes noncoding introns, while 3'end processing involves in cleavage and addition of poly(A) tails to the nascent transcript. Rna14 protein in budding yeast has been implicated in cleavage and polyadenylation of mRNA in the nucleus but their role in the pre-mRNA splicing has not been studied. Here, we report the isolation of a mutant allele of rna14 in fission yeast,Schizosaccharomyces pombe that exhibits reduction in protein level of Chk1 at the nonpermissive temperature, primarily due to the defects in posttranscriptional processing. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis reveals defective splicing of the chk1¹+transcript at the nonpermissive temperature. Apart from chk1¹+, the splicing of some other genes were also found to be defective at the nonpermissive temperature suggesting that Rna14 might be involved in pre-mRNA splicing. Subsequently, genetic interaction of Rna14 with prp1 and physical interactions with Prp28 suggest that the Rna14 might be part of a larger protein complex responsible for the pre-mRNA maturation.

  19. Effect of selenium on growth and antioxidant enzyme activities of wine related yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, M; Martins, L L; Mourato, M P; Baleiras-Couto, M M

    2015-12-01

    The use of supplements in the diet is a common practice to address nutritional deficiencies. Selenium is an essential micronutrient with an antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic role in human and animal health. There is increasing interest in developing nutritional supplements such as yeast cells enriched with selenium. The possibility of producing beverages, namely wine, with selenium-enriched yeasts, led us to investigate the selenium tolerance of six wine related yeasts. The production of such cells may hamper selenium toxicity problems. Above certain concentrations selenium can be toxic inducing oxidative stress and yeast species can show different tolerance. This work aimed at studying selenium tolerance of a diversity of wine related yeasts, thus antioxidant response mechanisms with different concentrations of sodium selenite were evaluated. Viability assays demonstrated that the yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii showed the highest tolerance for the tested levels of 100 µg mL(-1) of sodium selenite. The evaluation of antioxidative enzyme activities showed the best performance for concentrations of 250 and 100 µg mL(-1), respectively for the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii. These results encourage future studies on the possibility to use pre-enriched yeast cells as selenium supplement in wine production.

  20. Construction and Identification of a Yeast Two-Hybrid Bait Vector and Its Effect on the Growth of Yeast Cells and the Self-Activating Function of Reporter Genes for Screening of HPV18 E6-Interacting Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅泉; 李双; 刘萍; 奚玲; 王世宣; 孟玉菡; 刘杰; 杨欣慰; 卢运萍; 汪辉

    2010-01-01

    By using a yeast two-hybrid system,a yeast two-hybrid bait vector was constructed and identified for screening of the HPV18 E6-interacting proteins,and its effects on the growth of yeast cells and the activation of reporter genes were investigated.Total mRNA extracted from Hela cells was reversely transcribed into cDNA.Fragment of HPV18 E6 cDNA was amplified using RT-PCR and directly ligated to the pGBKT7 vector.The recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA sequencing.Th...

  1. Use of indirect conductimetry to predict the growth of spoilage yeasts, with special consideration of Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, T; Beuchat, L R

    1994-11-01

    In recent years, modeling for the purpose of predicting microbiological spoilage of foods has gained much interest. Predictive modeling requires a concentrated mathematical and experimental approach; to collect data of adequate quality is a technically demanding task when several experimental parameters are involved. Rapid, non-traditional, automated techniques are particularly useful in modeling. Of these, electrometric techniques appear to be most promising. Indirect conductimetry was used to study the effect of temperature, aw, pH and potassium sorbate concentration on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii. The automated Malthus 2000 instrument proved to be convenient for gathering a large amount of data that were then used to develop polynomial models describing the response of the yeast to combinations of experimental factors in terms of conductimetric detection time and maximum rate of change in conductance. Results demonstrated that indirect conductimetry is suitable for monitoring the effect of environmental factors on the growth and activity of Z. bailii and perhaps other food spoilage yeasts.

  2. The [PSI (+)] yeast prion does not wildly affect proteome composition whereas selective pressure exerted on [PSI (+)] cells can promote aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick H W; Lee, Lisa; Kim, Erin; Hui, Tony; Stoynov, Nikolay; Nassar, Roy; Moksa, Michelle; Cameron, Dale M; Hirst, Martin; Gsponer, Joerg; Mayor, Thibault

    2017-08-16

    The yeast Sup35 protein is a subunit of the translation termination factor, and its conversion to the [PSI (+)] prion state leads to more translational read-through. Although extensive studies have been done on [PSI (+)], changes at the proteomic level have not been performed exhaustively. We therefore used a SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry approach and identified 4187 proteins from both [psi (-)] and [PSI (+)] strains. Surprisingly, there was very little difference between the two proteomes under standard growth conditions. We found however that several [PSI (+)] strains harbored an additional chromosome, such as chromosome I. Albeit, we found no evidence to support that [PSI (+)] induces chromosomal instability (CIN). Instead we hypothesized that the selective pressure applied during the establishment of [PSI (+)]-containing strains could lead to a supernumerary chromosome due to the presence of the ade1-14 selective marker for translational read-through. We therefore verified that there was no prevalence of disomy among newly generated [PSI (+)] strains in absence of strong selection pressure. We also noticed that low amounts of adenine in media could lead to higher levels of mitochondrial DNA in [PSI (+)] in ade1-14 cells. Our study has important significance for the establishment and manipulation of yeast strains with the Sup35 prion.

  3. Effect of Ethanol, Sulfur Dioxide and Glucose on the Growth of Wine Spoilage Yeasts Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Chandra

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology (RSM was used to study the effect of three factors, sulfur dioxide, ethanol and glucose, on the growth of wine spoilage yeast species, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Seventeen central composite rotatable design (CCRD trials were designed for each test yeast using realistic concentrations of the factors (variables in premium red wine. Polynomial regression equations were fitted to experimental data points, and the growth inhibitory conditions of these three variables were determined. The overall results showed Sa. ludwigii as the most resistant species growing under high ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations, i.e., 15% (v/v/20 mg L-1, 14% (v/v/32 mg L-1 and 12.5% (v/v/40 mg L-1, whereas other yeasts did not survive under the same levels of ethanol/free sulfur dioxide concentrations. The inhibitory effect of ethanol was primarily observed during longer incubation periods, compared with sulfur dioxide, which showed an immediate effect. In some CCRD trials, Sa. ludwigii and S. cerevisiae showed growth recovery after a short death period under the exposure of 20-32 mg L-1 sulfur dioxide in the presence of 11% (v/v or more ethanol. However, Sc. pombe and Z. bailii did not show such growth recovery under similar conditions. Up to 10 g L-1 of glucose did not prevent cell death under the sulfur dioxide or ethanol stress. This observation demonstrates that the sugar levels commonly used in wine to sweeten the mouthfeel do not increase wine susceptibility to spoilage yeasts, contrary to the anecdotal evidence.

  4. Role of specific components from commercial inactive dry yeast winemaking preparations on the growth of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar-Ortiz, Inmaculada; Pozo-Bayón, Maria Angeles; García-Ruiz, Almudena; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2010-07-28

    The role of specific components from inactive dry yeast preparations widely used in winemaking on the growth of three representative wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii and Pediococcus pentosaceus) has been studied. A pressure liquid extraction technique using solvents of different polarity was employed to obtain extracts with different chemical composition from the inactive dry yeast preparations. Each of the extracts was assayed against the three lactic acid bacteria. Important differences in the effect of the extracts on the growth of the bacteria were observed, which depended on the solvent employed during the extraction, on the type of commercial preparations and on the lactic acid bacteria species. The extracts that exhibited the most different activity were chemically characterized in amino acids, free monosaccharides, monosaccharides from polysaccharides, fatty acids and volatile compounds. In general, specific amino acids and monosaccharides were related to a stimulating effect whereas fatty acid composition and likely some volatile compounds seemed to show an inhibitory effect on the growth of the lactic acid bacteria. These results may provide novel and useful information in trying to obtain better and more specific formulations of winemaking inactive dry yeast preparations.

  5. How Stock Markets Development Affect Endogenous Growth Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeb Masoud

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper can bedescribed as a significant exploratory study that will provide a significantcontribution to knowledge to consider crucial issues which need to be barriersto understanding or a temptation/ requirement to judge some practices as‘better’ than others for stock market development effective approach andimplement successful stock market performance and economic growth. Recentanalysis of the link between financial development and growth, gained frominsights acquired as a result of using the technique of endogenous growthmodels, has illustrated that growth without exogenous technical progress andthat growth rates could be related to technology, income distribution andinstitutional arrangements. This provides the theoretical background thatempirical studies have lacked; illustrating that financial intermediationaffects the level of economic growth. Resulting models have provided newimpetus to empirical research of the effects of financial development. Thebirth of the new endogenous growth theory has facilitated the development ofimproved growth models where the long-term rate could be affected by a numberof elements. These included technology, education and health policies in theprocess of economic development, capital accumulation, government policies andinstitutional activities in the role of financial development in economicgrowth.

  6. Yeast fermentation affected by homo- and hetero-fermentative Lactobacilli isolated from fuel ethanol distilleries with sugarcane products as substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antagonism between by yeast and lactobacilli is largely dependent on the initial population of each organism. While homo-fermentative lactobacillus present higher inhibitory effect upon yeast when in equal cell number, in industrial fuel ethanol conditions where high yeast cell densities prevail...

  7. Spaceflight and age affect tibial epiphyseal growth plate histomorphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montufar-Solis, Dina; Duke, Pauline J.; Durnova, G.

    1992-01-01

    Growth plate histomorphometry of rats flown aboard the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 2044, a 14-day spaceflight, was compared with that of control groups. In growth plates of flight animals, there was a significant increase in cell number per column and height of the proliferative zone and a reduction in height and cell number in the hypertrophy/calcification zone. No significant differences were found in matrix organization at the ultrastructural level of flight animals, indicating that although spacefligfht continues to affect bone growth of 15-wk-old rats, extracellular matrix is not altered in the same manner as seen previously in younger animals. All groups showed growth plate characteristics attributed to aging: lack of calcification zone, reduced hypertrophy zone, and unraveling of collagen fibrils. Tail-suspended controls did not differ from other controls in any of the parameters measured. The results suggest that growth plates of older rats are less responsive to unloading by spaceflight or suspension than those of younger rats and provide new evidence about the modifying effect of spaceflight on the growth plate.

  8. Functional profiling discovers the dieldrin organochlorinated pesticide affects leucine availability in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaytán, Brandon D; Loguinov, Alex V; Lantz, Stephen R; Lerot, Jan-Michael; Denslow, Nancy D; Vulpe, Chris D

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to organochlorinated pesticides such as dieldrin has been linked to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, endocrine disruption, and cancer, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity behind these effects remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate, using a functional genomics approach in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that dieldrin alters leucine availability. This model is supported by multiple lines of congruent evidence: (1) mutants defective in amino acid signaling or transport are sensitive to dieldrin, which is reversed by the addition of exogenous leucine; (2) dieldrin sensitivity of wild-type or mutant strains is dependent upon leucine concentration in the media; (3) overexpression of proteins that increase intracellular leucine confer resistance to dieldrin; (4) leucine uptake is inhibited in the presence of dieldrin; and (5) dieldrin induces the amino acid starvation response. Additionally, we demonstrate that appropriate negative regulation of the Ras/protein kinase A pathway, along with an intact pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is required for dieldrin tolerance. Many yeast genes described in this study have human orthologs that may modulate dieldrin toxicity in humans.

  9. Brewer's yeast cell wall affects microbiota composition and decreases Bacteroides fragilis populations in an anaerobic gut intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashimada, Yutaka; Michinaka, Atsuko; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nishio, Naomichi; Fujii, Toshio

    2011-02-01

    Brewer's yeast cell wall (BYC) has been reported to have prebiotic activity that improves the microbiotal composition of the human gut. To understand the precise effect of BYC on gut microbiota and its metabolism, we used a three-stage continuous-flow reactor system that mimicked the environment of the large intestine. The reactor system was able to maintain the bacterial community stably for a week. The Bacteroides fragilis population decreased drastically after the addition of BYC into this system while the number of Lactobacillus was stably maintained. In addition, propionate and acetate levels increased drastically. This metabolic change correlated with an increase in a number of specific operational taxonomic units annotated to the genus Veillonella and Megasphaella. These results suggest that BYC affects the composition of microbiota in an in vitro model system. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Does Misaligned Currency Affect Economic Growth? – Evidence from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonći Svilokos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to measure the currency misalignment of the Croatian kuna and to reveal whether it affects economic growth for the period 2001 (Q1 to 2013 (Q3. The estimate relies on recent cointegration techniques, VAR models and Granger causality tests. The findings show that there are two misalignment sub-periods for the Croatian kuna: undervaluation in the period from 2000Q1 to 2007Q4 and overvaluation in the period from 2008Q1 to 2013Q3. The evidence reveals that for the whole sample period, the Granger causality goes from misalignments (MISA to GDP growth under the 10 percent significance level. However, for the two sub-periods no evidence of Granger causality from MISA to GDP growth or vice versa is found. The research also reveals that the currency misalignments in the observed period are relatively small.

  11. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveiczer Akos

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, which are suitable for comparing differently parameterized models in terms of the quality and robustness of the fit but have not yet been used in cell growth-profile studies. Results Length increase data from representative individual fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells measured on time-lapse films have been reanalyzed using these model selection criteria. To fit the data, an extended version of a recently introduced linearized biexponential (LinBiExp model was developed, which makes possible a smooth, continuously differentiable transition between two linear segments and, hence, allows fully parametrized bilinear fittings. Despite relatively small differences, essentially all the quantitative selection criteria considered here indicated that the bilinear model was somewhat more adequate than the exponential model for fitting these fission yeast data. Conclusion A general quantitative framework was introduced to judge the adequacy of bilinear versus exponential models in the description of growth time-profiles. For single cell growth, because of the relatively limited data-range, the statistical evidence is not strong enough to favor one model clearly over the other and to settle the bilinear versus exponential dispute. Nevertheless, for the present individual cell growth data for fission yeast, the bilinear model seems more adequate according to all metrics, especially in the case of wee1Δ cells.

  12. The baker's yeast diploid genome is remarkably stable in vegetative growth and meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K T Nishant

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimates of mutation rates provide critical information to analyze genome evolution and organism fitness. We used whole-genome DNA sequencing, pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and comparative genome hybridization to determine mutation rates in diploid vegetative and meiotic mutation accumulation lines of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The vegetative lines underwent only mitotic divisions while the meiotic lines underwent a meiotic cycle every ∼20 vegetative divisions. Similar base substitution rates were estimated for both lines. Given our experimental design, these measures indicated that the meiotic mutation rate is within the range of being equal to zero to being 55-fold higher than the vegetative rate. Mutations detected in vegetative lines were all heterozygous while those in meiotic lines were homozygous. A quantitative analysis of intra-tetrad mating events in the meiotic lines showed that inter-spore mating is primarily responsible for rapidly fixing mutations to homozygosity as well as for removing mutations. We did not observe 1-2 nt insertion/deletion (in-del mutations in any of the sequenced lines and only one structural variant in a non-telomeric location was found. However, a large number of structural variations in subtelomeric sequences were seen in both vegetative and meiotic lines that did not affect viability. Our results indicate that the diploid yeast nuclear genome is remarkably stable during the vegetative and meiotic cell cycles and support the hypothesis that peripheral regions of chromosomes are more dynamic than gene-rich central sections where structural rearrangements could be deleterious. This work also provides an improved estimate for the mutational load carried by diploid organisms.

  13. Factors affecting the production of L-phenylacetylcarbinol by yeast: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, A L; Anderson, B N; Roddick, F A

    1999-01-01

    L-Phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) is the precursor for L-ephedrine and D-pseudoephedrine, alkaloids possessing alpha- and beta-adrenergic activity. The most commonly used method for production of L-PAC is a biological method whereby the enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) decarboxylates pyruvate and then condenses the product with added benzaldehyde. The process may be undertaken by either whole cells or purified PDC. If whole cells are used, the biomass may be grown and allowed to synthesize endogenous pyruvate, or the cells may be used as a catalyst only, with both pyruvate and benzaldehyde being added. Several yeast species have been investigated with regard to L-PAC-producing potential; the most commonly used organisms are strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida utilis. It was found that initial high production rates did not necessarily result in the highest final yields. Researchers then examined ways of improving the productivity of the process. The substrate, benzaldehyde, and the product, L-PAC, as well as the by-products, were found to be toxic to the biomass. Methods examined to reduce toxicity include modification of benzaldehyde dosing regimes, immobilization of biomass or purified enzymes, modification of benzaldehyde solubility and the use of two-phase reaction systems. Various means of modifying metabolism to enhance enzyme activity, relevant metabolic pathways and yield have been examined. Methods investigated include the use of respiratory quotient to influence pyruvate production and induce fermentative activity, reduced aeration to increase PDC activity, and carbohydrate feeding to modify glycolytic enzyme activity. The effect of temperature on L-PAC yield has been examined to identify conditions which provide the optimal balance between L-PAC and benzyl alcohol production, and L-PAC inactivation. However, relatively little work has been undertaken on the effect of medium composition on L-PAC yield.

  14. Inorganic nitrogen assimilation in yeasts: alteration in enzyme activities associated with changes in cultural conditions and growth phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomulka, K W; Moat, A G

    1972-01-01

    Ammonia assimilation has been investigated in four strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring, at intervals throughout the growth cycle, the activities of several enzymes concerned with inorganic ammonia assimilation. Enzyme activities in extracts of cells were compared after growth in complete and defined media. The effect of shift from growth in a complete to growth in a defined medium (and the reverse) was also determined. The absence of aspartase (EC 4.3.1.1, l-aspartate-ammonia lyase) activity, the low specific activities of alanine dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase [EC 6.3.1.2, l-glutamate-ammonia ligase (ADP)], and the marked increase in activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) [EC 1.4.1.4, l-glutamate:NADP-oxidoreductase (deaminating)] during the early stages of growth support the conclusion that yeasts assimilate ammonia primarily via glutamate. The NADP-GDH showed a rapid increase in activity just before the initiation of exponential growth, reached a maximum at the mid-exponential stage, and then gradually declined in activity in the stationary phase. The NADP-GDH reached a higher level of activity when the yeasts were grown on the defined medium as compared with complete medium. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) [EC 1.4.1.2, l-glutamate:NAD-oxidoreductase (deaminating)] showed only slight increases in activity during the exponential phase of growth. There was an inverse relationship in that the NADP-GDH increased in activity as the NAD-GDH decreased. The NAD-GDH activity was higher after growth on the complete medium. The glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.1. l-aspartate:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase) activity rose and fell in parallel with the NADP-GDH, although its specific activity was somewhat lower. Although other ammonia-assimilatory enzymes were demonstrable, it seems unlikely that their combined activities could account

  15. Genomic saturation mutagenesis and polygenic analysis identify novel yeast genes affecting ethyl acetate production, a non-selectable polygenic trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Den Abt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of mutants in populations of microorganisms has been a valuable tool in experimental genetics for decades. The main disadvantage, however, is the inability of isolating mutants in non-selectable polygenic traits. Most traits of organisms, however, are non-selectable and polygenic, including industrially important properties of microorganisms. The advent of powerful technologies for polygenic analysis of complex traits has allowed simultaneous identification of multiple causative mutations among many thousands of irrelevant mutations. We now show that this also applies to haploid strains of which the genome has been loaded with induced mutations so as to affect as many non-selectable, polygenic traits as possible. We have introduced about 900 mutations into single haploid yeast strains using multiple rounds of EMS mutagenesis, while maintaining the mating capacity required for genetic mapping. We screened the strains for defects in flavor production, an important non-selectable, polygenic trait in yeast alcoholic beverage production. A haploid strain with multiple induced mutations showing reduced ethyl acetate production in semi-anaerobic fermentation, was selected and the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs were mapped using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis after crossing with an unrelated haploid strain. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and allele exchange identified PMA1 and CEM1 as causative mutant alleles and TPS1 as a causative genetic background allele. The case of CEM1 revealed that relevant mutations without observable effect in the haploid strain with multiple induced mutations (in this case due to defective mitochondria can be identified by polygenic analysis as long as the mutations have an effect in part of the segregants (in this case those that regained fully functional mitochondria. Our results show that genomic saturation mutagenesis combined with complex trait polygenic analysis could be used

  16. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate-limited habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    The success of the Antarctic Dry Valley yeasts presumeably results from adaptations to multiple stresses, to low temperatures and substrate-limitation as well as prolonged resting periods enforced by low water availability. Previous investigations have suggested that the crucial stress is substrate limitation. Specific adaptations may be pinpointed by comparing the physiology of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex, the yeasts of the Tyrol Valley, with their congeners from other habitats. Progress was made in methods of isolation and definition of ecological niches, in the design of experiments in competition for limited substrate, and in establishing the relationships of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex with other yeasts. In the course of investigating relationships, a new method for 25SrRNA homology was developed. For the first time it appears that 25SrRNA homology may reflect parallel or convergent evolution.

  17. The exponential growth of autophagy-related research: from the humble yeast to the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Noboru

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy was discovered more than half a century ago. In the early days, autophagy was studied mostly through the use of biochemical methods and electron microscopy. In the 1990s, yeast genetics was introduced to this field and brought about an exponential expansion. The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was eventually awarded to the scientist who spearheaded the rapid development of the field: Yoshinori Ohsumi. Here, I describe in a Nutshell how the autophagy machinery was discovered and how the autophagy research field has grown following the breakthroughs from yeast studies. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Mitochondrial localization of fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase is required for its lysine acetylation and for cellular stress resistance and respiratory growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hidekazu, E-mail: hidetakahashi@riken.jp [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, Takehiro [Biomolecular Characterization Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Shirai, Atsuko; Matsuyama, Akihisa [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dohmae, Naoshi [Biomolecular Characterization Team, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru, E-mail: yoshidam@riken.jp [Chemical Genetics Laboratory/Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CREST Research Project, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is acetylated. {yields} The mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is required for the acetylation of MnSOD. {yields} The MTS is not crucial for MnSOD activity, but is important for respiratory growth. {yields} Posttranslational regulation of MnSOD differs between budding and fission yeast. -- Abstract: Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is localized in the mitochondria and is important for oxidative stress resistance. Although transcriptional regulation of MnSOD has been relatively well studied, much less is known about the protein's posttranslational regulation. In budding yeast, MnSOD is activated after mitochondrial import by manganese ion incorporation. Here we characterize posttranslational modification of MnSOD in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Fission yeast MnSOD is acetylated at the 25th lysine residue. This acetylation was diminished by deletion of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence, suggesting that MnSOD is acetylated after import into mitochondria. Mitochondrial localization of MnSOD is not essential for the enzyme activity, but is crucial for oxidative stress resistance and growth under respiratory conditions of fission yeast. These results suggest that, unlike the situation in budding yeast, S. pombe MnSOD is already active even before mitochondrial localization; nonetheless, mitochondrial localization is critical to allow the cell to cope with reactive oxygen species generated inside or outside of mitochondria.

  19. Inhibitors of the influenza A virus M2 proton channel discovered using a high-throughput yeast growth restoration assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna D Balgi

    Full Text Available The M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus is the target of the anti-influenza drugs amantadine and rimantadine. The effectiveness of these drugs has been dramatically limited by the rapid spread of drug resistant mutations, mainly at sites S31N, V27A and L26F in the pore of the channel. Despite progress in designing inhibitors of V27A and L26F M2, there are currently no drugs targeting these mutated channels in clinical trials. Progress in developing new drugs has been hampered by the lack of a robust assay with sufficient throughput for discovery of new active chemotypes among chemical libraries and sufficient sensitivity to provide the SAR data essential for their improvement and development as drugs. In this study we adapted a yeast growth restoration assay, in which expression of the M2 channel inhibits yeast growth and exposure to an M2 channel inhibitor restores growth, into a robust and sensitive high-throughput screen for M2 channel inhibitors. A screen of over 250,000 pure chemicals and semi-purified fractions from natural extracts identified 21 active compounds comprising amantadine, rimantadine, 13 related adamantanes and 6 non-adamantanes. Of the non-adamantanes, hexamethylene amiloride and a triazine derivative represented new M2 inhibitory chemotypes that also showed antiviral activity in a plaque reduction assay. Of particular interest is the fact that the triazine derivative was not sufficiently potent for detection as an inhibitor in the traditional two electrode voltage clamp assay for M2 channel activity, but its discovery in the yeast assay led to testing of analogues of which one was as potent as amantadine.

  20. The influence of exogenous nutrients on the abundance of yeasts on the phylloplane of turfgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix-Stohr, Shannon; Burpee, Leon L; Buck, James W

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to assess the effect of foliar applications of various nutrient solutions on the phylloplane yeast community of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). In the first three experiments, increasing concentrations of sucrose (2-16%), yeast extract (0.5-2.5%), and sucrose plus yeast extract (2.5-18.5% total) were applied and the yeast colony forming units (cfu) enumerated 14 h later by dilution plating. Significant positive linear relationships were observed between the number of yeast cfu and applications of both yeast extract and sucrose plus yeast extract. Foliar applications of sucrose alone had no significant effect on yeast community abundance, indicating that phylloplane yeasts of turfgrass are not limited by the amount or availability of carbohydrates. In the fourth experiment, five different solutions were applied to tall fescue to investigate the response of the yeast community to organic and inorganic nitrogen sources. Tryptone or yeast extract, both with considerable amino acid composition, significantly increased the yeast population, while yeast nitrogen base (with or without amino acids) and ammonium sulfate had no affect on yeast abundance. These results suggest that organic nitrogen stimulate yeast community growth and development on the phylloplane of tall fescue, while carbohydrates, inorganic nitrogen, and non-nitrogenous nutrients have little positive effect.

  1. How managed care growth affects where physicians locate their practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, D; Escarce, J J

    2000-11-01

    Managed care has had a profound effect on physician practice. It has altered patterns in the use of physician services, and consequently, the practice and employment options available to physicians. But managed care growth has not been uniform across the United States, and has spawned wide geographic disparities in earning opportunities for generalists and specialists. This Issue Brief summarizes new information on how managed care has affected physicians' labor market decisions and the impact of managed care on the number and distribution of physicians across the country.

  2. Growth, Nitrogen Uptake and Flow in Maize Plants Affected by Root Growth Restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-zheng Xu; Jun-fang Niu; Chun-jian Li; Fu-suo Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of a reduced maize root-system size on root growth and nitrogen (N) uptake and flow within plants. Restriction of shoot-borne root growth caused a strong decrease in the absorption of root: shoot dry weight ratio and a reduction in shoot growth. On the other hand, compensatory growth and an increased N uptake rate in the remaining roots were observed. Despite the limited long-distance transport pathway in the mesocotyl with restriction of shoot-borne root growth, N cycling within these plants was higher than those in control plants, implying that xylem and phloem flow velocities via the mesocotyl were considerably higher than in plants with an intact root system. The removal of the seminal roots in addition to restricting shoot-borne root development did not affect whole plant growth and N uptake, except for the stronger compensatory growth of the primary roots. Our results suggest that an adequate N supply to maize plant is maintained by compensatory growth of the remaining roots, increased N uptake rate and flow velocities within the xylem and phloem via the mesocotyl, and reduction in the shoot growth rate.

  3. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains. PMID:28231223

  4. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lentz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains.

  5. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-10-15

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces' metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains.

  6. Potato crop growth as affected by nitrogen and plant density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA CARLOS ALBERTO DA SILVA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth and development variables and dry matter characteristics were studied for cultivar Snowden of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. to evaluate nitrogen and plant density influence. Disregarding ending of season plant stress, the average number of actives haulms per plant was five and it was not affected by plant spacing. However, seasonal and final number of active haulms per plant were increased at 200 kg/ha of nitrogen. Maximum stem elongation was reached quickly with double density and had the tendency to keep constant at the highest and lowest nitrogen levels after 70 days after planting. Specific stem mass defined as mass per unit stem length was established as an indirect measure of stem thickness and load capacity. Specific leaf mass position in plant was higher at upper stem leaves, increased as plant density increased and did not vary markedly over time throughout the season. The rate of leaf appearance increased drastically due to more branching caused by high nitrogen level, and increased above ground dry matter per plant. Canopy growth and development influenced main tuber yield components. The number of active tubers per haulm decreased after 60 days after planting showing that tuberization is reversible. Tuber growth functions were established allowing the estimate of dry biomass partitioning coefficients for each plant organ.

  7. Lichen secondary metabolites affect growth of Physcomitrella patens by allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goga, Michal; Antreich, Sebastian J; Bačkor, Martin; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Lang, Ingeborg

    2017-05-01

    Lichen secondary metabolites can function as allelochemicals and affect the development and growth of neighboring bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, microorganisms, and even other lichens. Lichen overgrowth on bryophytes is frequently observed in nature even though mosses grow faster than lichens, but there is still little information on the interactions between lichens and bryophytes.In the present study, we used extracts from six lichen thalli containing secondary metabolites like usnic acid, protocetraric acid, atranorin, lecanoric acid, nortistic acid, and thamnolic acid. To observe the influence of these metabolites on bryophytes, the moss Physcomitrella patens was cultivated for 5 weeks under laboratory conditions and treated with lichen extracts. Toxicity of natural mixtures of secondary metabolites was tested at three selected doses (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 %). When the mixture contained substantial amounts of usnic acid, we observed growth inhibition of protonemata and reduced development of gametophores. Significant differences in cell lengths and widths were also noticed. Furthermore, usnic acid had a strong effect on cell division in protonemata suggesting a strong impact on the early stages of bryophyte development by allelochemicals contained in the lichen secondary metabolites.Biological activities of lichen secondary metabolites were confirmed in several studies such as antiviral, antibacterial, antitumor, antiherbivore, antioxidant, antipyretic, and analgetic action or photoprotection. This work aimed to expand the knowledge on allelopathic effects on bryophyte growth.

  8. Influence of N-glycosylation on the morphogenesis and growth of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and on the biological activities of yeast proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Bruno Dos Reis Almeida

    Full Text Available The fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a human pathogen that causes paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. The cell wall of P. brasiliensis is a network of glycoproteins and polysaccharides, such as chitin, that perform several functions. N-linked glycans are involved in glycoprotein folding, intracellular transport, secretion, and protection from proteolytic degradation. Here, we report the effects of tunicamycin (TM-mediated inhibition of N-linked glycosylation on P. brasiliensis yeast cells. The underglycosylated yeasts were smaller than their fully glycosylated counterparts and exhibited a drastic reduction of cell budding, reflecting impairment of growth and morphogenesis by TM treatment. The intracellular distribution in TM-treated yeasts of the P. brasiliensis glycoprotein paracoccin was investigated using highly specific antibodies. Paracoccin was observed to accumulate at intracellular locations, far from the yeast wall. Paracoccin derived from TM-treated yeasts retained the ability to bind to laminin despite their underglycosylation. As paracoccin has N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAGase activity and induces the production of TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO by macrophages, we compared these properties between glycosylated and underglycosylated yeast proteins. Paracoccin demonstrated lower NAGase activity when underglycosylated, although no difference was detected between the pH and temperature optimums of the two forms. Murine macrophages stimulated with underglycosylated yeast proteins produced significantly lower levels of TNF-α and NO. Taken together, the impaired growth and morphogenesis of tunicamycin-treated yeasts and the decreased biological activities of underglycosylated fungal components suggest that N-glycans play important roles in P. brasiliensis yeast biology.

  9. Growth of and fumitremorgin production by Neosartorya fischeri as affected by temperature, light, and water activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, P V; Beuchat, L. R.; Frisvad, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of temperature, light, and water activity (aw) on the growth and fumitremorgin production of a heat-resistant mold, Neosartorya fischeri, cultured on Czapek Yeast Autolysate agar (CYA) were studied for incubation periods of up to 74 days. Colonies were examined visually, and extracts of mycelia and CYA on which the mold was cultured were analyzed for mycotoxin content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Growth always resulted in the production of the tremorgenic mycotoxins ...

  10. Strength of Rocks Affected by Deformation Enhanced Grain Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann Slotemaker, A.; de Bresser, H.; Spiers, C.

    2005-12-01

    One way of looking into the possibility of long-term strength changes in the lithosphere is to study transient effects resulting from modifications of the microstructure of rocks. It is generally accepted that mechanical weakening may occur due to progressive grain size refinement resulting from dynamic recrystallization. A decrease in grain size may induce a switch from creep controlled by grain size insensitive dislocation mechanisms to creep governed by grain size sensitive (GSS) mechanisms involving diffusion and grain boundary sliding processes. This switch forms a well-known scenario to explain localization in the lithosphere. However, fine-grained rocks in localized deformation zones are prone to grain coarsening due to surface energy driven grain boundary migration (SED-GBM). This might harden the rock, affecting its role in localizing strain in the long term. The question has arisen if grain growth by SED-GBM in a rock deforming in the GSS creep field can be significantly affected by strain. The broad aim of this study is to shed more light onto this. We have experimentally investigated the microstructural and strength evolution of fine-grained (~0.6 μm) synthetic forsterite and Fe-bearing olivine aggregates that coarsen in grain size while deforming by GSS creep at elevated pressure (600 MPa) and temperature (850-1000 °C). The materials were prepared by `sol-gel' method and contained 0.3-0.5 wt% water and 5-10 vol% enstatite. We performed i) static heat treatment tests of various time durations involving hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and ii) heat treatment tests starting with HIP and continuing with deformation up to 45% axial strain at strain rates in the range 4x10-7 - 1x10-4 s-1. Microstructures were characterized by analyzing full grain size distributions and textures using SEM/EBSD. In addition to the experiments, we studied microstructural evolution in simple two-dimensional numerical models, combining deformation and SED-GBM by means of the

  11. Factors Affecting Growth of Pinus radiata in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Munoz, Jose Santos

    The Chilean forestry industry is based on hundreds of thousands of hectares of Pinus radiata plantations that have been established in a variety of soil and climate conditions. This approach has resulted in highly variable plantation productivity even when the best available technology was used. Little information is known about the ecophysiology basis for this variability. We explored the spatial and temporal variation of stand growth in Chile using a network of permanent sample plots from Modelo Nacional de Simulacion de Pino radiata. We hypothesized that the climate would play an important role in the annual variations in productivity. To answer these questions we developed the following projects: (1) Determination of site resource availability from historical data from automatic weather stations (rainfall, temperatures) and a geophysical model for solar irradiation, (2) Determination of peak annual leaf area index (LAI) for selected permanent sample plots using remote sensing technologies, (3) Analysis of soil, climate, canopy and stand factors affecting the Pinus radiata plantation growth and the use efficiency of site resources. For project 1, we estimated solar irradiation using the r.sun , Hargreaves-Samani (HS), and Bristow-Campbell (BC) models and validated model estimates with observations from weather stations. Estimations from a calibrated r.sun model accounted for 94% of the variance (r2=0.94) in monthly mean measured values. The r.sun model performed quite well for a wide range of Chilean conditions when compared with the HS and BC models. Our estimates of global irradiation may be improved with better estimates of cloudiness as they become available. Our model was able to provide spatial estimates of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly solar irradiation. For project 2, we estimated the inter-annual variation of LAI (Leaf Area Index), using remote sensing technologies. We determined LAI using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data covering a 5 year period

  12. Plant growth-promoting traits of epiphytic and endophytic yeasts isolated from rice and sugar cane leaves in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutaratat, Pumin; Srisuk, Nantana; Arunrattiyakorn, Panarat; Limtong, Savitree

    2014-08-01

    A total of 1035 yeast isolates, obtained from rice and sugar cane leaves, were screened primarily for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production. Thirteen isolates were selected, due to their IAA production ranging from 1.2 to 29.3 mg g(-)(1) DCW. These isolates were investigated for their capabilities of calcium phosphate and ZnO(3) solubilisation, and also for production of NH(3), polyamine, and siderophore. Their 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, catalase and fungal cell wall-degrading enzyme activities were assessed. Their antagonism against rice fungal pathogens was also evaluated. Strain identification, based on molecular taxonomy, of the thirteen yeast isolates revealed that four yeast species - i.e. Hannaella sinensis (DMKU-RP45), Cryptococcus flavus (DMKU-RE12, DMKU-RE19, DMKU-RE67, and DMKU-RP128), Rhodosporidium paludigenum (DMKU-RP301) and Torulaspora globosa (DMKU-RP31) - were capable of high IAA production. Catalase activity was detected in all yeast strains tested. The yeast R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301 was the best IAA producer, yielding 29.3 mg g(-)(1) DCW, and showed the ability to produce NH3 and siderophore. Different levels of IAA production (7.2-9.7 mg g(-)(1) DCW) were found in four strains of C. flavus DMKU-RE12, DMKU-RE19, and DMKU-RE67, which are rice leaf endophytes, and strain DMKU-RP128, which is a rice leaf epiphyte. NH(3) production and carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) activity was also detected in these four strains. Antagonism to fungal plant pathogens and production of antifungal volatile compounds were exhibited in T. globosa DMKU-RP31, as well as a moderate level of IAA production (4.9 mg g(-)(1) DCW). The overall results indicated that T. globosa DMKU-RP31 might be used in two ways: enhancing plant growth and acting as a biocontrol agent. In addition, four C. flavus were also found to be strains of interest for optimal IAA production.

  13. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate limited habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    The multiple stresses temperature, moisture, and for chemoheterotrophs, sources of carbon and energy of the Dry Valley Antarctica soils allow at best depauperate communities, low in species diversity and population density. The nature of community structure, the operation of biogeochemical cycles, the evolution and mechanisms of adaptation to this habitat are of interest in informing speculations upon life on other planets as well as in modeling the limits of gene life. Yeasts of the Cryptococcus vishniacil complex (Basidiobiastomycetes) are investigated, as the only known indigenes of the most hostile, lichen free, parts of the Dry Valleys. Methods were developed for isolating these yeasts (methods which do not exclude the recovery of other microbiota). The definition of the complex was refined and the importance of nitrogen sources was established as well as substrate competition in fitness to the Dry Valley habitats.

  14. Growth of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 on different sugar combinations as sole carbon and energy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Gustavo Graciano; de Carvalho, Nuno Miguel Barbosa; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2013-06-01

    The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus has been pointed out as a promising microorganism for a variety of industrial bioprocesses. Although genetic tools have been developed for this yeast and different potential applications have been investigated, quantitative physiological studies have rarely been reported. Here, we report and discuss the growth, substrate consumption, metabolite formation, and respiratory parameters of K. marxianus CBS 6556 during aerobic batch bioreactor cultivations, using a defined medium with different sugars as sole carbon and energy source, at 30 and 37 °C. Cultivations were carried out both on single sugars and on binary sugar mixtures. Carbon balances closed within 95 to 101 % in all experiments. Biomass and CO2 were the main products of cell metabolism, whereas by-products were always present in very low proportion (<3 % of the carbon consumed), as long as full aerobiosis was guaranteed. On all sugars tested as sole carbon and energy source (glucose, fructose, sucrose, lactose, and galactose), the maximum specific growth rate remained between 0.39 and 0.49 h(-1), except for galactose at 37 °C, which only supported growth at 0.31 h(-1). Different growth behaviors were observed on the binary sugar mixtures investigated (glucose and lactose, glucose and galactose, lactose and galactose, glucose and fructose, galactose and fructose, fructose and lactose), and the observations were in agreement with previously published data on the sugar transport systems in K. marxianus. We conclude that K. marxianus CBS 6556 does not present any special nutritional requirements; grows well in the range of 30 to 37 °C on different sugars; is capable of growing on sugar mixtures in a shorter period of time than Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is interesting from an industrial point of view; and deviates tiny amounts of carbon towards metabolite formation, as long as full aerobiosis is maintained.

  15. Effects of different forms of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth performance, intestinal development, and systemic immunity in early-weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zongyong; Wei, Shaoyong; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Cui; Hu, Shenglan; Zheng, Chuntian; Chen, Zhuang; Hu, Youjun; Wang, Li; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine effects of different forms of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain Y200007) on the growth performance, intestinal development, and systemic immunity in early-weaned piglets. A total of 96 piglets (14-d old, initial average body weight of 4.5 kg) were assigned to 4 dietary treatments: (1) basal diet without yeast (Control); (2) basal diet supplemented with 3.00 g/kg live yeast (LY); (3) basal diet supplemented with 2.66 g/kg heat-killed whole yeast (HKY); and (4) basal diet supplemented with 3.00 g/kg superfine yeast powders (SFY). Diets and water were provided ad libitum to the piglets during 3-week experiment. Growth performance of piglets was measured weekly. Samples of blood and small intestine were collected at days 7 and 21 of experiment. Dietary supplementation with LY and SFY improved G:F of piglets at days 1-21 of the experiment (P yeast-supplemented diets (P intestinal development, and systemic immunity in early-weaned piglets, with better improvement in feed conversion by dietary supplementation with LY, while dietary supplementation with SFY was more effective in increasing systemic immune functions in early-weaned piglets.

  16. Assessment of yeast cell wall as replacements for antibiotic growth promoters in broiler diets: effects on performance, intestinal histo-morphology and humoral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T K; Haldar, S; Bedford, M R; Muthusami, N; Samanta, I

    2012-04-01

    The study compared the effects of an antibiotic growth promoter (AGP), yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and yeast cell wall (YCW) on performance, microbiology and histo-morphology of the small intestine and humoral immune responses in Ross 308 broilers. The treatments (eight replicates/treatment, n = 12/replicate) were negative control (NC, without AGP), positive control (PC, supplemented with bacitracin methylene disalicylate, 400 mg/kg), Y and YCW (supplemented with yeast and YCW, respectively, 1000 mg/kg). Live weight at 42 days improved (p = 0.086) in the PC, Y and YCW groups. Feed conversion ratio was better (p = 0.039) in the YCW group compared with the other groups. Antibiotic growth promoter in the PC group shortened the villi in duodenum (p = 0.044). Mucosal Escherichia coli number was higher in the PC group (p Yeast cell wall -treated birds exhibited better (p yeast and the yeast cell wall may have effects identical to BMD on performance of broilers and thus may constitute an effective replacement strategy in the dietary regimens for broiler chickens.

  17. Does the water reuse affect the fish growth, welfare quality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štěpán Lang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fish production in aquaculture is growing from year to year. However capacities of current aquaculture facilities are limited. So the need of intensification of old facilities and building new intensive facilities is obvious. The high intensity of fish culture generates some questions. Could water reuse affect fish growth, welfare, health or quality of final product? A lot of research was performed for this issue but just a few works compared water reuse systems (RAS versus flow thru systems (FTS. A problem with CO2 oversaturation was solved by shallow diffusers. Fin erosion seems to be a problem of high stocking density and system hygienic but it is not related directly to water reuse. A few papers were written about biochemical blood stress markers but it was mostly aimed to acute crowding or changes were found at extreme stocking densities over 124 kg.m3 for rainbow trout and 70 kg.m3 for sea bass. The fish are able to accustom to increased noise produced by RAS equipment very fast so it don’t affect fish negatively. There wasn’t found any prove of main water reuse to fish influence in the available literature. All results indicates that if the ecological parameters are kept in natural range for the fish reared in RAS, there is no negative effect of water reuse on fish.

  18. Effects of dietary live and heat-inactive baker's yeast on growth, gut health, and disease resistance of Nile tilapia under high rearing density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Chao; Huang, Lu; Hu, Jun; Tacon, Philippe; He, Suxu; Li, Zhimin; Wang, Yibing; Liu, Zhi; Xu, Li; Yang, Yalin; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effects of baker's yeast as probiotics was evaluated in Nile tilapia reared at high density. Juvenile tilapia were distributed to tanks at high density (436 fish/m(3)) and fed with basal diet (CK) or diets supplemented with live (LY) or heat-inactivated yeast (HIY). Another group of fish reared at low density (218 fish/m(3)) and fed with basal diet was also included (LowCK). After 8 weeks of feeding, growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, digestive enzymes, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila to evaluate disease resistance. High rearing density significantly decreased the growth, feed utilization, microvilli length, and disease resistance of fish (CK versus LowCK). Moreover, the intestinal hsp70 expression was increased in fish reared at high density, supporting a stress condition. Compared to CK group, supplementation of live yeast significantly increased gut microvilli length and trypsin activity, decreased intestinal hsp70 expression, and enhanced resistance of fish against A. hydrophila (reflected by reduced intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity 24 h post infection). The gut microbiota was not markedly influenced by either rearing density or yeast supplementation. Heat-inactivated yeast (HIY) didn't display the beneficial effects observed in LY except an increase in gut trypsin activity, suggesting the importance of yeast viability and thus secretory metabolites of yeast. In conclusion, live baker's yeast may alleviate the negative effects induced by crowding stress, and has the potential to be used as probiotics for tilapia reared at high density.

  19. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic yeasts and growth in substrate-limited habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The high, dry valleys of the Ross Desert of Antarctic, characterized by extremely low temperatures, aridity and a depauperate biota, are used as an analog of the postulated extreme climates of other planetary bodies of the Solar System to test the hypothesis that if life could be supported by Ross, it might be possible where similar conditions prevail. The previously considered sterility of the Ross Desert soil ecosystem has yielded up an indigenous yeast, Cryptoccus vishniacci, which is able to resist the extremes of cold, wet and dry freezing, and long arid periods, while making minimal nutritional demands on the soil.

  20. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth in Budding Yeast and Bacteria Reveals a Common Size Regulation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soifer, Ilya; Robert, Lydia; Amir, Ariel

    2016-02-08

    To maintain a constant cell size, dividing cells have to coordinate cell-cycle events with cell growth. This coordination has long been supposed to rely on the existence of size thresholds determining cell-cycle progression [1]. In budding yeast, size is controlled at the G1/S transition [2]. In agreement with this hypothesis, the size at birth influences the time spent in G1: smaller cells have a longer G1 period [3]. Nevertheless, even though cells born smaller have a longer G1, the compensation is imperfect and they still bud at smaller cell sizes. In bacteria, several recent studies have shown that the incremental model of size control, in which size is controlled by addition of a constant volume (in contrast to a size threshold), is able to quantitatively explain the experimental data on four different bacterial species [4-7]. Here, we report on experimental results for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, finding, surprisingly, that cell size control in this organism is very well described by the incremental model, suggesting a common strategy for cell size control with bacteria. Additionally, we argue that for S. cerevisiae the "volume increment" is not added from birth to division, but rather between two budding events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Coordinated regulation of sulfur and phospholipid metabolism reflects the importance of methylation in the growth of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Mark J; Petti, Allegra A; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Silverman, Sanford J; McIsaac, R Scott; Lee, Traci A; Botstein, David

    2011-11-01

    A yeast strain lacking Met4p, the primary transcriptional regulator of the sulfur assimilation pathway, cannot synthesize methionine. This apparently simple auxotroph did not grow well in rich media containing excess methionine, forming small colonies on yeast extract/peptone/dextrose plates. Faster-growing large colonies were abundant when overnight cultures were plated, suggesting that spontaneous suppressors of the growth defect arise with high frequency. To identify the suppressor mutations, we used genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism and standard genetic analyses. The most common suppressors were loss-of-function mutations in OPI1, encoding a transcriptional repressor of phospholipid metabolism. Using a new system that allows rapid and specific degradation of Met4p, we could study the dynamic expression of all genes following loss of Met4p. Experiments using this system with and without Opi1p showed that Met4 activates and Opi1p represses genes that maintain levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the substrate for most methyltransferase reactions. Cells lacking Met4p grow normally when either SAM is added to the media or one of the SAM synthetase genes is overexpressed. SAM is used as a methyl donor in three Opi1p-regulated reactions to create the abundant membrane phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine. Our results show that rapidly growing cells require significant methylation, likely for the biosynthesis of phospholipids.

  2. Discovering aptamers by cell-SELEX against human soluble growth factors ectopically expressed on yeast cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hsien-Wei; Pagano, John M; White, Brian S; Toyoda, Yoshiko; Min, Irene M; Craighead, Harold G; Shalloway, David; Lis, John T; Xiao, Kai; Jin, Moonsoo M

    2014-01-01

    SELEX, the process of selecting aptamers, is often hampered by the difficulty of preparing target molecules in their native forms and by a lack of a simple yet quantitative assay for monitoring enrichment and affinity of reactive aptamers. In this study, we sought to discover DNA aptamers against human serum markers for potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications. To circumvent soluble expression and immobilization for performing SELEX, we ectopically expressed soluble growth factors on the surface of yeast cells to enable cell-SELEX and devised a flow cytometry-based method to quantitatively monitor progressive enrichment of specific aptamers. High-throughput sequencing of selected pools revealed that the emergence of highly enriched sequences concurred with the increase in the percentage of reactive aptamers shown by flow cytometry. Particularly, selected DNA aptamers against VEGF were specific and of high affinity (K(D)  = ∼ 1 nM) and demonstrated a potent inhibition of capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, comparable to the effect of a clinically approved anti-VEGF antibody drug, bevacizumab. Considering the fact that many mammalian secretory proteins have been functionally expressed in yeast, the strategy of implementing cell-SELEX and quantitative binding assay can be extended to discover aptamers against a broad array of soluble antigens.

  3. Discovering aptamers by cell-SELEX against human soluble growth factors ectopically expressed on yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Wei Meng

    Full Text Available SELEX, the process of selecting aptamers, is often hampered by the difficulty of preparing target molecules in their native forms and by a lack of a simple yet quantitative assay for monitoring enrichment and affinity of reactive aptamers. In this study, we sought to discover DNA aptamers against human serum markers for potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications. To circumvent soluble expression and immobilization for performing SELEX, we ectopically expressed soluble growth factors on the surface of yeast cells to enable cell-SELEX and devised a flow cytometry-based method to quantitatively monitor progressive enrichment of specific aptamers. High-throughput sequencing of selected pools revealed that the emergence of highly enriched sequences concurred with the increase in the percentage of reactive aptamers shown by flow cytometry. Particularly, selected DNA aptamers against VEGF were specific and of high affinity (K(D  = ∼ 1 nM and demonstrated a potent inhibition of capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, comparable to the effect of a clinically approved anti-VEGF antibody drug, bevacizumab. Considering the fact that many mammalian secretory proteins have been functionally expressed in yeast, the strategy of implementing cell-SELEX and quantitative binding assay can be extended to discover aptamers against a broad array of soluble antigens.

  4. Influence of geosmin-producing Streptomyces on the growth and volatile metabolites of yeasts during chinese liquor fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Lu, Hu; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-14

    Diverse Streptomyces species act as geosmin producers in the Chinese liquor-making process, causing an earthy, off-odor containment. Through microbiological and metabolite analyses, this paper investigates the influence of several geosmin-producing Streptomyces on the microbial community of a brewing system. The antifungal activity against functional liquor-brewing microbes was assayed by an agar diffusion method. Several Streptomyces, most notably Streptomyces sampsonii QC-2, inhibited the growth of the brewing functional yeasts and molds in pure culture. In a simulated coculture, Streptomyces spp. reduced the flavor compounds (alcohols and esters) contributed by yeasts. Nine components in Streptomyces sampsonii QC-2 broth were detected by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with photo diode array (UPLC–PDA), with characteristic ultraviolet absorptions at 360, 380, and 400 nm. The main products of Streptomyces sampsonii QC-2 were identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography–quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF–MS/MS), and confirmed by standard mass spectrometry. The antifungal active components were revealed as a series of heptaene macrolide antibiotics.

  5. Influence of Allium ampeloprasum L. and Allium cepa L. essential oils on the growth of some yeasts and moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocić-Tanackov Sunčica D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils extracted from spices, as natural antimicrobial agents, attract particular attention due to their possible role in food protection from microorganisms, and their nontoxicity, in contrast to the synthetic preservatives. In this work, inhibitory effect of Allium ampeloprasum and two onions (Allium cepa, Junski srebrnjak and Kupusinski jabučar, essential oils in different concentrations (1, 4, 7 and 10% on three yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida tropicalis and Rhodotorula sp. and three moulds (Aspergillus tamarii, Penicillium griseofulvum and Eurotium amstelodami was investigated. All three essential oils showed the strongest inhibitory effect against S. cerevisiae in concentration of only 1%. Among onions, Kupusinski jabučar essential oil had stronger influence to C. tropicalis, while Allium ampeloprasum essential oil did not show any influence on this yeast. Rhodotorula sp. was influenced only by Allium ampeloprasum essential oil. The strongest inhibitory effect on A. tamarii showed Kupusinski jabučar (57% of inhibition, in concentration of 10%, while on P. griseofulvum, the strongest influence showed Allium ampeloprasum essential oil (78.3% of inhibition, in concentration of 10%. Junski srebrnjak and Kupusinski jabučar essential oils, in concentrations of 7 and 10% respectively, completely inhibited the growth of E. amstelodami.

  6. Growth inhibitory effect of grape phenolics against wine spoilage yeasts and acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorkova, E; Zakova, T; Landa, P; Novakova, J; Vadlejch, J; Kokoska, L

    2013-02-15

    This paper investigates the in vitro antimicrobial potential of 15 grape phenolic compounds of various chemical classes (phenolic acids, stilbenes and flavonoids) using the broth microdilution method against yeasts and acetic acid bacteria frequently occurring in deteriorated wine. Pterostilbene (MICs=32-128 μg/mL), resveratrol (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) and luteolin (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) are among six active compounds that possessed the strongest inhibitory effects against all microorganisms tested. In the case of phenolic acids, myricetin, p-coumaric and ferulic acids exhibited selective antimicrobial activity (MICs=256-512 μg/mL), depending upon yeasts and bacteria tested. In comparison with potassium metabisulphite, all microorganisms tested were more susceptible to the phenolics. The results revealed the antibacterial and antiyeast effects against wine spoilage microorganisms of several highly potent phenolics naturally occurring in grapes. These findings also provide arguments for further investigation of stilbenes as prospective compounds reducing the need for the use of sulphites in winemaking.

  7. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance of different wine yeast species during alcoholic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Monteiro Lomba Viana, Tiago; Ardö, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    -Saccharomyces yeast species (Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Torulaspora delbrueckii) was investigated during alcoholic fermentation. Briefly, the N-sources with beneficial effects on all performance parameters (or for the majority of them) for each yeast species were...

  8. Ethanol Production by Fermentation of Various Sweet-Stalk Sorghum Juices Using Various Yeast Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Donny Widianto; Akbar Arofatullah; Triwibowo Yuwono; Irfan Dwidya Prijambada

    2015-01-01

    The ethanol production by fermentation of sweet-stalk sorghum juice is affected by the juice composition and the capability of the yeast strain to ferment it. Eight yeast strains were tested on their growth and ethanol fermentation abilities in sweet-stalk sorghum juices extracted from three cultivars of sweet sorghum. The best specific growth rate of the yeast strains grown aerobically in the yeast extract peptone dextrose (YEPD) broth and the sweet-stalk sorghum juices of KCS105, FS501, and...

  9. Ethanol Production by Fermentation of Various Sweet-Stalk Sorghum Juices Using Various Yeast Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donny Widianto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol production by fermentation of sweet-stalk sorghum juice is affected by the juice composition and the capability of the yeast strain to ferment it. Eight yeast strains were tested on their growth and ethanol fermentation abilities in sweet-stalk sorghum juices extracted from three cultivars of sweet sorghum. The best specific growth rate of the yeast strains grown aerobically in the yeast extract peptone dextrose (YEPD broth and the sweet-stalk sorghum juices of KCS105, FS501, and FS902 cultivars, were achieved by OUT7903, OUT7913, OUT7903, and OUT7027 yeast strains, respectively. However, the best specific CO2 evolution rate of the yeast strain during fermentation of the juices was achieved by OUT7027 yeast strains. The highest ethanol concentration, ethanol yield, and sugar conversion efficiency (SCE were obtained by strain OUT7921 when it was employed to ferment sweet-stem sorghum juice of FS902 cultivar. It was also observed that the juice extracted from sweet-stalk sorghum of FS902 cultivar is the most suitable medium for all yeast strains to achieve their best fermentation abilities. Thus, it is likely that the growth and ethanol production ability of a yeast strain in sweet-stalk sorghum juice depend on the physiological responses of the yeasts to nutrientcomposition of the sorghum juice and the sorghum cultivar from which the juice was extracted.Key words : Sweet-stalk sorghum juice, ethanol, fermentation, yeast

  10. Effect of carbon sources on the growth and ethanol production of native yeast Pichia kudriavzevii ITV-S42 isolated from sweet sorghum juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Nava, L E; Montes-Garcia, N; Domínguez, J M; Aguilar-Uscanga, M G

    2017-07-01

    The importance of non-Saccharomyces yeast species in fermentation processes is widely acknowledged. Within this group, Pichia kudriavzevii ITV-S42 yeast strain shows particularly desirable characteristics for ethanol production. Despite this fact, a thorough study of the metabolic and kinetic characteristics of this strain is currently unavailable. The aim of this work is to study the nutritional requirements of Pichia kudriavzevii ITV-S42 strain and the effect of different carbon sources on the growth and ethanol production. Results showed that glucose and fructose were both assimilated and fermented, achieving biomass and ethanol yields of 0.37 and 0.32 gg(-1), respectively. Glycerol was assimilated but not fermented; achieving a biomass yield of 0.88 gg(-1). Xylose and sucrose were not metabolized by the yeast strain. Finally, the use of a culture medium enriched with salts and yeast extract favored glucose consumption both for growth and ethanol production, improving ethanol tolerance reported for this genre (35 g L(-1)) to 90 g L(-1) maximum ethanol concentration (over 100%). Furthermore Pichia kudriavzevii ITV-S42 maintained its fermentative capacity up to 200 g L(-1) initial glucose, demonstrating that this yeast is osmotolerant.

  11. Growth performance and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed diets supplemented with GroBiotic - A and Brewtech Dried Brewers Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary levels of Brewtech® dried brewers yeast (BY) and GroBiotic®-A (GB) on growth performance, proximate body composition, immune response and resistance of juvenile Nile tilapia to Streptococcus iniae challenge. A practical basal (control) diet ...

  12. Rhizopus oligosporus and yeast co-cultivation during barley tempeh fermentation--nutritional impact and real-time PCR quantification of fungal growth dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin Mei; Passoth, Volkmar; Eklund-Jonsson, Charlotte; Alminger, Marie Larsson; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-06-01

    Barley tempeh was produced by fermenting barley kernels with Rhizopus oligosporus. The potential of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae (three strains), S. boulardii (one strain), Pichia anomala (one strain) and Kluyveromyces lactis (one strain) to grow together with R. oligosporus during barley tempeh fermentation was evaluated. All yeast strains grew during the fermentation and even during cold storage of tempeh (P<0.01). The growth of yeasts slightly increased the ergosterol contents, but did not influence amino acid contents and compositions, and did not reduce phytate contents. Slight increases of vitamins B(6) and niacinamide, and slight decreases of B(1) and biotin were observed. Quantification of fungal growth is difficult during mixed species fermentations because ergosterol is found in all fungal species, and colony-forming-unit (cfu) estimations are not reliable for R. oligosporus and other sporulating fungi. Therefore, we developed a quantitative real-time PCR method for individually quantifying S. cerevisiae and R. oligosporus growth in barley tempeh. The PCR results were highly correlated with the ergosterol content of R. oligosporus and with the number of cfu of S. cerevisiae. Thus, real-time PCR is a rapid and selective method to quantify yeasts and R. oligosporus during mixed species fermentation of inhomogenous substrate such as barley tempeh.

  13. Effects of low power microwave radiation on biological activity of Collagenase enzyme and growth rate of S. Cerevisiae yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaim, Hamad S.; Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, microwave radiation, a type/subset of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) has been widely used in industry, medicine, as well as food technology and mobile communication. Use of mobile phones is rapidly growing. Four years from now, 5.1 billion people will be mobile phone users around the globe - almost 1 billion more mobile users than the 4.3 billion people worldwide using them now. Consequently, exposure to weak radiofrequency/microwave radiation generated by these devices is markedly increasing. Accordingly, public concern about potential hazards on human health is mounting [1]. Thermal effects of radiofrequency/microwave radiation are very well-known and extensively studied. Of particular interest are non-thermal effects of microwave exposures on biological systems. Nonthermal effects are described as changes in cellular metabolism caused by both resonance absorption and induced EMR and are often accompanied by a specific biological response. Non-thermal biological effects are measurable changes in biological systems that may or may not be associated with adverse health effects. In this study we studied non-thermal effects of low power microwave exposures on kinetics of L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and growth rate of yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains type II. The selected model systems were continuously exposed to microwave radiation at the frequency of 968MHz and power of 10dBm using the designed and constructed (custom made) Transverse Electro-Magnetic (TEM) cell [2]. The findings reveal that microwave radiation at 968MHz and power of 10dBm inhibits L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity by 26% and increases significantly (15%) the proliferation rate of yeast cells.

  14. Solution structures, dynamics, and ice growth inhibitory activity of peptide fragments derived from an antarctic yeast protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hussinien H Shah

    Full Text Available Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities.

  15. [Effects of furfural on the growth and lipid production of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Zihan; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-10-01

    In order to illustrate the effects of furfural, one of the most common inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate, on oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis, we investigated the effects of different concentrations of furfural (0.1, 0.4, 0.6 and 1.5 g/L) on the biomass and lipid production of R. glutinis, as well as the effects of 1.0 g/L furfural on the utilization of glucose and xylose. Results showed that: when the furfural concentration reached 1.5 g/L, the lag phrase time was extended to 96 h, and the residual glucose was up to 17.7 g/L, with maximum biomass of only 6.6 g/L, which accounted for 47% of that in the basic medium (furfural-free), and the corresponding lipid content was reduced about 50%. Furfural showed lighter inhibitory degree on R. glutinis when xylose acted as the carbon source than glucose was the carbon source; more C18 fatty acids or unsaturated C18 fatty acids were generated in the presence of furfural.

  16. Yeast vs. Mushrooms: A Note on Harberger's "A Vision of the Growth Process"

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Napoletano; Andrea Roventini; Sandro Sapio

    2004-01-01

    Harberger's "A Vision of the Growth Process", Presidential Address at the 1998 Annual Meeting of the American Economic Association, provides evidence that contributions to aggregate real cost reduction (RCR) are concentrated in a small number of industries. According to Harberger, this is because the effect of broad externalities - such as those linked to the growth of the total stock of knowledge or human capital, or brought about by economies of scale tied to the scale of the economy - is n...

  17. Yeast vs. mushrooms: A note on Harberger's "A view of the growth process"

    OpenAIRE

    Napoletano, Mauro; Roventini, Andrea; Sapio, Sandro

    2004-01-01

    Harberger's 'A Vision of the Growth Process', Presidential Address at the 1998 Annual Meeting of the American Economic Association, provides evidence that contributions to aggregate real cost reduction (RCR) are concentrated in a small number of industries. According to Harberger, this is because the effect of broad externalities - such as those linked to the growth of the total stock of knowledge or human capital, or brought about by economies of scale tied to the scale of the economy - is n...

  18. Growth model and metabolic activity of brewing yeast biofilm on the surface of spent grains: a biocatalyst for continuous beer fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brányik, Tomás; Vicente, António A; Kuncová, Gabriela; Podrazký, Ondrej; Dostálek, Pavel; Teixeira, José A

    2004-01-01

    In the continuous systems, such as continuous beer fermentation, immobilized cells are kept inside the bioreactor for long periods of time. Thus an important factor in the design and performance of the immobilized yeast reactor is immobilized cell viability and physiology. Both the decreasing specific glucose consumption rate (q(im)) and intracellular redox potential of the cells immobilized to spent grains during continuous cultivation in bubble-column reactor implied alterations in cell physiology. It was hypothesized that the changes of the physiological state of the immobilized brewing yeast were due to the aging process to which the immobilized yeast are exposed in the continuous reactor. The amount of an actively growing fraction (X(im)act) of the total immobilized biomass (X(im)) was subsequently estimated at approximately X(im)act = 0.12 g(IB) g(C)(-1) (IB = dry immobilized biomass, C = dry carrier). A mathematical model of the immobilized yeast biofilm growth on the surface of spent grain particles based on cell deposition (cell-to-carrier adhesion and cell-to-cell attachment), immobilized cell growth, and immobilized biomass detachment (cell outgrowth, biofilm abrasion) was formulated. The concept of the active fraction of immobilized biomass (X(im)act) and the maximum attainable biomass load (X(im)max) was included into the model. Since the average biofilm thickness was estimated at ca. 10 microm, the limitation of the diffusion of substrates inside the yeast biofilm could be neglected. The model successfully predicted the dynamics of the immobilized cell growth, maximum biomass load, free cell growth, and glucose consumption under constant hydrodynamic conditions in a bubble-column reactor. Good agreement between model simulations and experimental data was achieved.

  19. The Effect of Created Local Hyperosmotic Microenvironment in Microcapsule for the Growth and Metabolism of Osmotolerant Yeast Candida krusei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida krusei is osmotolerant yeast used for the production of glycerol. Addition of osmolyte such as NaCl into culture medium can increase the production of glycerol from glucose, but osmolytes may burden the glycerol separation. A coencapsulation method was suggested to create local extracellular hyperosmotic stress for glycerol accumulation. Firstly, the influence of osmotic stress induced by the addition of PEG4000 on growth and metabolism of free cell was studied in detail. Glycerol accumulation could be improved by employing PEG4000 as osmoregulator. Secondly, cells and PEG4000 were coentrapped in NaCS/PDMDAAC capsules to create local hyperosmotic stress. The effects of local hyperosmotic microenvironment on the cell growth and metabolism were studied. The coentrapment method increased the glycerol concentration by 25%, and the glycerol concentration attained 50 gL−1 with productivity of 18.8 gL−1Day−1 in shake flask. More importantly, the glycerol could be directly separated from the encapsulated cells. The entrapped cells containing PEG4000 were also cultivated for 15 days in an airlift reactor. The yield and productivity were ca. 35% and 21 gL−1Day−1, respectively.

  20. RNAseq Analysis Highlights Specific Transcriptome Signatures of Yeast and Mycelial Growth Phases in the Dutch Elm Disease Fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Martha; Laroche, Jérôme; Landry, Christian R; Bernier, Louis

    2015-09-17

    Fungal dimorphism is a complex trait and our understanding of the ability of fungi to display different growth morphologies is limited to a small number of model species. Here we study a highly aggressive dimorphic fungus, the ascomycete Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, which is a model in plant pathology and the causal agent of Dutch elm disease. The two growth phases that this fungus displays, i.e., a yeast phase and mycelial phase, are thought to be involved in key steps of disease development. We used RNAseq to investigate the genome-wide gene expression profiles that are associated with yeast and mycelial growth phases in vitro. Our results show a clear molecular distinction between yeast and mycelial phase gene expression profiles. Almost 12% of the gene content is differentially expressed between the two phases, which reveals specific functions related to each growth phase. We compared O. novo-ulmi transcriptome profiles with those of two model dimorphic fungi, Candida albicans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Few orthologs showed similar expression regulation between the two growth phases, which suggests that, globally, the genes associated with these two life forms are poorly conserved. This poor conservation underscores the importance of developing specific tools for emerging model species that are distantly related to the classical ones. Taken together, our results provide insights into transcriptome regulation and molecular specificity in O. novo-ulmi and offer a new perspective for understanding fungal dimorphism. Copyright © 2015 Nigg et al.

  1. Automatic Evaluation of Colonies Growth rate of Yeasts incubated in Petri dishes using Mobile Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alecsander Pereira Martins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an automatic method based on computer vision implemented in mobile platform capable of monitoring the growth of microbial colonies incubated in Petri dishes. The developed optimized image processing algorithm performs this task without human intervention from images of colonies of the microorganism in different evolution phases. The contribution of this paper is the development of a fast and robust mobile tool to assist bioprocess experts in monitoring the growth of colonies without using the conventional error prone evaluation techniques. The obtained results successfully demonstrated dimensional alterations in colonies in a faster and more precise fashion when compared with the conventional method, with the additional advantage of versatility in producing reliable estimation of the growth rates with higher statistical significance.

  2. Growth inhibition of thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, in hydrolysates from cassava pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugthaworn, Prapassorn; Murata, Yoshinori; Machida, Masashi; Apiwatanapiwat, Waraporn; Hirooka, Akiko; Thanapase, Warunee; Dangjarean, Hatairat; Ushiwaka, Satoru; Morimitsu, Kozo; Kosugi, Akihiko; Arai, Takamitsu; Vaithanomsat, Pilanee

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we report the inhibition of Kluyveromyces marxianus TISTR5925 growth and ethanol fermentation in the presence of furan derivatives and weak acids (acetic acid and lactic acid) at high temperatures. Cassava pulp, obtained as the waste from starch processing, was collected from 14 starch factories located in several provinces of Thailand. At a high temperature (42 °C), the cassava pulp hydrolysate from some starch factories strongly inhibited growth and ethanol production of both K. marxianus (strain TISTR5925) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain K3). HPLC detected high levels of lactic acid and acetic acid in the hydrolysates, suggesting that these weak acids impaired the growth of K. marxianus at high temperature. We isolated Trp-requiring mutants that had reduced tolerance to acetic acid compared to the wild-type. This sensitivity to acetic acid was suppressed by supplementation of the medium with tryptophan.

  3. Do Corruption and Social Trust affect Economic Growth? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serritzlew, Søren; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2014-01-01

    Two separate literatures suggest that corruption and social trust, respectively, are related to economic growth, although the strengths of the relationships, and the direction of causality, are still debated. In this paper, we review these literatures and evaluate the evidence for causal effects...... of corruption and trust on economic growth, and discuss how corruption and trust are interrelated. The reviews show that absence of corruption and high levels of social trust foster economic growth. The literatures also indicate that corruption has a causal effect on social trust, while the opposite effect...... is more uncertain. In the conclusion, we offer the suggestion that fighting corruption may yield a “double dividend”, as reduced corruption is likely to have both direct and indirect effects on growth....

  4. Do Corruption and Social Trust affect Economic Growth? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serritzlew, Søren; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2014-01-01

    Two separate literatures suggest that corruption and social trust, respectively, are related to economic growth, although the strengths of the relationships, and the direction of causality, are still debated. In this paper, we review these literatures and evaluate the evidence for causal effects...... of corruption and trust on economic growth, and discuss how corruption and trust are interrelated. The reviews show that absence of corruption and high levels of social trust foster economic growth. The literatures also indicate that corruption has a causal effect on social trust, while the opposite effect...... is more uncertain. In the conclusion, we offer the suggestion that fighting corruption may yield a “double dividend”, as reduced corruption is likely to have both direct and indirect effects on growth....

  5. How Stock Markets Development Affect Endogenous Growth Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Najeb Masoud

    2013-01-01

    This paper can bedescribed as a significant exploratory study that will provide a significantcontribution to knowledge to consider crucial issues which need to be barriersto understanding or a temptation/ requirement to judge some practices as‘better’ than others for stock market development effective approach andimplement successful stock market performance and economic growth. Recentanalysis of the link between financial development and growth, gained frominsights acquired as a result of us...

  6. Of yeast and mushrooms : Patterns of industry-level productivity growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inklaar, Robert; Timmer, Marcel P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we analyse labour productivity growth in the United States, four European countries (France, Germany, the Netherlands and United Kingdom), Australia and Canada between 1987 and 2003 from an industry perspective. Rather than analysing broad industry groups, we compare the pattern of gro

  7. Evolution of CDC42, a putative virulence factor triggering meristematic growth in black yeasts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, S.; Gerrits van den Ende, A.H.G.; Ram, A.F.J.; Arentshorst, M.; Gräser, Y.; Hu, H.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    The cell division cycle gene (CDC42) controlling cellular polarization was studied in members of Chaetothyriales. Based on ribosomal genes, ancestral members of the order exhibit meristematic growth in view of their colonization of inert surfaces such as rock, whereas in derived members of the order

  8. Evaluation of growth and survival rate of Artemia parthenogenetica feed with micro algae (Isochrysis galbana and Chlorella vulgaris and bakery yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehghan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to evaluate growth and survival rate of Maharloo lake artemia (ArtemiaParthenogenetica (Bowen & Sterling, 1978 which feed with two species of microalgae (IsochrysisGalbana and Chlorella vulgaris and bakery yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae with different nutritiousingredients for 15 days. We evaluated them in 3rd, 7th, 11th and 15thdays of cultivation period for 4 times. This experiment was done in completely randomized design with 4 treatments (3 treatments and 1 control and each treatment has 3 replicates. Artemia parthenogenetica nauplii were feed with three different types of food that includes Isochrysis galbana microalgae (T1, Chlorella vulgaris (T2 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (T4. Control had feed with blend of these three matters. After 15 days the highest survival rate was observed in control (84.00 and the lowest one was related to the T4 (59.58 which feed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (p<0.05. The highest growth rate was observed in T4, T3, followed by T1 and T2 respectively. Achievement results showed significantdifferences between control and other treatments (p<0.05. This study proved that treatments whichfeed with blend of two micro algae's species and bakery yeast have higher survival ability than theother treatments.

  9. Growth, nutrient digestibility, ileal digesta viscosity, and energy metabolizability of growing turkeys fed diets containing malted sorghum sprouts supplemented with enzyme or yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, F O; Oso, A O; Oduguwa, O O; Jegede, A V; Südekum, K-H; Fafiolu, A O; Pirgozliev, V

    2017-06-01

    Growth, apparent nutrient digestibility, ileal digesta viscosity, and energy metabolizability of growing turkeys fed diets containing malted sorghum sprouts (MSP) supplemented with enzyme or yeast were investigated using 120, 28-day-old male turkeys. Six treatments were laid out in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with three dietary inclusion levels of MSP (0, 50, and 100 g/kg) and supplemented with 200 mg/kg yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or 200 mg/kg of a commercial enzyme. The experiment lasted for the starter (day 28-56) and grower phases (day 57-84) of the birds. Each treatment group consisted of 20 turkeys replicated four times with five birds each. Data were analysed using analysis of variance while polynomial contrast was used to determine the trends (linear and quadratic) of MSP inclusion levels. Irrespective of dietary supplementation with enzyme or yeast, final body weight (BW), total BW gain, and feed intake for turkey poults from day 29-56 was reduced (p  0.05) with MSP inclusion levels. Enzyme supplementation reduced (p  0.05) on AME. Inclusion of MSP resulted in poor growth performance. This confirms earlier studies that utilization of MSP by poultry is rather poor. Supplementation with enzyme or yeast did not lead to any appreciable improvement in performance of turkeys in this study. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Growth charts for patients affected with Morquio A disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Adriana M; Tomatsu, Shunji; Brusius, Ana; Smith, Mary; Orii, Tadao

    2008-05-15

    Children with Morquio A disease grow poorly and become physically handicapped because of systemic bone disease. The purpose of this study was to describe observed growth patterns and their relationship with the physical condition of patients with Morquio A. In a one-center study, questionnaire-based longitudinal and cross sectional data were used to develop growth curves, to assess physical activity and to determine the incidence of surgical procedures in 354 patients with Morquio A. Mean birth lengths of boys and girls were 52.6 and 52.1 cm, respectively. The mean final heights for males and females at 18 years and older were 122.4 +/- 21.5 and 113.1 +/- 22.6 cm, respectively. These results corresponded to -7.4 SD for males and -7.7 SD for females compared to the normal healthy controls. Mean birth weights for boys and girls were 3.59 +/- 0.58 and 3.5 +/- 0.7 kg, respectively. The mean body mass index for males and females at over 18 years of age was 24.7 +/- 6.1 and 25.6 +/- 5.4 kg/m(2), respectively. The growth pattern in Morquio A patients was characterized by impaired growth velocity after 1 year of age. This is the first report providing growth charts for patients with Morquio A, which can help with monitoring the disease and assessing the clinical efficacy of treatments.

  11. How does cell size regulation affect population growth?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of a growing microbial colony is well characterized by the population growth rate. However, at the single-cell level, isogenic cells often exhibit different cell-cycle durations. For evolutionary dynamics, it is thus important to establish the connection between the population growth rate and the heterogeneous single-cell generation time. Existing theories often make the assumption that the generation times of mother and daughter cells are independent. However, it has been shown that to maintain a bounded cell size distribution, cells that grow exponentially at the single-cell level need to adopt cell size regulation, leading to a negative correlation of mother-daughter generation time. In this work, we construct a general framework to describe the population growth in the presence of size regulation. We derive a formula for the population growth rate, which only depends on the variability of single-cell growth rate, independent of other sources of noises. Our work shows that a population ca...

  12. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS WHICH AFFECTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparna Wijaya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available High economic growth and sustainable process are main conditions for sustainability of economic country development. They are also become measures of the success of the country's economy. Factors which tested in this study are economic and non-economic factors which impacting economic development. This study has a goal to explain the factors that influence on macroeconomic Indonesia. It used linear regression modeling approach. The analysis result showed that Tax Amnesty, Exchange Rate, Inflation, and interest rate, they jointly can bring effect which amounted to 77.6% on economic growth whereas the remaining 22.4% is the influenced by other variables which not observed in this study. Keywords: tax amnesty, exchange rates, inflation, SBI and economic growth

  13. Shade periodicity affects growth of container grown dogwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Container-grown dogwoods rank third in the US in nursery sales of ornamental trees. However, Dogwoods are a challenging crop to produce in container culture, especially when bare root liners are used as the initial transplant into containers due unacceptable levels of mortality and poor growth. This...

  14. Dissolved oxygen concentration affects hybrid striped bass growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. Three studies were conducted to quantify performance traits and metabolic responses of hybrid striped b...

  15. Growth and flower development in roses as affected by light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, F.M.; Bakx, E.

    1997-01-01

    Growth and flowering of shoots of rose ‘Mercedes’ were investigated as a function of the level and spectral quality of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Experiments were performed with single-shoot plants decapitated above the two most basal leaves with five leaflets. The development of

  16. Gastric luminal epidermal growth factor is affected by diet

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vegetable,' and on contaminants in the diet such as fumonisins.' The first ... with low dietary intake of animal products (p = 0.002) and vegetables (p .... had an effect on EGF since a non-significant difference was seen. Vegetable .... growth factor administration on intestinal cell proliferation, crypt Ossion and polyp formation in ...

  17. Effect of synbiotics between Bacillus licheniformis and yeast extract on growth, hematological and biochemical indices of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Hassaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve practical diets were formulated to contain four levels of Bacillus licheniformis (0.0, 0.24 × 106, 0.48 × 106 and 0.96 × 106 CFU g−1, respectively, with three yeast extract levels (0%, 0.5% and 1%, respectively. Each diet was randomly assigned to duplicate groups of 50 Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus (5.99 ± 0.03 g in 24 concrete ponds (0.5 m3 and 1.25 m depth for 12 weeks. Increasing dietary B. licheniformis levels in O. niloticus and yeast extract levels significantly (P < 0.01 improved growth performance and nutrient utilization. Supplementation of the experimental diets with, 0.48 × 106 CFU/g−1 and 1.0% yeast extract showed the best nutrient utilization compared to other treatments. All probiotic levels significantly (P < 0.01 increased chemical composition (P < 0.05 compared to the control group, while increasing yeast extract did not significantly alter chemical composition. Hematological indices, total protein and albumin of O. niloticus significantly increased while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase significantly (P < 0.01 decreased with an increase in B. licheniformis level up to 0.48 × 106 CFU g−1. Increasing levels of yeast extract had no effect on hematological parameters and the diets supplemented with 0.48 × 106 CFU g−1 and 0.5% yeast extract showed the highest hematological values.

  18. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  19. Effects of Yeast Polysaccharide on Growth and Flavonoid Accumulation in Fagopyrum tataricum Sprout Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of yeast polysaccharide (YPS on growth and flavonoid accumulation in sprout cultures of Fagopyrum tataricum (tartary buckwheat. Without obvious change in the appearance of the sprouts, the exogenous YPS notably stimulated the production of functional metabolites in F. tataricum sprouts, and the stimulation effect was concentration-dependent. With 400 mg/L of YPS applied to the sprout cultures on day 6, the total rutin and quercentin content was effectively increased to 42.8 mg/gdw, or about 1.4-fold in comparison with the control of 31.2 mg/gdw. Feeding with 800 mg/L of YPS on day 9, the sprouts biomass was increased by about 8% compared to the control culture (0.99 gdw/100 sprouts versus 0.92 gdw/100 sprouts. Moreover, the present study revealed that the accumulation of these bioactive metabolites resulted from the stimulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway by YPS treatment. It could be an effective strategy for improving the functional quality of the F. tataricum sprouts provided with YPS.

  20. Ancient gene duplication provided a key molecular step for anaerobic growth of Baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaya; Schilke, Brenda; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Williams, Barry; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles required for a number of key cellular processes. As most mitochondrial proteins are nuclear encoded, their efficient translocation into the organelle is critical. Transport of proteins across the inner membrane is driven by a multicomponent, matrix-localized "import motor," which is based on the activity of the molecular chaperone Hsp70 and a J-protein cochaperone. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two paralogous J-proteins, Pam18 and Mdj2, can form the import motor. Both contain transmembrane and matrix domains, with Pam18 having an additional intermembrane space (IMS) domain. Evolutionary analyses revealed that the origin of the IMS domain of S. cerevisiae Pam18 coincides with a gene duplication event that generated the PAM18/MDJ2 gene pair. The duplication event and origin of the Pam18 IMS domain occurred at the relatively ancient divergence of the fungal subphylum Saccharomycotina. The timing of the duplication event also corresponds with a number of additional functional changes related to mitochondrial function and respiration. Physiological and genetic studies revealed that the IMS domain of Pam18 is required for efficient growth under anaerobic conditions, even though it is dispensable when oxygen is present. Thus, the gene duplication was beneficial for growth capacity under particular environmental conditions as well as diversification of the import motor components.

  1. Growth and flower development in roses as affected by light

    OpenAIRE

    Maas, F.M.; Bakx, E.

    1997-01-01

    Growth and flowering of shoots of rose ‘Mercedes’ were investigated as a function of the level and spectral quality of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Experiments were performed with single-shoot plants decapitated above the two most basal leaves with five leaflets. The development of the two lateral shoots emerging from the axillary buds of these leaves was studied over a period of 4 to 6 weeks. In order to discriminate between the effects of irradiance level and light quality...

  2. Comparative efficacy of a yeast product and bacitracin methylene disalicylate in enhancing early growth and intestinal maturation in broiler chicks from breeder hens of different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasina, Y O; Thanissery, R R

    2011-05-01

    The intestine of the newly hatched chick is immature at hatch. Yeast contains nucleotides and β-glucans that enhance intestinal development and chick growth. Accordingly, a 14-d experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a novel yeast product and bacitracin methylene disalicylate in enhancing early growth and intestinal maturation in chicks obtained from young (26-27 wk old) and old (58 to 59 wk old) breeder hens. Chicks (384) were randomly assigned to 8 dietary treatments. Treatment 1 (YH) consisted of chicks, from young hens, fed corn-soybean meal (SBM) diet alone. Treatment 2 (YHB) consisted of chicks, from young hens, fed corn-SBM basal into which BMD was added at 0.055 g/kg. Treatment 3 (YHE) consisted of chicks, from young hens, fed corn-SBM basal into which yeast extract (YE) was added at 0.075% level. Treatment 4 (YHED) consisted of chicks, from young hens, fed corn-SBM basal into which YE was added at 0.15% level. Treatments 5 (OH), 6 (OHB), 7 (OHE), and 8 (OHED) consisted of chicks from old hens fed diets similar to those given to YH in treatments 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Growth performance (body weight gain and feed conversion ratio) was evaluated on d 7 and 14. Intestinal tissue samples were also analyzed for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as an indicator of intestinal maturation on d 4 and 13 of experiment. Results showed that by d 14 of experiment, only BMD treatments (YHB and OHB) improved body weight gain (P yeast-supplemented treatments (YHE, YHED, OHE, and OHED) were statistically similar (P > 0.05) to those of the BMD treatments. Ileal ALP activity was consistently enhanced by BMD and yeast product supplemented at 0.075% of the diet. It was concluded that antibiotic BMD and our novel yeast product supplemented at 0.075% of the diet improved early chick growth and maturation of the ileal segment of the small intestine.

  3. Adaptive mutations in sugar metabolism restore growth on glucose in a pyruvate decarboxylase negative yeast strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Guodong; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequencing. Among these genetic changes, 4 genes were found to carry point mutations in at least two of the evolved strains: MTH1 encoding a negative regulator of the glucose-sensing signal transduction pathway, HXT2 encoding a hexose transporter, CIT1 encoding a mitochondrial citrate synthase...... further increased the maximum specific growth rate to 0.069 h-1. Conclusions: In this study, possible evolving mechanisms of Pdc negative strains on glucose were investigated by genome sequencing and reverse engineering. The non-synonymous mutations in MTH1 alleviated the glucose repression by repressing...... expression of several hexose transporter genes. The non-synonymous mutations in HXT2 and CIT1 may function in the presence of mutated MTH1 alleles and could be related to an altered central carbon metabolism in order to ensure production of cytosolic acetyl-CoA in the Pdc negative strain....

  4. Growth of bacteria and yeast on enzymically degraded alkali treated rice and wheat straws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, J.K.; Shirkot, C.K.; Dhawan, S.

    1981-01-01

    An enzyme filtrate of Trichoderma viride QM 9414 was used to saccharify rice and wheat straw. Delignification of the straw by alkali treatment increased the enzymic saccharification of both materials to approximately 70%. The optimum conditions for delignification were autoclaving at 120 degrees for 30 minutes with 2% Sodium Hydroxide. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus megaterium, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae grew very well on enriched hydrolyzates of rice and wheat straws. Even nonenriched straw hydrolyzates supported better growth of L. acidophilus, B. megaterium, and E. coli on rice straw than the enriched synthetic medium containing equivalent glucose. S. cerevisiae grown in shake flasks containing 25 mL of enriched rice and wheat straw hydrolyzates yielded 0.595 g and 0.450 g of dry cells, respectively. The corresponding yield was 0.396 g from enriched synthetic medium containing equal amounts of glucose.

  5. Factors affecting growth and pigmentation of Penicillium caseifulvum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Haasum, I.; Steenstrup, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    Color formation, metabolite production and growth of Penicillium caseifulvum were studied in order to elucidate factors contributing to. yellow discoloration of Blue Cheese caused by the mold. A screening experiment was set up to study the effect of pH, concentration of salt (NaCl), P, K, N, S, Mg...... the factors contributing to yellow color formation, pH and salt concentration are easy to control for the cheesemaker, while the third factor, P-concentration, is not. Naturally occurring variations in the P-concentration in milk delivered to Blue Cheese plants, could be responsible for the yellow...

  6. Mexican propolis flavonoids affect photosynthesis and seedling growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Díaz, Beatriz; Granados-Pineda, Jessica; Bah, Mustapha; Rivero-Cruz, J Fausto; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2015-10-01

    As a continuous effort to find new natural products with potential herbicide activity, flavonoids acacetin (1), chrysin (2) and 4',7-dimethylnarangenin (3) were isolated from a propolis sample collected in the rural area of Mexico City and their effects on the photosynthesis light reactions and on the growth of Lolium perenne, Echinochloa crus-galli and Physalis ixocarpa seedlings were investigated. Acacetin (1) acted as an uncoupler by enhancing the electron transport under basal and phosphorylating conditions and the Mg(2+)-ATPase. Chrysin (2) at low concentrations behaved as an uncoupler and at concentrations up to 100 μM its behavior was as a Hill reaction inhibitor. Finally, 4',7-dimethylnarangenin (3) in a concentration-dependent manner behaved as a Hill reaction inhibitor. Flavonoids 2 and 3 inhibited the uncoupled photosystem II reaction measured from water to 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ), and they did not inhibit the uncoupled partial reactions measured from water to sodium silicomolybdate (SiMo) and from diphenylcarbazide (DPC) to diclorophenol indophenol (DCPIP). These results indicated that chrysin and 4',7-dimethylnarangenin inhibited the acceptor side of PS II. The results were corroborated with fluorescence of chlorophyll a measurements. Flavonoids also showed activity on the growth of seedlings of Lolium perenne and Echinochloa crus-galli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dicarboxylic acids affect the growth of dermatophytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasch, J; Friege, B

    1994-09-01

    Azelaic acid is a dicarboxylic acid with known antimycotic activity. In this study we have used an agar dilution technique to test the effect of six other dicarboxylic acids (sebacic, undecanedioic, dodecanedioic, tridecanedioic, tetradecanedioic and hexadecanedioic acid, 10(-4)-10(-2) mol/l, pH 5.5) on in vitro growth of Trichophyton (T.) rubrum, T. mentagrophytes and Microsporum (M.) canis. Furthermore, the fungicidal activity of 10(-2) mol/l undecanedioic and sebacic acid was tested using a T. rubrum growth assay. Undecanedioic acid proved fungistatic at 10(-2) mol/l for all species and fungicidal for T. rubrum. A minor fungistatic effect on T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes was also seen with the other acids at this concentration. M. canis was inhibited only by high concentrations of four acids, whereas low concentrations of all six agents resulted in enlarged thallus diameters. We conclude that among dicarboxylic acids fungistatic activity is not limited to azelaic acid. Undecanedioic acid appears promising for further investigations.

  8. Stress tolerance and growth physiology of yeast strains from the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Bianca, B E; Gombert, A K

    2013-12-01

    Improved biofuels production requires a better understanding of industrial microorganisms. Some wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from the fuel ethanol industry in Brazil, present exceptional fermentation performance, persistence and prevalence in the harsh industrial environment. Nevertheless, their physiology has not yet been systematically investigated. Here we present a first systematic evaluation of the widely used industrial strains PE-2, CAT-1, BG-1 and JP1, in terms of their tolerance towards process-related stressors. We also analyzed their growth physiology under heat stress. These strains were evaluated in parallel to laboratory and baker's strains. Whereas the industrial strains performed in general better than the laboratory strains under ethanol or acetic acid stresses and on industrial media, high sugar stress was tolerated equally by all strains. Heat and low pH stresses clearly distinguished fuel ethanol strains from the others, indicating that these conditions might be the ones that mostly exert selective pressure on cells in the industrial environment. During shake-flask cultivations using a synthetic medium at 37 °C, industrial strains presented higher ethanol yields on glucose than the laboratory strains, indicating that they could have been selected for this trait-a response to energy-demanding fermentation conditions. These results might be useful to guide future improvements of large-scale fuel ethanol production via engineering of stress tolerance traits in other strains, and eventually also for promoting the use of these fuel ethanol strains in different industrial bioprocesses.

  9. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity.

  10. Nickel and ocean warming affect scleractinian coral growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscéré, T; Lorrain, A; Rodolfo-Metalpa, R; Gilbert, A; Wright, A; Devissi, C; Peignon, C; Farman, R; Duvieilbourg, E; Payri, C; Houlbrèque, F

    2017-07-15

    The sensitivity of corals and their Symbiodinium to warming has been extensively documented; however very few studies considered that anthropogenic inputs such as metal pollution have already an impact on many fringing reefs. Thus, today, nickel releases are common in coastal ecosystems. In this study, two major reef-building species Acropora muricata and Pocillopora damicornis were exposed in situ to ambient and moderate nickel concentrations on a short-term period (1h) using benthic chamber experiments. Simultaneously, we tested in laboratory conditions the combined effects of a chronic exposure (8weeks) to moderate nickel concentrations and ocean warming on A. muricata. The in situ experiment highlighted that nickel enrichment, at ambient temperature, stimulated by 27 to 47% the calcification rates of both species but not their photosynthetic performances. In contrast, an exposure to higher nickel concentration, in combination with elevated temperature simulated in aquaria, severely depressed by 30% the growth of A. muricata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Dietary Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisia Supplementation in Practical Diets of Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. P. Cyrino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-day feeding trial was carried out to determine the effects of various dietary levels of brewer’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the growth performance, body composition and nutrient utilization in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, juveniles. Fish (7.6 ± 0.3 g were stocked into eighteen 1,000-L tanks (100 fish per tank; n = 3 and fed to apparent satiation six isonitrogenous (27% crude protein and isoenergetic (19 kJ/g diets, formulated to contain different dried yeast levels (0%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30% or 40% diet in substitution to fishmeal. Body weight tripled at the end of the feeding trial for fish fed up to 20% dietary yeast incorporation. Daily growth coefficient (DGC, % body weight/day decreased with increasing dietary yeast level (P < 0.0001. Voluntary feed intake (VFI, %BW/day did not vary significantly with increasing yeast level. Fish fed 40% yeast showed significant reduction in protein efficiency rate, protein retention and nitrogen gain. Increasing levels of dietary yeast did not significantly affect protein or lipid digestibility. Dietary dried yeast was seemingly palatable to tilapia juveniles and was suitable up to 15% inclusion to promote growth and efficient diet utilization, without affecting body composition.

  12. Weed Interference Affects Dry Bean Yield and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein GHAMARI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Dry bean is one of the most important pulse crops in Iran. Field study was conducted in 2011 to evaluate effects of weed competition from a natural flora on growth and yield of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. The treatments consisted of weed infestation and weed removal periods (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 days after crop emergence. Control plots kept weed-infested and weed-free throughout growing season. To assess the weed competition effect on crop characteristics, Richards, Gompertz and logistic equations were fitted to the data. The most abundant weed species were Chenopodium album and Amaranthus retroflexus. Increase in duration of weed interference decreased the stem height of dry bean. At the end of the growing season, dry bean was 20 cm taller in season-long weed-free treatment compared to the season-long weed-infested treatment. As the number of days of weed interference increased, a declining trend of LAI and number of pods was observed. The minimum number of pods was obtained in season-long weed-infested treatment (5.01 pods/plant. Weed interference during the whole growing season, caused a 60% reduction in yield. Considering 5% and 10% acceptable yield lost, the critical period of weed competition was determined from 20 to 68 and 23 to 55 days after planting (DAE, respectively.

  13. Factors Affecting Bacterial Growth in Drinking Water Distribution System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI LU; XIAO-JIAN ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Objective To define the influence of some parameters, including assimilable organic carbon (AOC), chloramine residual, etc. on the bacterial growth in drinking water distribution systems. Methods Three typical water treatment plants in a northern city (City T) of China and their corresponding distribution systems were investigated. Some parameters of the water samples, such as heterotrophic plate content (HPC), AOC, CODMn, TOC, and phosphate were measured. Results The AOC in most water samples were more than 100 μg/L, or even more than 200 μg/L in some cases. The HPC in distribution systems increased significantly with the decrease of residual chlorine. When the residual chlorine was less than 0.1 mg/L, the magnitude order of HPC was 104 CFU/mL; when it was 0.5-0.7 mg/L, the HPC was about 500 CFU/mL. Conclusion For controlling the biostability of drinking water, the controlling of AOC and residual chlorine should be considered simultaneously. The influence of phosphors on the AOC tests of water is not significant. Phosphors may not be the limiting nutrient in the water distribution systems.

  14. Temperature affects insulin-like growth factor I and growth of juvenile southern flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckenbach, J Adam; Murashige, Ryan; Daniels, Harry V; Godwin, John; Borski, Russell J

    2007-01-01

    Temperature profoundly influences growth of heterothermic vertebrates. However, few studies have investigated the effects of temperature on growth and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in fishes. The aim of this study was to examine effects of temperature on growth and establish whether IGF-I may mediate growth at different temperatures in southern flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma. In two experiments, juvenile flounder were reared at 23 and 28 degrees C and growth was monitored for either 117 or 197 days. Growth was similar across treatments in both experiments until fish reached approximately 100 mm total length. Body size then diverged with fish at 23 degrees C ultimately growing 65-83% larger than those at 28 degrees C. Muscle IGF-I mRNA, plasma IGF-I, and hepatosomatic index (HSI) were significantly higher in flounder at 23 degrees C, whereas hepatic IGF-I mRNA abundance did not differ with treatment. Muscle IGF-I mRNA was correlated with HSI, while plasma IGF-I was correlated with body size, hepatic IGF-I mRNA, and HSI. These results demonstrate a strong effect of temperature on flounder growth and show that temperature-induced variation in growth is associated with differences in systemic IGF-I and local (i.e., muscle) IGF-I mRNA levels. The results also support the use of plasma IGF-I and HSI as indicators of flounder growth status.

  15. Interactions between Drosophila and its natural yeast symbionts—Is Saccharomyces cerevisiae a good model for studying the fly-yeast relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Hoang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts play an important role in the biology of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In addition to being a valuable source of nutrition, yeasts affect D. melanogaster behavior and interact with the host immune system. Most experiments investigating the role of yeasts in D. melanogaster biology use the baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae is rarely found with natural populations of D. melanogaster or other Drosophila species. Moreover, the strain of S. cerevisiae used most often in D. melanogaster experiments is a commercially and industrially important strain that, to the best of our knowledge, was not isolated from flies. Since disrupting natural host–microbe interactions can have profound effects on host biology, the results from D. melanogaster–S. cerevisiae laboratory experiments may not be fully representative of host–microbe interactions in nature. In this study, we explore the D. melanogaster-yeast relationship using five different strains of yeast that were isolated from wild Drosophila populations. Ingested live yeasts have variable persistence in the D. melanogaster gastrointestinal tract. For example, Hanseniaspora occidentalis persists relative to S. cerevisiae, while Brettanomyces naardenensis is removed. Despite these differences in persistence relative to S. cerevisiae, we find that all yeasts decrease in total abundance over time. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are an important component of the D. melanogaster anti-microbial response and can inhibit S. cerevisiae growth in the intestine. To determine if sensitivity to ROS explains the differences in yeast persistence, we measured yeast growth in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. We find that B. naardenesis is completely inhibited by hydrogen peroxide, while H. occidentalis is not, which is consistent with yeast sensitivity to ROS affecting persistence within the D. melanogaster gastrointestinal tract. We also compared the feeding

  16. Growth of ponderosa pine seedlings as affected by air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, B.; Anderson, P. D.; Houpis, J. L. J.; Helms, J. A.

    The effect of air pollution on seedling survival and competitive ability is important to natural and artificial regeneration of forest trees. Although biochemical and physiological processes are sensitive indicators of pollution stress, the cumulative effects of air pollutants on seedling vigor and competitive ability may be assessed directly from whole-plant growth characteristics such as diameter, height, and photosynthetic area. A few studies that have examined intraspecific variation in seedling response to air pollution indicate that genotypic differences are important in assessing potential effects of air pollution on forest regeneration. Here, we studied the effects of acid rain (no-rain, pH 5.1 rain, pH 3.0 rain) and ozone (filtered, ambient, twice-ambient) in the field on height, diameter, volume, the height:diameter ratio, maximum needle length, and time to reach maximum needle length in seedlings of three families of ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws). Seedling diameter, height, volume, and height:diameter ratio related significantly to their pre-treatment values. Twice-ambient ozone decreased seedling diameter compared with ozone-filtered air. A significant family-by-ozone interaction was detected for seedling height, as the height of only one of the three families was decreased by twice-ambient ozone compared with the ambient level. Seedling diameter was larger and the height:diameter ratio was smaller under pH 3.0 rain compared to either the no-rain or the pH 5.1-rain treatment. This suggests greater seedling vigor, perhaps due to a foliar fertilization effect of the pH 3.0 rain.

  17. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-05-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Emulsifying activity of hydrocarbonoclastic marine yeasts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, R.

    Marine yeast growth on four petroleum hydrocarbons induced the production of extracellular emulsifying agents (biosurfactants). Out of the 17 marine yeast isolates tested, 7 isolates, i.e., Candida parapsilosis, C. cantarelli, C. membranae...

  19. Heterologous Expression of the Carrot Hsp17.7 gene Increased Growth, Cell Viability, and Protein Solubility in Transformed Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under Heat, Cold, Acid, and Osmotic Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunhye; Kim, Minhye; Park, Yunho; Ahn, Yeh-Jin

    2017-08-01

    In industrial fermentation of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), culture conditions are often modified from the optimal growth conditions of the cells to maintain large-scale cultures and/or to increase recombinant protein production. However, altered growth conditions can be stressful to yeast cells resulting in reduced cell growth and viability. In this study, a small heat shock protein gene from carrot (Daucus carota L.), Hsp17.7, was inserted into the yeast genome via homologous recombination to increase tolerance to stress conditions that can occur during industrial culture. A DNA construct, Translational elongation factor gene promoter-carrot Hsp17.7 gene-Phosphoribosyl-anthranilate isomerase gene (an auxotrophic marker), was generated by a series of PCRs and introduced into the chromosome IV of the yeast genome. Immunoblot analysis showed that carrot Hsp17.7 accumulated in the transformed yeast cell lines. Growth rates and cell viability of these cell lines were higher than control cell lines under heat, cold, acid, and hyperosmotic stress conditions. Soluble protein levels were higher in the transgenic cell lines than control cell lines under heat and cold conditions, suggesting the molecular chaperone function of the recombinant Hsp17.7. This study showed that a recombinant DNA construct containing a HSP gene from carrot was successfully expressed in yeast by homologous recombination and increased tolerances to abiotic stress conditions.

  20. Mead production: effect of nitrogen supplementation on growth, fermentation profile and aroma formation by yeasts in mead fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, A.P.; Ferreira, A. Mendes; Oliveira,J.M.; Estevinho, L. M.; Faia, Arlete Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Mead is an alcoholic beverage, produced since ancient times, resulting from an alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey by yeasts. When it is produced in a traditional manner, mead producers can encounter several problems related to a lack of es-sential nutrients, such as available nitrogen. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nitrogen addition to honey-must on the fermentation performance of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts, QA23 and ICV D47, as well as on the me...

  1. Deficiency in frataxin homologue YFH1 in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii leads to missregulation of iron acquisition and riboflavin biosynthesis and affects sulfate assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pynyaha, Yuriy V; Boretsky, Yuriy R; Fedorovych, Daria V; Fayura, Lubov R; Levkiv, Andriy I; Ubiyvovk, Vira M; Protchenko, Olha V; Philpott, Caroline C; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2009-12-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a representative of yeast species that overproduce riboflavin (vitamin B2) in response to iron deprivation. P. guilliermondii YFH1 gene coding for frataxin homologue, eukaryotic mitochondrial protein involved in iron trafficking and storage, was identified and deleted. Constructed P. guilliermondii Δyfh1 mutant grew very poorly in a sucrose-containing synthetic medium supplemented with sulfate or sulfite as a sole sulfur source. Addition of sodium sulfide, glutathione, cysteine, methionine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine partially restored growth rate of the mutant suggesting that it is impaired in sulfate assimilation. Cellular iron content in Δyfh1 mutant was ~3-3.5 times higher as compared to the parental strain. It produced 50-70 times more riboflavin in iron sufficient synthetic media relative to the parental wildtype strain. Biomass yield of the mutant in the synthetic glutathione containing medium supplemented with glycerol as a sole carbon source was 1.4- and 2.6-fold increased as compared to sucrose and succinate containing media, respectively. Oxygen uptake of the Δyfh1 mutant on sucrose, glycerol or succinate, when compared to the parental strain, was decreased 5.5-, 1.7- and 1.5-fold, respectively. Substitution of sucrose or glycerol in the synthetic iron sufficient medium with succinate completely abolished riboflavin overproduction by the mutants. Deletion of the YFH1 gene caused hypersensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and exogenously added riboflavin and led to alterations in superoxide dismutase activities. Thus, deletion of the gene coding for yeast frataxin homologue has pleiotropic effect on metabolism in P. guilliermondii.

  2. Numerical study of how creep and progressive stiffening affect the growth stress formation in trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Dahlblom, O.; Johansson, M.

    2010-01-01

    annual rings is progressively added to the tree during the analysis. The material model used is based on the theory of small strains (where strains refer to the undeformed configuration which is good approximation for strains less than 4%) where so-called biological maturation strains (growth......It is not fully understood how much growth stresses affect the final quality of solid timber products in terms of e.g. shape stability. It is for example difficult to predict the internal growth stress field within the tree stem. Growth stresses are progressively generated during the tree growth...... and they are highly influenced by climate, biologic and material related factors. To increase the knowledge of the stress formation a finite element model was created to study how the growth stresses develop during the tree growth. The model is an axisymmetric general plane strain model where material for all new...

  3. Brewers dried yeast as a source of mannan oligosaccharides for weanling pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L A; Newman, M C; Cromwell, G L; Lindemann, M D

    2002-10-01

    Brewers dried yeast, a source of mannan oligosaccharides (MOS), was assessed as an alternative to an antimicrobial agent (carbadox) for young pigs in two experiments. The yeast contained 5.2% MOS. Agglutination tests confirmed adsorption of several serovars of E. coli and Salmonella spp. onto the yeast product. In Exp. 1, seven replicates (five pigs per pen) of 22-d-old pigs were fed a nonmedicated basal diet or the basal diet with carbadox (55 mg/kg), yeast (3%), or a combination of 3% yeast and 2% citric acid for 28 d. Carbadox did not improve growth performance. Growth rate and feed intake were depressed (P yeast alone or in combination with acid. Log counts of total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens in feces were not affected by diet, but Bifidobacteria spp. counts were lower (P yeast + acid diet and lactobacilli counts were higher (P yeast. Fecal pH and VFA concentrations and intestinal morphological traits were not consistently affected by diet. Serum IgG levels were elevated in the yeast + acid (P yeast and carbadox additions to the diet on enteric microbial populations in young pigs housed in isolation units were evaluated. Pigs (n = 24) were weaned at 11 d of age (4.1 kg BW) and placed in isolation chambers (two pigs per chamber) equipped with individual air filtering systems and excrement containers. Treatments were a nonmedicated basal diet and the basal diet with 55 mg/kg of carbadox or with 3% yeast. Diets were fed for 29 d, then each pig was orally dosed with approximately 9.5 x 10(8) CFU of E. coli K88. Daily fecal E. coli K88 counts were not different (P > 0.05) among treatments, but fecal shedding of carbadox-resistant coliforms was higher (P yeast (P Yeast reduced colonization oftotal coliforms in the duodenum,jejunum, cecum, and colon, but it did not have a consistent effect on colonization of E. coli K88. Pigs fed yeast tended (P yeast and carbadox had minimal effects on growth, microbial populations, and intestinal health

  4. Anaerobic lactic acid degradation during ensilage of whole crop maize inoculated with lactobacillus buchneri inhibits yeast growth and improves aerobic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driehuis; Elferink; Spoelstra

    1999-10-01

    Aerobic deterioration of silages is initiated by (facultative) aerobic micro-organisms, usually yeasts, that oxidize the preserving organic acids. In this study, a Lactobacillus buchneri strain isolated from maize silage was evaluated for its potential as a bacterial inoculant that enhances aerobic stability of silages. In four experiments, chopped whole crop maize (30-43% dry matter (DM)) was inoculated with Lact. buchneri and ensiled in laboratory silos. Uninoculated silages served as controls. Analysis of silages treated with Lact. buchneri at levels of 103-106 cfu g-1 after about 3 months of anaerobic storage showedthat acetic acid and 1-propanol contents increased with inoculum levels above 104 cfu g-1,whereas lactic acid decreased. Propionic acid, silage pH and DM loss increased withinoculum levels above 105 cfu g-1. Time course experiments with maize inoculated with Lact. buchneri at 4 x 104-2 x 105 cfu g-1 showed that up to 7-14 d after ensiling, Lact. buchneri had no effect on silage characteristics. Thereafter, the lactic acid content of the inoculated silages declined and, simultaneously, acetic acid and, to a lesser extent, propionic acid and 1-propanol, accumulated. Inoculation reduced survival of yeasts during the anaerobic storage phase and inhibited yeast growth when the silage was exposed to O2, resulting in a substantial improvement in aerobic stability. The results indicate that the use of Lact. buchneri as a silage inoculant can enhance aerobic stability by inhibition of yeasts. The ability of the organism to ferment lactic acid to acetic acid appears to be an important underlying principle of this effect.

  5. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria affect the growth and nutrient uptake of Fraxinus americana container seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangchun; Xing, Shangjun; Ma, Hailin; Du, Zhenyu; Ma, Bingyao

    2013-05-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are important catalysts that regulate the functional properties of agricultural systems. However, there is little information on the effect of PGPR inoculation on the growth and nutrient accumulation of forest container seedlings. This study determined the effects of a growth medium inoculated with PGPR on the nutrient uptake, nutrient accumulation, and growth of Fraxinus americana container seedlings. PGPR inoculation with fertilizer increased the dry matter accumulation of the F. americana aerial parts with delayed seedling emergence time. Under fertilized conditions, the accumulation time of phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) in the F. americana aerial parts was 13 days longer due to PGPR inoculation. PGPR increased the maximum daily P and K accumulations in fertilized seedlings by 9.31 and 10.44 %, respectively, but had little impact on unfertilized ones. Regardless of fertilizer application, the root exudates, namely sugars, amino acids, and organic acids significantly increased because of PGPR inoculation. PGPR inoculation with fertilizer increased the root, shoot, and leaf yields by 19.65, 22.94, and 19.44 %, respectively, as well as the P and K contents by 8.33 and 10.60 %, respectively. Consequently, the N, P, and K uptakes increased by 19.85, 31.97, and 33.95 %, respectively. Hence, PGPR inoculation with fertilizer can be used as a bioenhancer for plant growth and nutrient uptake in forest container seedling nurseries.

  6. Environmental Growth Conditions of Trichoderma spp. Affects Indole Acetic Acid Derivatives, Volatile Organic Compounds, and Plant Growth Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Jacobo, Maria F; Steyaert, Johanna M; Salazar-Badillo, Fatima B; Nguyen, Dianne Vi; Rostás, Michael; Braithwaite, Mark; De Souza, Jorge T; Jimenez-Bremont, Juan F; Ohkura, Mana; Stewart, Alison; Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio

    2017-01-01

    Trichoderma species are soil-borne filamentous fungi widely utilized for their many plant health benefits, such as conferring improved growth, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance to their hosts. Many Trichoderma species are able to produce the auxin phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and its production has been suggested to promote root growth. Here we show that the production of IAA is strain dependent and diverse external stimuli are associated with its production. In in vitro assays, Arabidopsis primary root length was negatively affected by the interaction with some Trichoderma strains. In soil experiments, a continuum effect on plant growth was shown and this was also strain dependent. In plate assays, some strains of Trichoderma spp. inhibited the expression of the auxin reporter gene DR5 in Arabidopsis primary roots but not secondary roots. When Trichoderma spp. and A. thaliana were physically separated, enhancement of both shoot and root biomass, increased root production and chlorophyll content were observed, which strongly suggested that volatile production by the fungus influenced the parameters analyzed. Trichoderma strains T. virens Gv29.8, T. atroviride IMI206040, T. sp. "atroviride B" LU132, and T. asperellum LU1370 were demonstrated to promote plant growth through volatile production. However, contrasting differences were observed with LU1370 which had a negative effect on plant growth in soil but a positive effect in plate assays. Altogether our results suggest that the mechanisms and molecules involved in plant growth promotion by Trichoderma spp. are multivariable and are affected by the environmental conditions.

  7. Pengimbuhan Ragi Roti dalam Pakan Meningkatkan Respons Imun Nonspesifik dan Pertumbuhan Ikan Nila (SUPPLEMENTATION OF BAKER’S YEAST IN FEED ENHANCE NONSPECIFIC IMMUNE RESPONSE AND GROWTH OF NILE TILAPIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henky Manoppo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of Baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cereviciae to enhancenonspecific immune response and growth of Nile tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus. The fish were obtainedfrom Freshwater Hatchery Tateli (BP3I, Marine and Fisheries Office, North Sulawesi. After acclimatizationfor two weeks in 1000 L fiberglass tank, fish with an average weight of 9 g were put in five 45 L-aquaria ata density of 15 fish/aquarium. During the experiment, fish were fed with feed pellet supplemented withfive different doses of baker’s yeast (10, 20, 30, 40 g yeast/kg pellet for four consecutive weeks at 5% bw/day, twice a day. Fish in different aquarium received different dose of baker’s yeast. Immune parametersincluding total leucocyte count and phagocytosis activity and growth of fish were measured at two weeksinterval. After four weeks of feeding, total leucocyte count and phagocytosis activity of phagocyte cells offish fed pellet supplemented with 10 g yeast/kg pellet increased significantly as compared to that ofcontrol fish (p<0.01. Growth of fish fed pellet supplemented with 10 g yeast/kg pellet also increasesignificantly as compared to control group (p=0.01. Average weight gain of fish fed pellet supplementedwith 10 g yeast/kg pellet was 15.00±1.00 g while control fish was 8.33 g. As conclusion, supplementationof baker’s yeast in feed could enhance nonspecific immune response and growth of Nile tilapia fish.

  8. Growth of and fumitremorgin production by Neosartorya fischeri as affected by temperature, light, and water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, P V; Beuchat, L R; Frisvad, J C

    1988-06-01

    The effects of temperature, light, and water activity (aw) on the growth and fumitremorgin production of a heat-resistant mold, Neosartorya fischeri, cultured on Czapek Yeast Autolysate agar (CYA) were studied for incubation periods of up to 74 days. Colonies were examined visually, and extracts of mycelia and CYA on which the mold was cultured were analyzed for mycotoxin content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Growth always resulted in the production of the tremorgenic mycotoxins verruculogen and fumitremorgins A and C. The optimum temperatures for the production of verruculogen and fumitremorgins A and C on CYA at pH 7.0 were 25, 30, and 37 degrees C, respectively. The production of fumitremorgin C by N. fischeri has not been previously reported. Fumitremorgin production was retarded at 15 degrees C, but an extension of the incubation period resulted in concentrations approaching those observed at 25 degrees C. Light clearly enhanced fumitremorgin production on CYA (pH 7.0, 25 degrees C), but not as dramatically as did the addition of glucose, fructose, or sucrose to CYA growth medium (pH 3.5, 25 degrees C). Growth and fumitremorgin production was greatest at aw of 0.980 on CYA supplemented with glucose or fructose and at aw of 0.990 on CYA supplemented with sucrose. Growth and fumitremorgin production were observed at aw as low as 0.925 on glucose-supplemented CYA but not at aw lower than 0.970 on CYA supplemented with sucrose. Verruculogen was produced in the highest amount on all test media, followed by fumitremorgin A and fumitremorgin C.

  9. Yeast two-hybrid screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Yeast two-hybrid is a method for screening large numbers of gene products (encoded by cDNA libraries) for their ability to interact with a protein of interest. This system can also be used for characterizing and manipulating candidate protein: protein interactions. Interactions between proteins are monitored by the growth of yeast plated on selective media.

  10. Timing of growth hormone treatment affects trabecular bone microarchitecture and mineralization in growth hormone deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Erika; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Morck, Douglas W; Boyd, Steven K

    2010-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is essential in the development of bone mass, and a growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in childhood is frequently treated with daily injections of GH. It is not clear what effect GHD and its treatment has on bone. It was hypothesized that GHD would result in impaired microarchitecture, and an early onset of treatment would result in a better recovery than late onset. Growth hormone deficient homozygous (lit/lit) mice of both sexes were divided into two treatment groups receiving daily injections of GH, starting at an early (21 days of age) or a late time point (35 days of age, corresponding to the end of puberty). A group of heterozygous mice with normal levels of growth hormone served as controls. In vivo micro-computed tomography scans of the fourth lumbar vertebra were obtained at five time points between 21 and 60 days of age, and trabecular morphology and volumetric BMD were analyzed to determine the effects of GH on bone microarchitecture. Early GH treatment led to significant improvements in bone volume ratio (p=0.006), tissue mineral density (p=0.005), and structure model index (p=0.004) by the study endpoint (day 60), with no detected change in trabecular thickness. Trabecular number increased and trabecular separation decreased in GHD mice regardless of treatment compared to heterozygous mice. This suggests fundamental differences in the structure of trabecular bone in GHD and GH treated mice, reflected by an increased number of thinner trabeculae in these mice compared to heterozygous controls. There were no significant differences between the late treatment group and GHD mice except for connectivity density. Taken together, these results indicate that bone responds to GH treatment initiated before puberty but not to treatment commencing post-puberty, and that GH treatment does not rescue the structure of trabecular bone to that of heterozygous controls. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Does Foreign Direct Investment Affect Green Growth? Evidence from China’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Yue

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Foreign Direct Investment (FDI not only affects the economic growth but also affects the environmental protection of the host country. With China’s background of pursuing green growth, we need to consider the performance of FDI from the economic and environmental benefit aspects. On this basis, using slacks-based measure directional distance function (SBMDDF to build up green growth efficiency, economic efficiency and environmental efficiency indexes, empirical research on FDI in 104 Chinese cities from 2004 to 2011 has shown that: (1 Different cities have differences in their green growth efficiency. Shenzhen city is always efficient in green economic growth. (2 Overall, FDI is positive on Chinese cities’ green growth. (3 When the green growth efficiency is broken down into economic efficiency and environmental efficiency, FDI promotes China’s economic green growth through both environmental benefits and economic benefits. (4 The effect of FDI differs in different sectors. FDI in the emission-intensive sector promotes green efficiency mainly through the improvement of economic efficiency. FDI in the non-emission-intensive sector promotes economic efficiency, environmental efficiency and green efficiency.

  12. Rice OsRAD21-2 is Expressed in Actively Dividing Tissues and its Ectopic Expression in Yeast Results in Aberrant Cell Division and Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Gong; Tang Li; Qi Li; Longfeng Yan; Tai Wang

    2011-01-01

    Rad21 and its meiotic counterpart Rec8,the key components of the cohesin complex,are essential for sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis,respectively.In contrast to yeast and vertebrates,which have only two RAD21/REC8 genes,the rice genome encodes four Rad21/Rec8 proteins.Here,we report on the cloning and characterization of OsRAD21-2 from rice (Oryza sativa L.).Phylogenetic analysis of the full-length amino acids showed that OsRad21-2 was grouped into the plant-specific Rad21 subfamily.Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed OsRAD21-2 preferentially expressed in premeiotic flowers.Further RNA in situ hybridization analysis and promoter::β-glucuronidase staining indicated that OsRAD21-2 was mainly expressed in actively dividing tissues including premeiotic stamen,stem intercalary meristem,leaf meristem,and root pericycle.Ectopic expression of OsRAD21-2 in fission yeast resulted in cell growth delay and morphological abnormality.Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the OsRAD21-2-expressed cells were arrested in G2 phase.Our results suggest that OsRad21-2 functions in regulation of cell division and growth.

  13. Effect of Carbonated Cassava on Yeast Growth%碳化木薯对酵母生长的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓峰; 李莉; 徐新

    2016-01-01

    以不同程度的碳化木薯和正常木薯作为原料,在相同工艺条件下,采用摇瓶发酵法,进行酒精发酵效果的初步研究,研究了不同程度的碳化木薯对酵母生长的影响。结果表明,碳化木薯干发酵效果较差,碳化过程中产生的乙酸和乳酸,对酵母生长有抑制作用,为工厂采购木薯和木薯储存提供参考。%The effects of cassava carbonated degree on yeast growth were compared in ethanol fermentation on shake-flask scale under the same condition using carbonated and normal cassava. The results showed that the fermentation was poor by carbonated dry cassava. The acetic acid and lactic acid produced in the carbonization process inhibited the growth of yeast. The results provided a reference for factory in purchasing and storing cassava material.

  14. Characterization of hexose transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica reveals new groups of Sugar Porters involved in yeast growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Rossignol, Tristan; Devillers, Hugo; Morin, Nicolas; Robak, Małgorzata; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Crutz-Le Coq, Anne-Marie

    2017-03-01

    Sugar assimilation has been intensively studied in the model yeast S. cerevisiae, and for two decades, it has been clear that the homologous HXT genes, which encode a set of hexose transporters, play a central role in this process. However, in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, which is well-known for its biotechnological applications, sugar assimilation is only poorly understood, even though this yeast exhibits peculiar intra-strain differences in fructose uptake: some strains (e.g., W29) are known to be slow-growing in fructose while others (e.g., H222) grow rapidly under the same conditions. Here, we retrieved 24 proteins of the Sugar Porter family from these two strains, and determined that at least six of these proteins can function as hexose transporters in the heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY.VW4000. Transcriptional studies and deletion analysis in Y. lipolytica indicated that two genes, YHT1 and YHT4, are probably the main players in both strains, with a similar role in the uptake of glucose, fructose, and mannose at various concentrations. The other four genes appear to constitute a set of 'reservoir' hexose transporters with an as-yet unclear physiological role. Furthermore, through examining Sugar Porters of the entire Yarrowia clade, we show that they constitute a dynamic family, within which hexose transport genes have been duplicated and lost several times. Our phylogenetic analyses support the existence of at least three distinct evolutionary groups of transporters which allow yeasts to grow on hexoses. In addition to the well-known and widespread Hxt-type transporters (which are not essential in Y. lipolytica), we highlight a second group of transporters, represented by Yht1, which are phylogenetically related to sensors that play a regulatory role in S. cerevisiae, and a third group, represented by Yht4, previously thought to contain only high-affinity glucose transporters related to Hgt1of Kluyveromyces lactis.

  15. An ethanolamine kinase Eki1 affects radial growth and cell wall integrity in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ronglin; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Dongyuan

    2015-09-01

    Ethanolamine kinase (ATP:ethanolamine O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.82) catalyzes the committed step of phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis via the CDP-ethanolamine pathway. The functions of eki genes that encode ethanolamine kinase have been intensively studied in mammalian cells, fruit flies and yeast. However, the role of the eki gene has not yet been characterized in filamentous fungi. In this study, Treki1, an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae EKI1, was identified and functionally characterized using a target gene deletion strategy in Trichoderma reesei. A Treki deletion mutant was less sensitive to cell wall stressors calcofluor white and Congo red and released fewer protoplasts during cell wall digestion than the parent strain QM9414. Further transcription analysis showed that the expression levels of five genes that encode chitin synthases were drastically increased in the ΔTreki1 mutant. The chitin content was also increased in the null mutant of Treki1 comparing to the parent strain. In addition, the ΔTreki1 mutant exhibited defects in radial growth, conidiation and the accumulation of ethanolamine. The results indicate that Treki1 plays a key role in growth and development and in the maintenance of cell wall integrity in T. reesei.

  16. Effect of supplementation of yeast with bacteriocin and culture on growth performance, cecal fermentation, microbiota composition, and blood characteristics in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of yeast with bacteriocin and Lactobacillus cultures (mixture of Lactobacillus agilis BCRC 10436 and Lactobacillus reuteri BCRC 17476 supplements, alone or in combination, on broiler chicken performance. Methods A total of 300, 1-d-old healthy broiler chickens were randomly divided into five treatment groups: i basal diet (control, ii basal diet+0.25% yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YC, iii basal diet+0.25% yeast with bacteriocin (BA, iv basal diet+Lactobacillus cultures (LAB, and v basal diet +0.25% yeast with bacteriocin+Lactobacillus cultures (BA+LAB. Growth performance, cecal microbiota, cecal fermentation products, and blood biochemistry parameters were determined when chickens were 21 and 35 d old. Results The supplementation of YC, BA, and BA+LAB resulted in a significantly better feed conversion rate (FCR than that of the control group during 1 to 21 d (p<0.05. The LAB supplementation had a significant effect on the presence of Lactobacillus in the ceca at 35 d. None of the supplements had an effect on relative numbers of L. agilis and L. reuter at 21 d, but the BA supplementation resulted in the decrease of both Lactobacillus strains at 35 d. The BA+LAB supplementation resulted in higher short chain fatty acid (SCFA in the ceca, but LAB supplementation significantly decreased the SCFA at 35 d (p<0.05. All treatments tended to decrease ammonia concentration in the ceca at 21 d, especially in the LAB treatment group. The BA supplementation alone decreased the triacylglycerol (TG concentration significantly at 21 d (p<0.05, but the synergistic effect of BA and LAB supplementation was required to reduce the TG concentration at 35 d. The YC supplementation tended to increase the plasma cholesterol at 21 d and 35 d. However, the BA supplementation significantly decreased the cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol level at 35 d. In conclusion, the BA

  17. Soil Type Affects Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum (Pinaceae Seedling Growth in Simulated Drought Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Lindsey

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Effects of drought stress and media type interactions on growth of Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum germinants were investigated. Methods and Results: Soil properties and growth responses under drought were compared across four growth media types: two native soils (dolomitic limestone and granite, a soil-less industry standard conifer medium, and a custom-mixed conifer medium. After 35 d of growth, the seedlings under drought stress (reduced watering produced less shoot and root biomass than watered control seedlings. Organic media led to decreased root biomass, but increased root length and shoot biomass relative to the mineral soils. Conclusions: Media type affected root-to-shoot biomass partitioning of P. ponderosa var. scopulorum, which may influence net photosynthetic rates, growth, and long-term seedling survival. Further work should examine how specific soil properties like bulk density and organic matter influence biomass allocation in greenhouse studies.

  18. Environmental Growth Conditions of Trichoderma spp. Affects Indole Acetic Acid Derivatives, Volatile Organic Compounds, and Plant Growth Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Jacobo, Maria F.; Steyaert, Johanna M.; Salazar-Badillo, Fatima B.; Nguyen, Dianne Vi; Rostás, Michael; Braithwaite, Mark; De Souza, Jorge T.; Jimenez-Bremont, Juan F.; Ohkura, Mana; Stewart, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Trichoderma species are soil-borne filamentous fungi widely utilized for their many plant health benefits, such as conferring improved growth, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance to their hosts. Many Trichoderma species are able to produce the auxin phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and its production has been suggested to promote root growth. Here we show that the production of IAA is strain dependent and diverse external stimuli are associated with its production. In in vitro assays, Arabidopsis primary root length was negatively affected by the interaction with some Trichoderma strains. In soil experiments, a continuum effect on plant growth was shown and this was also strain dependent. In plate assays, some strains of Trichoderma spp. inhibited the expression of the auxin reporter gene DR5 in Arabidopsis primary roots but not secondary roots. When Trichoderma spp. and A. thaliana were physically separated, enhancement of both shoot and root biomass, increased root production and chlorophyll content were observed, which strongly suggested that volatile production by the fungus influenced the parameters analyzed. Trichoderma strains T. virens Gv29.8, T. atroviride IMI206040, T. sp. “atroviride B” LU132, and T. asperellum LU1370 were demonstrated to promote plant growth through volatile production. However, contrasting differences were observed with LU1370 which had a negative effect on plant growth in soil but a positive effect in plate assays. Altogether our results suggest that the mechanisms and molecules involved in plant growth promotion by Trichoderma spp. are multivariable and are affected by the environmental conditions. PMID:28232840

  19. Disruption of the lower food web in Lake Ontario: Did it affect alewife growth or condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, R.; Prindle, S.E.; Lantry, J.R.; Lantry, B.F.

    2008-01-01

    From the early 1980s to the late 1990s, a succession of non-native invertebrates colonized Lake Ontario and the suite of consequences caused by their colonization became known as "food web disruption". For example, the native burrowing amphipod Diporeia spp., a key link in the profundal food web, declined to near absence, exotic predaceous cladocerans with long spines proliferated, altering the zooplankton community, and depth distributions of fishes shifted. These changes had the potential to affect growth and condition of planktivorous alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, the most abundant fish in the lake. To determine if food web disruption affected alewife, we used change-point analysis to examine alewife growth and adult alewife condition during 1976-2006 and analysis-of-variance to determine if values between change points differed significantly. There were no change points in growth during the first year of life. Of three change points in growth during the second year of life, one coincided with the shift in springtime distribution of alewife to deeper water but it was not associated with a significant change in growth. After the second year of life, no change points in growth were evident, although growth in the third year of life spiked in those years when Bythotrephes, the largest of the exotic cladocerans, was abundant suggesting that it was a profitable prey item for age-2 fish. We detected two change points in condition of adult alewife in fall, but the first occurred in 1981, well before disruption began. A second change point occurred in 2003, well after disruption began. After the springtime distribution of alewife shifted deeper during 1992-1994, growth in the first two years of life became more variable, and growth in years of life two and older became correlated (P < 0.05). In conclusion, food web disruption had no negative affect on growth and condition of alewife in Lake Ontario although it appears to have resulted in growth in the first two years of

  20. Breed effect and non-genetic factors affecting growth performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-07-30

    Jul 30, 2013 ... Breed effect and non-genetic factors of growth performance of sheep. 5302. Breed effect and .... consisting of 25% cottonseed cake and 75% maize. The General Liner Model ..... and environmental changes have effect on the quality and quantity of pasture forages, which also affect the provision of food and ...

  1. Mutations and environmental factors affecting regulation of riboflavin synthesis and iron assimilation also cause oxidative stress in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Protchenko, Olga V; Prokopiv, Tetiana M; Mukalov, Igor O; Fedorovych, Daria V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-10-01

    Iron deficiency causes oversynthesis of riboflavin in several yeast species, known as flavinogenic yeasts. However, the mechanisms of such regulation are not known. We found that mutations causing riboflavin overproduction and iron hyperaccumulation (rib80, rib81 and hit1), as well as cobalt excess or iron deficiency all provoke oxidative stress in the Pichia guilliermondii yeast. Iron content in the cells, production both of riboflavin and malondialdehyde by P. guilliermondii wild type and hit1 mutant strains depend on a type of carbon source used in cultivation media. The data suggest that the regulation of riboflavin biosynthesis and iron assimilation in P. guilliermondii are linked with cellular oxidative state.

  2. Salinity fluctuation of the brine discharge affects growth and survival of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote-Moreno, A; Fernández-Torquemada, Y; Sánchez-Lizaso, J L

    2014-04-15

    The increase of seawater desalination plants may affect seagrasses as a result of its hypersaline effluents. There are some studies on the salinity tolerance of seagrasses under controlled laboratory conditions, but few have been done in situ. To this end, Cymodocea nodosa shoots were placed during one month at four localities: two close to a brine discharge; and the other two not affected by the discharge, and this experiment was repeated four times. The results obtained showed a decrease in growth and an increased mortality at the localities affected by the brine discharge. An increase was detected in the percentage of horizontal shoots in respect to vertical shoots at the impacted localities. It is probably that not only the average salinity, but also the constant salinity fluctuations and slightly higher temperatures associated with the brine that may have caused physiological stress thus reducing C. nodosa growth and survival.

  3. A dietary dairy/yeast prebiotic and flaxseed oil enhance growth, hematological and immunological parameters in channel catfish at a suboptimal temperature (15°C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M; Lochmann, R; Phillips, H; Sink, T D

    2015-07-01

    Channel catfish raised in the southern United States require two growing seasons to reach market size. Growing seasons are separated by a cool period of about 3 months when feed intake and growth are greatly reduced. A cool-weather feeding strategy to improve feed intake, growth or health of catfish might improve survival and reduce the time needed to achieve market size. We conducted a feeding trial with channel catfish at a suboptimal temperature (15°C) to determine the effects of supplementing diets with either a dairy/yeast prebiotic or flaxseed oil (high in 18:3n-3) compared with a control with soybean oil (high in 18:2n-6). The trial was conducted in recirculating systems with 1140-l tanks containing 100 fish each (mean initial weight 61.4 g±0.43 s.e.m.). A 28%-protein basal diet was supplemented with 20 g/kg cellulose and 20 g/kg soybean oil (SBO, control), 20 g/kg cellulose and 20 g/kg flaxseed oil (FLAX) or 20 g/kg of a dairy/yeast prebiotic and 20 g/kg soybean oil (PREB). Fish were fed once daily to satiation and weighed every 3 weeks to track growth. Hematology, non-specific immune responses, proximate and fatty acid composition of muscle were determined to assess diet effects. Catfish-fed FLAX or PREB had higher weight gain, feed consumption and lysozyme activity than fish fed SBO. Total n-3 fatty acids in muscle were higher in fish fed SBO or FLAX than those fed PREB. Total n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated acids were higher in muscle of fish fed PREB than those fed SBO. Fatty acids in the PREB and SBO diets were similar, so the PREB appeared to increase elongation and desaturation of n-6 fatty acids in muscle. Flaxseed oil and the dairy/yeast prebiotic both have potential to increase catfish performance at a low temperature.

  4. Growth and ethanol fermentation ability on hexose and pentose sugars and glucose effect under various conditions in thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrussamee, Nadchanok; Hirata, Katsushi; Suprayogi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Kosaka, Tomoyuki [Yamaguchi Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture; Limtong, Savitree [Kasetsart Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Faculty of Science; Yamada, Mamoru [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Yamaguchi Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    2011-05-15

    Ethanol fermentation ability of the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, which is able to utilize various sugars including glucose, mannose, galactose, xylose, and arabinose, was examined under shaking and static conditions at high temperatures. The yeast was found to produce ethanol from all of these sugars except for arabinose under a shaking condition but only from hexose sugars under a static condition. Growth and sugar utilization rate under a static condition were slower than those under a shaking condition, but maximum ethanol yield was slightly higher. Even at 40 C, a level of ethanol production similar to that at 30 C was observed except for galactose under a static condition. Glucose repression on utilization of other sugars was observed, and it was more evident at elevated temperatures. Consistent results were obtained by the addition of 2-deoxyglucose. The glucose effect was further examined at a transcription level, and it was found that KmGAL1 for galactokinase and KmXYL1 for xylose reductase for galactose and xylose/arabinose utilization, respectively, were repressed by glucose at low and high temperatures, but KmHXK2 for hexokinase was not repressed. We discuss the possible mechanism of glucose repression and the potential for utilization of K. marxianus in high-temperature fermentation with mixed sugars containing glucose. (orig.)

  5. Dietary zinc affects concentrations of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I and growth hormone in lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droke, E.A.; Spears, J.W.; Armstrong, J.D. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Glucose tolerance and concentrations of insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) were evaluated in lambs deficient, marginal or adequate in zinc (Zn). Lambs were fed a semipurified diet that contained either 3.7, 8.7, or 43.7 mg Zn/kg. Zinc deficiency resulted in lower serum insulin levels 1 h after feeding while levels in marginal lambs were not different from that of adequate lambs. Dietary Zn did not affect plasma glucose post feeding. One h after IV glucose administration plasma glucose concentrations were lower in deficient lambs compared to adequate lambs; marginal lambs had intermediate glucose levels. Concentration of GH before and after feeding or glucose challenge were not affected by Zn status; however, serum IGF-I was lower in deficient than in marginal or adequate lambs. A GH releasing factor (GRF) analog was given to evaluate the release of GH. Serum GH in response to GRF challenge was higher in deficient lambs and tended to be higher in marginal lambs when compared to adequate lambs. Impaired growth observed with Zn deficiency may be mediated in part by its effect on insulin, GH and IGF-I concentrations.

  6. Fusarium Oxysporum Volatiles Enhance Plant Growth Via Affecting Auxin Transport and Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitas, Vasileios; McCartney, Nathaniel; Li, Ningxiao; Demers, Jill; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hye-Seon; Brown, Kathleen M; Kang, Seogchan

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption.

  7. Fusarium oxysporum volatiles enhance plant growth via affecting auxin transport and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios eBitas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption.

  8. Do soil fertilization and forest canopy foliage affect the growth and photosynthesis of Amazonian saplings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilvanda dos Santos Magalhães

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Most Amazonian soils are highly weathered and poor in nutrients. Therefore, photosynthesis and plant growth should positively respond to the addition of mineral nutrients. Surprisingly, no study has been carried out in situ in the central Amazon to address this issue for juvenile trees. The objective of this study was to determine how photosynthetic rates and growth of tree saplings respond to the addition of mineral nutrients, to the variation in leaf area index of the forest canopy, and to changes in soil water content associated with rainfall seasonality. We assessed the effect of adding a slow-release fertilizer. We determined plant growth from 2010 to 2012 and gas exchange in the wet and dry season of 2012. Rainfall seasonality led to variations in soil water content, but it did not affect sapling growth or leaf gas exchange parameters. Although soil amendment increased phosphorus content by 60 %, neither plant growth nor the photosynthetic parameters were influenced by the addition of mineral nutrients. However, photosynthetic rates and growth of saplings decreased as the forest canopy became denser. Even when Amazonian soils are poor in nutrients, photosynthesis and sapling growth are more responsive to slight variations in light availability in the forest understory than to the availability of nutrients. Therefore, the response of saplings to future increases in atmospheric [CO2] will not be limited by the availability of mineral nutrients in the soil.

  9. Effects of methionine chelate- or yeast proteinate-based supplement of copper, iron, manganese and zinc on broiler growth performance, their distribution in the tibia and excretion into the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhay Kumar; Ghosh, Tapan Kumar; Haldar, Sudipto

    2015-04-01

    A straight-run flock of 1-day-old Cobb 400 chicks (n = 432) was distributed into four treatment groups (9 replicate pens in each group, 12 birds in a pen) for a 38-day feeding trial evaluating the effects of a methionine chelate (Met-TM)- or a yeast proteinate (Yeast-TM)-based supplement of copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) on growth performance, bone criteria and some metabolic indices in commercial broiler chickens. The diets were either not supplemented with any trace elements at all (negative control, NC) or supplemented with an inorganic (sulphate) trace element premix (inorganic TM (ITM), 1 g/kg feed), the Met-TM (1 g/kg feed) and the Yeast-TM (0.5 g/kg feed). Body weight, feed conversion ratio and dressed meat yield at 38 days were better in the Yeast-TM-supplemented group as compared with the NC, ITM and Met-TM groups (p chelates or yeast proteinate forms of Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn improved body weight and feed conversion ratio (FCR) and markedly reduced excretion of the said trace elements. The study revealed that it may be possible to improve broiler performance and reduce excretion of critical trace elements into the environment by complete replacement of inorganic trace minerals from their dietary regime and replacing the same with methionine chelate or yeast proteinate forms.

  10. The growth and photosynthesis of Typha in oil sands process affected material and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Hornung, J. [Petro-Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Aquatic plants such as cattail contribute substantially to the energy flow in wetlands. Since Typha (cattail) plants acquire and cycle carbon and nutrients through wetlands, their growth and recycling of captured nutrients are an important part of natural, healthy wetland ecosystems. Cattail are pervasive and satisfy many of the criteria to be used as indicators of wetland integrity. This study investigated if cattail growth and carbon accrual were influenced by oil sands process materials (OSPM) such as consolidated tailings (CT). The purpose was to facilitate land reclamation initiatives by evaluating the impact that constituents of oil sands process material have on aquatic plant growth. The study was conducted at Suncor's experimental trenches. Six lined basins were used, of which 3 were filled with natural water and 3 were filled with trench water. Cattail were planted in different growth medium combinations, including CT over CT; soil over soil; soil over CT; and soil over sterilized sand. All leaf lengths and widths were measured along with the photosynthesis of the leaves and root and plant biomass at planting and after 2-years growth. A larger leaf area was observed under oil sands process influence, which may indicate increased carbon accrual above ground. Leaf area data suggested that CT affected plants are quite productive. The study also indicated that oil sands affected water may reduce plant fitness, and therefore could influence the overall oil sands reclamation timelines. Conversely, cattail grown in soil capped process affected material had a much larger leaf area compared to those grown in soil capped sand, most likely due to the higher levels of ammonia in process affected material.

  11. Growth and nitrogen metabolism of sea bass fed graded levels of nucleic acid nitrogen from yeast or RNA extract as partial substitute for protein nitrogen from fish meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kaushik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some studies carried out in mammalian models have shown de novo synthesis and salvage of nucleotides to be a costly metabolic process and a dietary supplementation with nucleic acids (NA or nucleotides has been suggested to result in a protein sparing action (Sanderson and He, 1994. On the other hand, high levels of dietary NA could have toxic effects and lead to disturbance in protein, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in monogastric animals lacking uricase activity, an enzyme involved in NA degradation (Clifford and Story, 1976. So far, there is no clear indication of such effects in fish fed nucleic acid-enriched diets (Tacon and Cooke, 1980; Rumsey et al., 1992; Fournier et al., 2002. The aim of this experiment was to investigate growth response and N metabolism in juvenile sea bass (D. labrax fed diets supplying graded levels of nucleic acid N from dry brewer's yeast or RNA extract as partial substitutes for protein nitrogen provided by fish meal.

  12. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  13. FACTORS AFFECTING FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH RATES OF FIBER REINFORCED METAL LAMINATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Based upon an analytical model for predicting the crack growth in fiber reinforced metal laminates (FRMLs), some factors affecting the fatigue crack growth rates of FRMLs were analyzed, including the lay-up of FRMLs, the modulus of the fibers, the residual stresses in FRMLs, the bonding strength and the shear modulus of the adhesive, etc.It was shown from the present analysis that the interface number of the laminates, the modulus of the fibers and the residual stresses in FRMLs have very great effects on the fatigue lives of FRMLs, but the effects of the bonding strength and the shear modulus of the adhesive are relatively small.

  14. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance and local innate immune response of broiler chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, M; Rogiewicz, A; McMillan, E; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Patterson, R; Slominski, B A

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on growth performance, gut lesion score, intestinal population of Clostridium perfringens, and local innate immunity of broiler chickens challenged with C. perfringens. One-day-old broiler chickens were randomly assigned to eight dietary treatments providing six replicate pens of 55 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of Control diets without and with C. perfringens challenge, and diets containing bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD, 55 g/tonne), nucleotides (150 g/tonne), yeast cell wall (YCW, 300 g/tonne), and a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus (1 kg/tonne) fed to chickens challenged with C. perfringens. Diets containing 10% distillers dried grains with solubles without and with C. perfringens challenge were also used. Birds were orally challenged with C. perfringens (10(8) colony-forming units (cfu)/bird) on day 14. On day 21, intestinal samples were collected for gene expression analysis. Pathogen challenge significantly (P intestinal lesion scores were observed for challenged birds except the BMD-containing diet. Over the entire trial (1-35 days), no difference in growth performance was observed except the BMD diet which improved FCR over the Control, challenged group. Birds receiving nucleotides showed increased expression of toll-like receptors and cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-18 compared to the Control, challenged group. Expression of macrophage mannose receptor and IL-18 was upregulated in birds receiving YCW. Increased expression of cytokines and receptors involved in innate immunity in broilers receiving nucleotides and YCW suggests the immunomodulatory properties of these products under pathogen challenge conditions.

  15. Phenol Is the Initial Product Formed during Growth and Degradation of Bromobenzene by Tropical Marine Yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 via an Early Dehalogenation Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakanksha A. Vatsal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bromobenzene (BrB, a hydrophobic, recalcitrant organic compound, is listed by the environmental protection agencies as an environmental and marine pollutant having hepatotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic effects. The tropical marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica 3589 was seen to grow aerobically on BrB and displayed a maximum growth rate (μmax of 0.04 h-1. Furthermore, we also observed an increase in cell size and sedimentation velocity for the cells grown on BrB as compared to the glucose grown cells. The cells attached to the hydrophobic bromobenzene droplets through its hydrophobic and acid–base interactions. The BrB (0.5%, 47.6 mM was utilized by the cells with the release of a corresponding amount of bromide (12.87 mM and yielded a cell mass of 1.86 g/L after showing 34% degradation in 96 h. Maximum dehalogenase activity of 16.16 U/mL was seen in the cell free supernatant after 24 h of growth. Identification of metabolites formed as a result of BrB degradation, namely, phenol, catechol, cis, cis muconic acid, and carbon dioxide were determined by LC–MS and GC–MS. The initial attack on bromobenzene by Y. lipolytica cells lead to the transient accumulation of phenol as an early intermediate which is being reported for the first time. Degradation of phenol led to catechol which was degraded by the ortho- cleavage pathway forming cis, cis muconic acid and then to Krebs cycle intermediates eventually leading to CO2 production. The study shows that dehalogenation via an extracellular dehalogenase occurs prior to ring cleavage with phenol as the preliminary degradative compound being produced. The yeast was also able to grow on the degradative products, i.e., phenol and catechol, to varying degrees which would be of potential relevance in the degradation and remediation of xenobiotic environmental bromoaromatic pollutants such as bromobenzene.

  16. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  17. Characteristics of metal-tolerant plant growth-promoting yeast (Cryptococcus sp. NSE1) and its influence on Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wuxing; Wang, Beibei; Wang, Qingling; Hou, Jinyu; Wu, Longhua; Wood, Jennifer L; Luo, Yongming; Franks, Ashley E

    2016-09-01

    Plant growth-promoting yeasts are often over looked as a mechanism to improve phytoremediation of heavy metals. In this study, Cryptococcus sp. NSE1, a Cd-tolerant yeast with plant growth capabilities, was isolated from the rhizosphere of the heavy metal hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola. The yeast exhibited strong tolerance to a range of heavy metals including Cd, Cu, and Zn on plate assays. The adsorption rate Cd, Cu, Zn by NSE1 was 26.1, 13.2, and 25.2 %, respectively. Irregular spines were formed on the surface of NSE1 when grown in MSM medium supplemented with 200 mg L(-1) Cd. NSE1 was capable of utilizing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as a sole nitrogen source and was capable of solubilization of inorganic phosphate at rates of 195.2 mg L(-1). Field experiments demonstrated that NSE1 increased phytoremediation by increasing the biomass of Cd hyperaccumulator S. plumbizincicola (46 %, p Cd accumulation by S. plumbizincicola was increased from 19.6 to 31.1 mg m(-2) though no difference in the concentration of Cd in the shoot biomass was observed between NSE1 and control. A Cd accumulation ratio of 38.0 % for NSE1 and 17.2 % for control was observed. The HCl-extractable Cd and CaCl2-extractable Cd concentration in the soil of the NSE1 treatment were reduced by 39.2 and 29.5 %, respectively. Community-level physiology profiling, assessed using Biolog Eco plates, indicated functional changes to the rhizosphere community inoculated with NSE1 by average well color development (AWCD) and measurement of richness (diversity). Values of Shannon-Weiner index, Simpson index, and McIntosh index showed a slight but no significant increases. These results indicate that inoculation of NSE1 could increase the shoot biomass of S. plumbizincicola, enhance the Cd accumulation in S. plumbizincicola, and decrease the available heavy metal content in soils significantly without overall significant changes to the microbial community.

  18. Evaluation of commercially available enzymes, probiotics, or yeast on apparent total-tract nutrient digestion and growth in nursery and finishing pigs fed diets containing corn dried distillers grains with solubles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of enzymes, direct fed microbials, or yeast to enhance nutrient utilization or growth performance in nursery or finishing pigs fed diets containing increased levels of corn fiber from dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) is largely unknown. Ten commercially available feed additiv...

  19. Aqualase, a yeast-based in-feed probiotic, modulates intestinal microbiota, immunity and growth of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adel, Milad; Lazado, Carlo Cabacang; Safari, Reza;

    2016-01-01

    performance parameters were significantly improved following probiotic administration specifically at inclusion rate 1.5% and above. Taken together, the results revealed that Aqualase is a promising yeast-based probiotic for rainbow trout with the capability of modulating the intestinal microbiota, immunity......). Probiotics were incorporated in the diets at three different inclusion levels (1%, 1.5% and 2%) and administered to the fish for a period of 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, intestinal total viable aerobic bacterial count was significantly higher in fish group that received 2% in-feed probiotics....... In addition, a significant increase in at least 11% in intestinal lactic acid bacteria population was observed in all probiotic-fed groups. Total protein level and lysozyme activity in skin mucus were significantly elevated following probiotic feeding. Inhibitory potential of skin mucus against fish pathogens...

  20. Pleiotropic Genes Affecting Carcass Traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) Cattle Are Modulators of Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Marco; Torrecilha, Rafaela B. P.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Neves, Haroldo H. R.; Carvalheiro, Roberto; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Sölkner, Johann; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J.; Garcia, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Two complementary methods, namely Multi-Trait Meta-Analysis and Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies (VEGAS), were used to identify putative pleiotropic genes affecting carcass traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) cattle. The genotypic data comprised over 777,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 995 bulls, and the phenotypic data included deregressed breeding values (dEBV) for weight measurements at birth, weaning and yearling, as well visual scores taken at weaning and yearling for carcass finishing precocity, conformation and muscling. Both analyses pointed to the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) as a major pleiotropic gene. VEGAS analysis revealed 224 additional candidates. From these, 57 participated, together with PLAG1, in a network involved in the modulation of the function and expression of IGF1 (insulin like growth factor 1), IGF2 (insulin like growth factor 2), GH1 (growth hormone 1), IGF1R (insulin like growth factor 1 receptor) and GHR (growth hormone receptor), suggesting that those pleiotropic genes operate as satellite regulators of the growth pathway. PMID:27410030

  1. Insulin-like growth factor- I and factors affecting it in thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf T Soliman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvement of blood transfusion regimens and iron chelation therapy growth and maturational delay, cardiomyopathy, endocrinopathies and osteoporosis still occur in good number of thalassemic patients. Decreased IGF-1 secretion occurs in the majority of the thalassemic patients particularly those with growth and pubertal delay. Many factors contribute to this decreased synthesis of IGF-I including disturbed growth hormone (GH - insulin-like growth factor - I (IGF-I axis. The possible factors contributing to low IGF-I synthesis in thalassemia and the possible interaction between low IGF-I secretion and the occurrence of these complications is discussed in this mini-review. Improvement of IGF-I secretion in thalassemic patients should be intended to improve linear growth and bone mineral accretion in thalassemic patients. This can be attained through adequate correction of anemia and proper chelation, nutritional supplementation (increasing caloric intake, correction of vitamin D and zinc deficiencies, induction of puberty and correction of hypogonadism at the proper time and treating GH deficiency. This review paper provides a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding IGF-I and factors affecting it in patients with thalassaemia major (TM. Search on PubMed and reference lists of articles with the term ′IGF-I, GH, growth, thalassemia, thyroxine, anemia, vitamin D, and zinc′ was carried out. A hundred and forty-eight articles were found and used in the write up and the data analyzed was included in this report.

  2. Exploring posttraumatic growth in Tamil children affected by the Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exenberger, Silvia; Ramalingam, Panch; Höfer, Stefan

    2016-10-13

    Few studies explore posttraumatic growth (PTG) in children from Eastern cultures. To help address this gap, the present study examined PTG among 177 South Indian children aged 8-17 years who were affected by the 2004 Tsunami. The study identifies the underlying factor structure of the Tamil version of the Revised Posttraumatic Growth Inventory for Children (PTGI-C-R), and aims to explore the prevalence of PTG, the relationship between distress and growth, and gender and age differences in PTG. The results of the principal component analysis indicated a two-factor structure with an interpersonal and a person-centred dimension of growth. The total scores of the Tamil PTGI-C-R were positively associated with posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and age. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between age and the person-centred growth subscale. Non-parametric tests found no gender differences in perceived growth. The role of socio-cultural factors on the nature of PTG is discussed.

  3. Pleiotropic Genes Affecting Carcass Traits in Bos indicus (Nellore Cattle Are Modulators of Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirene G T Pereira

    Full Text Available Two complementary methods, namely Multi-Trait Meta-Analysis and Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies (VEGAS, were used to identify putative pleiotropic genes affecting carcass traits in Bos indicus (Nellore cattle. The genotypic data comprised over 777,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 995 bulls, and the phenotypic data included deregressed breeding values (dEBV for weight measurements at birth, weaning and yearling, as well visual scores taken at weaning and yearling for carcass finishing precocity, conformation and muscling. Both analyses pointed to the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1 as a major pleiotropic gene. VEGAS analysis revealed 224 additional candidates. From these, 57 participated, together with PLAG1, in a network involved in the modulation of the function and expression of IGF1 (insulin like growth factor 1, IGF2 (insulin like growth factor 2, GH1 (growth hormone 1, IGF1R (insulin like growth factor 1 receptor and GHR (growth hormone receptor, suggesting that those pleiotropic genes operate as satellite regulators of the growth pathway.

  4. Time dependent physiological characterization of yeast oxidative stress response and growth modulation of protein kinase/phosphatase mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altintas, Ali; Workman, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to investigate the time-dependent batch growth effects of oxidative environmental conditions on protein ki nase (PK) and phosphatase (PP) deletion mutants and relevant wild type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae . To achieve this goal, 44 different PK and PP.......25, 0.50 and 1.0 mM). Understanding the growth physiology of S. cerevisiae allows us to estimate the link between genotype and stress-response phenotype. Growth physiology parameters, such as growth rate, diauxic shift times, stress-induced stasis times, were measured in fermentative batch cultures...

  5. Metal/metalloid fixation by litter during decomposition affected by silicon availability during plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Jörg

    2013-03-01

    Organic matter is known to accumulate high amounts of metals/metalloids, enhanced during the process of decomposition by heterotrophic biofilms (with high fixation capacity for metals/metalloids). The colonization by microbes and the decay rate of the organic matter depends on different litter properties. Main litter properties affecting the decomposition of organic matter such as the nutrient ratios and the content of cellulose, lignin and phenols are currently described to be changed by silicon availability. But less is known about the impact of silicon availability during plant growth on elemental fixation during decay. Hence, this research focuses on the impact of silicon availability during plant growth on fixation of 42 elements during litter decay, by controlling the litter properties. The results of this experiment are a significantly higher metal/metalloid accumulation during decomposition of plant litter grown under low silicon availability. This may be explained by the altered litter properties (mainly nutrient content) affecting the microbial decomposition of the litter, the microbial growth on the litter and possibly by the silicon double layer, which is evident in leaf litter with high silicon content and reduces the binding sites for metals/metalloids. Furthermore, this silicon double layer may also reduce the growing biofilm by reducing the availability of carbon compounds at the litter surface and has to be elucidated in further research. Hence, low silicon availability during plant growth enhances the metal/metalloid accumulation into plant litter during aquatic decomposition.

  6. The Fate of Acetic Acid during Glucose Co-Metabolism by the Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Rodrigues; Maria João Sousa; Paula Ludovico; Helena Santos; Manuela Côrte-Real; Cecília Leão

    2012-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate me...

  7. Growth conditions affect carotenoid-based plumage coloration of great tit nestlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hõrak, P.; Vellau, Helen; Ots, Indrek; Møller, Anders Pape

    Carotenoid-based integument colour in animals has been hypothesised to signal individual phenotypic quality because it reliably reflects either foraging efficiency or health status. We investigated whether carotenoid-derived yellow plumage coloration of fledgling great tits (Parus major) reflects their nestling history. Great tit fledglings reared in a poor year (1998) or in the urban habitat were less yellow than these reared in a good year (1999) or in the forest. The origin of nestlings also affected their coloration since nestlings from a city population did not improve their coloration when transferred to the forest. Brood size manipulation affected fledgling colour, but only in the rural population, where nestlings from reduced broods developed more yellow coloration than nestlings from increased and control broods. Effect of brood size manipulation on fledgling plumage colour was independent of the body mass, indicating that growth environment affects fledgling body mass and plumage colour by different pathways.

  8. Rearing Tenebrio molitor in BLSS: Dietary fiber affects larval growth, development, and respiration characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Leyuan; Stasiak, Michael; Li, Liang; Xie, Beizhen; Fu, Yuming; Gidzinski, Danuta; Dixon, Mike; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Rearing of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) will provide good animal nutrition for astronauts in a bioregenerative life support system. In this study, growth and biomass conversion data of T. molitor larvae were tested for calculating the stoichiometric equation of its growth. Result of a respiratory quotient test proved the validity of the equation. Fiber had the most reduction in mass during T. molitor‧s consumption, and thus it is speculated that fiber is an important factor affecting larval growth of T. molitor. In order to further confirm this hypothesis and find out a proper feed fiber content, T. molitor larvae were fed on diets with 4 levels of fiber. Larval growth, development and respiration in each group were compared and analyzed. Results showed that crude-fiber content of 5% had a significant promoting effect on larvae in early instars, and is beneficial for pupa eclosion. When fed on feed of 5-10% crude-fiber, larvae in later instars reached optimal levels in growth, development and respiration. Therefore, we suggest that crude fiber content in feed can be controlled within 5-10%, and with the consideration of food palatability, a crude fiber of 5% is advisable.

  9. Potassium channel conductance: a mechanism affecting hair growth both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, A E; Waldon, D J; Conrad, S J; Mulholland, M J; Shull, K L; Kubicek, M F; Johnson, G A; Brunden, M N; Stefanski, K J; Stehle, R G

    1992-03-01

    The opening of intracellular potassium channels has been suggested as a mechanism regulating hair growth. Enhancing the flux of potassium ions is a mechanism shared by several structurally diverse antihypertensive agents including minoxidil sulfate (the active metabolite of minoxidil), pinacidil, P-1075 (a potent pinacidil analog), RP-49,356, diazoxide, cromakalim, and nicorandil. Of these drugs, minoxidil, pinacidil, and diazoxide have been reported to elicit hypertrichosis in humans. This potassium channel hypothesis was examined by testing these drugs for effects on hair growth both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro studies, mouse vibrissae follicles were cultured for 3 d with drug and the effects on hair growth were measured by metabolic labeling. All drugs, except diazoxide, enhanced cysteine incorporation into the hair shafts of the cultured vibrissae. Diazoxide was poorly soluble and thus was tested only at low doses. Minoxidil, P-1075, cromakalim, and RP-49,356 were also evaluated in vivo by measuring hair growth effects in balding stumptail macaque monkeys. The drugs were administered topically to defined sites on balding scalps once per day for 4-5 months and the amount of hair grown was determined by monthly measurements of shaved hair weight. Three of the drugs produced significant increases in hair weight whereas, the RP-49,356 had no effect. These studies provide correlative evidence that the opening of potassium channels is an important regulatory mechanism for hair growth. This provides the impetus for further studies on this potentially important mechanism affecting hair biology.

  10. Root cooling strongly affects diel leaf growth dynamics, water and carbohydrate relations in Ricinus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiré, Richard; Schneider, Heike; Thorpe, Michael R; Kuhn, Arnd J; Schurr, Ulrich; Walter, Achim

    2010-03-01

    In laboratory and greenhouse experiments with potted plants, shoots and roots are exposed to temperature regimes throughout a 24 h (diel) cycle that can differ strongly from the regime under which these plants have evolved. In the field, roots are often exposed to lower temperatures than shoots. When the root-zone temperature in Ricinus communis was decreased below a threshold value, leaf growth occurred preferentially at night and was strongly inhibited during the day. Overall, leaf expansion, shoot biomass growth, root elongation and ramification decreased rapidly, carbon fluxes from shoot to root were diminished and carbohydrate contents of both root and shoot increased. Further, transpiration rate was not affected, yet hydrostatic tensions in shoot xylem increased. When root temperature was increased again, xylem tension reduced, leaf growth recovered rapidly, carbon fluxes from shoot to root increased, and carbohydrate pools were depleted. We hypothesize that the decreased uptake of water in cool roots diminishes the growth potential of the entire plant - especially diurnally, when the growing leaf loses water via transpiration. As a consequence, leaf growth and metabolite concentrations can vary enormously, depending on root-zone temperature and its heterogeneity inside pots.

  11. Ozone affects gas exchange, growth and reproductive development in Brassica campestris (Wisconsin fast plants).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, V J; Stewart, C A; Roberts, J A; Black, C R

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ozone (O(3)) may affect vegetative and reproductive development, although the consequences for yield depend on the effectiveness of the compensatory processes induced. This study examined the impact on reproductive development of exposing Brassica campestris (Wisconsin Fast Plants) to ozone during vegetative growth. Plants were exposed to 70 ppb ozone for 2 d during late vegetative growth or 10 d spanning most of the vegetative phase. Effects on gas exchange, vegetative growth, reproductive development and seed yield were determined. Impacts on gas exchange and foliar injury were related to pre-exposure stomatal conductance. Exposure for 2 d had no effect on growth or reproductive characteristics, whereas 10-d exposure reduced vegetative growth and reproductive site number on the terminal raceme. Mature seed number and weight per pod and per plant were unaffected because seed abortion was reduced. The observation that mature seed yield per plant was unaffected by exposure during the vegetative phase, despite adverse effects on physiological, vegetative and reproductive processes, shows that indeterminate species such as B. campestris possess sufficient compensatory flexibility to avoid reductions in seed production.

  12. Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea A. Koch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5 directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5 on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation.

  13. Comparative study of the growth and enzyme production of Rhizopus mycelium in two different distriller's yeast%两种酒曲根霉菌丝生长及产酶条件的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段彬; 郑述祥; 王世强

    2012-01-01

    采用固体平板及液体摇瓶培养方法对安琪酒曲及徽州酒曲根霉进行比较研究,探讨环境条件对根霉菌丝生长和产酶的影响。结果表明:徽州和安琪酒曲在根霉菌落形态特征方面差异不明显;但安琪酒曲根霉生长速率略大于徽州酒曲;两种酒曲根霉较适生长温度为20-25℃;两种酒曲根霉最适生长pH为4;当培养基酒精浓度达6%时,两种酒曲根霉菌丝生长明显受到抑制,当培养基中酒精度达8%时,两种酒曲根霉孢子均难以萌发;根霉菌丝生长最适摇瓶转数为100-150r/min。安琪酒曲品质优于徽州酒曲。%The impact of environment on the growth and enzyme production of Rhizopus mycelium was studied through the comparative studies of Anqi distriller's yeast and Huizhou Distriller's yeast,by using two different culture methods,solid plate method and liquor shaking method. The results showed the difference of the two distriller's yeasts was not obvious in the colonial morphology characteristics of Rhizopus,but the Rhizopus growth speed of Anqi distriller's yeast was slightly higher. The suitable growing temperature was 20-25℃ for Huizhou and Anqi distriller's yeast,and the optimal pH value was both 4. When alcohol concentration(AC) of culture medium reached 6% ,the mycelium growth of both was restrained apparently. Rhizopus spore would stop spouting when AC reached 8%. The optimal shaking speed for the growth of Rhizopus mycelium was 100-150r/min. In generaI,Rhizopus mycelium growth in Anqi distriller's yeast was better than that in Huizhou distriller's yeast.

  14. Implications of evolutionary engineering for growth and recombinant protein production in methanol-based growth media in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Josef W; Prielhofer, Roland; Gerner, Samuel M; Graf, Alexandra B; Wilson, Iain B H; Mattanovich, Diethard; Dragosits, Martin

    2017-03-17

    Pichia pastoris is a widely used eukaryotic expression host for recombinant protein production. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) has been applied in a wide range of studies in order to improve strains for biotechnological purposes. In this context, the impact of long-term carbon source adaptation in P. pastoris has not been addressed so far. Thus, we performed a pilot experiment in order to analyze the applicability and potential benefits of ALE towards improved growth and recombinant protein production in P. pastoris. Adaptation towards growth on methanol was performed in replicate cultures in rich and minimal growth medium for 250 generations. Increased growth rates on these growth media were observed at the population and single clone level. Evolved populations showed various degrees of growth advantages and trade-offs in non-evolutionary growth conditions. Genome resequencing revealed a wide variety of potential genetic targets associated with improved growth performance on methanol-based growth media. Alcohol oxidase represented a mutational hotspot since four out of seven evolved P. pastoris clones harbored mutations in this gene, resulting in decreased Aox activity, despite increased growth rates. Selected clones displayed strain-dependent variations for AOX-promoter based recombinant protein expression yield. One particularly interesting clone showed increased product titers ranging from a 2.5-fold increase in shake flask batch culture to a 1.8-fold increase during fed batch cultivation. Our data indicate a complex correlation of carbon source, growth context and recombinant protein production. While similar experiments have already shown their potential in other biotechnological areas where microbes were evolutionary engineered for improved stress resistance and growth, the current dataset encourages the analysis of the potential of ALE for improved protein production in P. pastoris on a broader scale.

  15. Overview of Longitudinal Survey of Newborns in the 21st Century: Factors Affecting Infant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Fumihiro; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Ozaki, Takashi; Ito, Yoshiya; Yoshiike, Nobuo; Takimoto, Hidemi

    2017-01-01

    There are two major nationwide birth cohort studies in Japan, namely, the Longitudinal Survey of Newborns in the 21st Century conducted by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) and the Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS) conducted by the Ministry of Environment. The former was a longitudinal questionnaire survey focusing on environmental and socioeconomic factors for descriptive epidemiology conducted every year since 2001 by mail. The latter was based on 15 unit centers nationwide with environmental measurements and collection of biological samples for environmental risk evaluation. Both are prospective birth cohort studies whose findings will be expected as the basis for establishing health policies. The data obtained in the former study can be used for research with permission from MHLW. To date, there have been more than ten published studies using those data. We have reviewed these studies and introduced our preliminary findings on factors affecting infant growth. Employment before delivery, educational background of parents, household income, and smoking habit of both parents have been suggested to affect infant growth. We will analyze the associations between socioeconomic factors and infant growth trajectory to elucidate the most adequate intervention for children.

  16. Response to long-term growth hormone therapy in patients affected by RASopathies and growth hormone deficiency: Patterns of growth, puberty and final height data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, Federica; Gibertoni, Dino; Rossi, Cesare; Scarano, Emanuela; Perri, Annamaria; Montanari, Francesca; Fantini, Maria Pia; Pession, Andrea; Tartaglia, Marco; Mazzanti, Laura

    2015-11-01

    RASopathies are developmental disorders caused by heterozygous germline mutations in genes encoding proteins in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Reduced growth is a common feature. Several studies generated data on growth, final height (FH), and height velocity (HV) after growth hormone (GH) treatment in patients with these disorders, particularly in Noonan syndrome, the most common RASopathy. These studies, however, refer to heterogeneous cohorts in terms of molecular information, GH status, age at start and length of therapy, and GH dosage. This work reports growth data in 88 patients affected by RASopathies with molecularly confirmed diagnosis, together with statistics on body proportions, pubertal pattern, and FH in 33, including 16 treated with GH therapy for proven GH deficiency. Thirty-three patients showed GH deficiency after pharmacological tests, and were GH-treated for an average period of 6.8 ± 4.8 years. Before starting therapy, HV was -2.6 ± 1.3 SDS, and mean basal IGF1 levels were -2.0 ± 1.1 SDS. Long-term GH therapy, starting early during childhood, resulted in a positive height response compared with untreated patients (1.3 SDS in terms of height-gain), normalizing FH for Ranke standards but not for general population and Target Height. Pubertal timing negatively affected pubertal growth spurt and FH, with IGF1 standardized score increased from -2.43 to -0.27 SDS. During GH treatment, no significant change in bone age velocity, body proportions, or cardiovascular function was observed.

  17. SCREENING OF SELECTED OLEAGINOUS YEASTS FOR LIPID PRODUCTION FROM GLYCEROL AND SOME FACTORS WHICH AFFECT LIPID PRODUCTION BY YARROWIA LIPOLYTICA STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salinee Sriwongchai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of eight yeast strains to utilize glycerol as a sole carbon source and accumulate lipids in a chemically defined medium was screened. Among the yeasts, Yarrowia lipolytica strains DSM 70561 and JDC 335 grew to high cell densities on glycerol. These strains were further tested for lipid accumulation under varying nutritional conditions in Erlenmeyer flasks. The results showed that strains DSM 70561 and JDC 335 accumulated lipids up to 37.1 % and 54.4 % of total cell dry weight, respectively, when the defined medium was supplemented with 1 g/L urea and 2 g/L yeast extract. The lipids accumulated by the two yeasts contained a high proportion of C16:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:0 fatty acids. The results suggest that Y. lipolytica strains DSM 70561 and JDC 335 have the potential for converting crude glycerol into fatty acids which can in turn be utilized as substrate for biodiesel production.

  18. Yield components in wheat affected by sowing density and growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Luiz Fioreze

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Improvement on yield potential of plants by crop management is the main research challenge due to the growing of food demand worldwide. The objective of this work was to study physiological and morphological traits and its relationship with yield components and yield of wheat as affected by sowing densities and plant growth regulators. The experimental design was a split-plot design with four replications. The plots were consisted by four sowing densities (30, 50 70 and 90 plants m-1 and the subplots were consisted by plant growth regulators [control, (IBA+GA+KT, Trinexapac-Ethyl e (IBA+GA+KT + Trinexapac-Ethyl]. Dry matter accumulation, plant height, source-sink distance, gas exchange and yield were determined. Trinexapac-Ethyl application resulted in decreasing of plant height, source-sink distance and flag leaf length; however, the grain yield was not affected. The number of plants per unit area affected dry matter accumulation. Higher dry matter accumulation showed direct relationship with yield and yield components in lower plant densities.

  19. A primary screen of the bovine genome for quantitative trait loci affecting carcass and growth traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R T; Keele, J W; Shackelford, S D; Kappes, S M; Koohmaraie, M

    1999-06-01

    A primary genomic screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting carcass and growth traits was performed by genotyping 238 microsatellite markers on 185 out of 300 total progeny from a Bos indicus x Bos taurus sire mated to Bos taurus cows. The following traits were analyzed for QTL effects: birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WW), yearling weight (YW), hot carcass weight (HCW), dressing percentage (DP), fat thickness (FT), marbling score (MAR), longissimus muscle area (LMA), rib bone (RibB), rib fat (RibF), and rib muscle (RibM), and the predicted whole carcass traits, retail product yield (RPYD), fat trim yield (FATYD), bone yield (BOYD), retail product weight (RPWT), fat weight (FATWT), and bone weight (BOWT). Data were analyzed by generating an F-statistic profile computed at 1-cM intervals for each chromosome by the regression of phenotype on the conditional probability of receiving the Brahman allele from the sire. There was compelling evidence for a QTL allele of Brahman origin affecting an increase in RibB and a decrease in DP on chromosome 5 (BTA5). Putative QTL at or just below the threshold for genome-wide significance were as follows: an increase in RPYD and component traits on BTA2 and BTA13, an increase in LMA on BTA14, and an increase in BWT on BTA1. Results provided represent a portion of our efforts to identify and characterize QTL affecting carcass and growth traits.

  20. Ultrasonography estimates of fetal growth in fetuses affected by trisomy 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Sarah N; Saller, Devereux N; Catov, Janet M; Canavan, Timothy P

    2016-06-01

    To construct growth curves specific for fetuses with trisomy 21 (T21) and to compare them with the reference-based standard. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of ultrasonography examinations from women with singleton pregnancies with a confirmed diagnosis of T21 who sought care at an academic tertiary-care center in the USA between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013. Growth curves were constructed using linear regression and compared with the Hadlock standard. The study included 425 ultrasonography examinations from 235 women. The head circumference and femur length were smaller than the reference standards at all gestational ages (head circumference: P=0.017; femur length: P<0.001). The abdominal circumference was larger than the reference standard from 29weeks onward (P<0.001). The biparietal diameter was smaller in the second trimester and in the late third trimester (P<0.001). The overall estimated fetal weight was not different from the reference standard. The T21-specific growth curves indicate anthropometric differences between T21 fetuses and the general population. Once validated, such individual growth curves could allow for more accurate prenatal assessment and management of fetuses affected by T21. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Warming and neighbor removal affect white spruce seedling growth differently above and below treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kyoko; Bret-Harte, M Syndonia

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to be pronounced towards higher latitudes and altitudes. Warming triggers treeline and vegetation shifts, which may aggravate interspecific competition and affect biodiversity. This research tested the effects of a warming climate, habitat type, and neighboring plant competition on the establishment and growth of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) seedlings in a subarctic mountain region. P. glauca seedlings were planted in June 2010 under 4 different treatments (high/control temperatures, with/without competition) in 3 habitats (alpine ridge above treeline/tundra near treeline /forest below treeline habitats). After two growing seasons in 2011, growth, photosynthesis and foliar C and N data were obtained from a total of 156, one-and-a-half year old seedlings that had survived. Elevated temperatures increased growth and photosynthetic rates above and near treeline, but decreased them below treeline. Competition was increased by elevated temperatures in all habitat types. Our results suggest that increasing temperatures will have positive effects on the growth of P. glauca seedlings at the locations where P. glauca is expected to expand its habitat, but increasing temperatures may have negative effects on seedlings growing in mature forests. Due to interspecific competition, possibly belowground competition, the upslope expansion of treelines may not be as fast in the future as it was the last fifty years.

  2. The PpCMT chromomethylase affects cell growth and interacts with the homolog of LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangwal, Meenakshi; Kapoor, Sanjay; Kapoor, Meenu

    2014-02-01

    Chromomethylases (CMTs) are plant-specific cytosine DNA methyltransferases that are involved in maintenance of CpNpG methylation. In seed plants, histone methylation and interaction of CMT with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (LHP1) is essential for recruitment of CMT to target sites. LHP1 has been characterized as a putative component of the POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 (PRC1) in plants, and functions downstream of PRC2 to maintain genes in repressed state for orchestrated development. In the present study, we show that targeted disruption of PpCMT results in an approximately 50% reduction in global cytosine methylation levels. This affects growth of apical cells, predominantly growth of side branch initials emerging from chloronema cells. In some places, these cells develop thick walls with plasmolyzed cellular contents. Transcript accumulation patterns of genes involved in apical cell extension and metabolism of hemicelluloses, such as xyloglucans, in the primary cell walls decreased many fold in ppcmt mutant lines, as determined by real-time PCR. Using yeast two-hybrid method and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, we show that PpCMT and PpLHP1 interact through their chromo domains, while PpLHP1 homodimerizes through its chromo shadow domain. The results presented in this study provide insight into the role of the single chromomethylase, PpCMT, in proliferation of protonema filaments, and shed light on the evolutionary conservation of proteins interacting with these methylases in the early land plant, Physcomitrella patens.

  3. Bovine growth hormone gene polymorphism affects stress response in Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Noriko; Tanaka, Sigefumi; Ardiyanti, Astrid; Katoh, Kazuo; Sato, Shusuke

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the associations between growth hormone (GH) gene polymorphism and behavioral and physiological responses to stressors and learning ability in Japanese Black cattle. Flight distance test was conducted in the first experiment. Steers with haplotype C of GH gene polymorphism avoided human approaches at a significantly greater distance than ones without haplotype C (C: 1.9 ± 0.9, non-C: 1.0 ± 0.2 m, P affect stress responses through GH concentration in steers.

  4. PEMBUATAN PEPTON DARI BUNGKIL KEDELAI DAN KHAMIR DENGAN ENZIM PAPAIN UNTUK MEDIA PERTUMBUHAN BAKTERI [Peptone Production From Soybean Press Cake and Yeast By Papain Enzyme For The Bacterial Growth Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fachraniah1

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptone can be produced from soybean press cake and yeast by enzymatic hydrolysis with papain. The activity of papain used in this experiment against casein is indicated by Vm (2000 unit and Km (0.8%. The process condition for soybean press cake was : [S] = 3.72%, [E] = 0.4%, 60 0C, pH 6.2-6.3, 5 hours, while for yeast was [S] = 4.76%, [E] = 0.2%, 60 0C, pH 5.8-5.9, 5 hours. The yield of the hydrolysis process of soybean press cake peptone was 12.1%, while that of yeast was 18.9%. The peptone obtained was brownish yellow in color with moisture content of 3 and 5%, ash content 6 and 7 %, total protein 9 and 11%, solubility 98%, amino nitrogen 1.9 and 2.82, and AN/TN ratio = 26.47 and 27.62%, respectively. The chromatographic pattern of the peptone using gel filtration column of Superdex-75 appeared to be the same as that of the commercial soy pepton. Growth test with E. coli, S. aureus, and B. subtilis showed that soybean press cake and yeast peptone could be used as component in media for microbial growth.

  5. Two novel herbicide candidates affect Arabidopsis thaliana growth by inhibiting nitrogen and phosphate absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chongchong; Jin, Yujian; He, Haifeng; Wang, Wei; He, Hongwu; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2015-09-01

    Both 2-[(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetoxy](methy)lmethyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one (termed as IIa) and 2-[(4-chloro-2-methyl-phenoxy)-acetoxy](methyl)methyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one (termed as IIr) are novel herbicide candidates that positively affect herbicidal activity via the introduction of a phosphorus-containing heterocyclic ring. This report investigated the mechanism of IIa and IIr on weed control in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at physiological, ultrastructural and molecular levels. IIa and IIr significantly inhibited the growth of A. thaliana and altered its root structure by inhibiting energy metabolism and lipid or protein biosynthesis. These compounds also significantly affected the absorption of nitrogen and phosphorus by down-regulating the transcripts of nitrate transporter-related genes, ammonium transporter-related genes and phosphorus transporter-related genes.

  6. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy, E-mail: jlundholm@smu.ca

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%–26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21 °C–36 °C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  7. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  8. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eLebreton

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males.

  9. Towards systematic discovery of signaling networks in budding yeast filamentous growth stress response using interventional phosphorylation data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Reversible phosphorylation is one of the major mechanisms of signal transduction, and signaling networks are critical regulators of cell growth and development. However, few of these networks have been delineated completely. Towards this end, quantitative phosphoproteomics is emerging as a useful tool enabling large-scale determination of relative phosphorylation levels. However, phosphoproteomics differs from classical proteomics by a more extensive sampling limitation due to the limited number of detectable sites per protein. Here, we propose a comprehensive quantitative analysis pipeline customized for phosphoproteome data from interventional experiments for identifying key proteins in specific pathways, discovering the protein-protein interactions and inferring the signaling network. We also made an effort to partially compensate for the missing value problem, a chronic issue for proteomics studies. The dataset used for this study was generated using SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture technique with interventional experiments (kinase-dead mutations. The major components of the pipeline include phosphopeptide meta-analysis, correlation network analysis and causal relationship discovery. We have successfully applied our pipeline to interventional experiments identifying phosphorylation events underlying the transition to a filamentous growth form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 5 high-confidence proteins from meta-analysis, and 19 hub proteins from correlation analysis (Pbi2p and Hsp42p were identified by both analyses. All these proteins are involved in stress responses. Nine of them have direct or indirect evidence of involvement in filamentous growth. In addition, we tested four of our predicted proteins, Nth1p, Pbi2p, Pdr12p and Rcn2p, by interventional phenotypic experiments and all of them present differential invasive growth, providing prospective validation of our approach. This comprehensive

  10. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

    OpenAIRE

    Sveiczer Akos; Buchwald Peter

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential) F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, whi...

  11. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  12. Does Maternal HIV Status Affect Infant Growth?: A Hospital Based Follow Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Trivedi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV infection is difficult to diagnose in infants, as most infected babies appear healthy and exhibit no signs and symptoms at birth. The present study was conducted to study the clinical profile & morbidity pattern of infants born to HIV positive mothers, their nutritional status and growth pattern and compare them with HIV non exposed infants. Methodology: This observational longitudinal study was conducted in Dec 2009 – Dec 2010 where all HIV exposed baby born in the hospital (n=44 were compared with suitable sample of HIV non exposed babies (n=140 in context of clinical profile & morbidity pattern. Results: In maternal weight <50 Kg category, mean weight, length and head circumference of HIV exposed infants is significantly lower than HIV non exposed infants. However, pattern of weight gain remain similar in both group. Grade 1 and grade 2 malnutrition was more in HIV exposed group at 3 month & 6 month. HIV exposed baby reported higher episodes of diarrhea (28.57% as compared to non exposed group (15.33% with statistically significant difference (p value<0.05. Conclusion: HIV exposure does not adversely affect growth potential of infants but because of their lower baseline values they seem to lag behind. Moreover maternal HIV status does not lead to severe degree of malnutrition if these babies were not themselves affected with HIV. [Natl J of Med Res 2012; 2(4.000: 512-517

  13. Maternal and fetal risk factors affecting perinatal mortality in early and late fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Oya; Selçuk, Selçuk; Kumru, Pınar; Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Mahmutoğlu, Didar; Boza, Barış; Türkyılmaz, Gürcan; Bütün, Zafer; Arısoy, Resul; Tandoğan, Bülent

    2015-12-01

    To determine the factors which affect the perinatal deaths in early and late fetal growth restriction (FGR) fetuses using threshold of estimated fetal weight (EFW) fetuses, defined as an EFW fetuses considered as growth restrictions were confirmed by birth weight. Fetuses with multiple pregnancy, congenital malformation, chromosomal abnormality, and premature rupture of membrane were excluded. Samples were grouped in early and late FGR. Early FGR fetuses was classified as gestational age at birth ≤ 34 weeks and late FGR was classified as gestational age at birth > 34 weeks. Factors which affect the perinatal deaths were analyzed descriptively in early and late FGR. The perinatal mortality was calculated by adding the number of stillbirths and neonatal deaths. The study included 86 early and 185 late FGR fetuses, 31 resulted in perinatal deaths, 28 perinatal deaths were in early FGR, and three perinatal deaths were in late FGR. Perinatal deaths occurred more commonly in early FGR fetuses with an EFW death in early FGR. All three perinatal deaths in late FGR occurred in fetuses with EFW death was found significantly higher in increased vascular impedance of UtAs whatever the umbilical artery Doppler. Only EFW death in late FGR in comparison with early FGR. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfliegler, Walter P; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2015-07-01

    The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here.

  15. Review of factors affecting the growth and survival of follicular grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Parsley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Great strides have been made in hair restoration over the past 20 years. A better understanding of natural balding and non-balding patterns along with more respect for ageing has helped guide proper hairline design. Additionally, the use of smaller grafts has created a significantly improved natural appearance to the transplanted grafts. Inconsistent growth and survival of follicular grafts, however, has continued to be a problem that has perplexed hair restoration surgeons. This review attempts to explore the stresses affecting grafts during transplantation and some of the complexities involved in graft growth and survival. These authors reviewed the literature to determine the primary scope of aspects influencing growth and survival of follicular grafts. This scope includes patient selection, operating techniques, graft care, storage solutions and additives. The primary focus of the hair restoration surgeons should first be attention to the fundamentals of hair care, hydration, temperature, time out of body and gentle handling. Factors such as advanced storage solutions and additives can be helpful once the fundamentals have been addressed.

  16. Sodic soil properties and sunflower growth as affected by byproducts of flue gas desulfurization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinman Wang

    Full Text Available The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD is CaSO(4, which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha(-1 and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m(3 ha(-1. The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP, pH and total dissolved salts (TDS in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha(-1 and water was supplied at 1200 m(3·ha(-1. Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage.

  17. Streptomycin affects the growth and photochemical activity of the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; García, Roberto Velasco; Gómez-Juárez, Evelyn Alicia; Salcedo-Álvarez, Martha Ofelia; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are increasingly being used in human and veterinary medicine, as well as pest control in agriculture. Recently, their emergence in the aquatic environment has become a global concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of streptomycin on growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 72h exposure. We found that growth, photosynthetic activity and the content of the D1 protein of photosystem II decreased. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission shows a reduction in the energy transfer between the antenna complex and reaction center. Also the activity of the oxygen evolution complex and electron flow between QA and QB were significantly reduced; in contrast, we found an increase in the reduction rate of the acceptor side of photosystem I. The foregoing can be attributed to the inhibition of the synthesis of the D1 protein and perhaps other coded chloroplast proteins that are part of the electron transport chain which are essential for the transformation of solar energy in the photosystems. We conclude that micromolar concentrations of streptomycin can affect growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris. The accumulation of antibiotics in the environment can become an ecological problem for primary producers in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Overexpression of a glutamine synthetase gene affects growth and development in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urriola, Jazmina; Rathore, Keerti S

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen is a primary macronutrient in plants, and nitrogen fertilizers play a critical role in crop production and yield. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene on nitrogen metabolism, and plant growth and development in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench). GS catalyzes the ATP dependent reaction between ammonia and glutamate to produce glutamine. A 1,071 bp long coding sequence of a sorghum cytosolic GS gene (Gln1) under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubq) promoter was introduced into sorghum immature embryos by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Progeny of the transformants exhibited higher accumulation of the Gln1 transcripts and up to 2.2-fold higher GS activity compared to the non-transgenic controls. When grown under optimal nitrogen conditions, these Gln1 transgenic lines showed greater tillering and up to 2.1-fold increase in shoot vegetative biomass. Interestingly, even under greenhouse conditions, we observed a seasonal component to both these parameters and the grain yield. Our results, showing that the growth and development of sorghum Gln1 transformants are also affected by N availability and other environmental factors, suggest complexity of the relationship between GS activity and plant growth and development. A better understanding of other control points and the ability to manipulate these will be needed to utilize the transgenic technology to improve nitrogen use efficiency of crop plants.

  19. Pollen development and tube growth are affected in the symbiotic mutant of Lotus japonicus, crinkle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansengco, Myra L; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Takagi, Shingo; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Makoto; Murooka, Yoshikatsu

    2004-05-01

    The symbiotic mutant of Lotus japonicus, crinkle (crk), exhibits abnormal nodulation and other alterations in the root hairs, trichomes, and seedpods. Defective nodulation in crk mutant is due to the arrested infection thread growth from the epidermis into the cortex. Here, we describe that crk is also affected in male fertility that causes the production of small pods with few seeds. Under in vitro conditions, pollen germination and tube growth were markedly reduced in the crk mutant. A swollen tip phenotype with disorganized filamentous actin (F-actin) was observed in the mutant pollen tubes after prolonged in vitro culture. During pollen development, the striking difference noted in the mutant was the small size of the microspores that remained spherical. Histological examination of ovule development, as well as outcrosses of the mutant as female to wild type as male, showed no evidence of abnormality in the female gametophyte development. Based on these findings, the Crk gene, aside from its role in the infection process during nodulation, is also involved in male gametophyte development and function. Therefore, this gene represents a connection between nodule symbiosis, polar tip growth, and other plant developmental processes.

  20. Austenite grain growth and microstructure control in simulated heat affected zones of microalloyed HSLA steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Department of Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University of Berlin, Pascalstraße 8 – 9, 10587, Berlin (Germany); Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Kannengiesser, Thomas [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Materials and Joining Technology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitetsplatz 2, 39106, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    The roles of microalloying niobium, titanium and vanadium for controlling austenite grain growth, microstructure evolution and hardness were investigated at different simulated heat affected zones (HAZ) for high strength low alloy (HSLA) S690QL steel. High resolution FEG-SEM has been used to characterize fine bainitic ferrite, martensite and nanosized second phases at simulated coarse and fine grain HAZs. It was found that for Ti bearing steel (Ti/N ratio is 2) austenite grain had the slowest growth rate due to the presence of most stable TiN. The fine cuboidal particles promoted intragranular acicular ferrite (IGF) formation. Nb bearing steel exhibited relatively weaker grain growth retardation compared with titanium bearing steels and a mixed microstructure of bainite and martensite was present for all simulated HAZs. IGF existed at coarse grain HAZ of Ti+V bearing steel but it was totally replaced by bainite at fine grain HAZs. Hardness result was closely related to the morphology of bainitic ferrite, intragranular ferrite and second phases within ferrite. The microstructure and hardness results of different simulated HAZs were in good agreement with welded experimental results.

  1. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  2. Dietary electrolyte balance affects growth performance, amylase activity and metabolic response in the meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoni, Leonardo J; Salas-Leiton, Emilio; Peixoto, Maria-João; Pereira, Luis; Silva-Brito, Francisca; Fontinha, Filipa; Gonçalves, José F M; Wilson, Jonathan M; Schrama, Johan W; Ozório, Rodrigo O A

    2017-09-01

    Dietary ion content is known to alter the acid-base balance in freshwater fish. The current study investigated the metabolic impact of acid-base disturbances produced by differences in dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) in the meagre (Argyrosomus regius), an euryhaline species. Changes in fish performance, gastric chyme characteristics, pH and ion concentrations in the bloodstream, digestive enzyme activities and metabolic rates were analyzed in meagre fed ad libitum two experimental diets (DEB 200 or DEB 700mEq/kg) differing in the Na2CO3 content for 69days. Fish fed the DEB 200 diet had 60-66% better growth performance than the DEB 700 group. Meagre consuming the DEB 200 diet were 90-96% more efficient than fish fed the DEB 700 diet at allocating energy from feed into somatic growth. The pH values in blood were significantly lower in the DEB 700 group 2h after feeding when compared to DEB 200, indicating that acid-base balance in meagre was affected by electrolyte balance in diet. Osmolality, and Na(+) and K(+) concentrations in plasma did not vary with the dietary treatment. Gastric chyme in the DEB 700 group had higher pH values, dry matter, protein and energy contents, but lower lipid content than in the DEB 200 group. Twenty-four hours after feeding, amylase activity was higher in the gastrointestinal tract of DEB 700 group when compared to the DEB 200 group. DEB 700 group had lower routine metabolic (RMR) and standard metabolic (SMR) rates, indicating a decrease in maintenance energy expenditure 48h after feeding the alkaline diet. The current study demonstrates that feeding meagre with an alkaline diet not only causes acid-base imbalance, but also negatively affects digestion and possibly nutrient assimilation, resulting in decreased growth performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Does coral disease affect symbiodinium? Investigating the impacts of growth anomaly on symbiont photophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Henrik Robert Burns

    Full Text Available Growth anomaly (GA is a commonly observed coral disease that impairs biological functions of the affected tissue. GA is prevalent at Wai 'ōpae tide pools, southeast Hawai 'i Island. Here two distinct forms of this disease, Type A and Type B, affect the coral, Montiporacapitata. While the effects of GA on biology and ecology of the coral host are beginning to be understood, the impact of this disease on the photophysiology of the dinoflagellate symbiont, Symbiodinium spp., has not been investigated. The GA clearly alters coral tissue structure and skeletal morphology and density. These tissue and skeletal changes are likely to modify not only the light micro-environment of the coral tissue, which has a direct impact on the photosynthetic potential of Symbiodinium spp., but also the physiological interactions within the symbiosis. This study utilized Pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry (PAM to characterize the photophysiology of healthy and GA-affected M. capitata tissue. Overall, endosymbionts within GA-affected tissue exhibit reduced photochemical efficiency. Values of both Fv/Fm and ΔF/ Fm' were significantly lower (p<0.01 in GA tissue compared to healthy and unaffected tissues. Tracking the photophysiology of symbionts over a diurnal time period enabled a comparison of symbiont responses to photosynthetically available radiation (PAR among tissue conditions. Symbionts within GA tissue exhibited the lowest values of ΔF/Fm' as well as the highest pressure over photosystem II (p<0.01. This study provides evidence that the symbionts within GA-affected tissue are photochemically compromised compared to those residing in healthy tissue.

  4. Drought negatively affects communities on a foundation tree: growth rings predict diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Adrian C; Gehring, Catherine A; Whitham, Thomas G

    2010-11-01

    Understanding how communities respond to extreme climatic events is important for predicting the impact of climate change on biodiversity. The plant vigor and stress hypotheses provide a theoretical framework for understanding how arthropods respond to stress, but are rarely tested at the community level. Following a record drought, we compared the communities of arthropods on pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) that exhibited a gradient in physical traits related to environmental stress (e.g., growth rate, branch dieback, and needle retention). Six patterns emerged that show how one of the predicted outcomes of climate change in the southwestern USA (i.e., increased drought severity) alters the communities of a foundation tree species. In accordance with the plant vigor hypothesis, increasing tree stress was correlated with an eight to tenfold decline in arthropod species richness and abundance. Trees that were more similar in their level of stress had more similar arthropod communities. Both foliage quantity and quality contributed to arthropod community structure. Individual species and feeding groups differed in their responses to plant stress, but most were negatively affected. Arthropod richness (r(2) = 0.48) and abundance (r(2) = 0.48) on individual trees were positively correlated with the tree's radial growth during drought. This relationship suggests that tree ring analysis may be used as a predictor of arthropod diversity, which is similar to findings with ectomycorrhizal fungi. A contrast of our findings on arthropod abundance with published data on colonization by mutualistic fungi on the same trees demonstrates that at low stress these two communities respond differently, but at high stress both are negatively affected. These results suggest that the effect of extreme climatic events such as drought on foundation tree species are likely to decrease multi-trophic diversity and shift arthropod community composition, which in turn could cascade to affect other

  5. Integrin antagonists affect growth and pathfinding of ventral motor nerves in the trunk of embryonic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thomas; McLane, Mary Ann; Becker, Catherina G

    2003-05-01

    Integrins are thought to be important receptors for extracellular matrix (ECM) components on growing axons. Ventral motor axons in the trunk of embryonic zebrafish grow in a midsegmental pathway through an environment rich in ECM components. To test the role of integrins in this process, integrin antagonists (the disintegrin echistatin in native and recombinant form, as well as the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide) were injected into embryos just prior to axon outgrowth at 14-16 h postfertilization (hpf). All integrin antagonists affected growth of ventral motor nerves in a similar way and native echistatin was most effective. At 24 hpf, when only the three primary motor axons per trunk hemisegment had grown out, 80% (16 of 20) of the embryos analyzed had abnormal motor nerves after injection of native echistatin, corresponding to 19% (91 of 480) of all nerves. At 33 hpf, when secondary motor axons were present in the pathway, 100% of the embryos were affected (24 of 24), with 20% of all nerves analyzed (196 of 960) being abnormal. Phenotypes comprised abnormal branching (64% of all abnormal nerves) and truncations (36% of all abnormal nerves) of ventral motor nerves at 24 hpf and mostly branching of the nerves at 33 hpf (94% of all abnormal nerves). Caudal branches were at least twice as frequent as rostral branches. Surrounding trunk tissue and a number of other axon fascicles were apparently not affected by the injections. Thus integrin function contributes to both growth and pathfinding of axons in ventral motor nerves in the trunk of zebrafish in vivo.

  6. Stiff mutant genes of phycomyces affect turgor pressure and wall mechanical properties to regulate elongation growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Joseph K E; Munoz, Cindy M; Blakley, Scott E; Truong, Jason T; Ortega, Elena L

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth is paramount to all living organisms. In plants, algae and fungi, regulation of expansive growth of cells is required for development and morphogenesis. Also, many sensory responses of stage IVb sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus are produced by regulating elongation growth rate (growth responses) and differential elongation growth rate (tropic responses). "Stiff" mutant sporangiophores exhibit diminished tropic responses and are found to be defective in at least five genes; madD, E, F, G, and J. Prior experimental research suggests that the defective genes affect growth regulation, but this was not verified. All the growth of the single-celled stalk of the stage IVb sporangiophore occurs in a short region termed the "growth zone." Prior experimental and theoretical research indicates that elongation growth rate of the stage IVb sporangiophore can be regulated by controlling the cell wall mechanical properties within the growth zone and the magnitude of the turgor pressure. A quantitative biophysical model for elongation growth rate is required to elucidate the relationship between wall mechanical properties and turgor pressure during growth regulation. In this study, it is hypothesized that the mechanical properties of the wall within the growth zone of stiff mutant sporangiophores are different compared to wild type (WT). A biophysical equation for elongation growth rate is derived for fungal and plant cells with a growth zone. Two strains of stiff mutants are studied, C149 madD120 (-) and C216 geo- (-). Experimental results demonstrate that turgor pressure is larger but irreversible wall deformation rates within the growth zone and growth zone length are smaller for stiff mutant sporangiophores compared to WT. These findings can explain the diminished tropic responses of the stiff mutant sporangiophores. It is speculated that the defective genes affect the amount of wall-building material delivered to the inner cell wall.

  7. Effect of lysozyme on "flor" velum yeasts in the biological aging of sherry wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Ana; Lasanta, Cristina; Caro, Ildefonso; Palacios, Víctor

    2012-05-01

    Biological aging is a key step in the production of Sherry wine classified as "fine". During this stage, a film of yeast referred to as "flor velum" covers the surface of the wine and substantially alters its characteristics. Other microorganisms may coexist with flor yeasts, such as lactic acid bacteria and non-Saccharomyces yeasts, whose growth may be favored under certain conditions, causing organoleptic deviations and deterioration of the wine. To prevent the development of lactic bacteria, lysozyme usage has been introduced. Lysozyme is a hydrolytic enzyme with muramidase activity that can lyse gram-positive bacteria; its use in winemaking was approved by the OIV in 1997 (resolution OENO 10/97). Thus far, the use of lysozyme during the production of Sherry wines is not widespread despite its effectiveness in controlling lactic acid bacteria. However, there have been no studies on the effect of lysozyme on flor velum. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of lysozyme on yeast growth and the formation, development and metabolism of flor velum during the biological aging process of Sherry wine. The results indicate that lysozyme does not affect the flor yeast during the fermentative stage or biofilm stage. However, if yeast inoculation is carried out under submerged culture conditions during biological aging, low doses of lysozyme (≥12.5 g/hL) affect cell multiplication and the membrane hydrophobicity of the yeast, inhibiting their aggregation and flotation and the subsequent development of flor velum. Thus, the yeast inoculation protocol and the methodology used for the addition of lysozyme influence velum development, its metabolism and the wine characteristics.

  8. Temperature-induced elevation of basal metabolic rate does not affect testis growth in great tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Samuel P; Visser, Marcel E

    2009-07-01

    The timing of reproduction varies from year to year in many bird species. To adjust their timing to the prevailing conditions of that year, birds use cues from their environment. However, the relative importance of these cues, such as the initial predictive (e.g. photoperiod) and the supplemental factors (e.g. temperature), on the seasonal sexual development are difficult to distinguish. In particular, the fine-tuning effect of temperature on gonadal growth is not well known. One way temperature may affect timing is via its strong effect on energy expenditure as gonadal growth is an energy-demanding process. To study the interaction of photoperiod and temperature on gonadal development, we first exposed 35 individually housed male great tits (Parus major) to mid-long days (after 6 weeks of 8 h L:16 h D at 15 degrees C, photoperiod was set to 13 h L:11 h D at 15 degrees C). Two weeks later, for half of the males the temperature was set to 8 degrees C, and for the other half to 22 degrees C. Unilateral laparotomies were performed at weeks 5 (i.e one week before the birds were transferred to mid-long days), 8 and 11 to measure testis size. Two measures of basal metabolic rate (BMR) were performed at the end of the experiment (weeks 11 and 12). Testis size increased significantly during the course of the experiment, but independently of the temperature treatment. BMR was significantly higher in birds exposed to the cold treatment. These results show that temperature-related elevation of BMR did not impair the long-day-induced testis growth in great tits. As a consequence, temperature may not be a crucial cue and/or constraint factor in the fine-tuning of the gonadal recrudescence in male great tits, and testis growth is not a high energy-demanding seasonal process.

  9. Unilateral Nasal Obstruction during Later Growth Periods Affects Craniofacial Muscles in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchima Koecklin, Karin H.; Hiranuma, Maya; Kato, Chiho; Funaki, Yukiha; Kataguchi, Taku; Yabushita, Tadachika; Kokai, Satoshi; Ono, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Nasal obstruction can occur at different life stages. In early stages of life the respiratory system is still under development, maturing during the growth period. Previous studies have shown that nasal obstruction in neonatal rats alters craniofacial function. However, little is known about the effects of nasal obstruction that develops during later growth periods. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nasal obstruction during later periods of growth on the functional characteristics of the jaw-opening reflex (JOR) and tongue-protruding muscles. In total, 102 6-day-old male Wistar rats were randomized into either a control or experimental group (both n = 51). In order to determine the appropriate timing of nasal obstruction, the saturation of arterial oxygen (SpO2) was monitored at 8 days, and at 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 weeks in the control group. Rats in the experimental group underwent unilateral nasal obstruction at the age of 5 weeks. The SpO2 was monitored at 7, 9, and 11 weeks in the experimental group. The electromyographic responses of JOR and the contractile properties of the tongue-protruding muscles were recorded at 7, 9, and 11 weeks. In the control group, SpO2 decreased until 5 weeks of age, and remained relatively stable until 11 weeks of age. The SpO2 was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control. In the experimental group, JOR changes included a longer latency and smaller peak-to-peak amplitude, while changes in the contractile properties of the tongue-protruding muscles included larger twitch and tetanic forces, and a longer half-decay time. These results suggest that nasal obstruction during later growth periods may affect craniofacial function.

  10. Do Amplitudes of Water Level Fluctuations Affect the Growth and Community Structure of Submerged Macrophytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo-Zhu; Liu, Zheng-Yuan; Luo, Fang-Li; Lei, Guang-Chun; Li, Hong-Li

    2016-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes are subjected to potential mechanical stresses associated with fluctuating water levels in natural conditions. However, few experimental studies have been conducted to further understand the effects of water level fluctuating amplitude on submerged macrophyte species and their assemblages or communities. We designed a controlled experiment to investigate the responses of three submerged macrophyte species (Hydrilla verticillata, Ceratophyllum demersum and Elodea nuttallii) and their combinations in communities to three amplitudes (static, ± 30 cm, ± 60 cm) of water level fluctuations. Results showed that water level fluctuating amplitude had little effects on the community performance and the three tested species responded differently. H. verticillata exhibited more growth in static water and it was negatively affected by either of the water level fluctuations amplitude, however, growth parameters of H. verticillata in two fluctuating water level treatments (i.e., ± 30 cm, ± 60 cm) were not significantly different. On the other hand, the growth of C. demersum was not significantly correlated with different amplitude treatments. However, it became more abundant when water levels fluctuated. E. nuttallii was inhibited by the two fluctuating water level treatments, and was less in growth parameters compared to the other species especially in water level fluctuating conditions. The inherent differences in the adaptive capabilities of the tested species indicate that C. demersum or other species with similar responses may be dominant species to restore submerged macrophyte communities with great fluctuating water levels. Otherwise, H. verticillata, E. nuttallii or other species with similar responses could be considered for constructing the community in static water conditions.

  11. Influence of Feeding Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Yeast Cell Wall on Growth Performance and Digestive Function of Feedlot Cattle during Periods of Elevated Ambient Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Chavira, J; Arzola, C; González-Vizcarra, V; Manríquez-Núñez, O M; Montaño-Gómez, M F; Navarrete-Reyes, J D; Raymundo, C; Zinn, R A

    2015-09-01

    In experiment 1, eighty crossbred steers (239±15 kg) were used in a 229-d experiment to evaluate the effects of increasing levels of enzymatically hydrolyzed yeast (EHY) cell wall in diets on growth performance feedlot cattle during periods of elevated ambient temperature. Treatments consisted of steam-flaked corn-based diets supplemented to provide 0, 1, 2, or 3 g EHY/hd/d. There were no effects on growth performance during the initial 139-d period. However, from d 139 to harvest, when 24-h temperature humidity index averaged 80, EHY increased dry matter intake (DMI) (linear effect, p0.10) on carcass characteristics. In experiment 2, four Holstein steers (292±5 kg) with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum were used in a 4×4 Latin Square design experiment to evaluate treatments effects on characteristics of ruminal and total tract digestion in steers. There were no treatment effects (p>0.10) on ruminal pH, total volatile fatty acid, molar proportions of acetate, butyrate, or estimated methane production. Supplemental EHY decreased ruminal molar proportion of acetate (p = 0.08), increased molar proportion of propionate (p = 0.09), and decreased acetate:propionate molar ratio (p = 0.07) and estimated ruminal methane production (p = 0.09). It is concluded that supplemental EHY may enhance DMI and ADG of feedlot steers during periods of high ambient temperature. Supplemental EHY may also enhance ruminal fiber digestion and decrease ruminal acetate:propionate molar ratios in feedlot steers fed steam-flaked corn-based finishing diets.

  12. Influence of Feeding Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Yeast Cell Wall on Growth Performance and Digestive Function of Feedlot Cattle during Periods of Elevated Ambient Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Salinas-Chavira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In experiment 1, eighty crossbred steers (239±15 kg were used in a 229-d experiment to evaluate the effects of increasing levels of enzymatically hydrolyzed yeast (EHY cell wall in diets on growth performance feedlot cattle during periods of elevated ambient temperature. Treatments consisted of steam-flaked corn-based diets supplemented to provide 0, 1, 2, or 3 g EHY/hd/d. There were no effects on growth performance during the initial 139-d period. However, from d 139 to harvest, when 24-h temperature humidity index averaged 80, EHY increased dry matter intake (DMI (linear effect, p0.10 on carcass characteristics. In experiment 2, four Holstein steers (292±5 kg with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum were used in a 4×4 Latin Square design experiment to evaluate treatments effects on characteristics of ruminal and total tract digestion in steers. There were no treatment effects (p>0.10 on ruminal pH, total volatile fatty acid, molar proportions of acetate, butyrate, or estimated methane production. Supplemental EHY decreased ruminal molar proportion of acetate (p = 0.08, increased molar proportion of propionate (p = 0.09, and decreased acetate:propionate molar ratio (p = 0.07 and estimated ruminal methane production (p = 0.09. It is concluded that supplemental EHY may enhance DMI and ADG of feedlot steers during periods of high ambient temperature. Supplemental EHY may also enhance ruminal fiber digestion and decrease ruminal acetate:propionate molar ratios in feedlot steers fed steam-flaked corn-based finishing diets.

  13. Tobacco cells transformed with the fission yeast Spcdc25 mitotic inducer display growth and morphological characteristics as well as starch and sugar status evocable by cytokinin application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomelová-Masková, Petra; Novák, Ondrej; Lipavská, Helena

    2008-07-01

    In plants, the G2/M control of cell cycle remains an elusive issue as doubts persist about activatory dephosphorylation--in other eukaryotes provided by CDC25 phosphatase and serving as a final all-or-nothing mitosis regulator. We report on the effects of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Samsun) transformation with fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) cdc25 (Spcdc25) on cell characteristics. Transformed cell suspension cultures showed higher dry mass accumulation during the exponential phase and clustered more circular cell phenotypes compared to chains of elongated WT cells. Similar cell parameters, as in the transformants, can be induced in WT by cytokinins. Spcdc25 cells, after cytokinin treatment, showed giant cell clusters and growth inhibition. In addition, Spcdc25 expression led to altered carbohydrate status: increased starch and soluble sugars with higher sucrose:hexoses ratio, inducible in WT by cytokinin treatment. Taken together, the Spcdc25 transformation had a cytokinin-like effect on studied characteristics. However, endogenous cytokinin determination revealed markedly lower cytokinin levels in Spcdc25 transformants. This indicates that the cells sense Spcdc25 expression as an increased cytokinin availability, manifested by changed cell morphology, and in consequence decrease endogenous cytokinin levels. Clearly, the results on cell growth and morphology are consistent with the model of G2/M control including cytokinin-regulated activatory dephosphorylation. Nevertheless, no clear link is obvious between Spcdc25 transformation and carbohydrate status and thus the observed cytokinin-like effect on carbohydrate levels poses a problem. Hence, we propose that Spcdc25-induced higher CDK(s) activity at G2/M generates a signal-modifying carbohydrate metabolism to meet high energy and C demands of forthcoming cell division.

  14. Yeast Lab

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Matt; Powell, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Yeast are grown in a small, capped ask, generating carbon dioxide which is trapped in an inverted jar full of colored water. The volume of carbon dioxide produced can either be measured directly or using time-lapse imagery on an iPad or similar. Students are then challenged to model the resulting data. From this exercise students gain greater understand- ing of ODE compartment models, parameter estimation, population dynamics and limiting factors.

  15. Aerobic induction of respiro-fermentative growth by decreasing oxygen tensions in the respiratory yeast Pichia stipitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinner, U; Fluthgraf, S; Freese, S; Passoth, V

    2005-04-01

    The fermentative and respiratory metabolism of Pichia stipitis wild-type strain CBS 5774 and the derived auxotrophic transformation recipient PJH53 trp5-10 his3-1 were examined in differentially oxygenated glucose cultures in the hermetically sealed Sensomat system. There was a good agreement of the kinetics of gas metabolism, growth, ethanol formation and glucose utilisation, proving the suitability of the Sensomat system for rapid and inexpensive investigation of strains and mutants for their respiratory and fermentative metabolism. Our study revealed respiro-fermentative growth by the wild-type strain, although the cultures were not oxygen-limited. The induction of respiro-fermentative behaviour was obviously due to the decrease in oxygen tension but not falling below a threshold of oxygen tension. The responses differed depending on the velocity of the decrease in oxygen tension. At high oxygenation (slow decrease in oxygen tension), ethanol production was induced but glucose uptake was not influenced. At low oxygenation, glucose uptake and ethanol formation increased during the first hours of cultivation. The transformation recipient PJH53 most probably carries a mutation that influences the response to a slow decrease in oxygen tension, since almost no ethanol formation was found under these conditions.

  16. Proteolytic activities in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheki, T; Holzer, H

    1975-03-28

    Studies on the mechanism and time course of the activation of proteinases A (EC 3.4.23.8), B (EC 3.4.22.9) and C (EC 3.4.12.--) in crude yeast extracts at pH 5.1 and 25 degrees C showed that the increase in proteinase B activity is paralleled with the disappearance of proteinase B inhibitor. Addition of purified proteinase A to fresh crude extracts accelerates the inactivation of the proteinase B inhibitor and the appearance of maximal activities of proteinases B and C. The decrease of proteinase B inhibitor activity and the increase of proteinase B activity are markedly retarded by the addition of pepstatin. Because 10-minus 7 M pepstatin completely inhibits proteinase A without affecting proteinase B activity, this is another indication for the role of proteinase A during the activation of proteinase B. Whereas extracts of yeast grown on minimal medium reached maximal activation of proteinases B and C after 20 h of incubation at pH 5.1 and 25 degrees C, extracts of yeast grown on complete medium had to be incubated for about 100 h. In the latter case, the addition of proteinas A results in maximal activation of proteinases B and C and disappearance of proteinase B inhibitor activity only after 10--20 h of incubation. With the optimal conditions, the maximal activities of proteinases A, B and C, as well as of the proteinase B inhibitor, were determined in crude extracts of yeast that had been grown batchwise for different lengths of time either on minimal or on complete medium. Upon incubation, all three proteinases were activated by several times their initial activity. This reflects the existence of proteolytically degradable inhibitors of the three proteinases and together with the above mentioned observations it demonstrates that the "activation" of yeast proteinases A, B and C upon incubation results from the proteolytic digestion of inhibitors rather than from activation of inactive zymogens by limited proteolysis.

  17. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Huang Hsueh

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (≥ 50 ppm, with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5-10 ppm, with concentrations ≤ 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles.

  18. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance, gut morphology, and gene expression of pattern recognition receptors and cytokines in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Rogiewicz, A; Patterson, R; Slominski, B A

    2016-03-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of yeast-derived products and distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance, small intestinal morphology, and innate immune response in broiler chickens from 1 to 21 d of age. Nine replicates of 5 birds each were assigned to dietary treatments consisting of a control diet without antibiotic (C), and diets containing 11 mg/kg of virginiamycin, 0.25% of yeast cell wall (YCW), 0.2% of a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus, 0.025% of nucleotides, 0.05% of nucleotides, or a diet containing 10% of DDGS. On d 21, 5 birds per treatment were euthanized and approximately 5-cm long duodenum, jejunum, and ileum segments were collected for intestinal morphology measurements. Cecal tonsils and spleen were collected to measure the gene expression of toll-like receptors TLR2b, TLR4, and TLR21, macrophage mannose receptor (MMR), and cytokines IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-10, and IL-4. No significant difference was observed for growth performance parameters. However, diets containing 0.05% of nucleotides and YCW significantly increased (P yeast-derived products. The expression of TLR2b in the spleen was down-regulated for diets supplemented with nucleotides and antibiotic. In addition, lower expression of TLR21 and MMR was observed in the spleen of birds receiving yeast-derived products and antibiotic. However, expression of TLR4 in the spleen was up-regulated in diets supplemented with YCW and nucleotides. The expression of IFN-γ and IL-12 was down-regulated in the spleen of birds fed diets supplemented with yeast-derived products. In addition, inclusion of YCW, Maxi-Gen Plus, or 0.05% of nucleotides down-regulated the expression of IL-10 and IL-4 in the cecal tonsils. In conclusion, down-regulation of receptors and cytokines in spleen and cecal tonsils of birds fed diets supplemented with yeast-derived products may suggest that yeast products do not exert immune stimulating effect under normal health conditions.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 9 is a novel modulator of negative affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurbach, Elyse L.; Inui, Edny Gula; Turner, Cortney A.; Hagenauer, Megan H.; Prater, Katherine E.; Li, Jun Z.; Absher, Devin; Shah, Najmul; Blandino, Peter; Bunney, William E.; Myers, Richard M.; Barchas, Jack D.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda

    2015-01-01

    Both gene expression profiling in postmortem human brain and studies using animal models have implicated the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family in affect regulation and suggest a potential role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). FGF2, the most widely characterized family member, is down-regulated in the depressed brain and plays a protective role in rodent models of affective disorders. By contrast, using three microarray analyses followed by quantitative RT-PCR confirmation, we show that FGF9 expression is up-regulated in the hippocampus of individuals with MDD, and that FGF9 expression is inversely related to the expression of FGF2. Because little is known about FGF9’s function in emotion regulation, we used animal models to shed light on its potential role in affective function. We found that chronic social defeat stress, an animal model recapitulating some aspects of MDD, leads to a significant increase in hippocampal FGF9 expression, paralleling the elevations seen in postmortem human brain tissue. Chronic intracerebroventricular administration of FGF9 increased both anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. In contrast, knocking down FGF9 expression in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus using a lentiviral vector produced a decrease in FGF9 expression and ameliorated anxiety-like behavior. Collectively, these results suggest that high levels of hippocampal FGF9 play an important role in the development or expression of mood and anxiety disorders. We propose that the relative levels of FGF9 in relation to other members of the FGF family may prove key to understanding vulnerability or resilience in affective disorders. PMID:26351673

  20. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics.

  1. The protective function of personal growth initiative among a genocide-affected population in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackie, Laura E R; Jayawickreme, Eranda; Forgeard, Marie J C; Jayawickreme, Nuwan

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the extent to which individual differences in personal growth initiative (PGI) were associated with lower reports of functional impairment of daily activities among a genocide-affected population in Rwanda. PGI measures an individual's motivation to develop as a person and the extent to which he or she is active in setting goals that work toward achieving self-improvement. We found that PGI was negatively associated with functional impairment when controlling for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and other demographic factors. Our results suggest that PGI may constitute an important mindset for facilitating adaptive functioning in the aftermath of adversity and in the midst of psychological distress, and as such they might have practical applications for the development of intervention programs. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Does overhead irrigation with salt affect growth, yield, and phenolic content of lentil plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakoula Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Overhead irrigation of lentil plants with salt (100 mM NaCl did not have any significant impact on plant growth, while chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm were affected. Under such poor irrigation water quality, the malondialdehyde content in leaves was increased due to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. In seeds, the total phenolic content (TPC was correlated to their total antioxidant capacity (TAC. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS detection showed that flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, rutin, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid and resveratrol appear to be the compounds with the greatest influence on the TAC values. Catechin is the most abundant phenolic compound in lentil seeds. Overhead irrigation with salt reduced the concentration of almost all phenolic compounds analyzed from lentil seed extracts.

  3. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%-26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21°C-36°C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  4. Arabidopsis SMALL ORGAN 4, a homolog of yeast NOP53, regulates cell proliferation rate during organ growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ran Zhang; Zhixiang Qin; Xiao Zhang; Yuxin Hu

    2015-01-01

    Cel proliferation is a fundamental event essential for plant organogenesis and contributes greatly to the final organ size. Although the control of cel proliferation in plants has been extensively studied, how the plant sets the cel number required for a single organ is largely elusive. Here, we describe the Arabidopsis SMALL ORGAN 4 (SMO4) that functions in the regulation of cell proliferation rate and thus final organ size. The smo4 mutant exhibits a reduced size of organs due to the decreased cell number, and further analysis reveals that such phenotype results from a retardation of the cell cycle progression during organ development. SMO4 encodes a homolog of NUCLEOLAR PROTEIN 53 (NOP53) in Saccharomy-ces cerevisiae and is expressed primarily in tissues undergoing cel proliferation. Nevertheless, further complementation tests show that SMO4 could not rescue the lethal defect of NOP53 mutant of S. cerevisiae. These results define SMO4 as an important regulator of cell proliferation during organ growth and suggest that SMO4 might have been evolutionarily divergent from NOP53.

  5. Chlorine dioxide against bacteria and yeasts from the alcoholic fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghin, Silvana Perissatto; Reis, Fabricia Cristina; de Almeida, Paulo Garcia; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2008-01-01

    The ethanol production in Brazil is carried out by fed-batch or continuous process with cell recycle, in such way that bacterial contaminants are also recycled and may be troublesome due to the substrate competition. Addition of sulphuric acid when inoculum cells are washed can control the bacterial growth or alternatively biocides are used. This work aimed to verify the effect of chlorine dioxide, a well-known biocide for bacterial decontamination of water and equipments, against contaminant bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides) from alcoholic fermentation, through the method of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), as well as its effect on the industrial yeast inoculum. Lower MIC was found for B. subtilis (10 ppm) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides (50 ppm) than for Lactobacillus fermentum (75 ppm) and Lactobacillus plantarum (125 ppm). Additionally, these concentrations of chlorine dioxide had similar effects on bacteria as 3 ppm of Kamoran® (recommended dosage for fermentation tanks), exception for B. subtilis, which could not be controlled at this Kamoran® dosage. The growth of industrial yeasts was affected when the concentration of chlorine dioxide was higher than 50 ppm, but the effect was slightly dependent on the type of yeast strain. Smooth yeast colonies (dispersed cells) seemed to be more sensitive than wrinkled yeast colonies (clustered cells/pseudohyphal growth), both isolated from an alcohol-producing unit during the 2006/2007 sugar cane harvest. The main advantage in the usage of chlorine dioxide that it can replace antibiotics, avoiding the selection of resistant populations of microorganisms. PMID:24031227

  6. Growth media affect the volatilome and antimicrobial activity against Phytophthora infestans in four Lysobacter type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazazzara, Valentina; Perazzolli, Michele; Pertot, Ilaria; Biasioli, Franco; Puopolo, Gerardo; Cappellin, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Bacterial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important ecological roles in soil microbial interactions. Lysobacter spp. are key determinants of soil suppressiveness against phytopathogens and the production of non-volatile antimicrobial metabolites has been extensively characterised. However, the chemical composition and antagonistic properties of the Lysobacter volatilome have been poorly investigated. In this work, VOC emission profiles of four Lysobacter type strains grown on a sugar-rich and a protein-rich medium were analysed using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry. Lysobacter antibioticus, L. capsici, L. enzymogenes and L. gummosus type strains were recognised according to their volatilome assessed using both headspace mass spectrometry methods Moreover, the chemical profiles and functional properties of the Lysobacter volatilome differed according to the growth medium, and a protein-rich substrate maximised the toxic effect of the four Lysobacter type strains against Phytophthora infestans. Antagonistic (pyrazines, pyrrole and decanal) and non-antagonistic (delta-hexalactone and ethanol) VOCs against Ph. infestans or putative plant growth stimulator compounds (acetoin and indole) were mainly emitted by Lysobacter type strains grown on protein- and sugar-rich media respectively. Thus nutrient availability under soil conditions could affect the aggressiveness of Lysobacter spp. and possibly optimise interactions of these bacterial species with the other soil inhabitants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Seedling growth of maize (Zea mays L. inbred lines affected by seed treatment with pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamindžić Gordana D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed treatment is a common way of fungicide and insecticide use nowadays, since this way of pesticide application can provide the best protection in the vicinity of the future plant. The aim of research was to evaluate the effects of different seed treatments on germination and seedling growth in three maize inbred lines. The research included the seed treatment with several combinations of a fungicide Maxim XL 035-FS (a.i. metalaxil-M + fludioxonil and neonicotinoid insecticides Gaucho 600-FS (a.i. imidacloprid and Cruiser 350-FS (a.i. thiamethoxam, as well as untreated seed (control. The results indicated that inbred lines 21202 x 21101 NS and 317659 NS had a highly vigourous seed which was not affected by the seed treatments. The seed treatments with Maxim XL 035- FS+Gaucho 600-FS and Maxim XL 035-FS+Cruiser 350-FS led to a decrease in germination (90.25% and 89.50%, respectively of maize inbred line 306081 NS as well as a decrease in root length (126.75 mm and 125.25 mm, respectively and dry root weight (0.135 g and 0.1875 g, respectively of maize inbred line 21202 x 21101 NS. All seed treatments had positive effects on root growth, as well as on fresh root weight of maize inbred lines 306081 NS and 317659 NS. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31073: Improvement of maize and sorghum under stress

  8. Mest but Not MiR-335 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramuki, Yosuke; Sato, Takahiko; Furuta, Yasuhide; Surani, M. Azim; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibers are injured, they regenerate and grow until their sizes are adjusted to surrounding muscle fibers and other relevant organs. In this study, we examined whether Mest, one of paternally expressed imprinted genes that regulates body size during development, and miR-335 located in the second intron of the Mest gene play roles in muscle regeneration. We generated miR-335-deficient mice, and found that miR-335 is a paternally expressed imprinted microRNA. Although both Mest and miR-335 are highly expressed during muscle development and regeneration, only Mest+/- (maternal/paternal) mice show retardation of body growth. In addition to reduced body weight in Mest+/-; DMD-null mice, decreased muscle growth was observed in Mest+/- mice during cardiotoxin-induced regeneration, suggesting roles of Mest in muscle regeneration. Moreover, expressions of H19 and Igf2r, maternally expressed imprinted genes were affected in tibialis anterior muscle of Mest+/-; DMD-null mice compared to DMD-null mice. Thus, Mest likely mediates muscle regeneration through regulation of imprinted gene networks in skeletal muscle. PMID:26098312

  9. Zebra pattern in rocks as a function of grain growth affected by second-phase particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich eKelka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we present a simple microdynamic model which can explain the beginning of the zebra pattern formation in rocks. The two dimensional model consists of two main processes, mineral replacement along a reaction front, and grain boundary migration affected by impurities. In the numerical model we assume that an initial distribution of second-phase particles is present due to sedimentary layering. The reaction front percolates the model and redistributes second-phase particles by shifting them until the front is saturated and drops the particles again. This produces and enhances initial layering. Grain growth is hindered in layers with high second-phase particle concentrations whereas layers with low concentrations coarsen. Due to the grain growth activity in layers with low second-phase particle concentrations these impurities are collected at grain boundaries and the crystals become very clean. Therefore the white layers in the pattern contain large grains with low concentration of second-phase particles, whereas the dark layers contain small grains with a large second-phase particle concentration.

  10. Effect of Selenium and Yeast on the Growth and Hatchability of Caridina denticulata sinensis%硒和酵母对中华米虾孵化率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽坤; 蔡端波; 李泽健; 黄增瑞; 李春青; 刘建国

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective ] The aim was to study the effect of selenium (Se) and yeast on the hatchability of Caridina denticulata sinensis. [ Method ] Selenium (Se) and yeast were added into the diet to compare the growth index ,hatchability and larvae survival rate of Caridina denticulata sinensis. [ Result ] Results show that when the content of selenium was 0. 45 μg/g,the growth index and hatchability of Caridina denticulata sinensis what was fed with organic selenium were higher than those withinorganic selenium,at the same time,suitable yeast was added into diet can also improved the above indexes. [ Conclusion ] Se-enriched yeast was added into the diet of of C. d. sinensis by a certain percentage was an effective approach to improve the growth index and hatchability.%[目的]研究硒和酵母对中华米虾孵化率等的影响.[方法]饲料中添加硒和酵母,比较虾的生长指标、孵化率及其幼体的成活率.[结果]当硒含量为0.45 μg/g时,饲喂有机硒的中华米虾的生长指标、孵化率等,均高于不添加硒元素和添加同含量无机硒饲喂的中华米虾;同时在饲料中添加适量酵母也可提高以上指标.[结论]将富硒酵母作为饵料生物,按一定比例添加到中华米虾饲料中,可提高虾生长指标、孵化率等.

  11. Elastic modulus affects the growth and differentiation of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-feng Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It remains poorly understood if carrier hardness, elastic modulus, and contact area affect neural stem cell growth and differentiation. Tensile tests show that the elastic moduli of Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes are lower than that of an ordinary dish, while the elastic modulus of SMI silicone membrane is lower than that of Tiansu silicone membrane. Neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto ordinary dishes as well as Tiansu silicone membrane and SMI silicone membrane. Light microscopy showed that neural stem cells on all three carriers show improved adherence. After 7 days of differentiation, neuron specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed a higher rate of neural stem cell differentiation into astrocytes on Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes than on the ordinary dish, which was also higher on the SMI than the Tiansu silicone membrane. These findings confirm that all three cell carrier types have good biocompatibility, while SMI and Tiansu silicone membranes exhibit good mechanical homogenization. Thus, elastic modulus affects neural stem cell differentiation into various nerve cells. Within a certain range, a smaller elastic modulus results in a more obvious trend of cell differentiation into astrocytes.

  12. Elastic modulus affects the growth and differentiation of neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-feng Jiang; Kai Yang; Xiao-qing Yang; Ying-fu Liu; Yuan-chi Cheng; Xu-yi Chen; Yue Tu

    2015-01-01

    It remains poorly understood if carrier hardness, elastic modulus, and contact area affect neural stem cell growth and differentiation. Tensile tests show that the elastic moduli of Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes are lower than that of an ordinary dish, while the elastic modulus of SMI silicone membrane is lower than that of Tiansu silicone membrane. Neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto ordinary dishes as well as Tiansu silicone membrane and SMI silicone membrane. Light microscopy showed that neural stem cells on all three carriers show improved adherence. After 7 days of differentiation, neuron speciifc enolase, glial ifbrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein expression was detected by immunolfuorescence. Moreover, lfow cytometry revealed a higher rate of neural stem cell differentiation into astrocytes on Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes than on the ordinary dish, which was also higher on the SMI than the Tiansu silicone membrane. These ifndings con-ifrm that all three cell carrier types have good biocompatibility, while SMI and Tiansu silicone membranes exhibit good mechanical homogenization. Thus, elastic modulus affects neural stem cell differentiation into various nerve cells. Within a certain range, a smaller elastic modulus re-sults in a more obvious trend of cell differentiation into astrocytes.

  13. Salivary enzymes and exhaled air affect Streptococcus salivarius growth and physiological state in complemented artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, P; Harn-Arsa, S; Delettre, J; Béal, C

    2011-12-01

    To better understand the phenomena governing the establishment of the oral bacterium Streptococcus salivarius in the mouth, the effect of some environmental factors has been studied in complemented artificial saliva, under oral pH and temperature conditions. Three salivary enzymes at physiological concentrations were tested: peroxidase, lysozyme and amylase, as well as injection of exhaled air. Injection of air containing 5% CO2 and 16% O2 induced a deleterious effect on S. salivarius K12, mainly by increasing redox potential. Addition of lysozyme slightly affected the physiological state of S. salivarius by altering membrane integrity. In contrast, peroxidase was not detrimental as it made it possible to decrease the redox potential. The addition of amylase reduced the specific growth rate of S. salivarius by formation of a complex with amylase and mucins, but led to high final biomass, as a result of enzymatic degradation of some nutrients. Finally, this work demonstrated that salivary enzymes had a slight impact on S. salivarius behaviour. It can thus be concluded that this bacterium was well adapted to in-mouth conditions, as it was able to resist certain salivary enzymes, even if tolerance to expired air was affected, as a result of an increased redox potential.

  14. Transformation of deoxynivalenol and its acetylated derivatives in Chinese steamed bread making, as affected by pH, yeast, and steaming time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Wang, Bujun

    2016-07-01

    We hereby report the transformation of deoxynivalenol (DON) and its acetylated derivatives (3-ADON and 15-ADON) by spiking targeted mycotoxins to Fusarium mycotoxin-free flour in the process of making Chinese steamed bread (CSB). The impacts of pH, yeast level, and steaming time on the transformation of 3-ADON to DON were investigated. DON, 3-ADON, and 15-ADON were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. Spiked DON was stable throughout the CSB making process. Spiked 3-ADON and 15-ADON were partially deacetylated and transformed to DON during kneading (54.1-60.0% and 59.3-77.5%, respectively), fermentation (64.0-76.9% and 78.2-91.6%, respectively), and steaming (47.2-52.7% and 52.4-61.9%, respectively). The ADONs level increased after steaming compared with their level in the previous step. The pH level and steaming duration significantly (Pprocess. Briefly, alkaline conditions and short steaming times favored the deacetylation of 3-ADON. The level of yeast did not remarkably (Ptransformation between ADONs and DON.

  15. [Metabolomics analysis of taxadiene producing yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huifang; Ding, Mingzhu; Yuan, Yingjin

    2014-02-01

    In order to study the inherent difference among terpenes producing yeasts from the point of metabolomics, we selected taxadiene producing yeasts as the model system. The changes of cellular metabolites during fermentation log phase of artificial functional yeasts were determined using metabolomics methods. The results represented that compared to W303-1A as a blank control, the metabolites in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle and several amino acids were influenced. And due to the changes of metabolites, the growth of cells was inhibited to a certain extent. Among the metabolites identified, citric acid content in taxadiene producing yeasts changed the most, the decreasing amplitude reached 90% or more. Therefore, citric acid can be a marker metabolite for the future study of artificial functional yeasts. The metabolomics analysis of taxadiene producing yeasts can provide more information in further studies on optimization of terpenes production in heterologous chassis.

  16. Influence of feeding chromium-enriched enzymatically hydrolyzed yeast on growth performance, dietary energetics and carcass characteristics in feedlot cattle under conditions of high ambient temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sánchez-Mendoza, B; Montelongo-Terriquez, A; Plascencia, A; Torrentera, N; Ware, R.A; Zinn, R.A

    2015-01-01

    Forty crossbred steers (245 ± 0.95 kg) were used in a 222-day feeding trial to assess the effects of a supplementation of chelated chromium-enhanced extract of enzymatically hydrolyzed yeast (Cr-EHY...

  17. Enhancement of lipid productivity in oleaginous Colletotrichum fungus through genetic transformation using the yeast CtDGAT2b gene under model-optimized growth condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabuddha Dey

    Full Text Available Oleaginous fungi are of special interest among microorganisms for the production of lipid feedstocks as they can be cultured on a variety of substrates, particularly waste lingocellulosic materials, and few fungal strains are reported to accumulate inherently higher neutral lipid than bacteria or microalgae. Previously, we have characterized an endophytic filamentous fungus Colletotrichum sp. DM06 that can produce total lipid ranging from 34% to 49% of its dry cell weight (DCW upon growing with various carbon sources and nutrient-stress conditions. In the present study, we report on the genetic transformation of this fungal strain with the CtDGAT2b gene, which encodes for a catalytically efficient isozyme of type-2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT from oleaginous yeast Candida troplicalis SY005. Besides the increase in size of lipid bodies, total lipid titer by the transformed Colletotrichum (lipid content ∼73% DCW was found to be ∼1.7-fold more than the wild type (lipid content ∼38% DCW due to functional activity of the CtDGAT2b transgene when grown under standard condition of growth without imposition of any nutrient-stress. Analysis of lipid fractionation revealed that the neutral lipid titer in transformants increased up to 1.8-, 1.6- and 1.5-fold compared to the wild type when grown under standard, nitrogen stress and phosphorus stress conditions, respectively. Lipid titer of transformed cells was further increased to 1.7-fold following model-based optimization of culture conditions. Taken together, ∼2.9-fold higher lipid titer was achieved in Colletotrichum fungus due to overexpression of a rate-limiting crucial enzyme of lipid biosynthesis coupled with prediction-based bioprocess optimization.

  18. Enhancement of lipid productivity in oleaginous Colletotrichum fungus through genetic transformation using the yeast CtDGAT2b gene under model-optimized growth condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prabuddha; Mall, Nikunj; Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Chakraborty, Monami; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2014-01-01

    Oleaginous fungi are of special interest among microorganisms for the production of lipid feedstocks as they can be cultured on a variety of substrates, particularly waste lingocellulosic materials, and few fungal strains are reported to accumulate inherently higher neutral lipid than bacteria or microalgae. Previously, we have characterized an endophytic filamentous fungus Colletotrichum sp. DM06 that can produce total lipid ranging from 34% to 49% of its dry cell weight (DCW) upon growing with various carbon sources and nutrient-stress conditions. In the present study, we report on the genetic transformation of this fungal strain with the CtDGAT2b gene, which encodes for a catalytically efficient isozyme of type-2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) from oleaginous yeast Candida troplicalis SY005. Besides the increase in size of lipid bodies, total lipid titer by the transformed Colletotrichum (lipid content ∼73% DCW) was found to be ∼1.7-fold more than the wild type (lipid content ∼38% DCW) due to functional activity of the CtDGAT2b transgene when grown under standard condition of growth without imposition of any nutrient-stress. Analysis of lipid fractionation revealed that the neutral lipid titer in transformants increased up to 1.8-, 1.6- and 1.5-fold compared to the wild type when grown under standard, nitrogen stress and phosphorus stress conditions, respectively. Lipid titer of transformed cells was further increased to 1.7-fold following model-based optimization of culture conditions. Taken together, ∼2.9-fold higher lipid titer was achieved in Colletotrichum fungus due to overexpression of a rate-limiting crucial enzyme of lipid biosynthesis coupled with prediction-based bioprocess optimization.

  19. The effects of mixture commercial live bakers’ yeast and probiotic bacillus on growth and feeding performance and survival rate of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix larvae via bioencapsulated Artemia urmiana nauplii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Adineh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (Valenciennes, 1844 larvae is an important species forfreshwater aquaculture. This study evaluated the effects of feeding a blend of probiotic bacilli bacteria(B. polymixa, B. licheniformis, B. circulans and baker´s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth and feeding parameters and survival rate of Silver carp larvae. Artemia urmiana (Gǘnther, 1899 nauplii is an important live food that was used as a vector to carry probiotic bacillus to digestive tract of silver carp larvae. The fish larvae were fed at a level of 10 percent body weight at 4 times a day for 30 days. Fish larvae in experimental treatments were fed A. urmiana nauplii that were enriched by blend of 50 percent of Bacillus spp. with concentrations of 1×105, 2×105, 3×105 and 4×105 CFU mL-1 and 50 percent of baker´s yeast with concentrations of 1×105, 2×105, 3×105 and 4×105 cellsmL-1 (T1, T2, T3, T4, respectively and were compared to fish larvae fed control diets of unbioencapsulated A. urmiananauplii. The experiment indicated that feeding and growth parameters in fish fed experimental treatments were significantly higher than fish fed control diets (P<0.05 but survival rate did not significantly differ. Overall, the best group was fed the highest level of yeast and probiotic.

  20. Wheat Growth and Photosynthesis as Affected by Oxytetracycline as a Soil Contaminant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhao-Jun; XIE Xiao-Yu; ZHANG Shu-Qing; LIANG Yong-Chao

    2011-01-01

    Extensive worldwide use of oxytetracycline (OTC), a member of the tetracyclines, has resulted in its accumulation in soils, posing a potential risk to food production and safety. A pair of OTC-sensitive (Heyou 1) and OTC-tolerant (Yannong 21) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars was compared hydroponically at 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 mmol L-1 OTC in terms of wheat growth and photosynthesis. Biomass and shoot length decreased significantly with the addition of OTC, with the decreases in dry biomass and shoot length being 5.61%-13.75% and 3.33%-8.57% larger, respectively, for Heyou 1 than Yannong 21. Photosynthesis of Heyou 1 was suppressed by OTC as indicated by the significant decreases in photosynthetic rate (PN), transpiration rate (TR), and stomatal conductance (GS) and the significant increase in intercellular CO2 concentrations (CI), at all OTC levels. Stomatal limitation (LS)and water use efficiencies (WUE) of Heyou 1 also increased significantly, but not at 0.08 mmol L-1 OTC. However, photosynthesis of Yannong 21 was suppressed by OTC only at high OTC levels from 0.02 to 0.08 mmol L- 1 as indicated by the decreases in PN, GS,TR, and LS; at 0.01 mmol L-1 OTC, PN, CI, GS, and TR significantly increased. It was noted that WUE of Yannong 21 was not affected by OTC addition. The results from this hydroponic test suggested that OTC had a potential risk to crop growth through inhibition of photosynthesis, requiring further confirmation with soil tests.

  1. Gold- and silver nanoparticles affect the growth characteristics of human embryonic neural precursor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Söderstjerna

    Full Text Available Rapid development of nanotechnologies and their applications in clinical research have raised concerns about the adverse effects of nanoparticles (NPs on human health and environment. NPs can be directly taken up by organs exposed, but also translocated to secondary organs, such as the central nervous system (CNS after systemic- or subcutaneous administration, or via the olfactory system. The CNS is particularly vulnerable during development and recent reports describe transport of NPs across the placenta and even into brain tissue using in vitro and in vivo experimental systems. Here, we investigated whether well-characterized commercial 20 and 80 nm Au- and AgNPs have an effect on human embryonic neural precursor cell (HNPC growth. After two weeks of NP exposure, uptake of NPs, morphological features and the amount of viable and dead cells, proliferative cells (Ki67 immunostaining and apoptotic cells (TUNEL assay, respectively, were studied. We demonstrate uptake of both 20 and 80 nm Au- and AgNPs respectively, by HNPCs during proliferation. A significant effect on the sphere size- and morphology was found for all cultures exposed to Au- and AgNPs. AgNPs of both sizes caused a significant increase in numbers of proliferating and apoptotic HNPCs. In contrast, only the highest dose of 20 nm AuNPs significantly affected proliferation, whereas no effect was seen on apoptotic cell death. Our data demonstrates that both Au- and AgNPs interfere with the growth profile of HNPCs, indicating the need of further detailed studies on the adverse effects of NPs on the developing CNS.

  2. Individual heterogeneity and offspring sex affect the growth-reproduction trade-off in a mammal with indeterminate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélin, Uriel; Wilson, Michelle E; Cripps, Jemma; Coulson, Graeme; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction can lead to a trade-off with growth, particularly when individuals reproduce before completing body growth. Kangaroos have indeterminate growth and may always face this trade-off. We combined an experimental manipulation of reproductive effort and multi-year monitoring of a large sample size of marked individuals in two populations of eastern grey kangaroos to test the predictions (1) that reproduction decreases skeletal growth and mass gain and (2) that mass loss leads to reproductive failure. We also tested if sex-allocation strategies influenced these trade-offs. Experimental reproductive suppression revealed negative effects of reproduction on mass gain and leg growth from 1 year to the next. Unmanipulated females, however, showed a positive correlation between number of days lactating and leg growth over periods of 2 years and longer, suggesting that over the long term, reproductive costs were masked by individual heterogeneity in resource acquisition. Mass gain was necessary for reproductive success the subsequent year. Although mothers of daughters generally lost more mass than females nursing sons, mothers in poor condition experienced greater mass gain and arm growth if they had daughters than if they had sons. The strong links between individual mass changes and reproduction suggest that reproductive tactics are strongly resource-dependent.

  3. The homologous putative GTPases Grn1p from fission yeast and the human GNL3L are required for growth and play a role in processing of nucleolar pre-rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xianming; Rao, Malireddi R K Subba; Chen, Xue Qin; Wu, Wei; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy; Balasundaram, David

    2006-01-01

    Grn1p from fission yeast and GNL3L from human cells, two putative GTPases from the novel HSR1_MMR1 GTP-binding protein subfamily with circularly permuted G-motifs play a critical role in maintaining normal cell growth. Deletion of Grn1 resulted in a severe growth defect, a marked reduction in mature rRNA species with a concomitant accumulation of the 35S pre-rRNA transcript, and failure to export the ribosomal protein Rpl25a from the nucleolus. Deleting any of the Grn1p G-domain motifs resulted in a null phenotype and nuclear/nucleolar localization consistent with the lack of nucleolar export of preribosomes accompanied by a distortion of nucleolar structure. Heterologous expression of GNL3L in a Deltagrn1 mutant restored processing of 35S pre-rRNA, nuclear export of Rpl25a and cell growth to wild-type levels. Genetic complementation in yeast and siRNA knockdown in HeLa cells confirmed the homologous proteins Grn1p and GNL3L are required for growth. Failure of two similar HSR1_MMR1 putative nucleolar GTPases, Nucleostemin (NS), or the dose-dependent response of breast tumor autoantigen NGP-1, to rescue deltagrn1 implied the highly specific roles of Grn1p or GNL3L in nucleolar events. Our analysis uncovers an important role for Grn1p/GNL3L within this unique group of nucleolar GTPases.

  4. Severe dietary lysine restriction affects growth and body composition and hepatic gene expression for nitrogen metabolism in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Lee, K S; Kwon, D-H; Bong, J J; Jeong, J Y; Nam, Y S; Lee, M S; Liu, X; Baik, M

    2014-02-01

    Dietary lysine restriction may differentially affect body growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism, depending on the degree of lysine restriction. This study was conducted to examine the effect of dietary lysine restriction on growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism with two different degree of lysine restriction. Isocaloric amino acid-defined diets containing 1.4% lysine (adequate), 0.70% lysine (50% moderate lysine restriction) and 0.35% lysine (75% severe lysine restriction) were fed from the age of 52 to 77 days for 25 days in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The 75% severe lysine restriction increased (p muscle lipid contents and abdominal fat accumulation, increased (p  0.05) affect body growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism. Our results demonstrate that severe 75% lysine restriction has detrimental effects on body growth and deregulate lipid and nitrogen metabolism.

  5. Pre-Analytical Parameters Affecting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Measurement in Plasma: Identifying Confounders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Walz

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A is intensively investigated in various medical fields. However, comparing VEGF-A measurements is difficult because sample acquisition and pre-analytic procedures differ between studies. We therefore investigated which variables act as confounders of VEGF-A measurements.Following a standardized protocol, blood was taken at three clinical sites from six healthy participants (one male and one female participant at each center twice one week apart. The following pre-analytical parameters were varied in order to analyze their impact on VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant (EDTA vs. PECT / CTAD, cannula (butterfly vs. neonatal, type of centrifuge (swing-out vs. fixed-angle, time before and after centrifugation, filling level (completely filled vs. half-filled tubes and analyzing method (ELISA vs. multiplex bead array. Additionally, intrapersonal variations over time and sex differences were explored. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear regression model.The following parameters were identified as statistically significant independent confounders of VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant, centrifuge, analyzing method and sex of the proband. The following parameters were no significant confounders in our data set: intrapersonal variation over one week, cannula, time before and after centrifugation and filling level of collection tubes.VEGF-A measurement results can be affected significantly by the identified pre-analytical parameters. We recommend the use of CTAD anticoagulant, a standardized type of centrifuge and one central laboratory using the same analyzing method for all samples.

  6. The GI-CDF module of Arabidopsis affects freezing tolerance and growth as well as flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornara, Fabio; de Montaigu, Amaury; Sánchez-Villarreal, Alfredo; Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Huettel, Bruno; Davis, Seth J; Coupland, George

    2015-03-01

    Plants monitor and integrate temperature, photoperiod and light quality signals to respond to continuous changes in their environment. The GIGANTEA (GI) protein is central in diverse signaling pathways, including photoperiodic, sugar and light signaling pathways, stress responses and circadian clock regulation. Previously, GI was shown to activate expression of the key floral regulators CONSTANS (CO) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) by facilitating degradation of a family of CYCLING DOF FACTOR (CDF) transcriptional repressors. However, whether CDFs are implicated in other processes affected by GI remains unclear. We investigated the contribution of the GI-CDF module to traits that depend on GI. Transcriptome profiling indicated that mutations in GI and the CDF genes have antagonistic effects on expression of a wider set of genes than CO and FT, whilst other genes are regulated by GI independently of the CDFs. Detailed expression studies followed by phenotypic assays showed that the CDFs function downstream of GI, influencing responses to freezing temperatures and growth, but are not necessary for proper clock function. Thus GI-mediated regulation of CDFs contributes to several processes in addition to flowering, but is not implicated in all of the traits influenced by GI. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Ice cover affects the growth of a stream-dwelling fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watz, Johan; Bergman, Eva; Piccolo, John J; Greenberg, Larry

    2016-05-01

    Protection provided by shelter is important for survival and affects the time and energy budgets of animals. It has been suggested that in fresh waters at high latitudes and altitudes, surface ice during winter functions as overhead cover for fish, reducing the predation risk from terrestrial piscivores. We simulated ice cover by suspending plastic sheeting over five 30-m-long stream sections in a boreal forest stream and examined its effects on the growth and habitat use of brown trout (Salmo trutta) during winter. Trout that spent the winter under the artificial ice cover grew more than those in the control (uncovered) sections. Moreover, tracking of trout tagged with passive integrated transponders showed that in the absence of the artificial ice cover, habitat use during the day was restricted to the stream edges, often under undercut banks, whereas under the simulated ice cover condition, trout used the entire width of the stream. These results indicate that the presence of surface ice cover may improve the energetic status and broaden habitat use of stream fish during winter. It is therefore likely that reductions in the duration and extent of ice cover due to climate change will alter time and energy budgets, with potentially negative effects on fish production.

  8. Maternal Stress Affects Fetal Growth but Not Developmental Instability in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Bots

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental instability (DI, often measured by fluctuating asymmetry (FA or the frequency of phenodeviants (fPD, is thought to increase with stress. However, specifically for stressors of maternal origin, evidence of such negative associations with DI is scarce. Whereas effects of maternal stress on DI have predominately been examined retroactively in humans, very little is known from experiments with well-defined stress levels in animal model systems. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of maternal exposure to three doses (plus a control of a toxic compound affecting maternal condition on DI of their offspring in rabbits. Presence of maternal stress induced by the treatment was confirmed by a decrease in food consumption and weight gain of gravid females in the medium and high dose. Major abnormalities and mortality were unaffected by dose, suggesting the lack of toxic effects of the compound on the offspring. In spite of string maternal stress, offspring FA did not increase with dose. The treatment did lead to elevated fPD, but most were transient, reflecting growth retardation. Furthermore, a consistent association between fPD and FA was absent. These findings indicate that DI is not increased by maternal stress in this animal model.

  9. Prevalence of yeasts in English full blood mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różański, Paweł; Slaska, Brygida; Różańska, Dorota

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was a quantitative and qualitative analysis of microflora, presentation of current data about prevalence of the microflora on the skin and mucous membranes, and determination of its possible effect on reproduction of English full blood horses bred in Poland. The material for analyses was sampled from the skin and mucous membranes (385 samples) of 55 English full blood mares. Taking into account reproduction traits, the mares were classified into three groups. Six yeast-like species, including five species from the genus Candida (C. albicans, C. guiliermondii, C. lusitaniae, C. sp., and C. tropicalis) and Trichomonascus ciferrii, were detected on the skin and mucous membranes in the English full blood mares. Growth of yeasts was observed in more than half of the samples taken from mares that had foaled and approximately 46 % of non-conceiving and barren mares. The high prevalence of various yeast strains in the mouth, nostrils, and collateral groove may suggest widespread occurrence of the microflora in the breeding environment. The results obtained indicate that the yeasts isolated in this study may be components of the normal microflora of the skin and mucous membranes in horses. The analysis results do not indicate unambiguously that the isolated microflora affects reproduction in mares, although this cannot be excluded.

  10. Construction of a lactose-assimilating strain of baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, A C; Prieto, J A; Rubio-Texeira, M; Polaina, J

    1999-09-30

    A recombinant strain of baker's yeast has been constructed which can assimilate lactose efficiently. This strain has been designed to allow its propagation in whey, the byproduct resulting from cheese-making. The ability to metabolize lactose is conferred by the functional expression of two genes from Kluyveromyces lactis, LAC12 and LAC4, which encode a lactose permease and a beta-galactosidase, respectively. To make the recombinant strain more acceptable for its use in bread-making, the genetic transformation of the host baker's yeast was carried out with linear fragments of DNA of defined sequence, carrying as the only heterologous material the coding regions of the two K. lactis genes. Growth of the new strain on cheese whey affected neither the quality of bread nor the yeast gassing power. The significance of the newly developed strain is two-fold: it affords a cheap alternative to the procedure generally used for the propagation of baker's yeast, and it offers a profitable use for cheese whey.

  11. Patchy Distributions of Competitors Affect the Growth of a Clonal Plant When the Competitor Density Is High

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Xue; Lin Huang; Bi-Cheng Dong; Ming-Xiang Zhang; Fei-Hai Yu

    2013-01-01

    Environments are patchy in not only abiotic factors but also biotic ones. Many studies have examined effects of spatial heterogeneity in abiotic factors such as light, water and nutrients on the growth of clonal plants, but few have tested those in biotic factors. We conducted a greenhouse experiment to examine how patchy distributions of competitors affect the growth of a rhizomatous wetland plant Bolboschoenus planiculmis and whether such effects depend on the density of the competitors. We...

  12. Increasing water stress negatively affects pear fruit growth by reducing first its xylem and then its phloem inflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Brunella; Losciale, Pasquale; Manfrini, Luigi; Zibordi, Marco; Anconelli, Stefano; Galli, Fabio; Pierpaoli, Emanuele; Corelli Grappadelli, Luca

    2014-10-15

    Drought stress negatively affects many physiological parameters and determines lower yields and fruit size. This paper investigates on the effects of prolonged water restriction on leaf gas exchanges, water relations and fruit growth on a 24-h time-scale in order to understand how different physiological processes interact to each other to face increasing drought stress and affect pear productive performances during the season. The diurnal patterns of tree water relations, leaf gas exchanges, fruit growth, fruit vascular and transpiration flows were monitored at about 50, 95 and 145 days after full bloom (DAFB) on pear trees of the cv. Abbé Fétel, subjected to two irrigation regimes, corresponding to a water restitution of 100% and 25% of the estimated Etc, respectively. Drought stress progressively increased during the season due to lower soil tensions and higher daily vapour pressure deficits (VPDs). Stem water potential was the first parameter to be negatively affected by stress and determined the simultaneous reduction of fruit xylem flow, which at 95 DAFB was reflected by a decrease in fruit daily growth. Leaf photosynthesis was reduced only from 95 DAFB on, but was not immediately reflected by a decrease in fruit phloem flow, which instead was reduced only at 145 DAFB. This work shows how water stress negatively affects pear fruit growth by reducing first its xylem and then its phloem inflow. This determines a progressive increase in the phloem relative contribution to growth, which lead to the typical higher dry matter percentages of stressed fruit.

  13. Growth substrates and caleosin-mediated functions affect conidial virulence in the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Fan, Yanhua; Garrett, Timothy; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2016-11-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, is a microbial biological control agent capable of infecting a wide range of insect hosts. Conidia (spores) initiate infection via adhesion, growth and penetration of the insect cuticle, whose outmost layer is rich in lipids. Conidial virulence was investigated in B. bassiana WT and caleosin mutants (ΔBbcal1), the latter a protein involved in lipid storage and turnover. Topical insect bioassays revealed that conidia of the WT strain showed up to 40-fold differences in LD50 values depending upon the growth substrate. The most virulent conidia were harvested from potato dextrose agar containing oleic acid, and the least potent were those derived from Sabouraud dextrose/yeast extract agar (SDAY). However, with the exception of conidia derived from SDAY and Czapek Dox agar, in which values were reduced, mean lethal times to kill (LT50) were essentially unaffected. In topical bioassays, the ΔBbcal1 mutant displayed LD50 values 5-40-fold higher than the WT depending upon the growth substrate, with ΔBbcal1 conidia derived from SDAY unable to effectively penetrate the host cuticle. The ΔBbcal1 mutant also showed concomitant dramatic increases in LT50 values from a mean of ~4.5 for WT to >8.5 days for the mutant. In contrast, intrahaemocoel injection bioassays that bypass cuticle penetration events revealed only minor effects on virulence for either WT or ΔBbcal1 conidia. These data highlight the importance of caleosin-dependent lipid mobilization and/or signalling in cuticle penetration events but suggest their dispensability for immune evasion and within-host growth.

  14. Endogenous abscisic acid promotes hypocotyl growth and affects endoreduplication during dark-induced growth in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplík, Jan F; Bergougnoux, Véronique; Jandová, Michaela; Šimura, Jan; Pěnčík, Aleš; Tomanec, Ondřej; Rolčík, Jakub; Novák, Ondřej; Fellner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Dark-induced growth (skotomorphogenesis) is primarily characterized by rapid elongation of the hypocotyl. We have studied the role of abscisic acid (ABA) during the development of young tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings. We observed that ABA deficiency caused a reduction in hypocotyl growth at the level of cell elongation and that the growth in ABA-deficient plants could be improved by treatment with exogenous ABA, through which the plants show a concentration dependent response. In addition, ABA accumulated in dark-grown tomato seedlings that grew rapidly, whereas seedlings grown under blue light exhibited low growth rates and accumulated less ABA. We demonstrated that ABA promotes DNA endoreduplication by enhancing the expression of the genes encoding inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases SlKRP1 and SlKRP3 and by reducing cytokinin levels. These data were supported by the expression analysis of the genes which encode enzymes involved in ABA and CK metabolism. Our results show that ABA is essential for the process of hypocotyl elongation and that appropriate control of the endogenous level of ABA is required in order to drive the growth of etiolated seedlings.

  15. Numerical study of how creep and progressive stiffening affect the growth stress formation in trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Dahlblom, O.; Johansson, M.

    2010-01-01

    clearly show how the growth stresses are progressively generated during the tree growth. The inner core becomes more and more compressed whereas the outer sapwood is subjected to slightly increased tension. The parametric study shows that the growth stresses are highly influenced by the creep behaviour...

  16. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Aloe; Patrizia Bianchi; Alberto De Bellis; Marzia Soligo; Maria Luisa Rocco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an in-creased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deifcits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells.

  17. Compensatory growth strategies are affected by the strength of environmental time constraints in anuran larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orizaola, Germán; Dahl, Emma; Laurila, Anssi

    2014-01-01

    Organisms normally grow at a sub-maximal rate. After experiencing a period of arrested growth, individuals often show compensatory growth responses by modifying their life-history, behaviour and physiology. However, the strength of compensatory responses may vary across broad geographic scales as populations differ in their exposition to varying time constraints. We examined differences in compensatory growth strategies in common frog (Rana temporaria) populations from southern and northern Sweden. Tadpoles from four populations were reared in the laboratory and exposed to low temperature to evaluate the patterns and mechanisms of compensatory growth responses. We determined tadpoles' growth rate, food intake and growth efficiency during the compensation period. In the absence of arrested growth conditions, tadpoles from all the populations showed similar (size-corrected) growth rates, food intake and growth efficiency. After being exposed to low temperature for 1 week, only larvae from the northern populations increased growth rates by increasing both food intake and growth efficiency. These geographic differences in compensatory growth mechanisms suggest that the strategies for recovering after a period of growth deprivation may depend on the strength of time constraints faced by the populations. Due to the costs of fast growth, only populations exposed to the strong time constraints are prone to develop fast recovering strategies in order to metamorphose before conditions deteriorate. Understanding how organisms balance the cost and benefits of growth strategies may help in forecasting the impact of fluctuating environmental conditions on life-history strategies of populations likely to be exposed to increasing environmental variation in the future.

  18. Nutritional factors affecting growth of muscle and adipose tissue in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, F M

    1982-07-01

    Patterns of tissue growth determine composition of growth, and over intervals of time, these patterns of tissue growth will also be reflected in total tissue accumulated in the animal. Although patterns of tissue growth may be modified by the effects of specific carbon sources through direct impact on lipogenesis, the primary avenue through which nutritional factors regulate or direct protein and fat deposition is through effects of total absorbed energy provided on rates of growth in relation to an animal's daily needs for maintenance and protein growth. Even though mature size and genetic potential establish the maximum upper limits for daily protein growth, other factors determine the extent to which these theoretical limits will ever be achieved. The actual partitioning of absorbed nutrients between protein and fat deposition also depends on other factors, including stage of growth, sex class, hormonal regulation (endogenous and exogenous), and intake of required nutrients. The sex class of an animal establishes different biological limits for bulls, steers, and heifers that are otherwise similar in mature size, genetics, and nutritional adequacy. Also, the use of anabolic agents alters the physiological limit for daily protein growth at the cellular level and allows an animal to deposit protein at rates closer to theoretical genetic limits. Energy that is provided above maintenance and protein growth requirements enhances rates of lipid deposition and accumulation of fat. As a consequence, the rate of growth will direct these tissue responses, and effects of diet, energy level, level of nutrition, and plane of nutrition will impact composition of growth primarily through acceleration of rate of growth above daily limits for protein growth. Changes in tissue storage will impact total body composition to the extent of time and differential in composition of gain and of tissue present.

  19. Embryonic zebrafish neuronal growth is not affected by an applied electric field in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Peter; Robinson, Kenneth R

    2007-01-10

    Naturally occurring electric fields (EFs) have been implicated in cell guidance during embryonic development and adult wound healing. Embryonic Xenopus laevis neurons sprout preferentially towards the cathode, turn towards the cathode, and migrate faster towards the cathode in the presence of an external EF in vitro. A recent Phase 1 clinical trial has investigated the effects of oscillating EFs on human spinal cord regeneration. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether embryonic zebrafish neurons respond to an applied EF, and thus extend this research into another vertebrate system. Neural tubes of zebrafish embryos (16-17 somites) were dissected and dissociated neuroblasts were plated onto laminin-coated glass. A 100 mV/mm EF was applied to cell cultures for 4 or 20 h and the responses of neurons to the applied EFs were investigated. After 4h in an EF neurites were significantly shorter than control neurites. No other statistically significant effects were observed. After 20 h, control and EF-exposed neurites were no different in length. No length difference was seen between cathodally- and anodally-sprouted neurites. Application of an EF did not affect the average number of neurons in a chamber. Growth cones did not migrate preferentially towards either pole of the EF and no asymmetry was seen in neurite sprout sites. We conclude that zebrafish neurons do not respond to a 100 mV/mm applied EF in vitro. This suggests that neurons of other vertebrate species may not respond to applied EFs in the same ways as Xenopus laevis neurons.

  20. Freezing adversely affects measurement of vascular endothelial growth factor levels in human aqueous samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankarathi Balaiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sankarathi Balaiya Sandeep Grover Ravi K Murthy Kakarla V ChalamDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USAPurpose: Aqueous levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF can be a surrogate marker of intraocular VEGF activity and a measure of efficacy of anti-VEGF treatment in a variety of vasoproliferative retinal disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and central retinal vein occlusion. Measurement of the VEGF level may be adversely affected by premeasurement variables, such as freezing and delay, in sample analysis. We aim to evaluate the effect of storage and delayed measurement of human aqueous VEGF levels in these conditions.Methods: Aqueous samples collected from patients receiving intravitreal injection of bevacizumab for various retinal diseases were divided into two groups. In Group 1, the VEGF levels were analyzed on the same day; in Group 2, the VEGF levels were analyzed after 21 days of freezer storage (-80°C using immunobead assay. Statistical comparison using a paired t-test was performed between the two groups.Results: Thirty-one aqueous humor samples were collected, and the VEGF concentration for fresh samples was 7.8 ± 5.9 pg/mL (mean ± SD compared to 6.5 ± 6.0 pg/mL in frozen samples, resulting in a statistically significant difference (P = 0.03.Conclusions: Accurate measurement of the VEGF level is a vital component of clinical decision-making. Delayed analysis of VEGF levels in aqueous samples may result in significant sample degradation and lower levels of measured VEGF.Keywords: VEGF level, aqueous humor, immunobead assay, VEGF storage

  1. The timing of "catch-up growth" affects metabolism and appetite regulation in male rats born with intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupé, Bérengère; Grit, Isabelle; Darmaun, Dominique; Parnet, Patricia

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrated a relationship between low birth weight mainly caused by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and adult metabolic disorders. The concept of metabolic programming centers on the idea that nutritional and hormonal status during the key period of development determines the long-term control of energy balance by programming future feeding behavior and energy expenditure. The present study examined the consequence of early or late "catch-up growth" after IUGR on feeding behavior and metabolic cues of male offspring of rat dams exposed to protein restriction during gestation and/or lactation. Our results suggest that early catch-up growth may be favorable for fasting metabolic parameters at weaning, as no differences were observed on plasma leptin, triglyceride, glucose, and insulin levels compared with controls. In contrast, if pups remained malnourished until weaning, low insulin concentration was detected and was accompanied by hyperphagia associated with a large increase in hypothalamic NPY and AgRP mRNA expression. At adult age, on a regular chow diet, only the meal structure was modified by fetal programming. The two IUGR groups demonstrated a reduced meal duration that enhanced the speed of food ingestion and consequently increased the rest period associated to the satiety state without changes in the hypothalamic expression of appetite neuropeptides. Our findings demonstrate that in IUGR, regardless of postnatal growth magnitude, metabolic programming occurred in utero and was responsible for both feeding behavior alteration and postprandial higher insulin level in adults. Additionally, catch-up growth immediately after early malnutrition could be a key point for the programming of postprandial hyperleptinemia.

  2. The effects of menhaden oil, flaxseed oil and a dairy-yeast prebiotic on growth , health , feed conversion , survival , critical maximum temperature, and body composition of sunshine bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 12-week feeding trial was conducted with juvenile "sunshine bass" female Morone chrysops x male M. saxatilis using four diets containing two levels of a dairy-yeast prebiotic (0 or 2%) and either menhaden fish oil or flaxseed oil as a lipid source. The objective was to determine the main and inte...

  3. Isolated isoflavones do not affect the circulating insulin-like growth factor system in men at increased colorectal cancer risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Rookus, M.A.; Kampman, E.; Bonfrer, J.M.G.; Korse, C.M.; Doorn, J. van; Lampe, J.W.; Cats, A.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Veer, L.J. van 't; Voskuil, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that increased insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations are related to increased colorectal cancer risk. A reduced colorectal cancer risk has been associated with isoflavones, which might affect the IGF-system because of their weak estrogenic activity. We

  4. Isolated Isoflavones do not affect the circulating insulin-like growth factor system in men at increased colorectal cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Rookus, M.A.; Kampman, E.; Bonfrer, J.M.G.; Korse, C.M.; Doorn, van J.; Lampe, J.W.; Cats, A.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Leeuwen, van F.E.; van't Veer, L.J.; Voskuil, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that increased insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations are related to increased colorectal cancer risk. A reduced colorectal cancer risk has been associated with isoflavones, which might affect the IGF-system because of their weak estrogenic activity. We

  5. Isolated Isoflavones do not affect the circulating insulin-like growth factor system in men at increased colorectal cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Rookus, M.A.; Kampman, E.; Bonfrer, J.M.G.; Korse, C.M.; Doorn, van J.; Lampe, J.W.; Cats, A.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Leeuwen, van F.E.; van't Veer, L.J.; Voskuil, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that increased insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations are related to increased colorectal cancer risk. A reduced colorectal cancer risk has been associated with isoflavones, which might affect the IGF-system because of their weak estrogenic activity. We conduc

  6. Expression of Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors in yeast under stress conditions reveals that HopX1 attenuates activation of the high osmolarity glycerol MAP kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Dor; Bosis, Eran; Dar, Daniel; Nachman, Iftach; Sessa, Guido

    2012-11-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) is the causal agent of speck disease in tomato. Pst pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system that delivers effector proteins into host cells, where they promote disease by manipulating processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Previous studies identified seven Pst effectors that inhibit growth when expressed in yeast under normal growth conditions, suggesting that they interfere with cellular processes conserved in yeast and plants. We hypothesized that effectors also target conserved cellular processes that are required for yeast growth only under stress conditions. We therefore examined phenotypes induced by expression of Pst effectors in yeast grown in the presence of various stressors. Out of 29 effectors tested, five (HopX1, HopG1, HopT1-1, HopH1 and AvrPtoB) displayed growth inhibition phenotypes only in combination with stress conditions. Viability assays revealed that the HopX1 effector caused loss of cell viability under prolonged osmotic stress. Using transcription reporters, we found that HopX1 attenuated the activation of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is responsible for yeast survival under osmotic stress, while other MAPK pathways were mildly affected by HopX1. Interestingly, HopX1-mediated phenotypes in yeast were dependent on the putative transglutaminase catalytic triad of the effector. This study enlarges the pool of phenotypes available for the functional analysis of Pst type III effectors in yeast, and exemplifies how analysis of phenotypes detected in yeast under stress conditions can lead to the identification of eukaryotic cellular processes affected by bacterial effectors.

  7. Impact of pitching rate on yeast fermentation performance and beer flavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, P J; Dekoninck, T M L; Saerens, S M G; Van Mulders, S E; Thevelein, J M; Delvaux, F R

    2009-02-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e. higher inoculum size). However, the impact of the pitching rate on crucial fermentation and beer quality parameters has never been assessed systematically. In this study, five pitching rates were applied to lab-scale fermentations to investigate its impact on the yeast physiology and beer quality. The fermentation rate increased significantly and the net yeast growth was lowered with increasing pitching rate, without affecting significantly the viability and the vitality of the yeast population. The build-up of unsaturated fatty acids in the initial phase of the fermentation was repressed when higher yeast concentrations were pitched. The expression levels of the genes HSP104 and HSP12 and the concentration of trehalose were higher with increased pitching rates, suggesting a moderate exposure to stress in case of higher cell concentrations. The influence of pitching rate on aroma compound production was rather limited, with the exception of total diacetyl levels, which strongly increased with the pitching rate. These results demonstrate that most aspects of the yeast physiology and flavour balance are not significantly or negatively affected when the pitching rate is changed. However, further research is needed to fully optimise the conditions for brewing beer with high cell density populations.

  8. Survival of the functional yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus B0399 in fermented milk with added sorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanelli, G; Verardo, V; Pasini, F; Cavina, P; Lanciotti, R; Caboni, M F; Gardini, F; Montanari, C

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the survival of the functional yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus B0399 in an industrially produced fermented milk was evaluated. In particular, the yeast viability was assessed throughout the entire shelf-life of the product (30 d) to ensure the presence of the effective yeast dose (20 million viable cells for each serving of 125 g) while avoiding, by sorbic acid addition, yeast growth, which could affect product quality and stability. To find the best combination of yeast and sorbic acid concentration, 13 different combinations were tested, and then 2 of them were chosen for industrial production. In production at lower concentrations (30 million viable cells, 150 mg/kg of sorbic acid) the effective dose was maintained only at 4 and 6°C, whereas at higher dosages (70 million viable cells, 250 mg/kg of sorbic acid) the effect of temperature was less evident. In all the trials, the concentration of sorbic acid was not affected by microbial metabolism and remained stable throughout the entire shelf-life.

  9. Factors affecting the course of body and kidney growth in infants with urolithiasis: A critical long-term evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Sarica

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the possible effects of dietary, patient and stone related factors on the clinical course of the stone disease as well as the body and renal growth status of the infants. Patients and Methods: A total of 50 children with an history of stone disease during infancy period were studied. Patient (anatomical abnormalities, urinary tract infection - UTI, associated morbidities, stone (obstruction, UTI and required interventions and lastly dietary (duration of sole breast feeding, formula feeding related factors which may affect the clinical course of the disease were all evaluated for their effects on the body and renal growth during long-term follow-up. Results: Mean age of the children was 2.40 ± 2.65 years. Our findings demonstrated that infants receiving longer period of breast feeding without formula addition seemed to have a higher rate of normal growth percentile values when compared with the other children. Again, higher frequency of UTI and stone attacks affected the growth status of the infants in a remarkable manner than the other cases. Our findings also demonstrated that thorough a close follow-up and appropriately taken measures; the possible growth retardation as well as renal growth problems could be avoided in children beginning to suffer from stone disease during infancy period. Conclusions: Duration of breast feeding, frequency of UTI, number of stone attacks and stone removal procedures are crucial factors for the clinical course of stone disease in infants that may affect the body as well as kidney growth during long-term follow-up.

  10. Milk and Protein Intake by Pregnant Women Affects Growth of Foetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borazjani, Fatemeh; Kulkarni, Shanuak S.

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed the effects of the daily intake of milk and protein by pregnant women on foetal growth and determined the growth pattern and velocity of growth. A total of 504 ultrasound observations from 156 respondents were collected following a cross-sectional design in the last trimester of pregnancy; majority of them were in the last month of pregnancy. De facto and purposive sampling was done, and direct interviews of affluent pregnant women were conducted. Kruskal-Wallis test shows that majority of the respondents had tendency to consume 155.65 to 465.17 mL of milk per day, resulting in better and higher foetal growth. Most respondents consumed about 50-70 g of protein per day, and the foetal growth measurements, such as abdomen-circumference, femur length, biparietal diameter, and head-circumference, on an average, were higher in the same group. Quadratic regression model exhibited that all the traits of growth pattern in Model 1 (low milk and protein intake) appeared to have more mode of decline, in contrast to Model 2 (more milk and protein intake), which shows better growth. In addition, velocity of growth pattern was obtained through the first derivative of quadratic regression of growth pattern. Moreover, 95% confidence interval calculated for regression line slope of Model 1 and Model 2 showed that the estimation point (2 B2) of Model 1 does not lay into 95% CI of Model 2; so, statistical significance assorted and also the same trend conversely hold for Model 2. The rate of growth was highly influenced by maternal milk and protein intake. These findings suggest that contribution of common nutrients or other nutritional factors present in milk and protein promote the growth of foetus. PMID:24592584

  11. Seed yeast cultivation for salad oil manufacturing wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The mixture of five yeast strains obtained from soil could remove about 85% TOC of oil-rich wastewater in batch test.While the highest MLSS was obtained at an N:C of 1:5, the oil removal decreased with the increase of N:C during yeast sludge cultivation. Ammonium chloride was the best nitrogen source for yeast cultivation from the viewpoint of yeast growth and oil utilization. An ammonia concentration of over 1300 mg l-1 led to mass death of yeast at a pH of 5. The ammonia concentration should be controlled at a level of 1000 mg l-1 or lower.

  12. Survey of naturally and conventionally cured commercial frankfurters, ham, and bacon for physio-chemical characteristics that affect bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Gary A; Jackson-Davis, Armitra L; Schrader, Kohl D; Xi, Yuan; Kulchaiyawat, Charlwit; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S

    2012-12-01

    Natural and organic food regulations preclude the use of sodium nitrite/nitrate and other antimicrobials for processed meat products. Consequently, processors have begun to use natural nitrate/nitrite sources, such as celery juice/powder, sea salt, and turbinado sugar, to manufacture natural and organic products with cured meat characteristics but without sodium nitrite. The objective of this study was to compare physio-chemical characteristics that affect Clostridium perfringens and Listeria monocytogenes growth in naturally cured and traditionally cured commercial frankfurters, hams, and bacon. Correlations of specific product characteristics to pathogen growth varied between products and pathogens, though water activity, salt concentration, and product composition (moisture, protein and fat) were common intrinsic factors correlated to pathogen growth across products. Other frequently correlated traits were related to curing reactions such as % cured pigment. Residual nitrite and nitrate were significantly correlated to C. perfringens growth but only for the ham products.

  13. How do Labor Market Institutions affect the Link between Growth and Unemployment: the case of the European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langot, François

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes how the frictions in the labor market simultaneously affect the economic growth and the long run unemployment. To this goal, we develop a schumpeterian model of endogenous growth: agents have the choice between employment and R and D activities. Unemployment is caused by the wage-setting behavior of unions. We show that: (i Increases in the labor costs or in the power of trade unions lead to higher unemployment and lower economic growth. (ii Efficient bargain allows to increase employment, at the price of a lower growth rate. These theoretical predictions are consistent with the insights from our empirical analysis based on 183 European Regions, between 1980-2003

  14. Growth and dry-mass partitioning in tomato as affected by phosphorus nutrition and light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de C.C.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Boogaard, van den R.; Lambers, H.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the effects of phosphorus (P) and light on the physiological and morphological components of growth of young tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Capita). The importance of dry-mass partitioning and starch accumulation in explaining the effects of P limitation on growth was ex

  15. Small doses, big troubles: modeling growth dynamics of organisms affecting microalgal production cultures in closed photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forehead, Hugh I; O'Kelly, Charles J

    2013-02-01

    The destruction of mass cultures of microalgae by biological contamination of culture medium is a pervasive and expensive problem, in industry and research. A mathematical model has been formulated that attempts to explain contaminant growth dynamics in closed photobioreactors (PBRs). The model simulates an initial growth phase without PBR dilution, followed by a production phase in which culture is intermittently removed. Contaminants can be introduced at any of these stages. The model shows how exponential growth from low initial inocula can lead to "explosive" growth in the population of contaminants, appearing days to weeks after inoculation. Principal influences are contaminant growth rate, PBR dilution rate, and the size of initial contaminant inoculum. Predictions corresponded closely with observed behavior of two contaminants, Uronema sp. and Neoparamoeba sp., found in operating PBRs. A simple, cheap and effective protocol was developed for short-term prediction of contamination in PBRs, using microscopy and archived samples.

  16. Role of the placental Vitamin D receptor in modulating feto-placental growth in Fetal growth restriction and Preeclampsia-affected pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma eMurthi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fetal growth restriction (FGR is a common pregnancy complication that affects up to 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Recent studies demonstrate that Vitamin D deficiency is implicated in reduced fetal growth, which may be rescued by supplementation of Vitamin D. Despite this, the pathway(s by which Vitamin D modulate fetal growth remains to be investigated. Our own studies demonstrate that the Vitamin D receptor (VDR is significantly decreased in placentae from human pregnancies complicated by FGR and contributes to abnormal placental trophoblast apoptosis and differentiation and regulation of cell-cycle genes in vitro. Thus, Vitamin D signalling is important for normal placental function and fetal growth. This review discusses the association of Vitamin D with fetal growth, the function of Vitamin D and its receptor in pregnancy, as well as the functional significance of a placental source of Vitamin D in FGR. Additionally, we propose that for Vitamin D to be clinically effective to prevent and manage FGR, the molecular mechanisms of Vitamin D and its receptor in modulating fetal growth requires further investigation.

  17. Role of the Placental Vitamin D Receptor in Modulating Feto-Placental Growth in Fetal Growth Restriction and Preeclampsia-Affected Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, Padma; Yong, Hannah E J; Ngyuen, Thy P H; Ellery, Stacey; Singh, Harmeet; Rahman, Rahana; Dickinson, Hayley; Walker, David W; Davies-Tuck, Miranda; Wallace, Euan M; Ebeling, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a common pregnancy complication that affects up to 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Recent studies demonstrate that Vitamin D deficiency is implicated in reduced fetal growth, which may be rescued by supplementation of Vitamin D. Despite this, the pathway(s) by which Vitamin D modulate fetal growth remains to be investigated. Our own studies demonstrate that the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is significantly decreased in placentae from human pregnancies complicated by FGR and contributes to abnormal placental trophoblast apoptosis and differentiation and regulation of cell-cycle genes in vitro. Thus, Vitamin D signaling is important for normal placental function and fetal growth. This review discusses the association of Vitamin D with fetal growth, the function of Vitamin D and its receptor in pregnancy, as well as the functional significance of a placental source of Vitamin D in FGR. Additionally, we propose that for Vitamin D to be clinically effective to prevent and manage FGR, the molecular mechanisms of Vitamin D and its receptor in modulating fetal growth requires further investigation.

  18. Soil Properties and Wheat Growth and Nutrients as Affected by Compost Amendment Under Saline Water Irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. M. MAHDY

    2011-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to test and compare the suitability of saline compost and saline irrigation water for nutrient status amendment of a slightly productive sandy clay loam soil,to study the macronutrient utilization and dry matter production of wheat (Triticum aestivum c.v.Gemmiza 7) grown in a modified soil environment and to determine the effects of compost and saline irrigation water on soil productivity.The sandy clay loam soil was treated with compost of five rates (0,24,36,48,and 60 m3 ha-1,equivalent to 0,3,4.5,and 6 g kg-1 soil,respectively) and irrigation water of four salinity levels (0.50 (tap water),4.9,6.3,and 8.7 dS m-1).The results indicated that at harvest,the electrical conductivity (EC) of the soil was significantly (P < 0.05) changed by the compost application as compared to thecontrol.In general,the soil salinity significantly increased with increasing application rates of compost.Soluble salts,K,C1,HCO3,Na,Ca,and Mg,were significantly increased by the compost treatment.Soil sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) was significantly affected by the salinity levels of the irrigation water,and showed a slight response to the compost application.The soil organic carbon content was also significantly (P < 0.05) affected by application of compost,with a maximum value of 31.03 g kg-1 recorded at the compost rate of 60 m3 ha-1 and the irrigation water salinity level of 8.7 dS m-1 and a minimum value of 12.05 g kg-1 observed in the control.The compost application produced remarkable increases in wheat shoot dry matter production.The maximum dry matter production (75.11 g pot-1) occurred with 60 m3 ha-1 compost and normal irrigation water,with a minimum of 19.83 g pot-1 with no addition of compost and irrigation water at a salinity level of 8.70 dS m-1.Significant increases in wheat shoot contents of K,N,P,Na,and C1 were observed with addition of compost.The relatively high shoot N values may be attributed to increases in N availability in

  19. Mutational analysis of the yeast RNA helicase Sub2p reveals conserved domains required for growth, mRNA export, and genomic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saguez, Cyril; Gonzales, Fernando A.; Schmid, Manfred; Bøggild, Andreas; Latrick, Chrysa M.; Malagon, Francisco; Putnam, Andrea; Sanderson, Lee; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2013-01-01

    Sub2p/UAP56 is a highly conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase involved in the packaging and nuclear export of mRNA/protein particles (mRNPs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Sub2p is recruited to active chromatin by the pentameric THO complex and incorporated into the larger transcription–export (TREX) complex. Sub2p also plays a role in the maintenance of genome integrity as its inactivation causes severe transcription-dependent recombination of DNA. Despite the central role of Sub2p in early mRNP biology, little is known about its function. Here, we report the presence of an N-terminal motif (NTM) conserved specifically in the Sub2p branch of RNA helicases. Mutation of the NTM causes nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNA and impaired growth without affecting core helicase functions. Thus, the NTM functions as an autonomous unit. Moreover, two sub2 mutants, that are deficient in ATP binding, act in a trans-dominant negative fashion for growth and induce high recombination rates in vivo. Although wild-type Sub2p is prevented access to transcribed loci in such a background, this does not mechanistically explain the phenotype. PMID:23962665

  20. The role of oxygen in yeast metabolism during high cell density brewery fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, P J; Saerens, S M G; Van Mulders, S E; Delvaux, F; Delvaux, F R

    2009-04-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e., higher inoculum size). However, the decreased yeast net growth observed in these high cell density fermentations can have a negative impact on the physiological stability throughout subsequent yeast generations. The use of different oxygen conditions (wort aeration, wort oxygenation, yeast preoxygenation) was investigated to improve the growth yield during high cell density fermentations and yeast metabolic and physiological parameters were assessed systematically. Together with a higher extent of growth (dependent on the applied oxygen conditions), the fermentation power and the formation of unsaturated fatty acids were also affected. Wort oxygenation had a significant decreasing effect on the formation of esters, which was caused by a decreased expression of the alcohol acetyl transferase gene ATF1, compared with the other conditions. Lower glycogen and trehalose levels at the end of fermentation were observed in case of the high cell density fermentations with oxygenated wort and the reference fermentation. The expression levels of BAP2 (encoding the branched chain amino acid permease), ERG1 (encoding squalene epoxidase), and the stress responsive gene HSP12 were predominantly influenced by the high cell concentrations, while OLE1 (encoding the fatty acid desaturase) and the oxidative stress responsive genes SOD1 and CTT1 were mainly affected by the oxygen availability per cell. These results demonstrate that optimisation of high cell density fermentations could be achieved by improving the oxygen conditions, without drastically affecting the physiological condition of the yeast and beer quality.

  1. Effects of wort gravity and nitrogen level on fermentation performance of brewer's yeast and the formation of flavor volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hongjie; Zhao, Haifeng; Yu, Zhimin; Zhao, Mouming

    2012-03-01

    Normal gravity wort and high gravity wort with different nitrogen levels were used to examine their effects on the fermentation performance of brewer's yeast and the formation of flavor volatiles. Results showed that both the wort gravity and nitrogen level had significant impacts on the growth rate, viability, flocculation, and gene expression of brewer's yeast and the levels of flavor volatiles. The sugar (glucose, maltose, and maltotriose) consumption rates and net cell growth decreased when high gravity worts were used, while these increased with increasing nitrogen level. Moreover, high gravity resulted in lower expression levels of ATF1, BAP2, BAT1, HSP12, and TDH, whereas the higher nitrogen level caused higher expression levels for these genes. Furthermore, the lower nitrogen level resulted in increases in the levels of higher alcohols and esters at high wort gravity. All these results demonstrated that yeast physiology and flavor balance during beer brewing were significantly affected by the wort gravity and nitrogen level.

  2. Expression of Bovine Cytosolic 5′-Nucleotidase (cN-II) in Yeast: Nucleotide Pools Disturbance and Its Consequences on Growth and Homologous Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Simone; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Galli, Alvaro; Collavoli, Anita; Pesi, Rossana; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase II is a widespread IMP hydrolyzing enzyme, essential for cell vitality, whose role in nucleotide metabolism and cell function is still to be exactly determined. Cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase overexpression and silencing have both been demonstrated to be toxic for mammalian cultured cells. In order to ascertain the effect of enzyme expression on a well-known eukaryote simple model, we expressed cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which normally hydrolyzes IMP through the action of a nucleotidase with distinct functional and structural features. Heterologous expression was successful. The yeast cells harbouring cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase II displayed a shorter duplication time and a significant modification of purine and pyrimidine derivatives concentration as compared with the control strain. Furthermore the capacity of homologous recombination in the presence of mutagenic compounds of yeast expressing cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase II was markedly impaired. PMID:23691116

  3. Growth model and metabolic activity of brewing yeast biofilm on the surface of spent grains : a biocatalyst for continuous beer fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Brányik, Tomáš; A.A. Vicente; Kuncová, Gabriela; Podrazký, Ondřej; Dostálek, Pavel; Teixeira, J. A

    2004-01-01

    In the continuous systems, such as continuous beer fermentation, immobilized cells are kept inside the bioreactor for long periods of time. Thus an important factor in the design and performance of the immobilized yeast reactor is immobilized cell viability and physiology. Both the decreasing specific glucose consumption rate (Q_im) and intracellular redox potential of the cells immobilized to spent grains during continuous cultivation in bubble-column reactor implied alteratio...

  4. Do variations in leaf phenology affect radial growth variations in Fagus sylvatica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čufar, Katarina; De Luis, Martin; Prislan, Peter; Gričar, Jožica; Črepinšek, Zalika; Merela, Maks; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka

    2015-08-01

    We used a dendrochronological and leaf phenology network of European beech ( Fagus sylvatica) in Slovenia, a transitional area between Mediterranean, Alpine and continental climatic regimes, for the period 1955-2007 to test whether year to year variations in leaf unfolding and canopy duration (i.e. time between leaf unfolding and colouring) influence radial growth (annual xylem production and tree ring widths) and if such influences are more pronounced at higher altitudes. We showed that variability in leaf phenology has no significant effect on variations in radial growth. The results are consistent in the entire region, irrespective of the climatic regime or altitude, although previous studies have shown that leaf phenology and tree ring variation depend on altitude. The lack of relationship between year to year variability in leaf phenology and radial growth may suggest that earlier leaf unfolding—as observed in a previous study—probably does not cause increased tree growth rates in beech in Slovenia.

  5. Fetal heart circumference as a predictor of menstrual age in fetuses affected by disturbances in growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, L M; Guzick, D; Peterson, C; DiNofrio, D; Maloney, J; Nedzeksy, P

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to evaluate the relationship between fetal heart circumference and gestational age and (2) to determine the effect, if any, of disturbances in fetal growth on heart circumference. Heart circumference was measured in 262 women with normal gestations (control group) and in two study groups consisting of 52 large-for-gestational age 32 small-for-gestational age fetuses. Standardized, gestational age-adjusted values in the two study groups were compared with normative data provided by the control group. There was a close correlation (R2 = 0.94) between heart circumference and gestational age in normally growing fetuses. Disturbances of fetal growth (i.e., macrosomia and growth retardation) were found to have an inconsistent effect on heart circumference. Heart circumference cannot be used as an independent parameter for gestational age evaluation in fetuses with disturbances of growth.

  6. Does warming affect growth rate and biomass production of shrubs in the High Arctic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campioli, Matteo; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Albert, Kristian Rost

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have assessed directly the impact of warming on plant growth and biomass production in the High Arctic. Here, we aimed to investigate the impact of 7 years of warming (open greenhouses) on the aboveground relative growth rate (RGR) of Cassiope tetragona and Salix arctica in North......-Eastern Greenland. RGR was assessed for apical (leaves, stem, reproductive organs) and lateral meristems (secondary growth of stem and branches) and accompanied by measures of gross ecosystem production (GEP), branching and tissue carbon (C) concentration. Measurements were based on harvest and biometric methods...... limits the growth of Cassiope but not that of Salix in North-Eastern Greenland. Summer warming thus has the potential to stimulate biomass production in the High Arctic but major species-specific differences are expected....

  7. Modulating F-actin organization induces organ growth by affecting the Hippo pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Sansores-Garcia, Leticia; Bossuyt, Wouter; Wada, Ken-Ichi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Tao, Chunyao; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Halder, Georg

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies actin organization as an upstream regulator of the Hippo pathway: F-actin accumulation promotes Yorkie-dependent transcriptional activation. This modulation of Hippo signalling by actin regulators controls organ growth in Drosophila.

  8. Do variations in leaf phenology affect radial growth variations in Fagus sylvatica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čufar, Katarina; De Luis, Martin; Prislan, Peter; Gričar, Jožica; Črepinšek, Zalika; Merela, Maks; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka

    2015-08-01

    We used a dendrochronological and leaf phenology network of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) in Slovenia, a transitional area between Mediterranean, Alpine and continental climatic regimes, for the period 1955-2007 to test whether year to year variations in leaf unfolding and canopy duration (i.e. time between leaf unfolding and colouring) influence radial growth (annual xylem production and tree ring widths) and if such influences are more pronounced at higher altitudes. We showed that variability in leaf phenology has no significant effect on variations in radial growth. The results are consistent in the entire region, irrespective of the climatic regime or altitude, although previous studies have shown that leaf phenology and tree ring variation depend on altitude. The lack of relationship between year to year variability in leaf phenology and radial growth may suggest that earlier leaf unfolding--as observed in a previous study--probably does not cause increased tree growth rates in beech in Slovenia.

  9. How Will Global Environmental Changes Affect the Growth of Alien Plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jujie Jia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Global environmental changes can create novel habitats, promoting the growth of alien plants that often exhibit broad environmental tolerance and high phenotypic plasticity. However, the mechanisms underlying these growth promotory effects are unknown at present. Here, we conducted a phylogenetically controlled meta-analysis using data from 111 published studies encompassing the responses of 129 alien plants to global warming, increased precipitation, N deposition, and CO2 enrichment. We compared the differences in the responses of alien plants to the four global environmental change factors across six categories of functional traits between woody and non-woody life forms as well as C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Our results showed that all four global change factors promote alien plant growth. Warming had a more positive effect on C4 than C3 plants. Although the effects of the four factors on the functional traits of alien plants were variable, plant growth was mainly promoted via an increase in growth rate and size. Our data suggest that potential future global environmental changes could further facilitate alien plant growth.

  10. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hajar Mohd Azhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  11. Identification of yeasts present in sour fermented foods and fodders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelhoven, Wouter J

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with rapid methods for identification of 50 yeast species frequently isolated from foods and fodders that underwent a lactic acid fermentation. However, many yeast species present in olive brine, alpechin, and other olive products were not treated. The methods required for identification include light microscopy, physiological growth tests (ID32C system of BioMérieux), assimilation of nitrate and of ethylamine as sole nitrogen sources, vitamin requirement, and maximum growth temperature. An identification key to treated yeast species is provided. In another table characteristics of all yeast species treated are listed.

  12. Bone quality is affected by food restriction and by nutrition-induced catch-up growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando, Rakefet; Masarwi, Majdi; Shtaif, Biana; Idelevich, Anna; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Shahar, Ron; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2014-12-01

    Growth stunting constitutes the most common effect of malnutrition. When the primary cause of malnutrition is resolved, catch-up (CU) growth usually occurs. In this study, we have explored the effect of food restriction (RES) and refeeding on bone structure and mechanical properties. Sprague-Dawley male rats aged 24 days were subjected to 10 days of 40% RES, followed by refeeding for 1 (CU) or 26 days long-term CU (LTCU). The rats fed ad libitum served as controls. The growth plates were measured, osteoclasts were identified using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, and micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and mechanical testing were used to study structure and mechanical properties. Micro-CT analysis showed that RES led to a significant reduction in trabecular BV/TV and trabecular number (Tb.N), concomitant with an increase in trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). Trabecular BV/TV and Tb.N were significantly greater in the CU group than in the RES in both short- and long-term experiments. Mechanical testing showed that RES led to weaker and less compliant bones; interestingly, bones of the CU group were also more fragile after 1 day of CU. Longer term of refeeding enabled correction of the bone parameters; however, LTCU did not achieve full recovery. These results suggest that RES in young rats attenuated growth and reduced trabecular bone parameters. While nutrition-induced CU growth led to an immediate increase in epiphyseal growth plate height and active bone modeling, it was also associated with a transient reduction in bone quality. This should be taken into consideration when treating children undergoing CU growth. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Factors Affecting Transportation Sector CO2 Emissions Growth in China: An LMDI Decomposition Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available China has now become the largest country in carbon emissions all over the world. Furthermore, with transportation accounting for an increasing proportion of CO2 emissions year by year, the transportation sector has turned out to be one of the main sectors which possesses a high growth speed in CO2 emissions. To accurately analyze potentially influencing factors which accelerate the process of CO2 emissions of transportation sector in China, based on carbon accounting by the checklists method of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC, in this paper, we propose a decomposition model using Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI decomposition analysis technology and modified fixed growth rate method. Then effects of six influencing factors including energy structure, energy efficiency, transport form, transportation development, economic development and population size from 2001 to 2014 were quantitatively analyzed. Consequently, the results indicate that: (1 economic development accounts most for driving CO2 emissions growth of the transportation sector, while energy efficiency accounts most for suppressing CO2 emissions growth; (2 the pulling effects of natural gas, electricity and other clean energy consumption on CO2 emissions growth offset the inhibitory effects of traditional fossil fuels, making energy structure play a significant role in promoting CO2 emissions growth; (3 the inhibitory effects of railways and highways lead to inhibitory effects of transport form on CO2 emissions growth; (4 transportation development plays an obvious role in promoting CO2 emissions, while the effects of population size is relatively weaker compared with those of transportation development. Furthermore, the decomposition model of CO2 emissions factors in transport industry constructed in this paper can also be applied to other countries so as to provide guidance and reference for CO2 emissions analysis of transportation industry.

  14. Maize development and grain quality are differentially affected by mycorrhizal fungi and a growth-promoting pseudomonad in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Graziella; Copetta, Andrea; Gamalero, Elisa; Bona, Elisa; Cesaro, Patrizia; Scarafoni, Alessio; D'Agostino, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) can increase the growth and yield of major crops, and improve the quality of fruits and leaves. However, little is known about their impact on seed composition. Plants were inoculated with AM fungi and/or the bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf4 and harvested after 7 months of growth in open-field conditions. Plant growth parameters were measured (biomass, length and circumference of spikes, number of grains per cob, grain yield, and grain size) and protein, lipid, and starch content in grains were determined. Plant growth and yield were increased by inoculation with the microorganisms. Moreover, spikes and grains of inoculated plants were bigger than those produced by uninoculated plants. Regarding grain composition, the bacterial strain increased grain starch content, especially the digestible components, whereas AM fungi-enhanced protein, especially zein, content. Plant inoculation with the fluorescent pseudomonad and mycorrhizal fungi resulted in additive effects on grain composition. Overall, results showed that the bacterial strain and the AM fungi promoted maize growth cultivated in field conditions and differentially affected the grain nutritional content. Consequently, targeted plant inoculation with beneficial microorganisms can lead to commodities fulfilling consumer and industrial requirements.

  15. Phenotypic and chemotypic studies using Arabidopsis and yeast reveal that GHB converts to SSA and induce toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-07-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a naturally occurring compound. It is detected in organisms such as yeasts, plants and mammals. GHB is produced from the reduction of succinic semialdehyde (SSA) by the activity of GHB dehydrogenase. Arabidopsis genome contains two GHB dehydrogenase encoding genes. The accumulation of GHB in ssadh mutants led to the speculation that GHB is the cause of aberrant phenotypes. Conversely, the accumulation of GHB in Arabidopsis plants subjected to abiotic stresses was described as a way of avoiding SSA induced damage. To resolve these contrasting views on GHB, we examined the effect of exogenous GHB and SSA on the growth of yeast and Arabidopsis plants. GHB concentrations up to 1.5 mM didn't affect shoots of Arabidopsis plants; however, root growth was inhibited. In contrast, 0.3 mM SSA has severely affected the growth of plants. Treatment of yeast wild-type strain with 10 mM SSA and 10 mM GHB didn't affect the growth. However, the growth of yeast uga2 mutant was greatly inhibited by the same concentration of SSA, but not GHB. Metabolic analysis and enzyme activity assay on native gel showed that Arabidopsis, but not yeast, possesses a GHB dehydrogenase activity that converts GHB back to SSA. The enzymatic assay has also indicated the existence of an additional GHB dehydrogenase encoding gene(s) in Arabidopsis genome. Taken together, we conclude that GHB is less toxic than SSA. Its accumulation in ssadh mutants and during abiotic stresses is a response to avoid the SSA induced damage.

  16. AtOMA1 Affects the OXPHOS System and Plant Growth in Contrast to Other Newly Identified ATP-Independent Proteases in Arabidopsis Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migdal, Iwona; Skibior-Blaszczyk, Renata; Heidorn-Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Garbiec, Arnold; Janska, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Compared with yeast, our knowledge on members of the ATP-independent plant mitochondrial proteolytic machinery is rather poor. In the present study, using confocal microscopy and immunoblotting, we proved that homologs of yeast Oma1, Atp23, Imp1, Imp2, and Oct1 proteases are localized in Arabidopsis mitochondria. We characterized these components of the ATP-independent proteolytic system as well as the earlier identified protease, AtICP55, with an emphasis on their significance in plant growth and functionality in the OXPHOS system. A functional complementation assay demonstrated that out of all the analyzed proteases, only AtOMA1 and AtICP55 could substitute for a lack of their yeast counterparts. We did not observe any significant developmental or morphological changes in plants lacking the studied proteases, either under optimal growth conditions or after exposure to stress, with the only exception being retarded root growth in oma1-1, thus implying that the absence of a single mitochondrial ATP-independent protease is not critical for Arabidopsis growth and development. We did not find any evidence indicating a clear functional complementation of the missing protease by any other protease at the transcript or protein level. Studies on the impact of the analyzed proteases on mitochondrial bioenergetic function revealed that out of all the studied mutants, only oma1-1 showed differences in activities and amounts of OXPHOS proteins. Among all the OXPHOS disorders found in oma1-1, the complex V deficiency is distinctive because it is mainly associated with decreased catalytic activity and not correlated with complex abundance, which has been observed in the case of supercomplex I + III2 and complex I deficiencies. Altogether, our study indicates that despite the presence of highly conservative homologs, the mitochondrial ATP-independent proteolytic system is not functionally conserved in plants as compared with yeast. Our findings also highlight the importance of

  17. Insulin Like Growth Factor System: How Does it Affect Neonatal Anthropometry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Kacar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aims to clarify the role of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3, ghrelin, and insulin in fetal growth. Material and Method: Based on Turkish standards, 14 newborns were defined as small for gestational age (SGA, 33 newborns were described as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, and 13 newborns were identified as large for gestational age (LGA. IGF-1, IGFBP-3, ghrelin, and insulin levels were measured in umbilical cord and maternal serum. Results: The LGA group had significantly higher levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-3, ghrelin, and insulin in umbilical cord and maternal serum than the SGA group. Umbilical cord and maternal serum levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 correlated significantly and positively with body weight, body length, head circumference, and abdominal circumference of the neonates. Discussion: Based on the findings of the present study, it may be postulated that insulin like growth factor system has a role in fetal growth.

  18. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); McMurry, Peter H. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  19. How maternal malnutrition affects linear growth and development in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathakis, Peggy C; Singh, Lauren N; Manary, Mark J

    2016-11-05

    Maternal malnutrition is common in the developing world and has detrimental effects on both the mother and infant. Pre-pregnancy nutritional status and weight gain during pregnancy are positively related to fetal growth and development. Internationally, there is no agreement on the method of diagnosis or treatment of moderate or severe malnutrition during pregnancy. Establishing clear guidelines for diagnosis and treatment will be essential in elevating the problem. Possible anthropometric measurements used to detect and monitor maternal malnutrition include pre-pregnancy BMI, weight gain, and mid upper arm circumference. Food supplements have the potential to increase gestational weight gain and energy intake which are positively associated with fetal growth and development. Overall more studies are needed to conclude the impact of food/nutrient supplements on infant growth in undernourished pregnant women in developing countries. Currently, a study underway may provide much needed documentation of the benefits of treating malnutrition in pregnancy.

  20. Elevated pressure of carbon dioxide affects growth of thermophilic Petrotoga sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Gniese, Claudia; Schippers, Axel; Schlömann, Michael; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a promising new technology which reduces carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and thereby decelerates global warming. During CCS, carbon dioxide is captured from emission sources (e.g. fossil fuel power plants or other industries), pressurised, and finally stored in deep geological formations, such as former gas or oil reservoirs as well as saline aquifers. However, with CCS being a very young technology, there are a number of unknown factors that need to be investigated before declaring CCS as being safe. Our research investigates the effect of high carbon dioxide concentrations and pressures on an indigenous microorganism that colonises a potential storage site. Growth experiments were conducted using the thermophilic thiosulphate-reducing bacterium Petrotoga sp., isolated from formation water of the gas reservoir Schneeren (Lower Saxony, Germany), situated in the Northern German Plain. Growth (OD600) was monitored over one growth cycle (10 days) at different carbon dioxide concentrations (50%, 100%, and 150% in the gas phase), and was compared to control cultures grown with 20% carbon dioxide. An additional growth experiment was performed over a period of 145 days with repeated subcultivation steps in order to detect long-term effects of carbon dioxide. Cultivation over 10 days at 50% and 100% carbon dioxide slightly reduced cell growth. In contrast, long-term cultivation at 150% carbon dioxide reduced cell growth and finally led to cell death. This suggested a more pronounced effect of carbon dioxide at prolonged cultivation and stresses the need for a closer consideration of long-term effects. Experiments with supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar completely inhibited growth of freshly inoculated cultures and also caused a rapid decrease of growth of a pre-grown culture. This demonstrated that supercritical carbon dioxide had a sterilising effect on cells. This effect was not observed in control cultures

  1. Mathematical model of the growth of a mollusk affected by a toxicant and by temperature fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurchenko, T.S.; Burtnaya, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to model the effect of a gamma isomer of hexachloran (lindane) and of temperature fluctuations on the growth of bivalves. The model is based on an experimental study of the effect of the toxicant on Radix ovata and Viviparus viviparus, and also on the Putter-Bertalanffy-Vinberg models and the model of Zotin. Quite good agreements has been obtained between calculated and experimental data, and growth curves have been constructed for the weight increase of the animals when exposed to lindane concentrations not tested in the experiment.

  2. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurry, Peter [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Smuth, James [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  3. Does temperature and oxygen affect duration of intramarsupial development and juvenile growth in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Malacostraca)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, Terézia; Antol, Andrzej; Czarnoleski, Marcin; Kramarz, Paulina; Bauchinger, Ulf; Labecka, Anna Maria; Kozłowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract According to the temperature-size rule (TSR), ectotherms developing under cold conditions experience slower growth as juveniles but reach a larger size at maturity. Whether temperature alone causes this phenomenon is unknown, but oxygen limitation can play a role in the temperature-size relationship. Oxygen may become limited under warm conditions when the resulting higher metabolism creates a greater demand for oxygen, especially in larger individuals. We examined the independent effects of oxygen concentration (10% and 22% O2) and temperature (15 °C and 22 °C) on duration of ontogenic development, which takes place within the maternal brood pouch (marsupium), and juvenile growth in the terrestrial isopod common rough woodlouse (Porcellio scaber). Individuals inside the marsupium undergo the change from the aqueous to the gaseous environment. Under hypoxia, woodlice hatched from the marsupium sooner, but their subsequent growth was not affected by the level of oxygen. Marsupial development and juvenile growth were almost three times slower at low temperature, and marsupial development was longer in larger females but only in the cold treatment. These results show that temperature and oxygen are important ecological factors affecting developmental time and that the strength of the effect likely depends on the availability of oxygen in the environment. PMID:26261441

  4. Does temperature and oxygen affect duration of intramarsupial development and juvenile growth in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Malacostraca?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terézia Horváthová

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the temperature-size rule (TSR, ectotherms developing under cold conditions experience slower growth as juveniles but reach a larger size at maturity. Whether temperature alone causes this phenomenon is unknown, but oxygen limitation can play a role in the temperature-size relationship. Oxygen may become limited under warm conditions when the resulting higher metabolism creates a greater demand for oxygen, especially in larger individuals. We examined the independent effects of oxygen concentration (10% and 22% O2 and temperature (15 °C and 22 °C on duration of ontogenic development, which takes place within the maternal brood pouch (marsupium, and juvenile growth in the terrestrial isopod common rough woodlouse (Porcellio scaber. Individuals inside the marsupium undergo the change from the aqueous to the gaseous environment. Under hypoxia, woodlice hatched from the marsupium sooner, but their subsequent growth was not affected by the level of oxygen. Marsupial development and juvenile growth were almost three times slower at low temperature, and marsupial development was longer in larger females but only in the cold treatment. These results show that temperature and oxygen are important ecological factors affecting developmental time and that the strength of the effect likely depends on the availability of oxygen in the environment.

  5. Atmospheric oxygen level affects growth trajectory, cardiopulmonary allometry and metabolic rate in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Elsey, Ruth M.; Hicks, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Recent palaeoatmospheric models suggest large-scale fluctuations in ambient oxygen level over the past 550 million years. To better understand how global hypoxia and hyperoxia might have affected the growth and physiology of contemporary vertebrates, we incubated eggs and raised hatchlings of the American alligator. Crocodilians are one of few vertebrate taxa that survived these global changes with distinctly conservative morphology. We maintained animals at 30°C under chronic hypoxia (12% O2), normoxia (21% O2) or hyperoxia (30% O2). At hatching, hypoxic animals were significantly smaller than their normoxic and hyperoxic siblings. Over the course of 3 months, post-hatching growth was fastest under hyperoxia and slowest under hypoxia. Hypoxia, but not hyperoxia, caused distinct scaling of major visceral organs–reduction of liver mass, enlargement of the heart and accelerated growth of lungs. When absorptive and post-absorptive metabolic rates were measured in juvenile alligators, the increase in oxygen consumption rate due to digestion/absorption of food was greatest in hyperoxic alligators and smallest in hypoxic ones. Hyperoxic alligators exhibited the lowest breathing rate and highest oxygen consumption per breath. We suggest that, despite compensatory cardiopulmonary remodelling, growth of hypoxic alligators is constrained by low atmospheric oxygen supply, which may limit their food utilisation capacity. Conversely, the combination of elevated metabolism and low cost of breathing in hyperoxic alligators allows for a greater proportion of metabolised energy to be available for growth. This suggests that growth and metabolic patterns of extinct vertebrates would have been significantly affected by changes in the atmospheric oxygen level. PMID:19376944

  6. Interaction with ectomycorrhizal fungi and endophytic Methylobacterium affects nutrient uptake and growth of pine seedlings in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjanen, Johanna; Koskimäki, Janne J; Sutela, Suvi; Ardanov, Pavlo; Suorsa, Marja; Niemi, Karoliina; Sarjala, Tytti; Häggman, Hely; Pirttilä, Anna Maria

    2014-09-01

    Tissues of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) contain several endophytic microorganisms of which Methylobacterium extorquens DSM13060 is a dominant species throughout the year. Similar to other endophytic bacteria, M. extorquens is able to colonize host plant tissues without causing any symptoms of disease. In addition to endophytic bacteria, plants associate simultaneously with a diverse set of microorganisms. Furthermore, plant-colonizing microorganisms interact with each other in a species- or strain-specific manner. Several studies on beneficial microorganisms interacting with plants have been carried out, but few deal with interactions between different symbiotic organisms and specifically, how these interactions affect the growth and development of the host plant. Our aim was to study how the pine endophyte M. extorquens DSM13060 affects pine seedlings and how the co-inoculation with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi [Suillus variegatus (SV) or Pisolithus tinctorius (PT)] alters the response of Scots pine. We determined the growth, polyamine and nutrient contents of inoculated and non-inoculated Scots pine seedlings in vitro. Our results show that M. extorquens is able to improve the growth of seedlings at the same level as the ECM fungi SV and PT do. The effect of co-inoculation using different symbiotic organisms was seen in terms of changes in growth and nutrient uptake. Inoculation using M. extorquens together with ECM fungi improved the growth of the host plant even more than single ECM inoculation. Symbiotic organisms also had a strong effect on the potassium content of the seedling. The results indicate that interaction between endophyte and ECM fungus is species dependent, leading to increased or decreased nutrient content and growth of pine seedlings.

  7. Effect of ethidium bromide on transmission of mitochondrial genomes and DNA synthesis in the petite negative yeast Schizosaccharomyces pomhe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, K; Del Giudice, L

    1980-04-01

    Treatment of haploid strains of the petite negative yeast Schizosaccharomyces pomhe with ethidium bromide prior to mating with untreated cells reduces transmission of mitochondrial markers from the treated strains. This effect is fully reversible after 20 generations of growth in drug free medium before mating. In contrast to the petite positive yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where nuclear DNA synthesis is not affected but mitochondrial DNA is degraded in the presence of 20 μg/ml ethidium bromide, the same concentration decreases both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA synthesis in Schizosaccharomyces pomhe. After removal of the drug, nuclear DNA synthesis increases faster than its mitochondrial counterpart in Schizosaccharomyces pomhe.

  8. Yeast adaptation to weak acids prevents futile energy expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmat eUllah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Weak organic acids (WOA are widely used preservatives to prevent fungal spoilage of foods and beverages. Exposure of baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to WOA leads to cellular acidification and anion accumulation. Pre-adaptation of cultures reduced the rate of acidification caused by weak acid exposure, most likely as a result of changes in plasma membrane or cell wall composition. In order to adapt to sublethal concentrations of the acids and grow, yeast cells activate ATP consuming membrane transporters to remove protons and anions. We explored to what extent ATP depletion contributes to growth inhibition in sorbic or acetic acid treated cells. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of the reduction of proton and anion pumping activity on intracellular pH (pHi, growth, and energy status upon exposure to the hydrophilic acetic acid (HA and the lipophilic sorbic acid (HS. ATP concentrations were dependent on the severity of the stress. Unexpectedly, we observed a stronger reduction of ATP with growth reducing than with growth inhibitory concentrations of both acids. We deduce that the not the ATP reduction caused by proton pumping, but rather the cost of sorbate anion pumping contributes to growth inhibition. A reduction of proton pumping activity may reduce ATP consumption, but the resulting decrease of intracellular pH affects growth more. ATP utilization was differentially regulated during moderate and severe stress conditions. We propose that the energy depletion alone is not the cause of growth inhibition during HA or HS stress. Rather, the cells appear to reduce ATP consumption in high stress conditions, likely to prevent futile cycling and maintain energy reserves for growth resumption in more favorable conditions. The mechanism for such decision making remains to be established.

  9. Cell Expansion-Mediated Organ Growth Is Affected by Mutations in Three EXIGUA Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bayón, Rebeca; Muñoz-Viana, Rafael; Borrega, Nero; Mouille, Gregory; Hernández-Romero, Diana; Robles, Pedro; Höfte, Herman; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Organ growth depends on two distinct, yet integrated, processes: cell proliferation and post-mitotic cell expansion. Although the regulatory networks of plant cell proliferation during organ growth have begun to be unveiled, the mechanisms regulating post-mitotic cell growth remain mostly unknown. Here, we report the characterization of three EXIGUA (EXI) genes that encode different subunits of the cellulose synthase complex specifically required for secondary cell wall formation. Despite this highly specific role of EXI genes, all the cells within the leaf, even those that do not have secondary walls, display small sizes in the exi mutants. In addition, we found a positive correlation between cell size and the DNA ploidy levels in exi mutant leaves, suggesting that both processes share some regulatory components. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the collapsed xylem vessels of the exi mutants hamper water transport throughout the plant, which, in turn, limits the turgor pressure levels required for normal post-mitotic cell expansion during leaf growth. PMID:22586475

  10. Factors Affecting Growth of Tengmalm's Owl (Aegolius funereus) Nestlings: Prey Abundance, Sex and Hatching Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárybnická, Markéta; Riegert, Jan; Brejšková, Lucie; Šindelář, Jiří; Kouba, Marek; Hanel, Jan; Popelková, Alena; Menclová, Petra; Tomášek, Václav; Šťastný, Karel

    2015-01-01

    In altricial birds, energy supply during growth is a major predictor of the physical condition and survival prospects of fledglings. A number of experimental studies have shown that nestling body mass and wing length can vary with particular extrinsic factors, but between-year observational data on this topic are scarce. Based on a seven-year observational study in a central European Tengmalm's owl population we examine the effect of year, brood size, hatching order, and sex on nestling body mass and wing length, as well as the effect of prey abundance on parameters of growth curve. We found that nestling body mass varied among years, and parameters of growth curve, i.e. growth rate and inflection point in particular, increased with increasing abundance of the owl's main prey (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles), and pooled prey abundance (Apodemus mice, Microtus voles, and Sorex shrews). Furthermore, nestling body mass varied with hatching order and between sexes being larger for females and for the first-hatched brood mates. Brood size had no effect on nestling body mass. Simultaneously, we found no effect of year, brood size, hatching order, or sex on the wing length of nestlings. Our findings suggest that in this temperate owl population, nestling body mass is more sensitive to prey abundance than is wing length. The latter is probably more limited by the physiology of the species.

  11. How maternal malnutrition affects linear growth and development in the offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal malnutrition is common in the developing world and has detrimental effects on both the mother and infant. Pre-pregnancy nutritional status and weight gain during pregnancy are positively related to fetal growth and development. Internationally, there is no agreement on the method of diagnos...

  12. Nitrate Uptake of Rice as Affected by Growth Stages and Ammonium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ke; WANG Xiao-li; CHEN Ping; SHENG Hai-jun

    2003-01-01

    Solution culture experiments were carried out to study the NO3- uptake kinetics by rice roots andthe nitrate reductase activity (NRA) in leaves of four typical rice genotypes (conventional indica, conventionaljaponica, hybrid indica, and hybrid japonica) at different growth stages. The effects of NH4+ on the NO3- up-take kinetics was also studied. The results indicated that the four genotypes responded differently to NO3- andNH4+. Comparing indica rice with japonica rice, hybrid rice with conventional rice, formers absorbed NO3-more rapidly than laters. The superiority of indica rice and hybid rice for NO3- uptake was mainly due to thehigher Vmax at the early growth stage (20 days) and the higher affinity of nitrate transporters for NO3-at themiddle growth stage (50 days). At both growth stages NH4+ significantly inhibited NO3- uptake for japonicarice, but showed little effect for indica rice. Conversely, NH4+ stimulated the uptake of NO3- for hybrid rice.NH4+ could repress NRA in leaves of all four genotypes with a sensitive order as following: hybrid japonica >hybrid indica > conventional indica > conventional japonica.

  13. The Ketogenic Diet Does Not Affect Growth of Hedgehog Pathway Medulloblastoma in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Mai T.; Wehrli, Suzanne; Dang, Chi V.; Curran, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The altered metabolism of cancer cells has long been viewed as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In particular, brain tumors often display heightened glycolysis, even in the presence of oxygen. A subset of medulloblastoma, the most prevalent malignant brain tumor in children, arises as a consequence of activating mutations in the Hedgehog (HH) pathway, which has been shown to promote aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we hypothesized that a low carbohydrate, high fat ketogenic diet would suppress tumor growth in a genetically engineered mouse model of medulloblastoma. However, we found that the ketogenic diet did not slow the growth of spontaneous tumors or allograft flank tumors, and it did not exhibit synergy with a small molecule inhibitor of Smoothened. Serum insulin was significantly reduced in mice fed the ketogenic diet, but no alteration in PI3 kinase activity was observed. These findings indicate that while the ketogenic diet may be effective in inhibiting growth of other tumor types, it does not slow the growth of HH-medulloblastoma in mice. PMID:26192445

  14. The Ketogenic Diet Does Not Affect Growth of Hedgehog Pathway Medulloblastoma in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai T Dang

    Full Text Available The altered metabolism of cancer cells has long been viewed as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In particular, brain tumors often display heightened glycolysis, even in the presence of oxygen. A subset of medulloblastoma, the most prevalent malignant brain tumor in children, arises as a consequence of activating mutations in the Hedgehog (HH pathway, which has been shown to promote aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we hypothesized that a low carbohydrate, high fat ketogenic diet would suppress tumor growth in a genetically engineered mouse model of medulloblastoma. However, we found that the ketogenic diet did not slow the growth of spontaneous tumors or allograft flank tumors, and it did not exhibit synergy with a small molecule inhibitor of Smoothened. Serum insulin was significantly reduced in mice fed the ketogenic diet, but no alteration in PI3 kinase activity was observed. These findings indicate that while the ketogenic diet may be effective in inhibiting growth of other tumor types, it does not slow the growth of HH-medulloblastoma in mice.

  15. The Ketogenic Diet Does Not Affect Growth of Hedgehog Pathway Medulloblastoma in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Mai T; Wehrli, Suzanne; Dang, Chi V; Curran, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The altered metabolism of cancer cells has long been viewed as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. In particular, brain tumors often display heightened glycolysis, even in the presence of oxygen. A subset of medulloblastoma, the most prevalent malignant brain tumor in children, arises as a consequence of activating mutations in the Hedgehog (HH) pathway, which has been shown to promote aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we hypothesized that a low carbohydrate, high fat ketogenic diet would suppress tumor growth in a genetically engineered mouse model of medulloblastoma. However, we found that the ketogenic diet did not slow the growth of spontaneous tumors or allograft flank tumors, and it did not exhibit synergy with a small molecule inhibitor of Smoothened. Serum insulin was significantly reduced in mice fed the ketogenic diet, but no alteration in PI3 kinase activity was observed. These findings indicate that while the ketogenic diet may be effective in inhibiting growth of other tumor types, it does not slow the growth of HH-medulloblastoma in mice.

  16. Soil CO2 concentration does not affect growth or root respiration in bean or citrus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Nielsen, K.F.; Eissenstat, D.M.; Lynch, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Contrasting effects of soil CO2 concentration on root respiration rates during short-term CO2 exposure, and on plant growth during long-term CO2 exposure, have been reported, Here we examine the effects of both short-and long-term exposure to soil CO2 on the root respiration of intact plants and on

  17. Intrauterine Cannabis Exposure Affects Fetal Growth Trajectories: The Generation R Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Marroun, Hanan; Tiemeier, Henning; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C.; van den Brink, Wim; Huizink, Anja C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cannabis is the most commonly consumed illicit drug among pregnant women. Intrauterine exposure to cannabis may result in risks for the developing fetus. The importance of intrauterine growth on subsequent psychological and behavioral child development has been demonstrated. This study examined the relation between maternal cannabis use…

  18. Chemotherapy affects the pattern of failure after shear loading of the proximal tibial growth plate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, B.L.; Hartel, R.M.; Jansen, H.W.B.; Verkerke, G.J.; Veth, R.P.H.; Kamps, W.A.; Hoekstra, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tibial bones are shorter and less resistant to shear forces after treatment with doxorubicin, methotrexate, or cisplatin. We investigated the pattern of failure after shear loading of the proximal tibial growth plate in rats treated with these chemotherapeutic agents. MATERIALS AND MET

  19. Factors Affecting the Growth and Usage of a Student Mental Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranto, Ernesto A.; Wepman, Barry J.

    1978-01-01

    The five-year growth of an active Student Mental Health Service (SMHS) in an urban academic health center is described. The function of SMHS is limited strictly to therapeutic and consultative services for the students and operates as an outpatient treatment facility using a standard 12-session goal-oriented treatment plan. (LBH)

  20. Cell expansion-mediated organ growth is affected by mutations in three EXIGUA genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Rubio-Díaz

    Full Text Available Organ growth depends on two distinct, yet integrated, processes: cell proliferation and post-mitotic cell expansion. Although the regulatory networks of plant cell proliferation during organ growth have begun to be unveiled, the mechanisms regulating post-mitotic cell growth remain mostly unknown. Here, we report the characterization of three EXIGUA (EXI genes that encode different subunits of the cellulose synthase complex specifically required for secondary cell wall formation. Despite this highly specific role of EXI genes, all the cells within the leaf, even those that do not have secondary walls, display small sizes in the exi mutants. In addition, we found a positive correlation between cell size and the DNA ploidy levels in exi mutant leaves, suggesting that both processes share some regulatory components. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the collapsed xylem vessels of the exi mutants hamper water transport throughout the plant, which, in turn, limits the turgor pressure levels required for normal post-mitotic cell expansion during leaf growth.

  1. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  2. National culture and cultural orientations of owners affecting the innovation-growth relationship in five countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauch, Andreas; Frese, Michael; Wang, Zhong-Ming; Unger, Jens; Lozada, Maria; Kupcha, Vita; Spirina, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    This study tests the cross-cultural validity of the relationship between innovation and growth in a sample of 857 business owners from five different countries: China, Germany, the Netherlands, Peru and Russia. We found that innovation is effective in each country, suggesting universal relationships

  3. Does Year Round Schooling Affect the Outcome and Growth of California's API Scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amery D.; Stone, Jake E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examined whether year round schooling (YRS) in California had an effect upon the outcome and growth of schools' Academic Performance Index (API) scores. While many previous studies had examined the connection between YRS and academic achievement, most had lacked the statistical rigour required to provide reliable interpretations. As a…

  4. Intrauterine Cannabis Exposure Affects Fetal Growth Trajectories: The Generation R Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Marroun, Hanan; Tiemeier, Henning; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C.; van den Brink, Wim; Huizink, Anja C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cannabis is the most commonly consumed illicit drug among pregnant women. Intrauterine exposure to cannabis may result in risks for the developing fetus. The importance of intrauterine growth on subsequent psychological and behavioral child development has been demonstrated. This study examined the relation between maternal cannabis use…

  5. Yeast That Smell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Y Xu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental mechanism of olfactory receptor activation has been conserved from yeast to humans. Engineered yeast cells can smell some of the same odorants as humans can, which makes yeast an ideal model system for studying human olfaction. Furthermore, if engineered yeast cells are incorporated into sensory arrays, they can be used as biosensors or artificial noses.Keywords: Yeast, olfactory receptor, G protein-coupled receptor, biosensor, smellReceived: 31 July 2008 / Received in revised form: 6 August 2008, Accepted: 13 August 2008, Published online: 17 August 2008

  6. Dietary supplementation of probiotics affects growth, immune response and disease resistance of Cyprinus carpio fry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akhil; Gupta, Paromita; Dhawan, Asha

    2014-12-01

    The effects of dietary Bacillus coagulans (MTCC 9872), Bacillus licheniformis (MTCC 6824) and Paenibacillus polymyxa (MTCC 122) supplementation on growth performance, non-specific immunity and protection against Aeromonas hydrophila infection were evaluated in common carp, Cyprinus carpio fry. Laboratory maintained B. coagulans, B. licheniformis and P. polymyxa were used to study antagonistic activity against fish pathogenic bacteria by agar well diffusion assay. Healthy fish fry were challenged by this bacterium for determination of its safety. Fish were fed for 80 days with control basal diet (B0) and experimental diets containing B. coagulans (B1), B. licheniformis (B2) and P. polymyxa (B3) at 10(9) CFU/g diet. Fish fry (mean weight 0.329 ± 0.01 g) were fed these diets and growth performance, various non-specific immune parameters and disease resistance study were conducted at 80 days post-feeding. The antagonism study showed inhibition zone against A. hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi. All the probiotic bacterial strains were harmless to fish fry as neither mortality nor morbidities were observed of the challenge. The growth-promoting influences of probiotic supplemented dietary treatments were observed with fish fry and the optimum survival, growth and feed utilization were obtained with P. polymyxa (B3) supplemented diet. Study of different non-specific innate immunological parameters viz. lysozyme activity, respiratory burst assay and myeloperoxidase content showed significant (p < 0.05) higher values in fish fry fed B3 diet at 10(9) CFU/g. The challenge test showed dietary supplementation of B. coagulans, B. licheniformis and P. polymyxa significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced the resistance of fish fry against bacterial challenge. These results collectively suggests that P. polymyxa is a potential probiotic species and can be used in aquaculture to improve growth, feed utilization, non-specific immune responses and disease resistance of fry common carp, C. carpio.

  7. Patchy distributions of competitors affect the growth of a clonal plant when the competitor density is high.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xue

    Full Text Available Environments are patchy in not only abiotic factors but also biotic ones. Many studies have examined effects of spatial heterogeneity in abiotic factors such as light, water and nutrients on the growth of clonal plants, but few have tested those in biotic factors. We conducted a greenhouse experiment to examine how patchy distributions of competitors affect the growth of a rhizomatous wetland plant Bolboschoenus planiculmis and whether such effects depend on the density of the competitors. We grew one ramet of B. planiculmis in the center of each of the experimental boxes without competitors (Schoenoplectus triqueter, with a homogeneous distribution of the competitors of low or high density, and with a patchy distribution of the competitors of low or high density. The presence of competitors markedly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets, number of tubers and rhizome length of the B. planiculmis clones. When the density of the competitors was low, the growth of B. planiculmis did not differ significantly between the competitor patches and competitor-free patches. However, when the density of the competitors was high, the growth of B. planiculmis was significantly higher in the competitor-free patches than in the competitor patches. Therefore, B. planiculmis can respond to patchy distributions of competitors by placing more ramets in competition-free patches when the density of competitors is high, but cannot do so when the density of competitors is low.

  8. Patchy distributions of competitors affect the growth of a clonal plant when the competitor density is high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Huang, Lin; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Environments are patchy in not only abiotic factors but also biotic ones. Many studies have examined effects of spatial heterogeneity in abiotic factors such as light, water and nutrients on the growth of clonal plants, but few have tested those in biotic factors. We conducted a greenhouse experiment to examine how patchy distributions of competitors affect the growth of a rhizomatous wetland plant Bolboschoenus planiculmis and whether such effects depend on the density of the competitors. We grew one ramet of B. planiculmis in the center of each of the experimental boxes without competitors (Schoenoplectus triqueter), with a homogeneous distribution of the competitors of low or high density, and with a patchy distribution of the competitors of low or high density. The presence of competitors markedly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets, number of tubers and rhizome length) of the B. planiculmis clones. When the density of the competitors was low, the growth of B. planiculmis did not differ significantly between the competitor patches and competitor-free patches. However, when the density of the competitors was high, the growth of B. planiculmis was significantly higher in the competitor-free patches than in the competitor patches. Therefore, B. planiculmis can respond to patchy distributions of competitors by placing more ramets in competition-free patches when the density of competitors is high, but cannot do so when the density of competitors is low.

  9. Mechanical feedback stabilizes budding yeast morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banavar, Samhita; Trogdon, Michael; Petzold, Linda; Campas, Otger

    Walled cells have the ability to remodel their shape while sustaining an internal turgor pressure that can reach values up to 10 atmospheres. This requires a tight and simultaneous regulation of cell wall assembly and mechanochemistry, but the underlying mechanisms by which this is achieved remain unclear. Using the growth of mating projections in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) as a motivating example, we have developed a theoretical description that couples the mechanics of cell wall expansion and assembly via a mechanical feedback. In the absence of a mechanical feedback, cell morphogenesis is inherently unstable. The presence of a mechanical feedback stabilizes changes in cell shape and growth, and provides a mechanism to prevent cell lysis in a wide range of conditions. We solve for the dynamics of the system and obtain the different dynamical regimes. In particular, we show that several parameters affect the stability of growth, including the strength of mechanical feedback in the system. Finally, we compare our results to existing experimental data.

  10. Calcium Addition Affects Germination and Early Seedling Growth of Sweet Sorghum under Saline Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to determine the interactive effects of supple- mental Ca amendment and salinity on germination of sweet sorghum seeds in saline solution culture medium, and investigate the effects of different combinations of Na/Ca ratio in saline soils on the early growth of sweet sorghum plants. [Method] A germi- nation test and a greenhouse pot experiment were conducted to assess the interac- tive effects of calcium addition to culture medium on the germination and seedling growth of sweet sorghum (Sorghum saccharatum Moench) in saline soils with a range of NaYCa ratios. In the germination test, seeds were treated with different combinations of five calcium levels [0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mmol/L Ca(NO3)2] and five salinity levels (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 mmol/L NaCI). In the greenhouse experi- ment, seeds were sown in potting soils containing 3 salinity levels (2.3, 4.7 and 7.0 dS/m) and three Na:Ca ratios (10:0, 10:1, and 5:1). [Result] In the germination test, Ca addition at 5 mmol/L promoted germination by 5.5%, 9.9%, and 17.0% at the 3.4, 6.7 and 10.1 dS/m salinity levels. The higher Ca level (10 mmol/L) also in- creased germination by 9.1% and 7.8% at the 3.4 and 6.7 dS/m salinity levels. Then even higher Ca addition at 15 and 20 mmol/L appeared to promote germina- tion when culture media had high salinity (10.1 and 13.4 dS/m). In the greenhouse pot experiment, saline soil amended with supplemental Ca at the 2.3 and 4.7 dS/m salinity levels significantly promoted early seedling growth, with an increase of 6.8% to 28.2% in plant height and 14.3% to 67.9% in whole plant weight. From 28 to 42 d after seeding, the relative growth of seedling was increased by Ca addition, with a reduction of 49.5% to 66.0% in plant height and 4.8% to 61.9% in whole plant weight. From 42 to 56 d after seeding, however, the relative growth of seedling was significantly inhibited by Ca amendment. [Conclusion] Results of this study indicate that appropriate supplemental

  11. Co-cultivation of Sorangium cellulosum strains affects cellular growth and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite epothilones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-fei; Li, Shu-guang; Li, Zhi-feng; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Ting; Pan, Hong-wei; Liu, Hong; Wu, Zhi-hong; Li, Yue-zhong

    2013-08-01

    Sorangium cellulosum, a cellulolytic myxobacterium, is capable of producing a variety of bioactive secondary metabolites. Epothilones are anti-eukaryotic secondary metabolites produced by some S. cellulosum strains. In this study, we analyzed interactions between 12 strains of S. cellulosum consisting of epothilone-producers and non-epothilone producers isolated from two distinct soil habitats. Co-cultivation on filter papers showed that different Sorangium strains inhibited one another's growth, whereas epothilone production by the producing strains changed markedly for most (73%) pairwise mixtures. Using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we demonstrated that the expression of epothilone biosynthetic genes in the epothilone producers typically changed significantly when these bacteria were mixed with non-producing strains. The results indicated that intraspecies interactions between different S. cellulosum strains not only inhibited the growth of partners, but also could change epothilone production.

  12. How the growth rate of host cells affects cancer risk in a deterministic way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Clément; Viger, Louise; Denis, Fabrice; Letellier, Christophe

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that cancers are significantly more often encountered in some tissues than in other ones. In this paper, by using a deterministic model describing the interactions between host, effector immune and tumor cells at the tissue level, we show that this can be explained by the dependency of tumor growth on parameter values characterizing the type as well as the state of the tissue considered due to the "way of life" (environmental factors, food consumption, drinking or smoking habits, etc.). Our approach is purely deterministic and, consequently, the strong correlation (r = 0.99) between the number of detectable growing tumors and the growth rate of cells from the nesting tissue can be explained without evoking random mutation arising during DNA replications in nonmalignant cells or "bad luck". Strategies to limit the mortality induced by cancer could therefore be well based on improving the way of life, that is, by better preserving the tissue where mutant cells randomly arise.

  13. Influence of various bacteria and Yeast AH109 on growth of Trichomonas vaginalis in vitro%不同细菌及酵母菌对阴道毛滴虫体外生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁鹤; 于艳辉; 宫鹏涛; 李建华; 杨举; 李赫; 张国才; 张西臣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of Escherichia coli J20,Lacbobacillus bulgaricus,Staphylococcus aureus and Yeast AH109 on the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis in vitro.Methods Escherichia coli J20,Lacbobacillus bulgaricus,Staphylococcus aureus and Yeast AH109 at various concentrations (104,105,106 and 107 bacteria/ml) were co-cultured with Trichomonas vaginalis for various hours and counted for trophozoites.Results As compared with that in blank control group,the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis was influenced significantly by Escherichia coli J20 and Staphylococcus aureus at low concentrations (each 104 bacteria/ml) (each P < 0.01).White precipitate of dead trophozoites was observed 6 h after co-culture.Lacbobacillus bulgaricus at high concentrations (106 and 107 bacteria/ml)showed significant effect on the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis (each P < 0.01).However,Yeast AH109 at various concentrations and cultured for various hours showed no significant effect on the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis (P> 0.05).Conclusion Escherichia coli J20,Staphylococcus aureus,as well as Lacbobacillus bulgaricus at high concentrations (106 and 107 bacteria/ml) showed significant effect on the growth of Trichomonas vaginalis,while Yeast AH109 showed no significant effect.It provided a theoretical basis for the study on interaction between Trichomonas vaginalis infection and vaginal flora in vivo.%目的 研究大肠埃希菌J20、保加利亚乳杆菌、金黄葡萄球菌及AH109酵母菌体外对阴道毛滴虫生长的影响.方法 分别将不同浓度(104、105、106和107个/ml)的大肠埃希菌J20、保加利亚乳杆菌、金黄葡萄球菌及AH109酵母菌与阴道毛滴虫进行体外共培养,并对不同培养时间(2、4、6和8h)的虫体进行计数.结果 与空白对照组相比,大肠埃希菌J20及金黄葡萄球菌在低浓度(1 04个/ml)时即明显影响阴道毛滴虫体外生长(P均<0.01),在6h时即可见白色死亡虫体沉淀:保加

  14. Nutrient availability affects pigment production but not growth in lichens of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.A.; Koch, G.W.; Belnap, J.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research suggests that micronutrients such as Mn may limit growth of slow-growing biological soil crusts (BSCs) in some of the drylands of the world. These soil surface communities contribute strongly to arid ecosystem function and are easily degraded, creating a need for new restoration tools. The possibility that Mn fertilization could be used as a restoration tool for BSCs has not been tested previously. We used microcosms in a controlled greenhouse setting to investigate the hypothesis that Mn may limit photosynthesis and consequently growth in Collema tenax, a dominant N-fixing lichen found in BSCs worldwide. We found no evidence to support our hypothesis; furthermore, addition of other nutrients (primarily P, K, and Zn) had a suppressive effect on gross photosynthesis (P = 0.05). We also monitored the growth and physiological status of our microcosms and found that other nutrients increased the production of scytonemin, an important sunscreen pigment, but only when not added with Mn (P = 0.01). A structural equation model indicated that this effect was independent of any photosynthesis-related variable. We propose two alternative hypotheses to account for this pattern: (1) Mn suppresses processes needed to produce scytonemin; and (2) Mn is required to suppress scytonemin production at low light, when it is an unnecessary photosynthate sink. Although Mn fertilization does not appear likely to increase photosynthesis or growth of Collema, it could have a role in survivorship during environmentally stressful periods due to modification of scytonemin production. Thus, Mn enrichment should be studied further for its potential to facilitate BSC rehabilitation. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Factors that affect postnatal bone growth retardation in the twitcher murine model of Krabbe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Ries, William Louis; Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Arboleda, Gonzalo; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2010-01-01

    Krabbe disease is an inherited lysosomal disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates mainly in the central nervous system. To gain insight into the possible mechanism(s) that may be participating in the inhibition of the postnatal somatic growth described in the animal model of this disease (twitcher mouse, twi), we studied their femora. This study reports that twi femora are smaller than of those of wild type (wt), and present with abnormality of marrow cellularity, bone deposition (osteoblastic function), and osteoclastic activity. Furthermore, lipidomic analysis indicates altered sphingolipid homeostasis, but without significant changes in the levels of sphingolipid-derived intermediates of cell death (ceramide) or the levels of the osteoclast-osteoblast coupling factor (sphingosine-1-phosphate). However, there was significant accumulation of psychosine in the femora of adult twi animals as compared to wt, without induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interleukin-6. Analysis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plasma levels, a liver secreted hormone known to play a role in bone growth, indicated a drastic reduction in twi animals when compared to wt. To identify the cause of the decrease, we examined the IGF-1 mRNA expression and protein levels in the liver. The results indicated a significant reduction of IGF-1 mRNA as well as protein levels in the liver from twi as compared to wt littermates. Our data suggest that a combination of endogenous (psychosine) and endocrine (IGF-1) factors play a role in the inhibition of postnatal bone growth in twi mice; and further suggest that derangements of liver function may be contributing, at least in part, to this alteration. PMID:20441793

  16. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  17. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  18. Association with pathogenic bacteria affects life-history traits and population growth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, S Anaid; Mooring, Eric Q; Rens, Elisabeth G; Restif, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Determining the relationship between individual life-history traits and population dynamics is an essential step to understand and predict natural selection. Model organisms that can be conveniently studied experimentally at both levels are invaluable to test the rich body of theoretical literature in this area. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, despite being a well-established workhorse in genetics, has only recently received attention from ecologists and evolutionary biologists, especially with respect to its association with pathogenic bacteria. In order to start filling the gap between the two areas, we conducted a series of experiments aiming at measuring life-history traits as well as population growth of C. elegans in response to three different bacterial strains: Escherichia coli OP50, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Whereas previous studies had established that the latter two reduced the survival of nematodes feeding on them compared to E. coli OP50, we report for the first time an enhancement in reproductive success and population growth for worms feeding on S. enterica Typhimurium. Furthermore, we used an age-specific population dynamic model, parameterized using individual life-history assays, to successfully predict the growth of populations over three generations. This study paves the way for more detailed and quantitative experimental investigation of the ecology and evolution of C. elegans and the bacteria it interacts with, which could improve our understanding of the fate of opportunistic pathogens in the environment.

  19. Novel developmental analyses identify longitudinal patterns of early gut microbiota that affect infant growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A White

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that some obesity trajectories are set early in life, and that rapid weight gain in infancy is a risk factor for later development of obesity. Identifying modifiable factors associated with early rapid weight gain is a prerequisite for curtailing the growing worldwide obesity epidemic. Recently, much attention has been given to findings indicating that gut microbiota may play a role in obesity development. We aim at identifying how the development of early gut microbiota is associated with expected infant growth. We developed a novel procedure that allows for the identification of longitudinal gut microbiota patterns (corresponding to the gut ecosystem developing, which are associated with an outcome of interest, while appropriately controlling for the false discovery rate. Our method identified developmental pathways of Staphylococcus species and Escherichia coli that were associated with expected growth, and traditional methods indicated that the detection of Bacteroides species at day 30 was associated with growth. Our method should have wide future applicability for studying gut microbiota, and is particularly important for translational considerations, as it is critical to understand the timing of microbiome transitions prior to attempting to manipulate gut microbiota in early life.

  20. Insights into embryo defenses of the invasive apple snail Pomacea canaliculata: egg mass ingestion affects rat intestine morphology and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos S Dreon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology.Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days.Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to the toxic effect of plant antipredator strategies

  1. Ozone affects growth and development of Pieris brassicae on the wild host plant Brassica nigra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaling, E.; Papazian, S.; Poelman, E.H.; Holopainen, J.K.; Albrectsen, B.R.; Blande, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    When plants are exposed to ozone they exhibit changes in both primary and secondary metabolism, which may affect their interactions with herbivorous insects. Here we investigated the performance and preferences of the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae on the wild plant Brassica nigra under eleva

  2. Changes in trehalose content of baker's yeast as affected by octanoic acid Alterações no teor de trealose de levedura de panificação provocadas por ácido octanóico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E. Gutierrez

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Octanoic acid inhibited ethanolic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (bakers yeast and the trehalose accumulation, however did not affect the endogenous degradation of trehalose. This inhibition may be explained by the binding of octanoic acid to hexokinase or other proteins of plasma membrane because they are not necessary for endogenous fermentation. The degradation of trehalose may be due to an activation of trehalase.A adição de ácido octanóico inibiu a fermentação alcoólica realizada por Saccharomyces cerevisiae (levedura de panificação e o acúmulo de trealose, contudo não afetou a degradação endógena de trealose. Esta inibição poderia ser explicada pela ligação do ácido octanóico a hexoquinase ou outra proteína da membrana plasmática porque não são necessárias para a fermentação endógena. A degradação da trealose poderia ser devida a uma ativação da trealase.

  3. Growth of the salt-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in microtiter plates : effects of NaCl, pH and temperature on growth and fusel alcohol production from branched-chain amino acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Michael; Veurink, Janine H.; Euverink, Gert-Jan W.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2003-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, a salt-tolerant yeast isolated from the soy sauce process, produces fusel alcohols (isoamyl alcohol, active amyl alcohol and isobutyl alcohol) from branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine, respectively) via the Ehrlich pathway. Using a high-throughput scr

  4. High dilutions of acetone affect the Avena sativa growth in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kely Karina Belato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acetone is an organic solvent with molecular structure CH3(COCH3, its endogenous production in the animal body is called ketosis. The production of this compound increases with the fat. Acetone influences the lipid membrane, altering its fluidity and lipid composition [1], causing cell damage and leakage and can cause cell death. The use of herbicides in organic farming is not accepted by the Brazilian legislation [2]. So the weed control becomes a problem for organic farmers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the herbicide potential of high dilutions of acetone on Avena sativa L. Materials and Methods: The preliminary tests were conducted at the Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Homeopathy, State University of Maringá (UEM. The seeds of Avena sativa are placed in Petri dishes. Fitty seeds were germinated and grown in Petri dishes containing 15ml of high dilution of acetone and maintained at 25°C ± 2 and 12h photoperiod. Acetone dilutions (6, 12, 18, 24 and 30cH were obtained according to the Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia [3]. Were evaluated the shoot length (cm, total length (cm, fresh root (mg and total dry mass (mg. The plants growth was measured after 7 days. The control consisted of distilled water. The experiment evaluated 4 replicates of each treatment and the data were analyzed by ANOVA and means were compared by Scott-Knott test (P ≤ 0.05. Results and Discussion: Dilutions 6, 24 and 30 cH inhibited the growth of the shoot and total seedling of A. sativa. The root fresh weight was significantly reduced by 4 dilutions (6,12,24 and 30x, with no difference of 24x compared to the control. The total dry mass of plants of A. sativa was reduced in all the dilutions studied, showing an inhibitory effect on growth of seedlings subjected to treatment. Somehow, acetone diluited inhibited the growth and accumulation of biomass of these seedlings, suggesting an imbalance in metabolism

  5. One motif to bind them: A small-XXX-small motif affects transmembrane domain 1 oligomerization, function, localization, and cross-talk between two yeast GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Antonia; Forfar, Rachel; Weston, Cathryn; Bowsher, Leo; Upton, Graham J G; Reynolds, Christopher A; Ladds, Graham; Dixon, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell-surface receptors in mammals and facilitate a range of physiological responses triggered by a variety of ligands. GPCRs were thought to function as monomers, however it is now accepted that GPCR homo- and hetero-oligomers also exist and influence receptor properties. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe GPCR Mam2 is a pheromone-sensing receptor involved in mating and has previously been shown to form oligomers in vivo. The first transmembrane domain (TMD) of Mam2 contains a small-XXX-small motif, overrepresented in membrane proteins and well-known for promoting helix-helix interactions. An ortholog of Mam2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2, contains an analogous small-XXX-small motif which has been shown to contribute to receptor homo-oligomerization, localization and function. Here we have used experimental and computational techniques to characterize the role of the small-XXX-small motif in function and assembly of Mam2 for the first time. We find that disruption of the motif via mutagenesis leads to reduction of Mam2 TMD1 homo-oligomerization and pheromone-responsive cellular signaling of the full-length protein. It also impairs correct targeting to the plasma membrane. Mutation of the analogous motif in Ste2 yielded similar results, suggesting a conserved mechanism for assembly. Using co-expression of the two fungal receptors in conjunction with computational models, we demonstrate a functional change in G protein specificity and propose that this is brought about through hetero-dimeric interactions of Mam2 with Ste2 via the complementary small-XXX-small motifs. This highlights the potential of these motifs to affect a range of properties that can be investigated in other GPCRs.

  6. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01–0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20–20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  7. The garlic allelochemical diallyl disulfide affects tomato root growth by influencing cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L., and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. seed germination, root growth, mitotic index and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs, auxin transport genes (SlPINs and expansin genes (EXPs in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM. This result suggests that tomato root growth

  8. Growth and Yield of Chili Pepper as Affected by Weed Based Organic Compost and Nitrogen Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Setyowati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fertility improvement of Ultisol is inevitable to increase growth and yield of chili pepper since the nutrient availability and organic matter of this soil is relatively low. Application of organic fertilizer will enhance microorganism activity in soil, thereafter will improve the availability of nutrients as well as other chemical, physical, biological properties of the soil. Most of manure releases nutrient quite slowly; therefore, addition of nitrogen to soil is expected to speed up the availability of nutrient to plant. Weed based organic fertilizers from Wedelia (Wedelia trilobata and Siam weed (Chromolaena odorata biomass have potential to substitute inorganic fertilizer. The objective of the experiment was to compare the effects of weed based organic compost and dry leaves compost with or without addition of nitrogen fertilizer on growth and yield of chili pepper. The experiment was carried out using Completely Randomized Design (CRD with treatments of 200 kg urea ha-1; Wedelia compost (WDC 20 ton ha-1; WDC 15, 10, and 5 ton ha-1 with addition of 200 kg urea ha-1 respectively; Siam weed compost (SWC 20 ton ha-1, SWC 15, 10, and 5 ton ha-1 with addition of  200 kg urea ha-1 respectively; and dry leaves compost (DLC 20 ton ha-1, DLC 15, 10, and 5 ton ha-1 with addition of 200 kg urea ha-1 respectively. The result revealed that composts with or without addition of nitrogen fertilizer had similar responses on the growth of chili pepper. Wedelia and Siam weeds compost at 20 ton ha-1 tended to give better yield of chili pepper as compared to application of urea alone. This result indicated that weed based organic fertilizers could substitute nitrogen fertilizer.

  9. Thermal manipulation during embryogenesis affects myoblast proliferation and skeletal muscle growth in meat-type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piestun, Yogev; Yahav, Shlomo; Halevy, Orna

    2015-10-01

    Thermal manipulation (TM) of 39.5°C applied during mid-embryogenesis (embryonic d 7 to 16) has been proven to promote muscle development and enhance muscle growth and meat production in meat-type chickens. This study aimed to elucidate the cellular basis for this effect. Continuous TM or intermittent TM (for 12 h/d) increased myoblast proliferation manifested by higher (25 to 48%) myoblast number in the pectoral muscles during embryonic development but also during the first week posthatch. Proliferation ability of the pectoral-muscle-derived myoblasts in vitro was significantly higher in the TM treatments until embryonic d 15 (intermittent TM) or 13 (continuous TM) compared to that of controls, suggesting increased myogenic progeny reservoir in the muscle. However, the proliferation ability of myoblasts was lower in the TM treatments vs. control during the last days of incubation. This coincided with higher levels of myogenin expression in the muscle, indicating enhanced cell differentiation in the TM muscle. A similar pattern was observed posthatch: Myoblast proliferation was significantly higher in the TM chicks relative to controls during the peak of posthatch cell proliferation until d 6, followed by lower cell number 2 wk posthatch as myoblast number sharply decreases. Higher myogenin expression was observed in the TM chicks on d 6. This resulted in increased muscle growth, manifested by significantly higher relative weight of breast muscle in the embryo and posthatch. It can be concluded that temperature elevation during mid-term embryogenesis promotes myoblast proliferation, thus increasing myogenic progeny reservoir in the muscle, resulting in enhanced muscle growth in the embryo and posthatch. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Lichen physiological traits and growth forms affect communities of associated invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhorst, Stef; Asplund, Johan; Kardol, Paul; Wardle, David A

    2015-09-01

    While there has been much interest in the relationships between traits of primary producers and composition of associated invertebrate consumer communities, our knowledge is largely based on studies from vascular plants, while other types of functionally important producers, such as lichens, have rarely been considered. To address how physiological traits of lichens drive community composition of invertebrates, we collected thalli from 27 lichen species from southern Norway and quantified the communities of associated springtails, mites, and nematodes. For each lichen species, we measured key physiological thallus traits and determined whether invertebrate communities were correlated with these traits. We also explored whether invertebrate communities differed among lichen groups, categorized according to nitrogen-fixing ability, growth form, and substratum. Lichen traits explained up to 39% of the variation in abundances of major invertebrate groups. For many invertebrate groups, abundance was positively correlated with lichen N and P concentrations, N:P ratio, and the percentage of water content on saturation (WC), but had few relationships with concentrations of carbon-based secondary compounds. Diversity and taxonomic richness of invertebrate groups were sometimes also correlated with lichen N and N:P ratios. Nitrogen-fixing lichens showed higher abundance and diversity of some invertebrate groups than did non-N-fixing lichens. However, this emerged in part because most N-fixing lichens have a foliose growth form that benefits invertebrates, through, improving the microclimate, independently of N concentration. Furthermore, invertebrate communities associated with terricolous lichens were determined more by their close proximity to the soil invertebrate pool than by lichen traits. Overall, our results reveal that differences between lichen species have a large impact on the invertebrate communities that live among the thalli. Different invertebrate groups show

  11. Solar light, seawater temperature, and nutrients, which one is more important in affecting phytoplankton growth?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Zhenqing; Yang Dongfang

    2009-01-01

    Based on research results on the impacts of solar light, seawater temperature, and nutrient available to phytoplankton growth and changes in phytoplankton physiology and assemblage, we discussed the order of influence of these factors. By clarifying the mechanisms and processes of the impacts by these factors, we have determined the rising order of the importance as solar light, seawater temperature, and nutrient silicon (Si). Therefore, for human interests in sustaining economic development, the first thing to be considered is the input of nutrient Si into the ocean, followed by seawater temperature change.

  12. Nitrogen fertilization and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria treatments affected amino acid content of cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Atilla; Yildirim, Ertan; Ekinci, Melek; Turan, Metin; Kul, Raziye; Karagöz, Fazilet P.

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the influence of a nitrogen fixing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation (seed coating and seedling dipping) and 6 doses of nitrogen (0, 40, 80, 120, 160, 200 kg ha-1) application on amino acid contents of cabbage. Coating and seedling dipping applications caused a significant increase in values histidine, glycine, thionin, arginine and alanine of cabbage. Highest glutamate, serine, asparagines and glutamine contents were obtained from 160-200 kg ha-1 nitrogen dose applied plants. As a result, the use of bacteria treatments provides means of improving amino acid contents in cabbage.

  13. Deiodinase knockdown during early zebrafish development affects growth, development, energy metabolism, motility and phototransduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enise Bagci

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH balance is essential for vertebrate development. Deiodinase type 1 (D1 and type 2 (D2 increase and deiodinase type 3 (D3 decreases local intracellular levels of T3, the most important active TH. The role of deiodinase-mediated TH effects in early vertebrate development is only partially understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of deiodinases during early development of zebrafish until 96 hours post fertilization at the level of the transcriptome (microarray, biochemistry, morphology and physiology using morpholino (MO knockdown. Knockdown of D1+D2 (D1D2MO and knockdown of D3 (D3MO both resulted in transcriptional regulation of energy metabolism and (muscle development in abdomen and tail, together with reduced growth, impaired swim bladder inflation, reduced protein content and reduced motility. The reduced growth and impaired swim bladder inflation in D1D2MO could be due to lower levels of T3 which is known to drive growth and development. The pronounced upregulation of a large number of transcripts coding for key proteins in ATP-producing pathways in D1D2MO could reflect a compensatory response to a decreased metabolic rate, also typically linked to hypothyroidism. Compared to D1D2MO, the effects were more pronounced or more frequent in D3MO, in which hyperthyroidism is expected. More specifically, increased heart rate, delayed hatching and increased carbohydrate content were observed only in D3MO. An increase of the metabolic rate, a decrease of the metabolic efficiency and a stimulation of gluconeogenesis using amino acids as substrates may have been involved in the observed reduced protein content, growth and motility in D3MO larvae. Furthermore, expression of transcripts involved in purine metabolism coupled to vision was decreased in both knockdown conditions, suggesting that both may impair vision. This study provides new insights, not only into the role of deiodinases, but also into the importance of a correct

  14. Size Matters a Lot: Drought-Affected Italian Oaks Are Smaller and Show Lower Growth Prior to Tree Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Michele; Camarero, Jesús J.; Borghetti, Marco; Gazol, Antonio; Gentilesca, Tiziana; Ripullone, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic theory suggests that tall trees are at greater risk of drought-triggered death caused by hydraulic failure than small trees. In addition the drop in growth, observed in several tree species prior to death, is often interpreted as an early-warning signal of impending death. We test these hypotheses by comparing size, growth, and wood-anatomy patterns of living and now-dead trees in two Italian oak forests showing recent mortality episodes. The mortality probability of trees is modeled as a function of recent growth and tree size. Drift-diffusion-jump (DDJ) metrics are used to detect early-warning signals. We found that the tallest trees of the anisohydric Italian oak better survived drought contrary to what was predicted by the theory. Dead trees were characterized by a lower height and radial-growth trend than living trees in both study sites. The growth reduction of now-dead trees started about 10 years prior to their death and after two severe spring droughts during the early 2000s. This critical transition in growth was detected by DDJ metrics in the most affected site. Dead trees were also more sensitive to drought stress in this site indicating different susceptibility to water shortage between trees. Dead trees did not form earlywood vessels with smaller lumen diameter than surviving trees but tended to form wider latewood vessels with a higher percentage of vessel area. Since living and dead trees showed similar competition we did not expect that moderate thinning and a reduction in tree density would increase the short-term survival probability of trees. PMID:28270816

  15. RNA interference of WdFKS1 mRNA expression causes slowed growth, incomplete septation and loss of cell wall integrity in yeast cells of the polymorphic, pathogenic fungus Wangiella (Exophiala) dermatitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pengfei; Szaniszlo, Paul J

    2011-11-01

    As one of the main components of the fungal cell wall, β-1,3-glucan provides the mechanical strength to protect fungal protoplasts. The enzyme responsible for the synthesis of β-1,3-glucans in fungi is β-1,3-glucan synthase. Here we report the cloning, sequencing and characterization of the WdFKS1 gene, which in the pathogenic fungus Wangiella dermatitidis encodes the catalytic domain of its β-1, 3-glucan synthase. Because our research suggested that WdFKS1 is a single copy essential gene, we used RNA interference to reduce its expression. Reduction of the WdFKS1 messenger retarded growth and caused the loss of cell wall integrity of yeast cells, but not hyphae or sclerotic cells. We suggest that the WdFKS1 in this polymorphic agent of phaeohyphomycosis is not only required for cell wall construction and maintenance, but also is involved in septum formation.

  16. A near-null magnetic field affects cryptochrome-related hypocotyl growth and flowering in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunxiao; Yin, Xiao; Lv, Yan; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Yuxia; Song, Tao

    2012-03-01

    The blue light receptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to act as a magnetoreceptor based on the proposition that photochemical reactions are involved in sensing the geomagnetic field. But the effects of the geomagnetic field on cryptochrome remain unclear. Although the functions of cryptochrome have been well demonstrated for Arabidopsis, the effect of the geomagnetic field on the growth of Arabidopsis and its mechanism of action are poorly understood. We eliminated the local geomagnetic field to grow Arabidopsis in a near-null magnetic field and found that the inhibition of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by white light was weakened, and flowering time was delayed. The expressions of three cryptochrome-signaling-related genes, PHYB, CO and FT also changed; the transcript level of PHYB was elevated ca. 40%, and that of CO and FT was reduced ca. 40% and 50%, respectively. These data suggest that the effects of a near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis are cryptochrome-related, which may be revealed by a modification of the active state of cryptochrome and the subsequent signaling cascade.

  17. Root Respiration and Growth in Plantago major as Affected by Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, R; van der Werf, A; Lambers, H

    1989-09-01

    Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and P on root respiration and dry matter allocation were studied in Plantago major L. ssp. pleiosperma (Pilger). By applying P, the relative growth rate of non-VAM controls and plants colonized by Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann) Gerdemann and Trappe was increased to a similar extent (55-67%). However, leaf area ratio was increased more and net assimilation rate per unit leaf area was increased less by VAM infection than by P addition. The lower net assimilation rate could be related to a 20 to 30% higher root respiration rate per unit leaf area of VAM plants. Root respiration per unit dry matter and specific net uptake rates of N and P were increased more by VAM infection than by P addition. Neither the contribution of the alternative respiratory path nor the relative growth rate could account for the differences in root respiration rate between VAM and non-VAM plants. It was estimated that increased fungal respiration (87%) and ion uptake rate (13%) contributed to the higher respiratory activity of VAM roots of P. major.

  18. Fertilizer residence time affects nitrogen uptake efficiency and growth of sweet corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotarelli, L; Scholberg, J M; Dukes, M D; Muñoz-Carpena, R

    2008-01-01

    Understanding plant N uptake dynamics is critical for increasing fertilizer N uptake efficiency (FUE) and minimize the risk of N leaching. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of residence time of N fertilizer on N uptake and FUE of sweet corn. Plants were grown in 25 L columns during the fall and spring to mimic short-term N uptake dynamics. Nitrogen was applied either 1, 3, or 7 d before a weekly leaching event, using KNO3 solution (total of 393 kg N ha(-1)). Residence times (tR) were tR-1, tR-3, and tR-7 d before weekly removal of residual soil N. Plant N uptake was calculated by comparing weekly N recovery from planted with non-planted columns. During the fall, N uptake values at 70 d after emergence were 59, 73, and 126 kg N ha(-1). During the spring, corresponding values were 54, 108, and 159 kg N ha(-1). A linear response of plant growth and yield to the tR was observed under cooler conditions, whereas a quadratic response occurred under warmer conditions. There was correlation between root length density and yield. It is concluded that increasing N fertilizer residence time, which is indicative of better irrigation practices, enhanced overall sweet corn growth, yield, N uptake, and FUE, consequently reduced the risk of N being leached below the root zone before complete N uptake.

  19. Drosophila Ten-m and filamin affect motor neuron growth cone guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Zheng

    Full Text Available The Drosophila Ten-m (also called Tenascin-major, or odd Oz (odz gene has been associated with a pair-rule phenotype. We identified and characterized new alleles of Drosophila Ten-m to establish that this gene is not responsible for segmentation defects but rather causes defects in motor neuron axon routing. In Ten-m mutants the inter-segmental nerve (ISN often crosses segment boundaries and fasciculates with the ISN in the adjacent segment. Ten-m is expressed in the central nervous system and epidermal stripes during the stages when the growth cones of the neurons that form the ISN navigate to their targets. Over-expression of Ten-m in epidermal cells also leads to ISN misrouting. We also found that Filamin, an actin binding protein, physically interacts with the Ten-m protein. Mutations in cheerio, which encodes Filamin, cause defects in motor neuron axon routing like those of Ten-m. During embryonic development, the expression of Filamin and Ten-m partially overlap in ectodermal cells. These results suggest that Ten-m and Filamin in epidermal cells might together influence growth cone progression.

  20. Growth and some physiological attributes of pea (Pisum sativum L.) as affected by salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, F; Khavari-Nejad, R A; Rastgar-Jazii, F; Sticklen, M

    2007-08-15

    The effects of salt stress were studied on growth and physiology of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Green Arrow) in a pot study. Pea plants were treated with NaCl at 0, 10, 30, 50 and 70 mM in Hoagland solution. Plants were harvested after 21 days for measurements of physiological parameters. The highest NAR and RGR were found in 10 mM NaCl. However, in 70 mM NaCl, RGR and RLGR were significantly decreased in respect of other concentrations of NaCl. In 50 and 70 mM NaCl, chlorophylls contents and photosynthetic rate, were significantly decreased and CO2 compensation concentration and respiration rate increased in comparison with control. In 10 and 30 mM NaCl gas exchanges and chlorophyll contents were not significantly decrease in respect of control. Results indicated that Pisum sativum L. cv. Green Arrow can tolerate to 70 mM NaCl, also growth of plants in 10 and 30 mM NaCl was better than that of those in 0 mM NaCl.

  1. GROWTH, YIELD AND POSTHARVEST QUALITY OF WAX APPLE AS AFFECTED BY NAPHTHALENE ACETIC ACID APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD MONERUZZAMAN KHANDAKER

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of this study represent the first report of the effect of Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA on the pre and post harvest quality of wax apple fruit. The wax apple trees were spray treated with 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg L-1 NAA under field conditions during 2008 to 2011. The experiments were carried out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD with six replications. Leaf chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic yield, net photosynthetic rate, drymatter content of leaves and total soluble solids and K+content of wax apple fruits were significantly increased after treatments with 10 mg L-1. Polygalacturonase activity significantly decreased with NAA treatments. The application of 5 mg L-1 NAA increased 27% more bud and reduced 42% less fruit drop compared to the control. In addition, higher protein and phosphate synthase activity of leaves, fruit set, fruit growth, larger fruit size and yield were recorded in NAA treated plants. In storage, treated fruits exhibited higher TSS and firmness and less weight loss, browning, titratable acidity, respiration and ethylene production than the control. It is concluded that spraying with 5 and 10 mg L-1 NAA once a week under field conditions produced better fruit growth and yield of the wax apple and maintained better fruit quality in postharvest storage.

  2. Expression of an Antisense BcMF3 Affects Microsporogenesis and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Le-cheng; CAO Jia-shu; YU Xiao-lin; XIANG Xun; FEI Yong-jun

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to provide some information relevant to the molecular mechanism of genic male sterility in plants, BcMF3 gene that encodes a pectin methylesterase was isolated from the fertile B line of Chinese cabbage-pak-choi (Brassica rapa ssp.chinensis, syn. B. campestris ssp. chinensis). In the present paper, a 455-bp antisense cDNA fragment of BcMF3 was introduced to binary vector pBI121, and then was mobilized into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. The A.tumefaciens harboring the BcMF3 antisense fragment was transformed to Arabidopsis thaliana by floral dip. Scanning electronic microscopy examination demonstrated that 47.8% of BcMF3 antisense pollen grains exhibited abnormal shape,which might lead to decreased germination of pollens, suggesting that the product of BcMF3 gene plays an important role during microsporogenesis. The evidence on burst of 45.7% of BcMF3 antisense pollen tubes in vitro and a majority of BcMF3 antisense pollens restricted within the stigmatic tissue revealed that BcMF3 is involved in aiding the growth of pollen tubes. The results suggest that BcMF3 acts at both stages of microsporogensis and pollen tube growth.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus infant infection adversely affects growth and development in maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed infants in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompels, U A; Larke, N; Sanz-Ramos, M; Bates, M; Musonda, K; Manno, D; Siame, J; Monze, M; Filteau, S

    2012-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) coinfections have been shown to increase infant morbidity, mortality, and AIDS progression. In HIV-endemic regions, maternal HIV-exposed but HIV-uninfected infants, which is the majority of children affected by HIV, also show poor growth and increased morbidity. Although nutrition has been examined, the effects of HCMV infection have not been evaluated. We studied the effects of HCMV infection on the growth, development, and health of maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed infants in Zambia. Infants were examined in a cohort recruited to a trial of micronutrient-fortified complementary foods. HIV-infected mothers and infants had received perinatal antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Growth, development, and morbidity were analyzed by linear regression analyses in relation to maternal HIV exposure and HCMV infection, as screened by sera DNA for viremia at 6 months of age and by antibody for infection at 18 months. All HCMV-seropositive infants had decreased length-for-age by 18 months compared with seronegative infants (standard deviation [z]-score difference: -0.44 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -.72 to -.17]; P = .002). In HIV-exposed infants, those who were HCMV positive compared with those who were negative, also had reduced head size (mean z-score difference: -0.72 [95% CI, -1.23 to -.22]; P = .01) and lower psychomotor development (Bayley test score difference: -4.1 [95% CI, -7.8 to -.5]; P = .03). HIV-exposed, HCMV-viremic infants were more commonly referred for hospital treatment than HCMV-negative infants. The effects of HCMV were unaffected by micronutrient fortification. HCMV affects child growth, development, and morbidity of African infants, particularly in those maternally exposed to HIV. HCMV is therefore a risk factor for child health in this region.

  4. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B differentially affects thyroid cancer cell growth, apoptosis, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweppe Rebecca E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is constitutively activated in many cancers and plays a key role in promoting cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. Our understanding of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer, however, is limited. In this study, we have investigated the role of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis using selective genetic inhibition of NF-κB in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Results Three pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-κB differentially inhibited growth in a panel of advanced thyroid cancer cell lines, suggesting that these NF-κB inhibitors may have off-target effects. We therefore used a selective genetic approach to inhibit NF-κB signaling by overexpression of a dominant-negative IκBα (mIκBα. These studies revealed decreased cell growth in only one of five thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, which occurred through a block in the S-G2/M transition. Resistance to TNFα-induced apoptosis was observed in all cell lines, likely through an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of NF-κB by mIκBα sensitized a subset of cell lines to TNFα-induced apoptosis. Sensitive cell lines displayed sustained activation of the stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK pathway, defining a potential mechanism of response. Finally, NF-κB inhibition by mIκBα expression differentially reduced thyroid cancer cell invasion in these thyroid cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines demonstrated approximately a two-fold decrease in invasion, which was associated with differential expression of MMP-13. MMP-9 was reduced by mIκBα expression in all cell lines tested. Conclusions These data indicate that selective inhibition of NF-κB represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of advanced thyroid. However, it is apparent that global regulation of thyroid cancer cell growth and invasion is not achieved by NF-κB signaling alone. Instead, our

  5. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles affect the growth and microRNA expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Taylor P; Burklew, Caitlin E; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) is one of the most widely used pigments in the world. Due to its heavy use in industry and daily life, such as food additives, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and paints, many residues are released into the environment and currently TiO(2) nanoparticles are considered an emerging environmental contaminant. Although several studies have shown the effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on a wide range of organisms including bacteria, algae, plankton, fish, mice, and rats, little research has been performed on land plants. In this study, we investigated the effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the growth, development, and gene expression of tobacco, an important economic and agricultural crop in the southeastern USA as well as around the world. We found that TiO(2) nanoparticles significantly inhibited the germination rates, root lengths, and biomasses of tobacco seedlings after 3 weeks of exposure to 0.1, 1, 2.5, and 5 % TiO(2) nanoparticles and that overall growth and development of the tobacco seedlings significantly decreased as TiO(2) nanoparticle concentrations increased. Overall, tobacco roots were the most sensitive to TiO(2) nanoparticle exposure. Nano-TiO(2) also significantly influenced the expression profiles of microRNAs (miRNAs), a recently discovered class of small endogenous noncoding RNAs (∼20-22 nt) that are considered important gene regulators and have been shown to play an important role in plant development as well as plant tolerance to abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, cold, and heavy metal. Low concentrations (0.1 and 1 %) of TiO(2) nanoparticles dramatically induced miRNA expression in tobacco seedlings with miR395 and miR399 exhibiting the greatest fold changes of 285-fold and 143-fold, respectively. The results of this study show that TiO(2) nanoparticles have a negative impact on tobacco growth and development and that miRNAs may play an important role in tobacco response to heavy metals/nanoparticles by regulating

  6. Ethanol-induced yeast flocculation directed by the promoter of TPS1 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase 1 for efficient ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Chang, Alan K; Zhang, Qiu-Mei; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-01-01

    Yeast flocculation is an important trait in the brewing industry as well as in ethanol production, through which biomass can be recovered by cost-effective sedimentation. However, mass transfer limitation may affect yeast growth and ethanol fermentation if the flocculation occurs earlier before fermentation is completed. In this article, a novel type of cell-cell flocculation induced by trehalose-6-phosphate synthase 1 (TPS1) promoter was presented. The linear cassette HO-P(TPS1)-FLO1(SPSC01)-KanMX4-HO was constructed to transform the non-flocculating industrial yeast S. cerevisiae 4126 by chromosome integration to obtain a new flocculating yeast strain, ZLH01, whose flocculation was induced by ethanol produced during fermentation. The experimental results illustrated that flocculation of ZLH01 was triggered by 3% (v/v) ethanol and enhanced as ethanol concentration increased till complete flocculation was achieved at ethanol concentration of 8% (v/v). Real time PCR analysis confirmed that the expression of FLO1(SPSC01) was dependent on ethanol concentration. The growth and ethanol fermentation of ZLH01 were improved significantly, compared with the constitutive flocculating yeast BHL01 engineered with the same FLO gene but directed by the constitutive 3-phosphoglycerate kinase promoter PGK1, particularly under high temperature conditions. These characteristics make the engineered yeast more suitable for ethanol production from industrial substrates under high gravity and temperature conditions. In addition, this strategy offers advantage in inducing differential expression of other genes for metabolic engineering applications of S. cerevisiae.

  7. Corn Growth as Affected by Plastic Cover Under Drip Irrigation Condition in the Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXUE-FENG; U.SHANI

    1994-01-01

    Plastic cover,as a method to minimize soil water evaporation and improve water use efficiency,was used for corn during the whole growing period in a desert area.Field Studies were conducted to determine the effect of plastic covering nmanagement on corn growth and rooting pattern and its relationship with changes in climate.Four treatments.0) bared soil without cover,1) covering one side of the crop,2) covering both sides of the crop,and 3) covering the surface totally,were established on a sandy loam soil.Results showed that treatment 0 was significantly different from others and revealed that plastic covering was not always good to corn growht.Improper usage of plastic cover might weaken root development and thereafter lower the total yield of the crop.Suitable practices cvombining different methods discussed could not only improve water use efficiency but also increase the crop yield.

  8. The sesquiterpene lactone dehydroleucodine (DhL) affects the growth of cultured epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brengio, S D; Belmonte, S A; Guerreiro, E; Giordano, O S; Pietrobon, E O; Sosa, M A

    2000-04-01

    Here, we report an inhibitory effect of a sesquiterpene lactone dehydroleucodine (DhL) on the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi in culture. At concentrations of the drug between 5 and 10 microg/ml in the medium,the parasites remained alive for at least 4 days. Higher concentrations of DhL were lethal for the parasites within a few hours. The effect of DhL is irreversible. Morphological changes induced by DhL were also observed in the parasites. The effect of DhL was blocked by the presence of reducing substrates such as glutathione or dithiothreitol, but these agents were not able to reverse the effect of DhL if added 2 days after the start of drug exposure.

  9. Chemotyping of yeast mutants using robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, K J; El-Alama, M; Stein, G; Bradshaw, C; Slonimski, P P; Maundrell, K

    1999-07-01

    By now, the EUROFAN programme for the functional analysis of genes from the yeast genome has attained its cruising speed. Indeed, several hundreds of yeast mutants with no phenotype as tested by growth on standard media and no significant sequence similarity to proteins of known function are available through the efforts of various laboratories. Based on the methodology initiated during the pilot project on yeast chromosome III (Yeast 13, 1547-1562, 1997) we adapted it to High Throughput Screening (HTS), using robotics. The first 100 different gene deletions from EUROSCARF, constructed in an FY1679 strain background, were run against a collection of about 300 inhibitors. Many of these inhibitors have not been reported until now to interfere in vivo with growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present paper we provide a list of novel growth conditions and a compilation of 49 yeast deletants (from chromosomes II, IV, VII, X, XIV, XV) corresponding to 58% of the analysed genes, with at least one clear and stringent phenotype. The majority of these deletants are sensitive to one or two compounds (monotropic phenotype) while a distinct subclass of deletants displays a hyper-pleiotropic phenotype with sensitivities to a dozen or more compounds. Therefore, chemotyping of unknown genes with a large spectrum of drugs opens new vistas for a more in-depth functional analysis and a more precise definition of molecular targets.

  10. Extension of yeast chronological lifespan by methylamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronological aging of yeast cells is commonly used as a model for aging of human post-mitotic cells. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose in the presence of ammonium sulphate is mainly used in yeast aging research. We have analyzed chronological aging of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha grown at conditions that require primary peroxisome metabolism for growth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The chronological lifespan of H. polymorpha is strongly enhanced when cells are grown on methanol or ethanol, metabolized by peroxisome enzymes, relative to growth on glucose that does not require peroxisomes. The short lifespan of H. polymorpha on glucose is mainly due to medium acidification, whereas most likely ROS do not play an important role. Growth of cells on methanol/methylamine instead of methanol/ammonium sulphate resulted in further lifespan enhancement. This was unrelated to medium acidification. We show that oxidation of methylamine by peroxisomal amine oxidase at carbon starvation conditions is responsible for lifespan extension. The methylamine oxidation product formaldehyde is further oxidized resulting in NADH generation, which contributes to increased ATP generation and reduction of ROS levels in the stationary phase. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that primary peroxisome metabolism enhanced chronological lifespan of H. polymorpha. Moreover, the possibility to generate NADH at carbon starvation conditions by an organic nitrogen source supports further extension of the lifespan of the cell. Consequently, the interpretation of CLS analyses in yeast should include possible effects on the energy status of the cell.

  11. Survival and growth of yeast without telomere capping by Cdc13 in the absence of Sgs1, Exo1, and Rad9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien-Ping Ngo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of telomere capping is absolutely essential to the survival of eukaryotic cells. Telomere capping proteins, such as Cdc13 and POT1, are essential for the viability of budding yeast and mammalian cells, respectively. Here we identify, for the first time, three genetic modifications that allow budding yeast cells to survive without telomere capping by Cdc13. We found that simultaneous inactivation of Sgs1, Exo1, and Rad9, three DNA damage response (DDR proteins, is sufficient to allow cell division in the absence of Cdc13. Quantitative amplification of ssDNA (QAOS was used to show that the RecQ helicase Sgs1 plays an important role in the resection of uncapped telomeres, especially in the absence of checkpoint protein Rad9. Strikingly, simultaneous deletion of SGS1 and the nuclease EXO1, further reduces resection at uncapped telomeres and together with deletion of RAD9 permits cell survival without CDC13. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis studies show that cdc13-1 rad9Delta sgs1Delta exo1Delta strains can maintain linear chromosomes despite the absence of telomere capping by Cdc13. However, with continued passage, the telomeres of such strains eventually become short and are maintained by recombination-based mechanisms. Remarkably, cdc13Delta rad9Delta sgs1Delta exo1Delta strains, lacking any Cdc13 gene product, are viable and can grow indefinitely. Our work has uncovered a critical role for RecQ helicases in limiting the division of cells with uncapped telomeres, and this may provide one explanation for increased tumorigenesis in human diseases associated with mutations of RecQ helicases. Our results reveal the plasticity of the telomere cap and indicate that the essential role of telomere capping is to counteract specific aspects of the DDR.

  12. Puerarin affects bone biomarkers in the serum of rats with intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juncao; Chen, Pingyang; Qi, Huaxue; Huang, Danhong

    2016-04-01

    To investigate serum bone biomarkers in rats with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) in order to determine the effects of puerarin on bone metabolism. A rat model of IUGR was induced using a low protein diet during pregnancy. The offspring were given puerarin or an identical volume of saline via subcutaneous abdominal injection. All rats were studied at 1, 3, and 8 weeks of age. Serum biomarkers of bone formation, including insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor-activator of nuclear factor-κB Iigand (RANKL), as well as blood levels of calcium and phosphorus were measured. Serum BALP, OPG, IGF-1, and OC levels, as well as the OPG/RANKL ratio, were lower in the IUGR group compared with the control group at 1 week of age (P = 0.024, 0.011, 0.014, 0.004, and 0.002, respectively). At 3 weeks of age, the serum BALP and OC levels were higher in the protein-restricted group compared with the control group (P = 0.003 and 0.001, respectively). A comparison between the IUGR plus puerarin intervention group and the IUGR group revealed differences in the levels of BALP and IGF-1 at 3 weeks of age (P = 0.008 and 0.003, respectively). In addition, serum OPG and OC levels and the OPG/RANKL ratio were higher at 8 weeks of age (P = 0.044, 0.007, and 0.016, respectively). No differences in serum calcium and phosphorus levels were observed among the three groups. Our study demonstrates that the bone microenvironment of the fetus can be altered by a low protein maternal diet and that puerarin can reverse these effects. These results indicate that the nutritional environment plays an important role in early skeletal development and that the bone turnover of IUGR rats can be altered by puerarin treatment.

  13. Estrogen Receptor β Agonists Differentially Affect the Growth of Human Melanoma Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Marzagalli

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive malignancy; its incidence is increasing worldwide and its prognosis remains poor. Clinical observations indicate that estrogen receptor β (ERβ is expressed in melanoma tissues and its expression decreases with tumor progression, suggesting its tumor suppressive function. These experiments were performed to investigate the effects of ERβ activation on melanoma cell growth.Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Cell proliferation was assessed by counting the cells by hemocytometer. ERβ transcriptional activity was evaluated by gene reporter assay. Global DNA methylation was analyzed by restriction enzyme assay and ERβ isoforms were identified by qRT-PCR. We demonstrated that ERβ is expressed in a panel of human melanoma cell lines (BLM, WM115, A375, WM1552. In BLM (NRAS-mutant cells, ERβ agonists significantly and specifically inhibited cell proliferation. ERβ activation triggered its cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the antiproliferative activity of ERβ agonists was associated with an altered expression of G1-S transition-related proteins. In these cells, global DNA was found to be hypomethylated when compared to normal melanocytes; this DNA hypomethylation status was reverted by ERβ activation. ERβ agonists also decreased the proliferation of WM115 (BRAF V600D-mutant cells, while they failed to reduce the growth of A375 and WM1552 (BRAF V600E-mutant cells. Finally, we could observe that ERβ isoforms are expressed at different levels in the various cell lines. Specific oncogenic mutations or differential expression of receptor isoforms might be responsible for the different responses of cell lines to ERβ agonists.Our results demonstrate that ERβ is expressed in melanoma cell lines and that ERβ agonists differentially regulate the proliferation of these cells. These data confirm the notion that melanoma is a

  14. Altered seawater salinity levels affected growth and photosynthesis ofUlva fasciata (Ulvales, Chlorophyta) germlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Binbin; ZOU Dinghui

    2015-01-01

    Seawater salinity is greatly influenced by tide, evaporation and rain falls. In this study, we investigated the growth and photosynthetic responses of zygote-derivedUlva fasciata Delile germlings to short-term (minutes) and prolonged (days) exposure to different salinity gradients, to evaluate the effect of salinity variation on the early stage of life history in this seaweed. The results showed that, the maximum net photosynthetic rates (NPRm) ofU. fasciata germlings was observably decreased in desalted (25 and 15) and high (45) salinity seawater in short-term exposure tests (in minutes). However, after 30 min, the photosynthesis activity in medium salinity (25) was maintained at a relative high level (above 70%). After 8 d prolonged culture, the photosynthesis and mean relative growth rate (RGR) of germlings were all markedly lowered, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents increased as the salinity desalted from 34 to 15. The salinity decrease from 34 to 25 had no significant effect on the RGR, but obviously influenced the morphology of the germlings. High salinity level (45) significantly depressed theRGR and photosynthesis ofU. fasciata germlings, while it notably increased the MDA contents. The results showed that the salinity elevation had more detrimental effects onUlva fasciata germlings than salinity decrease did. The germlings grown at the salinity seawater levels from 25 to 34, performed preferable photosynthetic acclimation both in temporary and prolonged culture. Broad salinity tolerance from 25 to 34 inU. fasciata germlings may have partly evolved as a response to regular diurnal tides.

  15. Bacterial Respiration and Growth Rates Affect the Feeding Preferences, Brood Size and Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    Full Text Available Bacteria serve as live food and nutrients for bacterial-feeding nematodes (BFNs in soils, and influence nematodes behavior and physiology through their metabolism. Five bacterial taxa (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens JX1, Variovorax sp. JX14, Bacillus megaterium JX15, Pseudomonas fluorescens Y1 and Escherichia coli OP50 and the typical BFN Caenorhabditis elegans were selected to study the effects of bacterial respiration and growth rates on the feeding preferences, brood size and lifespan of nematodes. P. fluorescens Y1 and E. coli OP50 were found to be more active, with high respiration and rapid growth, whereas B. amyloliquefaciens JX1 and B. megaterium JX15 were inactive. The nematode C. elegans preferred active P. fluorescens Y1 and E. coli OP50 obviously. Furthermore, worms that fed on these two active bacteria produced more offspring but had shorter lifespan, while inactive and less preferred bacteria had increased nematodes lifespan and decreased the brood size. Based on these results, we propose that the bacterial activity may influence the behavior and life traits of C. elegans in the following ways: (1 active bacteria reproduce rapidly and emit high levels of CO2 attracting C. elegans; (2 these active bacteria use more resources in the nematodes' gut to sustain their survival and reproduction, thereby reducing the worm's lifespan; (3 inactive bacteria may provide less food for worms than active bacteria, thus increasing nematodes lifespan but decreasing their fertility. Nematodes generally require a balance between their preferred foods and beneficial foods, only preferred food may not be beneficial for nematodes.

  16. Bacterial Respiration and Growth Rates Affect the Feeding Preferences, Brood Size and Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Yan, Xiaomei; Ye, Chenglong; Zhao, Haiyan; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria serve as live food and nutrients for bacterial-feeding nematodes (BFNs) in soils, and influence nematodes behavior and physiology through their metabolism. Five bacterial taxa (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens JX1, Variovorax sp. JX14, Bacillus megaterium JX15, Pseudomonas fluorescens Y1 and Escherichia coli OP50) and the typical BFN Caenorhabditis elegans were selected to study the effects of bacterial respiration and growth rates on the feeding preferences, brood size and lifespan of nematodes. P. fluorescens Y1 and E. coli OP50 were found to be more active, with high respiration and rapid growth, whereas B. amyloliquefaciens JX1 and B. megaterium JX15 were inactive. The nematode C. elegans preferred active P. fluorescens Y1 and E. coli OP50 obviously. Furthermore, worms that fed on these two active bacteria produced more offspring but had shorter lifespan, while inactive and less preferred bacteria had increased nematodes lifespan and decreased the brood size. Based on these results, we propose that the bacterial activity may influence the behavior and life traits of C. elegans in the following ways: (1) active bacteria reproduce rapidly and emit high levels of CO2 attracting C. elegans; (2) these active bacteria use more resources in the nematodes' gut to sustain their survival and reproduction, thereby reducing the worm's lifespan; (3) inactive bacteria may provide less food for worms than active bacteria, thus increasing nematodes lifespan but decreasing their fertility. Nematodes generally require a balance between their preferred foods and beneficial foods, only preferred food may not be beneficial for nematodes.

  17. Growth condition-dependent Esp expression by Enterococcus faecium affects initial adherence and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wamel, Willem J B; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Bonten, Marc J M; Top, Janetta; Posthuma, George; Willems, Rob J L

    2007-02-01

    A genetic subpopulation of Enterococcus faecium, called clonal complex 17 (CC-17), is strongly associated with hospital outbreaks and invasive infections. Most CC-17 strains contain a putative pathogenicity island encoding the E. faecium variant of enterococcal surface protein (Esp). Western blotting, flow cytometric analyses, and electron microscopy showed that Esp is expressed and exposed on the surface of E. faecium, though Esp expression and surface exposure are highly varied among different strains. Furthermore, Esp expression depends on growth conditions like temperature and anaerobioses. When grown at 37 degrees C, five of six esp-positive E. faecium strains showed significantly increased levels of surface-exposed Esp compared to bacteria grown at 21 degrees C, which was confirmed at the transcriptional level by real-time PCR. In addition, a significant increase in surface-exposed Esp was found in half of these strains when grown at 37 degrees C under anaerobic conditions compared to the level in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. Finally, amounts of surface-exposed Esp correlated with initial adherence to polystyrene (R(2) = 0.7146) and biofilm formation (R(2) = 0.7535). Polystyrene adherence was competitively inhibited by soluble recombinant N-terminal Esp. This study demonstrates that Esp expression on the surface of E. faecium (i) varies consistently between strains, (ii) is growth condition dependent, and (iii) is quantitatively correlated with initial adherence and biofilm formation. These data indicate that E. faecium senses and responds to changing environmental conditions, which might play a role in the early stages of infection when bacteria transit from oxygen-rich conditions at room temperature to anaerobic conditions at body temperature. In addition, variation of surface exposure may explain the contrasting findings reported on the role of Esp in biofilm formation.

  18. Antagonizing the Hedgehog Pathway with Vismodegib Impairs Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Growth In Vivo by Affecting Stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerang, Mayura; Bérard, Karima; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Lauk, Olivia; Vrugt, Bart; Boss, Andreas; Kenkel, David; Broggini-Tenzer, Angela; Stahel, Rolf A; Arni, Stephan; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    An autocrine-driven upregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been described in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), in which the ligand, desert Hh (DHH), was produced from tumor cells. However, our investigation revealed that the Hh pathway is activated in both tumor and stroma of MPM tumor specimens and an orthotopic immunocompetent rat MPM model. This was demonstrated by positive immunohistochemical staining of Glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1) and Patched1 (PTCH1) in both tumor and stromal fractions. DHH was predominantly expressed in the tumor fractions. To further investigate the role of the Hh pathway in MPM stroma, we antagonized Hh signaling in the rat model of MPM using a Hh antagonist, vismodegib, (100 mg/kg orally). Daily treatment with vismodegib efficiently downregulated Hh target genes Gli1, Hedgehog Interacting Protein (Hhip), and Ptch1, and caused a significant reduction of tumor volume and tumor growth delay. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that vismodegib treatment primarily downregulated GLI1 and HHIP in the stromal compartment along with a reduced expression of previously described fibroblast Hh-responsive genes such as Fibronectin (Fn1) and Vegfa Primary cells isolated from the rat model cultured in 3% O2 continued to express Dhh but did not respond to vismodegib in vitro However, culture supernatant from these cells stimulated Gli1, Ptch1, and Fn1 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which was suppressed by vismodegib. Our study provides new evidence regarding the role of Hh signaling in MPM stroma in the maintenance of tumor growth, emphasizing Hh signaling as a treatment target for MPM. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 1095-105. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Andrographolide inhibits hepatoma cells growth and affects the expression of cell cycle related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Liu, Tian-Yu; Xu, Chong; Ji, Li-Li; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2009-09-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the toxic effects of andrographolide (Andro) on hepatoma cells and elucidate its preliminary mechanisms. After cells were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-50 micromol x L(-1)) for 24 h, cell viability was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Furthermore, after hepatoma cells (Hep3B and HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-30 micromol x L(-1)) for 14 d, the number of colony formation was accounted under microscope. Cell cycle related proteins such as Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin B and Cyclin D1 were detected with Western blotting assay and the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. MTT results showed that Andro induced growth inhibition of hepatoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner but had no significant effects on human normal liver L-02 cells. Andro dramatically decreased the colony formation of hepatoma cells in the concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, Andro induced a decrease of Hep3B cells at the G0-G1 phase and a concomitant accumulation of cells at G2-M phase. At the molecular level, Western blotting results showed that Andro decreased the expression of Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B proteins in a time-dependent manner, which are all cell cycle related proteins. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Andro specifically inhibited the growth of hepatoma cells and cellular cell cycle related proteins were possibly involved in this process.

  20. Characterisation of palm wine yeast isolates for industrial utilisation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2006-10-02

    Oct 2, 2006 ... make this wine a veritable medium for the growth of a consortium of ... after isolation on glucose yeast agar (GYA) and yeast malt agar. (YMA) (Biolife). ... lactose, raffinose, soluble starch, D-xylose, L-arabinose, and D- ribose.

  1. Efficient expression of the yeast metallothionein gene in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, T.; Shatzman, A.; Zimmerman, J.; Strickler, J.; Rosenberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The yeast metallothionein gene CUP1 was cloned into a bacterial expression system to achieve efficient, controlled expression of the stable, unprocessed protein product. The Escherichia coli-synthesized yeast metallothionein bound copper, cadmium, zinc, indicating that the protein was functional. Furthermore, E. coli cells expressing CUP1 acquired a new, inducible ability to selectively sequester heavy metal ions from the growth medium.

  2. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis after exposure to the yeast Rhodotorula rubra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siersted, H C; Gravesen, S

    1993-05-01

    A case of extrinsic allergic alveolitis following exposure to the red yeast Rhodotorula rubra is reported--to our knowledge, for the first time. Extensive growth of the yeast in the patient's environment was demonstrated, explaining an elevated titer of Rhodotorula-specific precipitating antibodies in his serum. A bronchial provocation test confirmed the diagnosis.

  3. Medicinal Mushroom Growth as Affected by Non-Axenic Casing Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. C. ZIED; M. T. A. MINHONI; J. KOPYTOWSKI-FILHO; L. BARBOSA; M. C. N. ANDRADE

    2011-01-01

    Ten different casing soils were collected from two soils at two depths (0.2 and 2.0 m below soil surface) to examine the relationships between the physical properties of non-axenic casing soil and yield, number and weight of the medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei ss. Heinemann. The results showed that soil clay content and bulk density were negatively correlated with the mushroom yield,respectively, but soil silt content and water-holding capacity were found to be positively correlated with the yield. The number of mushrooms was negatively correlated with soil water-holding capacity but positively correlated with soil clay, bulk density and porosity.The weight of mushroom was positively correlated with the content of soil fine sand and negatively correlated with the contents of soil coarse sand, total sand and clay. Neither soil depth nor different soil combinations affected the yield and number of mushrooms, but the mushroom weight was affected by the soil combinations and soil depth, so interplay in the fructification process with the physical characteristics of casing is complicated.

  4. Real-time monitoring and control of the specific growth rate in yeast fed-batch cultures based on process analytical technology tools such as biocalorimetry or spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Schuler, Moira Monika

    2012-01-01

    Key features of bioprocesses, such as product quantity and quality, but also cell physiology can be related to the growth characteristics of the organism under study. The specific growth rate, a key variable, cannot be measured directly, but might be estimated and inferred from other measurable variables such as biomass, substrate or product concentrations. The present thesis reviews techniques for real-time estimation and control of the specific growth rate in microbial fed-batch cultures by...

  5. Influence of preserved brewing yeast strains on fermentation behavior and flocculation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Chul; Wackerbauer, Karl; Beckmann, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Preservation methods on the physiological and brewing technical characters in bottom and top brewing yeast strains were investigated. The preserved yeasts were reactivated after 24 months storage and grown up to stationary phase. The samples of filter paper storage indicated a higher cell growth and viability during propagation than those of nitrogen and lyophilization storage independent on propagation temperature. In addition, the filter paper storage demonstrated a faster absorption of free amino nitrogen and a highest level of higher aliphatic alcohols production during propagation than other preservation methods, which can be attributed to intensive cell growth during propagation. Moreover, the filter paper storage showed a faster accumulation for glycogen and trehalose during propagation, whereas, in particular, lyophilization storage noted a longer adaptation time regarding synthesis of glycogen and trehalose with delayed cell growth. In beer analysis, the filter paper storage formed an increased higher aliphatic alcohols than control. In conclusion, the preservation of filter paper affected positively on yeast growth, viability and beer quality independent on propagation temperature. In addition, in this study, it was obtained that the HICF and Helm-test can be involved as rapid methods for determination of flocculation capacity. PMID:20368948

  6. Respiratory capacity of the Kluyveromyces marxianus yeast isolated from the mezcal process during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano-Plaza, Melchor; Gschaedler-Mathis, Anne; Noriega-Cisneros, Ruth; Clemente-Guerrero, Mónica; Manzo-Ávalos, Salvador; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    During the mezcal fermentation process, yeasts are affected by several stresses that can affect their fermentation capability. These stresses, such as thermal shock, ethanol, osmotic and growth inhibitors are common during fermentation. Cells have improved metabolic systems and they express stress response genes in order to decrease the damage caused during the stress, but to the best of our knowledge, there are no published works exploring the effect of oxidants and prooxidants, such as H2O2 and menadione, during growth. In this article, we describe the behavior of Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from spontaneous mezcal fermentation during oxidative stress, and compared it with that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that were also obtained from mezcal, using the W303-1A strain as a reference. S. cerevisiae strains showed greater viability after oxidative stress compared with K. marxianus strains. However, when the yeast strains were grown in the presence of oxidants in the media, K. marxianus exhibited a greater ability to grow in menadione than it did in H2O2. Moreover, when K. marxianus SLP1 was grown in a minibioreactor, its behavior when exposed to menadione was different from its behavior with H2O2. The yeast maintained the ability to consume dissolved oxygen during the 4 h subsequent to the addition of menadione, and then stopped respiration. When exposed to H2O2, the yeast stopped consuming oxygen for the following 8 h, but began to consume oxygen when stressors were no longer applied. In conclusion, yeast isolated from spontaneous mezcal fermentation was able to resist oxidative stress for a long period of time.

  7. Growth and development of moringa (Moringa oleifera L. stem cuttings as affected by diameter magnitude, growth media, and indole-3-butyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsuddeen Rufai

    2016-12-01

    chlorophyll content were found to be non-significantly (P>0.05 influenced. The MB growth media was observed to significantly affect the plant height, percentage root number, and root length as compared to the M growth media. For a successful vegetative propagation and subsequent domestication, the MB growth media coupled with a higher stem diameter size are recommended.

  8. Growth and development of moringa (Moringa oleifera L. stem cuttings as affected by diameter magnitude, growth media, and indole-3-butyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsuddeen Rufai

    2016-12-01

    chlorophyll content were found to be non-significantly (P>0.05 influenced. The MB growth media was observed to significantly affect the plant height, percentage root number, and root length as compared to the M growth media. For a successful vegetative propagation and subsequent domestication, the MB growth media coupled with a higher stem diameter size are recommended.

  9. Growth status significantly affects the response of human lung cancer cells to antitumor polyamine-analogue exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Diane L; Devereux, Wendy L; Hacker, Amy; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2002-08-01

    Human solid tumors frequently have a relatively small growth fraction,which interferes with the action of many chemotherapeutic agents that target actively cycling cells. Several polyamine analogues are currently being developed for clinical application against human solid tumors including N1,N11-bis(ethyl)norspermine. Therefore, an effort was made to examine the effects of growth rate on polyamine-analogue efficacy. Low growth fraction (LGF) cell cultures of the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H157 were generated to partially mimic solid tumors with low mitotic indices. Log-phase cells were compared with LGF cells with respect to cell survival and biochemical effects after exposure to polyamine analogues. The results demonstrate generally that LGF NCI-H157 cells were sensitive to analogue treatment. However, the dose necessary to elicit a response in LGF cells was an order of magnitude higher than the dose needed in log-phase cells. Additionally, the biochemical effects of analogues were similar between log phase and LGF cells with regard to a down-regulation of polyamine biosynthesis as measured by ornithine decarboxylase activity and an increase in polyamine catabolism as indicated by an increase in spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase activity. However, biochemical effects were less dramatic in the LGF cells than those observed in the log-phase cells. The overall results of these studies suggest that the growth status of solid tumors can significantly affect the response to antitumor polyamine analogues, and growth fraction must be considered in the continued development and use of the polyamine analogues.

  10. How AGN and SN Feedback Affect Mass Transport and Black Hole Growth in High-redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés; Volonteri, Marta; Dubois, Yohan

    2017-02-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we study the effect of supernova (SN) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the mass transport (MT) of gas onto galactic nuclei and the black hole (BH) growth down to redshift z∼ 6. We study the BH growth in relation to the MT processes associated with gravity and pressure torques and how they are modified by feedback. Cosmological gas funneled through cold flows reaches the galactic outer region close to freefall. Then torques associated with pressure triggered by gas turbulent motions produced in the circumgalactic medium by shocks and explosions from SNe are the main source of MT beyond the central ∼100 pc. Due to high concentrations of mass in the central galactic region, gravitational torques tend to be more important at high redshift. The combined effect of almost freefalling material and both gravity and pressure torques produces a mass accretion rate of order ∼ 1 {M}ȯ yr‑1 at approximately parsec scales. In the absence of SN feedback, AGN feedback alone does not affect significantly either star formation or BH growth until the BH reaches a sufficiently high mass of ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ to self-regulate. SN feedback alone, instead, decreases both stellar and BH growth. Finally, SN and AGN feedback in tandem efficiently quench the BH growth, while star formation remains at the levels set by SN feedback alone, due to the small final BH mass, ∼few times {10}5 {M}ȯ . SNe create a more rarefied and hot environment where energy injection from the central AGN can accelerate the gas further.

  11. How do mineral fertilization and plant growth regulators affect yield and morphology of naked oat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Witkowicz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Oat (Avena sativa var. nuda is of an increasing interest in many parts of the world. This is why plant breeders have developed forms that are morphologically different from the current ones, such as naked, dwarf or with an increased 1000-grain-weight. In three experiments conducted at two sites, the influence of phosphorus (P and potassium (K fertilizers, spray application of urea and spray application of plant growth regulators (PGRs Promalin (gibberellins + cytokinin and Moddus (cimectacarps on the yield and morphological traits of different oat forms were studied. At a better site, only genotype statistically influenced oat grain yield. At a poorer site, apart from genotype there were statistically significant responses to P and K fertilizers and to the application of Moddus (especially in the experiment with a dwarf cultivar. The internode and panicle length were modified mostly by cimectacarps, which shortened specific internodes, but not the panicle. The PGR Promalin had no significant effect on oat stem morphology.

  12. How sea level rise affects sedimentation, plant growth, and carbon accumulation on coastal salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, S. M.; Howell, S. M.; Morris, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    The rate of accretion on coastal salt marshes depends on feedbacks between flow, macrophyte growth, and sedimentation. Under favourable conditions, marsh accretion rates will keep pace with the local rate of sea level rise. Marsh accretion is driven by both organic and inorganic sedimentation; mineral rich marshes will need less organic sedimentation to keep pace with sea level rise. Here we use a numerical model of marsh accretion, calibrated by sediment cores, to explore the relationship between sea level rise and carbon sequestration on salt marshes in the face of differing supplies of inorganic sediment. The model predicts that changes in carbon storage resulting from changing sediment supply or sea-level rise are strongly dependant on the background sediment supply: if inorganic sediment supply is reduced in an already sediment poor marsh the storage of organic carbon will increase to a far greater extent than in a sediment-rich marsh, provided that the rate of sea-level rise does not exceed a threshold. These results imply that altering sediment supply to estuaries (e.g., by damming upstream rivers or altering littoral sediment transport) could lead to significant changes in the carbon budgets of coastal salt marshes.

  13. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Marie Waters

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized or dead (sterilized substrates. Contact between daughter ramets and substrate was prohibited. Daughter ramet root biomass was significantly larger over live versus dead substrate. Root:shoot ratio also increased over live substrate, a morphological response we interpret as indicative of active nutrient foraging. Daughter ramet root biomass was positively correlated with mother ramet size over live but not dead substrate. Given the choice between a live versus a dead substrate, primary stolons extended preferentially toward live substrates. We conclude that exposure to live substrate drives positive nutrient foraging responses in Fragaria vesca. We propose that volatiles emitted from by the substrates might be effecting the morphological changes that occur during true nutrient foraging.

  14. Metal contaminated biochar and wood ash negatively affect plant growth and soil quality after land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D L; Quilliam, R S

    2014-07-15

    Pyrolysis or combustion of waste wood can provide a renewable source of energy and produce byproducts which can be recycled back to land. To be sustainable requires that these byproducts pose minimal threat to the environment or human health. Frequently, reclaimed waste wood is contaminated by preservative-treated timber containing high levels of heavy metals. We investigated the effect of feedstock contamination from copper-preservative treated wood on the behaviour of pyrolysis-derived biochar and combustion-derived ash in plant-soil systems. Biochar and wood ash were applied to soil at typical agronomic rates. The presence of preservative treated timber in the feedstock increased available soil Cu; however, critical Cu guidance limits were only exceeded at high rates of feedstock contamination. Negative effects on plant growth and soil quality were only seen at high levels of biochar contamination (>50% derived from preservative-treated wood). Negative effects of wood ash contamination were apparent at lower levels of contamination (>10% derived from preservative treated wood). Complete removal of preservative treated timber from wood recycling facilities is notoriously difficult and low levels of contamination are commonplace. We conclude that low levels of contamination from Cu-treated wood should pose minimal environmental risk to biochar and ash destined for land application.

  15. Factors Affecting the Growth of Women-Operated Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fesseha Mulu Gebremariam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The study employ