WorldWideScience

Sample records for affect surfactant denaturation

  1. Protein denaturation due to the action of surfactants: a study by SAXS and ITC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oseliero Filho, Pedro Leonidas; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Pedersen, Jan Skov; Otzen, Daniel Erik [University of Aarhus (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Proteins are the major constituent of biological systems along with carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). According to their structure and composition, proteins perform several functions in the organism, starting from the macroscopic level, with participation on the olfaction of animals, down to the cellular level, allocated in the membrane and making the connection between extra and intracellular environment. The function of a protein (which may be enzymatic, hormonal, structural, energetic, transport etc) is related to several factors including its structure (primary, secondary, tertiary or quaternary). Denaturation occurs when the secondary structure and/or tertiary is lost, which is almost always followed by the loss of the associated biological function. Temperature, pH and the action of surfactants influence the process of the denaturation. The influence of surfactants to the protein structure and function is the aim of this work. Therefore we are using an isolated protein, {alpha}-lactalbumin, that is found in the milk and whose function is related to the synthesis of galactose. The purpose is to characterize, in a thermodynamic-structural point of view, the denaturation of alpha-lactalbumin in the presence of surfactants anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate - SDS), cationic (tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide - TTAB), zwitterionic (2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine - DHPC) and nonionic (decyl-{beta}-D-Maltopyranoside - DM). The isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) technique, which provides information of structural changes from changes in energy, represents the starting point for the study, while the technique of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provides information about the structural characteristics of surfactant-protein complexes formed at each step of the denaturation process. The data analysis is in the initial stage, but it was possible to obtain general parameters related to the complex formed from the

  2. Weak and saturable protein-surfactant interactions in the denaturation of apo-alpha-lactalbumin by acidic and lactonic sophorolipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kell K Andersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However knowledge of such interactions is limited. Here we present a study of the interactions between the model protein apo-alpha-lactalbumin and the biosurfactant sophorolipid (SL produced by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. SL occurs both as an acidic and a lactonic form; the lactonic form (lactSL is sparingly soluble and has a lower critical micelle concentration than the acidic form (acidSL. We show that acidSL affects apo-aLA in a similar way to the related glycolipid biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL, with the important difference that RL is also active below the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0-1 mM SL, it is only possible to observe interactions with monomeric acidSL at high apo-aLA concentrations. However, the denaturation kinetics of apo-aLA in the presence of acidSL are consistent with a collaboration between monomeric and micellar surfactant species, similar to RL and nonionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Inclusion of lactSL as mixed micelles with acidSL lowers the cmc and this effectively reduces the rate of unfolding, emphasizing that SL like other biosurfactants is a gentle anionic surfactant. Our data highlight the potential of these biosurfactants for future use in the detergent industry.

  3. Weak and Saturable Protein–Surfactant Interactions in the Denaturation of Apo-α-Lactalbumin by Acidic and Lactonic Sophorolipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kell K.; Vad, Brian S.; Roelants, Sophie; van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; Otzen, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However, knowledge of such interactions is limited. Here, we present a study of the interactions between the model protein apo-α-lactalbumin (apo-aLA) and the biosurfactant sophorolipid (SL) produced by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. SL occurs both as an acidic and a lactonic form; the lactonic form (lactSL) is sparingly soluble and has a lower critical micelle concentration (cmc) than the acidic form [non-acetylated acidic sophorolipid (acidSL)]. We show that acidSL affects apo-aLA in a similar way to the related glycolipid biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL), with the important difference that RL is also active below the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0–1 mM SL), it is only possible to observe interactions with monomeric acidSL at high apo-aLA concentrations. However, the denaturation kinetics of apo-aLA in the presence of acidSL are consistent with a collaboration between monomeric and micellar surfactant species, similar to RL and non-ionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Inclusion of diacetylated lactonic sophorolipid (lactSL) as mixed micelles with acidSL lowers the cmc and this effectively reduces the rate of unfolding, emphasizing that SL like other biosurfactants is a gentle anionic surfactant. Our data highlight the potential of these biosurfactants for future use in the detergent and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27877155

  4. Weak and Saturable Protein-Surfactant Interactions in the Denaturation of Apo-α-Lactalbumin by Acidic and Lactonic Sophorolipid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kell K; Vad, Brian S; Roelants, Sophie;

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However...... the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0-1 mM SL), it is only possible...

  5. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved.

  6. Rheological properties of ovalbumin hydrogels as affected by surfactants addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Natalia; Messina, Paula V; Dodero, Veronica I; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-04-01

    The gel properties of ovalbumin mixtures with three different surfactants (sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate and sodium dodecanoate) have been studied by rheological techniques. The gel elasticities were determined as a function of surfactant concentration and surfactant type. The fractal dimension of the formed structures was evaluated from plots of storage modulus against surfactant concentration. The role of electrostatic, hydrophobic and disulfide SS interactions in these systems has been demonstrated to be the predominant. The viscosity of these structures tends to increase with surfactant concentration, except for the fluorinated one. Unfolded ovalbumin molecules tend to form fibrillar structures that tend to increase with surfactant concentration, except for the fluorinated one. This fact has been related to the particular nature of this molecule.

  7. [Denaturalized psychoanalysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peglau, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents hitherto unknown material from the German Foreign Office referring to the denaturalization of Therese Benedek, Bruno Bettelheim, Adolf Storfer and Wilhelm Reich by Nazi Germany. It corroborates the finding that nobody was persecuted by the Nazis solely on the basis of psychoanalytic activities or membership in a psychoanalytic organization.

  8. Kolliphor surfactants affect solubilization and bioavailability of fenofibrate. Studies of in vitro digestion and absorption in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Ragna; Holm, Rene; Jacobsen, Jette

    2015-01-01

    formulations only comprised an aqueous micellar solution of the model drug (fenofibrate) in varying concentrations (2–25% (w/v)) of the three tested surfactants. Increased concentrations of Kolliphor ELP and EL led to increased fenofibrate AUC0–24h values. For the Kolliphor RH40 formulations, an apparent...... fenofibrate absorption optimum was seen at 15% (w/v) surfactant, displaying both the highest AUC0–24h and Cmax. The reduced absorption of fenofibrate from the formulation containing the highest level of surfactant (25% w/v) was thought to be caused by some degree of trapping within Kolliphor RH40 micelles....... In vitro, Kolliphor ELP and EL were found to be more prone to digestion than Kolliphor RH40, though not affecting the in vivo results. The highest fenofibrate bioavailability was attained from formulations with high Kolliphor ELP/EL levels (25% (w/v)), indicating that these surfactants are the better...

  9. Heat-denaturation and aggregation of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) globulins as affected by the pH value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Koehler, Peter; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-04-01

    The influence of heating (100 °C; 0-15 min) on the relative molecular mass, protein unfolding and secondary structure of quinoa globulins was studied at pH 6.5 (low solubility), 8.5 and 10.5 (high solubility). The patterns of denaturation and aggregation varied with pH. Heating triggered the disruption of the disulfide bonds connecting the acidic and basic chains of the chenopodin subunits at pH 8.5 and 10.5, but not at pH 6.5. Large aggregates unable to enter a 4% SDS-PAGE gel were formed at pH 6.5 and 8.5, which became soluble under reducing conditions. Heating at pH 10.5 lead to a rapid dissociation of the native chenopodin and to the disruption of the subunits, but no SDS-insoluble aggregates were formed. No major changes in secondary structure occurred during a 15 min heating, but an increase in hydrophobicity indicated unfolding of the tertiary structure in all samples.

  10. Chemical Behavior of Cadmium in Purple Soil as Affected by Surfactants and EDTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-Cheng; XIONG Zhi-Ting; DONG Shan-Yan

    2006-01-01

    A soil batch experiment was conducted to investigate both separate and compound effects of three types of surfactants:anionic dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid sodiumsalt (DBSS), cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic nonyl phenol polyethyleneoxy ether (TX-100), as well as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on cadmium solubility, sorption kinetics, and sorption-desorption behavior in purple soil. The results indicated that both individual application of the three types of surfactants and surfactants combined with EDTA could stimulate Cd extraction from the soil with a general effectiveness ranking of EDTA/TX-100 > EDTA/DBSS > EDTA/CTAB > EDTA > TX-100 >DBSS > CTAB. Further study showed that the compound application of surfactants and EDTA had stronger (P < 0.05)effects on Cd solubility than those added individually. The application of surfactants and EDTA to purple soil (P < 0.05)decreased the proportion of Cd sorbed, while their effectiveness ranking was similar to that of enhanced solubilization. The sorption kinetics of Cd in purple soil was best described by the double-constant equation, while the Freundlich equation gave an excellent fit to the sorption isotherm curves. Therefore, surfactant-enhanced remediation of Cd contaminated soil is feasible and further research should be conducted.

  11. Factors Affecting the Stability of Crude and Transmission Oil Emulsion Swith Surfactant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Martínez Martín

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil emulsions with surfactant solutions are used to transport this for piping systems. The applicationof this technique requires that the emulsions remain stable during the pumping period and haveseparated after transporting the crude. In this paper, experimental assays were performed using differentconcentrations of surfactant, and mixing types settling conditions. They were employed as the continuousphase two substances: oil transmission and Cuban crude oil. The strong infl uence of the concentrationand type of mixing on the stability of the emulsions was observed. The results demonstrate the similaritiesin thermalhydraulic fl uid parameters objects of study. Allowing infer the approximate behavior of theCuban crude oil from experimental work with transmission oil.

  12. Factors affecting the design of slow release formulations of herbicides based on clay-surfactant systems. A methodological approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Del Carmen Galán-Jiménez

    Full Text Available A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ, mesotrione (MS and flurtamone (FL, whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i neutral: two berols (B048, B266 and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202; (ii cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15. Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i. in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for

  13. Stability of collagen during denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, R; Goshev, I; Gorinstein, S; Nedkov, P

    1999-05-01

    The stability of calf skin collagen (CSC) type I during thermal and chemical denaturation in the presence of glycerol was investigated. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen was performed in the presence of glycerol or in combination with urea and sodium chloride. The denaturation curves obtained in the presence of urea or sodium chloride retained their original shape without glycerol. These curves were shifted upward proportionally to the glycerol concentration in the reaction medium. This means that glycerol and the denaturants act independently. The explanation is based on the difference in the mechanism of their action on the collagen molecule.

  14. Factors affecting protein transfer into surfactant-isooctane solution: a case study of extraction behavior of chemically modified cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, T; Goto, M

    1998-01-01

    The extraction mechanism of proteins by surfactant molecules in an organic solvent has been investigated using a chemically modified protein. We conducted guanidylation on lysine residues of cytochrome c by replacing their amino groups with homoarginine to enhance the protein-surfactant interaction. Results have shown that guanidylated cytochrome c readily forms a hydrophobic complex with dioleyl phosphoric acid (DOLPA) through hydrogen bonding between the phosphate moiety and the guanidinium groups. Although improved protein-surfactant interaction activated the formation of a hydrophobic complex at the interface, it could not improve the protein transfer in isooctane. It has been established that the protein extraction mechanism using surfactant molecules is mainly governed by two processes: formation of an interfacial complex at the oil-water interface and the subsequent solubilization of the complex into the organic phase. In addition, a kinetic study demonstrated that guanidylation of lysine accelerated the initial extraction rate of cytochrome c. This fact implies that the protein transferability from aqueous phase into organic phase depends on the protein-surfactant interaction which can be modified by protein surface engineering.

  15. Small angle neutron scattering studies on protein denaturation induced by different methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chodankar; V K Aswal; J Kohlbrecher; R Vavrin; A G Wagh

    2008-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study conformational changes in protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) as induced by varying temperature and in the presence of protein denaturating agents urea and surfactant. BSA has pro-late ellipsoidal shape and is found to be stable up to 60°C above which it denaturates and subsequently leads to aggregation. The protein solution exhibits a fractal structure at temperatures above 64°C, with fractal dimension increasing with temperature. BSA protein is found to unfold in the presence of urea at concentrations greater than 4 M and acquires a random coil Gaussian chain conformation. The conformation of the unfolded protein in the presence of surfactant has been determined directly using contrast variation SANS measurements by contrast matching surfactant molecules. The protein acquires a random coil Gaussian conformation on unfolding with its radius of gyration increasing with increase in surfactant concentration

  16. NOS2 is critical to the development of emphysema in Sftpd deficient mice but does not affect surfactant homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Knudsen

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Surfactant protein D (SP-D has important immuno-modulatory properties. The absence of SP-D results in an inducible NO synthase (iNOS, coded by NOS2 gene related chronic inflammation, development of emphysema-like pathophysiology and alterations of surfactant homeostasis. OBJECTIVE: In order to test the hypothesis that SP-D deficiency related abnormalities in pulmonary structure and function are a consequence of iNOS induced inflammation, we generated SP-D and iNOS double knockout mice (DiNOS. METHODS: Structural data obtained by design-based stereology to quantify the emphysema-like phenotype and disturbances of the intracellular surfactant were correlated to invasive pulmonary function tests and inflammatory markers including activation markers of alveolar macrophages and compared to SP-D (Sftpd(-/- and iNOS single knockout mice (NOS2(-/- as well as wild type (WT littermates. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: DiNOS mice had reduced inflammatory cells in BAL and BAL-derived alveolar macrophages showed an increased expression of markers of an alternative activation as well as reduced inflammation. As evidenced by increased alveolar numbers and surface area, emphysematous changes were attenuated in DiNOS while disturbances of the surfactant system remained virtually unchanged. Sftpd(-/- demonstrated alterations of intrinsic mechanical properties of lung parenchyma as shown by reduced stiffness and resistance at its static limits, which could be corrected by additional ablation of NOS2 gene in DiNOS. CONCLUSION: iNOS related inflammation in the absence of SP-D is involved in the emphysematous remodeling leading to a loss of alveoli and associated alterations of elastic properties of lung parenchyma while disturbances of surfactant homeostasis are mediated by different mechanisms.

  17. Microwave-enhanced folding and denaturation of globular proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that microwave irradiation can affect the kinetics of the folding process of some globular proteins, especially beta-lactoglobulin. At low temperature the folding from the cold denatured phase of the protein is enhanced, while at a higher temperature the denaturation of the protein from...... its folded state is enhanced. In the latter case, a negative temperature gradient is needed for the denaturation process, suggesting that the effects of the microwaves are nonthermal. This supports the notion that coherent topological excitations can exist in proteins. The application of microwaves...

  18. Statistical mechanics of thermal denaturation of DNA oligomers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navin Singh; Yashwant Singh

    2003-08-01

    Double stranded DNA chain is known to have non-trivial elasticity. We study the effect of this elasticity on the denaturation profile of DNA oligomer by constraining one base pair at one end of the oligomer to remain in unstretched (or intact) state. The effect of this constraint on the denaturation profile of the oligomer has been calculated using the Peyrard–Bishop Hamiltonian. The denaturation profile is found to be very different from the free (i.e. without the constraint) oligomer. We have also examined how this constraint affects the denaturation profile of the oligomer having a segment of defect sites located at different parts of the chain.

  19. Hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández-Lemus

    Full Text Available In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue.

  20. Effects of Concentration and Conformation of Surfactants on Phase Separation of Surfactant-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁银权; 邹宪武; 刘昊阳

    2004-01-01

    The effects of surfactants on the phase separation of surfactant-water-oil systems have been investigated by using discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. The phase separation speed and equilibrium configuration are dependent on the surfactant concentration and conformation. The equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface remains constant. With the increasing surfactant concentration, the equilibrium configuration crosses over from the disperse phase to the bicontinuous one. The crossover concentration is estimated. The conformation of the surfactant has little effect on the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface,while it affects the equilibrium configuration after phase separation.

  1. Surfactant for pediatric acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Douglas F; Chess, Patricia R; Notter, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients who have ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS.

  2. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  3. Kolliphor surfactants affect solubilization and bioavailability of fenofibrate. Studies of in vitro digestion and absorption in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Ragna; Holm, Rene; Jacobsen, Jette;

    2015-01-01

    Selection of excipients for drug formulations requires both intellectual and experimental considerations as many of the used excipients are affected by physiological factors, e.g., they may be digested by pancreatic enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present paper we have looked...

  4. Single DNA denaturation and bubble dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, Ralf; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Hanke, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    for situations below, at, and above the denaturation transition. We also propose a new single molecule setup based on DNA constructs with two bubble zones to measure the bubble coalescence and extract the physical parameters relevant to DNA breathing. Finally we consider the interplay between denaturation......While the Watson-Crick double-strand is the thermodynamically stable state of DNA in a wide range of temperature and salt conditions, even at physiological conditions local denaturation bubbles may open up spontaneously due to thermal activation. By raising the ambient temperature, titration......, or by external forces in single molecule setups bubbles proliferate until full denaturation of the DNA occurs. Based on the Poland-Scheraga model we investigate both the equilibrium transition of DNA denaturation and the dynamics of the denaturation bubbles with respect to recent single DNA chain experiments...

  5. The dynamics of the DNA denaturation transition

    CERN Document Server

    van Erp, Titus S

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of the DNA denaturation is studied using the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model. The denaturation rate of double stranded polymers decreases exponentially as function of length below the denaturation temperature. Above Tc, the rate shows a minimum, but then increases as function of length. We also examine the influence of sequence and solvent friction. Molecules having the same number of weak and strong base-pairs can have significantly different opening rates depending on the order of base-pairs.

  6. Different thermal unfolding pathways of catalase in the presence of cationic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Elena; Ruso, Juan M; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we have corroborated the usefulness of spectroscopic techniques, such as UV-visible, in the study and thermodynamic characterization of the thermal unfolding of catalase as a function of the concentration and alkyl chain length of n-alkyltrimethylammonium bromides (CnTAB, n = 8, 10, and 12). For this reason, a thermodynamic model was used which included experimental data corresponding to the pre- and posttransition into the observable transition. It has been found that n-alkyltrimethylammonium bromides play two opposite roles in the folding and stability of catalase. They act as a structure stabilizer at a low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at a higher concentration. The maximum of the unfolding temperature has been found to decrease with the alkyl chain. The reason for this difference has been suggested to be the side chains involved. In the presence of C8TAB and C10TAB, Gibbs energies of unfolding (DeltaG(T)) decrease with concentration, whereas for C12TAB an increase has been observed. These findings can be explained by the fact that when differences in the hydrophobic nature of the surfactants exist, different pathways of unfolding may occur. Also, the presence of surfactants has been observed to affect the cold denaturation of catalase. Thermodynamic results suggest that the thermal denaturation of catalase in the presence of n-alkyltrimethylammonium bromides is a perfect transition between two states.

  7. Bubbles and denaturation in DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Van Erp, T S; Peyrard, M; Erp, Titus S. van; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Peyrard, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The local opening of DNA is an intriguing phenomenon from a statistical physics point of view, but is also essential for its biological function. For instance, the transcription and replication of our genetic code can not take place without the unwinding of the DNA double helix. Although these biological processes are driven by proteins, there might well be a relation between these biological openings and the spontaneous bubble formation due to thermal fluctuations. Mesoscopic models, like the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model, have fairly accurately reproduced some experimental denaturation curves and the sharp phase transition in the thermodynamic limit. It is, hence, tempting to see whether these models could be used to predict the biological activity of DNA. In a previous study, we introduced a method that allows to obtain very accurate results on this subject, which showed that some previous claims in this direction, based on molecular dynamics studies, were premature. This could either imply that the present...

  8. DNA denaturation in ionic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Arghya; Singh, Amar; Singh, Navin

    2016-05-01

    Salt or cations, present in solution play an important role in DNA denaturation and folding kinetics of DNA helix. In this work we study the thermal melting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule using Peyrard Bishop Dauxois (PBD) model. We modify the potential of H-bonding between the bases of the complimentary strands to introduce the salt and solvent effect. We choose different DNA sequences having different contents of GC pairs and calculate the melting temperatures. The melting temperature increases logarithmically with the salt concentration of the solution. The more GC base pairs in the chain enhance the stability of DNA chain at a fix salt concentration. The obtained results are in good accordance with experimental findings.

  9. Refolding of detergent-denatured lysozyme using β-cyclodextrin-assisted ion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Qinming; Wang, Chaozhan

    2013-03-01

    Chromatography-based protein refolding is widely used. Detergent is increasingly used for protein solubilization from inclusion bodies. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a refolding method for detergent-denatured/solubilized proteins based on liquid chromatography. In the present work, sarkosyl-denatured/dithiothreitol-reduced lysozyme was used as a model, and a refolding method based on ion exchange chromatography, assisted by β-cyclodextrin, was developed for refolding detergent-denatured proteins. Many factors affecting the refolding, such as concentration of urea, concentration of β-cyclodextrin, pH and flow rate of mobile phases, were investigated to optimize the refolding conditions for sarkosyl-denatured lysozymes. The results showed that the sarkosyl-denatured lysozyme could be successfully refolded using β-cyclodextrin-assisted ion exchange chromatography.

  10. Optimized mixed oils remarkably reduce the amount of surfactants in microemulsions without affecting oral bioavailability of ibuprofen by simultaneously enlarging microemulsion areas and enhancing drug solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yizhen; Tuo, Jue; Huang, Huizhi; Liu, Dan; You, Xiuhua; Mai, Jialuo; Song, Jiaqi; Xie, Yanqi; Wu, Chuanbin; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-06-20

    The toxicity and irritation associated with high amounts of surfactants restrict the extensive utilization of microemulsions. To address these shortcomings, employing mixed oils to enlarge microemulsion areas therefore reducing surfactant contents is a promising strategy. However, what kinds of mixed oils are more efficient in enlarging microemulsion areas still remains unclear. In this research, we found that the chain length and degree of unsaturation of oils play a key role in enlarging microemulsion areas. The combination of moderate chain saturated oil caprylic/capric triglyceride (GTCC) with long chain unsaturated oil glycerol trioleate significantly increased the microemulsion areas. Solubility of ibuprofen in the mixed oils was unexpectedly and remarkably increased (almost 300mg/mL) compared with that (around 100mg/mL) of the single oil (GTCC), which also resulted in greatly increased solubility of ibuprofen in mixed oils-containing microemulsions. By optimizing the mixed oil formulation, the absolute amount of surfactant in drug-loaded microemulsions was reduced but increased drug oral bioavailability in rats was maintained. It could be concluded that the combined use of moderate chain oils and long chain unsaturated oils could not only acquire enlarged microemulsion areas but also enhanced drug solubility, therefore doubly reducing surfactant amount, which is extremely beneficial for developing safe microemulsions.

  11. Assessment of collagen crosslinking and denaturation for the design of regenerative scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaghiele, Marta; Calò, Emanuela; Salvatore, Luca; Bonfrate, Valentina; Pedone, Deborah; Frigione, Mariaenrica; Sannino, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Crosslinking and denaturation were two variables that deeply affected the performance of collagen-based scaffolds designed for tissue regeneration. If crosslinking enhances the mechanical properties and the enzymatic resistance of collagen, while masking or reducing the available cell binding sites, denaturation has very opposite effects, as it impairs the mechanical and the enzymatic stability of collagen, but increases the number of exposed cell adhesive domains. The quantification of both crosslinking and denaturation was thus fundamental to the design of collagen-based scaffolds for selected applications. The aim of this work was to investigate the extents of crosslinking and denaturation of collagen-based films upon dehydrothermal (DHT) treatment, that is, one of the most commonly employed methods for zero-length crosslinking that shows the unique ability to induce partial denaturation. Swelling measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, colorimetric assays for the quantification of primary amines, and mechanical tests were performed to analyze the effect of the DHT temperature on crosslinking and denaturation. In particular, chemically effective and elastically effective crosslink densities were evaluated. Both crosslinking and denaturation were found to increase with the DHT temperature, although according to different trends. The results also showed that DHT treatments performed at temperatures up to 120°C maintained the extent of denaturation under 25%. Coupling a mild DHT treatment with further crosslinking may thus be very useful not only to modulate the crosslink density, but also to induce a limited amount of denaturation, which shows potential to partially compensate the loss of cell binding sites caused by crosslinking.

  12. The anionic biosurfactant rhamnolipid does not denature industrial enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Kvist Madsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants (BS are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. Their combination of useful properties and sustainable production make them promising industrial alternatives to petrochemical and oleochemical surfactants. Here we compare the impact of the anionic BS rhamnolipid (RL and the conventional/synthetic anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS on the structure and stability of three different commercially used enzymes, namely the cellulase Carezyme® (CZ, the phospholipase Lecitase Ultra® (LT and the α-amylase Stainzyme® (SZ. Our data reveal a fundamental difference in their mode of interaction. SDS shows great diversity of interaction towards the different enzymes. It efficiently unfolds both LT and CZ, but LT is unfolded by SDS through formation of SDS clusters on the protein well below the cmc, while CZ is only unfolded by bulk micelles and on average binds significantly less SDS than LT. SDS binds with even lower stoichiometry to SZ and leads to an increase in thermal stability. In contrast, RL does not affect the tertiary or secondary structure of any enzyme at room temperature, has little impact on thermal stability and only binds detectably (but at low stoichiometries to SZ. Furthermore all enzymes maintain activity at both monomeric and micellar concentrations of RL. We conclude that RL, despite its anionic charge, is a surfactant that does not compromise the structural integrity of industrially relevant proteins. This makes RL a promising alternative to current synthetic anionic surfactants in a wide range of commercial applications.

  13. Effect of curcumin on the binding of cationic, anionic and nonionic surfactants with myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Satyajit; Ghosh, Soumen

    2017-04-01

    Interaction of a globular protein, myoglobin and different surfactants has been studied in the absence and presence of curcumin in phosphate buffer at pH = 7.4 by UV-VIS spectrophotometry, fluorimetry and fluorescence polarization anisotropy methods. Results show that heme environment of myoglobin is changed by cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium N-dodecanoyl sarcosinate (SDDS). In the presence of curcumin, CTAB cannot change the heme; but SDDS can make change. Nonionic surfactant N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (Mega 10) cannot change the heme environment. Protein is unfolded by the surfactant. Curcumin can prevent the unfolding of protein in the low concentration region of ionic surfactants such as CTAB and SDDS. In nonionic surfactant media, curcumin accelerates the denaturation process. Due to myoglobin-curcumin complex formation, rotational motion of curcumin decreases in surfactant media and so anisotropy increases.

  14. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  15. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  16. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  17. Delivery and performance of surfactant replacement therapies to treat pulmonary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Kaviratna, Anubhav; Berkland, Cory; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2013-08-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for optimal pulmonary function throughout life. An absence or deficiency of surfactant can affect the surfactant pool leading to respiratory distress. Even if the coupling between surfactant dysfunction and the underlying disease is not always well understood, using exogenous surfactants as replacement is usually a standard therapeutic option in respiratory distress. Exogenous surfactants have been extensively studied in animal models and clinical trials. The present article provides an update on the evolution of surfactant therapy, types of surfactant treatment, and development of newer-generation surfactants. The differences in the performance between various surfactants are highlighted and advanced research that has been conducted so far in developing the optimal delivery of surfactant is discussed.

  18. Effects of protein and phosphate buffer concentrations on thermal denaturation of lysozyme analyzed by isoconversional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X M; Tian, Y; Wang, Z Y; Liu, Y W; Wang, C X

    2016-07-03

    Thermal denaturation of lysozymes was studied as a function of protein concentration, phosphate buffer concentration, and scan rate using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), which was then analyzed by the isoconversional method. The results showed that lysozyme thermal denaturation was only slightly affected by the protein concentration and scan rate. When the protein concentration and scan rate increased, the denaturation temperature (Tm) also increased accordingly. On the contrary, the Tm decreased with the increase of phosphate buffer concentration. The denaturation process of lysozymes was accelatated and the thermal stability was reduced with the increase of phosphate concentration. One part of degeneration process was not reversible where the aggregation occurred. The other part was reversible. The apparent activation energy (Ea) was computed by the isoconversional method. It decreased with the increase of the conversion ratio (α). The observed denaturation process could not be described by a simple reaction mechanism. It was not a process involving 2 standard reversible states, but a multi-step process. The new opportunities for investigating the kinetics process of protein denaturation can be supplied by this novel isoconversional method.

  19. Application of peptide gemini surfactants as novel solubilization surfactants for photosystems I and II of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeda, Shuhei; Umezaki, Katsunari; Noji, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kondo, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Taga, Keijiro; Dewa, Takehisa; Ito, Shigeru; Nango, Mamoru; Tanaka, Toshiki; Mizuno, Toshihisa

    2013-09-17

    We designed novel peptide gemini surfactants (PG-surfactants), DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D, which can solubilize Photosystem I (PSI) of Thermosynecoccus elongatus and Photosystem II (PSII) of Thermosynecoccus vulcanus in an aqueous buffer solution. To assess the detailed effects of PG-surfactants on the original supramolecular membrane protein complexes and functions of PSI and PSII, we applied the surfactant exchange method to the isolated PSI and PSII. Spectroscopic properties, light-induced electron transfer activity, and dynamic light scattering measurements showed that PSI and PSII could be solubilized not only with retention of the original supramolecular protein complexes and functions but also without forming aggregates. Furthermore, measurement of the lifetime of light-induced charge-separation state in PSI revealed that both surfactants, especially DKDKC12D, displayed slight improvement against thermal denaturation below 60 °C compared with that using β-DDM. This degree of improvement in thermal resistance still seems low, implying that the peptide moieties did not interact directly with membrane protein surfaces. By conjugating an electron mediator such as methyl viologen (MV(2+)) to DKDKC12K (denoted MV-DKDKC12K), we obtained derivatives that can trap the generated reductive electrons from the light-irradiated PSI. After immobilization onto an indium tin oxide electrode, a cathodic photocurrent from the electrode to the PSI/MV-DKDKC12K conjugate was observed in response to the interval of light irradiation. These findings indicate that the PG-surfactants DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D provide not only a new class of solubilization surfactants but also insights into designing other derivatives that confer new functions on PSI and PSII.

  20. Chemical shift prediction for denatured proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestegard, James H., E-mail: jpresteg@ccrc.uga.edu; Sahu, Sarata C.; Nkari, Wendy K.; Morris, Laura C.; Live, David; Gruta, Christian

    2013-02-15

    While chemical shift prediction has played an important role in aspects of protein NMR that include identification of secondary structure, generation of torsion angle constraints for structure determination, and assignment of resonances in spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins, interest has arisen more recently in using it in alternate assignment strategies for crosspeaks in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectra of sparsely labeled proteins. One such approach involves correlation of crosspeaks in the spectrum of the native protein with those observed in the spectrum of the denatured protein, followed by assignment of the peaks in the latter spectrum. As in the case of disordered proteins, predicted chemical shifts can aid in these assignments. Some previously developed empirical formulas for chemical shift prediction have depended on basis data sets of 20 pentapeptides. In each case the central residue was varied among the 20 amino common acids, with the flanking residues held constant throughout the given series. However, previous choices of solvent conditions and flanking residues make the parameters in these formulas less than ideal for general application to denatured proteins. Here, we report {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N shifts for a set of alanine based pentapeptides under the low pH urea denaturing conditions that are more appropriate for sparse label assignments. New parameters have been derived and a Perl script was created to facilitate comparison with other parameter sets. A small, but significant, improvement in shift predictions for denatured ubiquitin is demonstrated.

  1. Stratum corneum lipid removal by surfactants: relation to in vivo irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebe, C L; Simion, F A; Rhein, L D; Cagan, R H; Kligman, A

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the in vivo irritation potential of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) and the ability of these two surfactants to remove lipid from the stratum corneum (SC) in vitro were investigated. Either surfactant removes detectable levels of lipids only above its critical micelle concentration (CMC). At high concentrations the surfactants removed only very small amounts of cholesterol, free fatty acid, the esters of those materials, and possibly squalene. SLS and LAS have been shown, below the CMC, to bind to and irritate the SC. Thus, clinical irritation provoked by SLS or LAS is unlikely to be directly linked with extraction of SC lipid. The milder forms of irritation--dryness, tightness, roughness--may involve both surfactant binding to and denaturation of keratin as well as disruption of lipid. Our findings challenge earlier assumptions that surfactants' degreasing of the SC is involved in the induction of erythema.

  2. [Characterization of thermal denaturation process of proteinase K by spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Bing; Na, Xin-Zhu; Yin, Zong-Ning

    2013-07-01

    The effect of different temperatures on the activity and conformational changes of proteinase K was studied. Methods Proteinase K was treated with different temperatures, then denatured natural substrate casein was used to assay enzyme activity, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study tertiary structure, and circular dichroism was used to study secondary structure. Results show with the temperature rising from 25 to 65 degrees C, the enzyme activity and half-life of proteinase K dropped, maximum emission wavelength red shifted from 335 to 354 nm with fluorescence intensity decreasing. Synchronous fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues decreased and that of tyrosine residues increased. Fluorescence lifetime of tryptophan residues reduced from 4. 427 1 to 4. 032 4 ns and the fraction of alpha-helix dropped. It was concluded that it is simple and accurate to use steady-state/time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism to investigate thermal stability of proteinase K. Thermal denaturation of proteinase K followed a three-state process. Fluorescence intensity of proteinase K was affected by fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tyrosine to tryptophan residues. The alpha-helix was the main structure to maintain conformational stability of enzyme active site of proteinase K.

  3. DSC study of denaturation of β-lactoglobulin B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王邦宁; 谈夫

    1995-01-01

    The denaturation of bovine β-lactoglobulin B (β-Lg B) has been studied in phosphate solutions with various concentrations of GuHCl with differential scanning calorimetry The experiments demonstrated that the presence of GuHCl made the β-Lg B undergo both cold denaturation and heat denaturation under the condition of a high concentration of the protein. The enthalpy changes of both kinds of denaturation exhibit opposite signs. Both the cold denaturation and the renaturation of the protein are reproducible, but its heat denaturation is irreversible. The cooperation among monomer molecules of the protein is involved in its heat denaturation The heat denaturation of the protein can be represented by the thermodynamic model Nc D→F. The activation energy of heat denaturation is 285 kJ/mol, which imples that the depression of temperature and enthalpy of heat denaturation of the P-Lg B does not result from decreasing considerably the activation energy by GuHCl As for the cold denaturation of the protein, es

  4. SP-A-enriched surfactant for treatment of rat lung transplants with SP-A deficiency after storage and reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, ME; Hofstede, GJH; Petersen, AH; Batenburg, JJ; Haagsman, HP; Oetomo, SB; Prop, J

    2002-01-01

    Background. The function of pulmonary surfactant is affected by lung transplantation, contributing to impaired lung transplant function. A decreased amount of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) after reperfusion is believed to contribute to the impaired surfactant function. Surfactant treatment has been sh

  5. Effects of the protein denaturant guanidinium chloride on aqueous hydrophobic contact-pair interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ryan D; Khajehpour, Mazdak

    2015-01-01

    Guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is one of the most common protein denaturants. Although GdmCl is well known in the field of protein folding, the mechanism by which it denatures proteins is not well understood. In fact, there are few studies looking at its effects on hydrophobic interactions. In this work the effect of GdmCl on hydrophobic interactions has been studied by observing how the denaturant influences model systems of phenyl and alkyl hydrophobic contact pairs. Contact pair formation is monitored through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, i.e., measuring the intrinsic phenol fluorescence being quenched by carboxylate ions. Hydrophobic interactions are isolated from other interactions through a previously developed methodology. The results show that GdmCl does not significantly affect hydrophobic interactions between small moieties such as methyl groups and phenol; while on the other hand, the interaction of larger hydrophobes such as hexyl and heptyl groups with phenol is significantly destabilized.

  6. Surfactants in tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2014-01-01

    Surface science and tribology play very critical roles in many industries. Manufacture and use of almost all consumer and industrial products rely on the application of advanced surface and tribological knowledge. The fourth in a series, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 4 provides an update on research and development activities connecting surfactants and tribological phenomena. Written by renowned subject matter experts, the book demonstrates how improved design of surfactants can be harnessed to control tribological phenomena. Profusely illustrated and copiously referenced, the chapters also

  7. POLYMERIC SURFACTANT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.M. Saville; J.W. White

    2001-01-01

    Polymeric surfactants are amongst the most widespread of all polymers. In nature, proteins and polysaccharides cause self organization as a result of this surfactancy; in industry, polymeric surfactants play key roles in the food, explosives and surface coatings sectors. The generation of useful nano- and micro-structures in films and emulsions as a result of polymer amphiphilicity and the application of mechanical stress is discussed. The use of X-ray and neutron small angle scattering and reflectivity to measure these structures and their dynamic properties will be described. New results on linear and dendritic polymer surfactants are presented.

  8. Dendrimer-surfactant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiyun; Zhao, Libo; Li, Tianfu

    2014-04-28

    In this article, we reviewed the interactions between dendrimers and surfactants with particular focus on the interaction mechanisms and physicochemical properties of the yielding dendrimer-surfactant aggregates. In order to provide insight into the behavior of dendrimers in biological systems, the interactions of dendrimers with bio-surfactants such as phospholipids in bulk solutions, in solid-supported bilayers and at the interface of phases or solid-states were discussed. Applications of the dendrimer-surfactant aggregates as templates to guide the synthesis of nanoparticles and in drug or gene delivery were also mentioned.

  9. Surfactant Sector Needs Urgent Readjustment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Hongzhou

    2007-01-01

    @@ Surfactant industrial system has been basically established After 50 years' development, China has already established a surfactant industrial system with a relatively complete product portfolio and can produce 4714 varieties of surfactants in cationic,anionic, nonionic and amphoteric categories.

  10. Supercoiling induces denaturation bubbles in circular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Adamcik, Jozef; Dietler, Giovanni; Metzler, Ralf

    2010-11-12

    We present a theoretical framework for the thermodynamic properties of supercoiling-induced denaturation bubbles in circular double-stranded DNA molecules. We explore how DNA supercoiling, ambient salt concentration, and sequence heterogeneity impact on the bubble occurrence. An analytical derivation of the probability distribution to find multiple bubbles is derived and the relevance for supercoiled DNA discussed. We show that in vivo sustained DNA bubbles are likely to occur due to partial twist release in regions rich in weaker AT base pairs. Single DNA plasmid imaging experiments clearly demonstrate the existence of bubbles in free solution.

  11. 27 CFR 21.151 - List of denaturants authorized for denatured spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM... (Glycerol), U.S.P S.D.A. 31-A. Green soap, U.S.P S.D.A. 27-B. Guaiacol, N.F.X S.D.A. 38-B. Heptane C.D.A....

  12. 78 FR 38628 - Reclassification of Specially Denatured Spirits and Completely Denatured Alcohol Formulas and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... alcohol. 13-A 10 gallons of ethyl ether. 19 100 gallons of ethyl ether. 23-A 8 gallons of acetone, U.S.P... alcohol. 32 5 gallons of ethyl ether. 35-A 4.25 gallons of ethyl acetate having an ester content of 100... regulations regarding the production, warehousing, denaturing, distribution, sale, export, and use...

  13. Partially folded intermediates during trypsinogen denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium unfolding of bovine trypsinogen was studied by circular dichroism, differential spectra and size exclusion HPLC. The change in free energy of denaturation was = 6.99 ± 1.40 kcal/mol for guanidine hydrochloride and = 6.37 ± 0.57 kcal/mol for urea. Satisfactory fits of equilibrium unfolding transitions required a three-state model involving an intermediate in addition to the native and unfolded forms. Size exclusion HPLC allowed the detection of an intermediate population of trypsinogen whose Stokes radii varied from 24.1 ± 0.4 Å to 26.0 ± 0.3 Å for 1.5 M and 2.5 M guanidine hydrochloride, respectively. During urea denaturation, the range of Stokes radii varied from 23.9 ± 0.3 Å to 25.7 ± 0.6 Å for 4.0 M and 6.0 M urea, respectively. Maximal intrinsic fluorescence was observed at about 3.8 M urea with 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS binding. These experimental data indicate that the unfolding of bovine trypsinogen is not a simple transition and suggest that the equilibrium intermediate population comprises one intermediate that may be characterized as a molten globule. To obtain further insight by studying intermediates representing different stages of unfolding, we hope to gain a better understanding of the complex interrelations between protein conformation and energetics.

  14. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  15. Spectroscopy and computational studies on the interaction of octyl, dodecyl, and hexadecyl derivatives of anionic and cationic surfactants with adenosine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajloo, Davood; Mahmoodabadi, Najmeh; Ghadamgahi, Maryam; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Effects of sodium (octyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl) sulfate and their cationic analogous on the structure of adenosine deaminase (ADA) were investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics simulation and docking calculation. Root-mean-square derivations, radius of gyration, solvent accessible surface area, and radial distribution function were obtained. The results showed that anionic and cationic surfactants reduce protein stability. Cationic surfactants have more effect on the ADA structure in comparison with anionic surfactants. More concentration and longer surfactants are parallel to higher denaturation. Furthermore, aggregation in the presence of anionic surfactants is more than cationic surfactants. Docking data showed that longer surfactants have more interaction energy and smaller ones bound to the active site.

  16. Hot foam for weed control-Do alkyl polyglucoside surfactants used as foaming agents affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, H; Börjesson, E

    2016-08-15

    Use of alkyl polyglucosides (APGs) as a foaming agent during hot water weed control may influence the environmental fate of organic contaminants in soil. We studied the effects of the APG-based foaming agent NCC Spuma (C8-C10) on leaching of diuron, glyphosate, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sand columns. We also examined how APG concentration affected the apparent water solubility and adsorption of the herbicides and of the PAHs acenaphthene, acenaphthylene and fluorene. Application of APGs at the recommended concentration of 0.3% did not significantly affect leaching of any of the compounds studied. However, at a concentration of 1.5%, leaching of both diuron and glyphosate was significantly increased. The increased leaching corresponded to an increase in apparent water solubility of diuron and a decrease in glyphosate adsorption to the sand. However, APG addition did not significantly affect the mobility of PAHs even though their apparent water solubility was increased. These results suggest that application of APG-based foam during hot water weed control does not significantly affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil if used according to recommendations. Moreover, they suggest that APGs could be useful for soil bioremediation purposes if higher concentrations are used.

  17. Surfactants in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Surfactants are a diverse group of chemicals that are best known for their wide use in detergents and other cleaning products. After use, residual surfactants are discharged into sewage systems or directly into surface waters, and most of them end up dispersed in different environmental compartments such as soil, water or sediment. The toxic effects of surfactants on various aquatic organisms are well known. In general, surfactants are present in the environment at levels below toxicity and in Croatia below the national limit. Most surfactants are readily biodegradable and their amount is greatly reduced with secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The highest concern is the release of untreated wastewater or wastewater that has undergone primary treatment alone. The discharge of wastewater polluted with massive quantities of surfactants could have serious effects on the ecosystem. Future studies of surfactant toxicities and biodegradation are necessary to withdraw highly toxic and non-biodegradable compounds from commercial use and replace them with more environmentally friendly ones.

  18. Pulmonary surfactant and lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, Michiel Elardus

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers the surface tension at the air-water interface inside the alveolus. This is achieved by adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-water interface, a process controlled by surfactant-associated proteins, such as SP-A. In this way, surfactant prevents collapse of th

  19. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  20. Can A Denaturant Stabilize DNA? Pyridine Reverses DNA Denaturation in Acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portella, Guillem; Terrazas, Montserrat; Villegas, Núria; González, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-09-01

    The stability of DNA is highly dependent on the properties of the surrounding solvent, such as ionic strength, pH, and the presence of denaturants and osmolytes. Addition of pyridine is known to unfold DNA by replacing π-π stacking interactions between bases, stabilizing conformations in which the nucleotides are solvent exposed. We show here experimental and theoretical evidences that pyridine can change its role and in fact stabilize the DNA under acidic conditions. NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations demonstrate that the reversal in the denaturing role of pyridine is specific, and is related to its character as pseudo groove binder. The present study sheds light on the nature of DNA stability and on the relationship between DNA and solvent, with clear biotechnological implications.

  1. Micellization properties of cardanol as a renewable co-surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Antonella; Guernelli, Susanna; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Zappacosta, Romina; Genovese, Damiano; De Crescentini, Lucia; Riela, Serena

    2015-09-21

    With the aim to improve the features of surfactant solutions in terms of sustainability and renewability we propose the use of hydrogenated natural and sustainable plant-derived cardanol as an additive to commercial surfactants. In the present study we demonstrated that its addition, in amounts as high as 10%, to commercial surfactants of different charge does not significantly affect surfactant properties. Conversely, the presence of hydrogenated cardanol can strongly affect spectrophotometric determination of CMC if preferential interactions with the dyes used take place. This latter evidence may be profitably exploited in surfactant manufacturing by considering that the concurrent presence of a rigid organic molecule such as Orange OT and 10% hydrogenated cardanol decreases the CMC of CTAB up to 65 times.

  2. 27 CFR 20.144 - Packages of completely denatured alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packages of completely denatured alcohol. 20.144 Section 20.144 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM...

  3. 27 CFR 20.261 - Records of completely denatured alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records of completely denatured alcohol. 20.261 Section 20.261 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF DENATURED ALCOHOL AND...

  4. 27 CFR 19.464 - Denatured spirits inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... inventories. 19.464 Section 19.464 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... of Articles Inventories § 19.464 Denatured spirits inventories. Each proprietor shall take a physical inventory of all denatured spirits in the processing account at the close of each calendar quarter and...

  5. 19 CFR 10.56 - Vegetable oils, denaturing; release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vegetable oils, denaturing; release. 10.56 Section... Vegetable Oils § 10.56 Vegetable oils, denaturing; release. (a) Olive, palm-kernel, rapeseed, sunflower, and sesame oil shall be classifiable under subheadings 1509.10.20, 1509.10.40, 1509.90.20, 1509.90.40,...

  6. Effects of Surfactant on Solubility and Microbial Conversion of Steroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Enhancing the dispersion and dissolution of substrate particles in substrate/water suspension is a feasible way to improve steroid bioconversion. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of applying surfactant to microbial conversion system on the dispersion, solubilization and in turn bioconversion of steroid substrate. The model system is hydroxylation of substrate 16α-,17α-epoxy-4-pregnene-3,20-dine by microbial enzymes from Rhizopus nigricanl. The results show that the presence of substrate leads to an increase in critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant PSE compared with the normal CMC of PSE in aqueous solution. The grinding time during substrate suspension preparation affects the substrate aqueous solubility differently with the varied surfactant concentrations while barely making any difference in substrate solubility in the absence of surfactant. The properly prolonged grinding time can make up for the loss in substrate solubility arising from the reduction in surfactant concentration. The surfactant complexes composed of surfactants PSE and MGE at appropriate ratios are screened out with orthodoxy experiment method, the interaction between PSE and MGE exerts the most prominent effects on substrate bioconversion, and the surfactant complexes show more beneficial effects on steroid bioconversion than the surfactant PSE used alone.

  7. Thermal denaturation of protein studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuhua; Li, Xiangjun; Liu, Jianjun; Du, Yong; Hong, Zhi

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the absorption spectra of native or thermal protein were measured in 0.2-1.4THz using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system at room temperature, their absorption spectra and the refractive spectra were obtained. Experimental results indicate that protein both has strong absorption but their characteristics were not distinct in the THz region, and the absorption decreased during thermal denatured state. In order to prove protein had been denatured, we used Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measured their denatured temperature, from their DSC heating traces, collagen Td=101℃, Bovine serum albumin Td=97℃. While we also combined the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) to investigate their secondary and tertiary structure before and after denatuation, but the results did not have the distinct changes. We turned the absorption spectra and the refractive spectra to the dielectric spectra, and used the one-stage Debye model simulated the terahertz dielectric spectra of protein before and after denaturation. This research proved that the terahertz spectrum technology is feasible in testing protein that were affected by temperature or other factors which can provide theoretical foundation in the further study about the THz spectrum of protein and peptide temperature stability.

  8. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties.

  9. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  10. Effect of surfactant on surface hardness of dental stone and investment casts produced from polyvinyl siloxane duplicating materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Johani, Attalah; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2008-06-01

    Polyvinylsiloxane duplicating materials are typically treated with a topical surfactant before pouring dental models, but the use of topical surfactants in the dental laboratory may affect the surface hardness of the resultant models. The effect of two different topical surfactants on surface hardness of two dental stones (FujiRock and Dentstone) and one phosphate bonded investment material (Croform WB) produced from polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) dental laboratory duplicating moulds was investigated. Topical surfactants affected the surface hardness of FujiRock, Dentstone and Croform WB investment material. Surface hardness of FujiRock increased with Wax-Mate surfactant. However, surface hardness of Croform WB investment material decreased with both topical surfactants.

  11. Removal of 226Ra and 228Ra from TENORM sludge waste using surfactants solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, M F; Hamed, Mostafa M; El Afifi, E M; Aly, H F

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using surfactants as extracting agent for the removal of radium species from TENORM sludge produced from petroleum industry is evaluated. In this investigation cationic and nonionic surfactants were used as extracting agents for the removal of radium radionuclides from the sludge waste. Two surfactants namely cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Triton X-100 (TX100) were investigated as the extracting agents. Different parameters affecting the removal of both (226)Ra and (228)Ra by the two surfactants as well as their admixture were studied by the batch technique. These parameters include effect of shaking time, surfactants concentration and temperature as well as the effect of surfactants admixture. It was found that, higher solution temperature improves the removal efficiency of radium species. Combined extraction of nonionic and cationic surfactants produces synergistic effect in removal both (226)Ra and (228)Ra, where the removals reached 84% and 80% for (226)Ra and (228)Ra, respectively, were obtained using surfactants admixture.

  12. Removal of cationic surfactant (CTAB from aqueous solution on to activated carbon obtained from corncob.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yakout

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct and indirect releases of large quantities of surfactants to the environment may result in serious health and environmental problems. Therefore, surfactants should be removed from water before water is released to the environment or delivered for public use. Using powdered activated carbon (PAC as adsorbent may be an effective technique to remove surfactants. In this study, the removal of surfactants by PAC was investigated and the influencesof the operating parameters on the effectiveness on adsorption rate were studied. Cationic surfactant, Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB was selected for the experiments. A series of batch experiments were performed to determine the sorption isotherms of surfactants to PAC. The results showed that carbon structure affect mainly on the surfactant adsorption. Surfactant equilibrium data fitted very well to the binary langmuir model. The pseudo first-,second- order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied. Both, the external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion mechanisms involve in CTAB sorption.

  13. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to lung injury. The intra-alveolar material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for surfactant apoprotein, indicating that the accumulated proteinaceous material contained pulmonary surfactant. Type II pneumocytes in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis exhibited hyperplasia as well as hypertrophy. The few macrophages in lung affected by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for lysozyme. The excessive intraalveolar accumulation of proteinaceous material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis may be the result of both an over-production as well as a deficient removal of pulmonary surfactant. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 p[57]-a PMID:7004201

  14. Effects of thermally induced denaturation on technological-functional properties of whey protein isolate-based films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Krimmel, B; Grupa, U; Noller, K

    2014-09-01

    This study examined how and to what extent the degree of denaturation affected the technological-functional properties of whey protein isolate (WPI)-based coatings. It was observed that denaturation affected the material properties of WPI-coated films significantly. Surface energy decreased by approximately 20% compared with native coatings. Because the surface energy of a coating should be lower than that of the substrate, this might result in enhanced wettability characteristics between WPI-based solution and substrate surface. Water vapor barrier properties increased by about 35% and oxygen barrier properties increased by approximately 33%. However, significant differences were mainly observed between coatings made of fully native WPI and ones with a degree of denaturation of 25%. Higher degrees of denaturation did not lead to further improvement of material properties. This observation offers cost-saving potential: a major share of denatured whey proteins may be replaced by fully native ones that are not exposed to energy-intensive heat treatment. Furthermore, native WPI solutions can be produced with higher dry matter content without gelatinizing. Hence, less moisture has to be removed through drying, resulting in reduced energy consumption.

  15. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction.

  16. Micellization of monomeric and poly-ω-methacryloyloxyundecyltrimethylammonium surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Paul A; Chatjaroenporn, Khwanrat; Zhang, Xiaoli; Warr, Gregory G

    2011-10-04

    We have used small-angle neutron scattering to study how micelle morphology of the tail-polymerizable surfactants MUTAB and MUTAC (ω-methacryloyloxyundecyltrimethylammonium bromide and chloride) is affected by classic self-assembly modifiers such as temperature changes, salt addition, and counterion exchange, as a function of their conversion from monomer into polymer amphiphile in aqueous solution. Contrary to common assumptions about polymerized surfactants, these systems remain in dynamic equilibrium under all conditions examined and at all conversions (except for a small amount of high-molecular-weight precipitation by MUTAC). Counterintuitively, the polymerized methacrylate backbone has little influence on aggregate morphology, except for the formation of rod-like mixed micelles of polymerized and unpolymerized surfactant at intermediate conversions. The addition of salt produces a transition to rod-like micelles at all conversions except in the unpolymerized surfactant, which has some characteristics of an asymmetric bolaform surfactant and retains its spheroidal geometry under almost all conditions.

  17. Surfactant-Amino Acid and Surfactant-Surfactant Interactions in Aqueous Medium: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    An overview of surfactant-amino acid interactions mainly in aqueous medium has been discussed. Main emphasis has been on the solution thermodynamics and solute-solvent interactions. Almost all available data on the topic has been presented in a lucid and simple way. Conventional surfactants have been discussed as amphiphiles forming micelles and amino acids as additives and their effect on the various physicochemical properties of these conventional surfactants. Surfactant-surfactant interactions in aqueous medium, various mixed surfactant models, are also highlighted to assess their interactions in aqueous medium. Finally, their applied part has been taken into consideration to interpret their possible uses.

  18. Competitive adsorption of surfactants and hydrophilic silica particles at the oil-water interface: interfacial tension and contact angle studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2012-07-01

    The effect of surfactants' type and concentration on the interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of hydrophilic silica particles was investigated. Silica particles have been shown to have an antagonistic effect on interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of both W/O and O/W surfactants. Silica particles, combined with W/O surfactant, have no effect on interfacial tension, which is only dictated by the surfactant concentration, while they strongly affect interfacial tension when combined with O/W surfactants. At low O/W surfactant, both particles and surfactant are adsorbed at the interface, modifying the interface structure. At higher concentration, interfacial tension is only dictated by the surfactant. By increasing the surfactant concentration, the contact angle that a drop of aqueous phase assumes on a glass substrate placed in oil media decreases or increases depending on whether the surfactant is of W/O or O/W type, respectively. This is due to the modification of the wettability of the glass by the oil or water induced by the surfactants. Regardless of the surfactant's type, the contact angle profile was dictated by both particles and surfactant at low surfactant concentration, whereas it is dictated by the surfactant only at high concentration.

  19. Mechanisms for lowering of interfacial tension in alkali/acidic oil systems; Effect of added surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, J. Wasan, D.T. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports that experimental studies are conducted in order to determine the physicochemical mechanism responsible for lowering of interfacial tension in alkali, surfactant, and surfactant-enhanced alkali/acidic oil systems. A well-defined model oil is chosen to examine the influence of various surfactants and surfactant mixtures, such as oleic acid and its ionic counterpart, sodium dodecyl sulfate, petroleum sulfonate, and isobutanol, on equilibrium interfacial tension. With added surfactant alone, the interfacial tension goes through an ultralow minimum with increasing acid concentration. This proves for the first time that the un-ionized acid species plays a major role in affecting interfacial tension, and the ionized acid species.

  20. On the influence of the mixture of denaturants on protein structure stability: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qiang; Wang, Jinan; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-09-01

    Mixtures of osmolytes and/or inorganic salts are present in the cell. Therefore, the understanding of the interplay of mixed osmolyte molecules and inorganic salts and their combined effects on protein structure is of fundamental importance. A novel test is presented to investigate the combined effects of urea and a chaotropic inorganic salt, potassium iodide (KI), on protein structure by using molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the coexistence of KI and urea does not affect their respective distribution in solution. The solvation of KI salt in urea solution makes the electrostatic interactions of urea more favorable, promoting the hydrogen bonding between urea (and water) to protein backbone. The interactions from K+ and hydrogen bonding from urea and water to protein backbone work as the driving force for protein denaturation. The collaborative behavior of urea and KI salt thus enhances the denaturing ability of urea and KI mixed solution.

  1. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen vitrified gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Zhiyong, E-mail: zhiyong.xia@jhuapl.edu [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Calderon-Colon, Xiomara [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Trexler, Morgana, E-mail: morgana.trexler@jhuapl.edu [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Elisseeff, Jennifer; Guo, Qiongyu [The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyzed the denaturation of vitrigels synthesized under different conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall denaturation kinetics consisted of both reversible and irreversible steps. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More stable vitrigels were formed under high level of vitrification. - Abstract: The denaturation kinetics of type I collagen vitrigels synthesized under different vitrification time and temperature were analyzed by the classical Kissinger approach and the advanced model free kinetics (AMFK) using the Vyazovkin algorithm. The AMFK successfully elucidated the overall denaturation into reversible and irreversible processes. Depending on vitrification conditions, the activation energy for the irreversible process ranged from 100 to 200 kJ/mol, and the reversible enthalpy ranged from 250 to 300 kJ/mol. All of these values increased with the vitrification time and temperature, indicating that a more stable and complex structure formed with increased vitrification. The classical Kissinger method predicted the presence of a critical temperate of approximately 60 Degree-Sign C for the transition between reversible and irreversible processes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of fibril structures in vitrigels both before and after full denaturation; however the fibrils had became thicker and rougher after denaturation.

  2. Sublethal effect of agronomical surfactants on the spider Pardosa agrestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedobová, Jana; Hula, Vladimír; Michalko, Radek

    2016-06-01

    In addition to their active ingredients, pesticides contain also additives - surfactants. Use of surfactants has been increasing over the past decade, but their effects on non-target organisms, especially natural enemies of pests, have been studied only very rarely. The effect of three common agrochemical surfactants on the foraging behavior of the wolf spider Pardosa agrestis was studied in the laboratory. Differences in short-term, long-term, and overall cumulative predatory activities were investigated. We found that surfactant treatment significantly affected short-term predatory activity but had no effect on long-term predatory activity. The surfactants also significantly influenced the cumulative number of killed prey. We also found the sex-specific increase in cumulative kills after surfactants treatment. This is the first study showing that pesticide additives have a sublethal effect that can weaken the predatory activity of a potential biological control agent. More studies on the effects of surfactants are needed to understand how they affect beneficial organisms in agroecosystems.

  3. Sizing up surfactant synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2014-08-01

    Phosphatidylcholine is generated through de novo synthesis and remodeling involving a lysophospholipid. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, research from the Shimizu lab (Harayama et al., 2014) demonstrates the highly selective enzymatic behavior of lysophospholipid acyltransferases. The authors present an enzymatic model for phosphatidylcholine molecular species diversification that impacts surfactant formation.

  4. Evaluation of gasoline-denatured ethanol as a carbon source for denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazasi, Anna; Boardman, Gregory D; Bott, Charles B

    2013-06-01

    In this study concerning denitrification, the performance of three carbon sources, methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and gasoline-denatured ethanol (dEtOH), was compared and evaluated on the basis of treatment efficiency, inhibition potential and cost. The gasoline denaturant considered here contained mostly aliphatic compounds and little of the components that typically boost the octane rating, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes. Results were obtained using three lab-scale SBRs operated at SRT of 12.0 +/- 0.9 days. After biomass was acclimated, denitrification rates with dEtOH were similar to those of EtOH (201 +/- 50 and 197 +/- 28 NO3-N/g MLVSS x d, respectively), and higher than those of MeOH (165 +/- 49 mg NO3-N/g MLVSS x d). The denaturant did not affect biomass production, nitrification or denitrification. Effluent soluble COD concentrations were always less than the analytical detection limit. Although the cost of dEtOH ($2.00/kg nitrate removed) was somewhat higher than that of methanol ($1.63/kg nitrate removed), the use of dEtOH is very promising and utilities will have to decide if it is worth paying a little extra to take advantage of its benefits.

  5. Micro-CT imaging of denatured chitin by silver to explore honey bee and insect pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Butzloff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin and cuticle coatings are important to the environmental and immune defense of honey bees and insect pollinators. Pesticides or environmental effects may target the biochemistry of insect chitin and cuticle coating. Denaturing of chitin involves a combination of deacetylation, intercalation, oxidation, Schweiger-peeling, and the formation of amine hydrochloride salt. The term "denatured chitin" calls attention to structural and property changes to the internal membranes and external carapace of organisms so that some properties affecting biological activities are diminished. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case study was performed on honey bees using silver staining and microscopic computer-tomographic x-ray radiography (micro-CT. Silver nitrate formed counter-ion complexes with labile ammonium cations and reacted with amine hydrochloride. Silver was concentrated in the peritrophic membrane, on the abdomen, in the glossa, at intersegmental joints (tarsi, at wing attachments, and in tracheal air sacs. Imaged mono-esters and fatty acids from cuticle coating on external surfaces were apparently reduced by an alcohol pretreatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The technique provides 3-dimensional and sectional images of individual honey bees consistent with the chemistries of silver reaction and complex formation with denatured chitin. Environmental exposures and influences such as gaseous nitric oxide intercalant, trace oxidants such as ozone gas, oligosachharide salt conversion, exposure to acid rain, and chemical or biochemical denaturing by pesticides may be studied using this technique. Peritrophic membranes, which protect against food abrasion, microorganisms, and permit efficient digestion, were imaged. Apparent surface damage to the corneal lenses of compound eyes by dilute acid exposure consistent with chitin amine hydrochloride formation was imaged. The technique can contribute to existing insect pathology research, and may

  6. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS. II. LIPOPEPTIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The classification and the chemical structure of the lipopeptides and their producers (bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas are given. The role of the lipopeptides in cells motility, biofilm formation, metal binding and xenobiotics degradation and their action on the cells of pro- and eukaryotes is summarized. The stages of the nonribosomal lipopeptides synthesis and the role of two-component (GacA/GacS, ComA/ComP and the quorum system regulation of this process are shown. The potential of lactic acid bacteria and marine microorganisms as alternative surfactants producers (glycolipids, lipopeptides, phospholipids and fatty acids, glycolipopeptides are discussed. Their productivity and advantages over traditional producers are given as well. The properties of surfactants synthesized by lactic acid bacteria (the reduction of the surface tension, the critical micelle concentration, the stability in a wide range of pH, the temperature, the biological activity are summarized. Surfactants of nonpathogenic probiotic bacteria could be used as effective antimicrobial agents and antiadhesive and marine producers which able to synthesize unique metabolites that are not produced by other microorganisms.

  7. Virus inactivation by protein denaturants used in affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Peter L; Lloyd, David

    2007-10-01

    Virus inactivation by a number of protein denaturants commonly used in gel affinity chromatography for protein elution and gel recycling has been investigated. The enveloped viruses Sindbis, herpes simplex-1 and vaccinia, and the non-enveloped virus polio-1 were effectively inactivated by 0.5 M sodium hydroxide, 6 M guanidinium thiocyanate, 8 M urea and 70% ethanol. However, pH 2.6, 3 M sodium thiocyanate, 6 M guanidinium chloride and 20% ethanol, while effectively inactivating the enveloped viruses, did not inactivate polio-1. These studies demonstrate that protein denaturants are generally effective for virus inactivation but with the limitation that only some may inactivate non-enveloped viruses. The use of protein denaturants, together with virus reduction steps in the manufacturing process should ensure that viral cross contamination between manufacturing batches of therapeutic biological products is prevented and the safety of the product ensured.

  8. Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Orlando Jose

    Surface tension and high-resolution laser light scattering experiments were used to investigate the adsorption of isomeric sugar-based surfactants at the air/liquid interface in terms of surfactant surface packing and rheology. Soluble monolayers of submicellar surfactant solutions exhibited a relatively viscous behavior. It was also proved that light scattering of high-frequency thermally-induced capillary waves can be utilized to study surfactant exchange between the surface and the bulk solution. Such analysis revealed the existence of a diffusional relaxation mechanism. A procedure based on XPS was developed for quantification, on an absolute basis, of polymer adsorption on mica and Langmuir-Blodgett cellulose films. The adsorption of cationic polyelectrolytes on negatively-charged solid surfaces was highly dependent on the polymer ionicity. It was found that the adsorption process is driven by electrostatic mechanisms. Charge overcompensation (or charge reversal) of mica occurred after adsorption of polyelectrolytes of ca. 50% charge density, or higher. It was demonstrated that low-charge-density polyelectrolytes adsorb on solid surfaces with an extended configuration dominated by loops and tails. In this case the extent of adsorption is limited by steric constraints. The conformation of the polyelectrolyte in the adsorbed layer is dramatically affected by the presence of salts or surfactants in aqueous solution. The phenomena which occur upon increasing the ionic strength are consistent with the screening of the electrostatic attraction between polyelectrolyte segments and solid surface. This situation leads to polyelectrolyte desorption accompanied by both an increase in the layer thickness and the range of the steric force. Adsorbed polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants readily associate at the solid/liquid interface. Such association induces polyelectrolyte desorption at a surfactant concentration which depends on the polyelectrolyte charge

  9. Solubilization capacity of nonionic surfactant micelles exhibiting strong influence on export of intracellular pigments in Monascus fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Biyu; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Zhenqiang; Qi, Hanshi; Wang, Zhilong

    2013-09-01

    In this study, perstractive fermentation of intracellular Monascus pigments in nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution had been studied. The permeability of cell membrane modified by nonionic surfactant might have influence on the rate of export of intracellular pigments into its extracellular broth while nearly no effect on the final extracellular pigment concentration. However, the solubilization of pigments in nonionic surfactant micelles strongly affected the final extracellular pigment concentration. The solubilization capacity of micelles depended on the kind of nonionic surfactant, the super-molecule assembly structure of nonionic surfactant in an aqueous solution, and the nonionic surfactant concentration. Elimination of pigment degradation by export of intracellular Monascus pigments and solubilizing them into nonionic surfactant micelles was also confirmed experimentally. Thus, nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution is potential for replacement of organic solvent for perstractive fermentation of intracellular product.

  10. Gemini ester quat surfactants and their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczyński, Jacek; Frąckowiak, Renata; Włoch, Aleksandra; Kleszczyńska, Halina; Witek, Stanisław

    2013-03-01

    Cationic gemini surfactants are an important class of surface-active compounds that exhibit much higher surface activity than their monomeric counterparts. This type of compound architecture lends itself to the compound being easily adsorbed at interfaces and interacting with the cellular membranes of microorganisms. Conventional cationic surfactants have high chemical stability but poor chemical and biological degradability. One of the main approaches to the design of readily biodegradable and environmentally friendly surfactants involves inserting a bond with limited stability into the surfactant molecule to give a cleavable surfactant. The best-known example of such a compound is the family of ester quats, which are cationic surfactants with a labile ester bond inserted into the molecule. As part of this study, a series of gemini ester quat surfactants were synthesized and assayed for their biological activity. Their hemolytic activity and changes in the fluidity and packing order of the lipid polar heads were used as the measures of their biological activity. A clear correlation between the hemolytic activity of the tested compounds and their alkyl chain length was established. It was found that the compounds with a long hydrocarbon chain showed higher activity. Moreover, the compounds with greater spacing between their alkyl chains were more active. This proves that they incorporate more easily into the lipid bilayer of the erythrocyte membrane and affect its properties to a greater extent. A better understanding of the process of cell lysis by surfactants and of their biological activity may assist in developing surfactants with enhanced selectivity and in widening their range of application.

  11. OBSERVATION OF DNA PARTIAL DENATURATION BY ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-hua Dai; Zhi-gang Wang; Bo Xiao; Yong-jun Zhang; Chen Wang; Chun-li Bai; Xiao-li Zhang; Jian Xu

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) complexes adsorbed on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). These complexes, at low concentrations, can automatically spread out on the surface of HOPG. The DNA-CTAB complexes display a typically extended structure rather than a globular structure. Partially denaturated DNA produced by binding CTAB to DNA is directly observed by AFM with high resolution.The three-dimensional resolution of partially denaturated DNA obtained by AFM is not available by any other technique at present.

  12. Unusual cold denaturation of a small protein domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Ginka S; Shih, Natalie; Reece, Amy E; Niebling, Stephan; Kubelka, Jan

    2012-08-21

    A thermal unfolding study of the 45-residue α-helical domain UBA(2) using circular dichroism is presented. The protein is highly thermostable and exhibits a clear cold unfolding transition with the onset near 290 K without denaturant. Cold denaturation in proteins is rarely observed in general and is quite unique among small helical protein domains. The cold unfolding was further investigated in urea solutions, and a simple thermodynamic model was used to fit all thermal and urea unfolding data. The resulting thermodynamic parameters are compared to those of other small protein domains. Possible origins of the unusual cold unfolding of UBA(2) are discussed.

  13. Interaction of nonionic surfactant AEO9 with ionic surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-guo; YIN Hong

    2005-01-01

    The interaction in two mixtures of a nonionic surfactant AEO9 (C12H25O(CH2CH2O)9H) and different ionic surfactants was investigated. The two mixtures were AEO9/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and AEO9/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at molar fraction of AEO9, αAEO9 =0.5. The surface properties of the surfactants, critical micelle concentration (CMC),effectiveness of surface tension reduction (γCMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Гmax) and minimum area per molecule at the air/solution interface (Amin) were determined for both individual surfactants and their mixtures. The significant deviations from ideal behavior (attractive interactions) of the nonionic/ionic surfactant mixtures were determined. Mixtures of both AEO9/SDS and AEO9/CTAB exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction efficiency and mixed micelle formation, but neither exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction effectiveness.

  14. Thermodynamic denaturation of {beta}-lactoglobulin in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahihi, M. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, A.K., E-mail: bordbar@chem.ui.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghayeb, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    In this work, we determined the stability parameters of bovine {beta}-lactoglobulin, variant A, (BLG-A), in relation to their transition curves induced by cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) as a cationic surfactant. The experiments took place over the temperature range of 298 K to 358 K. For each transition curve at any specific temperature, the conventional method of analysis, which assumes a linear concentration dependence of the pre- and post-transition base lines, gave the most realistic values for {Delta}G{sub D}(H{sub 2}O). Results show that the minimum value of {Delta}G{sub D}(H{sub 2}O) occurs at T = 328 K. Using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, the values of enthalpy, {Delta}H{sub D}, and entropy, {Delta}S{sub D}, of denaturation have been calculated considering temperature dependence of {Delta}G{sub D} at any specified concentration of CPC. The values of 12.05 kJ . mol{sup -1}, 18.54 kJ . mol{sup -1}, and 18.32 J . mol{sup -1} . K{sup -1}, were obtained for {Delta}G{sub D}(H{sub 2}O), {Delta}H{sub D}(H{sub 2}O), and {Delta}S{sub D}(H{sub 2}O), respectively. The results show that the enthalpy term dominates the entropy term.

  15. Reaction of Native and Denatured Brucella abortus (S19 Proteins with Antibody Using Affinity Chromatography and Immunoblotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Karimi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Western blotting or immunoblotting commonly use for study of reaction between antigens and antibodies. Denaturation of many proteins in immunoblotting can affect greatly the reactivity of antibodies and outcome of the procedure.In this study proteins of Brucella abortus (S19 was extracted by a mild method and reaction of the extracted proteins with serum of infected human and goat and immunized rabbit compared by affinity chromatography and immunoblotting. Gamma globulin (mostly IgG fraction of the sera was precipitated by half saturation of ammonium sulfate and linked to activated sepharose 4B. The extracted proteins were loaded on the affinity column. Attached proteins was eluted by low pH and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Reaction of the total extract and eluted fractions with IgG fraction of sera was evaluated by Western blotting.Upon the results of affinity chromatography and immunoblotting, Brucella proteins can be classified in four groups: 1- The proteins that adsorbed to the affinity column and react with IgG in westernblotting. 2- Proteins that react with IgG in native state but no in denatured state. 3- Proteins that do not react with IgG in native state but react in denatured state. 4- Proteins that do not react with IgG in native and denatured state.

  16. Urea Induced Denaturation of Pre-Q1 Riboswitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeseong; Thirumalai, Devarajan; Hyeon, Changbong

    2013-01-01

    Urea, a polar molecule with a large dipole moment, not only destabilizes the folded RNA structures, but can also enhance the folding rates of large ribozymes. Unlike the mechanism of urea-induced unfolding of proteins, which is well understood, the action of urea on RNA has barely been explored. We performed extensive all atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine the molecular underpinnings of urea-induced RNA denaturation. Urea displays its denaturing power in both secondary and tertiary motifs of the riboswitch (RS) structure. Our simulations reveal that the denaturation of RNA structures is mainly driven by the hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions of urea with the bases. Through detailed studies of the simulation trajectories, we found that geminate pairs between urea and bases due to hydrogen bonds and stacks persist only ~ (0.1-1) ns, which suggests that urea-base interaction is highly dynamic. Most importantly, the early stage of base pair disruption is triggered by penetration of water molecules into the hydrophobic domain between the RNA bases. The infiltration of water into the narrow space between base pairs is critical in increasing the accessibility of urea to transiently disrupted bases, thus allowing urea to displace inter base hydrogen bonds. This mechanism, water-induced disruption of base-pairs resulting in the formation of a "wet" destabilized RNA followed by solvation by urea, is the exact opposite of the two-stage denaturation of proteins by urea. In the latter case, initial urea penetration creates a dry-globule, which is subsequently solvated by water penetration leading to global protein unfolding. Our work shows that the ability to interact with both water and polar, non-polar components of nucleotides makes urea a powerful chemical denaturant for nucleic acids.

  17. Electrophoretic separations in poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchips using mixtures of ionic, nonionic and zwitterionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qian; Noblitt, Scott D; Henry, Charles S

    2012-09-01

    The use of surfactant mixtures to affect both EOF and separation selectivity in electrophoresis with PDMS substrates is reported, and capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection is introduced for EOF measurement on PDMS microchips. First, the EOF was measured for two nonionic surfactants (Tween 20 and Triton X-100), mixed ionic/nonionic surfactant systems (SDS/Tween 20 and SDS/Triton X-100), and finally for the first time, mixed zwitterionic/nonionic surfactant systems (TDAPS/Tween 20 and TDAPS/Triton X-100). EOF for the nonionic surfactants decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. The addition of SDS or TDAPS to a nonionic surfactant increased EOF. After establishing the EOF behavior, the separation of model catecholamines was explored to show the impact on separations. Similar analyte resolution with greater peak heights was achieved with mixed surfactant systems containing Tween 20 and TDAPS relative to the single surfactant system. Finally, the detection of catecholamine release from PC12 cells by stimulation with 80 mM K(+) was performed to demonstrate the usefulness of mixed surfactant systems to provide resolution of biological compounds in complex samples.

  18. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  19. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  20. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  1. Solubilization isotherms of aromatic solutes in surfactant aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadelle, F.; Koros, W.J.; Schechter, R.S. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-03-01

    Several factors affecting solubilization of aromatic solutes in surfactant micelles have been investigated. Solubilization isotherms of benzene, toluene, and chlorobenzene in various aqueous micellar solutions were determined using head space gas chromatography. Cationic surfactants such as cetylpyridinium chloride or cetyltrimethylammonium bromide present high solubilization capacities. Comparable anionic surfactants exhibit lower solubilization and a greater tendency to precipitate. It was observed that nonionic surfactants show high solubilization on a molar basis. Solubilization in mixed cationic-anionic micelles was also investigated. It also appears that the molecular size of the solute determines the extent of the solubilization. Finally, the shape of the different isotherms indicates that knowing the amount solubilized at saturation of the micellar solution is not sufficient to estimate solubilization at solute concentrations lower than the solute aqueous solubility. Solubilization of organics in surfactant micelles is of major importance in many applications. One new application is micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration. Another application of interest is the surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation, a process in which a micellar aqueous solution is flushed into contaminated groundwaters to enhance recovery of pollutants by micellar solubilization.

  2. Barrier or carrier? Pulmonary surfactant and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Cruz, Antonio; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    To consider the lung as a target for drug delivery and to optimise strategies directed at the pulmonary route, it is essential to consider the role of pulmonary surfactant, a thin lipid-protein film lining the respiratory surface of mammalian lungs. Membrane-based surfactant multilayers are essential for reducing the surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface to minimise the work of breathing. Different components of surfactant are also responsible for facilitating the removal of potentially pathological entities such as microorganisms, allergens or environmental pollutants and particles. Upon inhalation, drugs or nanoparticles first contact the surfactant layer, and these interactions critically affect their lifetime and fate in the airways. This review summarises the current knowledge on the possible role and effects of the pulmonary surfactant system in drug delivery strategies. It also summarises the evidence that suggests that pulmonary surfactant is far from being an insuperable barrier and could be used as an efficient shuttle for delivering hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds deep into the lung and the organism.

  3. Improving reseeding success after catastrophic wildfire - shifting the paradigm with surfactant seed coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of soil surfactants in wildfire-affected ecosystems has been limited due to logistical and economic constraints associated with the standard practice of using large quantities of irrigation water as the surfactant carrier. We tested a potential solution to this problem that uses seed...

  4. Improving reseeding success after catastrophic wildfire with surfactant seed coating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of soil surfactants in wildfire-affected ecosystems has been limited due to logistical and economic constraints associated with the standard practice of using large quantities of irrigation water as the surfactant carrier. We tested a potential solution to this problem that uses seed...

  5. Aggregation Kinetics and Transport of Single-Walled CarbonNanotubes at Low Surfactant Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about how low levels of surfactants can affect the colloidal stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and how surfactant-wrapping of SWNTs can impact ecological exposures in aqueous systems. In this study, SWNTs were suspended in water with sodium ...

  6. Innovation in surfactant therapy II: surfactant administration by aerosolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, J Jane; Minocchieri, S

    2012-01-01

    Instilled bolus surfactant is the only approved surfactant treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, recent trends towards increased utilization of noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with surfactant deficiency have created a demand for a similarly noninvasive means of administering exogenous surfactant. Past approaches to surfactant nebulization met with varying success due to inefficient aerosol devices resulting in low intrapulmonary delivery doses of surfactant with variable clinical effectiveness. The recent development of vibrating membrane nebulizers, coupled with appropriate positioning of the interface device, indicates that efficient delivery of aerosolized surfactant is now a realistic goal in infants. Evidence of clinical effect despite low total administered dose in pilot studies, together with suggestions of enhanced homogeneity of pulmonary distribution indicate that this therapy may be applied in a cost-effective manner, with minimal patient handling and disruption. These studies need to be subjected to appropriately designed randomized controlled trials. Further work is also required to determine the optimum delivery route (mask, intranasal prong, nasopharyngeal or laryngeal), dosing amount and redosing interval.

  7. Interaction of nonionic surfactant AEO9 with ionic surfactants*

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The interaction in two mixtures of a nonionic surfactant AEO9 (C12H25O(CH2CH2O)9H) and different ionic surfactants was investigated. The two mixtures were AEO9/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and AEO9/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at molar fraction of AEO9, α AEO9=0.5. The surface properties of the surfactants, critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness of surface tension reduction (γ CMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γ max) and minimum area per...

  8. Theoretical Study on Effects of Salt and Temperature on Denaturation Transition of Double-stranded DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Rui-Xin; YAN Xun-Ling; PANG Xiao-Feng; JIANG Shan; LIU Sheng-Gang

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the statistical mechanics properties of a nonlinear dynamics model of the denaturation of the DNA double-helix and study the effects of salt concentration and temperature on denaturation transition of DNA. The specific heat, entropy, and denaturation temperature of the system versus salt concentration are obtained. These results show that the denaturation of DNA not only depends on the temperature but also is influenced by the salt concentration in the solution of DNA, which are in agreement with experimental measurement.

  9. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS IN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown literature and own experimental data concerning the use of microbial surface active glycolipids (rhamno-, sophoro- and trehalose lipids and lipopeptides for water and soil purification from oil and other hydrocarbons, removing toxic heavy metals (Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, degradation of complex pollution (oil and other hydrocarbons with heavy metals, and the role of microbial surfactants in phytoremediation processes. The factors that limit the use of microbial surfactants in environmental technologies are discussed. Thus, at certain concentrations biosurfactant can exhibit antimicrobial properties and inhibit microorganisms destructing xenobiotics. Microbial biodegradability of surfactants may also reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation. Development of effective technologies using microbial surfactants should include the following steps: monitoring of contaminated sites to determine the nature of pollution and analysis of the autochthonous microbiota; determining the mode of surfactant introduction (exogenous addition of stimulation of surfactant synthesis by autochthonous microbiota; establishing an optimal concentration of surfactant to prevent exhibition of antimicrobial properties and rapid biodegradation; research both in laboratory and field conditions.

  10. Surfactant enhanced volumetric sweep efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, J.H.; Scamehorn, J.F.

    1989-10-01

    Surfactant-enhanced waterflooding is a novel EOR method aimed to improve the volumetric sweep efficiencies in reservoirs. The technique depends upon the ability to induce phase changes in surfactant solutions by mixing with surfactants of opposite charge or with salts of appropriate type. One surfactant or salt solution is injected into the reservoir. It is followed later by injection of another surfactant or salt solution. The sequence of injections is arranged so that the two solutions do not mix until they are into the permeable regions well away from the well bore. When they mix at this point, by design they form a precipitate or gel-like coacervate phase, plugging this permeable region, forcing flow through less permeable regions of the reservoir, improving sweep efficiency. The selectivity of the plugging process is demonstrated by achieving permeability reductions in the high permeable regions of Berea sandstone cores. Strategies were set to obtain a better control over the plug placement and the stability of plugs. A numerical simulator has been developed to investigate the potential increases in oil production of model systems. Furthermore, the hardness tolerance of anionic surfactant solutions is shown to be enhanced by addition of monovalent electrolyte or nonionic surfactants. 34 refs., 32 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Stabilizing effect of biochar on soil extracellular enzymes after a denaturing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzobair, Khalid A; Stromberger, Mary E; Ippolito, James A

    2016-01-01

    Stabilizing extracellular enzymes may maintain enzymatic activity while protecting enzymes from proteolysis and denaturation. A study determined whether a fast pyrolysis hardwood biochar (CQuest™) would reduce evaporative losses, subsequently stabilizing soil extracellular enzymes and prohibiting potential enzymatic activity loss following a denaturing stress (microwaving). Soil was incubated in the presence of biochar (0%, 1%, 2%, 5%, or 10% by wt.) for 36 days and then exposed to microwave energies (0, 400, 800, 1600, or 3200 J g(-1) soil). Soil enzymes (β-glucosidase, β-d-cellobiosidase, N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase, β-xylosidase) were analyzed by fluorescence-based assays. Biochar amendment reduced leucine aminopeptidase and β-xylosidase potential activity after the incubation period and prior to stress exposure. The 10% biochar rate reduced soil water loss at the lowest stress level (400 J microwave energy g(-1) soil). Enzyme stabilization was demonstrated for β-xylosidase; intermediate biochar application rates prevented a complete loss of this enzyme's potential activity after soil was exposed to 400 (1% biochar treatment) or 1600 (5% biochar treatment) J microwave energy g(-1) soil. Remaining enzyme potential activities were not affected by biochar, and activities decreased with increasing stress levels. We concluded that biochar has the potential to reduce evaporative soil water losses and stabilize certain extracellular enzymes where activity is maintained after a denaturing stress; this effect was biochar rate and enzyme dependent. While biochar may reduce the potential activity of certain soil extracellular enzymes, this phenomenon was not universal as the majority of enzymes assayed in this study were unaffected by exposure to biochar.

  12. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  13. How water contributes to pressure and cold denaturation of proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Valentino

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cold- and pressure-denaturation of proteins are matter of debate and are commonly understood as due to water-mediated interactions. Here we study several cases of proteins, with or without a unique native state, with or without hydrophilic residues, by means of a coarse-grain protein model in explicit solvent. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations, that taking into account how water at the protein interface changes its hydrogen bond properties and its density fluctuations is enough to predict protein stability regions with elliptic shapes in the temperature-pressure plane, consistent with previous theories. Our results clearly identify the different mechanisms with which water participates to denaturation and open the perspective to develop advanced computational design tools for protein engineering.

  14. Influence of Ficoll on urea induced denaturation of fibrinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Meenakshisundaram, N.

    2016-03-01

    Ficoll is a neutral, highly branched polymer used as a molecular crowder in the study of proteins. Ficoll is also part of Ficoll-Paque used in biology laboratories to separate blood to its components (erythrocytes, leukocytes etc.,). Role of Ficoll in the urea induced denaturation of protein Fibrinogen (Fg) has been analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular docking and interfacial studies. Fluorescence studies show that Ficoll prevents quenching of Fg in the presence of urea. From the circular dichroism spectra, Fg shows conformational transition to random coil with urea of 6 M concentration. Ficoll helps to shift this denaturation concentration to 8 M and thus constraints by shielding Fg during the process. Molecular docking studies indicate that Ficoll interacts favorably with the protein than urea. The surface tension and shear viscosity analysis shows clearly that the protein is shielded by Ficoll.

  15. Rheological properties of sweet potato starch before and after denaturalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖华西; 林亲录; 夏新剑; 李丽辉; 林利忠; 吴卫国

    2008-01-01

    Based on the sweet potato starch,cationic starch,acetic starch and cationic-acetic compoundedly modified starch were made through chemical denaturalization.The above three kinds of static rheological parameter and dynamic rheological parameter were measured,respectively.The experimental result reveals that the thermal stability of starchy viscosity increases after chemical denaturalization.Under the condition of identical shearing rate,the shear stress of cationic-acetic ester compoundedly modified sweet potato starch paste is the largest among these kinds of sweet potato starch.This attributes to a phenomenon of shearing thinning.Furthermore,raw sweet potato starch has a larger gel intensity than that of modified starch.

  16. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Detergent Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Jelen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Detergent surfactantscan be found in wastewater in relevant concentrations. Most of them are known as ready degradable under aerobic conditions, as required by European legislation. Far fewer surfactants have been tested so far for biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. The natural environment is predominantly aerobic, but there are some environmental compartments such as river sediments, sub-surface soil layer and anaerobic sludge digesters of wastewater treatment plants which have strictly anaerobic conditions. This review gives an overview on anaerobic biodegradation processes, the methods for testing anaerobic biodegradability, and the anaerobic biodegradability of different detergent surfactant types (anionic, nonionic, cationic, amphoteric surfactants.

  17. Temperature induced denaturation of collagen in acidic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Changdao; Li, Defu; Lin, Wei; Ding, Yanwei; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2007-07-01

    The denaturation of collagen solution in acetic acid has been investigated by using ultra-sensitive differential scanning calorimetry (US-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), and laser light scattering (LLS). US-DSC measurements reveal that the collagen exhibits a bimodal transition, i.e., there exists a shoulder transition before the major transition. Such a shoulder transition can recover from a cooling when the collagen is heated to a temperature below 35 degrees C. However, when the heating temperature is above 37 degrees C, both the shoulder and major transitions are irreversible. CD measurements demonstrate the content of triple helix slowly decreases with temperature at a temperature below 35 degrees C, but it drastically decreases at a higher temperature. Our experiments suggest that the shoulder transition and major transition arise from the defibrillation and denaturation of collagen, respectively. LLS measurements show the average hydrodynamic radius R(h), radius of gyration R(g)of the collagen gradually decrease before a sharp decrease at a higher temperature. Meanwhile, the ratio R(g)/R(h) gradually increases at a temperature below approximately 34 degrees C and drastically increases in the range 34-40 degrees C, further indicating the defibrillation of collagen before the denaturation.

  18. [DNA degradation during standard alkaline of thermal denaturation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozhdeniuk, A P; Sulimova, G E; Vaniushin, B F

    1976-01-01

    Essential degradation 8 DNA (up to 10 per cent) with liberation of acid-soluble fragments takes place on the standard alkaline (0,01 M sodium phosphate, pH 12, 60 degrees, 15 min) or thermal (0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8, 102 degrees C, 15 min) denaturation. This degradation is more or less selective: fraction of low molecular weight fragments, isolated by hydroxyapatite cromatography and eluted by 0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8 is rich in adenine and thymine and contains about 2 times less 5-methylcytosine than the total wheat germ DNA. The degree of degradation of DNA on thermal denaturation is higher than on alkaline degradation. Therefore while studying reassociation of various DNA, one and the same standard method of DNA denaturation should be used. Besides, both the level of DNA degradation and the nature of the resulting products (fragments) should be taken into account.

  19. A conductometric investigation of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose/sodium dodecyl sulfate/nonionic surfactant systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Lidija B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant mixtures are very often used in various cosmetic and pharmaceutical products because they commonly act in synergism and provide more favorable properties than the single surfactants. At the same time, the 9 presence of polymers in mixtures of surfactants may lead to molecular interactions thereby affecting product stability and activity. For these reasons it is very important to determine the surfactant interactions influence on 1micellization and mixed micellization, as well as polymer-surfactants mixed micelles interactions. In this work we examined self-aggregation of nonionic surfactants, polysorbate 20 (Tween 20, polyoxyethylene octylphenyl ether (Triton X100 and polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block copolymer (Pluronic F68 with ionic surfactant, sodium dodecylsulfate, in aqueous solution at 40ºC using conductometric titration method. It was found that concentration region for mixed micelle formation depends on nonionic surfactant characteristics and its concentration. Formation of surfactants mixed micelles in the presence of nonionic polymer, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, and their binding to polymer hydrophobic sites, were investigated too. Analysis of obtained results points to different kinds of interactions in investigated systems, which are crucial for their application. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46010

  20. Protein's native state stability in a chemically induced denaturation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Quiroz, L; Garcia-Colin, L S

    2007-05-21

    In this work, we present a generalization of Zwanzig's protein unfolding analysis [Zwanzig, R., 1997. Two-state models of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94, 148-150; Zwanzig, R., 1995. Simple model of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9801], in order to calculate the free energy change Delta(N)(D)F between the protein's native state N and its unfolded state D in a chemically induced denaturation. This Extended Zwanzig Model (EZM) is both based on an equilibrium statistical mechanics approach and the inclusion of experimental denaturation curves. It enables us to construct a suitable partition function Z and to derive an analytical formula for Delta(N)(D)F in terms of the number K of residues of the macromolecule, the average number nu of accessible states for each single amino acid and the concentration C(1/2) where the midpoint of the ND transition occurs. The results of the EZM for proteins where chemical denaturation follows a sigmoidal-type profile, as it occurs for the case of the T70N human variant of lysozyme (PDB code: T70N) [Esposito, G., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 25910-25918], can be splitted into two lines. First, EZM shows that for sigmoidal denaturation profiles, the internal degrees of freedom of the chain play an outstanding role in the stability of the native state. On the other hand, that under certain conditions DeltaF can be written as a quadratic polynomial on concentration C(1/2), i.e., DeltaF approximately aC(1/2)(2)+bC(1/2)+c, where a,b,c are constant coefficients directly linked to protein's size K and the averaged number of non-native conformations nu. Such functional form for DeltaF has been widely known to fit experimental measures in chemically induced protein denaturation [Yagi, M., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 47009-47015; Asgeirsson, B., Guojonsdottir, K., 2006. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1764, 190-198; Sharma, S., et al., 2006. Protein Pept. Lett. 13(4), 323-329; Salem, M., et al

  1. Treatment with exogenous surfactant stimulates endogenous surfactant synthesis in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, JEH; Carnielli, VP; Janssen, DJ; Wattimena, JLD; Hop, WC; Sauer, PJ; Zimmermann, LJI

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with exogenous surfactant has greatly improved clinical outcome. Some infants require multiple doses, and it has not been studied whether these large amounts of exogenous surfactant disturb endogenous surfactant metabol

  2. Electrochemical Oscillations Induced by Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟俊红; 贺占博

    2003-01-01

    A new type of electrochemical oscillation induced by surfactant was observed in experiments. The electrochemical system is a Daniell cell with a copper rod in CuSO4 aqueous and an aluminum rod in Al(NO3)3 aqueous as electrodes. The surfactants are CTAB, TX-100, SLS. The addition of trace surfactant solution by a micro-syringe made the original monotonously changing electrochemical system produce obvious periodic phenomena. At the mean time, the copper ion selective electrode and Hg2SO4 reference electrode were used to monitor the copper electrode reaction and determine its rate constant k of first order reaction. According to the experimental results of electrode reaction kinetics, the possible mechanism was found to be the polarization induced from the directional adsorption of trace surfactant on the electrode surface. That is the electrochemical oscillations.

  3. Persurf, a New Method to Improve Surfactant Delivery: A Study in Surfactant Depleted Rats

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Exogenous surfactant is not very effective in adults with ARDS, since surfactant does not reach atelectatic alveoli. Perfluorocarbons (PFC) can recruit atelectatic areas but do not replace impaired endogenous surfactant. A surfactant-PFC-mixture could combine benefits of both therapies. The aim of the proof-of-principal-study was to produce a PFC-in-surfactant emulsion (Persurf) and to test in surfactant depleted Wistar rats whether Persurf achieves I.) a more homogenous pulmonary di...

  4. Surfactant damages on coastal vegetation in southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal vegetation decline caused by seaspray has been reported to affect a variety of species in several countries: Australia, South of France, along the Italian Tyrrhenian coast, Spain and Tunisia. The most serious injury is due to the interaction between sea salt and surfactants, even if surfactants may cause direct damage on cell membranes. The salt uptake is enhanced by the durfactant-induced erosion of the epicuticular wax, which reduces the water surface tension. The symptoms are non-specific and consist in leaf discoloration and necrosis. In needles, necrosis begins from the apex; in leaves, from the edges. Directionality of crown damage is the main symptom for diagnosing the involvement of polluted seaspray. If an obstacle is placed between trees and sea wind, the trees do not show appreciable damage. In Italy, the tree decline caused by seaspray and surfactants has been investigated with special reference to the pinewoods of the San Rossore (Tuscany, Central Italy, or on the Tyrrhenian coastlands of Central Italy, such as the area around Castelporziano in Lazio. This research is aimed at a preliminary assessment of the extent of surfactant damage to the coastal vegetation in four regions in Southern Italy by: i field surveys and mapping of damage caused by surfactants; ii detecting the presence of surfactants on the tree crowns. The damages have been observed in a lot of zones in Apulia, Basilicata, Campania and Calabria, within 500 m inland from the sea, for a maximum length of 5500 m coastline, near the mouth of a river or stream, near the outlet of sewage canals and in any other coastal areas where the surface currents carry a surfactant load.

  5. The role of surfactant treatment in preterm infants and term newborns with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirbelauer, J; Speer, C P

    2009-05-01

    Surfactant treatment in preterm infants and term newborns with (acute respiratory distress syndrome) ARDS-like severe respiratory failure has become part of an individualized treatment strategy in many intensive care units around the world. These babies constitute heterogeneous groups of gestational ages, lung maturity, as well as of the underlying disease processes and postnatal interventions. The pathophysiology of respiratory failure in preterm infants is characterized by a combination of primary surfactant deficiency and surfactant inactivation as a result of plasma proteins leaking into the airways from areas of epithelial disruption and injury. Various pre- and postnatal factors, such as exposure to chorioamnionitis, pneumonia, sepsis and asphyxia, induce an injurious inflammatory response in the lungs of preterm infants, which may subsequently affect surfactant function, synthesis and alveolar stability. Surfactant inactivation--and dysfunction--is also a hallmark in newborns with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), pneumonia and other disorders affecting the pulmonary function. Although for the majority of suggested indications no data from randomized controlled trials exist, a surfactant replacement that counterbalances surfactant inactivation seems to improve oxygenation and lung function in many babies with ARDS without any apparent negative side effects. Newborns with MAS will definitely benefit from a reduced need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Clinical experience seems to justify surfactant treatment in neonates with ARDS.

  6. Desorption of organophosphorous pesticides from soil with wastewater and surfactant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Soriano, M. C.; Mingorance, M. D.; Pena, A.

    2009-07-01

    Surfactants can be introduced in the environment by wastewater discharge, point-charge pollution or deliberate action, e. g. to remediate contaminated soil or groundwater. The irrigation of soil with wastewater containing surfactants may modify pesticide desorption from soil, thus affecting their affecting their environmental fate. Desorption from soil of the plain of Granada (South-eastern Spain) of two organophosphorous pesticides, diazinon and dimethoate, differing in solubility and hydrophobicity, has been evaluated in the presence of different surfactant aqueous solutions and municipal wastewater. (Author)

  7. Dynamics of surfactant-driven fracture of particle rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Dominic; Kim, Ho-Young; Aussillous, Pascale; Mahadevan, L

    2006-05-05

    We investigate the dynamic fracture of a close-packed monolayer of particles, or particle raft, floating at a liquid-gas interface induced by the localized addition of surfactant. Unusually for a two-dimensional solid, our experiments show that the speed of crack propagation here is not affected by the elastic properties of the raft. Instead it is controlled by the rate at which surfactant is advected to the crack tip by means of the induced Marangoni flows. Further, the velocity of propagation is not constant in time and the length of the crack scales as t(3/4). More broadly, this surfactant-induced rupture of interfacial rafts suggests ways to manipulate them for applications.

  8. Collagen thermal denaturation study for thermal angioplasty based on modified kinetic model: relation between the artery mechanical properties and collagen denaturation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, N.; Hayashi, T.; Kunio, M.; Arai, T.

    2010-02-01

    We have been developing the novel short-term heating angioplasty in which sufficient artery lumen-dilatation was attained with thermal softening of collagen fiber in artery wall. In the present study, we investigated on the relation between the mechanical properties of heated artery and thermal denaturation fractures of arterial collagen in ex vivo. We employed Lumry-Eyring model to estimate temperature- and time-dependent thermal denaturation fractures of arterial collagen fiber during heating. We made a kinetic model of arterial collagen thermal denaturation by adjustment of K and k in this model, those were the equilibrium constant of reversible denaturation and the rate constant of irreversible denaturation. Meanwhile we demonstrated that the change of reduced scattering coefficient of whole artery wall during heating reflected the reversible denaturation of the collagen in artery wall. Based on this phenomenon, the K was determined experimentally by backscattered light intensity measurement (at 633nm) of extracted porcine carotid artery during temperature elevation and descending (25°C-->80°C-->25°C). We employed the value of according to our earlier report in which the time-and temperature- dependent irreversible denaturation amount of the artery collagen fiber that was assessed by the artery birefringence. Then, the time- and temperature- dependent reversible (irreversible) denaturation fraction defined as the reversible ((irreversible) denatured collagen amount) / (total collagen amount) was calculated by the model. Thermo-mechanical analysis of artery wall was performed to compare the arterial mechanical behaviors (softening, shrinkage) during heating with the calculated denaturation fraction with the model. In any artery temperature condition in 70-80°, the irreversible denaturation fraction at which the artery thermal shrinkage started was estimated to be around 20%. On the other hand, the calculated irreversible denaturation fraction remained below

  9. [Adsorption of phenol chemicals by surfactant-modified zeolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jie; Wang, Zhe; Wu, De-Yi; Li, Chun-Jie

    2012-12-01

    Two kinds of zeolites were prepared from fly ash and modified by surfactant subsequently. Surfactant-modified zeolites were studied for adsorption of phenol chemicals (phenol, p-chlorphenol, bisphenol A). It showed that the adsorption affinity of zeolite to phenol chemicals was significantly improved after surfactant modification. The adsorption isotherms of phenol chemicals were well fitted by the Langmuir isotherm. For the two surfactant-surfactant modified zeolites, the maximum adsorption amounts of phenol, p-chlorphenol, and bisphenol A calculated from the Langmuir equation were 37.7, 52.36, 90.9 mg x g(-1) and 10.7, 22.83, 56.8 mg x g(-1), respectively. When pH values of solutions were higher than the pK(a) values of phenol chemicals, the removal efficiencies were getting higher with the increase of pH values. The octanol/water partition coefficient (K(ow)) was also found to be an important factor affecting adsorption of phenol chemicals by the modified zeolites. Higher K(ow) value, which means the greater hydrophobicity of the chemicals, resulted in a higher removal.

  10. Direct suppression of phagocytosis by amphipathic polymeric surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous-Peltier, N; Uhl, J; Steel, V; Brophy, L; Merisko-Liversidge, E

    1992-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that phagocytosis of colloidal particles by the mononuclear phagocytes of the liver and spleen can be controlled by either coating or stabilizing particulate carriers with the amphipathic polymeric surfactants, F108 and T908. These surfactants consist of copolymers of polypropylene oxide (PPO) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) and, when adsorbed to particulate surfaces, significantly decrease sequestration of particulates by the mononuclear phagocytes (MPS) of the liver. To evaluate these observations further, murine peritoneal macrophages were incubated for varying periods with surfactant-coated and noncoated polystyrene particles (PSPs). Phagocytosis was monitored using gamma counting and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data show that phagocytosis is decreased when PSPs are coated with F108 and T908. In addition, suppression of phagocytic activity was observed when cells were pretreated with the surfactant and then challenged with noncoated particles. The data confirm previous observations that polymeric surfactants consisting of PEO and PPO protect particulate carriers from rapid uptake by the MPS of the liver. Further, F108 and T908 suppress phagocytosis directly without affecting the integrity, viability, or functional state of the cell.

  11. Comparison of in vitro predictive tests for irritation induced by anionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Paye, M; Piérard, G E

    1995-07-01

    Skin compatibility of anionic surfactants may often but not always be predicted by in vitro tests. For instance, the correlation between in vivo and in vitro data is classically hampered in the presence of magnesium. This ion is known to interfere with in vitro skin irritation predictive tests based on protein denaturation. This study was conducted to compare a recently introduced assay, corneosurfametry, with other in vitro tests including the pH-rise of bovine serum albumin, collagen swelling, and zein solubilization tests. Corneosurfametry entails collection of cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings and short contact time with surfactants, followed by staining samples with toluidine blue and basic fuchsin dyes. Measurements are made by reflectance colorimetry. Data show that irritation potentials predicted by corneosurfametry agree with those obtained by established in vivo and in vitro irritation tests. Moreover, corneosurfametry data are not artificially lowered by addition of magnesium in surfactant solutions. In conclusion, corneosurfametry should be viewed as one of the realistic predictive tests for surfactant irritancy.

  12. Denatured ethanol release into gasoline residuals, Part 1: Source behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Juliana G.; Barker, James F.

    2013-05-01

    With the increasing use of ethanol in fuels, it is important to evaluate its fate when released into the environment. While ethanol is less toxic than other organic compounds present in fuels, one of the concerns is the impact ethanol might have on the fate of gasoline hydrocarbons in groundwater. One possible concern is the spill of denatured ethanol (E95: ethanol containing 5% denaturants, usually hydrocarbons) in sites with pre-existing gasoline contamination. In that scenario, ethanol is expected to increase the mobility of the NAPL phase by acting as a cosolvent and decreasing interfacial tension. To evaluate the E95 behaviour and its impacts on pre-existing gasoline, a field test was performed at the CFB-Borden aquifer. Initially gasoline contamination was created releasing 200 L of E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol) into the unsaturated zone. One year later, 184 L of E95 was released on top of the gasoline contamination. The site was monitored using soil cores, multilevel wells and one glass access tube. At the end of the test, the source zone was excavated and the compounds remaining were quantified. E95 ethanol accumulated and remained within the capillary fringe and unsaturated zone for more than 200 days, despite ~ 1 m oscillations in the water table. The gasoline mobility increased and it was redistributed in the source zone. Gasoline NAPL saturations in the soil increased two fold in the source zone. However, water table oscillations caused a separation between the NAPL and ethanol: NAPL was smeared and remained in deeper positions while ethanol moved upwards following the water table rise. Similarly, the E95 denaturants that initially were within the ethanol-rich phase became separated from ethanol after the water table oscillation, remaining below the ethanol rich zone. The separation between ethanol and hydrocarbons in the source after water table oscillation indicates that ethanol's impact on hydrocarbon residuals is likely limited to early times.

  13. Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

    1992-10-01

    In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

  14. RNA Denaturation: Excluded Volume, Pseudoknots, and Transition Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiesi, M.; Orlandini, E.; Stella, A. L.

    2003-11-01

    A lattice model of RNA denaturation which fully accounts for the excluded volume effects among nucleotides is proposed. A numerical study shows that interactions forming pseudoknots must be included in order to get a sharp continuous transition. Otherwise a smooth crossover occurs from the swollen linear polymer behavior to highly ramified, almost compact conformations with secondary structures. In the latter scenario, which is appropriate when these structures are much more stable than pseudoknot links, probability distributions for the lengths of both loops and main branches obey scaling with nonclassical exponents.

  15. Evaporation of Sessile Droplets Laden with Particles and Insoluble Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetsas, George; Chandra Sahu, Kirti; Matar, Omar K

    2016-07-12

    We consider the flow dynamics of a thin evaporating droplet in the presence of an insoluble surfactant and noninteracting particles in the bulk. On the basis of lubrication theory, we derive a set of evolution equations for the film height, the interfacial surfactant, and bulk particle concentrations, taking into account the dependence of liquid viscosity on the local particle concentration. An important ingredient of our model is that it takes into account the fact that the surfactant adsorbed at the interface hinders evaporation. We perform a parametric study to investigate how the presence of surfactants affects the evaporation process as well as the flow dynamics with and without the presence of particles in the bulk. Our numerical calculations show that the droplet lifetime is affected significantly by the balance between the ability of the surfactant to enhance spreading, suppressing the effect of thermal Marangoni stresses-induced motion, and to hinder the evaporation flux through the reduction of the effective interfacial area of evaporation, which tend to accelerate and decelerate the evaporation process, respectively. For particle-laden droplets and in the case of dilute solutions, the droplet lifetime is found to be weakly dependent on the initial particle concentration. We also show that the particle deposition patterns are influenced strongly by the direct effect of the surfactant on the evaporative flux; in certain cases, the "coffee-stain" effect is enhanced significantly. A discussion of the delicate interplay between the effects of capillary pressure and solutal and thermal Marangoni stresses, which drive the liquid flow inside of the evaporating droplet giving rise to the observed results, is provided herein.

  16. DSC study of cold and heat denaturation processes of β-lactoglobulin A with guanidine hydrochloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王邦宁; 谈夫

    1997-01-01

    The cold and heat denaturations of bovine β-lactoglobuhn A (β-lg A) has been studied in solutions of guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) by differential scanning calorimelry (DSC) The experimental results are presented and discussed.It is shown that the number of protons bound by the monomeric molecules of β-lg A was unchanged before and after its heat denaturation below pH 3,and that the activation energy of the heat denaturation was depressed owing to the presence of GuHCl.In the solutions with 2.50 and 3.06 mol/L of GuHCl,both the cold and heat denat-urations of β-lg A were observed.In comparison with the heat denaturation,the activation energy of cold denaturation was far lower and the number of GuHCl molecules bound by the unfolded polypeptide chains after cold denaturation increased a lot.The absolute value of the enthalpy of cold denaturation was larger than that of heat denaturation It was found by the analysis that the contribution to the total denaturational enthalpy of conformational change i

  17. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2016-03-07

    Intermolecular interaction phenomena occurring between endogenous compounds, such as proteins and bile salts, and electrospun compounds are so far unreported, despite the exposure of fibers to such biorelevant compounds when applied for biomedical purposes, e.g., tissue engineering, wound healing, and drug delivery. In the present study, we present a systematic investigation of how surfactants and proteins, as physiologically relevant components, interact with insulin-loaded fish sarcoplasmic protein (FSP) electrospun fibers (FSP-Ins fibers) in solution and thereby affect fiber properties such as accessible surface hydrophilicity, physical stability, and release characteristics of an encapsulated drug. Interactions between insulin-loaded protein fibers and five anionic surfactants (sodium taurocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium glycodeoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate), a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride), and a neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) were studied. The anionic surfactants increased the insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the neutral surfactant had no significant effect on the release. Interestingly, only minute amounts of insulin were released from the fibers when benzalkonium chloride was present. The FSP-Ins fibers appeared dense after incubation with this cationic surfactant, whereas high fiber porosity was observed after incubation with anionic or neutral surfactants. Contact angle measurements and staining with the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid indicated that the FSP-Ins fibers were hydrophobic, and showed that the fiber surface properties were affected differently by the surfactants. Bovine serum albumin also affected insulin release in vitro, indicating that also proteins may affect the fiber performance in an in vivo setting.

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for thermal denaturation of ovine milk lactoferrin determined by its loss of immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, F; Harouna, S; Calvo, M; Pérez, M D; Sánchez, L

    2015-07-01

    Lactoferrin is a protein with important biological functions that can be obtained from milk and by-products derived from the dairy industry, such as whey. Although bovine lactoferrin has been extensively studied, ovine lactoferrin is not quite as well known. In the present study, the effect of several heat treatments in 3 different media, over a temperature range from 66 to 75°C, has been studied on lactoferrin isolated from sheep milk. Denaturation of lactoferrin was determined by measuring its immunoreactivity with specific polyclonal antibodies. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that lactoferrin denatures by heat more rapidly in whey than in phosphate buffer or milk. The value of activation energy found for the denaturation process of lactoferrin when treated in whey is higher (390kJ/mol) than that obtained in milk (194kJ/mol) or phosphate buffer (179kJ/mol). This indicates that a great amount of energy is necessary to start denaturation of ovine lactoferrin, probably due to the interaction of this protein with other whey proteins. The changes in the hydrophobicity of lactoferrin after heat treatments were determined by fluorescence measurement using acrylamide. The decrease in the hydrophobicity constant was very small for the treatments from 66 to 75°C, up to 20min, which indicates that lactoferrin conformation did not experienced a great change. The results obtained in this study permit the prediction of behavior of ovine lactoferrin under several heat treatments and show that high-temperature, short-time pasteurization (72°C, 15 s) does not cause loss of its immunoreactivity and, consequently, would not affect its conformation and biological activity.

  19. Denatured Thermodynamics of Proteins in Weak Cation-exchange Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rong; CHEN Guo-Liang

    2003-01-01

    The thermostability of some proteins in weak cation-exchange chromatography was investigated at 20-80 ℃. The results show that there is a fixed thermal denaturation transition temperature for each protein. The appearance of the thermal transition temperature indicates that the conformations of the proteins are destroyed seriously. The thermal behavior of the proteins in weak cation-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies were compared in a wide temperature range. It was found that the proteins have a higher thermostability in a weak cation-exchange chromatography system. The thermodynamic parameters(ΔH0, ΔS0) of those proteins were determined by means of Vant Hoff relationship(lnk-1/T). According to standard entropy change(ΔS0), the conformational change of the proteins was judged in the chromatographic process. The linear relationships between ΔH0 and ΔS0 can be used to evaluate "compensation temperature"(β) at the protein denaturation and identify the identity of the protein retention mechanism in weak cation-exchange chromatography.

  20. Calorimetric Study of Thermal Denaturation of Superoxide Dismutase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王邦宁; 谈夫

    1994-01-01

    The thermal denaturation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) from bovine erythrocytes was studied at various pH values of different buffers and at various concentrations of solutions of two neutral salts by differential scanning calorimetry. The experiments performed indicate that the PIPES is a buffer non-coordinating with the SOD, and that the binding of the anions studied influences more or less the thermal denaturation of SOD, but the effect on the oxidation form of SOD is more apparent. A new conformer of SOD with lower thermostability was discovered by the experiments performed in different buffers at certain pH values higher than the isoelectric point of SOD, or at higher concentrations of neutral salt solutions. The new conformer may be converted irreversibly into the usual conformer with high thermostability during heating. Based on the thermodynamic parameters obtained in distilled water and by thermodynamic analysis using the Ooi’s model, it is revealed that the large enthalpy △Hdc contributed by

  1. Optical real-time measurement of collagen denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vanitha; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1997-06-01

    Linear birefringence is a property of collagenous tissue that results from both its composition and structure. Previous investigations have shown that birefringence provides an indication of structural changes in collagen during slow heating. We now report the birefringent response of both mature and young rat tail tendon to laser-heating. The results indicate that denaturation of collagen from mature rats induced by a 200-microsecond(s) -long Ho:YAG laser pulse may not be described accurately by kinetic parameters. Several second-long pulses of CO2 laser pulse may not be described from young rats fit an Arrhenius model with Ea equals 12.1 kcal/mol and A equals e18.03 s-1. Typically, for slow-heating of collagen, Ea equals kcal/mol and A equals e120 s-1. Thus, it seems likely that the temperature and energy needed to initiate collagen denaturation is lower in young collagen, possibly due to its decreased hydroxyproline content and consequent decreased thermal stability.

  2. Second-harmonic generation investigation of collagen thermal denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Sun, Yen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Chen, Yang-Fang; Lin, Ling-Chih; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-02-01

    Using the technique of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy we obtained large area image of type I collagen from rat tail tendon as it is heated from 40°C to 70°C for 0 to 180 minutes. The high resolution images allowed us to investigate the collagen structural change. We observed that heating the tendon below the temperature of 54°C does not produce any change in the averaged SHG intensity. At the heating temperature of 54°C and above, we find that increasing the heating temperature and time leads to decreasing SHG intensity. As the tendon is heated above 54°C, a decrease in the SHG signal occurs uniformly throughout the tendon, but the regions where the SHG signal vanishes form a tiger-tail like pattern. By comparing the relative SHG intensities in small and large areas, we found that the denaturation process responsible for forming the tiger-tail like pattern occurs at a higher rate than the global denaturation process occurring throughout the tendon. Our results show that second-harmonic generation microscopy is effective in monitoring the thermal damage to collagen and has potential applications in biomedicine.

  3. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharapiwattananon, N.; Osuwan, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Scamehorn, J.F. [Inst. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant from water. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used and three surfactants were studied (two anionic and one cationic). The effects of air flow rate, foam height, liquid height, liquid feed surfactant concentration, and sparger porosity were studied. This technique was shown to be effective in either surfactant recovery or the reduction of surfactant concentration in water to acceptable levels. As an example of the effectiveness of this technique, the cetylpyridinium chloride concentration in water can be reduced by 90% in one stage with a liquid residence time of 375 minutes. The surfactant concentration in the collapsed foam is 21.5 times the feed concentration. This cationic surfactant was easier to remove from water by foam fractionation than the anionic surfactants studied.

  4. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  5. Adsorption Behavior and Mechanisms of Surfactants by Farmland Soils in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of two nonionic surfactants polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether Triton X-100 (TX-100), polyoxyethylene lauryl ether(Brij35) and an anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate(SDBS) by two soils(S1, S2) of different natures and their respective organic-matter-extracted samples(S3, S4) were investigated. These adsorption isotherms show different adsorption stages of different types of surfactants by soils. The data fitted Langmuir equation very well. The adsorption maximum capacity(Q0) indicates that TX-100 and SDBS were in the sequence of S3〉S4〉S1〉S2 in adsorption, however, Brij35 was in the sequence of S4〉S3〉S1〉S2 in adsorption. And the adsorption amounts of the different surfactants by soils followed the order of TX-100〉Brij35〉SDBS. Meanwhile, the adsorption of the nonionic surfactants TX-100 and Brij35 decreased with the increase of their ethylene oxide(EO) numbers. The results indicate that both soil organic matter and mineral played important roles in the adsorption of surfactants, and the adsorption of the surfactants by soils was affected by the physicochemical properties and structures of the soils and surfactants, especially the mineral type and content of soil.

  6. Desorption of two organophosphorous pesticides from soil with wastewater and surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Soriano, M C; Mingorance, M D; Peña, A

    2012-03-01

    A batch test was used to evaluate the extent of desorption of diazinon and dimethoate, preadsorbed on a calcareous agricultural soil, representative of the Mediterranean area. Urban wastewater from a secondary treatment and seven surfactant solutions, at concentrations ranging from 0.75 mg L(-1) to 10 gL(-1), were used. The surfactants assayed were cationic (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HD)), anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Aerosol 22 (A22) and Biopower (BP)), and nonionic (Tween 80 (TW), Triton X 100 (TX) and Glucopon 600 (G600)). Desorption of dimethoate was either not affected or only slightly by the nonionic and anionic surfactants tested, while desorption of diazinon from the soil was only enhanced by A22, BP and TW. This desorption increase correlated significantly with the surfactant concentration of the solution used for desorption and with the concurrent increase in the supernatant of the dissolved organic carbon, in particular that originating from the surfactant. This parameter did not vary with the use of SDS, G600 and TX. The cationic surfactant HD was retained on the soil surface, as confirmed by an increase in soil organic carbon, resulting in a fall in desorption rate for both pesticides. Comparing treatment by wastewater with control water, there was no difference in desorption rate for either pesticide. Mixed TW/anionic surfactant solutions either did not modify or slightly increased desorption of both pesticides in comparison with individual surfactant solutions.

  7. The effect of surfactants on the dissolution behavior of amorphous formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Pei T; Peltonen, Leena; Novakovic, Dunja; Rades, Thomas; Strachan, Clare J; Laaksonen, Timo

    2016-06-01

    The optimal design of oral amorphous formulations benefits from the use of excipients to maintain drug supersaturation and thus ensures adequate absorption during intestinal transit. The use of surfactants for the maintenance of supersaturation in amorphous formulations has not been investigated in detail. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of surfactant on the dissolution behavior of neat amorphous drug and binary polymer based solid dispersion. Indomethacin was used as the model drug and the surfactants studied were polysorbate 80 and poloxamer 407. The presence of surfactants (alone or in combination with polymers) in the buffer was detrimental to the dissolution of neat amorphous indomethacin, suggesting that the surfactants promoted the crystallization of neat amorphous indomethacin. In contrast, the presence of surfactants (0.01% w/v) in the buffer resulted in a significant improvement on the dissolution behavior of binary polymer based solid dispersion. Incorporating the surfactant to the formulation to form ternary solid dispersion adversely affected the dissolution behavior. In conclusion, the use of surfactants (as wetting or solubilization agents) in dissolution studies of neat amorphous drugs requires prudent consideration. The design of amorphous formulations with optimal dissolution performance requires the appropriate selection of a combination of excipients and consideration of the method of introducing the excipients.

  8. Complex Formation Between Polyelectrolytes and Ionic Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The interaction between polyelectrolyte and ionic surfactant is of great importance in different areas of chemistry and biology. In this paper we present a theory of polyelectrolyte ionic-surfactant solutions. The new theory successfully explains the cooperative transition observed experimentally, in which the condensed counterions are replaced by ionic-surfactants. The transition is found to occur at surfactant densities much lower than those for a similar transition in non-ionic polymer-sur...

  9. 27 CFR 21.92 - Denaturants listed as U.S.P. or N.F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....P. or N.F. 21.92 Section 21.92 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... for Denaturants § 21.92 Denaturants listed as U.S.P. or N.F. Denaturing materials and products listed in this part as “U.S.P.” or “N.F.” shall meet the specifications set forth in the current...

  10. Heterogeneity of mitochondrial DNA from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. Denaturation mapping by electron microscopy.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C; Bak, AL

    1975-01-01

    Electronmicroscopic observation of the denaturation pattern of 130 partially denaturated linear mitochondrial DNA molecules from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was used to investigate the distribution of AT-rich sequences within the mitochondrial genome. The molecules were observed after heating...... denaturated sequences in the mitochondrial DNA. These sequences which presumably correspond to the very AT-rich regions, known to exist in the yeast mitochondrial DNA, were found at intervals of about 0.5 - 3 mum on the map....

  11. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the cati

  12. Surfactant analysis in oil-containing fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronsveld, J.; Faber, M.J. (Koninklijke Shell Exploratie en Produktie Laboratorium, Rijswijk (Netherlands))

    The total surfactant concentration in aqueous phase samples can be analysed with a potentiometric titration. In enhanced oil recovery research, however, the surfactant is produced not only in aqueous phase samples but also in oleic phase samples. The oleic constituents in the oliec phase samples interfere in the surfactant analysis and, therefore, the titration method has been adapted. (orig.).

  13. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2016-01-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on

  14. Structure of DNA-Cationic Surfactant Complexes at Hydrophobically Modified and Hydrophilic Silica Surfaces as Revealed by Neutron Reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Wacklin, Hanna; Campbell, Richard A.;

    2011-01-01

    layer structure (the location, coverage, and conformation the e DNA and surfactant molecules). Neutron reflectometry is the technique of choice for revealing the surface layer structure by means of selective deuteration. We start by studying the interfacial complexation of DNA...... with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on hydrophobic surfaces, where we show that DNA molecules are located on top of a self-assembled surfactant monolayer, with the thickness of the DNA layer and the surfactant DNA ratio determined by the surface coverage of the underlying...... cationic layer. The surface coverages of surfactant and DNA are determined by the bulk concentration of the surfactant relative to its critical micelle concentration (cmc). The structure of the interfacial layer is not affected by the choice of cationic surfactant studied. However, to obtain similar...

  15. Interaction between cationic surfactant of 1-methyl-3-tetradecylimidazolium bromide and anionic polymer of sodium polystyrene sulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qian [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Shandong Province, VIC 252059 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Engineering Research Center for Fine Chemicals of Ministry of Education, Shanxi University, Shanxi Province, VIC 030006 (China); Kang, Wenpei [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Ministry of Education, Shandong Province, VIC 250100 (China); Sun, Dezhi [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Shandong Province, VIC 252059 (China); Liu, Jie, E-mail: liujie@lcu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Shandong Province, VIC 252059 (China); Wei, Xilian, E-mail: weixilian@126.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Shandong Province, VIC 252059 (China)

    2013-08-15

    The interaction between long-chain imidazolium ionic liquid (C{sub 14}mimBr) and anionic polyelectrolyte of sodium polystyrene sulfonate (NaPSS) has been studied using surface tension, isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC), dynamic light scatting (DLS) and conductance methods. The result shows that the surface tension plots have a pronounced hump in the surface tension at surfactant concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the surfactant. The cooperative adsorption of surfactant and polymer on the surface (PS{sub S}) and the formation of polymer/surfactant aggregate in bulk solution (PS{sub M}) provide a rational explanation about it. The formation of surfactant/polymer complexes is affected by the concentration of the surfactant or NaPSS, which is also ascertained by ITC and DLS measurements. Further, the thermodynamic parameters are derived from calorimetric titration and conductance curves, and the effects of polymer concentration and temperature on the parameters are evaluated in detail.

  16. Fabrication of novel microstructures based on orientation-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules in a TMAH solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Prem; Sato, K.; Gosalvez, M. A.; Tang, B.; Hida, H.; Shikida, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the orientation-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules on the silicon surface during etching in surfactant-added tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) is investigated. Triton X-100 (C14H22O(C2H4O)n, n = 9-10) and 25 wt% TMAH are used as surfactant and main etchant, respectively. The crystallographic planes affected by the surfactant molecules are determined by analyzing the etching behavior of different mask patterns on Si{1 0 0} wafers and silicon hemispheres in pure and surfactant-added TMAH. Taken together, the shapes of the etched profiles and the analysis of the hemispherical etch rates confirm that thick and dense adsorbed surfactant layers are typically formed on both the exact and vicinal Si{1 1 0} surfaces. In addition, the results indicate that the adsorbed surfactant layer behaves as a permeable mask, partially slowing down the etch rate of the affected surface orientation/s and thus enforcing their appearance on the etching front. The peculiar etching properties of surfactant-added and surfactant-free TMAH are then utilized for the fabrication of advanced micromechanical structures with new shapes on Si{1 0 0} wafers and polydimethylsiloxane based on complex Si{1 0 0} molds.

  17. Persurf, a new method to improve surfactant delivery: a study in surfactant depleted rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Burkhardt

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Exogenous surfactant is not very effective in adults with ARDS, since surfactant does not reach atelectatic alveoli. Perfluorocarbons (PFC can recruit atelectatic areas but do not replace impaired endogenous surfactant. A surfactant-PFC-mixture could combine benefits of both therapies. The aim of the proof-of-principal-study was to produce a PFC-in-surfactant emulsion (Persurf and to test in surfactant depleted Wistar rats whether Persurf achieves I. a more homogenous pulmonary distribution and II. a more homogenous recruitment of alveoli when compared with surfactant or PFC alone. METHODS: Three different PFC were mixed with surfactant and phospholipid concentration in the emulsion was measured. After surfactant depletion, animals either received 30 ml/kg of PF5080, 100 mg/kg of stained (green dye Curosurf™ or 30 ml/kg of Persurf. Lungs were fixated after 1 hour of ventilation and alveolar aeration and surfactant distribution was estimated by a stereological approach. RESULTS: Persurf contained 3 mg/ml phospholipids and was stable for more than 48 hours. Persurf-administration improved oxygenation. Histological evaluation revealed a more homogenous surfactant distribution and alveolar inflation when compared with surfactant treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: In surfactant depleted rats administration of PFC-in-surfactant emulsion leads to a more homogenous distribution and aeration of the lung than surfactant alone.

  18. Adsorption and desorption of cationic surfactants onto silica from toluene studied by ATR-FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Rico F; Eastoe, Julian; Dowding, Peter

    2010-01-19

    The adsorption and desorption behavior of cationic dialkyldimethylammonium bromide surfactants (Di-CnDABs where n = 10, 12, 14) at the silica-toluene interface has been studied. Adsorption is a rapid process, consistent with transport control, whereas desorption appears to occur in a two-stage process, with varying proportions of surfactant desorbing in fast and slow modes. These proportions appear to be affected by trace moisture present in the adjacent toluene solvent, possibly owing to competition between surfactant and water molecules for surface sites. Surprisingly, the surfactant tail length (n) has a significant impact on solubility in toluene, and this appears to affect bulk-surface partitioning. The results are compared with previous experiments utilizing nonionic surfactants (Tabor, R. F.; Eastoe, J.; Dowding, P. Langmuir 2009, 25, 9785), and also with work on surfactant-stabilized silica in nonpolar solvents (Tabor, R. F.; Eastoe, J.; Dowding, P. J.; Grillo, I.; Heenan, R. K.; Hollamby, M. Langmuir 2008, 24, 12793). Observations are explained in terms of the balance of interactions between the surfactant, solvent, and surface.

  19. Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

    1993-11-01

    A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

  20. Alkyl propoxy ethoxylate "graded" surfactants: micelle formation and structure in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Biswajit; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2010-04-08

    The self-assembly of alkyl propoxy ethoxylate surfactants in aqueous solutions has been investigated with a focus on the (i) thermodynamics of micellization (critical micellization concentration; free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of micellization) and (ii) structure of the micelles (overall shape and size; local environment in the micelle core and corona) as affected by the surfactant composition (variation of degree of ethoxylation). The various results are compared to those for alkyl ethoxylate and poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide) amphiphiles with the aim to elucidate the role of the middle, propoxy, block in the novel alkyl propoxy ethoxylate surfactants which exhibit a "graded" hydrophobic-hydrophilic character.

  1. Nanofiltration: ion exchange system for effective surfactant removal from water solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kowalska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A system combining nanofiltration and ion exchange for highly effective separation of anionic surfactant from water solutions was proposed. The subjects of the study were nanofiltration polyethersulfone membranes and ion-exchange resins differing in type and structure. The quality of the treated solution was affected by numerous parameters, such as quality of the feed solution, membrane cut-off, resin type, dose and the solution contact time with the resin. A properly designed purification system made it possible to reduce the concentration of anionic surfactant below 1 mg L-1 from feed solutions containing surfactant in concentrations above the CMC value.

  2. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  3. Interactions of Ovalbumin with Ionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xia; YAN Hui; GUO Rong

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of ovalbumin (OVA) with one anionic surfactant,sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS),and two cationic surfactants,dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB),in water have been studied through fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopies and transmission electronic microscopy,combined with the measurement of conductivity.OVA can increase the critical micelle concentrations (cmc) of SDS and CTAB but has little effect on that of DTAB.The interaction between surfactant monomer and OVA is greater than that between surfactant micelles and OVA.Moreover,SDS can make OVA unfolded while cationic surfactants cannot.

  4. Consistent View of Polypeptide Chain Expansion in Chemical Denaturants from Multiple Experimental Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Alessandro; Zheng, Wenwei; Buholzer, Karin; Borgia, Madeleine B; Schüler, Anja; Hofmann, Hagen; Soranno, Andrea; Nettels, Daniel; Gast, Klaus; Grishaev, Alexander; Best, Robert B; Schuler, Benjamin

    2016-09-14

    There has been a long-standing controversy regarding the effect of chemical denaturants on the dimensions of unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins: A wide range of experimental techniques suggest that polypeptide chains expand with increasing denaturant concentration, but several studies using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) have reported no such increase of the radius of gyration (Rg). This inconsistency challenges our current understanding of the mechanism of chemical denaturants, which are widely employed to investigate protein folding and stability. Here, we use a combination of single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), SAXS, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and two-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2f-FCS) to characterize the denaturant dependence of the unfolded state of the spectrin domain R17 and the intrinsically disordered protein ACTR in two different denaturants. Standard analysis of the primary data clearly indicates an expansion of the unfolded state with increasing denaturant concentration irrespective of the protein, denaturant, or experimental method used. This is the first case in which SAXS and FRET have yielded even qualitatively consistent results regarding expansion in denaturant when applied to the same proteins. To more directly illustrate this self-consistency, we used both SAXS and FRET data in a Bayesian procedure to refine structural ensembles representative of the observed unfolded state. This analysis demonstrates that both of these experimental probes are compatible with a common ensemble of protein configurations for each denaturant concentration. Furthermore, the resulting ensembles reproduce the trend of increasing hydrodynamic radius with denaturant concentration obtained by 2f-FCS and DLS. We were thus able to reconcile the results from all four experimental techniques quantitatively, to obtain a comprehensive structural picture of denaturant-induced unfolded state expansion, and to

  5. Desorption of organo phosphorous pesticides from soil with wastewater and surfactant solution

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria del Carmen; Mingorance, Maria Dolores; Peña, Aranzazu

    2008-01-01

    Surfactants can be introduced in the environment by wastewater discharge, point-charge pollution or deliberate action, e.g. to remediate contaminated soil or groundwater. The irrigation of soil with wastewater containing surfactants may modify pesticide desorption from soil, thus affecting their environmental fate. Desorption from soil of the plain of Granada (South-eastern Spain) of two organophosphorous pesticides, diazinon and dimethoate, differing in solubility and hydrophobicity...

  6. Effect of surfactant and surfactant blends on pseudoternary phase diagram behavior of newly synthesized palm kernel oil esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi ES

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Elrashid Saleh Mahdi1, Mohamed HF Sakeena1, Muthanna F Abdulkarim1, Ghassan Z Abdullah1,3, Munavvar Abdul Sattar2, Azmin Mohd Noor11Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Physiology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden, Penang, Malaysia; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, International Medical University, Bukit Jalil, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to select appropriate surfactants or blends of surfactants to study the ternary phase diagram behavior of newly introduced palm kernel oil esters.Methods: Nonionic surfactant blends of Tween® and Tween®/Span® series were screened based on their solubilization capacity with water for palm kernel oil esters. Tween® 80 and five blends of Tween® 80/Span® 80 and Tween® 80/Span® 85 in the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB value range of 10.7–14.0 were selected to study the phase diagram behavior of palm kernel oil esters using the water titration method at room temperature.Results: High solubilization capacity was obtained by Tween® 80 compared with other surfactants of Tween® series. High HLB blends of Tween® 80/Span® 85 and Tween® 80/Span® 80 at HLB 13.7 and 13.9, respectively, have better solubilization capacity compared with the lower HLB values of Tween® 80/Span® 80. All the selected blends of surfactants were formed as water-in-oil microemulsions, and other dispersion systems varied in size and geometrical layout in the triangles. The high solubilization capacity and larger areas of the water-in-oil microemulsion systems were due to the structural similarity between the lipophilic tail of Tween® 80 and the oleyl group of the palm kernel oil esters.Conclusion: This study suggests that the phase diagram behavior of palm kernel oil esters, water, and nonionic surfactants is not only affected by the HLB value, but also by the structural similarity between palm kernel oil esters and the surfactant

  7. The generation of denatured reactor plutonium by different options of the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Kessler, G. [Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Research Center Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Denatured (proliferation resistant) reactor plutonium can be generated in a number of different fuel cycle options. First denatured reactor plutonium can be obtained if, instead of low enriched U-235 PWR fuel, re-enriched U-235/U-236 from reprocessed uranium is used (fuel type A). Also the envisaged existing 2,500 t of reactor plutonium (being generated world wide up to the year 2010), mostly stored in intermediate fuel storage facilities at present, could be converted during a transition phase into denatured reactor plutonium by the options fuel type B and D. Denatured reactor plutonium could have the same safeguards standard as present low enriched (<20% U-235) LWR fuel. It could be incinerated by recycling once or twice in PWRs and subsequently by multi-recycling in FRs (CAPRA type or IFRs). Once denatured, such reactor plutonium could remain denatured during multiple recycling. In a PWR, e.g., denatured reactor plutonium could be destroyed at a rate of about 250 kg/GWey. While denatured reactor plutonium could be recycled and incinerated under relieved IAEA safeguards, neptunium would still have to be monitored by the IAEA in future for all cases in which considerable amounts of neptunium are produced. (orig.)

  8. Residual ordered structure in denatured proteins and the problem of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharov, Mahmud A

    2012-02-01

    Structural characteristics of numerous globular proteins in the denatured state have been reviewed using literature data. Recent more precise experiments show that in contrast to the conventional standpoint, proteins under strongly denaturing conditions do not unfold completely and adopt a random coil state, but contain significant residual ordered structure. These results cast doubt on the basis of the conventional approach representing the process of protein folding as a spontaneous transition of a polypeptide chain from the random coil state to the unique globular structure. The denaturation of proteins is explained in terms of the physical properties of proteins such as stability, conformational change, elasticity, irreversible denaturation, etc. The spontaneous renaturation of some denatured proteins most probably is merely the manifestation of the physical properties (e.g., the elasticity) of the proteins per se, caused by the residual structure present in the denatured state. The pieces of the ordered structure might be the centers of the initiation of renaturation, where the restoration of the initial native conformation of denatured proteins begins. Studies on the denaturation of proteins hardly clarify how the proteins fold into the native conformation during the successive residue-by-residue elongation of the polypeptide chain on the ribosome.

  9. Photocatalytic Degradation of Diethyl Phthalate with Surfactant Addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tianyong; HU Juan; ZHANG Youlan; LI Bin; FEI Xuening

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the adsorption of diethyl phthalate (DEP,an environmental hormone) on the surface of nanoscale TiO2, effects of pH value of solutions, initial concentrations of DEP and additive surfactant on photocatalytic degradation and dynamics of DEP. Under ultra violet illumination, the interaction between DEP and surfactants including DBS (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate), CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide), and OP-10 (nonylphenol polyoxyethylene ether)was exploited from the perspective of degradation speed calculated by the data of high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-Vis spectra, respectively. Photocatalytic degradation of DEP followed pseudo first-order reaction kinetics. DEP as substrate degraded fast when its initial concentration was 130 mg/L. TiO2 had certain adsorption ability of DEP. TiO2 could adsorb the most DEP at the approximately neutral pH of 6.91. Degradation of DEP was not affected obviously by ad ditives OP-10 and JBS. Degradation rate of DEP was not enhanced greatly in the presence of surfactants, but degradation of DBS was sped up. Degradation rate of DEP was depressed in the presence of additive CTAB. The more CTAB was added, the less DEP was degraded. Degradation rate of CTAB became slow with the increase of initial CTAB concentration. The possible adsorption models among TiO2, DEP and surfactants were given.

  10. Exploring the affinity binding of alkylmaltoside surfactants to bovine serum albumin and their effect on the protein stability: A spectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierrezuelo, J M; Carnero Ruiz, C

    2015-08-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence together with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies was performed to examine the interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two alkylmaltoside surfactants, i.e. n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C10G2) and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C12G2), having identical structures but different tail lengths. Changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA from static as well as dynamic measurements revealed a weak protein-surfactant interaction and gave the corresponding binding curves, suggesting that the binding mechanism of surfactants to protein is essentially cooperative in nature. The behavior of both surfactants is similar, so that the differences detected were attributed to the more hydrophobic nature of β-C12G2, which favors the adsorption of micelle-like aggregates onto the protein surface. These observations were substantially demonstrated by data derived from synchronous, three-dimensional and anisotropy fluorescence experiments. Changes in the secondary structure of the protein induced by the interaction with surfactants were analyzed by CD to determine the contents of α-helix and β-strand. It was noted that whereas the addition of β-C10G2 appears to stabilize the secondary structure of the protein, β-C12G2 causes a marginal denaturation of BSA for a protein:surfactant molar ratio as high as 1 to 100.

  11. In situ observation of collagen thermal denaturation by second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C.-S.; Zhuo, Z.-Y.; Yu, J.-Y.; Chao, P.-H. G.; Chu, S.-W.

    2010-02-01

    Collagen denaturation is of fundamental importance for clinical treatment. Conventionally, the denaturation process is quantified by the shrinkage of collagen fibers, but the underlying molecular origin has not been fully understood. Since second harmonic generation (SHG) is related to the molecular packing of the triple helix in collagen fibers, this nonlinear signal provides an insight of molecular dynamics during thermal denaturation. With the aid of SHG microscopy, we found a new step in collagen thermal denaturation process, de-crimp. During the de-crimp step, the characteristic crimp pattern of collagen fascicles disappeared due to the breakage of interconnecting bonds between collagen fibrils, while SHG intensity remained unchanged, suggesting the intactness of the triple helical molecules. At higher temperature, shrinkage is observed with strongly reduced SHG intensity, indicating denaturation at the molecular level.

  12. Dynamic light scattering study of peanut agglutinin: Size, shape and urea denaturation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sagarika Dev; Avadhesha Surolia

    2006-12-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) is a homotetrameric protein with a unique open quaternary structure. PNA shows non-two state profile in chaotrope induced denaturation. It passes through a monomeric molten globule like state before complete denaturation (Reddy et al 1999). This denaturation profile is associated with the change in hydrodynamic radius of the native protein. Though the molten globule-like state is monomeric in nature it expands in size due to partial denaturation. The size and shape of the native PNA as well as the change in hydrodynamic radius of the protein during denaturation has been studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The generation of two species is evident from the profile of hydrodynamic radii. This study also reveals the extent of compactness of the intermediate state.

  13. In Vitro Reassembly of Tobacco Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/ Oxygenase from Fully Denatured Subunits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Hua YONG; Gen-Yun CHEN; Jiao-Nai SHI; Da-Quan XU

    2006-01-01

    It has been generally proved impossible to reassemble ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from fully denatured subunits in vitro in higher plant, because large subunit of fully denatured Rubisco is liable to precipitate when the denaturant is removed by common methods of direct dilution and one-step dialysis. In our experiment, the problem of precipitation was resolved by an improved gradual dialysis method, which gradually decreased the concentration of denaturant. However, fully denatured Rubisco subunits still could not be reassembled into holoenzyme using gradual dialysis unless chaperonin 60was added. The restored activity of reassembled Rubisco was approximately 8% of natural enzyme. The quantity of reassembled Rubisco increased greatly when heat shock protein 70 was present in the reassembly process. ATP and Mg2+ were unnecessary for in vitro reassembly of Rubisco, and Mg2+ inhibited the reassembly process. The reassembly was weakened when ATP, Mg2+ and K+ existed together in the reassembly process.

  14. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  15. Practical Considerations and Challenges Involved in Surfactant Enhanced Bioremediation of Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagarika Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant enhanced bioremediation (SEB of oil is an approach adopted to overcome the bioavailability constraints encountered in biotransformation of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL pollutants. Fuel oils contain n-alkanes and other aliphatic hydrocarbons, monoaromatics, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Although hydrocarbon degrading cultures are abundant in nature, complete biodegradation of oil is rarely achieved even under favorable environmental conditions due to the structural complexity of oil and culture specificities. Moreover, the interaction among cultures in a consortium, substrate interaction effects during the degradation and ability of specific cultures to alter the bioavailability of oil invariably affect the process. Although SEB has the potential to increase the degradation rate of oil and its constituents, there are numerous challenges in the successful application of this technology. Success is dependent on the choice of appropriate surfactant type and dose since the surfactant-hydrocarbon-microorganism interaction may be unique to each scenario. Surfactants not only enhance the uptake of constituents through micellar solubilization and emulsification but can also alter microbial cell surface characteristics. Moreover, hydrocarbons partitioned in micelles may not be readily bioavailable depending on the microorganism-surfactant interactions. Surfactant toxicity and inherent biodegradability of surfactants may pose additional challenges as discussed in this review.

  16. Engineering inclusion bodies for non denaturing extraction of functional proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaberc-Porekar Vladka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For a long time IBs were considered to be inactive deposits of accumulated target proteins. In our previous studies, we discovered IBs containing a high percentage of correctly folded protein that can be extracted under non-denaturing conditions in biologically active form without applying any renaturation steps. In order to widen the concept of correctly folded protein inside IBs, G-CSF (granulocyte colony stimulating factor and three additional proteins were chosen for this study: GFP (Green fluorescent protein, His7dN6TNF-α (Truncated form of Tumor necrosis factor α with an N-terminal histidine tag and dN19 LT-α (Truncated form of Lymphotoxin α. Results Four structurally different proteins that accumulate in the bacterial cell in the form of IBs were studied, revealing that distribution of each target protein between the soluble fraction (cytoplasm and insoluble fraction (IBs depends on the nature of the target protein. Irrespective of the folding pattern of each protein, spectroscopy studies have shown that proteins in IBs exhibit similar structural characteristics to the biologically active pure protein when produced at low temperature. In the case of the three studied proteins, G-CSF, His7ΔN6TNF-α, and GFP, a significant amount of protein could be extracted from IBs with 0.2% N-lauroyl sarcosine (NLS and the proteins retained biological activity although no renaturation procedure was applied. Conclusion This study shows that the presence of biologically active proteins inside IBs is more general than usually believed. A large amount of properly folded protein is trapped inside IBs prepared at lower temperatures. This protein can be released from IBs with mild detergents under non-denaturing conditions. Therefore, the active protein can be obtained from such IBs without any renaturation procedure. This is of great importance for the biopharmaceutical industry. Furthermore, such IBs composed of active proteins could

  17. Structure-property relationship of quinuclidinium surfactants--Towards multifunctional biologically active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skočibušić, Mirjana; Odžak, Renata; Štefanić, Zoran; Križić, Ivana; Krišto, Lucija; Jović, Ozren; Hrenar, Tomica; Primožič, Ines; Jurašin, Darija

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by diverse biological and pharmacological activity of quinuclidine and oxime compounds we have synthesized and characterized novel class of surfactants, 3-hydroxyimino quinuclidinium bromides with different alkyl chains lengths (CnQNOH; n=12, 14 and 16). The incorporation of non conventional hydroxyimino quinuclidinium headgroup and variation in alkyl chain length affects hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of surfactant molecule and thereby physicochemical properties important for its application. Therefore, newly synthesized surfactants were characterized by the combination of different experimental techniques: X-ray analysis, potentiometry, electrical conductivity, surface tension and dynamic light scattering measurements, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Comprehensive investigation of CnQNOH surfactants enabled insight into structure-property relationship i.e., way in which the arrangement of surfactant molecules in the crystal phase correlates with their solution behavior and biologically activity. The synthesized CnQNOH surfactants exhibited high adsorption efficiency and relatively low critical micelle concentrations. In addition, all investigated compounds showed very potent and promising activity against Gram-positive and clinically relevant Gram-negative bacterial strains compared to conventional antimicrobial agents: tetracycline and gentamicin. The overall results indicate that bicyclic headgroup with oxime moiety, which affects both hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of CnQNOH molecule in addition to enabling hydrogen bonding, has dominant effect on crystal packing and physicochemical properties. The unique structural features of cationic surfactants with hydroxyimino quinuclidine headgroup along with diverse biological activity have made them promising structures in novel drug discovery. Obtained fundamental understanding how combination of different functionalities in a single surfactant molecule affects its physicochemical

  18. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Detergent Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Erich Jelen; Ute Merrettig-Bruns

    2009-01-01

    Detergent surfactantscan be found in wastewater in relevant concentrations. Most of them are known as ready degradable under aerobic conditions, as required by European legislation. Far fewer surfactants have been tested so far for biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. The natural environment is predominantly aerobic, but there are some environmental compartments such as river sediments, sub-surface soil layer and anaerobic sludge digesters of wastewater treatment plants which have str...

  19. Surfactants in tribology, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2013-01-01

    The manufacture and use of almost every consumer and industrial product rely on application of advanced knowledge in surface science and tribology. These two disciplines are of critical importance in major economic sectors, such as mining, agriculture, manufacturing (including metals, plastics, wood, computers, MEMS, NEMS, appliances), construction, transportation, and medical instruments, transplants, and diagnostic devices. An up-to-date reference with contributions by experts in surface science and tribology, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 3 discusses some of the underlying tribological a

  20. Surfactant inhibition in acute respiratory failure : consequences for exogenous surfactant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P. Eijking (Eric)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is characterized by immaturity of the lung, resulting in relative or absolute absence of pulmonary surfactant. Worldwide, neonates suffering from RDS have been treated successfully with exogenous surfactant preparations. Currently, exogeno

  1. Cationic versus anionic surfactant in tuning the structure and interaction of nanoparticle, protein, and surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2014-08-26

    The structure and interaction in complexes of anionic Ludox HS40 silica nanoparticle, anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein, and cationic dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) surfactant have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results are compared with similar complexes having anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant (Mehan, S; Chinchalikar, A. J.; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R. Langmuir 2013, 29, 11290). In both cases (DTAB and SDS), the structure in nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes is predominantly determined by the interactions of the individual two-component systems. The nanoparticle-surfactant (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for DTAB, but nanoparticle-protein (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for SDS, are found to be responsible for the resultant structure of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes. Irrespective of the charge on the surfactant, the cooperative binding of surfactant with protein leads to micellelike clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. The adsorption of these protein-surfactant complexes for DTAB on oppositely charged nanoparticles gives rise to the protein-surfactant complex-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles (similar to that of DTAB surfactant). It is unlike that of depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles with nonadsorption of protein-surfactant complexes for SDS in similarly charged nanoparticle systems (similar to that of protein alone). The modifications in nanoparticle aggregation as well as unfolding of protein in these systems as compared to the corresponding two-component systems have also been examined by selectively contrast matching the constituents.

  2. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  3. Studies on the refolding of the reduced-denatured insulin with size exclusion chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Quan; KONG; Yu; DONG; Cuihua; GENG; Xindu

    2005-01-01

    The refolding of the reduced-denatured insulin from bovine pancreas was investigated with the size exclusion chromatography (SEC). It was shown that the reduced-denatured insulin originally denatured with 7.0 mol·L-1 guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) or 8.0 mol·L-1 urea could not be refolded with a non-oxidized mobile phase. Although the oxidized and reduced glutathione (GSSG and GSH) were employed in the oxidized mobile phase, the reduced-denatured insulin still could not be renatured. However, in the presence of 2.0 mol·L-1 urea in the oxidized mobile phase employed, the reduced-denatured insulin can be refolded with SEC, and the aggregation of denatured insulin can be diminished by urea. In addition, the disulfide exchange of reduced-denatured insulin also can be accelerated with GSSG/GSH in the oxidized mobile phase. The three disulfide bridges of insulin were formed correctly and the reduced-unfolded insulin can be renatured completely. The results were further tested with reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC).

  4. Remediation using trace element humate surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Taylor, Steven Cheney; Bruhn, Debra Fox

    2016-08-30

    A method of remediation at a remediation site having one or more undesirable conditions in which one or more soil characteristics, preferably soil pH and/or elemental concentrations, are measured at a remediation site. A trace element humate surfactant composition is prepared comprising a humate solution, element solution and at least one surfactant. The prepared trace element humate surfactant composition is then dispensed onto the remediation site whereby the trace element humate surfactant composition will reduce the amount of undesirable compounds by promoting growth of native species activity. By promoting native species activity, remediation occurs quickly and environmental impact is minimal.

  5. Solubilization of Hydrophobic Dyes in Surfactant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Tehrani-Bagha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of surfactants for solubilization of hydrophobic organic dyes (mainly solvent and disperse dyes has been reviewed. The effect of parameters such as the chemical structures of the surfactant and the dye, addition of salt and of polyelectrolytes, pH, and temperature on dye solubilization has been discussed. Surfactant self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and below the concentration where this occurs—the critical micelle concentration (CMC—there is no solubilization. Above the CMC, the amount of solubilized dye increases linearly with the increase in surfactant concentration. It is demonstrated that different surfactants work best for different dyes. In general, nonionic surfactants have higher solubilization power than anionic and cationic surfactants. It is likely that the reason for the good performance of nonionic surfactants is that they allow dyes to be accommodated not only in the inner, hydrocarbon part of the micelle but also in the headgroup shell. It is demonstrated that the location of a dye in a surfactant micelle can be assessed from the absorption spectrum of the dye-containing micellar solution.

  6. Using biologically soft surfactants for dust suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachenko, N.G.; Kolodiichak, V.K.; Motrii, A.E.; Severin, V.D.

    1982-07-01

    This article discusses environmental aspects of using surfactants in coal mines for dust suppression. Surfactants for underground black coal mines in the USSR are divided into three classes: so-called soft surfactants with a decomposition period from 1 to 3 days, hard surfactants with decomposition exceeding a month and an intermediary group. The decomposition process is analyzed; the role played by fermentation is stressed. Environmental effects of surfactant decomposition are evaluated. Selected surfactants tested in Soviet laboratories are described. The results of experimental use of diethanolamide as a surfactant for water injection in coal seams are evaluated. Wetting time amounts to 1 s when a 0.2% concentration is used. When surfactant concentration in water is reduced to 0.05% wetting time does not change; when concentration decreases to 0.025% wetting time increases to 3 s. Surfactant efficiency is investigated under operational conditions in a Donbass mine. Specifications of the working face, mining system and air pollution caused by a shearer loader are discussed. When diethanolamide is used dust suppression efficiency ranges from 86.4 to 90.4%. During the tests diethanolamide concentration in water was 0.05%.

  7. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  8. Surfactant nebulisation : lung function, surfactant distribution and pulmonary blood flow distribution in lung lavaged rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant nebulisation is a promising alternative to surfactant instillation in newborns with the respiratory distress syndrome. Although less surfactant is deposited in the lung, it improves gas exchange, probably due to a superior distribution. We hypothesize that a more uniform distri

  9. Urea-temperature phase diagrams capture the thermodynamics of denatured state expansion that accompany protein unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    We have analyzed the thermodynamic properties of the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A3 domain using urea-induced unfolding at variable temperature and thermal unfolding at variable urea concentrations to generate a phase diagram that quantitatively describes the equilibrium between native and denatured states. From this analysis, we were able to determine consistent thermodynamic parameters with various spectroscopic and calorimetric methods that define the urea-temperature parameter plane from cold denaturation to heat denaturation. Urea and thermal denaturation are experimentally reversible and independent of the thermal scan rate indicating that all transitions are at equilibrium and the van't Hoff and calorimetric enthalpies obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions are equivalent demonstrating two-state character. Global analysis of the urea-temperature phase diagram results in a significantly higher enthalpy of unfolding than obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions and significant cross correlations describing the urea dependence of ΔH0 and ΔCP0 that define a complex temperature dependence of the m-value. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy illustrates a large increase in secondary structure content of the urea-denatured state as temperature increases and a loss of secondary structure in the thermally denatured state upon addition of urea. These structural changes in the denatured ensemble make up ∼40% of the total ellipticity change indicating a highly compact thermally denatured state. The difference between the thermodynamic parameters obtained from phase diagram analysis and those obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions illustrates that phase diagrams capture both contributions to unfolding and denatured state expansion and by comparison are able to decipher these contributions.

  10. Heat Denaturation of Protein Structures and Chlorophyll States in PSII Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬海; 阮翔; 许强; 王可玢; 公衍道; 匡廷云; 赵南明

    2002-01-01

    Heat denaturation is an important technique in the study of the structure and function of photosynthetic proteins. Heat denaturation of photosystem II (PSII) membrane was studied using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and oxygen electrode. Complete loss of oxygen-evolving activity of the PSII membrane was observed at temperatures below 45℃. The decrease of excitonic interaction between chlorophyll molecules occurred more rapidly than the change of the protein secondary structure of the PSII membrane at temperatures above 45℃. The results indicate that the protein secondary structure of the membrane proteins in PSII membranes is more stable than the excitonic interaction between chlorophyll molecules during heat denaturation.

  11. Protein denaturation and functional properties of Lenient Steam Injection heat treated whey protein concentrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickow, Jonatan Ahrens; Kaufmann, Niels; Wiking, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) was heat treated by use of the novel heat treatment method of Lenient Steam Injection (LSI) to elucidate new functional properties in relation to heat-induced gelation of heat treated WPC. Denaturation was measured by both DSC and FPLC, and the results of the two...... methods were highly correlated. Temperatures of up to 90 °C were applicable using LSI, whereas only 68 °C could be reached by plate heat exchange before coagulation/fouling. Denaturation of whey proteins increased with increasing heat treatment temperature up to a degree of 30–35% denaturation at 90 °C...

  12. Relaxation rate for an ultrafast folding protein is independent of chemical denaturant concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellmer, Troy; Henry, Eric R; Kubelka, Jan; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A

    2007-11-28

    The connection between free-energy surfaces and chevron plots has been investigated in a laser temperature jump kinetic study of a small ultrafast folding protein, the 35-residue subdomain from the villin headpiece. Unlike all other proteins that have been studied so far, no measurable dependence of the unfolding/refolding relaxation rate on denaturant concentration was observed over a wide range of guanidinium chloride concentration. Analysis with a simple Ising-like theoretical model shows that this denaturant-invariant relaxation rate can be explained by a large movement of the major free energy barrier, together with a denaturant- and reaction coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficient.

  13. On the Effect of Sodium Chloride and Sodium Sulfate on Cold Denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pica

    Full Text Available Both sodium chloride and sodium sulfate are able to stabilize yeast frataxin, causing an overall increase of its thermodynamic stability curve, with a decrease in the cold denaturation temperature and an increase in the hot denaturation one. The influence of low concentrations of these two salts on yeast frataxin stability can be assessed by the application of a theoretical model based on scaled particle theory. First developed to figure out the mechanism underlying cold denaturation in water, this model is able to predict the stabilization of globular proteins provided by these two salts. The densities of the salt solutions and their temperature dependence play a fundamental role.

  14. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Raman Preet, E-mail: ramanpreetsingh@hotmail.com [Evalueserve SEZ (Gurgaon) Pvt. Ltd. (India); Jain, Sanyog [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Centre for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Ramarao, Poduri, E-mail: ramaraop@yahoo.com [Central University of Punjab, School of Basic and Applied Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation.

  15. Chain architecture and micellization: A mean-field coarse-grained model for poly(ethylene oxide) alkyl ether surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Daza, Fabián A.; Mackie, Allan D., E-mail: allan.mackie@urv.cat [Department d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEQ, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avinguda dels Països Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Colville, Alexander J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115-5000 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    Microscopic modeling of surfactant systems is expected to be an important tool to describe, understand, and take full advantage of the micellization process for different molecular architectures. Here, we implement a single chain mean field theory to study the relevant equilibrium properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and aggregation number for three sets of surfactants with different geometries maintaining constant the number of hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomers. The results demonstrate the direct effect of the block organization for the surfactants under study by means of an analysis of the excess energy and entropy which can be accurately determined from the mean-field scheme. Our analysis reveals that the CMC values are sensitive to branching in the hydrophilic head part of the surfactant and can be observed in the entropy-enthalpy balance, while aggregation numbers are also affected by splitting the hydrophobic tail of the surfactant and are manifested by slight changes in the packing entropy.

  16. Role of the charge, carbon chain length, and content of surfactant on the skin penetration of meloxicam-loaded liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangjit S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sureewan Duangjit,1,2 Boonnada Pamornpathomkul,1 Praneet Opanasopit,1 Theerasak Rojanarata,1 Yasuko Obata,2 Kozo Takayama,2 Tanasait Ngawhirunpat11Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Hoshi University, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of surfactant charge, surfactant carbon chain length, and surfactant content on the physicochemical characteristics (ie, vesicle size, zeta potential, elasticity, and entrapment efficiency, morphology, stability, and in vitro skin permeability of meloxicam (MX-loaded liposome. Moreover, the mechanism for the liposome-enhanced skin permeation of MX was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The model formulation used in this study was obtained using a response surface method incorporating multivariate spline interpolation (RSM-S. Liposome formulations with varying surfactant charge (anionic, neutral, and cationic, surfactant carbon chain length (C4, C12, and C16, and surfactant content (10%, 20%, and 29% were prepared. The formulation comprising 29% cationic surfactant with a C16 chain length was found to be the optimal liposome for the transdermal delivery of MX. The skin permeation flux of the optimal formulation was 2.69-fold higher than that of a conventional liposome formulation. Our study revealed that surfactants affected the physicochemical characteristics, stability, and skin permeability of MX-loaded liposomes. These findings provide important fundamental information for the development of liposomes as transdermal drug delivery systems.Keywords: optimal liposome, optimization, transdermal drug delivery, surfactant charge, surfactant carbon chain length, surfactant content

  17. Tuning Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Interactions: Modification of Poly(ethylenimine) with Propylene Oxide and Blocks of Ethylene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Li, P; Batchelor, S N; Tucker, I M; Burley, A W

    2016-02-02

    Significantly enhanced adsorption at the air-water interface arises in polyelectrolyte/ionic surfactant mixtures, such as poly(ethylenimine)/sodium dodecyl sulfate (PEI/SDS), down to relatively low surfactant concentrations due to a strong surface interaction between the polyelectrolyte and surfactant. In the region of charge neutralization this can result in precipitation or coacervation and give rise to undesirable properties in many applications. Ethoxylation of the PEI can avoid precipitation, but can also considerably weaken the interaction. Localization of the ethoxylation can overcome these shortcomings. Further manipulation of the polyelectrolyte-surfactant interaction can be achieved by selective ethoxylation and propoxylation of the PEI amine groups. Neutron reflectivity and surface tension data are presented here which show how the polyelectrolyte-surfactant interaction can be manipulated by tuning the PEI structure. Using deuterium labeled surfactant and polymer the neutron reflectivity measurements provide details of the surface composition and structure of the adsorbed layer. The general pattern of behavior is that at low surfactant concentrations there is enhanced surfactant adsorption due to the strong surface interaction; whereas around the region of the SDS critical micellar concentration, cmc, the surface is partially depleted of surfactant in favor bulk aggregate structures. The results presented here show how these characteristic features of the adsorption are affected by the degree of ethoxylation and propoxylation. Increasing the degree of propoxylation enhances the surfactant adsorption, whereas varying the degree of ethoxylation has a less pronounced effect. In the region of surfactant surface depletion increasing both the degree of ethoxylation and propoxylation result in an increased surface depletion.

  18. Migration of a surfactant-laden droplet in non-isothermal Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sayan; Mandal, Shubhadeep; Som, S. K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-01-01

    The motion of a surfactant-laden viscous droplet in the presence of non-isothermal Poiseuille flow is studied analytically and numerically. Specifically, the focus of the present study is on the role of interfacial Marangoni stress generated due to imposed temperature gradient and non-uniform distribution of bulk-insoluble surfactants towards dictating the velocity and direction of motion of the droplet when the background flow is Poiseuille. Assuming the thermal convection and fluid inertia to be negligible, we obtain the explicit expression for steady velocity of a non-deformable spherical droplet when the droplet is located at the centerline of the imposed unbounded Poiseuille flow and encountering a linearly varying temperature field. Under these assumptions, the interfacial transport of surfactants is governed by the surface Péclet number which represents the relative strength of the advective transport of surfactant molecules over the diffusive transport. We obtain analytical solution for small and large values of the surface Péclet number. Analytical solution is also obtained for the case in which the surface Péclet number is of order unity by considering small surfactant Marangoni number which represents the relative strength of the surfactant-induced Marangoni stress over the viscous stress. For an arbitrary surface Péclet number, a numerical solution of the surfactant transport equation is performed using an iterative method which compares well with the analytical solutions. Depending on the direction of temperature gradient with respect to the imposed Poiseuille flow, the surfactant-induced Marangoni stress affects the droplet velocity significantly. When the imposed temperature increases in the direction of imposed Poiseuille flow, surfactants retard the droplet motion as compared with a surfactant-free droplet. However, when the imposed temperature decreases in the direction of imposed Poiseuille flow, the presence of surfactants may increase or

  19. The influence of applied heat treatments on whey protein denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fetahagić Safet

    2002-01-01

    . Distribution of nitrogen matter from milk 8%+3%DWP heat treated at 85ºC/10 min, 90ºC/10 min and 95ºC/10 min to sera samples were 9.64%, 8.66% and 8.67%, respectively. Whey protein denaturation increased with increasing of the temperature of the applied heat treatment. Denaturation was the most significant for milk sample 11%.

  20. Protein folding by distributed computing and the denatured state ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianayagam, Neelan J; Fawzi, Nicolas L; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2005-11-15

    The distributed computing (DC) paradigm in conjunction with the folding@home (FH) client server has been used to study the folding kinetics of small peptides and proteins, giving excellent agreement with experimentally measured folding rates, although pathways sampled in these simulations are not always consistent with the folding mechanism. In this study, we use a coarse-grain model of protein L, whose two-state kinetics have been characterized in detail by using long-time equilibrium simulations, to rigorously test a FH protocol using approximately 10,000 short-time, uncoupled folding simulations starting from an extended state of the protein. We show that the FH results give non-Poisson distributions and early folding events that are unphysical, whereas longer folding events experience a correct barrier to folding but are not representative of the equilibrium folding ensemble. Using short-time, uncoupled folding simulations started from an equilibrated denatured state ensemble (DSE), we also do not get agreement with the equilibrium two-state kinetics because of overrepresented folding events arising from higher energy subpopulations in the DSE. The DC approach using uncoupled short trajectories can make contact with traditionally measured experimental rates and folding mechanism when starting from an equilibrated DSE, when the simulation time is long enough to sample the lowest energy states of the unfolded basin and the simulated free-energy surface is correct. However, the DC paradigm, together with faster time-resolved and single-molecule experiments, can also reveal the breakdown in the two-state approximation due to observation of folding events from higher energy subpopulations in the DSE.

  1. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency.

  2. Structured fluids polymers, colloids, surfactants

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Thomas A

    2010-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, the study of liquids containing polymers, surfactants, or colloidal particles has developed from a loose assembly of facts into a coherent discipline with substantial predictive power. These liquids expand our conception of what condensed matter can do. Such structured-fluid phenomena dominate the physical environment within living cells. This book teaches how to think of these fluids from a unified point of view showing the far-reaching effects ofthermal fluctuations in producing forces and motions. Keeping mathematics to a minimum, the book seeks the simplest expl

  3. Innovation in surfactant therapy I: surfactant lavage and surfactant administration by fluid bolus using minimally invasive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaville, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the field of exogenous surfactant therapy continues more than two decades after the drug became commercially available. One such innovation, lung lavage using dilute surfactant, has been investigated in both laboratory and clinical settings as a treatment for meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Studies in animal models of MAS have affirmed that dilute surfactant lavage can remove meconium from the lung, with resultant improvement in lung function. In human infants both non-randomised studies and two randomised controlled trials have demonstrated a potential benefit of dilute surfactant lavage over standard care. The largest clinical trial, performed by our research group in infants with severe MAS, found that lung lavage using two 15-ml/kg aliquots of dilute surfactant did not reduce the duration of respiratory support, but did appear to reduce the composite outcome of death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A further trial of lavage therapy is planned to more precisely define the effect on survival. Innovative approaches to surfactant therapy have also extended to the preterm infant, for whom the more widespread use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has meant delaying or avoiding administration of surfactant. In an effort to circumvent this problem, less invasive techniques of bolus surfactant therapy have been trialled, including instillation directly into the pharynx, via laryngeal mask and via brief tracheal catheterisation. In a recent clinical trial, instillation of surfactant into the trachea using a flexible feeding tube was found to reduce the need for subsequent intubation. We have developed an alternative method of brief tracheal catheterisation in which surfactant is delivered via a semi-rigid vascular catheter inserted through the vocal cords under direct vision. In studies to date, this technique has been relatively easy to perform, and resulted in rapid improvement in lung function and reduced need for

  4. Single molecule study of the DNA denaturation phase transition in the force-torsion space

    CERN Document Server

    Salerno, D; Mai, I; Brogioli, D; Ziano, R; Cassina, V; Mantegazza, F

    2012-01-01

    We use the "magnetic tweezers" technique to reveal the structural transitions that DNA undergoes in the force-torsion space. In particular, we focus on regions corresponding to negative supercoiling. These regions are characterized by the formation of so-called denaturation bubbles, which have an essential role in the replication and transcription of DNA. We experimentally map the region of the force-torsion space where the denaturation takes place. We observe that large fluctuations in DNA extension occur at one of the boundaries of this region, i.e., when the formation of denaturation bubbles and of plectonemes are competing. To describe the experiments, we introduce a suitable extension of the classical model. The model correctly describes the position of the denaturation regions, the transition boundaries, and the measured values of the DNA extension fluctuations.

  5. Second Law Analysis of Adiabatic and Non-Adiabatic Pipeline Flows of Unstable and Surfactant-Stabilized Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder Pal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Entropy generation, and hence exergy destruction, in adiabatic flow of unstable and surfactant-stabilized emulsions was investigated experimentally in different diameter pipes. Four types of emulsion systems are investigated covering a broad range of the dispersed-phase concentration: (a unstable oil-in-water (O/W emulsions without surfactant; (b surfactant-stabilized O/W emulsions; (c unstable water-in-oil (W/O emulsions without surfactant; and (d surfactant-stabilized W/O emulsions. The entropy generation rate per unit pipe length is affected by the type of the emulsion as well as its stability. Unstable emulsions without any surfactant present at the interface generate less entropy in the turbulent regime as compared with the surfactant-stabilized emulsions of the same viscosity and density. The effect of surfactant is particularly severe in the case of W/O emulsions. In the turbulent regime, the rate of entropy generation in unstable W/O emulsions is much lower in comparison with that observed in the stable W/O emulsions. A significant delay in the transition from laminar to turbulent regime is also observed in the case of unstable W/O emulsion. Finally, the analysis and simulation results are presented on non-adiabatic pipeline flow of emulsions.

  6. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  7. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  8. Avoiding adsorption of DNA to polypropylene tubes and denaturation of short DNA fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillard, Claire; Strauss, Francois

    1998-01-01

    Two problems can arise when working with small quantities of DNA in polypropylene tubes: first, significant amounts of DNA can become lost by sticking to the tube walls; second, short DNA fragments tend to denature when binding to polypropylene. In addition, DNA also tends to denature upon dehydration. We have found that a simple way to solve these problems is by using polyallomer tubes instead of polypropylene and by avoiding certain salts, such as sodium acetate, when drying DNA.

  9. Metathesis depolymerization for removable surfactant templates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zifer, Thomas (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Wheeler, David Roger; Rahimian, Kamayar; McElhanon, James Ross (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Long, Timothy Michael; Jamison, Gregory Marks; Loy, Douglas Anson (Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM); Kline, Steven R. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); Simmons, Blake Alexander (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    Current methodologies for the production of meso- and nanoporous materials include the use of a surfactant to produce a self-assembled template around which the material is formed. However, post-production surfactant removal often requires centrifugation, calcination, and/or solvent washing which can damage the initially formed material architecture(s). Surfactants that can be disassembled into easily removable fragments following material preparation would minimize processing damage to the material structure, facilitating formation of templated hybrid architectures. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of novel cationic and anionic surfactants with regularly spaced unsaturation in their hydrophobic hydrocarbon tails and the first application of ring closing metathesis depolymerization to surfactant degradation resulting in the mild, facile decomposition of these new compounds to produce relatively volatile nonsurface active remnants.

  10. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Surfactant Flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandersen, Sara Bülow

    behavior inside the reservoir can be manipulated by the injection of surfactants and co-surfactants, creating advantageous conditions in order to mobilize trapped oil. Correctly designed surfactant systems together with the crude oil can create microemulsions at the interface between crude oil and water...... observation of the phase behavior of the different systems at various temperatures and pressures inside the high pressure cell. Phase volumes can also be measured visually through the glass window using precision equipment. The surfactant system for which an experimental study was carried out consisted...... models, such as equations of state, while able to predict and correlate phase equilibrium in two liquid phases (with varying degrees of success) cannot account for the formation of a microemulsion phase. The presence of electrolytes in the surfactant systems further complicates the problem...

  11. Thermal denaturation behavior of collagen fibrils in wet and dry environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Yosuke; Nam, Kwangwoo; Ozeki, Kazuhide; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio; Masuzawa, Toru

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new minimally invasive technique--integrated low-level energy adhesion technique (ILEAT)--which uses heat, pressure, and low-frequency vibrations for binding living tissues. Because the adhesion mechanism of the living tissues is not fully understood, we investigated the effect of thermal energy on the collagen structure in living tissues using ILEAT. To study the effect of thermal energy and heating time on the structure of the collagen fibril, samples were divided in two categories-wet and dry. Further, atomic force microscopy was used to analyze the collagen fibril structure before and after heating. Results showed that collagen fibrils in water denatured after 1 minute at temperatures higher than 80 °C, while partial denaturation was observed at temperatures of 80 °C and a heating time of 1 min. Furthermore, complete denaturation was achieved after 90 min, suggesting that the denaturation rate is temperature and time dependent. Moreover, the collagen fibrils in dry condition maintained their native structure even after being heated to 120 °C for 90 min in the absence of water, which specifically suppressed denaturation. However, partial denaturation of collagen fibrils could not be prevented, because this determines the adhesion between the collagen molecules, and stabilizes tissue bonding.

  12. Biophysical analysis of phaseolin denaturation induced by urea, guanidinium chloride, pH, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, J M; Nelson, J W; Murai, N

    1992-06-01

    The structural stability of phaseolin was determined by using absorbance, circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence emission, and fluorescence polarization anisotropy to monitor denaturation induced by urea, guanidinium chloride (GdmCl), pH changes, increasing temperature, or a combination thereof. Initial results indicated that phaseolin remained folded to a similar extent in the presence or absence of 6.0 M urea or GdmCl at room temperature. In 6.0 M GdmCl, phaseolin denatures at approximately 65 degrees C when probed with absorbance, CD, and fluorescence polarization anisotropy. The transition occurs at lower temperatures by decreasing pH. Kinetic measurements of denaturation using CD indicated that the denaturation is slow below 55 degrees C and is associated with an activation energy of 52 kcal/mol in 6.0 M GdmCl. In addition, kinetic measurement using fluorescence emission indicated that the single tryptophan residue was sensitive to at least two steps of the denaturation process. The fluorescence emission appeared to reflect some other structural perturbation than protein denaturation, as fluorescence inflection occurred approximately 5 degrees C prior to the changes observed in absorbance, CD, and fluorescence polarization anisotropy.

  13. Calcium Binding and Disulfide Bonds Regulate the Stability of Secretagogin towards Thermal and Urea Denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiffert, Tanja; Ní Mhurchú, Niamh; O’Connell, David; Linse, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin is a calcium-sensor protein with six EF-hands. It is widely expressed in neurons and neuro-endocrine cells of a broad range of vertebrates including mammals, fishes and amphibia. The protein plays a role in secretion and interacts with several vesicle-associated proteins. In this work, we have studied the contribution of calcium binding and disulfide-bond formation to the stability of the secretagogin structure towards thermal and urea denaturation. SDS-PAGE analysis of secretagogin in reducing and non-reducing conditions identified a tendency of the protein to form dimers in a redox-dependent manner. The denaturation of apo and Calcium-loaded secretagogin was studied by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy under conditions favoring monomer or dimer or a 1:1 monomer: dimer ratio. This analysis reveals significantly higher stability towards urea denaturation of Calcium-loaded secretagogin compared to the apo protein. The secondary and tertiary structure of the Calcium-loaded form is not completely denatured in the presence of 10 M urea. Reduced and Calcium-loaded secretagogin is found to refold reversibly after heating to 95°C, while both oxidized and reduced apo secretagogin is irreversibly denatured at this temperature. Thus, calcium binding greatly stabilizes the structure of secretagogin towards chemical and heat denaturation. PMID:27812162

  14. Interim assessment of the denatured /sup 233/U fuel cycle: feasibility and nonproliferation characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L.S.; Bartine, D.E.; Burns, T.J. (eds.)

    1978-12-01

    A fuel cycle that employs /sup 233/U denatured with /sup 238/U and mixed with thorium fertile material is examined with respect to its proliferation-resistance characteristics and its technical and economic feasibility. The rationale for considering the denatured /sup 233/U fuel cycle is presented, and the impact of the denatured fuel on the performance of Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Controlled Reactors, Gas-Cooled Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors, and Fast Breeder Reactors is discussed. The scope of the R, D and D programs to commercialize these reactors and their associated fuel cycles is also summarized and the resource requirements and economics of denatured /sup 233/U cycles are compared to those of the conventional Pu/U cycle. In addition, several nuclear power systems that employ denatured /sup 233/U fuel and are based on the energy center concept are evaluated. Under this concept, dispersed power reactors fueled with denatured or low-enriched uranium fuel are supported by secure energy centers in which sensitive activities of the nuclear cycle are performed. These activities include /sup 233/U production by Pu-fueled transmuters (thermal or fast reactors) and reprocessing. A summary chapter presents the most significant conclusions from the study and recommends areas for future work.

  15. Tissue sealing device associated thermal spread: a comparison of histologic methods for detecting adventitial collagen denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Grisez, Brian T.; Thomas, Aaron C.; Livengood, Ryan H.; Coad, James E.

    2013-02-01

    Thermal spread (thermal tissue damage) results from heat conduction through the tissues immediately adjacent to a hyperthermic tissue sealing device. The extent of such heat conduction can be assessed by the detection of adventitial collagen denaturation. Several histologic methods have been reported to measure adventitial collagen denaturation as a marker of thermal spread. This study compared hematoxylin and eosin staining, Gomori trichrome staining and loss of collagen birefringence for the detection of collagen denaturation. Twenty-eight ex vivo porcine carotid arteries were sealed with a commercially available, FDA-approved tissue sealing device. Following formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, two 5-micron tissue sections were hematoxylin and eosin and Gomori trichrome stained. The hematoxylin and eosin-stained section was evaluated by routine bright field microscopy and under polarized light. The trichromestained section was evaluated by routine bright field microscopy. Radial and midline adventitial collagen denaturation measurements were made for both the top and bottom jaw sides of each seal. The adventitial collagen denaturation lengths were determined using these three methods and statistically compared. The results showed that thermal spread, as represented by histologically detected collagen denaturation, is technique dependent. In this study, the trichrome staining method detected significantly less thermal spread than the hematoxylin and eosin staining and birefringence methods. Of the three methods, hematoxylin and eosin staining provided the most representative results for true thermal spread along the adjacent artery.

  16. Effects of Perfluorocarbons on surfactant exocytosis and membrane properties in isolated alveolar type II cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravasio Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perfluorocarbons (PFC are used to improve gas exchange in diseased lungs. PFC have been shown to affect various cell types. Thus, effects on alveolar type II (ATII cells and surfactant metabolism can be expected, data, however, are controversial. Objective The study was performed to test two hypotheses: (I the effects of PFC on surfactant exocytosis depend on their respective vapor pressures; (II different pathways of surfactant exocytosis are affected differently by PFC. Methods Isolated ATII cells were exposed to two PFC with different vapor pressures and spontaneous surfactant exocytosis was measured. Furthermore, surfactant exocytosis was stimulated by either ATP, PMA or Ionomycin. The effects of PFC on cell morphology, cellular viability, endocytosis, membrane permeability and fluidity were determined. Results The spontaneous exocytosis was reduced by PFC, however, the ATP and PMA stimulated exocytosis was slightly increased by PFC with high vapor pressure. In contrast, Ionomycin-induced exocytosis was decreased by PFC with low vapor pressure. Cellular uptake of FM 1-43 - a marker of membrane integrity - was increased. However, membrane fluidity, endocytosis and viability were not affected by PFC incubation. Conclusions We conclude that PFC effects can be explained by modest, unspecific interactions with the plasma membrane rather than by specific interactions with intracellular targets.

  17. Adsorption Behavior and Mechanisms of Surfactants by Farmland Soils in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei-wei; KANG Chun-li; WANG Ting-ting; LI Yue-ming; ZHANG Ying-xin; WEN Xin; GUO Ping

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of two nonionic surfactants polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether Triton X-100 (TX-100), polyoxyethylene lauryl ether(Brij35) and an anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate(SDBS) by two soils(S1, S2) of different natures and their respective organic-matter-extracted samples(S3, S4) were investigated. These adsorption isotherms show different adsorption stages of different types of surfactants by soils. The data fitted Langmuir equation very well. The adsorption maximum capacity(Q0) indicates that TX-100 and SDBS were in the sequence of S3>S4>S1>S2 in adsorption, however, Brij35 was in the sequence of S4>S3>S1>S2 in adsorption. And the adsorption amounts of the different surfactants by soils followed the order of TX-1 00>Brij35>SDBS. Meanwhile,the adsorption of the nonionic surfactants TX-100 and Brij35 decreased with the increase of their ethylene oxide(EO) numbers. The results indicate that both soil organic matter and mineral played important roles in the adsorption of suffactants, and the adsorption of the surfactants by soils was affected by the physicochemical properties and structures of the soils and suffactants, especially the mineral type and content of soil.

  18. The significance of recurrent lung opacities in neonates on surfactant treatment for respiratory distress syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odita, J.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Louisiana State Univ. Health Sciences Center, Shreveport (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Purpose. To determine the significance of recurrent opacities in chest radiographs of neonates on surfactant therapy for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) after an initial period of improvement. Materials and methods. Serial pre- and post-surfactant chest radiographs on 94 preterm infants with RDS were analyzed and the pattern of chest radiographic response was classified as (a) clear, (b) recurrent opacities, and (c) no response. Their clinical characteristics were also recorded. Results. In 34 infants the RDS changes cleared within 3 days. 31 infants developed lung opacities within 10 days after an initial period of improvement. Twenty-nine infants failed to respond to the surfactant. The corresponding mean birth weights for the three groups were 1.74, 1.19, and 0.76 kg and the mean gestation ages 32.6, 27.7, and 25.4 weeks. The incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) was highest among the slumping infants (72. % vs 50 % in no responders, P < 0.001) Conclusions. The pattern of chest radiographic response is primarily affected by gestation age and birth weight. Recurrent lung opacity after an initial positive response to surfactant therapy may be caused by such factors as edema from barotrauma and patent ductus arteriosus. Infants with intraventricular hemorrhage may demonstrate neurogenic edema. Other contributory factors include pneumonia and abnormal consumption of surfactant. Recurrent lung opacities after surfactant may be a predictor of chronic lung disease in the preterm infant. (orig.)

  19. Micellization of alkyl-propoxy-ethoxylate surfactants in water-polar organic solvent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Biswajit; Lam, Stephanie; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2010-07-06

    The effects of cosolvents (glycerol, ethanol, and isopropanol) on the self-assembly of novel alkyl-propoxy-ethoxylate surfactants in aqueous solutions have been investigated with a focus on the (i) quantification of solvent effects on the critical micelle concentration (cmc), (ii) free-energy contributions to micellization, (iii) local environment in the micellar solution, and (iv) structure of the micelles. The introduction of the polar organic solvents considered in this work into water decreases cohesive forces in the solvent mixture, resulting in an increase in the solubility of the surfactant molecules. As a result, micelle formation becomes less favorable and the cmc increases. The contribution of the cosolvent to the free energy of micellization is positive, and the data for different mixed solvents collapse onto a single straight line when plotted versus a function of the solubility parameters of the surfactant alkyl chains and the mixed solvents. The behavior of the poly(propylene oxide) part of the alkyl-propoxy-ethoxylate surfactants is hydrophilic, albeit less so in the ethanol-water mixed solvent than in plain water. Pyrene fluorescence emission I(1)/I(3) data suggest that the microenvironment in micellar solutions is affected mainly by the cosolvent concentration, not the surfactant degree of ethoxylation. Small-angle X-ray scattering data for both water and ethanol-water surfactant solutions are consistent with oblate ellipsoid micelles and reveal that the introduction of 20% ethanol decreases the micelle long axis by 10-15%.

  20. pH-Sensitive surfactants from lysine: assessment of their cytotoxicity and environmental behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer, Aurora; Pinazo, Aurora; García, Maria Teresa; Mitjans, Montserrat; Vinardell, M Pilar; Infante, Maria Rosa; Martínez, Verónica; Pérez, Lourdes

    2012-04-10

    The toxicity and environmental behavior of new pH-sensitive surfactants from lysine are presented. Three different chemical structures are studied: surfactants with one amino acid and one alkyl chain, surfactants with two amino acids on the polar head and one alkyl chain, and gemini surfactants. The pH sensitivity of these compounds can be tuned by modifying their chemical structures. Cytotoxicity has been evaluated using erythrocytes and fibroblast cells. The toxic effects against these cells depend on the hydrophobicity of the molecules as well as their cationic charge density. The effect of hydrophobicity and cationic charge density on toxicity is different for each type of cells. For erythrocytes, the toxicity increases as hydrophobicity and charge density increases. Nevertheless, for fibroblasts cationic charge density affects cytotoxicity in the opposite way: the higher charge density, the lower the toxicity. The effect of the pH on hemolysis has been evaluated in detail. The aquatic toxicity was established using Daphnia magna . All surfactants yielded EC(50) values considerably higher than that reported for cationic surfactants based on quaternary ammonium groups. Finally, their biodegradability was evaluated using the CO(2) headspace test (ISO 14593). These lysine derivatives showed high levels of biodegradation under aerobic conditions and can be classified as "readily biodegradable compounds".

  1. Joint influence of surfactants and humic matter on PAH solubility. Are mixed micelles formed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippold, H.; Gottschalch, U.; Kupsch, H. [Inst. of Interdisziplinare Isotopeforschung, Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    Mobilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) by surfactants, present at contaminated sites or deliberately introduced for remediation purposes, is inevitably associated with the influence of humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural systems. Therefore, the solubilizing effects of anthropogenic and natural amphiphiles must be considered in their combined action since synergistic or antagonistic effects may be expected, for instance, as a consequence of mixed micellization. In this paper, solubilization of {sup 14}C-labeled pyrene in single-component and mixed solutions of surfactants and humic acid (coal-derived) was investigated up to the micellar concentration range. At low concentrations, antagonistic effects were observed for systems with cationic as well as anionic surfactants. Solubility enhancements in the presence of humic acid were canceled on addition of a cationic surfactant (DTAB) since charge compensation at humic colloids entailed precipitation. Solubility was also found to be decreased in the presence of an anionic surfactant (SDS), which was attributed to a competitive effect in respect of pyrene-humic interaction. This explanation is based on octanol-water partitioning experiments with radiolabeled humic acid, yielding evidence of different interaction modes between humic colloids and cationic/anionic surfactants. At higher concentrations, the effects of humic acid and SIDS were found to be additive. Thus, a formation of mixed micelles is very unlikely, which was confirmed by size exclusion chromatography of mixed systems. It can be concluded that remediation measures on the basis of micellar solubilization are not significantly affected by the presence of natural amphiphilic compounds.

  2. Influence of surfactant conditions on the structure of an upward bubbly channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Toshiyuki

    2005-11-01

    We investigated an upward bubbly channel flow and the effects of surfactant on its flow structure experimentally. 3-Pentanol and Triton X-100 are used as surfactants. By the addition of small amount of surfactant, bubble coalescences are prevented and mono-dispersed 1mm spherical bubbles are obtained. Under all of our experimental conditions, the added surfactants do not influence the single-phase turbulence. On the other hand, small amount of surfactant drastically changes the whole flow structure of bubbly flow. On the low concentration of 3-Pentanol (21-63ppm), bubbles strongly migrate towards the wall and these highly accumulated bubbles on the wall form crescent-like shaped horizontal bubble clusters of 10-40mm length. However, in 3-Pentanol solution of higher concentration (˜168ppm) or in the 2ppm Triton X-100 solution, the tendency of the lateral migration of bubbles is weaken and the bubbles are distributed uniformly in the channel. In the surfactant solution, the slip velocity on the bubble surface retards and the bubble rising velocity decreases (Marangoni effect). The change of boundary condition on the bubble surface affects not only drag force but shear-induced lift force. It is indicated that this change of shear-induced lift force greatly relates to the lateral migration of bubbles and the disaggregation of the bubble clusters. We also measured the turbulent properties using LDV and discuss the flow structure.

  3. Solubilization of octane in electrostatically-formed surfactant-polymer complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zeeb, Benjamin; Salminen, Hanna; Feng, Fengqin; Weiss, Jochen

    2014-03-01

    Polymers can be used to modulate the stability and functionality of surfactant micelles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the solubilization of an octane oil-in-water emulsion in mixtures of an anionic polymer (carboxymethyl cellulose) and anionic sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS), nonionic polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant micelles using dynamic light scattering, microelectrophoresis and turbidity measurements. The results showed that the addition of anionic carboxymethyl cellulose accelerated octane solubilization in cationic CTAB and CTAB-Tween 80 micelles, but did not affect the solubilization behaviors of micelles that were nonionic and anionic. The surfactant-polymer interactions were also studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to characterize different physiochemical interaction regions depending on surfactant concentration in surfactant-polymer systems. Upon octane solubilization in CTAB-carboxymethyl cellulose mixtures, shape transitions of polymer-micelle complexes may have taken place that altered light scattering behavior. Based on these results, we suggest a mechanism for oil solubilization in electrostatically-formed surfactant-polymer complexes.

  4. Surfactant induced complex formation and their effects on the interfacial properties of seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Eduardo; Santini, Eva; Benedetti, Alessandro; Ravera, Francesca; Ferrari, Michele; Liggieri, Libero

    2014-11-01

    The effect of a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), on the interfacial properties of seawater has been studied by dynamic and equilibrium surface tension and by dilational rheology essays. Important modifications of the surface tension and dilational rheology response have been observed already at the very low CTAB concentrations, where the effects due to the high ionic strength are negligible. The comparison with the effects of CTAB in different seawater models, or in natural seawater fractions, points out the establishment of strong interactions between the surfactant molecules and the lipophilic fraction of organic material dispersed/dissolved in seawater, affecting the interfacial activity of the molecules. Considering the biochemical richness of seawater, these results can be explained assuming interaction mechanisms and adsorption schemes similar to those speculated for protein and other macromolecules in the presence of surfactants, which in fact show similar features. Thus already at the low concentrations the surfactant molecules form highly surface-active complexes with part of the organic fraction of seawater. At the larger surfactant concentrations these complexes compete for adsorption with an excess of free CTAB molecules which, according to the thermodynamic conditions, are most favoured to occupy the liquid interface. The results of this study underline the important role of the sea organic content in enhancing the surface-activity of surfactants, which is relevant for a deeper understand of the direct and indirect effects of these types of pollutants on the physico-chemical environment in the sea coastal areas and develop mitigation strategies.

  5. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  6. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants.

  7. Exogenous Pulmonary Surfactant as a Vehicle for Antimicrobials: Assessment of Surfactant-Antibacterial Interactions In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Birkun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia.

  8. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar remote sensing captures various fine-scale features on the ocean surface such as coastal discharges, oil pollution, vessel traffic, algal blooms and sea slicks. Although numerous factors potentially affect the synthetic aperture radar imaging process, the influence of biogenic and anthropogenic surfactants has been suggested as one of the primary parameters, especially under relatively low wind conditions. Surfactants have a tendency to dampen the short gravity-capillary ocean waves causing the sea surface to smoothen, thus allowing the radar to detect areas of surfactants. Surfactants are found in sea slicks, which are the accumulation of organic material shaped as elongated bands on the ocean's surface. Sea slicks are often observable with the naked eye due to their glassy appearance and can also be seen on synthetic aperture radar images as dark scars. While the sources of surfactants can vary, some are known to be of marine bacteria origin. Countless numbers of marine bacteria are present in the oceanic environment, and their biogeochemical contributions cannot be overlooked. Not only does marine-bacteria produce surfactants, but they also play an important role in the transformation of surfactants. In this study, we profiled the surfactant-associated bacteria composition within the biogenic thin layer of the ocean surface more commonly referred as the sea surface microlayer. Bacterial samples were collected from the sea surface microlayer for comparative analysis from both within and outside of sea slick areas as well as the underlying subsurface water. The bacterial microlayer sampling coincided with synthetic aperture radar satellite, RADARSAT-2, overpasses to demonstrate the simultaneous in-situ measurements during a satellite image capture. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the

  9. Biobased surfactant-like molecules from organic wastes: the effect of waste composition and composting process on surfactant properties and on the ability to solubilize Tetrachloroethene (PCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Giorgia; Chen, Xiaosong; Jawitz, James W; Tambone, Fulvia; Genevini, Pierluigi; Faoro, Franco; Adani, Fabrizio

    2008-04-01

    In this work, four surfactant-like humic acids (HAs) obtained from garden lignocellulose wastes and kitchen food wastes mixed with garden-lignocellulose wastes, both before and after composting, were tested for surfactant properties and the ability to solubilize tetrachloroethene (PCE). The waste-derived HAs showed good surfactant properties, lowering the water surface tension from 74 mN m(-1) to 45.4 +/- 4.4 mN m(-1), with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 1.54 +/- 1.68 g L(-1), which is lower than many synthetic ionic surfactants. CMC was affected by both waste origin and composting processes. The addition of food waste and composting reduced CMC by adding alkyl-C (measured by CP MAS 13C NMR) and N- and S-HA contents (amide molecules), so that a multistep regression was found [CMC = 24.6 - 0.189 alkyl C - 2.64 (N + S); R2 = 0.77, P < 0.10, n = 6]. The four HAs solubilized PCE at the rate of 0.18-0.47 g PCE/g aqueous biosurfactant. These results were much higher than those reported in the literature for a commercial HA (0.026 g/g), but they were in line with those measured in this work for nonionic surfactants such as Tween-80 (0.69 g/g) and Triton X-100 (1.08 g/g).

  10. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity.

  12. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region.

  13. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes H Kügler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gloablly, the drive towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application.

  14. MicroRNA-23b Inhibits the Proliferation and Migration of Heat-Denatured Fibroblasts by Targeting Smad3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xipeng Zhang

    Full Text Available Skin grafting with the preservation of denatured dermis is a novel strategy for the treatment of burn-injured skin. Denatured dermis has the ability to restore to the morphology and function of normal skin, but the underlying molecular mechanism is elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNA are small noncoding RNAs and regulate normal physiology as well as disease development. In this study, we assessed the potential role of miRNA-23b (miR-23b in the regulation of cell proliferation and migration of heat-denatured fibroblasts and identified the underlying mechanism.The expression of miR-23b in denatured dermis and heat-denatured fibroblasts was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The effects of miR-23b on cell proliferation and migration of heat-denatured fibroblasts were assessed by transient transfection of miR-23b mimics and inhibitor. The target gene of miR-23b and the downstream pathway were further investigated.miR-23b was downregulated in denatured dermis and heat-denatured fibroblasts. Downregulation of miR-23b dramatically promoted the proliferation and migration of heat-denatured fibroblasts. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that Smad3 was a direct and functional target of miR-23b in heat-denatured fibroblasts, which was validated by the dual luciferase reporter assay. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analysis showed that denatured dermis from rats displayed enhanced staining of Smad3. In addition, miR-23b modulated denatured dermis by activating the Notch1 and TGF-β signaling pathways.Our findings suggest that downregulation of miR-23b contributes to the recovery of denatured dermis, which may be valuable for treatment of skin burns.

  15. Effect of high-pressure treatment on denaturation of bovine lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazri, C; Sánchez, L; Ramos, S J; Calvo, M; Pérez, M D

    2012-02-01

    Lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase are whey proteins with biological properties that may provide health benefits to consumers. These properties are vulnerable to potentially denaturing conditions during processing. High-pressure treatment is an appealing alternative to the traditional heat processing of foods because it exerts an antimicrobial effect without changing the sensory and nutritional quality of foods. In this work, the effect of high-pressure treatment on the denaturation of lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase present in skim milk and whey, and as isolated proteins in buffer, was studied over a pressure range of 450 to 700 MPa at 20°C. Denaturation of lactoferrin was measured by the loss of reactivity with their specific antibodies using a sandwich ELISA. Denaturation of lactoperoxidase was determined by measuring the loss of enzymatic activity using a spectrophotometric technique. No substantial inactivation of lactoperoxidase was observed in any treatment assayed. The concentration of the residual immunoreactive lactoferrin after each pressure treatment was determined, and the data were subjected to kinetic analysis to obtain D and Z values. Denaturation of lactoferrin increased with pressure and holding time, and D values were lower when lactoferrin was treated in whey than in milk, and lower in both whey and milk than in phosphate buffer. Thus, protein is denatured more slowly in buffer and in milk than in whey. Denaturation of lactoferrin in the 3 media was found to follow a reaction order of n=1.5. Volumes of activation of about -34.77, -24.35, and -24.09 mL/mol were obtained for lactoferrin treated in skim milk, whey, and buffer, respectively, indicating a decrease in protein volume under pressure.

  16. Development of novel short-term heating angioplasty: thermal denaturation dynamics of collagen in artery wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, N.; Tokunaga, H.; Katou, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Arai, T.

    2009-02-01

    We have studied to develop the new thermal angioplasty methodology, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PTDBA), which provides artery dilatation with short-term (collagen in artery media may be the important factor to attain sufficient artery dilatation for the PTDBA. In order to predict the optimum heating condition i.e. the balloon temperature and heating duration, we investigated the thermal denaturation dynamics of artery collagen in ex vivo. The extracted fresh porcine carotid artery was used. The temperature-dependent light scattering property and mechanical property of the artery specimen were simultaneously measured during artery temperature rising by specially made setup to assess the denaturation of arterial collagen. The change rate of the backscattered light intensity from the artery specimen; I(T)/I0 with 633nm was measured to evaluate the artery scattering property change with the thermal denaturation. The artery specimen was heated from 25°C to 80°C with constant temperature rising rate of 3°C/min. The measured I(T)/I0 was suddenly increased over 48°C. This boundary temperature might be the initiation temperature of the arterial collagen denaturation. We defined the variation of the I(T)/I0 as the collagen denaturation ratio, and calculated the reactive enthalpy by the chemical equilibrium theory. Since the calculated enthalpy was similar to the enthalpy in literature report, the variety of I(T)/I0 during the temperature rising might be attributed to the collagen conformational change due to the denaturation. In terms of the artery internal force measurement, the artery force was decreased with increasing of the artery temperature up to 65°C (i.e. softening), and increased over 65°C (i.e. shrinkage). We confirmed that the changes of the backscattered light (at 633nm in wavelength) from the artery might represent the artery collagen thermal denaturation degree.

  17. Influence of surfactants in forced dynamic dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Franziska; Fell, Daniela; Truszkowska, Dorota; Weirich, Marcel; Anyfantakis, Manos; Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Wagner, Manfred; Auernhammer, Günter K; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-09-20

    In this work we show that the forced dynamic dewetting of surfactant solutions depends sensitively on the surfactant concentration. To measure this effect, a hydrophobic rotating cylinder was horizontally half immersed in aqueous surfactant solutions. Dynamic contact angles were measured optically by extrapolating the contour of the meniscus to the contact line. Anionic (sodium 1-decanesulfonate, S-1DeS), cationic (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) and nonionic surfactants (C4E1, C8E3 and C12E5) with critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) spanning four orders of magnitude were used. The receding contact angle in water decreased with increasing velocity. This decrease was strongly enhanced when adding surfactant, even at surfactant concentrations of 10% of the critical micelle concentration. Plots of the receding contact angle-versus-velocity almost superimpose when being plotted at the same relative concentration (concentration/CMC). Thus the rescaled concentration is the dominating property for dynamic dewetting. The charge of the surfactants did not play a role, thus excluding electrostatic effects. The change in contact angle can be interpreted by local surface tension gradients, i.e. Marangoni stresses, close to the three-phase contact line. The decrease of dynamic contact angles with velocity follows two regimes. Despite the existence of Marangoni stresses close to the contact line, for a dewetting velocity above 1-10 mm s(-1) the hydrodynamic theory is able to describe the experimental results for all surfactant concentrations. At slower velocities an additional steep decrease of the contact angle with velocity was observed. Particle tracking velocimetry showed that the flow profiles do not differ with and without surfactant on a scales >100 μm.

  18. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  19. Gemini surfactants from natural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lourdes; Pinazo, Aurora; Pons, Ramon; Infante, Mrosa

    2014-03-01

    In this review, we report the most important contributions in the structure, synthesis, physicochemical (surface adsorption, aggregation and phase behaviour) and biological properties (toxicity, antimicrobial activity and biodegradation) of Gemini natural amino acid-based surfactants, and some potential applications, with an emphasis on the use of these surfactants as non-viral delivery system agents. Gemini surfactants derived from basic (Arg, Lys), neutral (Ser, Ala, Sar), acid (Asp) and sulphur containing amino acids (Cys) as polar head groups, and Geminis with amino acids/peptides in the spacer chain are reviewed.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconia Nanocrystallites by Cationic Surfactant and Anionic Surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Study on nanomaterials has attracted great interests in recent years. In this article,zirconia nanocrystallites of different structures have been successfully synthesized via hydrothermal methods with cationic surfactant (CTAB) and anionic surfactant (SDS), respectively. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC-TG), X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis) and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses are used for their structure characteristics. The results show that the cationic surfactant has a distinctive direction effect on the formation of zirconia nanocrystallites, while the anionic surfactant has a self-assembly synergistic effect on them. The sample synthesized with the cationic surfactant presents good dispersion with the main phase of tetragonal zirconia, and the average nanocryst al size is around 15nm after calcination at 500 ℃. While the sample synthesized with the anionic surfactant exhibits a worm-like mesoporous structure with pure tetragonal phase after calcination at 500 ℃ and with good thermal stability.

  1. Studies on the electrocapillary curves of anionic surfactants in presence of non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembi, R; Goyal, R N; Malik, W U

    1976-09-01

    Polyoxyethylated non-ionic surfactants such as Tween 20, Tween 40, Nonidet P40 and Nonex 501 have been supposed to be associated with cationic characteristics. Studies on the effect of these surfactants on the electrocapillary curves of the anionic surfactants Aerosol IB, Manaxol OT and sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), show that the electrocapillary maxima shift towards positive potentials. The order of adsorption of the anionic surfactants is SLS > Manaxol OT > Aerosol IB while the shift in maxima is in the order Aerosol IB ~ Manaxol OT > SLS which confirms association of cationic characteristics with the micelles of these non-ionic surfactants. The magnitude of the shift in electrocapillary maxima is Nonex 501 > Nonidet P40 > Tween 20 > Tween 40 which may be the order of magnitude of the positive charge carried by these non-ionic surfactants.

  2. Liquid-liquid extraction for surfactant-contaminant separation and surfactant reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, M.A. [Surbec Environmental, Norman, OK (United States); Sabatini, D.A.; Harwell, J.H. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction was investigated for use with surfactant enhanced subsurface remediation. A surfactant liquid-liquid extraction model (SLLEM) was developed for batch equilibrium conditions based on contaminant partitioning between micellar, water, and solvent phases. The accuracy of this fundamental model was corroborated with experimental results (using naphthalene and phenanthrene as contaminants and squalane as the extracting solvent). The SLLEM model was then expanded to nonequilibrium conditions. The effectiveness of this nonequilibrium model was corroborated with experimental results from continuous flow hollow fiber membrane systems. The validated models were used to conduct a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects of surfactants on the removal of the contaminants in liquid-liquid extraction systems. In addition, liquid-liquid extraction is compared to air stripping for surfactant-contaminant separation. Finally, conclusions are drawn as to the impact of surfactants on liquid-liquid extraction processes, and the significance of these impacts on the optimization of surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation.

  3. Synthesis of novel quaternary ammonium surfactants containing adamantane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wei Guo; Xing Zhong; Hua Zhu; Li Juan Feng; Ying De Cui

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel quaternary ammonium surfactants containing adamantane were designed and synthesized from 1-adamantanecarboxylic acid.The structures of target surfactants were confirmed by 1H NMR,elements analysis and FTIR.Surface properties of these surfactants were investigated.Due to the lipophilicity of adamantane,the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and C20 values of the synthesized quaternary ammonium surfactants are lower than that of conventional quaternary ammonium surfactants.

  4. Preparation of nanocrystalline MgO by surfactant assisted precipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, Mehran, E-mail: rezaei@kashanu.ac.ir [Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajenoori, Majid; Nematollahi, Behzad [Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area. {yields} MgO prepared with surfactant showed different morphologies compared with the sample prepared without surfactant. {yields} MgO prepared with surfactant showed a plate-like shape. {yields} Refluxing temperature and time and the surfactant to metal molar ratio affect the textural properties of MgO. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area was prepared by a simple precipitation method using pluronic P123 triblock copolymer (Poly (ethylene glycol)-block, Poly (propylene glycol)-block, Poly (ethylene glycol)) as surfactant and under refluxing conditions. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET) and scanning and transmission electron microscopies (SEM and TEM). The obtained results revealed that the refluxing time and temperature and the molar ratio of surfactant to metal affect the structural properties of MgO, because of the changes in the rate and extent of P123 adsorption on the prepared samples. The results showed that the addition of surfactant is effective to prepare magnesium oxide with high surface area and affects the morphology of the prepared samples. With increasing the P123/MgO molar ratio to 0.05 the pore size distribution was shifted to larger size. The sample prepared with addition of surfactant showed a plate-like shape which was completely different with the morphology of the sample prepared without surfactant. The formation of nanoplate-like MgO was related to higher surface density of Mg ions on the (0 0 1) plane than that on the other planes of the Mg(OH){sub 2} crystal. The (0 0 1) plane would be blocked preferentially by the adsorbed P123 molecules during the growing process of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoentities and the growth on the (0 0 1) plane would be markedly restricted, and the consequence is the generation of nanoplate-like MgO. In addition, increase in refluxing temperature and time

  5. Molecular-thermodynamic theory of micellization of multicomponent surfactant mixtures: 2. pH-sensitive surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsipe, Arthur; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-05-22

    In article 1 of this series, we developed a molecular-thermodynamic (MT) theory to model the micellization of mixtures containing an arbitrary number of conventional (pH-insensitive) surfactants. In this article, we extend the MT theory to model mixtures containing a pH-sensitive surfactant. The MT theory was validated by examining mixtures containing both a pH-sensitive surfactant and a conventional surfactant, which effectively behave like ternary surfactant mixtures. We first compared the predicted micellar titration data to experimental micellar titration data that we obtained for varying compositions of mixed micelles containing the pH-sensitive surfactant dodecyldimethylamine oxide (C12DAO) mixed with either a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, C12TAB), a nonionic surfactant (dodecyl octa(ethylene oxide), C12E8), or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) surfactant. The MT theory accurately modeled the titration behavior of C12DAO mixed with C12E8. However, C12DAO was observed to interact more favorably with SDS and with C12TAB than was predicted by the MT theory. We also compared predictions to data from the literature for mixtures of C12DAO and SDS. Although the pH values of solutions with no added acid were modeled with only qualitative accuracy, the MT theory resulted in quantitatively accurate predictions of solution pH for mixtures containing added acid. In addition, the predicted degree of counterion binding yielded a lower bound to the experimentally measured value. Finally, we predicted the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of solutions of two pH-sensitive surfactants, tetradecyldimethylamine oxide (C14DAO) and hexadecyldimethyl betaine (C16Bet), at varying solution pH and surfactant composition. However, at the pH values considered, the pH sensitivity of C16Bet could be neglected, and it was equivalently modeled as a zwitterionic surfactant. The cmc's predicted using the MT theory agreed well with the experimental

  6. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Fukuzawa

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+ and Ig-Hepta(-/- mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii surfactant secretion, and (iii a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  7. Experimental and Modelling Study of the Denaturation of Milk Protein by Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Fang; Sun, Jiayue; Cao, Di; Tuo, Yanfeng; Jiang, Shujuan; Mu, Guangqing

    2017-01-01

    Heat treatment of milk aims to inhibit the growth of microbes, extend the shelf-life of products and improve the quality of the products. Heat treatment also leads to denaturation of whey protein and the formation of whey protein-casein polymer, which has negative effects on milk product. Hence the milk heat treatment conditions should be controlled in milk processing. In this study, the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein and casein when undergoing heat treatment were also determined by using the Native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE analysis. The results showed that the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein with casein extended with the increase of the heat-treated temperature and time. The effects of the heat-treated temperature and heat-treated time on the denaturation degree of whey protein and on the combination degree of whey protein and casein were well described using the quadratic regression equation. The analysis strategy used in this study reveals an intuitive and effective measure of the denaturation degree of whey protein, and the changes of milk protein under different heat treatment conditions efficiently and accurately in the dairy industry. It can be of great significance for dairy product proteins following processing treatments applied for dairy product manufacturing. PMID:28316470

  8. Comparison of chemical and thermal protein denaturation by combination of computational and experimental approaches. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Christiansen, Alexander; Samiotakis, Antonios; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-11-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation methods have been widely used to investigate folding processes of proteins in vitro. However, a molecular understanding of the relationship between these two perturbation methods is lacking. Here, we combined computational and experimental approaches to investigate denaturing effects on three structurally different proteins. We derived a linear relationship between thermal denaturation at temperature Tb and chemical denaturation at another temperature Tu using the stability change of a protein (ΔG). For this, we related the dependence of ΔG on temperature, in the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, to that of ΔG on urea concentration in the linear extrapolation method, assuming that there is a temperature pair from the urea (Tu) and the aqueous (Tb) ensembles that produces the same protein structures. We tested this relationship on apoazurin, cytochrome c, and apoflavodoxin using coarse-grained molecular simulations. We found a linear correlation between the temperature for a particular structural ensemble in the absence of urea, Tb, and the temperature of the same structural ensemble at a specific urea concentration, Tu. The in silico results agreed with in vitro far-UV circular dichroism data on apoazurin and cytochrome c. We conclude that chemical and thermal unfolding processes correlate in terms of thermodynamics and structural ensembles at most conditions; however, deviations were found at high concentrations of denaturant.

  9. Denaturation of milk proteins and their influence on the yield of fresh cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mejía-López

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine the denaturation of milk proteins by the effects of heat treatment on pasteurization and to establish their influence on the yield of the fresh cheese manufactured, 20 laboratory- scale controlled trials and 40 plant productions were made. Crude and treated milk was used at 65 ° C for 30 minutes, 72 ° C for 15 seconds and boiled for 2 seconds, and the protein was quantified in milk to calculate percent denaturation. In the cheese the moisture content was determined and the amount of cheese obtained was quantified. The data were processed by Tukey's mean analysis (p> 0.05. The results at the laboratory level showed that the increase in temperature caused higher denaturation of the proteins, a higher yield and an increase in moisture in the cheese compared to that obtained with raw milk. However, statistically the results showed that the heat treatment does influence the denaturation of the proteins but not the performance of the cheese. The results obtained in the factory investigation revealed that at 65 and 72 ° C the yield decreases relative to the production with raw milk, but statistically does not present significant differences in the yield, concluding that the pasteurization at different temperatures denature the protein But does not influence the performance of fresh processed cheese.

  10. Alcohol-induced structural transitions in the acid-denatured Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyani Azizah Abd Halim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol-induced structural changes in the acid-denatured Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase (BLA at pH 2.0 were studied by far-ultra violet circular dichroism, intrinsic, three-dimensional and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS fluorescence, acrylamide quenching and thermal denaturation. All the alcohols used in this study produced partial refolding in the acid-denatured BLA as evident from the increased mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm, increased intrinsic fluorescence and decreased ANS fluorescence. The order of effectiveness of these alcohols to induce a partially folded state of BLA was found to be: 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/tert-butanol > 1-propanol/2-propanol > 2-chloroethanol > ethanol > methanol. Three-dimensional fluorescence and acrylamide quenching results obtained in the presence of 5.5 M tert-butanol also suggested formation of a partially folded state in the acid-denatured BLA. However, 5.5 M tert-butanol-induced state of BLA showed a non-cooperative thermal transition. All these results suggested formation of a partially folded state of the acid-denatured BLA in the presence of these alcohols. Furthermore, their effectiveness was found to be guided by their chain length, position of methyl groups and presence of the substituents.

  11. Drying and denaturation characteristics of whey protein isolate in the presence of lactose and trehalose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M Amdadul; Chen, Jie; Aldred, Peter; Adhikari, Benu

    2015-06-15

    The denaturation kinetics of whey protein isolate (WPI), in the presence and absence of lactose and trehalose, was quantified in a convective air-drying environment. Single droplets of WPI, WPI-lactose and WPI-trehalose were dried in conditioned air (2.5% RH, 0.5m/s air velocity) at two temperatures (65°C and 80°C) for 500s. The initial solid concentration of these solutions was 10% (w/v) in all the samples. Approximately 68% of WPI was denatured when it was dried in the absence of sugars. Addition of 20% trehalose prevented the irreversible denaturation of WPI at both temperatures. Thirty percent lactose was required to prevent denaturation of WPI at 65°C and the same amount of lactose protected only 70% of WPI from denaturation at 80°C. The secondary structures of WPI were found to be altered by the drying-induced stresses, even in the presence of 20% trehalose and 30% lactose.

  12. Polar or apolar--the role of polarity for urea-induced protein denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C Stumpe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Urea-induced protein denaturation is widely used to study protein folding and stability; however, the molecular mechanism and driving forces of this process are not yet fully understood. In particular, it is unclear whether either hydrophobic or polar interactions between urea molecules and residues at the protein surface drive denaturation. To address this question, here, many molecular dynamics simulations totalling ca. 7 micros of the CI2 protein in aqueous solution served to perform a computational thought experiment, in which we varied the polarity of urea. For apolar driving forces, hypopolar urea should show increased denaturation power; for polar driving forces, hyperpolar urea should be the stronger denaturant. Indeed, protein unfolding was observed in all simulations with decreased urea polarity. Hyperpolar urea, in contrast, turned out to stabilize the native state. Moreover, the differential interaction preferences between urea and the 20 amino acids turned out to be enhanced for hypopolar urea and suppressed (or even inverted for hyperpolar urea. These results strongly suggest that apolar urea-protein interactions, and not polar interactions, are the dominant driving force for denaturation. Further, the observed interactions provide a detailed picture of the underlying molecular driving forces. Our simulations finally allowed characterization of CI2 unfolding pathways. Unfolding proceeds sequentially with alternating loss of secondary or tertiary structure. After the transition state, unfolding pathways show large structural heterogeneity.

  13. Effects of Interactions Among Surfactants,Water and Oil on Equilibrium Configuration of Surfactant-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yin-quan; SUN Zhi-bo; XIE Yun; ZOU Xian-wu

    2004-01-01

    The distribution and configuration of surfactants at interface in surfactant-water-oil systems have been investigated using discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. There exists a certain equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface for the systems with certain interactions among surfactant, water and oil. The interface length and equilibrium morphology of the systems are dependent on the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface and the total amount of surfactants. The interaction strengths among surfactant, water and oil determine the equilibrium concentration of surfactants at interface. Three typical configurations of surfactants at interface have been observed: ① surfactant molecules are perpendicular to the interface and arranged closely; ② perpendicular to the interface and arranged at interval of two particles; ③ lie down in the interface partly.

  14. Aggregation of sulfosuccinate surfactants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magid, L.J.; Daus, K.A.; Butler, P.D.; Quincy, R.B.

    1983-12-22

    The aggregation of sodium di-n-alkyl sulfosuccinates in water (H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O at 45/sup 0/C) has been investigated. A self-consistent picture of the dependence of sodium ion binding on surfactant concentration is obtained from emf measurements, conductimetry, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. The concentration dependence of the micellar agregation number for the sulfosuccinates and related double-tailed surfactants depends markedly on surfactant solubility. A sphere-to-disk transition in micellar shape, which might have been expected as a precursor to formation of a lamellar mesophase, was not observed as the surfactant concentration was increased. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant in rat lungs after inhalation of nanomaterials: Fullerenes, nickel oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Chikara; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Ogami, Akira; Oyabu, Takako; Nishi, Ken-ichiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Todoroki, Motoi; Morimoto, Yasuo; Tanaka, Isamu; Myojo, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The health risks of inhalation exposure to engineered nanomaterials in the workplace are a major concern in recent years, and hazard assessments of these materials are being conducted. The pulmonary surfactant of lung alveoli is the first biological entity to have contact with airborne nanomaterials in inhaled air. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the pulmonary surfactant components of rat lungs after a 4-week inhalation exposure to three different nanomaterials: fullerenes, nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), with similar levels of average aerosol concentration (0.13-0.37 mg/m(3)). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the rat lungs stored after previous inhalation studies was analyzed, focusing on total protein and the surfactant components, such as phospholipids and surfactant-specific SP-D (surfactant protein D) and the BALF surface tension, which is affected by SP-B and SP-C. Compared with a control group, significant changes in the BALF surface tension and the concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D were observed in rats exposed to NiO nanoparticles, but not in those exposed to fullerenes. Surface tension and the levels of surfactant phospholipids and proteins were also significantly different in rats exposed to MWCNTs. The concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D and BALF surface tension were correlated significantly with the polymorphonuclear neutrophil counts in the BALF. These results suggest that pulmonary surfactant components can be used as measures of lung inflammation.

  16. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to l...

  17. Investigation of a polyether trisiloxane surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to their adaptability and high efficiency compared to traditional carbon based surfactants, silicone surfactants are a success in many different applications, from pesticides to cosmetics, polyurethane foam, textile and car care products. In spite of those numerous applications, no analytical method existed for their trace determination in environmental samples and no data have been available regarding their environmental occurrence and fate. An analytical method for the trace ana...

  18. Protein thermal denaturation is modulated by central residues in the protein structure network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Valquiria P; Ikegami, Cecília M; Arantes, Guilherme M; Marana, Sandro R

    2016-03-01

    Network structural analysis, known as residue interaction networks or graphs (RIN or RIG, respectively) or protein structural networks or graphs (PSN or PSG, respectively), comprises a useful tool for detecting important residues for protein function, stability, folding and allostery. In RIN, the tertiary structure is represented by a network in which residues (nodes) are connected by interactions (edges). Such structural networks have consistently presented a few central residues that are important for shortening the pathways linking any two residues in a protein structure. To experimentally demonstrate that central residues effectively participate in protein properties, mutations were directed to seven central residues of the β-glucosidase Sfβgly (β-D-glucoside glucohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.21). These mutations reduced the thermal stability of the enzyme, as evaluated by changes in transition temperature (Tm ) and the denaturation rate at 45 °C. Moreover, mutations directed to the vicinity of a central residue also caused significant decreases in the Tm of Sfβgly and clearly increased the unfolding rate constant at 45 °C. However, mutations at noncentral residues or at surrounding residues did not affect the thermal stability of Sfβgly. Therefore, the data reported in the present study suggest that the perturbation of the central residues reduced the stability of the native structure of Sfβgly. These results are in agreement with previous findings showing that networks are robust, whereas attacks on central nodes cause network failure. Finally, the present study demonstrates that central residues underlie the functional properties of proteins.

  19. Serum-surfactant SP-D correlates inversely to lung function in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Holmskov, Uffe; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) affects the lungs causing infections and inflammation. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an innate defense lectin primarily secreted in the lungs. We investigated the influence of the SP-D Met11Thr polymorphism on CF lung function; and serum SP-D as a marker for CF...

  20. Severe adverse effects related to dermal exposure to a glyphosate-surfactant herbicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, T P; Madsen, P V; Ebbehøj, N E

    2013-01-01

    This is a case of severe chemical burns following prolonged accidental exposure to a glyphosate-surfactant herbicide. The patient developed local swelling, bullae and exuding wounds. Neurological impairment followed affecting finger flexion and sensation with reduced nerve conduction. Imaging...... revealed oedema of the soft tissue and juxta-articular osteopenia, and a causal relationship to exposure is suggested....

  1. Spinodal Decomposition in Mixtures Containing Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenekvitz, J.

    1998-03-01

    Spinodal decomposition in mixtures containing two immiscible liquids (A and B) plus surfactant was investigated using a recently developed (J. Melenkevitz and S. H. Javadpour, J. Chem. Phys., 107, 623 (1997).) 3-component Ginzburg-Landau model. The time dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations governing the evolution of structure were numerically integrated in 2-dimensions. We found the growth rate of the average domain size, R(t), decreased with increasing surfactant concentration over a wide range of relative amounts of A and B. This can be attributed to the surfactant accumulating at the growing interface between the immiscible liquids, which leads to a reduction in the surface tension. At late times, the growth rate was noticeably altered when thermal fluctuations were added to the numerical simulations. In this case, power law behavior was observed for R(t) at late times, R(t) ~ t^α, with the exponent α decreasing as the amount of surfactant increased. The dynamics at early times were determined by linearizing the TDGL equations about a uniformly mixed state. The growth rate at ealry times was found to be strongly dependent on the model parameters describing the surfactant miscibility in A and B and the surfactant strength. Comparison with recent measurements on SBR / PB mixtures with added PB-SBR diblock copolymer will also be presented.

  2. Performance of some surfactants as wetting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, M.N.; El-Shanny, O.A.A. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute (EPRI), Cairo (Egypt). Evaluation and Analysis Dept.

    2005-12-01

    The wetting power of anionic surfactant: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and nonionic surfactants: polyoxyethelene(14)monolaurate [La(EO){sub 14}] and polyoxyethelene(14)monoeleate [OI(EO){sub 14}] has been studied to determine their performance as wetting agents. The study reveals that the nonionic compound with a long hydrophobic chain exhibits higher wettability than the shorter one when used at very low cocentrations (below CMC) and the reverse is shown with high concentrations (above CMC). the wetting power of the investigated surfactants increases as the CMC values increases. In case of the nonionic compounds and at surfactant concentrations equal their CMC values, OI(EO){sub 14} shows a higher wetting power than La(EO){sub 14} while is possesses a lower HLB value. The anionic surfactant shows an optimum wetting in comparison with the tested nonionic one. The wettability of all the investigated samples increases as the surface tension of their solutions increases to the allowed limit that can be reached in the presence of surfactant. (orig.)

  3. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Imbibition in an originally oil-wet 2D capillary is the fastest in the case of Alf-38 and slowest in the case of DTAB (among the surfactants studied). Force of adhesion studies and contact angle measurements show that greater wettability alteration is possible with these anionic surfactants than the cationic surfactant studied. The water imbibition rate does not increase monotonically with an increase in the surfactant concentration. A numerical model has been developed that fits the rate of imbibition. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  4. Evaluation of Surfactant Effects on Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Khalessi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: One of the standard therapies in neonates with severe respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is surfactant administration in early course of therapy that cause reduction in mortality, pneumothorax and need to mechanical ventilation. In this study that was carried out in Aliasghar Hospital NICU in 1994-1995 & 2001-2002, the goal was to compare two groups of neonates with severe RDS that had been ventilated in the first 24 hours but one group had received surfactant and the other group (7 years ago was deprived of this substance. Materials & Methods: In our study, 36 neonates that received surfactant and 52 neonates with only mechanical ventilation therapy were compared. Data collected and analyzed using SPSS.Results: We found that mortality in patients with surfactant administration was significantly lower compared to the second group who did not receive surfactant. There were not any significant differences in incidences of HIV, pneumothorax, sepsis, and PDA and also course of hospitalization and need to ventilation between two groups. Conclusion: As a result, all of these findings reflect obligatory surfactant administration in sever RDS in NICU under observation of an educated expert.

  5. Nonlinear water waves with soluble surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Gary; Dowling, David; Schultz, William

    1998-11-01

    The hydrodynamic effects of surfactants have fascinated scientists for generations. This presentation describes an experimental investigation into the influence of a soluble surfactant on nonlinear capillary-gravity waves in the frequency range from 12 to 20 Hz. Waves were generated in a plexiglass wave tank (254 cm long, 30.5 cm wide, and 18 cm deep) with a triangular plunger wave maker. The tank was filled with carbon- and particulate-filtered water into which the soluble surfactant Triton-X-100® was added in known amounts. Wave slope was measured nonintrusively with a digital camera running at 225 fps by monitoring the position of light beams which passed up through the bottom of the tank, out through the wavy surface, and onto a white screen. Wave slope data were reduced to determine wave damping and the frequency content of the wave train. Both were influenced by the presence of the surfactant. Interestingly, a subharmonic wave occurring at one-sixth the paddle-driving frequency was found only when surfactant was present and the paddle was driven at amplitudes high enough to produce nonlinear waves in clean water. Although the origins of this subharmonic wave remain unclear, it appears to be a genuine manifestation of the combined effects of the surfactant and nonlinearity.

  6. Nonsurgical Transurethral Radiofrequency Collagen Denaturation: Results at Three Years after Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise M. Elser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess treatment efficacy and quality of life in women with stress urinary incontinence 3 years after treatment with nonsurgical transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation. Methods. This prospective study included 139 women with stress urinary incontinence due to bladder outlet hypermobility. Radiofrequency collagen denaturation was performed using local anesthesia in an office setting. Assessments included incontinence quality of life (I-QOL and urogenital distress inventory (UDI-6 instruments. Results. In total, 139 women were enrolled and 136 women were treated (mean age, 47 years. At 36 months, intent-to-treat analysis (n=139 revealed significant improvements in quality of life. Mean I-QOL score improved 17 points from baseline (P=.0004, while mean UDI-6 score improved (decreased 19 points (P=.0005. Conclusions. Transurethral collagen denaturation is a low-risk, office-based procedure that results in durable quality-of-life improvements in a significant proportion of women for as long as 3 years.

  7. Statistical mechanics of the denatured state of a protein using replica-averaged metadynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2014-06-25

    The characterization of denatured states of proteins is challenging because the lack of permanent structure in these states makes it difficult to apply to them standard methods of structural biology. In this work we use all-atom replica-averaged metadynamics (RAM) simulations with NMR chemical shift restraints to determine an ensemble of structures representing an acid-denatured state of the 86-residue protein ACBP. This approach has enabled us to reach convergence in the free energy landscape calculations, obtaining an ensemble of structures in relatively accurate agreement with independent experimental data used for validation. By observing at atomistic resolution the transient formation of native and non-native structures in this acid-denatured state of ACBP, we rationalize the effects of single-point mutations on the folding rate, stability, and transition-state structures of this protein, thus characterizing the role of the unfolded state in determining the folding process.

  8. EQUIVALENCY OF FOULING THICKNESS WITH DENATURED Β-LG IN HEATING OF MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Molina-Pérez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an approach to match the foaling thickness of dairy food and the concentration of denatured β-lg (β-lactoglobuline by a mathematical model. This includes, on the one hand, the dynamic simulation of fouling and, on the other hand, the generation of denatured β-lg under a kinetic model. In both cases a transient energy balance is developed, including the rigorous calculation of the global coefficient, and the properties by the Choi-Okos model. The solution was obtained by a fourth order Runge-Kutta written in Excel’s Macro language Visual Basic. The equivalence concluded with a model obtained by a non-linear multiple regression that relates the concentration of denatured β-lg and the foaling thickness. This methodology is applicable to analysis equipment cleaning in which kinetic cleaning has equality by reduction of the foaling thickness.

  9. Stabilizing Effect of Various Polyols on the Native and the Denatured States of Glucoamylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Suleiman Zaroog

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Different spectral probes were employed to study the stabilizing effect of various polyols, such as, ethylene glycol (EG, glycerol (GLY, glucose (GLC and trehalose (TRE on the native (N, the acid-denatured (AD and the thermal-denatured (TD states of Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (GA. Polyols induced both secondary and tertiary structural changes in the AD state of enzyme as reflected from altered circular dichroism (CD, tryptophan (Trp, and 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS fluorescence characteristics. Thermodynamic analysis of the thermal denaturation curve of native GA suggested significant increase in enzyme stability in the presence of GLC, TRE, and GLY (in decreasing order while EG destabilized it. Furthermore, CD and fluorescence characteristics of the TD state at 71°C in the presence of polyols showed greater effectiveness of both GLC and TRE in inducing native-like secondary and tertiary structures compared to GLY and EG.

  10. Inhibition of thermal induced protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Murad Ali; Khan, Haroon; Rauf, Abdul; Ben Hadda, Taibi

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the in vitro inhibition of protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides including 20β hydroxy-1-oxo(22R)-witha-2,5,24 trienolide (1), (20R,22R-14α,20α)-dihydroxy-1-oxowitha-2,5,16,24 tetraenolide (2). The results showed that the extract/fractions of the plant evoked profound inhibitory effect on thermal-induced protein denaturation. The chloroform fraction caused the most dominant attenuation of 68% at 500 μg/mL. The bioactivity-guided isolation from chloroform fraction led to the isolation of compounds 1 and 2 that showed profound protein inhibition with 78.05% and 80.43% effect at 500 μg/mL and thus strongly complimented the activity of extract/fractions. In conclusion, extract/fractions of W. somnifera possessed strong inhibition of protein denaturation that can be attributed to these isolated withanolides.

  11. Nonsurgical transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation: results at three years after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Denise M; Mitchell, Gretchen K; Miklos, John R; Nickell, Kevin G; Cline, Kevin; Winkler, Harvey; Wells, W Glen

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To assess treatment efficacy and quality of life in women with stress urinary incontinence 3 years after treatment with nonsurgical transurethral radiofrequency collagen denaturation. Methods. This prospective study included 139 women with stress urinary incontinence due to bladder outlet hypermobility. Radiofrequency collagen denaturation was performed using local anesthesia in an office setting. Assessments included incontinence quality of life (I-QOL) and urogenital distress inventory (UDI-6) instruments. Results. In total, 139 women were enrolled and 136 women were treated (mean age, 47 years). At 36 months, intent-to-treat analysis (n = 139) revealed significant improvements in quality of life. Mean I-QOL score improved 17 points from baseline (P = .0004), while mean UDI-6 score improved (decreased) 19 points (P = .0005). Conclusions. Transurethral collagen denaturation is a low-risk, office-based procedure that results in durable quality-of-life improvements in a significant proportion of women for as long as 3 years.

  12. Lung remodeling in aging surfactant protein D deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Arkenau, Martina; Knudsen, Lars; Wedekind, Dirk; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-02-07

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of lipids and proteins at the air-liquid interface of alveoli, prevents the lungs from collapsing due to surface tension. One constituent is surfactant-associated protein-D (SP-D), a protein involved in surfactant homeostasis and innate immunity. Mice deficient in SP-D (SP-D (-/-)) has been described as developing a characteristic phenotype which affects the surfactant system (including changes in the intra-cellular and intra-alveolar surfactant pool, alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages), lung architecture and its inflammatory state (development of an emphysema-like pathology, inflammatory cell infiltration). Furthermore, it has been described that these mice develop sub-pleural fibrosis and a thickening of alveolar septal walls. The aim of the present study was to systematically investigate the long term progression of this phenotype with special focus on parenchymal remodeling, whether there are progressive emphysematous changes and whether there is progressive septal wall thickening which might indicate the development of pulmonary fibrosis. By means of design-based stereology and light microscopy, lungs of wild type (wt) and SP-D (-/-) mice of four age groups (3, 6, 12 and ∼18 months) were investigated. The data do not suggest a relevant spontaneous pro-fibrotic remodeling or a destructive process in the aging SP-D (-/-) mice. We demonstrated neither a significant destructive emphysema nor significant thickening of alveolar septal walls, but the data suggest an increase in the number weighted mean alveolar volume in aging SP-D (-/-) mice without loss of alveoli or alveolar epithelial surface area per lung. This increase may reflect over-distension due to altered mechanical properties of alveoli. In the light of our findings and data from the literature, the question arises as to whether a lack of SP-D promotes structural changes in the lung which have been described as being associated with aging lungs

  13. Biosurfactants and surfactants interacting with membranes and proteins: Same but different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-04-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. For several decades they have attracted interest as promising alternatives to current petroleum-based surfactants. Aside from their green profile, they have remarkably low critical micelle concentrations, reduce the air/water surface tension to very low levels and are excellent emulsifiers, all of which make them comparable or superior to their synthetic counterparts. These remarkable physical properties derive from their more complex chemical structures in which hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are not as clearly separated as chemical surfactants but have a more mosaic distribution of polarity as well as branched or circular structures. This allows the lipopeptide surfactin to adopt spherical structures to facilitate dense packing at interfaces. They are also more complex. Glycolipid BS, e.g. rhamnolipids (RL) and sophorolipids, are produced biologically as mixtures which vary in the size and saturation of the hydrophobic region as well as modifications in the hydrophilic headgroup, such as the number of sugar groups and different levels of acetylation, leading to variable surface-active properties. Their amphiphilicity allows RL to insert easily into membranes at sub-cmc concentrations to modulate membrane structure and extract lipopolysaccharides, leading to extensive biofilm remodeling in vivo, sometimes in collaboration with hydrophobic RL precursors. Thanks to their mosaicity, even anionic BS like RL only bind weakly to proteins and show much lower denaturing potency, even supporting membrane protein refolding. Nevertheless, they can promote protein degradation by proteases e.g. by neutralizing positive charges, which together with their biofilm-combating properties makes them very promising detergent surfactants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  14. Synthesis of high quality MCM-48 with binary cationic-nonionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Quanzhi; Wang, Lina; Chu, Jinglong; Qu, Jinkui; Li, Shaohua; Qi, Tao

    2010-05-18

    Highly ordered MCM-48 was synthesized in the hydrothermal system of a mixture of cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and nonionic poly(ethylene glycol) monooctylphenyl ether (Tx-100) using water glass as the silicon source. The effect of various factors, such as the amount of surfactant, CTAB/Tx-100, Si source, crystallization temperature, and crystallization time, on the synthesis were discussed in detail. The local effective surfactant packing parameter theory and the charge balance theory were used to explain the reason that various factors can affect the product structure reasonably. Especially, the role of Tx-100 was expounded. The optimum synthesis conditions for MCM-48 were obtained.

  15. Effect of ethanol denaturant on gasoline RVP (revised). Topical report, June 21, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1993-12-01

    The Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 require further reduction in gasoline Reid vapor pressure (RVP) to reduce pollution. This research focused on characterizing the effect of ethanol denaturant and water on the RVP of the final ethanol-blended fuel. Anectdotal stories tell of up to a 0.5-psi effect of ethanol denaturant on the RVP of the finished ethanol-blended gasoline. Additionally, earlier Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) data indicated water could have a significant effect on the RVP. It was necessary to scientifically verify these effects using acceptable laboratory protocols.

  16. Refolding of Denatured/Reduced Lysozyme Using Weak-Cation Exchange Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan WANG; Bo Lin GONG; Xin Du GENG

    2003-01-01

    Oxidative refolding of the denatured/reduced lysozyme was investigated by using weak-cation exchange chromatography (WCX). The stationary phase of WCX binds to the reduced lysozyme and prevented it from forming intermolecular aggregates. At the same time urea and ammonium sulfate were added to the mobile phase to increase the elution strength for lysozyme. Ammonium sulfate can more stabilize the native protein than a common eluting agent, sodium chloride. Refolding of lysozyme by using this WCX is successfully. It was simply carried out to obtain a completely and correctly refolding of the denatured lysozyme at high concentration of 20.0 mg/mL.

  17. Surprisingly high stability of barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, towards denaturant, heat and proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Winther, J R

    2001-01-01

    Barley LTP1 belongs to a large family of plant proteins termed non-specific lipid transfer proteins. The in vivo function of these proteins is unknown, but it has been suggested that they are involved in responses towards stresses such as pathogens, drought, heat, cold and salt. Also, the proteins...... have been suggested as transporters of monomers for cutin synthesis. We have analysed the stability of LTP1 towards denaturant, heat and proteases and found it to be a highly stable protein, which apparently does not denature at temperatures up to 100 degrees C. This high stability may be important...

  18. Effects of Glucides on Thermal Denaturation and Coagulation of Whey Proteins Studied by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongo Antoine, Etou; Abena, A. A.; Gbeassor, M.; Chaveron, H.

    The thermal coagulation of whey proteins concentrates was inhibited by various glucides. The disaccharides, saccharose and lactose, were most effective and the amino sugar, glucosamine, least effective in this respect. Ultraviolet absorption and light-scattering measurements on thermal denaturation and coagulation of both unfractionated and individual whey proteins (α-lactalbumin, ß-lactoglobulin and bovine serum albumin) showed that saccharose promotes the denaturation of these proteins but inhibits their subsequent coagulation. These results are interpreted in terms of the effect of saccharose on the hydrophobic interactions between solvent and protein.

  19. Silicone antifoam performance enhancement by nonionic surfactants in potato medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiano, Steven P; Fey, Kenneth C

    2003-01-01

    The ability of a silicone antifoam to retard foaming in a liquor prepared from potatoes is enhanced by the addition of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants. The enhancement is non-linear for surfactant concentration, with all 12 surfactants tested possessing a concentration at which foam heights strongly diminish, referred to as the surfactant critical antifoaming concentration (SCAFC). SCAFCs vary between surfactants, with lower values indicating better mass efficiency of antifoaming enhancement. SCAFCs decrease with degree of ethoxylation and decrease with the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance for ethoxylated nonionic surfactants. Surfactant addition produces a mixed water-surface layer containing surfactant and surface-active components in the potato medium. Surface tension reduction does not correlate well with antifoam performance enhancement. A model is proposed where surfactant adsorption promotes desorption of surface-active potato medium components from the water surface. At the SCAFC, desorption is not complete, yet the rate of bubble rupture is sufficiently enhanced to provide excellent foam control.

  20. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  1. Wormlike micelles in mixed amino acid surfactant/nonionic surfactant aqueous systems and the effect of added electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Rodriguez-Abreu, Carlos; Aramaki, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    The formation of viscoelastic wormlike micelles in mixed amino acid surfactant/nonionic surfactant aqueous systems in the presence of different counterions and salts is reported, and the effects of the different electrolytes on the rheological behavior are discussed. N-dodecanoylglutamic acid (LAD) is neutralized with biologically relevant L-lysine and L-arginine to obtain anionic surfactants (LAD-Lys2, LAD-Arg2) which form aqueous micellar solutions at 25 degrees C. Addition of a nonionic surfactant, tri-ethyleneglycol mono n-tetradecyl ether (C14EO3), to the aqueous solutions of both LAD-Lys2 and LAD-Arg2 causes the zero-shear viscosity (eta(0)) to increase with C14EO3 concentration gradually at first, and then sharply, indicating one-dimensional growth of the aggregates and eventual formation of entangled wormlike micelles. Further addition of C14EO3 ultimately leads to phase separation of liquid crystals. Such a phase separation, which limits the maximum attainable viscosity, takes place at lower C14EO3 concentrations for LAD-Lys2 compared to LAD-Arg2 systems. It was found that the rheological behavior of micellar solutions is significantly affected by the addition of Na+X(-) salts (X = Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), NO3(-)). The maximum viscosities obtained for the systems with added salt are all higher than that of the salt-free system, and the onset of wormlike micelle formation shift towards lower nonionic surfactant concentrations upon addition of electrolyte. The maximum attainable thickening effect of anions increases in the order NO3(-)>I(-)>Br(-)>Cl(-). The effect of temperature was also investigated. Phase separation takes place at certain temperature, which depends on the type of anion in the added salt, and decreases in the order I(-)>NO3(-)>Br(-) approximately equal Cl(-), in agreement with Hofmeister's series in terms of amphiphile solubility. The thermoresponsive rheological behavior was also found to be highly dependent on the type of anion, and anomalous

  2. Surfactant nebulization versus instillation during high frequency ventilation in surfactant-deficient rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1998-01-01

    Surfactant nebulization improves lung function at low alveolar doses of surfactant. However, efficiency of nebulization is low, and lung deposition seems to depend on lung aeration. High frequency ventilation (HFV) has been shown to improve lung aeration. We hypothesize that the combination of HFV a

  3. Critical interaction strength for surfactant-induced mesomorphic structures in polymer-surfactant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruokolainen, J.; Torkkeli, M.; Serimaa, R.; Vahvaselka, S.; Saariaho, M.; ten Brinke, G.; Ikkala, O.; Vahvaselkä, Sakari

    1996-01-01

    The critical interaction strength to induce mesomorphic structures in flexible polymers by complexing with surfactants is determined by using surfactants with different hydrogen-bonding strengths;. Two essential requirements have to be satisfied: (i) the association has to be strong enough, otherwis

  4. Surfactant Enhanced Electroremediation of Phenanthrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佘鹏; 杨建刚; 等

    2003-01-01

    Removal of hydrophobic organic contaminants(HOCs) form soil of low permeability by electroremediation was investigated by using phenanthrene and kaolinite as a model system.Tween 80 was added into the purging solution in order to enhance the solubility of phenanthrene.The effects of pH on the adsorption of phenanthrene and Tween 80 on kaolinite and the magnitude of ζ-potential of kaolinite were examined,respectively.The effects of electric field strength indicated by electric current on the electroremediation behavior,including the pH of purging solution,the conductivity,phenanthrene concentration and flow rate of effluent,were experimentally investigated,repectively,In case of an electric field of 25mA applied for 72 hours,over 90% of phenanthrene was removed from 424g(dry mass)of kaolinite at an energy consumption of 0.148kW.h.The experimental results described in present study show that the addition of surfactant into purging solution greatly enhances the removel of HOCs by electroremediation.

  5. Effect of anionic surfactants on the process of Fenton degradation of methyl orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C W; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    Fenton process has been shown to be very successful to remove dyes from water. However, the influence of other constituents in dyeing industry wastewater, such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS) surfactants, has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of SDS surfactant on the kinetics of Methyl Orange degradation undergoing Fenton process was investigated. Results show that Methyl Orange degradation rate decreased as SDS concentration increased, which was attributed to the consumption of hydroxyl radicals (OH) by surfactants and the formation of Methyl Orange-SDS complex. No evidence was found that the Methyl Orange degradation pathway was affected by the presence of SDS. The kinetics modelling indicates the reaction was the first-order reaction to Methyl Orange.

  6. Effect of surfactants and temperature on germination and vegetative growth of Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzy A. Mwamburi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Three non-ionic surfactants: Tween20, Tween80 and Breakthru® were screened for their effects on spore germination and mycelial growth rates and for their influence on three isolates of Beauveria bassianaspore germination at various temperatures. Tween20 and Tween80 were compatible with all the B. bassiana isolates in the germination studies, but inhibited germination at higher surfactant concentrations, irrespective of the conidial concentrations. Breakthru® had an inhibitory effect on germination even at the lowest concentration of 0.1% on all the B. bassiana isolates. The effects of the surfactants on spore germination did not correspond with their effects on colony growth. Conidial viability within the same formulation declined significantly with increases in temperature, irrespective of the surfactant. The optimal temperature for conidial germination of B. bassiana isolates was approximately 25 °C with an upper limit at 30 °C. Isolate 7320 was identified as the least affected by the different surfactants. This isolate was able to germinate rapidly in a broad temperature range of 25–30 °C after 24 h, this characteristic being an essential factor in controlling house fly populations in poultry houses.

  7. Effect of surfactants and temperature on germination and vegetative growth of Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwamburi, Lizzy A; Laing, Mark D; Miller, Ray M

    2015-03-01

    Three non-ionic surfactants: Tween20, Tween80 and Breakthru (®) were screened for their effects on spore germination and mycelial growth rates and for their influence on three isolates of Beauveria bassiana spore germination at various temperatures. Tween20 and Tween80 were compatible with all the B. bassiana isolates in the germination studies, but inhibited germination at higher surfactant concentrations, irrespective of the conidial concentrations . Breakthru (®) had an inhibitory effect on germination even at the lowest concentration of 0.1% on all the B. bassiana isolates. The effects of the surfactants on spore germination did not correspond with their effects on colony growth. Conidial viability within the same formulation declined significantly with increases in temperature, irrespective of the surfactant. The optimal temperature for conidial germination of B. bassiana isolates was approximately 25 °C with an upper limit at 30 °C. Isolate 7320 was identified as the least affected by the different surfactants. This isolate was able to germinate rapidly in a broad temperature range of 25-30 °C after 24 h, this characteristic being an essential factor in controlling house fly populations in poultry houses.

  8. Selection of surfactant in remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by comparison of surfactant effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Yueming; Chen, Tao; Li, Linhui; Wang, Guanzhu

    2014-01-01

    With an aim to select the most appropriate surfactant for remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, the performance of nonionic surfactants Tween80, TX-100, and Brij35 and one anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) in enhancement of DDT water solubility and desorption of DDT from contaminated soil and their adsorption onto soil and ecotoxicities were investigated in this study. Tween80 had the highest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT among the four experimental surfactants. The adsorption loss of surfactants onto soil followed the order of TX-100 > Tween80 > Brij35 > SDBS. The ecotoxicity of Tween80 to ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was lowest. The overall performance considering about the above four aspects suggested that Tween80 should be selected for the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, because Tween80 had the greatest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT, less adsorption loss onto soil, and the lowest ecotoxicity in this experiment.

  9. Microemulsion-based lycopene extraction: Effect of surfactants, co-surfactants and pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2016-04-15

    Lycopene is a potent antioxidant that has received extensive attention recently. Due to the challenges encountered with current methods of lycopene extraction using hazardous solvents, industry calls for a greener, safer and more efficient process. The main purpose of present study was application of microemulsion technique to extract lycopene from tomato pomace. In this respect, the effect of eight different surfactants, four different co-surfactants, and ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments on lycopene extraction efficiency was examined. Experimental results revealed that application of combined ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments, saponin as a natural surfactant, and glycerol as a co-surfactant, in the bicontinuous region of microemulsion was the optimal experimental conditions resulting in a microemulsion containing 409.68±0.68 μg/glycopene. The high lycopene concentration achieved, indicates that microemulsion technique, using a low-cost natural surfactant could be promising for a simple and safe separation of lycopene from tomato pomace and possibly from tomato industrial wastes.

  10. A Review on Progress in QSPR Studies for Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on recent progress in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR studies of surfactants and applications of various molecular descriptors. QSPR studies on critical micelle concentration (cmc and surface tension (γ of surfactants are introduced. Studies on charge distribution in ionic surfactants by quantum chemical calculations and its effects on the structures and properties of the colloids of surfactants are also reviewed. The trends of QSPR studies on cloud point (for nonionic surfactants, biodegradation potential and some other properties of surfactants are evaluated .

  11. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  12. Alcohol--Induced Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Complex Coacervate Systems: Characterization and Applications in Enzyme and Protein Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati Moshtaghin, Mahboubeh

    The focus of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of the newly discovered surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervate (SPCC) systems induced by fluoroalcohol/acid as well as short chain aliphatic alcohol; and to elucidate their applications in extraction and enrichment of proteins and enzyme. We have discovered that fluoroalcohols and --acids induce complex coacervation and phase separation in the aqueous mixtures of oppositely charged anionic polyelectrolytes; specifically, sodium salts of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid and cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) over a broad range of concentrations of mole fractions of the oppositely charged amphiphiles. Accordingly, these new classes of coacervators will significantly broaden the scope and facilitate engineering of new coacervate phases. Toward these goals, we have inspected the formation of surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervates in the presence of fluoroalcohols namely hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Trifluoroethanol (TFE). Furthermore, the extent of coacervation as a function of concentrations the system components, and charge ratios of the oppositely charged amphiphiles has been investigated. Polyelectrolytes are considered to be milder reagents, as compared to surfactants, regarding proteins denaturation. This highlights the importance of a detailed investigation of the efficiency of our coacervate systems for extraction and preconcentration of proteins and enzymes, especially, when the biological activity of the extracted proteins needs to be maintained based on the objectives mentioned above, the results of the investigations have been organized in four chapters. In Chapter II, the phase behavior of the FA-SPCC will be investigated. The objective is to examine the phase behavior and phase properties with respect to the extent of coacervation in different solution conditions. In particular, the effects of different solution variables such as concentration

  13. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-14

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity - as described by the Gaussian network model - with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  14. Screening for mutations in the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase gene using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, L; Ged, C; Hombrados, I;

    1999-01-01

    , confirming the heterogeneity of the underlying genetic defects of these diseases. We have established a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) assay for mutation detection in the UROD gene, enabling the simultaneous screening for known and unknown mutations. The established assay has proved able...

  15. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-01

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity — as described by the Gaussian network model — with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  16. Lysozyme Thermal Denaturation and Self-Interaction: Four Integrated Thermodynamic Experiments for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Schaefle, Nathaniel J.; Muth, Gregory W.; Miessler, Gary L.; Clark, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of an effort to infuse our physical chemistry laboratory with biologically relevant, investigative experiments, we detail four integrated thermodynamic experiments that characterize the denaturation (or unfolding) and self-interaction of hen egg white lysozyme as a function of pH and ionic strength. Students first use Protein Explorer to…

  17. Denaturing Effects of Urea and Guanidine Hydrochloride on Hyperthermophilic Esterase from Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The changes in the activity and the conformation of the hyperthermophilic esterase derived from aerobic thermophilic Aeropyrumpernix K1 (APE1547) were studied during denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)and urea. The denaturation course of APE1547 was followed by the steady-state and time resolved fluorescence methods. An increase in the denaturant concentration in the denatured system can significantly enhance the inactivation and unfolding of APE1547. The enzyme can be completely inactivated with a urea concentration of 2. 7 mol/L or a GdnHCl concentration of 7.5 mol/L. The fluorescence emission maximum of the enzyme protein red shifts in magnitude to a maximum value(355 nm) when the concentration of GdnHCl is 5.1 mol/L. The experimental results indicate that APE1547 has a high resistance to urea. Unfolding of APE1547 in GdnHCl(4.2-6.0 mol/L) was shown to be an irreversible process. The present results indicate that the ion pairs in this protein may be a key factor for the stability of this esterase.

  18. Reversible Dimerization of Acid-Denatured ACBP Controlled by Helix A4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fieber, Wolfgang; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; Meldal, Morten Peter;

    2005-01-01

    of dimers and revealed a cooperative stabilization of helix A4 in this process. This emphasizes its special role in the structure formation in the denatured state of ACBP. No dimers are formed in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride, which underlines the fundamental difference between the nature...

  19. Affinity chromatography of chaperones based on denatured proteins: Analysis of cell lysates of different origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, N Yu; Sikorskaya, E V; Marchenkov, V V; Kashparov, I A; Semisotnov, G V

    2016-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in folding, oligomerization, transport, and degradation of numerous cellular proteins. Most of chaperones are heat-shock proteins (HSPs). A number of diseases of various organisms are accompanied by changes in the structure and functional activity of chaperones, thereby revealing their vital importance. One of the fundamental properties of chaperones is their ability to bind polypeptides lacking a rigid spatial structure. Here, we demonstrate that affinity chromatography using sorbents with covalently attached denatured proteins allows effective purification and quantitative assessment of their bound protein partners. Using pure Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL (Hsp60), the capacity of denatured pepsin or lysozyme-based affinity sorbents was evaluated as 1 mg and 1.4 mg of GroEL per 1 ml of sorbent, respectively. Cell lysates of bacteria (E. coli, Thermus thermophilus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis), archaea (Halorubrum lacusprofundi) as well as the lysate of rat liver mitochondria were analyzed using affinity carrier with denatured lysozyme. It was found that, apart from Hsp60, other proteins with a molecular weight of about 100, 50, 40, and 20 kDa are able to interact with denatured lysozyme.

  20. Mesoscopic modeling of DNA denaturation rates: Sequence dependence and experimental comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlen, Oda, E-mail: oda.dahlen@ntnu.no; Erp, Titus S. van, E-mail: titus.van.erp@ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Høgskoleringen 5, Realfagbygget D3-117 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-06-21

    Using rare event simulation techniques, we calculated DNA denaturation rate constants for a range of sequences and temperatures for the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model with two different parameter sets. We studied a larger variety of sequences compared to previous studies that only consider DNA homopolymers and DNA sequences containing an equal amount of weak AT- and strong GC-base pairs. Our results show that, contrary to previous findings, an even distribution of the strong GC-base pairs does not always result in the fastest possible denaturation. In addition, we applied an adaptation of the PBD model to study hairpin denaturation for which experimental data are available. This is the first quantitative study in which dynamical results from the mesoscopic PBD model have been compared with experiments. Our results show that present parameterized models, although giving good results regarding thermodynamic properties, overestimate denaturation rates by orders of magnitude. We believe that our dynamical approach is, therefore, an important tool for verifying DNA models and for developing next generation models that have higher predictive power than present ones.

  1. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis to study bacterial community structure in pockets of periodontitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijnge, V.; Harmsen, H.J.M.; Kleinfelder, J.W.; Rest, M.E. van der; Degener, J.E.; Welling, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria are involved in the onset and progression of periodontitis. A promising molecular technique, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), to study microbial population dynamics in the subgingival pocket is presented. Twenty-three samples were taken from the subgingival pockets of nine pa

  2. 27 CFR 19.57 - Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recovery and reuse of denatured spirits in manufacturing processes. 19.57 Section 19.57 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Activities Not Subject to This Part § 19.57 Recovery and reuse...

  3. Manifestations of native topology in the denatured state ensemble of Rhodopseudomonas palustris cytochrome c'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Tanveer A; Schaeffer, R Dustin; Daggett, Valerie; Bowler, Bruce E

    2011-02-15

    To provide insight into the role of local sequence in the nonrandom coil behavior of the denatured state, we have extended our measurements of histidine-heme loop formation equilibria for cytochrome c' to 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. We observe that there is some reduction in the scatter about the best fit line of loop stability versus loop size data in 6 M versus 3 M guanidine hydrochloride, but the scatter is not eliminated. The scaling exponent, ν(3), of 2.5 ± 0.2 is also similar to that found previously in 3 M guanidine hydrochloride (2.6 ± 0.3). Rates of histidine-heme loop breakage in the denatured state of cytochrome c' show that some histidine-heme loops are significantly more persistent than others at both 3 and 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Rates of histidine-heme loop formation more closely approximate random coil behavior. This observation indicates that heterogeneity in the denatured state ensemble results mainly from contact persistence. When mapped onto the structure of cytochrome c', the histidine-heme loops with slow breakage rates coincide with chain reversals between helices 1 and 2 and between helices 2 and 3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the unfolding of cytochrome c' at 498 K show that these reverse turns persist in the unfolded state. Thus, these portions of the primary structure of cytochrome c' set up the topology of cytochrome c' in the denatured state, predisposing the protein to fold efficiently to its native structure.

  4. INTERACTION BETWEEN SURFACTANT AND COLLAGEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of collagen fibres (made from Beef Achilles tendons )with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS),sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS),cetylpyridinium bromide(CPB)and Igepal CA-720 were studied.Sorptions isotherms of all ionic surfactants under different reaction conditions were found out.At suitable conditions S-isotherms were obtained,while under isoeletric conditions isotherms were logaritmic.Igepal had no sorption.The interaction of surfactants with collagen is connected with its mass changes. Changes depend on reaction conditions,namely pH and ionic strenght of reaction solution.Degree of swelling(αm)was used for the description of these changes.At pH=3,in absence SDBS and under low ionic strenghts,a high swelling was attained.An addition of SDBS to reaction mixture led to vigerous deswelling and when the bound amount of SDBS reached about 1 mmol.g-1 αm became independent on a futher bound SDBS.With higher ionic strenghts αm was independent on the equilibrium bound amount of SDBS.Under isoeletric conditions changes of αm were markedly smaller than in acid region and had the opposite character.%研究了十二烷基硫酸钠(SDS)、二十烷基苯磺酸钠(SDBS)、溴化十六烷基吡啶翁(CPB)和Igepal CA-720等表面活性剂与胶原(来源于牛跟腱)间的相互作用.发现了不同的反应条件下,上述离子性表面活性剂的吸附等温线,得到了适当条件下的吸附等温线,同时发现在等电条件下等温线呈对数关系,Igepal没有吸附.表面活性剂与胶原的作用情况与其质量的变化是相互关联的,这种变化取决于反应条件,即pH值和反应溶液中的离子强度,胶原的膨胀程度(am)被用来描述这种变化.在pH3.0,无SDBS存在且在低的离子强度下,胶原得到了大的膨胀:加入SDBS将会导致强烈的消肿作用,并且当胶原对SDBS的结合量达到1mmol/g时,am的值将不再随SDBS结合量的进一步增加而变化.在高的离子

  5. Alterations of alveolar type II cells and intraalveolar surfactant after bronchoalveolar lavage and perfluorocarbon ventilation. An electron microscopical and stereological study in the rat lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhardt Wolfram

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL has been used in animals to induce surfactant depletion and to study therapeutical interventions of subsequent respiratory insufficiency. Intratracheal administration of surface active agents such as perfluorocarbons (PFC can prevent the alveolar collapse in surfactant depleted lungs. However, it is not known how BAL or subsequent PFC administration affect the intracellular and intraalveolar surfactant pool. Methods Male wistar rats were surfactant depleted by BAL and treated for 1 hour by conventional mechanical ventilation (Lavaged-Gas, n = 5 or partial liquid ventilation with PF 5080 (Lavaged-PF5080, n = 5. For control, 10 healthy animals with gas (Healthy-Gas, n = 5 or PF5080 filled lungs (Healthy-PF5080, n = 5 were studied. A design-based stereological approach was used for quantification of lung parenchyma and the intracellular and intraalveolar surfactant pool at the light and electron microscopic level. Results Compared to Healthy-lungs, Lavaged-animals had more type II cells with lamellar bodies in the process of secretion and freshly secreted lamellar body-like surfactant forms in the alveoli. The fraction of alveolar epithelial surface area covered with surfactant and total intraalveolar surfactant content were significantly smaller in Lavaged-animals. Compared with Gas-filled lungs, both PF5080-groups had a significantly higher total lung volume, but no other differences. Conclusion After BAL-induced alveolar surfactant depletion the amount of intracellularly stored surfactant is about half as high as in healthy animals. In lavaged animals short time liquid ventilation with PF5080 did not alter intra- or extracellular surfactant content or subtype composition.

  6. Reversible denaturation of Brazil nut 2S albumin (Ber e1) and implication of structural destabilization on digestion by pepsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Gaspari, M.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.; Knol, E.F.; Hefle, S.L.; Jongh, H.H.J.de

    2005-01-01

    The high resistance of Brazil nut 2S albumin, previously identified as an allergen, against proteolysis by pepsin was examined in this work. Although the denaturation temperature of this protein exceeds the 110 °C at neutral pH, at low pH a fully reversible thermal denaturation was observed at ∼82 °

  7. Comparison of the fine structure of mitochondrial DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. carlsbergensis: electron microscopy of partially denatured molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C

    1976-01-01

    Denaturation-maps of mitochondrial DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. carlsbergensis have been derived from electron microscopic observations of partially denatured complete circular molecules and large fragments of these circles. The mitochondrial DNA from the two species differ by 6...

  8. Exogenous surfactant application in a rat lung ischemia reperfusion injury model: effects on edema formation and alveolar type II cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Joachim

    2008-01-01

    peribronchovascular edema. Morphological changes of alveolar type II cells due to I/R are not affected by surfactant treatment. The beneficial effects of exogenous surfactant therapy are related to the intraalveolar activity of the exogenous surfactant.

  9. Foaming behaviour of polymer-surfactant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes-MartInez, Alfredo [Departamento de Investigacion en PolImeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Maldonado, Amir [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 1626, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2007-06-20

    We study the effect of a non-ionic amphiphilic polymer (PEG-100 stearate also called Myrj 59) on the foaming behaviour of aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS). The SDS concentration was kept fixed while the Myrj 59 concentration was varied. Measurements of foamability, surface tension and electrical conductivity were carried out. The results show two opposite effects depending on the polymer concentration: foamability is higher when the Myrj 59 concentration is low; however, it decreases considerably when the polymer concentration is increased. This behaviour is due to the polymer adsorption at the air/liquid interface at lower polymer concentrations, and to the formation of a polymer-surfactant complex in the bulk at higher concentrations. The results are confirmed by surface tension and electrical conductivity measurements, which are interpreted in terms of the microstructure of the polymer-surfactant solutions. The observed behaviour is due to the amphiphilic nature of the studied polymer. The increased hydrophobicity of Myrj 59, compared to that of water-soluble polymers like PEG or PEO, increases its 'reactivity' towards SDS, i.e. the strength of its interaction with this anionic surfactant. Our results show that hydrophobically modified polymers have potential applications as additives in order to control the foaming properties of surfactant solutions.

  10. History of surfactant up to 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Remarkable insight into disturbed lung mechanics of preterm infants was gained in the 18th and 19th century by the founders of obstetrics and neonatology who not only observed respiratory failure but also designed devices to treat it. Surfactant research followed a splendid and largely logical growth curve. Pathological changes in the immature lung were characterized in Germany by Virchow in 1854 and by Hochheim in 1903. The Swiss physiologist von Neergard fully understood surfactant function in 1929, but his paper was ignored for 25 years. The physical properties of surfactant were recognized in the early 1950s from research on warfare chemicals by Pattle in Britain and by Radford and Clements in the United States. The causal relationship of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and surfactant deficiency was established in the USA by Avery and Mead in 1959. The Australian obstetrician Liggins induced lung maturity with glucocorticoids in 1972, but his discovery was not fully believed for another 20 years. A century of basic research was rewarded when Fujiwara introduced surfactant substitution in Japan in 1980 for treatment and prevention of RDS.

  11. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  12. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  13. 2-DE using hemi-fluorinated surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita-Geribaldi, Mireille; Thebault, Pascal; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frederic; Geribaldi, Serge

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis of hemi-fluorinated zwitterionic surfactants was realized and assessed for 2-DE, a powerful separation method for proteomic analysis. These new fluorinated amidosulfobetaine (FASB-p,m) were compared to their hydrocarbon counterparts amidosulfobetaine (ASB-n) characterized by a hydrophilic polar head, a hydrophobic and lipophilic tail, and an amido group as connector. The tail of these FASB surfactants was in part fluorinated resulting in the modulation of its lipophilicity (or oleophobicity). Their effect on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane showed a specific solubilization depending on the length of the hydrophobic part. A large number of polypeptide spots appeared in the 2-DE patterns by using FASB-p,m. The oleophobic character of these surfactants was confirmed by the fact that Band 3, a highly hydrophobic transmembrane protein, was not solubilized by these fluorinated structures. The corresponding pellet was very rich in Band 3 and could then be solubilized by using a strong detergent such as amidosulfobetaine with an alkyl tail containing 14 carbon atoms (ASB-14). Thus, these hemi-fluorinated surfactants appeared as powerful tools when used at the first step of a two-step solubilization strategy using a hydrocarbon homologous surfactant in the second step.

  14. Syntheses of surfactants from oleochemical epoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwel Siegfried

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugar-based surfactants were obtained in good yields (up to 100% under mild conditions (70°C, methanol or mixtures of methanol and water by ring-opening of terminal epoxides with aminopolyols, derived from glucose. Reaction of N-methyl glucamine with epoxides from even-numbered C4-C18 alpha-olefins or from terminal unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters leads to linear products, while corresponding reactions with N-dodecyl glucamine or glucamine yield surfactants with different Y-structures. Products obtained by conversion of omega-epoxy fatty acid methyl esters were saponificated with NaOH or hydrolyzed enzymatically to sodium salts or free acids respectively, which are amphoteric surfactants. Studies of the surfactants at different pH-values demonstrate different surface active properties in aqueous solutions. Critical micelle concentrations (c.m.c. in a range between 2 and 500mg/l and surface tensions of 25-40mN/m were measured for several of the synthesized sugar-based surfactants. The ring-opening products are rather poor foamers, whereas some of the corresponding hydrobromides show good foaming properties.

  15. Detection of the End Point Temperature of Thermal Denatured Protein in Fish and Chicken Meat Through SDS-PAGE Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hongwei; MAO Mao; LIANG Chengzhu; LIN Chao; XIANG Jianhai

    2009-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was applied in the detection of the end point temperature (EPT) of thermal denatured protein in fish and meat in this study. It was also used in studying the thermal denatured temperature range of proteins in salmon and chicken meat. The results show that the temperature ranges of denatured proteins were from 65℃ to 75℃, and these temperature ranges were influenced by the processing methods. Through SDS-PAGE, the features of repeated heating thermal denatured proteins under the same temperature and processing time were studied. The electrophoresis pat-terns of thermal denatured proteins determined through repeated heating at the same temperature did not exhibit any change. For the detection of cooked fish and meat samples, they were subjected to applying the SDS-PAGE method, which revealed an EPT ranging from 60℃ to 80℃.

  16. Structural properties of cyanase. Denaturation, renaturation, and role of sulfhydryls and oligomeric structure in catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, R M; Anderson, P M

    1987-07-25

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes bicarbonate-dependent decomposition of cyanate to give ammonia and bicarbonate. The enzyme is composed of 8-10 identical subunits (Mr = 17,008). The objective of this study was to clarify some of the structural properties of cyanase for the purpose of understanding the relationship between oligomeric structure and catalytic activity. Circular dichroism studies showed that cyanase has a significant amount of alpha-helix and beta-sheet structure. The one sulfhydryl group per subunit does not react with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) unless cyanase is denatured. Denaturation is apparently complete in 10 M urea or 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, but is significantly reduced in 10 M urea by the presence of azide (analog of cyanate) and is incomplete in 8 M urea. Denatured cyanase could be renatured and reactivated (greater than 85%) by removal of denaturants. Reactivation was greatly facilitated by the presence of certain anions, particularly bicarbonate, and by high ionic strength and protein concentration. The catalytic activity of renatured cyanase was associated only with oligomer. Cyanase that had been denatured in the presence of DTNB to give a cyanase-DTNB derivative could also be renatured at 26 degrees C to give active cyanase-DTNB oligomer. The active oligomeric form of the cyanase-DTNB derivative could be converted reversibly to inactive dimer by lowering the temperature to 4 degrees C or by reduction of the ionic strength and removal of monoanions. These results provide evidence that free sulfhydryl groups are not required for catalytic activity and that catalytic activity may be dependent upon oligomeric structure.

  17. The role of surfactants in Köhler theory reconsidered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sorjamaa

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particles typically consist of inorganic salts and organic material. The inorganic compounds as well as their hygroscopic properties are well defined, but the effect of organic compounds on cloud droplet activation is still poorly characterized. The focus of the present study is in the organic compounds that are surface active i.e. they concentrate on droplet surface and decrease droplet surface tension. Gibbsian surface thermodynamics were used to find out how partitioning in binary and ternary aqueous solutions affects the droplet surface tension and the droplet bulk concentration in droplets large enough to act as cloud condensation nuclei. Sodium dodecyl sulfate was used as a model compound together with sodium chloride to find out the effect the correct evaluation of surfactant partitioning has on the solute effect (Raoult effect. While the partitioning is known to lead to higher surface tension compared to a case in which partitioning is neglected, the present results show that the partitioning also alters the solute effect, and that the change is large enough to further increase the critical supersaturation and hence decrease the droplet activation. The fraction of surfactant partitioned to droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet size, which suggests that surfactants might enhance the activation of larger particles relatively more thus leading to less dense clouds. Cis-pinonic acid-ammonium sulfate aqueous solution was studied in order to relate the partitioning to more realistic atmospheric situation and to find out the combined effects of dissolution and partitioning behaviour. The results show that correct partitioning consideration alters the shape of the Köhler curve when compared to a situation in which the partitioning is neglected either completely or in the Raoult effect.

  18. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  19. Interaction of Fluorocarbon Containing Hydrophobically Modified Polyelectrolyte with Nonionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO,Jin-Feng(郭金峰); ZHUANG,Dong-Qing(庄东青); ZHOU,Hui(周晖); ZHANG,Yun-Xiang(章云祥)

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of fluorocarbon containing hydrophobically modified polyelectrolyte (FMPAANa) with two kinds of nonionic surfactants (hydrogenated and fluorinated) in a semidilute (0.5 wt% ) aqueous solution had been studied by rheological measurements. Association behavior was found in both systems. The hydrophobic interaction of FMPAANa with fluorinated surfactant (FC171) is much stronger than that with hydrogenated surfactant (NP7.5) at low surfactant concentrations. The interaction is strengthened by surfactants being added for the density of active junctions increased. Whereas distinct phenomena for FC171 and NP7. 5 start to be found as the surfactants added over their respective certain concentration. The interaction of polyelectrolyte with fluorinated surfactant increases dramatical ly while that with hydrogenated surfactant decreases.

  20. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  1. Polyelectrolyte surfactant aggregates and their deposition on macroscopic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Voisin, D

    2002-01-01

    Oppositely charged surfactant and polyelectrolyte are present in hair shampoos and conditioners, together with particles (e.g. anti-dandruff agents for scalp) and droplets (e.g. silicone oil for the hair). These are normally formulated at high surfactant concentrations, beyond the flocculation region for the polyelectrolyte concentration used. However, on dilution with water, during application, flocs are formed which carry the particles and droplets to the scalp and hair. The addition of an anionic surfactant to an aqueous solution of cationic polyelectrolyte, at a given concentration, can lead to the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant 'particles', in which the surfactant 'binds' to the polyelectrolyte. This occurs from the critical association concentration (CAC), up to the surfactant concentration corresponding to maximum binding. Within this range of surfactant concentrations, the surfactant bound to the polyelectrolyte is thought to associate to form what might be termed 'internal micelles'. Each po...

  2. Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 study has been initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This report covers the second quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: completion of coal liquefaction autoclave reactor runs with Illinois number 6 coal at processing temperatures of 300, 325, and 350 C, and pressures of 1800 psig; analysis of the filter cake and the filtrate obtained from the treated slurry in each run; and correlation of the coal conversions and the liquid yield quality to the surfactant concentration. An increase in coal conversions and upgrading of the liquid product quality due to surfactant addition was observed for all runs.

  3. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  4. Natural surfactants used in cosmetics: glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourith, N; Kanlayavattanakul, M

    2009-08-01

    Cosmetic surfactant performs detergency, wetting, emulsifying, solubilizing, dispersing and foaming effects. Adverse reactions of chemical synthesis surfactant have an effect on environment and humans, particularly severe in long term. Biodegradability, low toxicity and ecological acceptability which are the benefits of naturally derived surfactant that promises cosmetic safety are, therefore, highly on demand. Biosurfactant producible from microorganisms exhibiting potential surface properties suitable for cosmetic applications especially incorporate with their biological activities. Sophorolipids, rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids are the most widely used glycolipids biosurfactant in cosmetics. Literatures and patents relevant to these three glycolipids reviewed were emphasizing on the cosmetic applications including personal care products presenting the cosmetic efficiency, efficacy and economy benefits of glycolipids biosurfactant.

  5. Alkanediyl-α, ω-bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide gemini surfactants as novel corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in formic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mobin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gemini surfactants, butanediyl 1,4-bis(dimethyl cetylammonium bromide, pentanediyl 1,5 - bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide and hexanediyl 1,6 - bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide from Alkanediyl-α, ω-bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide series were synthesized in laboratory and were characterized by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The surfactants were tested as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 20% formic acid. The influence of surfactants on mild steel corrosion inhibition was investigated by measuring the corrosion rate of mild steel in their absence and presence by weight loss measurements, solvent analysis of iron ions into the test solution and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The surface morphology of the corroded steel samples in presence and absence of surfactants was evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The synthesized gemini surfactants performed as excellent corrosion inhibitor, the inhibition efficiency (IE being in the range of 76.66-97.41%. The IE of surfactants is slightly affected by the spacer length. The IE increased with increase in surfactant concentration and temperature. The adsorption of gemini surfactants on the steel surface was found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The results of the potentiodynamic polarization studies are consistent with the results of weight loss studies.

  6. Surfactant-Polymer Interaction for Improved Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabitto, Jorge; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2002-01-07

    The goal of this research was to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, oil solubility in the displacing fluid and mobility control. Surfactant-polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation and viscous/heterogeneity fingering.

  7. A Review on Progress in QSPR Studies for Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengwu Wang; Xiaoyi Zhang; Jiwei Hu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review on recent progress in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies of surfactants and applications of various molecular descriptors. QSPR studies on critical micelle concentration (cmc) and surface tension (γ) of surfactants are introduced. Studies on charge distribution in ionic surfactants by quantum chemical calculations and its effects on the structures and properties of the colloids of surfactants are also reviewed. The trends of QSPR studies o...

  8. Dynamic Study of Gemini Surfactant and Single-chain Surfactant at Air/Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Jian CHEN; Gui Ying XU; Shi Ling YUAN; Hai Ying SUN

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation are used to study the properties of gemini surfactant of ethyl-α,ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (C12C2C12) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) at the air/water interface, respectively. In the two systems,the surfactant concentrations are both 28 wt. %, and other conditions are also the same. After reaching the thermodynamic equilibrium, the concentration profiles, the radial distributions functions (RDF) and the mean squared displacement (MSD) are investigated. Theresults reveal that the surface activity of C12C2C12 suffactant is higher than DTAB surfactant.

  9. Surfactant therapy in late preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yurdakök

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Late preterm (LPT neonates are at a high risk for respiratory distress soon after birth due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, transient tachypnea of the newborn, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and pneumonia along with an increased need for surfactant replacement therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, and ventilator support when compared with the term neonates. In the past, studies on outcomes of infants with respiratory distress have primarily focused on extremely premature infants, leading to a gap in knowledge and understanding of the developmental biology and mechanism of pulmonary diseases in LPT neonates. Surfactant deficiency is the most frequent etiology of RDS in very preterm and moderately preterm infants, while cesarean section and lung infection play major roles in RDS development in LPT infants. The clinical presentation and the response to surfactant therapy in LPT infants may be different than that seen in very preterm infants. Incidence of pneumonia and occurrence of pneumothorax are significantly higher in LPT and term infants. High rates of pneumonia in these infants may result in direct injury to the type II alveolar cells of the lung with decreasing synthesis, release, and processing of surfactant. Increased permeability of the alveolar capillary membrane to both fluid and solutes is known to result in entry of plasma proteins into the alveolar hypophase, further inhibiting the surface properties of surfactant. However, the oxygenation index value do not change dramatically after ventilation or surfactant administration in LPT infants with RDS compared to very preterm infants. These finding may indicate a different pathogenesis of RDS in late preterm and term infants. In conclusion, surfactant therapy may be of significant benefit in LPT infants with serious respiratory failure secondary to a number of insults. However, optimal timing and dose of administration are not so clear in this group. Additional

  10. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  11. Influence of surfactant concentration on nanohydroxyapatite growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Gopi; J Indira; S Nithiya; L Kavitha; U Kamachi Mudali; K Kanimozhi

    2013-10-01

    Nanohydroxyapatite particles with different morphologies were synthesized through a microwave coupled hydrothermal method using CTAB as a template. A successful synthesis of nanosized HAP spheres, rods and fibres is achieved through this method by controlling the concentration of the surfactant. The concentration of the surfactant was tuned in such a way that the desired HAP nanostructures were obtained. The resultant powders were sintered at 900 °C in order to obtain phase pure HAP particles. The results obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques have substantiated the formation of nanosized HAP spheres and fibres.

  12. VESICLE-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS - EFFECTS OF ADDED SURFACTANTS ON THE GEL TO LIQUID-CRYSTAL TRANSITION FOR 2 VESICULAR SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandamer, M.J; Briggs, B.; Cullis, P.M.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.; Kacperska, A.

    1995-01-01

    Interactions of both cationic and anionic surfactants with vesicles formed by dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DOAB) and by sodium didodecylphosphate (DDP) have been probed using differential scanning microcalorimetry. The scans show that the surfactants are incorporated into the vesicle bilayer

  13. Vesicle-Surfactant Interactions : Effects of Added Surfactants on the Gel to Liquid-crystal Transition for Two Vesicular Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandamer, Michael J.; Briggs, Barbara; Cullis, Paul M.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Kacperska, Anna

    1995-01-01

    Interactions of both cationic and anionic surfactants with vesicles formed by dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DOAB) and by sodium didodecylphosphate (DDP) have been probed using differential scanning microcalorimetry. The scans show that the surfactants are incorporated into the vesicle bilayer

  14. Studying luminescent characteristics of the specific surfactants in various regions of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, V.; Darecki, M.; Gutowska, D.; Makuch, P.; Kowalczyk, J.; Strzałkowska, A.; Petelski, T.; Piskozub, J.

    2012-04-01

    The sea surface layer is the interface between the atmosphere and marine environment, where there are a variety of physical, biological and chemical processes that contribute to accumulation and exchange of surface-active-agents (surfactants). At the same time the dynamic properties of the water surface (surface wave spectrum) and fluxes (especially in gas exchange and production of marine aerosol) and even the apparent and real optical properties of seawater are affected by the surfactants gathered on the sea surface. Moreover, the presence of the surface film may restrict the supply of light energy into the depths of the sea. The study was conducted in different regions of the Baltic Sea which also assessed the impact of external environment (estuaries, vicinity of the ports and shipping routs) on the marine environment. The primary scientific objectives were: - to investigate the variability of luminescent properties of surfactants and organic matter contained in the surface film and layer of the sea from the results of spectrophotometric studies. - to find any special surfactants (characterized by luminescent properties) occurring in certain regions of the Baltic. The practical aim was to answer the question whether and to what extent changes in luminescence properties of organic matter contained in the film and the layer depend on the biological activity of the basin and how they affect the water leaving radiance remotely measured over the surface of the sea.

  15. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism in preterm infants studied with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAIM OF THE STUDIES 1. To develop and use a novel method to study surfactant metabolism in preterm and older infants. (chapters 3 and 4). 2. To study endogenous surfactant synthesis in relation to prenatal glucocorticosteroids. (chapters 5 and 6). 3. To study the influence of surfactant t

  16. Effects of selected surfactants on soil microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants (surface-active agents) facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, and wetting properties of liquids. Surfactants are used in industry to reduce the surface tension of liquid and to solubilize compounds. For agricultural pest management, surfactants are an import...

  17. Synthesis and Properties of Novel Cationic Maleic Diester Polymerizable Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Three new cationic polymerizable surfactants are synthesized by the reaction of alkylmaleic hemiester with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. Their structures are confirmed by 1H NMR, IR and elements analysis. The values of CMC and gCMC of these surfactants have been measured. One can obtain nearly monodisperse polystyrene latex by emulsion polymerization using the polymerizable surfactant.

  18. Secondary oil recovery process. [two separate surfactant slugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallgatter, W.S.

    1969-01-14

    Oil recovery by two separate surfactant slugs is greater than for either one alone. One slug contains a surfactant(s) in either oil or water. The other slug contains surfactant(s) in thickened water. The surfactants are sodium petroleum sulfonate (Promor SS20), polyoxyethylene sorbitan trioleate (Tween 85), lauric acid diethanolamide (Trepoline L), and sodium tridecyl sulfate polyglycol ether (Trepenol S30T). The thickener is carboxymethyl cellulose (Hercules CMC 70-S Medium thickener) or polyvinyl alcohol (Du Pont Elvanol 50-42). Consolidated sandstone cores were flooded with water, followed with Hawes crude, and finally salt water (5 percent sodium chloride) which recovered about 67 percent of the crude. A maximum of 27.5 percent of the residual oil was recovered by surfactant(s) in oil or water followed by fresh water, then surfactant(s) plus thickener in water followed by fresh water. Either surfactant slug may be injected first. Individually, each of the surfactant slugs can recover from about 3 to 11 percent less residual oil than their total recovery when used consecutively.

  19. The adsorption of biomolecules to multi-walled carbon nanotubes is influenced by both pulmonary surfactant lipids and surface chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bing

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During production and processing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, they may be inhaled and may enter the pulmonary circulation. It is essential that interactions with involved body fluids like the pulmonary surfactant, the blood and others are investigated, particularly as these interactions could lead to coating of the tubes and may affect their chemical and physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to characterize the possible coatings of different functionalized MWCNTs in a cell free environment. Results To simulate the first contact in the lung, the tubes were coated with pulmonary surfactant and subsequently bound lipids were characterized. The further coating in the blood circulation was simulated by incubating the tubes in blood plasma. MWCNTs were amino (NH2- and carboxyl (-COOH-modified, in order to investigate the influence on the bound lipid and protein patterns. It was shown that surfactant lipids bind unspecifically to different functionalized MWCNTs, in contrast to the blood plasma proteins which showed characteristic binding patterns. Patterns of bound surfactant lipids were altered after a subsequent incubation in blood plasma. In addition, it was found that bound plasma protein patterns were altered when MWCNTs were previously coated with pulmonary surfactant. Conclusions A pulmonary surfactant coating and the functionalization of MWCNTs have both the potential to alter the MWCNTs blood plasma protein coating and to determine their properties and behaviour in biological systems.

  20. Effect of surfactants on the aggregation and sedimentation of zinc oxide nanomaterial in natural water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuankun; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko; Matsui, Yasuto

    2017-03-01

    The wide application of surfactants and engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in industrial and consumer products lead to the high possibility of their co-presence in natural water environment, making it important to study the effect of surfactants on the environmental behavior and fate of ENMs. In this work, we selected an anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and a nonionic nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPEO, Tergitol NP-9) to study their effects on the aggregation and sedimentation of a 20nm ZnO ENM in different water matrices. The adsorption of SDS and NP-9 by ZnO ENM were fitted with Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacities were 43.73±4.62mg/g and 13.79±1.09 respectively. As the surfactant concentration increased from 0 to 0.030% (m:v), SDS reduced the zeta potential of ZnO ENM from 17.56±2.13 to -27.96±2.59mV, whereas NP-9 did not affect the zeta potential. After a 24-h batch reactor experiment, SDS and NP-9 reduced 93.02% and 80.26% of the aggregate size of ZnO ENM (50mgL(-1)) in maximum at surfactant concentrations≥0.015%. The ZnO ENM was not stable in natural aqueous matrices, mainly because of the relatively high ionic strength. However, surfactants were found to reduce the aggregation and sedimentation of ZnO ENM in six natural water matrices in different degrees. With the presence of 0.030% SDS in tap water, maximum reduction rates of aggregate size and sedimentation were recorded as 69.54% and 26.69%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that the presence of surfactants may alter the behaviors and fate of ENMs in natural water environment.

  1. Recent progress of the characterization of oppositely charged polymer/surfactant complex in dilution deposition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, M

    2017-01-01

    A mixture of oppositely charged polymer and surfactants changes the solubilized state, having a complex precipitation region at the composition of electric neutralization. This complex behavior has been applied to surface modification in the fields of health care and cosmetic products such as conditioning shampoos, as a dilution-deposition system in which the polymer/surfactant mixture at the higher surfactant concentration precipitates the insoluble complex by dilution. A large number of studies over many years have revealed the basic coacervation behavior and physicochemical properties of complexes. However, the mechanism by which a precipitated complex performs surface modification is not well understood. The precipitation region and the morphology of precipitated complex that are changed by molecular structure and additives affect the performance. Hydrophilic groups such as the EO unit in polymers and surfactants, the mixing of nonionic or amphoteric surfactant and nonionic polymer, and the addition of low polar solvent influence the complex precipitation region. Furthermore, the morphology of precipitated complex is formed by crosslinking and aggregating among polymers in the dilution process, and characterizes the performance of products. The polymer chain density in precipitated complex is determined by the charges of both the polymer and surfactant micelle and the conformation of polymer. As a result, the morphology of precipitated complexes is changed from a closely packed film to looser meshes, and/or to small particles, and it is possible for the morphology to control the rheological properties and the amount of adsorbed silicone. In the future, further investigation of the relationships between the morphology and performance is needed.

  2. Degradation of surfactant-modified montmorillonites in HCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madejova, Jana, E-mail: jana.madejova@savba.sk [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, SK-845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Palkova, Helena, E-mail: helena.palkova@savba.sk [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, SK-845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Jankovic, Lubos, E-mail: lubos.jankovic@savba.sk [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, SK-845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of surfactant size on the extent of montmorillonites decomposition in HCl was investigated. Na-SAz montmorillonite and tetraalkylammonium salts of alkyl-chains length increasing from methyl- Me{sub 4}N to pentyl- Pe{sub 4}N were used for organo-montmorillonites preparation. Decreasing intensity of d{sub 001} diffraction proved destruction of montmorillonite structure connected with gradual surfactant release. A shift of the SiO stretching band to 1097 cm{sup -1} confirmed formation of amorphous silica phase. A new band near 7315 cm{sup -1} corresponding to SiOH overtone revealed creation of protonated silica. This band was observed in the spectra of all acid-treated samples, also in those with minor decomposition of the structure. The size of the cations significantly affected decomposition of montmorillonites in HCl. The less stable were Na-SAz and Me{sub 4}N-SAz in which the content of octahedral atoms dropped to {approx}5% of their original values upon 8 h treatments. Et{sub 4}N-SAz and Pr{sub 4}N-SAz were slightly more resistant mainly at short times. Bu{sub 4}N-SAz and Pe{sub 4}N-SAz showed the least structural modifications, only 50% and 35% of octahedral atoms, respectively, were released into solution within 8 h treatments. This observation proves that bulky alkylammonium cations covering the inner and outer surfaces of montmorillonite prevent effectively the access of protons to the layers protecting the mineral from degradation in the acid. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid materials were prepared from montmorillonite and alkylammonium cations with short alkyl chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of surfactant on organo-montmorillonites dissolution in HCl was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With increasing size of cation the extent of montmorillonite decomposition decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bulky surfactants prevent the access of protons to the layers and thus protect montmorillonite from

  3. Isothermal DNA origami folding: avoiding denaturing conditions for one-pot, hybrid-component annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopielski, Andreas; Schneider, Anne; Csáki, Andrea; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The DNA origami technique offers great potential for nanotechnology. Using biomolecular self-assembly, defined 2D and 3D nanoscale DNA structures can be realized. DNA origami allows the positioning of proteins, fluorophores or nanoparticles with an accuracy of a few nanometers and enables thereby novel nanoscale devices. Origami assembly usually includes a thermal denaturation step at 90 °C. Additional components used for nanoscale assembly (such as proteins) are often thermosensitive, and possibly damaged by such harsh conditions. They have therefore to be attached in an extra second step to avoid defects. To enable a streamlined one-step nanoscale synthesis - a so called one-pot folding - an adaptation of the folding procedures is required. Here we present a thermal optimization of this process for a 2D DNA rectangle-shaped origami resulting in an isothermal assembly protocol below 60 °C without thermal denaturation. Moreover, a room temperature protocol is presented using the chemical additive betaine, which is biocompatible in contrast to chemical denaturing approaches reported previously.The DNA origami technique offers great potential for nanotechnology. Using biomolecular self-assembly, defined 2D and 3D nanoscale DNA structures can be realized. DNA origami allows the positioning of proteins, fluorophores or nanoparticles with an accuracy of a few nanometers and enables thereby novel nanoscale devices. Origami assembly usually includes a thermal denaturation step at 90 °C. Additional components used for nanoscale assembly (such as proteins) are often thermosensitive, and possibly damaged by such harsh conditions. They have therefore to be attached in an extra second step to avoid defects. To enable a streamlined one-step nanoscale synthesis - a so called one-pot folding - an adaptation of the folding procedures is required. Here we present a thermal optimization of this process for a 2D DNA rectangle-shaped origami resulting in an isothermal assembly

  4. Coarsening of firefighting foams containing fluorinated hydrocarbon surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Matthew J.; Dougherty, John A.; Otto, Nicholas; Conroy, Michael W.; Williams, Bradley A.; Ananth, Ramagopal; Fleming, James W.

    2013-03-01

    Diffusion of gas between bubbles in foam causes growth of large bubbles at the expense of small bubbles and leads to increasing mean bubble size with time thereby affecting drainage. Experimental data shows that the effective diffusivity of nitrogen gas in aqueous film forming foam (AFFF), which is widely used in firefighting against burning liquids, is several times smaller than in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) foam based on time-series photographs of bubble size and weighing scale recordings of liquid drainage. Differences in foam structure arising from foam production might contribute to the apparent difference in the rates of coarsening. AFFF solution produces wetter foam with initially smaller bubbles than SDS solution due in part to the lower gas-liquid surface tension provided by the fluorosurfactants present in AFFF. Present method of foam production generates microbubble foam by high-speed co-injection of surfactant solution and gas into a tube of 3-mm diameter. These results contribute to our growing understanding of the coupling between foam liquid fraction, bubble size, surfactant chemistry, and coarsening. NRC Resident Research Associate at NRL

  5. Undoped Polyaniline/Surfactant Complex for the Corrosion Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lo-Min; Levon, Kalle

    1998-01-01

    Due to the strict regulations on the usage of heavy metals as the additives in the coating industries, the search for effective organic corrosion inhibitors in replace of those metal additives has become essential. Electrically conducting polymers have been shown to be effective for corrosion prevention but the poor solubility of these intractable polymers has been a problem. We have explored a polyaniline/4-dodecylphenol complex (PANi/DDPh) to improve the dissolution and it has been shown to be an effective organic corrosion inhibitor. With the surfactant, DDPh, PANi could be diluted into the coatings and the properties of the coatings were affected. Emeraldine base (EB) form of PANi was also found to be oxidized by the hardener. The oxidized form of polyaniline provides improved corrosion protection of metals than that of emeraldine base since the value of the standard electrode potential for the oxidized form of PANi is higher than that of EB. Additionally, the surfactant improves the wet adhesion property between the coating and the metal surface.

  6. Effects of urea denatureation and pH on the ability of porcine myoglobin to undergo reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L G; Brewer, M S

    2003-04-01

    To determine the effects of globin moiety denaturation and pH on the ability of metmyoglobin (MetMb) to undergo reduction, MetMb isolated from porcine hearts was denatured in 8.5M urea. Both native and denatured MetMb solutions were serially reduced with Na(2)S(2)O(4) (0, 7.5, 15, 18.75, 22.5, 26.25, 30, 30.75, and 45 umol). Reduction was conducted at pH 5, 5.2, 5.4, 5.6, 6, 6.2, 6.4, 6.6, and 7. After reduction, absorbance was determined at 635 nm and the percent of the original MetMb which was reduced was calculated. The average percent MetMb reduced from the native and denatured forms was 35 and 25%, respectively. pH significantly influenced the percentage of MetMb reduced, especially when pH was <6. If the MetMb was denatured prior to reduction, the influence of pH on its ability to undergo reduction was slight. The percentage of denatured MetMb reduced was higher at pH 7 than at all other pHs. High pH enhanced the ability of MetMb to undergo reduction; while low pH decreases it. Low pH may have denatured the native globin moiety.

  7. Photosensitive surfactants: micellization and interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  8. Titration procedure for low ethoxylated nonionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschmann, N. [Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst., Lehrstuhl fuer Analytische Chemie, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Huelskoetter, F. [Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst., Lehrstuhl fuer Analytische Chemie, Muenster Univ. (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    Highly lipophilic surfactants are frequently used as emulsifiers for preparing oil-in-water emulsions (e.g. coolants lubricants). Typical surfactants used for this purpose are low ethoxylated alcohols and ethoxylated alkylphenols. Due to the low degree of ethoxylation they cannot be analysed by conventional methods. The method described in this article is based on the introduction of an anionic group into the molecule by a derivatization reaction. The reaction product can be determined by conventional titration methods for anionic surfactants without any modification. The use of the new method for other nonionic surfactants like sorbitan esters, (ethoxylated) fatty acid amides or glycerol fatty acid partial esters is also described as well as the sample preparation for coolants lubricants. (orig.) [Deutsch] Lipophile Tenside werden haeufig zur Herstellung von Oel-in-Wasser-Emulsionen verwandt, wie sie beispielsweise in Kuehlschmiermitteln eingesetzt werden. Typische Vertreter dieser Tenside sind niedrig ethoxylierte Fettalkohole und Alkylphenole. Wegen ihres geringen Ethoxylierungsgrades koennen sie mit den konventionellen Methoden nicht analytisch bestimmt werden. Die hier beschriebene Analysenmethode beruht auf der Derivatisierung der Ethoxylate zu entsprechenden anionischen Tensiden (Ethersulfate). Diese koennen ohne weiteres mit den etablierten Titrationsverfahren bestimmt werden. Die Anwendung dieses neuen Verfahrens auf die Bestimmung anderer nichtionischer Tenside - Sorbitanester, (ethoxylierte) Fettsaeureamide und Partialglyceride - wird ebenso beschrieben wie die Probenvorbereitung fuer die Analyse von Kuehlschmiermitteln. (orig.)

  9. Mitoxantrone-Surfactant Interactions: A Physicochemical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Enache

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitoxantrone is a synthetic anticancer drug used clinically in the treatment of different types of cancer. It was developed as a doxorubicin analogue in a program to find drugs with improved antitumor activity and decreased cardiotoxicity compared with the anthracyclines. As the cell membrane is the first barrier encountered by anticancer drugs before reaching the DNA sites inside the cells and as surfactant micelles are known as simple model systems for biological membranes, the drugs-surfactant interaction has been the subject of great research interest. Further, quantitative understanding of the interactions of drugs with biomimicking structures like surfactant micelles may provide helpful information for the control of physicochemical properties and bioactivities of encapsulated drugs in order to design better delivery systems with possible biomedical applications. The present review describes the physicochemical aspects of the interactions between the anticancer drug mitoxantrone and different surfactants. Mitoxantrone-micelle binding constants, partitions coefficient of the drug between aqueous and micellar phases and the corresponding Gibbs free energy for the above processes, and the probable location of drug molecules in the micelles are discussed.

  10. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd...

  11. Topological transformation of a surfactant bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant lamellar phases are often complicated by the formation of multilamellar (onions) under shear, which can originate simply by shaking the sample. A systematic study has been performed on the C10E3-D2O system in which different bilayer structures under a steady shear flow were investigated...

  12. Photosensitive surfactants: Micellization and interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  13. Physicochemical characteristics of PFC surfactants for dry decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Lee, Chi Woo [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Even the trace amount of the used nuclear fuels of high radioactivity are hazardous to the earth and humans. Perfluorocarbons and perfluorocarbon surfactants are emerging to be efficient chemicals in the dry decontamination process of the used fuels of high radioactivity. The theme was undertaken to increase the knowledge on perfluorocarbon surfactants to develop the perfluorocarbon system in the dry decontamination process in Korea. Several cationic and anionic pfc surfactants were synthesized. Effects of pfc surfactants on electrochemical etching of silicon were investigated to form porous silicons. Forces were measured between silicon surfaces and AFM tip in the absence and presence of pfc surfactants. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  14. Minimally Invasive Surfactant Therapy and Noninvasive Respiratory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kribs, Angela

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) caused by surfactant deficiency is major cause for neonatal mortality and short- and long-term morbidity of preterm infants. Continuous positive airway pressure and other modes of noninvasive respiratory support and intubation and positive pressure ventilation with surfactant therapy are efficient therapies for RDS. Because continuous positive airway pressure can fail in severe surfactant deficiency, and because traditional surfactant therapy requires intubation and positive pressure ventilation, this entails a risk of lung injury. Several strategies to combine noninvasive respiratory therapy with minimally invasive surfactant therapy have been described. Available data suggest that those strategies may improve outcome of premature infants with RDS.

  15. Thermally stable surfactants and compositions and methods of use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    2008-09-02

    There are provided novel thermally stable surfactants for use with fillers in the preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites. Typically, surfactants of the invention are urethanes, ureas or esters of thiocarbamic acid having a hydrocarbyl group of from 10 to 50 carbons and optionally including an ionizable or charged group (e.g., carboxyl group or quaternary amine). Thus, there are provided surfactants having Formula I: ##STR00001## wherein the variables are as defined herein. Further provided are methods of making thermally stable surfactants and compositions, including composites and nanocomposites, using fillers coated with the surfactants.

  16. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  17. Dimeric Surfactants: Promising Ingredients of Cosmetics and Toiletries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are an essential ingredient for cosmetic, toiletries and personal care products for enhancing their performance. Dimeric surfactants demonstrate superiority compared to conventional surfactants in all areas of application. Dimeric surfactants are extremely promising for utilization in various cosmetic formulations viz. shampoo, lotions, creams, conditioners etc. These surfactants possess extremely unique surface properties viz. lower surface tension, unique micellization, low critical micelle concentration (CMC and antimicrobial activity, higher solubilization etc. Dimerics enhance the performances of cosmetics in an extraordinary manner and provide eco-friendly preparations for human epidermis.

  18. Phase diagrams of DNA-photosensitive surfactant complexes: effect of ionic strength and surfactant structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Titov, Evgenii; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-10-28

    Realization of all-optically controlled and efficient DNA compaction is the major motivation in the study of interactions between DNA and photosensitive surfactants. In this article, using recently published approach of phase diagram construction [Y. Zakrevskyy, P. Cywinski, M. Cywinska, J. Paasche, N. Lomadze, O. Reich, H.-G. Löhmannsroben, and S. Santer, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044907 (2014)], a strategy for substantial reduction of compaction agent concentration and simultaneous maintaining the light-induced decompaction efficiency is proposed. The role of ionic strength (NaCl concentration), as a very important environmental parameter, and surfactant structure (spacer length) on the changes of positions of phase transitions is investigated. Increase of ionic strength leads to increase of the surfactant concentration needed to compact DNA molecule. However, elongation of the spacer results to substantial reduction of this concentration. DNA compaction by surfactants with longer tails starts to take place in diluted solutions at charge ratios Z phase diagrams for different DNA-photosensitive surfactant systems allowed explanation and proposal of a strategy to overcome previously reported limitations of the light-induced decompaction for complexes with increasing surfactant hydrophobicity.

  19. Surface characterization of proteins using multi-fractal property of heat-denatured aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Tapobrata; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Sarkar, Subrata; Misra, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Multi-fractal property of heat-denatured protein aggregates (HDPA) is characteristic of its individual form. The visual similarity between digitally generated microscopic images of HDPA with that of surface-image of its individual X-ray structures in protein databank (PDB) displayed using Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) viewer is the basis of the study. We deigned experiments to view the fractal nature of proteins at different aggregate scales. Intensity based multi-fractal dimensions (ILMFD) extracted from various planes of digital microscopic images of protein aggregates were used to characterize HDPA into different classes. Moreover, the ILMFD parameters extracted from aggregates show similar classification pattern to digital images of protein surface displayed by VMD viewer using PDB entry. We discuss the use of irregular patterns of heat-denatured aggregate proteins to understand various surface properties in native proteins. PMID:18795110

  20. Acid Denaturation Inducing Self-Assembly of Curcumin-Loaded Hemoglobin Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaikai Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin is a promising drug carrier but lacks extensive investigation. The chemical conjugation of hemoglobin and drugs is costly and complex, so we have developed curcumin-loaded hemoglobin nanoparticles (CCM-Hb-NPs via self-assembly for the first time. Using the acid-denaturing method, we avoid introducing denaturants and organic solvents. The nanoparticles are stable with uniform size. We have conducted a series of experiments to examine the interaction of hemoglobin and CCM, including hydrophobic characterization, SDS-PAGE. These experiments substantiate that this self-assembly process is mainly driven by hydrophobic forces. Our nanoparticles achieve much higher cell uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity than free CCM solution in vitro. The uptake inhibition experiments also demonstrate that our nanoparticles were incorporated via the classic clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. These results indicate that hemoglobin nanoparticles formed by self-assembly are a promising drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  1. Comparison of inactivation and conformational changes of native and apo yeast alcohol dehydrogenase during thermal denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Chen, R; Zhou, H M

    1998-07-01

    The conformational changes of native and apo yeast alcohol dehydrogenase during thermal denaturation have been followed by fluorescence emission and circular dichroism spectra. A comparison of inactivation and conformational changes during thermal denaturation shows that for the native enzyme and for the apo-I YADH which has the conformational zinc removed, the extent of inactivation was larger than the extent of conformational changes at the same temperature. This result supported the suggestion by Tsou (Trends Biochem. Sci. 1986, 11, 427-429: Science 1993, 262, 380-381) that the enzyme active site is more flexible. The results also show that apo-I YADH without the conformational zinc was more easily inactivated with increasing incubation temperature, indicating that the stability of the apo-I YADH decreased. Kinetic analysis suggest that the substrate does not provide any protective effect during thermal inactivation of native and apo-I YADH.

  2. Theoretical aspects of pressure and solute denaturation of proteins: A Kirkwood-buff-theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2012-12-01

    A new approach to the problem of pressure-denaturation (PD) and solute-denaturation (SD) of proteins is presented. The problem is formulated in terms of Le Chatelier principle, and a solution is sought in terms of the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions. It is found that both problems have one factor in common; the excluded volumes of the folded and the unfolded forms with respect to the solvent molecules. It is shown that solvent-induced effects operating on hydrophilic groups along the protein are probably the main reason for PD. On the other hand, the SD depends on the preferential solvation of the folded and the unfolded forms with respect to solvent and co-solvent molecules.

  3. Teaching what one does not know: strangeness and denaturation in (autobiographical narrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz da Cunha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The thematic focus in this text are the estrangement/denaturation processes in (autobiographical narrations. The aim of this study was to reflect on the possibility to promote estrangement/denatura - tion in (autobiographical writings made by teenagers in the space/ time of the classroom environment. The methodological proposal consisted on developing (autobiographical writings by students from sociology classes in High School. A total of 138 teenagers from a public school, attending the first school trimester in the year 2013, have participated in the study. The concepts of estrangement/de - naturation are located in the anthropology field and, the work with (autobiographical narrations is located in the socio-clinic perspec - tives and of biographization processes. The results indicate that (autobiographical narrations provide estrangements/denaturation and go towards teaching what one does not know. We can, then, conclude that this possibility, as an educational act, may generate knowledge suspension to self-inventiveness.

  4. Protective role of salt in catalysis and maintaining structure of halophilic proteins against denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari eSinha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Search for new enzymes of industrial relevance, bestowed with novel properties continues to be a desirable pursuit in enzyme research. Halophilism is the unusual existence of life in saline/ hypersaline habitats and haloenzymes, are the proteins from such origin, naturally endowed with unique structural features which enable them to sustain functionality under high salt. Driven by industrial requirements, halophilic enzymes have been explored for their stability and catalytic abilities under harsh operational conditions. These have been documented to withstand high temperature, pH, organic solvents, and chaotropic agents. However, this stability is modulated by salt. Understanding the basis of salt mediated protection amidst a denaturing milieu will add significantly to the existing knowledge about structure function relationships in halophilic proteins. Exploring their protein architecture may provide template for rationale design of stable enzymes. The article encompasses the current level of understanding about haloadaptations in halophiles and structural basis of their stability against classical denaturants.

  5. pH-sensitive polymer-assisted refolding of urea-denatured fibroblast growth factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Feng Huang; Shan Shan Wang; Chun Yan Ni; Shu Lin Yang; Xiao Kun Li; Susanna S.J.Leong

    2009-01-01

    A pH-responsive polymer Eudragit S-100 has been found to assist in correct folding of FGF-2(fibroblast growth factor-2)denatured with 8 mol/L urea and 10 mmol/L dithiothreitol at pH 7.2.The refolding of FGF-2 was performed by directly diluting denatured FGF-2 into a refolding buffer containing Eudragit S-100.The ability of Eudragit S-100 to enhance protein refolding level was investigated using MTT method,fluorescence emission spectroscopy and reversc phase HPLC.On the other hand,the result shows the ability of Eudragit S-100 to enhance the refolding level of protein is due to the interaction between Eudragit S-100 and positively charged FGF-2.

  6. Comparison between conformational change and inactivation rates of aminoacylase during denaturation in urea solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪睿; 王希成; 张彤; 周海梦

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic method of the substrate reaction in the presence of mactivator previously described by Tsou has been applied to the determination of inactivation rates of aminoacylase during denaturation in urea solutions. The protective effect of substrate on the inactivation of aminoacylase by urea has been investigated. Simultaneously, the comparison between conformational change and inactivation rates of enzyme in the urea solutions of different concentrations has been studied. Results obtained show that the inactivation rate constants of the enzyme are larger than the rate constants of conformational changes. The present results show that the active site of metal enzyme-aminoacylase is also located in a limited and flexible region of the molecule that is more sensitive to denaturants than the enzyme as a whole.

  7. Formation of Native and Non-native Interactions in Ensembles of Denatured ACBP Molecules from Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansdottir, S.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Fieber, W.;

    2005-01-01

    in the denatured states with those in the transition state for folding we also provided new insights into the mechanism of formation of the native state of this protein. Keywords: protein folding; denatured state; NMR; molecular dynamics; structural studies Abbreviations: ACBP, acyl coenzyme A binding protein; Gu...... of the residual structure in the denatured state of ACBP under these different conditions has enabled us to infer that regions in the N and C-terminal parts of the protein sequence have a high tendency to interact in the unfolded state under physiological conditions. By comparing the structural features...

  8. Use of two-surfactants mixtures to attain specific HLB values for assisted TPH-diesel biodegradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis G. Torres; Neftalí Rojas; Rosario Iturbe

    2004-01-01

    In a surfactant assisted biodegradation process, the choice of surfactant(s) is of crucial importance. The question is: does the type of surfactant (i.e. chemical family) affect the biodegradation process at fixed hidrophillic-lypofillic balance HLB values? Microcosm assessments were developed using contaminated soil, with around of 5000 mg/kg of hydrocarbons as TPH-diesel. Mixtures of three nonionic surfactants were employed to get a wide range of specific HLB values. Tween20 and Span20 were mixed in the appropriate proportions to get HLB values between 8.6 and 16.7. Tween/Span60 mixtures reached HLB values between 4.7 and 14.9. Finally, Tween/Span80 combinations yielded HLB values between 4.3 and 15. TPH-diesel biodegradation was measured at the beginning, and after 8 weeks, as well as the FCU/grsoil, as a measure of microorganisms′ development during the biodegradation period. A second aim of this work was to assess the use of guar gum as a biodegradation enhancer instead of synthetic products. The conclusions of this work are that surfactant chemical family, and not only the HLB value clearly affects the assisted biodegradation rate. Surfactant's synergism was clearly observed. Regarding the use of guar gum, no biodegradation enhancement was observed for the three assessed concentrations i.e., 2, 20, and 200 mg/kg, respectively. On the contrary, TPH-diesel removal was lower as the gum concentration increased. It is quite possible that guar gum was used as a microbial substrate.

  9. A kinetic study of jack-bean urease denaturation by a new dithiocarbamate bismuth compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, D. C.; Borges, E.; Torres, M. F.; Braga, J. P.

    2012-10-01

    A kinetic study concerning enzymatic inhibitory effect of a new bismuth dithiocarbamate complex on jack-bean urease is reported. A neural network approach is used to solve the ill-posed inverse problem arising from numerical treatment of the subject. A reaction mechanism for the urease denaturation process is proposed and the rate constants, relaxation time constants, equilibrium constants, activation Gibbs free energies for each reaction step and Gibbs free energies for the transition species are determined.

  10. Multifocal peritoneal splenosis in Tc-99m-labeled heat-denatured red blood cell scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Min Ki; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choe, Won Sick [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    A 44-year-old man with a past medical history of splenectomy came to hospital because of epigastric pain abdominopelvic computed tomography(CT) showed a soft tissue mass and multifocal variable-sized nodules as well as finding suggestive of cholecystitis. Subsequently, he underwent Tc-99m-labeled heat- denatured red blood cell(RBC) scintigraphy to evaluate the mass and nodules. The scintigraphy confirmed multifocal peritoneal splenosis in the abdominopelvic cavity.

  11. Surface characterization of proteins using multi-fractal property of heat-denatured aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Lahiri, Tapobrata; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Sarkar, Subrata; Misra, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Multi-fractal property of heat-denatured protein aggregates (HDPA) is characteristic of its individual form. The visual similarity between digitally generated microscopic images of HDPA with that of surface-image of its individual X-ray structures in protein databank (PDB) displayed using Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) viewer is the basis of the study. We deigned experiments to view the fractal nature of proteins at different aggregate scales. Intensity based multi-fractal dimensions (ILMFD)...

  12. Detection of Rifampin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Double Gradient-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpellini, Paolo; Braglia, Sergio; Carrera, Paola; Cedri, Maura; Cichero, Paola; Colombo, Alessia; Crucianelli, Rosella; Gori, Andrea; Ferrari, Maurizio; Lazzarin, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    We applied double gradient-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DG-DGGE) for the rapid detection of rifampin (RMP) resistance from rpoB PCR products of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and clinical samples. The results of this method were fully concordant with those of DNA sequencing and susceptibility testing analyses. DG-DGGE is a valid alternative to the other methods of detecting mutations for predicting RMP resistance. PMID:10508043

  13. Thermal stability of chemically denatured green fluorescent protein (GFP) A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Attila; Malnasi-Csizmadia, Andras; Somogyi, Bela; Lorinczy, Denes

    2004-02-09

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a light emitter in the bioluminescence reaction of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The protein consist of 238 amino acids and produces green fluorescent light ({lambda}{sub max}=508 nm), when irradiated with near ultraviolet light. The fluorescence is due to the presence of chromophore consisting of an imidazolone ring, formed by a post-translational modification of the tripeptide -Ser{sup 65}-Tyr{sup 66}-Gly{sup 67}-, which buried into {beta}-barrel. GFP is extremely compact and heat stable molecule. In this work, we present data for the effect of chemical denaturing agent on the thermal stability of GFP. When denaturing agent is applied, global thermal stability and the melting point of the molecule is decreases, that can be monitored with differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicate, that in 1-6 M range of GuHCl the melting temperature is decreasing continuously from 83 to 38 deg. C. Interesting finding, that the calculated calorimetric enthalpy decreases with GuHCl concentration up to 3 M (5.6-0.2 kJ mol{sup -1}), but at 4 M it jumps to 8.4 and at greater concentration it is falling down to 1.1 kJ mol{sup -1}. First phenomena, i.e. the decrease of melting point with increasing GuHCl concentration can be easily explained by the effect of the extended chemical denaturation, when less and less amount of heat required to diminish the remaining hydrogen bonds in {beta}-barrel. The surprising increase of calorimetric enthalpy at 4 M concentration of GuHCl could be the consequence of a dimerization or a formation of stable complex between GFP and denaturing agent as well as a precipitation at an extreme GuHCl concentration. We are planning further experiments to elucidate fluorescent consequence of these processes.

  14. Thermal denaturation of beta-galactosidase and of two site-specific mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R A; Jacobson, A L; Huber, R E

    1990-12-11

    The thermal denaturation of wild-type beta-galactosidase and two beta-galactosidases with substitutions at the active site was studied by kinetics, differential scanning calorimetry, electrophoresis, molecular exclusion chromatography, and circular dichroism. From the results, a model is developed for thermal denaturation of beta-galactosidase which includes the reversible dissociation of ligands, reversible formation of an inactive tetramer, irreversible dissociation of the inactive tetramer to inactive monomers, and subsequent aggregation of inactive monomers to dimers and larger aggregates. Under some conditions, partial reversibility of the activity loss could be demonstrated, and several intermediates in the thermal denaturation process were trapped by quenching and observed by electrophoresis and molecular exclusion chromatography. The ligands Mg2+ and phenylethyl thio-beta-D-galactoside increase the stability of beta-galactosidase to heat denaturation by shifting the ligand binding equilibrium according to Le Chatelier's principle, thus decreasing the concentration of the ligand-free tetramer which can proceed to subsequent steps. Circular dichroism results indicated that beta-galactosidase is dominated by beta-sheet with lower amounts of alpha-helix. Large changes in secondary structure begin to occur only after activity has been lost. Single amino acid changes at the active site can have significant effects on thermal stability of beta-galactosidases. Some of the effects result from increased thermal stability of the ligand-free enzyme itself. Other effects result from changes in ligand binding, but the magnitude of the resulting changes in stability is not related to the strength of ligand binding in a simple fashion.

  15. SURFACTANT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY AND FOAM MOBILITY CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope; Richard E. Jackson

    2004-02-01

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. Also, the addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine.

  16. Stabilization of Human Serum Albumin against Urea Denaturation by Diazepam and Ketoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Pralad; Wong, Yin H; Tayyab, Saad

    2015-01-01

    Stabilizing effect of diazepam and ketoprofen, Sudlow's site II markers on human serum albumin (HSA) against urea denaturation was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. The two-step, three-state urea transition of HSA was transformed into a single-step, two-state transition with the abolishment of the intermediate state along with a shift of the transition curve towards higher urea concentrations in the presence of diazepam or ketoprofen. Interestingly, a greater shift in the transition curve of HSA was observed in the presence of ketoprofen compared to diazepam. A comparison of the intrinsic fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra of HSA and partially-denatured HSAs, obtained in the absence and the presence of diazepam or ketoprofen suggested significant retention of native-like conformation in the partially-denatured states of HSA in the presence of Sudlow's site II markers. Taken together, all these results suggested stabilization of HSA in the presence of diazepam or ketoprofen, being greater in the presence of ketoprofen.

  17. Denaturation Kinetics of Whey Protein Isolate Solutions and Fouling Mass Distribution in a Plate Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Khaldi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Few investigations have attempted to connect the mechanism of dairy fouling to the chemical reaction of denaturation (unfolding and aggregation occurring in the bulk. The objective of this study is to contribute to this aspect in order to propose innovative controls to limit fouling deposit formation. Experimental investigations have been carried out to observe the relationship between the deposit mass distribution generated in plate heat exchangers (PHE by a whey protein isolate (WPI mainly composed of β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg and the ratio between the unfolding and aggregation rate constants. Experiments using a PHE were carried out at a pilot scale to identify the deposit distribution of a model fouling solution with different calcium contents. In parallel, laboratory experiments were performed to determine the unfolding/aggregation rate constants. Data analysis showed that (i β-Lg denaturation is highly dependent on the calcium content, (ii for each fouling solution, irrespective of the imposed temperature profile, the deposit mass in each channel and the ratio between the unfolding and aggregation rate constants seem to be well correlated. This study demonstrates that both the knowledge of the thermal profile and the β-Lg denaturation rate constants are required in order to predict accurately the deposit distribution along the PHE.

  18. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides an evidence of papain denaturation and aggregation during cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rašković, Brankica; Popović, Milica; Ostojić, Sanja; Anđelković, Boban; Tešević, Vele; Polović, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease with wide substrate specificity and many applications. Despite its widespread applications, cold stability of papain has never been studied. Here, we used differential spectroscopy to monitor thermal denaturation process. Papain was the most stabile from 45 °C to 60 °C with ΔG°321 of 13.9±0.3 kJ/mol and Tm value of 84±1 °C. After cold storage, papain lost parts of its native secondary structures elements which gave an increase of 40% of intermolecular β-sheet content (band maximum detected at frequency of 1621 cm(-1) in Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum) indicating the presence of secondary structures necessary for aggregation. The presence of protein aggregates after cold storage was also proven by analytical size exclusion chromatography. After six freeze-thaw cycles around 75% of starting enzyme activity of papain was lost due to cold denaturation and aggregation of unfolded protein. Autoproteolysis of papain did not cause significant loss of the protein activity. Upon the cold storage, papain underwent structural rearrangements and aggregation that correspond to other cold denatured proteins, rather than autoproteolysis which could have the commercial importance for the growing polypeptide based industry.

  19. Thermal and mechanical denaturation properties of a DNA model with three sites per nucleotide

    CERN Document Server

    Florescu, Ana-Maria; 10.1063/1.3626870

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we show that the coarse grain model for DNA, which has been proposed recently by Knotts, Rathore, Schwartz and de Pablo (J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084901 (2007)), can be adapted to describe the thermal and mechanical denaturation of long DNA sequences by adjusting slightly the base pairing contribution. The adjusted model leads to (i) critical temperatures for long homogeneous sequences that are in good agreement with both experimental ones and those obtained from statistical models, (ii) a realistic step-like denaturation behaviour for long inhomogeneous sequences, and (iii) critical forces at ambient temperature of the order of 10 pN, close to measured values. The adjusted model furthermore supports the conclusion that the thermal denaturation of long homogeneous sequences corresponds to a first-order phase transition and yields a critical exponent for the critical force equal to sigma=0.70. This model is both geometrically and energetically realistic, in the sense that the helical structure and th...

  20. Remarkable activation of enzymes in nonaqueous media by denaturing organic cosolvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almarsson, O.; Klibanov, A.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-01-05

    The rates of transesterification reactions catalyzed by the protease subtilisin Carlsberg suspended in various anhydrous solvents at 30 C can be increased more than 100-fold by the addition of denaturing organic cosolvents (dimethyl sulfoxide or formamide); in water, the same cosolvents exert no enzyme activation. At 4 C, the activation effect on the lyophilized protease is even higher, reaching 1,000-fold. Marked enhancement of enzymatic activity in anhydrous solvents by formamide is also observed for two other enzymes, {alpha}-chymotrypsin and Rhizomucor miehei lipase, and is manifested in two transesterification reactions. In addition to lyophilized subtilisin, crosslinked crystals of subtilisin are also amenable to the dramatic activation by the denaturing cosolvents. In contrast, subtilisin solubilized in anhydrous media by covalent modification with poly(ethylene glycol) exhibits only modest activation. These observations are rationalized in terms of a mechanistic hypothesis based on an enhanced protein flexibility in anhydrous milieu brought about by the denaturing organic cosolvents. The latter exert their lubricating effect largely at the interfaces between enzyme molecules in a solid preparation, thus easing the flexibility constraints imposed by protein-protein contacts.

  1. Single domain antibodies are specially suited for quantitative determination of gliadins under denaturing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doña, Vanina; Urrutia, Mariela; Bayardo, Mariela; Alzogaray, Vanina; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Chirdo, Fernando G

    2010-01-27

    Food intended for celiac patients' consumption must be analyzed for the presence of toxic prolamins using high detectability tests. Though 60% ethanol is the most commonly used solvent for prolamins extraction, 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) and guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) can be added to increase protein recovery. However, ethanol and denaturing agents interfere with antigen recognition when conventional antibodies are used. In the present work, a new method for gliadins quantification is shown. The method is based on the selection of llama single domain antibody fragments able to operate under denaturing conditions. Six out of 28 VHH-phages obtained retained their binding capacity in 15% ethanol. Selected clones presented a long CDR3 region containing two additional cysteines that could be responsible for the higher stability. One of the clones (named VHH26) was fully operative in the presence of 15% ethanol, 0.5% 2-ME, and 0.5 M GuHCl. Capture ELISA using VHH26 was able to detect gliadins in samples shown as negatives by conventional ELISA. Therefore, this new strategy appears as an excellent platform for quantitative determination of proteins or any other immunogenic compound, in the presence of denaturing agents, when specific recognition units with high stability are required.

  2. Comparison of membrane electroporation and protein denature in response to pulsed electric field with different durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feiran; Fang, Zhihui; Mast, Jason; Chen, Wei

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we compared the minimum potential differences in the electroporation of membrane lipid bilayers and the denaturation of membrane proteins in response to an intensive pulsed electric field with various pulse durations. Single skeletal muscle fibers were exposed to a pulsed external electric field. The field-induced changes in the membrane integrity (leakage current) and the Na channel currents were monitored to identify the minimum electric field needed to damage the membrane lipid bilayer and the membrane proteins, respectively. We found that in response to a relatively long pulsed electric shock (longer than the membrane intrinsic time constant), a lower membrane potential was needed to electroporate the cell membrane than for denaturing the membrane proteins, while for a short pulse a higher membrane potential was needed. In other words, phospholipid bilayers are more sensitive to the electric field than the membrane proteins for a long pulsed shock, while for a short pulse the proteins become more vulnerable. We can predict that for a short or ultrashort pulsed electric shock, the minimum membrane potential required to start to denature the protein functions in the cell plasma membrane is lower than that which starts to reduce the membrane integrity.

  3. Enhance transdermal delivery of flurbiprofen via microemulsions: Effects of different types of surfactants and cosurfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, MA.; Rahman, NU.; Ahmad, S.; Ali, MY.; Ahmad, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Microemulsions are thermodynamically stable, clear dispersions of water, oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant. This study was aimed to develop flurbiprofen microemulsion for enhanced transdermal delivery and investigate the effects of different surfactants and cosurfactants on its delivery and phase behavior. Method Various surfactant-cosurfactant mixtures in ratio of 2:1 (Smix) along with oleic acid (oil) were selected and phase diagrams were constructed. Six microemulsions each containing 5% drug, 5% oil, 56% Smix and 34% water, were prepared and compared for their permeation and phase behaviors to determine the effects of the type of Smix. Results In vitro transdermal permeation through rabbit skin of all microemulsions was high than saturated aqueous drug solution. Tween 20 and ethanol as Smix produced the highest flux amongst all the Smix, and were used to prepare formulations with different values of oil and Smix. While the type of surfactant did not affect the droplet size, propylene glycol as cosurfactant produced the largest droplets and highest viscosity. Decrease in oil or Smix concentration resulted in decrease of the droplet size and increase in permeation flux while decrease in viscosity also increased the permeation flux of microemulsions. Finally the selected microemulsion formulation comprising 5% flurbiprofen, 5% oleic acid, 46% Tween 20:ethanol (2:1) and 44% water, showed the highest transdermal flux and caused no skin irritation. Conclusion Type of surfactant and cosurfactant affect both the phase behavior and transdermal drug delivery of microemulsion; and results of this study showed that they are promising vehicles for improved transdermal delivery and sustained action of flurbiprofen. PMID:23008689

  4. Enhance Transdermal Delivery of Flurbiprofen Via Microemulsions: Effects of Different Types of Surfactants and Cosurfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ahmad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Microemulsions are thermodynamically stable, clear dispersions of water, oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant. This study was aimed to develop flurbiprofen microemulsion for enhanced transdermal delivery and investigate the effects of different surfactants and cosurfactants on its delivery and phase behavior.Method: Various surfactant-cosurfactant mixtures in ratio of 2:1 (Smix along with oleic acid (oil were selected and phase diagrams were constructed. Six microemulsions each containing 5% drug, 5% oil, 56% Smix and 34% water, were prepared and compared for their permeation and phase behaviors to determine the effects of the type of Smix.Results: In vitro transdermal permeation through rabbit skin of all microemulsions was high than saturated aqueous drug solution. Tween 20 and ethanol as Smix produced the highest flux amongst all the Smix, and were used to prepare formulations with different values of oil and Smix. While the type of surfactant did not affect the droplet size, propylene glycol as cosurfactant produced the largest droplets and highest viscosity. Decrease in oil or Smix concentration resulted in decrease of the droplet size and increase in permeation flux while decrease in viscosity also increased the permeation flux of microemulsions. Finally the selected microemulsion formulation comprising 5% flurbiprofen, 5% oleic acid, 46% Tween 20:ethanol (2:1 and 44% water, showed the highest transdermal flux and caused no skin irritation.Conclusion: Type of surfactant and cosurfactant affect both the phase behavior and transdermal drug delivery of microemulsion; and results of this study showed that they are promising vehicles for improved transdermal delivery and sustained action of flurbiprofen.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF PHASE AND EMULSION BEHAVIOR, SURFACTANT RETENTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FOR NOVEL ALCOHOL ETHOXYCARBOXYLATE SURFACTANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebone T. Moeti; Ramanathan Sampath

    2001-09-28

    This final technical report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-97FT97278 during the period October 01, 1997 to August 31, 2001 which covers the total performance period of the project. During this period, detailed information on optimal salinity, temperature, emulsion morphologies, effectiveness for surfactant retention and oil recovery was obtained for an Alcohol Ethoxycarboxylate (AEC) surfactant to evaluate its performance in flooding processes. Tests were conducted on several AEC surfactants and NEODOX (23-4) was identified as the most suitable hybrid surfactant that yielded the best proportion in volume for top, middle, and bottom phases when mixed with oil and water. Following the selection of this surfactant, temperature and salinity scans were performed to identify the optimal salinity and temperature, and the temperature and salinity intervals in which all three phases coexisted. NEODOX 23-4 formed three phases between 4 and 52.5 C. It formed an aqueous rich microemulsion phase at high temperatures and an oleic rich microemulsion phase at low temperatures--a characteristic of the ionic part of the surfactant. The morphology measurement system was set-up successfully at CAU. The best oil/water/surfactant system defined by the above phase work was then studied for emulsion morphologies. Electrical conductivities were measured for middle and bottom phases of the NEODOX 23-4/dodecane/10mM water system and by mixing measured volumes of the middle phase into a fixed volume of the bottom phase and vice versa at room temperature. Electrical conductivity of the mixture decreased as the fraction of volume of the middle phase was increased and vice versa. Also inversion phenomena was observed. These experiments were then repeated for bottom/middle (B/M) and middle/bottom (M/B) conjugate pair phases at 10, 15, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 C. Electrical conductivity measurements were then compared with the predictions of the conductivity model developed in

  6. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lifeng; Witkowski, Colette M.; Craig, Michael M.; Greenwade, Molly M.; Joseph, Katherine L.

    2009-12-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system.

  7. "The effects of polysorbate surfactants on the structure of mucus Glycoproteins "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajadi Tabassi A

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic oscillatory technique was used to assess the effect of polysorbate non-ionic surfactants on mucus rheology. Adherent mucus gel was scraped from the surface mucosa of pig stomachs and purified by gel exclusion chromatography followed by ultrafiltration and gelation. Rheological measurements of this gel were carried out on a Carri-Med Controlled Stress Rheometer. Appropriate volumes of surfactant solution were added to weighed samples of mucus gel so that a final concentration of 20 mM surfactant was achieved in a gel containing 8% w/w solids content. Polysorbate 20 (PS20, polysorbate 40 (PS40, polysorbate 60 (PS60 and polysorbate 80 (PS80 all decreased both storage (elastic modulus G’ and loss (viscous modulus G’’ significantly at 10 Hz (PPS20>PS60>PS40. The mechanisms by which surfactants disturb the mucus structure are not fully understood, nonetheless, they could possibly affect the mucus gel properties by causing depletion of the glycoprotein constituents such as non-mucin proteins and mucin associated lipids. This might lead to the conclusion that polysorbates, by reducing the viscoelasticity of mucus gel could alleviate its barrier properties and facilitate the diffusion of concomitantly administered drugs via mucus gel.

  8. Manipulating perfume delivery to the interface using polymer-surfactant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig

    2016-03-15

    Enhanced delivery of perfumes to interfaces is an important element of their effectiveness in a range of home and personal care products. The role of polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures to promote perfume adsorption at interfaces is explored here. Neutron reflectivity, NR, was used to quantify the adsorption of the model perfumes phenylethanol, PE, and linalool, LL, at the air-water interface in the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS, and the cationic polyelectrolytes, poly(dimethyldiallyl ammonium chloride), polydmdaac, and poly(ethyleneimine), PEI. The strong SDS-polydmdaac interaction dominates the surface adsorption in SDS-polymer-perfume (PE, LL) mixtures, such that the PE and LL adsorption is greatly suppressed. For PEI-SDS-perfume mixtures the PEI-LL interaction competes with the SDS-PEI interaction at all pH at the surface and significant LL adsorption occurs, whereas for PE the PEI-SDS interaction dominates and the PE adsorption is greatly reduced. The use of the strong surface polyelectrolyte-ionic surfactant interaction to manipulate perfume adsorption at the air-water interface has been demonstrated. In particular the results show how the competition between polyelectrolyte, surfactant and perfume interactions at the surface and in solution affect the partitioning of perfumes to the surface.

  9. Surfactant-assisted sol–gel synthesis of forsterite nanoparticles as a novel drug delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanzadeh-Tabrizi, S.A., E-mail: tabrizi1980@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bigham, Ashkan [Advanced Materials Research Center, Materials Engineering Department, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafienia, Mohammad [Biosensor Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, forsterite nanoparticles were synthesized via surfactant-assisted sol–gel method using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a surfactant. The effects of CTAB contents and heat treatment on the textural properties and drug release from nanoparticles were investigated. The synthesized powders were studied by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis and transmission electron microscope images. Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} materials demonstrated mesoporous characteristics and large specific surface area ranging from 159 to 30 m{sup 2}/g. The TEM results showed that forsterite nanorods had diameters about 4 nm and lengths ranging from 10 to 60 nm. It was found that the samples with 6 g CTAB show slower drug release rate than the other specimens, which is due to smaller pore size. This study revealed that the drug delivery of forsterite can be tailored by changing the amount of surfactant. - Highlights: • Forsterite nanoparticles were synthesized via surfactant-assisted sol–gel method. • Nanoparticles were loaded with ibuprofen as a novel drug delivery system. • Synthesized nanoparticles had a rod-like morphology. • CTAB concentration strongly affected the textural properties and drug release of the nanoparticles.

  10. Sorption of a nonionic surfactant Tween 80 by minerals and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soyoung; Jeong, Hoon Young

    2015-03-02

    Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate Tween 80 sorption by oxides, aluminosilicates, and soils. For oxides, the sorption by silica and alumina follow linear isotherms, and that by hematite follows a Langmuir isotherm. Considering isotherm type and surface coverage, Tween 80 may partition into the silica/alumina-water interface, whereas it may bind to hematite surface sites. Among aluminosilicates, montmorillonite shows the greatest sorption due to the absorption of Tween 80 into interlayers. For other aluminosilicates, it sorbs to surfaces, with the sorption increasing as plagioclaseTween 80 sorption. The greater sorption by untreated soils than H2O2-treated soils indicates that soil organic matter is a vital sorbent. The sorption hysteresis, contributed to by clay minerals and soil organic matter, is characterized by the greater sorption during the desorption than the sorption stages. This suggests the potential difficulty in removing surfactants from soils. Also, sorption of surfactants can adversely affect surfactant-enhanced remediation by decreasing the aquifer permeability and the availability of surfactants for micellar solubilization.

  11. Accumulation of yellow Monascus pigments by extractive fermentation in nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xu; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Zhilong

    2015-02-01

    Monascus species can produce various secondary metabolites of polyketide structure. In the current study, it is found that an interesting phenomenon, i.e., submerged culture of Monascus species in an aqueous solution majorly accumulated intracellular orange Monascus pigments exhibiting one peak at 470 nm with absorbance of 32 OD while extractive fermentation in a nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution produced extracellular and intracellular yellow Monascus pigments exhibiting one peak at 410 nm with absorbance 30 OD and 12 OD, respectively. The spectrum profiles of both intracellular and extracellular Monascus pigments were affected by surfactant loading, extractive fermentation time, and surfactant adding time. Meanwhile, the instability of orange Monascus pigments in the extracellular nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution was also confirmed experimentally. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is attributed to the export of intracellular yellow Monascus pigments into its broth by extractive fermentation. The transferring of intracellular yellow Monascus pigments into its broth blocks yellow Monascus pigments from further enzymatic conversion or eliminates the feedback inhibition of yellow Monascus pigments based on the biosynthetic pathway of Monascus pigments.

  12. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkowski Colette

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood–brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system.

  13. Lyophilization-induced protein denaturation in phosphate buffer systems: monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikal-Cleland, K A; Carpenter, J F

    2001-09-01

    During freezing in phosphate buffers, selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component and subsequent pH shifts may induce protein denaturation. Previous reports indicate significantly more inactivation and secondary structural perturbation of monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) during freeze-thawing in sodium phosphate (NaP) buffer as compared with potassium phosphate (KP) buffer. This observation was attributed to the significant pH shifts (from 7.0 to as low as 3.8) observed during freezing in the NaP buffer (1). In the current study, we investigated the impact of the additional stress of dehydration after freezing on the recovery of active protein on reconstitution and the retention of the native structure in the dried state. Freeze-drying monomeric and tetrameric beta-gal in either NaP or KP buffer resulted in significant secondary structural perturbations, which were greatest for the NaP samples. However, similar recoveries of active monomeric protein were observed after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, indicating that most dehydration-induced unfolding was reversible on reconstitution of the freeze-dried protein. In contrast, the tetrameric protein was more susceptible to dehydration-induced denaturation as seen by the greater loss in activity after reconstitution of the freeze-dried samples relative to that measured after freeze-thawing. To ensure optimal protein stability during freeze-drying, the protein must be protected from both freezing and dehydration stresses. Although poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran are preferentially excluded solutes and should confer protection during freezing, they were unable to prevent lyophilization-induced denaturation. In addition, Tween did not foster maintenance of native protein during freeze-drying. However, sucrose, which hydrogen bonds to dried protein in the place of lost water, greatly reduced freezing- and drying-induced denaturation, as observed by the high retention of native

  14. Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  15. Foaming and foam stability for mixed polymer-surfactant solutions: effects of surfactant type and polymer charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, R; Tcholakova, S; Denkov, N D

    2012-03-20

    Solutions of surfactant-polymer mixtures often exhibit different foaming properties, compared to the solutions of the individual components, due to the strong tendency for formation of polymer-surfactant complexes in the bulk and on the surface of the mixed solutions. A generally shared view in the literature is that electrostatic interactions govern the formation of these complexes, for example between anionic surfactants and cationic polymers. In this study we combine foam tests with model experiments to evaluate and explain the effect of several polymer-surfactant mixtures on the foaminess and foam stability of the respective solutions. Anionic, cationic, and nonionic surfactants (SDS, C(12)TAB, and C(12)EO(23)) were studied to clarify the role of surfactant charge. Highly hydrophilic cationic and nonionic polymers (polyvinylamine and polyvinylformamide, respectivey) were chosen to eliminate the (more trivial) effect of direct hydrophobic interactions between the surfactant tails and the hydrophobic regions on the polymer chains. Our experiments showed clearly that the presence of opposite charges is not a necessary condition for boosting the foaminess and foam stability in the surfactant-polymer mixtures studied. Clear foam boosting (synergistic) effects were observed in the mixtures of cationic surfactant and cationic polymer, cationic surfactant and nonionic polymer, and anionic surfactant and nonionic polymer. The mixtures of anionic surfactant and cationic polymer showed improved foam stability, however, the foaminess was strongly reduced, as compared to the surfactant solutions without polymer. No significant synergistic or antagonistic effects were observed for the mixture of nonionic surfactant (with low critical micelle concentration) and nonionic polymer. The results from the model experiments allowed us to explain the observed trends by the different adsorption dynamics and complex formation pattern in the systems studied.

  16. Antibodies with specificity for native and denatured forms of ovalbumin differ in reactivity between enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, B. E.; Bergmann, Ann Christina; Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this study, polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to native and denatured chicken ovalbumin (OVA) were produced to compare their dependency on continuous and three-dimensional epitopes. These antibodies were characterized with respect to reactivity to native and denatured OVA by enzyme......-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) employing surface-bound OVA and streptavidin-capture ELISA to determine whether effects of different coating influence antibody specificity and with respect to epitope specificity by peptide ELISA, using overlapping peptides, covering the complete OVA sequence. Polyclonal antibodies...... to native OVA reacted strongly with native and denatured OVA in both assays, but did not react with the overlapping peptides. Polyclonal antibodies to denatured OVA reacted strongly with both OVA forms and with several of the overlapping peptides. Monoclonal antibodies to native OVA reacted preferentially...

  17. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE as a powerful novel alternative for differentiation of epizootic ISA virus variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela Carmona

    Full Text Available Infectious Salmon Anemia is a devastating disease critically affecting world-wide salmon production. Chile has been particularly stricken by this disease which in all cases has been directly related with its causative agent, a novel orthomyxovirus which presents specific and distinctive infective features. Among these, two molecular markers have been directly associated with pathogenicity in two of the eight RNA sub genomic coding units of the virus: an insertion hot spot region present in viral segment 5 and a Highly Polymorphic Region (HPR located in viral segment 6. Here we report the successful adaptation of a PCR-dependent denaturing gel electrophoresis technique (DGGE, which enables differentiation of selected reported HPR epizootic variants detected in Chile. At the same time, the technique allows us to distinguish one nucleotide differences in sequences associated with the intriguing, and still not well-understood, insertion events which tend to occur on RNA Segment 5. Thus, the versatility of the technique opens new opportunities for improved understanding of the complex biology of all ISA variants as well as possible applications to other highly variable pathogens.

  18. Cowpea Vicilins: Fractionation of Urea Denatured Sub-Units and Effects on Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Chagas Mota

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Vicilins (7S storage globulins isolated from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. seeds which were susceptible (S and resistant (R to the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus F., Coleoptera: Bruchidae were denatured by urea and fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. Isolated fractions were incorporated in artificial seeds for assessment of their toxicity to C. maculatus. The most acidic fractions of both susceptible (CE-31 cultivar and resistant (IT81D-1045 line seeds were shown to affect development and survival of the bruchid. Results indicated that vicilin polypeptides of toxic nature were expressed in both types of storage globulins although at different levels.Vicilinas (globulinas de reserva 7S isoladas de sementes de feijão-de-corda (Vigna unguiculata L., susceptíveis (S e resistentes (R ao caruncho/gorgulho (Callosobruchus maculatus F., Coleoptera: Bruchidae foram desnaturadas por uréia e fracionadas por cromatografia de troca iônica. As frações isoladas foram incorporadas em sementes artificiais para avaliação de sua toxicidade a C. maculatus. As fracões mais ácidas de ambas vicilinas afetaram o desenvolvimento e a sobrevivência do bruquídeo. Sugerimos que polipeptídeos de vicilinas de natureza tóxica são expressos em ambos tipos de globulinas de reserva, embora em níveis diferentes.

  19. Seven new mutations in hMSH2, an HNPCC Gene, identified by denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnen, J.; Vasen, H.; Khan, P.M.; Klift, H. van der; Leeuwen, C. van; Broek, M. van den; Leeuwen-Cornelisse, I. van; Fodde, R.; Menko, F.H. [Univ. Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Nagengast, F. [Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-05-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a relatively common autosomal dominant cancer-susceptibility condition. The recent isolation of the DNA mismatch repair genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2) responsible for HNPCC has allowed the search for germ-line mutations in affected individuals. In this study we used denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations in the hMSH2 gene. Analysis of all the 16 exons of HMSH2, in 34 unrelated HNPCC kindreds, has revealed seven novel pathogenic germ-line mutations resulting in stop codons either directly or through frameshifts. Additionally, nucleotide substitutions giving rise to one missense, two silent, and one useful polymorphism have been identified. The proportion of families in which hMSH2 mutations were found is 21%. Although the spectrum of mutations spread at the hMSH2 gene among HNPCC patients appears extremely heterogeneous, we were not able to establish any correlation between the site of the individual mutations and the corresponding tumor spectrum. Our results indicate that, given the genomic size and organization of the hMSH2 gene and the heterogeneity of its mutation spectrum, a rapid and efficient mutation detection procedure is necessary for routine molecular diagnosis and presymptomatic detection of the disease in a clinical setup. 34 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller

    2006-09-09

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A mixture of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. The mixture is single phase for higher salinity or calcium concentrations than that for either surfactant used alone. This makes it possible to inject the surfactant slug with polymer close to optimal conditions and yet be single phase. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. It uses partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for mobility control. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of naphthenic soap and significant reduction of synthetic surfactant adsorption. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT takes advantage of the observation that the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Even for a fixed ratio of soap to surfactant, the range of salinity for low IFT was wider than that reported for surfactant systems in the literature. Low temperature, forced displacement experiments in dolomite and silica sandpacks demonstrate that greater than 95% recovery of the waterflood remaining oil is possible with 0.2% surfactant concentration, 0.5 PV surfactant slug, with no alcohol. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the role of soap/surfactant ratio on passage of the profile through the ultralow IFT region, the importance of a wide salinity range of low IFT, and the importance of the viscosity of the surfactant slug. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs as well as a

  1. Use of polymers and a surfactant in the treatment of Kraft process wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Seyffert, Hans J.

    1988-01-01

    This study-investigated the use of cationic polymers, and a surfactant, EHDABr, in the color removal treatment of Kraft pulp and paper wastewater. Four polymers were evaluated for their color removal performance by jar test procedures. The polymers removed between 77 and 87% of the wastewater color. The affect of pH upon polymer performance varied with the polymer tested. Powdered activated carbon addition improved the performance of the polymers. The color removal abili...

  2. Modeling of surfactant transport and adsorption in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, F.T.H.

    1991-04-01

    When surfactant solution is flowing in a reservoir formation, surfactants will be diluted by flow dispersion, retained in dead-end pores, adsorbed on rock surfaces, or precipitated due to ion exchange. The loss of surfactant will be detrimental to the performance of gas foam. Information of surfactant concentration profiles in reservoir formations is essential for gas foaming technique development. The major objective of this research is to investigate with mathematical models the transport and dynamic adsorption of surfactants in porous media. The mathematical models have taken into account the convection, dispersion, capacitance, and adsorption effects on concentrations of surfactants. Numerical methods and computer programs have been developed which can be used to match experimental results and to determine the characterization parameters in the models. The models can be included in foam simulation programs to calculate surfactant concentration profiles in porous media. A flow experimental method was developed to measure the effluent surfactant concentration, which will be used to determine the model parameters. Commercial foaming agent Alipal CD-128 was used in this study. Equilibrium adsorption and surfactant precipitation have been tested. Tracer solutions with a nonadsorbing solute such as dextrose and sucrose were used to determine the dispersion parameters for the experimental sandpack; thus, the adsorption of the surfactant in the test sand can be identified with an adequate model. 49 refs., 21 figs.

  3. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries.

  4. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies

  5. Imaging high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced tissue denaturation by multispectral photoacoustic method: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; O'Neill, Brian

    2013-03-10

    We present an ex vivo study for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in multispectral photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of tissue denaturation induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in this paper. Tissue of bovine muscle was thermally treated in a heated water bath and by HIFU, and then was imaged using a multispectral photoacoustic approach. Light at multiple optical wavelengths between 700 and 900 nm was delivered to the treated bovine muscle tissue to excite the photoacoustic signal. Apparent tissue denaturation has been observed in multispectral photoacoustic images after being treated in a water bath and by HIFU. It is interesting that the denaturation is more striking at shorter optical wavelength photoacoustic images than at longer optical wavelength photoacoustic images. Multispectral photoacoustic images of the tissue denaturation were further analyzed and the photoacoustic spectrums of the denaturized tissue were calculated in this paper. This study suggests that a multispectral PAI approach might be a promising tool to evaluate tissue denaturation induced by HIFU treatment.

  6. Denatured-state energy landscapes of a protein structural database reveal the energetic determinants of a framework model for folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Suwei; Gu, Jenny; Larson, Scott A; Whitten, Steven T; Hilser, Vincent J

    2008-09-19

    Position-specific denatured-state thermodynamics were determined for a database of human proteins by use of an ensemble-based model of protein structure. The results of modeling denatured protein in this manner reveal important sequence-dependent thermodynamic properties in the denatured ensembles as well as fundamental differences between the denatured and native ensembles in overall thermodynamic character. The generality and robustness of these results were validated by performing fold-recognition experiments, whereby sequences were matched with their respective folds based on amino acid propensities for the different energetic environments in the protein, as determined through cluster analysis. Correlation analysis between structure and energetic information revealed that sequence segments destined for beta-sheet in the final native fold are energetically more predisposed to a broader repertoire of states than are sequence segments destined for alpha-helix. These results suggest that within the subensemble of mostly unstructured states, the energy landscapes are dominated by states in which parts of helices adopt structure, whereas structure formation for sequences destined for beta-strand is far less probable. These results support a framework model of folding, which suggests that, in general, the denatured state has evolutionarily evolved to avoid low-energy conformations in sequences that ultimately adopt beta-strand. Instead, the denatured state evolved so that sequence segments that ultimately adopt alpha-helix and coil will have a high intrinsic structure formation capability, thus serving as potential nucleation sites.

  7. A high-resolution study of surfactant partitioning and kinetic limitations for two-component internally mixed aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, S. R.; Petters, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), altering cloud properties and ultimately affecting climate through their effect on the radiative balance. Aerosol CCN activity depends in part on aerosol composition and surfactant compounds are of particular interest because surfactants are enriched at the water/air interface, resulting in a radial concentration gradient within the aqueous droplet. Accurate treatment of the surfactant concentration gradient complicates the otherwise straightforward predictions of CCN activity for aerosols of known composition. To accurately evaluate predictions made by theory, laboratory studies investigating the relationship between critical supersaturation and dry diameter of particles that include surfactants require significant reduction in measurement uncertainty for both water-uptake and CCN measurements. Furthermore, uncertainties remain regarding kinetic limitations to surfactant partitioning that could result in deviation from predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. This study attempts to address some of these issues through high-resolution analysis of CCN activity of two-component mixed surfactant/non-surfactant aerosols at different internal mixing ratios performed with and without a water-uptake time delay to ascertain whether or not the observed effects are kinetically limited. We present new data for the aerosols consisting of 1) the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with ammonium sulfate, 2) SDS with sodium chloride and 3) the strong non-ionic fluorosurfactant Zonyl with an organic proxy glucose. As a point of reference we also evaluated the mixture of ammonium sulfate with glucose. Aerosol activation diameters were determined using CCN analysis in conjunction with scanning mobility size classification and high sheath-to-aerosol flow ratios. This resulted in CCN-derived kappa values that could be determined within +/-5% relative error. To test whether dynamic surfactant partitioning

  8. Hydrogels of sodium alginate in cationic surfactants: Surfactant dependent modulation of encapsulation/release toward Ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Suraya; Chat, Oyais Ahmad; Maswal, Masrat; Ashraf, Uzma; Rather, Ghulam Mohammad; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-11-20

    The interaction of cetyltrimethylammoium bromide (CTAB) and its gemini homologue (butanediyl-1,4-bis (dimethylcetylammonium bromide), 16-4-16 with biocompatible polymer sodium alginate (SA) has been investigated in aqueous medium. Addition of K2CO3 influences viscoelastic properties of surfactant impregnated SA via competition between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Viscosity of these polymer-surfactant systems increases with increase in concentration of K2CO3, and a cryogel is formed at about 0.5M K2CO3 concentration. The thermal stability of gel (5% SA+0.5M K2CO3) decreases with increase in surfactant concentration, a minimum is observed with increase in 16-4-16 concentration. The impact of surfactant addition on the alginate structure vis-à-vis its drug loading capability and release thereof was studied using Ibuprofen (IBU) as the model drug. The hydrogel with 16-4-16 exhibits higher IBU encapsulation and faster release in comparison to the one containing CTAB. This higher encapsulation-cum-faster release capability has been related to micelle mediated solubilization and greater porosity of the hydrogel with gemini surfactant.

  9. Bending elasticity of charged surfactant layers: the effect of mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, L Magnus

    2006-08-01

    Expressions have been derived from which the spontaneous curvature (H(0)), bending rigidity (k(c)), and saddle-splay constant (k(c)) of mixed monolayers and bilayers may be calculated from molecular and solution properties as well as experimentally available quantities such as the macroscopic hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfacial tension. Three different cases of binary surfactant mixtures have been treated in detail: (i) mixtures of an ionic and a nonionic surfactant, (ii) mixtures of two oppositely charged surfactants, and (iii) mixtures of two ionic surfactants with identical headgroups but different tail volumes. It is demonstrated that k(c)H(0), k(c), and k(c) for mixtures of surfactants with flexible tails may be subdivided into one contribution that is due to bending properties of an infinitely thin surface as calculated from the Poisson-Boltzmann mean field theory and one contribution appearing as a result of the surfactant film having a finite thickness with the surface of charge located somewhat outside the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface. As a matter of fact, the picture becomes completely different as finite layer thickness effects are taken into account, and as a result, the spontaneous curvature is extensively lowered whereas the bending rigidity is raised. Furthermore, an additional contribution to k(c) is present for surfactant mixtures but is absent for k(c)H(0) and k(c). This contribution appears as a consequence of the minimization of the free energy with respect to the composition of a surfactant layer that is open in the thermodynamic sense and must always be negative (i.e., k(c) is generally found to be brought down by the process of mixing two or more surfactants). The magnitude of the reduction of k(c) increases with increasing asymmetry between two surfactants with respect to headgroup charge number and tail volume. As a consequence, the bending rigidity assumes the lowest values for layers formed in mixtures of two oppositely charged

  10. Preparation and evaluation of sulphonamide nonionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M. H. M.

    2010-07-01

    Alkyl (octyl, decyl and dodecyl; C{sub 8}, C{sub 1}0 and C{sub 1}2) benzene sulphonyl chloride was used in the preparation of a novel series of nonionic surfactants (IV-VI)a-c, (VII-IX) a-c and (X-XII)a-c. The preparations were completed by reacting each alkyl (C{sub 8}, C{sub 1}0 and C{sub 1}2) benzene sulphonyl chloride with ethanolamine to give (I-III) respectively. The resulting products were reacted separately with ethylene oxide in the presence of different (base KOH, Lewis acid SnCl4 and k10 clay) catalysts to produce different moles of nonionic surfactants (5, 7 and 9) in sequence corresponding to (IV-VI)a-c, (VII-IX) a-c and (X-XII)a-c respectively. The chemical structures of prepared nonionic surfactants were elucidated by IR and 1HNMR spectra. The surface activity, biodegradability and biological activities of the prepared compounds were investigated. The obtained data show that these compounds have good surface and biological activities as well as reasonable biodegradability properties. (Author) 30 refs.

  11. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-05-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like `top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and `bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated.

  12. A novel approach to enhancement of surface properties of CdO films by using surfactant: dextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Bünyamin; Bayansal, Fatih; Yüksel, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    We studied the effect of an organic surfactant, dextrin, concentration on structural, morphological and optical properties of nanostructured CdO films deposited on glass substrates by using an easy and low-cost SILAR method. Microstructures of the nanostructured CdO films were optimized by adjusting dextrin concentration. XRD, SEM and UV-Vis Spectroscopy were used to study phase structure, surface morphology and optical properties of CdO films. Furthermore, effects of dextrin concentration on the surface roughness characteristics of CdO samples were reported. The results showed that the presence of organic surfactant highly affected the physical properties of CdO nanomaterials.

  13. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Somasundaran

    2006-04-30

    During this reporting period, further fundamental studies were conducted to understand the mechanism of the interactions between surfactants and minerals with the aim of minimizing chemical loss by adsorption. The effects of pH and mixing ratio on the chemical loss by adsorption were investigated. Some preliminary modeling work has been done towards the aim of developing a guide book to design optimal polymer/surfactant formula based on the understanding of adsorption and orientation of surfactants and their aggregates at solid/liquid interfaces. The study of adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) was continued during this period. Based on the adsorption results, the effects of pH and mixing ratio on reagent loss were quantitatively evaluated. Adsorption of dodecyl maltoside showed a maximum at certain mixing ratio at low pH (3{approx}5), while adsorption of dodecyl maltoside steadily decreased with the increase in C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na. Analytical ultracentrifuge technique was employed to study the micellization of DM/C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na mixtures. Compositional changes of the aggregates were observed the mixing ratio of the components. Surfactant mixture micellization affects the conformation and orientation of adsorption layer at mineral/water interface and thus the wettability and as a result, the oil release efficiency of the chemical flooding processes. A preliminary term, Reagent Loss Index (RLI), has been proposed to represent the adsorption of all the surfactants in a standardized framework for the development of the models. Previously reported adsorption data have been analyzed using the theoretical framework for the preparation of a guidebook to help optimization of chemical combinations and selection of reagent scheme for enhanced oil recovery.

  14. Effect of nonionic surfactant Brij 35 on the fate and transport of oxytetracycline antibiotic in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Eman M; Prasher, Shiv O; Patel, Ramanbhai M

    2013-02-15

    In many parts of the world, river water is used for irrigation. Treated, partially treated, and even untreated water from wastewater treatment plants is discharged directly into rivers, thereby degrading the quality of the water. Consequently, irrigation water may contain surfactants which may affect the fate and transport of chemicals such as pesticides and antibiotics in agricultural soils. A field lysimeter study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the nonionic surfactant, Brij 35, on the fate and transport of an antibiotic, Oxytetracycline, commonly used in cattle farms. Nine PVC lysimeters, 1.0 m long × 0.45 m diameter, were packed with a sandy soil to a bulk density of 1.35 Mg m(-3). Cattle manure, containing Oxytetracycline, was applied at the surface of the lysimeters at the recommended rate of 10 t/ha. Each of three aqueous Brij 35 solutions, 0, 0.5 and 5 g L(-1) (i.e., 'good,' 'poor' and 'very poor' quality irrigation water) were each applied to the lysimeters in triplicate. Over a 90 day period, soil and leachate samples were collected and analyzed. Batch experiment results showed that the presence of the nonionic surfactant Brij 35 significantly reduced the sorption coefficient of OTC from 23.55 mL g(-1) in the aqueous medium to 19.49, 12.49 and 14.53 in the presence of Brij 35 at concentrations of 0.25, 2.5 and 5 g L(-1), respectively. Lysimeter results indicted the significant downward movement of OTC at depths of 60 cm into soil profile and leachate in the presence of surfactant. Thus, the reuse of wastewater containing surfactants might enhance the mobility of contaminants and increase ground water pollution.

  15. Sorption of a nonionic surfactant Tween 80 by minerals and soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Soyoung, E-mail: soyoung@pusan.ac.kr; Jeong, Hoon Young, E-mail: hjeong@pusan.ac.kr

    2015-03-02

    Highlights: • Tween 80 sorption varies significantly among soil minerals. • Sorption mechanisms and atomic compositions explain to mineral-specific sorption. • Clay minerals and SOM in soils are the key contributors to Tween 80 sorption. • Hysteresis suggests the potential difficulty in removing residual surfactants. - Abstract: Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate Tween 80 sorption by oxides, aluminosilicates, and soils. For oxides, the sorption by silica and alumina follow linear isotherms, and that by hematite follows a Langmuir isotherm. Considering isotherm type and surface coverage, Tween 80 may partition into the silica/alumina–water interface, whereas it may bind to hematite surface sites. Among aluminosilicates, montmorillonite shows the greatest sorption due to the absorption of Tween 80 into interlayers. For other aluminosilicates, it sorbs to surfaces, with the sorption increasing as plagioclase < vermiculite < kaolinite. This results from the relative reactivity among surface sites: ≡NaOH, ≡CaOH << ≡SiOH < ≡AlOH. Experiments using dry- and wet-sieved soils reveal that fine-grained clay minerals, difficult to separate by dry-sieving, contribute significantly to Tween 80 sorption. The greater sorption by untreated soils than H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated soils indicates that soil organic matter is a vital sorbent. The sorption hysteresis, contributed to by clay minerals and soil organic matter, is characterized by the greater sorption during the desorption than the sorption stages. This suggests the potential difficulty in removing surfactants from soils. Also, sorption of surfactants can adversely affect surfactant-enhanced remediation by decreasing the aquifer permeability and the availability of surfactants for micellar solubilization.

  16. Influence of metacide - surfactant complexes on agricultural crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orynkul Esimova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexes based on surfactants and polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride (metacide are important for agriculture. This paper considers compositions of known bactericidal metacide with different surfactants: anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulphate (DDSNa and nonionic surfactant Tween 80 (monooleate of oxyethylenated anhydrosorbitols. The effect of individual components and associates of metacide and surfactants on productivity and infection of cereals was studied. According to the study, the highest productivity and infection rate were shown by the associate of metacide and Tween-80. At concentration of Tween-80 in aqueous solution equal to 0.001% in combination with metacide, efficiency was 98% at 0% infection. The surface tension and the wetting of metacide, DDSNa, Tween-80, and associates of metacide with surfactants were studied. In comparison with individual components, metacide-DDSNa and metacide-Tween-80 associates have higher surface activity.

  17. Interfacial mechanisms for stability of surfactant-laden films

    CERN Document Server

    Bhamla, M Saad; Alvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; Tajuelo, Javier; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-01-01

    Thin liquid films are central to everyday life. They are ubiquitous in modern technology (pharmaceuticals, coatings), consumer products (foams, emulsions) and also serve vital biological functions (tear film of the eye, pulmonary surfactants in the lung). A common feature in all these examples is the presence of surface-active molecules at the air-liquid interface. Though they form only molecularly-thin layers, these surfactants produce complex surface stresses on the free surface, which have important consequences for the dynamics and stability of the underlying thin liquid film. Here we conduct simple thinning experiments to explore the fundamental mechanisms that allow the surfactant molecules to slow the gravity-driven drainage of the underlying film. We present a simple model that works for both soluble and insoluble surfactant systems. We show that surfactants with finite surface rheology influence bulk flow through viscoelastic interfacial stresses, while surfactants with inviscid surfaces achieve stab...

  18. Estimation hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawignya, Harsa, E-mail: harsa-paw@yahoo.co.id [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Departement University of Pembangunan Nasional Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Prasetyaningrum, Aji, E-mail: ajiprasetyaningrum@gmail.com; Kusworo, Tutuk D.; Pramudono, Bambang, E-mail: Pramudono2004@yahoo.com [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Dyartanti, Endah R. [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Chemical Enginering Departement Sebelas Maret University (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Any type of surfactant has a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number (HLB number) of different. There are several methods for determining the HLB number, with ohysical properties of surfactant (solubility cloud point and interfacial tension), CMC methods and by thermodynamics properties (Free energy Gibbs). This paper proposes to determined HLB numbers from interfelation methods. The result of study indicated that the CMC method described by Hair and Moulik espesially for nonionic surfactant. The application of exess Gibbs free energy and by implication activity coefficient provides the ability to predict the behavior of surfactants in multi component mixtures of different concentration. Determination of HLB number by solubility and cloud point parameter is spesific for anionic and nonionic surfactant but this methods not available for cationic surfactants.

  19. [Pulmonary surfactant homeostasis associated genetic abnormalities and lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaojing; Sun, Xiuzhu; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is synthesized and secreted by alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells, which is a complex compound formed by proteins and lipids. Surfactant participates in a range of physiological processes such as reducing the surface tension, keeping the balance of alveolar fluid, maintaining normal alveolar morphology and conducting host defense. Genetic disorders of the surfactant homeostasis genes may result in lack of surfactant or cytotoxicity, and lead to multiple lung diseases in neonates, children and adults, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper has provided a review for the functions and processes of pulmonary surfactant metabolism, as well as the connection between disorders of surfactant homeostasis genes and lung diseases.

  20. Branched alkyl alcohol propoxylated sulfate surfactants for improved oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.; Iglauer, S.; Shuler, P.; Tang, Y. [California Institute of Technology, Covina, CA (US). Power, Environmental and Energy Research (PEER) Center; Goddard, W.A. III [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Materials and Process Simulation Center

    2010-05-15

    This investigation considers branched alkyl alcohol propoxylated sulfate surfactants as candidates for chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications. Results show that these anionic surfactants may be preferred candidates for EOR as they can be effective at creating low interfacial tension (IFT) at dilute concentrations, without requiring an alkaline agent or cosurfactant. In addition, some of the formulations exhibit a low IFT at high salinity, and hence may be suitable for use in more saline reservoirs. Adsorption tests onto kaolinite clay indicate that the loss of these surfactants can be comparable to or greater than other types of anionic surfactants. Surfactant performance was evaluated in oil recovery core flood tests. Selected formulations recovered 35-50% waterflood residual oil even with dilute 0.2 wt% surfactant concentrations from Berea sandstone cores. (orig.)

  1. Effects of silicon surfactant in rigid polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The rigid polyurethane foams (RPUFs have been fabricated from high functional crude 4,4’-di-phenylmethane diisocyanate (CMDI and polypropylene glycols (PPGs for a wide range of surfactant concentration with an environmently friendly blowing agent (HFC 365mfc. Cream time, gel time, and tack-free time increased with the addition of surfactant. Foam density decreased rapidly to a minimum at 0.5 pphp (part per hundred polyol surfactant due to the increased blowing efficiency with surfactant. Surface tension rapidly decreased to an asymptotic value at 2 pphp surfactant. In accordance with this, cell size decreased and closed cell content increased rapidly to constant values at low surfactant concentrations (<1 pphp. The decrease of cell size was accompanied by the decrease of thermal conductivity to give a linear relatiohship between the two implying that the series model of heat transfer is applicable.

  2. Gemini imidazolium surfactants: synthesis and their biophysiochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Raman; Singh, Sukhprit; Bhadani, Avinash; Kataria, Hardeep; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-08-21

    New gemini imidazolium surfactants 9-13 have been synthesized by a regioselective epoxy ring-opening reaction under solvent-free conditions. The surface properties of these new gemini surfactants were evaluated by surface tension and conductivity measurements. These surfactants have been found to have low critical micelle concentration (cmc) values as compared to other categories of gemini cationic surfactants and also showed the tendency to form premicellar aggregates in solution at sufficiently low concentration below their cmc values. The thermal degradation of these surfactants was determined by thermograviometry analysis (TGA). These new cationic surfactants have a good DNA binding capability as determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide exclusion experiments. They have also been found to have low cytotoxicity by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay on the C6 glioma cell line.

  3. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D variation in pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Husby, Steffen; Holmskov, Uffe

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) have been implicated in pulmonary innate immunity. The proteins are host defense lectins, belonging to the collectin family which also includes mannan-binding lectin (MBL). SP-A and SP-D are pattern-recognition molecules with the lectin domains binding...... lavage and blood have indicated associations with a multitude of pulmonary inflammatory diseases. In addition, accumulating evidence in mouse models of infection and inflammation indicates that recombinant forms of the surfactant proteins are biologically active in vivo and may have therapeutic potential...... in controlling pulmonary inflammatory disease. The presence of the surfactant collectins, especially SP-D, in non-pulmonary tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and genital organs, suggest additional actions located to other mucosal surfaces. The aim of this review is to summarize studies on genetic...

  4. Investigation of Polymer-Surfactant and Polymer-Drug-Surfactant Miscibility for Solid Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumaste, Suhas G; Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-09-01

    In a solid dispersion (SD), the drug is generally dispersed either molecularly or in the amorphous state in polymeric carriers, and the addition of a surfactant is often important to ensure drug release from such a system. The objective of this investigation was to screen systematically polymer-surfactant and polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility by using the film casting method. Miscibility of the crystalline solid surfactant, poloxamer 188, with two commonly used amorphous polymeric carriers, Soluplus® and HPMCAS, was first studied. Then, polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility was determined using itraconazole as the model drug, and ternary phase diagrams were constructed. The casted films were examined by DSC, PXRD and polarized light microscopy for any crystallization or phase separation of surfactant, drug or both in freshly prepared films and after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 7, 14, and 30 days. The miscibility of poloxamer 188 with Soluplus® was <10% w/w, while its miscibility with HPMCAS was at least 30% w/w. Although itraconazole by itself was miscible with Soluplus® up to 40% w/w, the presence of poloxamer drastically reduced its miscibility to <10%. In contrast, poloxamer 188 had minimal impact on HPMCAS-itraconazole miscibility. For example, the phase diagram showed amorphous miscibility of HPMCAS, itraconazole, and poloxamer 188 at 54, 23, and 23% w/w, respectively, even after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 1 month. Thus, a relatively simple and practical method of screening miscibility of different components and ultimately physical stability of SD is provided. The results also identify the HPMCAS-poloxamer 188 mixture as an optimal surface-active carrier system for SD.

  5. The Role of Surfactant in Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the insufficient production of surfactant in the lungs of preterm infants. As a result, researchers have looked into the possibility of surfactant replacement therapy as a means of preventing and treating RDS. We sought to identify the role of surfactant in the prevention and management of RDS, comparing the various types, doses, and modes of administration, and the recent development. A PubMed search was carried out up to March 2012 u...

  6. [Liposome phospholipid substitution and lung function in surfactant deprived rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, M

    1985-01-01

    In vivo activity of an artificial surfactant was studied in surfactant depleted rats. After tenfold alveolar lavage, PaO2, tidal volume, and compliance of the respiratory system fell to one third of initial value. Substitution of large unilamellar vesicles containing 90% Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 10% unsaturated phosphatidylglycerol largely restored oxygenation and lung mechanics in most animals. Complete normalization with weaning from the ventilator, however, was achieved neither with liposomes nor with natural surfactant concentrate.

  7. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope

    2005-07-01

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A combination of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT is more challenging since the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the interdependence of the various components for oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. It has been modified to represent the effects of a change in wettability. Simulated case studies demonstrate the effects of wettability.

  8. A study of the thermal denaturation of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus salivarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lighezan, Liliana; Georgieva, Ralitsa; Neagu, Adrian

    2012-09-01

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins display an intrinsic self-assembly property, forming monomolecular crystalline arrays, identified in outermost structures of the cell envelope in many organisms, such as bacteria and archaea. Isolated S-layer proteins also possess the ability to recrystallize into regular lattices, being used in biotechnological applications, such as controlling the architecture of biomimetic surfaces. To this end, the stability of the S-layer proteins under high-temperature conditions is very important. In this study, the S-layer protein has been isolated from Lactobacillus salivarius 16 strain of human origin, and purified by cation-exchange chromatography. Using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, we have investigated the thermal denaturation of the S-layer protein. The far- and near-UV CD spectra have been collected, and the temperature dependence of the CD signal in these spectral domains has been analyzed. The variable temperature results show that the secondary and tertiary structures of the S-layer protein change irreversibly due to the heating of the sample. After the cooling of the heated protein, the secondary and tertiary structures are partially recovered. The denaturation curves show that the protein unfolding depends on the sample concentration and on the heating rate. The secondary and tertiary structures of the protein suffer changes in the same temperature range. We have also detected an intermediate state in the protein denaturation pathway. Our results on the thermal behavior of the S-layer protein may be important for the use of S-layer proteins in biotechnological applications, as well as for a better understanding of the structure and function of S-layer proteins.

  9. Multiple unfolding intermediates of human placental alkaline phosphatase in equilibrium urea denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, H C; Chang, G G

    2001-12-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme with a typical alpha/beta hydrolase fold. The conformational stability of the human placental alkaline phosphatase was examined with the chemical denaturant urea. The red shifts of fluorescence spectra show a complex unfolding process involving multiple equilibrium intermediates indicating differential stability of the subdomains of the enzyme. None of these unfolding intermediates were observed in the presence of 83 mM NaCl, indicating the importance of ionic interactions in the stabilization of the unfolding intermediates. Guanidinium chloride, on the other hand, could stabilize one of the unfolding intermediates, which is not a salt effect. Some of the unfolding intermediates were also observed in circular dichroism spectroscopy, which clearly indicates steady loss of helical structure during unfolding, but very little change was observed for the beta strand content until the late stage of the unfolding process. The enzyme does not lose its phosphate-binding ability after substantial tertiary structure changes, suggesting that the substrate-binding region is more resistant to chemical denaturant than the other structural domains. Global analysis of the fluorescence spectral change demonstrated the following folding-unfolding process of the enzyme: N I(1) I(2) I(3) I(4) I(5) D. These discrete intermediates are stable at urea concentrations of 2.6, 4.1, 4.7, 5.5, 6.6, and 7.7 M, respectively. These intermediates are further characterized by acrylamide and/or potassium iodide quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of the enzyme and by the hydrophobic probes, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid and 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-binaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid. The stepwise unfolding process was interpreted by the folding energy landscape in terms of the unique structure of the enzyme. The rigid central beta-strand domain is surrounded by the peripheral alpha-helical and coil structures, which are marginally stable toward a chemical

  10. Adsorption kinetics of surfactants at liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interfaces from atomic-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya K.; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2012-02-01

    Nucleate pool boiling of pure liquid is a complex process involving different size- and time-scale phenomena. The appearance of the first nanobubble in the liquid at the bottom of a hot pan, the detachment of the bubble from the solid surface, its subsequent coalescence with other bubbles, all represent complex multiscale phenomena. Surfactants added to water increase the complexity of the process by contributing to the dynamic surface tension at the liquid-vapor and liquid-solid interfaces and thus affecting the heat and mass transfer at those interfaces. We apply molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption kinetics of anionic, cationic, and non-ionic surfactants at liquid/solid and liquid/vapor interfaces. The all-atom vs. united-atom approaches for the solid and surfactants are surveyed in view of their applicability at near boiling temperatures and a range of model water potentials is assessed for reproducing the thermal properties of water at boiling conditions.

  11. A Glimpse of Our Journey into the Design of Optical Probes in Self-assembled Surfactant Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Nilanjan; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic self-assembling amphiphilic surfactant molecules, popularly known as "micelles", have received widespread attention, due to their ability to modulate the photophysical properties of various organic dyes upon encapsulation. Along with their well-known use as cleaning agents, catalysts in organic reactions, and even for drug delivery purposes, these surfactant assemblies also show promising pertinence in the recognition of both ionic and nonionic targeted analytes. Low micropolarity and relatively hydrophobic environments promote their interaction with ionic analytes, whereas neutral species mostly affect the aggregation pattern of the probe molecules upon partitioning inside the micellar hydrophobic milieu. The environment-sensitive nature of micelle-based self-assembled probes also prompts us to devise new sensor arrays for the recognition of multiple analytes. While this account will largely focus on our own work in developing surfactant-triggered self-assembled sensors, our findings have been placed in the context of the relevant contributions from others during their strategic evolution.

  12. Effect of ionic surfactants on the phase behavior and structure of sucrose ester/water/oil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Carlos; Acharya, Durga P; Hinata, Shigeki; Ishitobi, Masahiko; Kunieda, Hironobu

    2003-06-15

    The phase behavior and structure of sucrose ester/water/oil systems in the presence of long-chain cosurfactant (monolaurin) and small amounts of ionic surfactants was investigated by phase study and small angle X-ray scattering. In a water/sucrose ester/monolaurin/decane system at 27 degrees C, instead of a three-phase microemulsion, lamellar liquid crystals are formed in the dilute region. Unlike other systems in the presence of alcohol as cosurfactant, the HLB composition does not change with dilution, since monolaurin adsorbs almost completely in the interface. The addition of small amounts of ionic surfactant, regardless of the counterion, increases the solubilization of water in W/O microemulsions. The solubilization on oil in O/W microemulsions is not much affected, but structuring is induced and a viscous isotropic phase is formed. At high ionic surfactant concentrations, the single-phase microemulsion disappears and liquid crystals are favored.

  13. Effect of dielectric fluid with surfactant and graphite powder on Electrical Discharge Machining of titanium alloy using Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murahari Kolli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Taguchi method was employed to optimize the surfactant and graphite powder concentration in dielectric fluid for the machining of Ti-6Al-4V using Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM. The process parameters such as discharge current, surfactant concentration and powder concentration were changed to explore their effects on Material Removal Rate (MRR, Surface Roughness (SR, Tool wear rate (TWR and Recast Layer Thickness (RLT. Detailed analysis of structural features of machined surface was carried out using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM to observe the influence of surfactant and graphite powder on the machining process. It was observed from the experimental results that the graphite powder and surfactant added dielectric fluid significantly improved the MRR, reduces the SR, TWR and RLT at various conditions. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and F-test of experimental data values related to the important process parameters of EDM revealed that discharge current and surfactant concentration has more percentage of contribution on the MRR and TWR whereas the SR, and RLT were found to be affected greatly by the discharge current and graphite powder concentration.

  14. Biocidal and inhibitory activity screening of de novo synthesized surfactants against two eukaryotic and two prokaryotic microbial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiecco, Matteo; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Roscini, Luca; Germani, Raimondo; Corte, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Thirty-six quaternary ammonium salts, of which 28 structurally different non-commercially available surfactants, were tested to screen their biocidal and inhibitory antimicrobial activity. Their activity was compared to commercially available amphiphiles as well as to non-amphiphilic quaternary ammonium salts. As target of these compounds four microbial species were employed of which two (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans) were important yeast in the food and clinical environment and the other two (Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua) represented the Gram negative and positive bacteria, respectively. The surfactants showed the ability to kill the microbial cells in water solution and to variably hamper their growth onto agar medium. The non-amphiphilic compounds (which represent analogues of some surfactants used in this study, since they have the same head group but no hydrophobic portion) had little effect in solution and no effect against the microbial growth on plate. Amphoteric and non-amphoteric zwitterionic surfactants showed reduced biocidal activity. The most active antimicrobial agent was N-tetradecyltropinium bromide (23S) surfactant. The presence of cells did not significantly affect the ability to form micelles, as demonstrated by comparative conductometric measurements.

  15. Interfacial tension in oil-water-surfactant systems: on the role of intra-molecular forces on interfacial tension values using DPD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguillard, E; Pannacci, N; Creton, B; Rousseau, B

    2013-04-14

    We have computed interfacial tension in oil-water-surfactant model systems using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. Oil and water molecules are modelled as single DPD beads, whereas surfactant molecules are composed of head and tail beads linked together by a harmonic potential to form a chain molecule. We have investigated the influence of the harmonic potential parameters, namely, the force constant K and the equilibrium distance r0, on the interfacial tension values. For both parameters, the range investigated has been chosen in agreement with typical values in the literature. Surprisingly, we observe a large effect on interfacial tension values, especially at large surfactant concentration. We demonstrate that, due to a subtle balance between intra-molecular and inter-molecular interactions, the local structure of surfactants at the oil-water interface is modified, the interfacial tension is changed and the interface stability is affected.

  16. Light and Heat Induced Denaturation of Photosystem Ⅱ Core Antenna Complex CP47

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Light and heat induced denaturation of CP47, the core antenna complex of photosystem Ⅱ purified from spinach, were investigated using absorption and circular dichroism spectra.Light caused the destruction of chlorophyll a and excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a in CP47, while the protein secondary structure was not apparently changed.Heat induced the destruction of protein secondary structure and excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a, but the chlorophyll a molecule was not damaged.The results suggest that both the chlorophyll a molecular structure and the protein native conformation are necessary for excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a and the energy transfer function of the chlorophyll a binding protein.

  17. Optical Tweezers Analysis of Double-Stranded DNA Denaturation in the Presence of Urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunli; Li, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Urea is a kind of denaturant prone to form hydrogen bonds with the electronegative centers of the nitrogenous bases, threatening the stability of hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs. In this paper, the stability and stiffness of DNA double helix influenced by urea are investigated at single-molecule level using optical tweezers. Experimental results show that DNA's double helix stability and stiffness both decrease with increasing urea concentration. In addition, the re-forming of ruptured hydrogen bonds between the base pairs is blocked by urea as the tension on DNA is released.

  18. Immobilization of denatured DNA to macroporous supports: II. Steric and kinetic parameters of heterogeneous hybridization reactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Bünemann, H

    1982-01-01

    The accessibility of immobilized DNA has been shown to depend more crucially on the method of immobilization than on the type of support used for fixation. When sonicated denatured DNA is coupled via diazotization or via cyanogen bromide reaction to solid Sephadex G-25 and Cellex 410 or to macroporous Sephacryl S-500 and Sepharose C1-6B its accessibility varies from 100 to 24 percent. Generally the loss of accessibility is linked to a depression of the melting temperature of DNA helices forme...

  19. Effects of Surfactant Adsorption on Surficial Wettability of Nonwoven Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Bing; TANG Bing; LI Rui-xia; WU Da-cheng

    2002-01-01

    All types of surfactants (cationic, anionic and nonionic)reported in this paper could enhance the surficiai wettability of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven fabrics. However, the effects of cationic and nonionic surfactants were better.The longer the treatment time of surfactants on the nonwoven fabrics, the better the surficial wettability.The surficial rewetting time would no longer change above a certain treatment time. The rewettability of nonwoven fabrics could be evidently improved just when the concentration of surfactants was just above the CMC,except for sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (LAS). The finer the fibers and the looser the structures, the better the surficial rewettability of nonwoven fabrics.

  20. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline. Surfactant replacement therapy: 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian K; Daigle, Brandon; DiBlasi, Robert M; Restrepo, Ruben D

    2013-02-01

    We searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases for English-language randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and articles investigating surfactant replacement therapy published between January 1990 and July 2012. By inspection of titles, references having no relevance to the clinical practice guideline were eliminated. The update of this clinical practice guideline is based on 253 clinical trials and systematic reviews, and 12 articles investigating surfactant replacement therapy. The following recommendations are made following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation scoring system: 1: Administration of surfactant replacement therapy is strongly recommended in a clinical setting where properly trained personnel and equipment for intubation and resuscitation are readily available. 2: Prophylactic surfactant administration is recommended for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in which surfactant deficiency is suspected. 3: Rescue or therapeutic administration of surfactant after the initiation of mechanical ventilation in infants with clinically confirmed RDS is strongly recommended. 4: A multiple surfactant dose strategy is recommended over a single dose strategy. 5: Natural exogenous surfactant preparations are recommended over laboratory derived synthetic suspensions at this time. 6: We suggest that aerosolized delivery of surfactant not be utilized at this time.

  1. STRUCTURE AND MORPHOLOGY CHANGES OF HYDROBIOTITES MODIFIED BY CATIONIC SURFACTANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) together with Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the complexes, where the hydrobiotites (Xinjiang) were modified by single-chain surfactants octyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTMA) and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ODTMA). XRD patterns showed that the structure of complexes was significantly influenced by the surfactant concentration and the alkyl chain length, because obvious changes took place in the basal spacing. Furthermore, according to the XRD results, several arrangements of surfactant molecules within the hydrobiotite interlayer space were deduced. The FTIR spectrum indicated that the surfactant contents in complexes dramatically increased with the alkyl chain length. The SPM micrographs demonstrated that the surfaces of complexes prepared at lower surfactant concentration were relatively flat compared with that prepared at higher concentration, while those with higher surfactant concentration had much steeper surface due to the alkyl chain length. It was concluded that structure and morphology of surfactant/hydrobiotite complexes depend not only on the surfactant concentration, but also strongly on the surfactant species.

  2. Interactions in Calcium Oxalate Hydrate/Surfactant Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikiric; Filipovic-Vincekovic; Babic-Ivancić Vdović Füredi-Milhofer

    1999-04-15

    Phase transformation of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) into the thermodynamically stable monohydrate (COM) in anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) and cationic (dodecylammonium chloride) surfactant solutions has been studied. Both surfactants inhibit, but do not stop transformation from COD to COM due to their preferential adsorption at different crystal faces. SDS acts as a stronger transformation inhibitor. The general shape of adsorption isotherms of both surfactants at the solid/liquid interface is of two-plateau-type, but differences in the adsorption behavior exist. They originate from different ionic and molecular structures of crystal surfaces and interactions between surfactant headgroups and solid surface. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Effect of heating strategies on whey protein denaturation--Revisited by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, M; Rauh, V M; Christensen, M; Johansen, L B; Hammershøj, M; Larsen, L B

    2016-01-01

    Previous standards in the area of effect of heat treatment processes on milk protein denaturation were based primarily on laboratory-scale analysis and determination of denaturation degrees by, for example, electrophoresis. In this study, whey protein denaturation was revisited by pilot-scale heating strategies and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC/MC Q-TOF) analysis. Skim milk was heat treated by the use of 3 heating strategies, namely plate heat exchanger (PHE), tubular heat exchanger (THE), and direct steam injection (DSI), under various heating temperatures (T) and holding times. The effect of heating strategy on the degree of denaturation of β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin was determined using LC/MC Q-TOF of pH 4.5-soluble whey proteins. Furthermore, effect of heating strategy on the rennet-induced coagulation properties was studied by oscillatory rheometry. In addition, rennet-induced coagulation of heat-treated micellar casein concentrate subjected to PHE was studied. For skim milk, the whey protein denaturation increased significantly as T and holding time increased, regardless of heating method. High denaturation degrees were obtained for T >100°C using PHE and THE, whereas DSI resulted in significantly lower denaturation degrees, compared with PHE and THE. Rennet coagulation properties were impaired by increased T and holding time regardless of heating method, although DSI resulted in less impairment compared with PHE and THE. No significant difference was found between THE and PHE for effect on rennet coagulation time, whereas the curd firming rate was significantly larger for THE compared with PHE. Micellar casein concentrate possessed improved rennet coagulation properties compared with skim milk receiving equal heat treatment.

  4. Comparative study of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying and isothermal heat treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M Amdadul; Aldred, Peter; Chen, Jie; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-11-15

    The extent and nature of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying environments was measured and analysed using single droplet drying. A custom-built, single droplet drying instrument was used for this purpose. Single droplets having 5±0.1μl volume (initial droplet diameter 1.5±0.1mm) containing 10% (w/v) WPI were dried at air temperatures of 45, 65 and 80°C for 600s at constant air velocity of 0.5m/s. The extent and nature of denaturation of WPI in isothermal heat treatment processes was measured at 65 and 80°C for 600s and compared with those obtained from convective air drying. The extent of denaturation of WPI in a high hydrostatic pressure environment (600MPa for 600s) was also determined. The results showed that at the end of 600s of convective drying at 65°C the denaturation of WPI was 68.3%, while it was only 10.8% during isothermal heat treatment at the same medium temperature. When the medium temperature was maintained at 80°C, the denaturation loss of WPI was 90.0% and 68.7% during isothermal heat treatment and convective drying, respectively. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) fraction of WPI was found to be more stable in the convective drying conditions than β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin, especially at longer drying times. The extent of denaturation of WPI in convective air drying (65 and 80°C) and isotheral heat treatment (80°C) for 600s was found to be higher than its denaturation in a high hydrostatic pressure environment at ambient temperature (600MPa for 600s).

  5. Air leak seal for lung dissection plane with diode laser irradiation: monitoring heat-denature with auto-fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Maya; Arai, Tsunenori

    2008-02-01

    We studied the monitoring of heat-denature by autofluorescence spectrum from lung dissection plane during laser air leak sealing procedure. In order to seal the air leakage from lung in thoracotomy, we proposed novel laser sealing method with the combination of the diode laser (810nm wavelength) irradiation and indocyanine green staining (peak absorption wavelength: 805 nm). This sealing method is expected to preserve the postoperative ventilatory capacity and achieve minimally invasive surgery. We previously reported that this laser sealing only requires thin sealing margin (less than 300 μm in thickness) compared with that of the suturing or stapling. The most serious issue on the laser air leak sealing might be re-air-leakage due to rigid surface layer caused by excessive heat-denature, such as carbonization. We should achieve laser air leak sealing minimizing the degree of heat denature. Dissection planes of isolated porcine lung with /without the diode laser irradiation were prepared as samples. We measured the auto-fluorescence from these samples using a spectrometer. When the diode laser was irradiated with 400J/cm2, the surface of diode laser irradiated lung was fully carbonized. The ration of auto-fluorescence emission of 450nm / 500 nm, with 280 nm excitation wavelength was decreased less tha 50 % of initial value. That of 600 nm / 500 nm was increased over 700 % of initial value. The decreasing of the 450 nm auto-fluorescence intensity might be attributed to the heat-denaturing of the interstitial collagen in lung. However, increasing of the 600 nm didn't specify the origins, we suppose it might be originated from heat-denature substance, like carbonization. We could establish the useful monitoring for lung heat-denaturing with simple methodology. We think the auto-fluorescence measurement can be helpful not only for understanding the sealing mechanism, but also for controlling the degree of heat-denaturing during the procedure.

  6. TOXICITY COMPARISON OF BIOSURFACTANTS AND SYNTHETIC SURFACTANTS USED IN OIL SPILL REMEDIATION TO TWO ESTUARINE SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative environmental toxicities of synthetic and biogenic surfactants used in oil spill remediation efforts are not well understood. Acute and chronic toxicities of three synthetic surfactants and three microbially produced surfactants were determined and compared in this s...

  7. Surfactant-controlled composition and crystal structure of manganese(II sulfide nanocrystals prepared by solvothermal synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Capetti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how the outcome of the solvothermal synthesis of manganese(II sulfide (MnS nanocrystals (NCs is affected by the type and amount of long chain surfactant present in the reaction mixture. Prompted by a previous observation that a larger than stoichiometric amount of sulfur is required [Puglisi, A.; Mondini, S.; Cenedese, S.; Ferretti, A. M.; Santo, N.; Ponti A. Chem. Mater. 2010, 22, 2804–2813], we carried out a wide set of reactions using Mn(II carboxylates and Mn2(CO10 as precursors with varying amounts of sulfur and carboxylic acid. MnS NCs were obtained provided that the S/Mn ratio was larger than the L/Mn ratio, otherwise MnO NCs were produced. Since MnS can crystallize in three distinct phases (rock salt α-MnS, zincblende β-MnS, and wurtzite γ-MnS, we also investigated whether the surfactant affected the NC polymorphism. We found that MnS polymorphism can be controlled by appropriate selection of the surfactant. γ-MnS nanocrystals formed when a 1:2 mixture of long chain carboxylic acid and amine was used, irrespective of the presence of carboxylic acid as a free surfactant or ligand in the metal precursor. When we used a single surfactant (carboxylic acid, alcohol, thiol, amine, α-MnS nanocrystals were obtained. The peculiar role of the amine seems to be related to its basicity. The nanocrystals were characterized by TEM and electron diffraction; ATR-FTIR spectroscopy provided information about the surfactants adsorbed on the NCs.

  8. C-reactive protein increases membrane fluidity and distorts lipid lateral organization of pulmonary surfactant. Protective role of surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saenz, Alejandra; Lopez-Sanchez, Almudena; Mojica-Lazaro, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how surfactant membranes can be perturbed by C-reactive protein (CRP) and whether surfactant protein A (SP-A) might overcome CRP-induced surfactant membrane alterations. The effect of CRP on surfactant surface adsorption was evaluated in vivo after int...

  9. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Dispersion Methods Affect Their Aggregation, Deposition, and Biomarker Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    To systematically evaluate how dispersion methods affect the environmental behaviors of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), MWNTs were dispersed in various solutions (e.g., surfactants, natural organic matter (NOM), and etc.) via ultrasonication (SON) and long-term stirring (LT...

  10. Effect of sulfoxides on the thermal denaturation of hen lysozyme: A calorimetric and Raman study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, A.; Di Foggia, M.; Manco, I.; De Maio, A.; Markarian, S. A.; Bonora, S.

    2008-11-01

    A multidisciplinary study of the thermal denaturation of lysozyme in the presence of three sulfoxides with different length in hydrocarbon chain (DMSO, DESO, and DPSO) was carried out by means of DSC, Raman spectroscopy, and SDS-PAGE techniques. In particular, the Td and Δ H values obtained from the calorimetric measurements showed that lysozyme is partially unfolded by sulfoxides but most of the conformation holds native state. The sulfoxide denaturing ability increases in the order DPSO > DESO > DMSO. Moreover, only DMSO and DESO have a real effect in preventing the heat-induced inactivation of the protein and their maximum heat-protective ability is reached when the DMSO and DESO amount is ⩾25% w/w. The sulfoxide ability to act as effective protective agents against the heat-induced inactivation was confirmed by the protein analysis. The enzymatic activity, as well as the SDS-PAGE analysis, suggested that DESO, having a low hydrophobic character and a great ability to stabilise the three-dimensional water structure, is the most heat-protective sulfoxide. An accurate evaluation of the heat-induced conformational changes of the lysozyme structure before and after sulfoxide addition was obtained by the analysis of the Raman spectra. The addition of DMSO or DESO in low concentration resulted to sensitively decrease the heat-induced structural modifications of the protein.

  11. Two conformational states in D-shaped DNA: Effects of local denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, O.-Chul; Kim, Cheolhee; Kim, Jae-Yeol; Lee, Nam Ki; Sung, Wokyung

    2016-06-01

    The bending of double-stranded(ds) DNA on the nano-meter scale plays a key role in many cellular processes such as nucleosome packing, transcription-control, and viral-genome packing. In our recent study, a nanometer-sized dsDNA bent into a D shape was formed by hybridizing a circular single-stranded(ss) DNA and a complementary linear ssDNA. Our fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement of D-DNA revealed two types of conformational states: a less-bent state and a kinked state, which can transform into each other. To understand the origin of the two deformed states of D-DNA, here we study the presence of open base-pairs in the ds portion by using the breathing-DNA model to simulate the system. We provide strong evidence that the two states are due to the emergence of local denaturation, i.e., a bubble in the middle and two forks at ends of the dsDNA portion. We also study the system analytically and find that the free-energy landscape is bistable with two minima representative of the two states. The kink and fork sizes estimated by the analytical calculation are also in excellent agreement with the results of the simulation. Thus, this combined experimental-simulation-analytical study corroborates that highly bent D-DNA reduces bending stress via local denaturation.

  12. Urea-induced denaturation of apolipoprotein serum amyloid A reveals marginal stability of hexamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Colón, Wilfredo

    2005-01-01

    Serum Amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase reactant protein that is predominantly found bound to high-density lipoprotein in plasma. Upon inflammation, the plasma concentration of SAA can increase dramatically, occasionally leading to the development of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, which involves the deposition of SAA amyloid fibrils in major organs. We previously found that the murine isoform SAA2.2 exists in aqueous solution as a hexamer containing a central channel. Here we show using various biophysical and biochemical techniques that the SAA2.2 hexamer can be totally dissociated into monomer by ~2 M urea, with the concerted loss of its α-helical structure. However, limited trypsin proteolysis experiments in urea showed a conserved digestion profile, suggesting the preservation of major backbone topological features in the urea-denatured state of SAA2.2. The marginal stability of hexameric SAA2.2 and the presence of residual structure in the denatured monomeric protein suggest that both forms may interconvert in vivo to exert different functions to meet the various needs during normal physiological conditions and in response to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:15937280

  13. Culture-independent analysis of probiotic products by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmerman, R; Scheirlinck, I; Huys, G; Swings, J

    2003-01-01

    In order to obtain functional and safe probiotic products for human consumption, fast and reliable quality control of these products is crucial. Currently, analysis of most probiotics is still based on culture-dependent methods involving the use of specific isolation media and identification of a limited number of isolates, which makes this approach relatively insensitive, laborious, and time-consuming. In this study, a collection of 10 probiotic products, including four dairy products, one fruit drink, and five freeze-dried products, were subjected to microbial analysis by using a culture-independent approach, and the results were compared with the results of a conventional culture-dependent analysis. The culture-independent approach involved extraction of total bacterial DNA directly from the product, PCR amplification of the V3 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA, and separation of the amplicons on a denaturing gradient gel. Digital capturing and processing of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band patterns allowed direct identification of the amplicons at the species level. This whole culture-independent approach can be performed in less than 30 h. Compared with culture-dependent analysis, the DGGE approach was found to have a much higher sensitivity for detection of microbial strains in probiotic products in a fast, reliable, and reproducible manner. Unfortunately, as reported in previous studies in which the culture-dependent approach was used, a rather high percentage of probiotic products suffered from incorrect labeling and yielded low bacterial counts, which may decrease their probiotic potential.

  14. Immobilization of denatured DNA to macroporous supports: II. Steric and kinetic parameters of heterogeneous hybridization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünemann, H

    1982-11-25

    The accessibility of immobilized DNA has been shown to depend more crucially on the method of immobilization than on the type of support used for fixation. When sonicated denatured DNA is coupled via diazotization or via cyanogen bromide reaction to solid Sephadex G-25 and Cellex 410 or to macroporous Sephacryl S-500 and Sepharose C1-6B its accessibility varies from 100 to 24 percent. Generally the loss of accessibility is linked to a depression of the melting temperature of DNA helices formed on the support. This correlation shows a characteristic course for a particular coupling method. DNA coupled under denaturing conditions may become totally inaccessible when only 3 percent of its bases are involved in the covalent linkage. Kinetic experiments with sonicated E.coli DNA have shown that the rate constants for renaturation or hybridization reactions are very similar for DNA immobilized by different methods to solid or macroporous supports. Generally the second order rate constant for a heterogeneous reaction (between mobile and immobilized DNA) is about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the analogous homogeneous reaction (in solution).

  15. Molecular monitoring of the intestinal flora by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Oliver; Herrmann, Stefanie; Marjoram, Gina; Noyer-Weidner, Mario; Hong, George; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf B

    2007-01-01

    Gut flora analysis is hampered by the complexity of the intestinal microbiota and by inherent limitations of culture-based approaches. Therefore, culture-independent molecular methods based upon 16S rRNA gene analysis were applied successfully for the analysis of complex microbial communities. However, generally accepted and validated profiling methods such as denaturing and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE/TGGE) are still laborious and time consuming. Thus, we adapted the separation of amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) using the WAVE Microbial Analysis System as a rapid and convenient means to display complex intestinal bacterial communities and to monitor changes in the gut flora. The separation of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from reference strains representing main gut bacterial populations and from human stool samples revealed that DHPLC analysis effectively detects bacterial groups predominant in the human gut flora. The investigation of faecal samples from hospitalized patients before, during and after antibiotic therapy showed that PCR-based DHPLC can be used to monitor gut flora changes. Results from DHPLC analysis were comparable with DGGE profiles generated from the same samples, demonstrating that the adapted DHPLC protocol is well suited for the analysis of complex microbial communities.

  16. Enriched surface acidity for surfactant-free suspensions of carboxylated carbon nanotubes purified by centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth I. Braun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that surfactant-suspended carbon nanotube (CNT samples can be purified by centrifugation to decrease agglomerates and increase individually-dispersed CNTs. However, centrifugation is not always part of protocols to prepare CNT samples used in biomedical applications. Herein, using carboxylated multi-walled CNTs (cMWCNTs suspended in water without a surfactant, we developed a Boehm titrimetric method for the analysis of centrifuged cMWCNT suspensions and used it to show that the surface acidity of oxidized carbon materials in aqueous cMWCNT suspensions was enriched by ∼40% by a single low-speed centrifugation step. This significant difference in surface acidity between un-centrifuged and centrifuged cMWCNT suspensions has not been previously appreciated and is important because the degree of surface acidity is known to affect the interactions of cMWCNTs with biological systems.

  17. Mesoporous Silica Materials Synthesized via Sol-Gel Methods Modified with Ionic Liquid and Surfactant Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cun-ying Xu; Ru-lan Tang; Yi-xin Hu; Peng-xiang Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silica materials were synthesized via a sol-gel method employing a room temperature ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmim][BF4]) as a new solvent medium and further modified with surfactant (hexadecyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide, CTAB) as a pore templating material. The synthesized samples were characterized by the transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. The results indicated that the mesoporous silica synthesized by using [bmim][BF4] and CTAB as mixed templates showed better mesostructural order and smaller pore size, compared with mesoporous silica materials synthesized by using single [bmim][BF4]as template under the same conditions. This indicates that the presence of surfactant can affect the microstructures of silica prepared by the present synthesis method.

  18. Development of alkaline/surfactant/polymer (ASP flooding technology for recovery of Karazhanbas oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birzhan Zhappasbaev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The tertiary oil recovery methods like alkaline, surfactant and polymer (ASP flooding are very perspective in order to achieve the synergetic effect out of the different impacts which are caused by these chemicals, which affect oil and water filtration in the reservoir and increase oil recovery. In this communication, we consider the applicability of hydrophobically modified polyampholyte – poly(hexadecylaminocrotonatebetaine (PHDACB as ASP flooding agent for recovery of oil from Karazhanbas oilfield. As “polysoap”, the aqueous solution of PHDACB dissolved in aqueous KOH was used. This system combines the advantages of alkaline, surfactant and polymer and exhibits the synergistic effect. The laboratory results showed that the ASP flooding considerably increases the oil recovery in addition to water flooding. In perspective, the ASP flooding may substitute the steam injection and other thermal enhanced oil recovery (EOR technologies.

  19. Novel Highly Flexible Wormlike Micelles Formed by Cetylpyridinium Chloride and Trioxyethylene Monododecyl Ether Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoz Kapadia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of small nonionic hydrophobic molecule, trioxyethylene monododecyl ether (C12EO3, on the viscoelastic properties of aqueous solutions of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC is studied. As the C12EO3 concentration increases, the viscosity passes through a maximum. Dynamic rheological measurements revealed a comprehensive picture of how C12EO3 affects the different length scales in the entangled wormlike micelles. Increase in the viscosity can normally be caused by insertion of amphiphilic C12EO3 molecules into the cationic surfactant (CPC layer, or micellar swelling, caused by solubilization of very hydrophobic molecules in the micellar core. The partial phase behavior and rheology of this mixed surfactant systems is studied.

  20. Enhanced production of erythritol and mannitol by Yarrowia lipolytica in media containing surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakicka, Magdalena; Rywińska, Anita; Cybulski, Krzysztof; Rymowicz, Waldemar

    2016-01-01

    Various chemical compounds, including surfactants, when introduced to culture media may increase the permeability of cellular membranes and thereby affect the quantity of metabolites excreted by cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of detergents including Triton X-100, Span 20 and Tween 80 on erythritol production from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica Wratislavia K1 in a shake-flask experiment, batch and fed-batch cultures. When Span 20 was added to a fed-batch culture with glycerol as a carbon source (300gL(-1)), erythritol production increased by 15% compared to the culture without the surfactant where it reached 142gL(-1) after 5 days, which corresponded to 0.47gg(-1) yield and productivity of 1.1gL(-1)h(-1). Therefore, it was concluded that Span 20 considerably enhanced the production of this polyol from glycerol.

  1. Surfactant enhanced disinfection of the human norovirus surrogate, tulane virus with organic acids and surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human infection with foodborne viruses can occur following consumption of contaminated food, person-to-person body contact, or release of aerosols. Combinatorial treatments of surfactants and organic acids may have synergistic or additive mechanisms to inactivate foodborne viruses and prevent outbr...

  2. Exact Solution to the Extended Zwanzig Model for Quasi-Sigmoidal Chemically Induced Denaturation Profiles: Specific Heat and Configurational Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Aguilar-Pineda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and chemically induced denaturation comprise two of the most characteristic mechanisms to achieve the passage from the native state N to any of the unstructured states Dj in the denatured ensemble in proteins and peptides. In this work we present a full analytical solution for the configurational partition function qs of a homopolymer chain poly-X in the extended Zwanzig model (EZM for a quasisigmoidal denaturation profile. This solution is built up from an EZM exact solution in the case where the fraction α of native contacts follows exact linear dependence on denaturant’s concentration ζ; thus an analytical solution for L in the case of an exact linear denaturation profile is also provided. A recently established connection between the number ν of potential nonnative conformations per residue and temperature-independent helical propensity ω complements the model in order to identify specific proteinogenic poly-X chains, where X represents any of the twenty naturally occurring aminoacid residues. From qs, equilibrium thermodynamic potentials like entropy and average internal energy 〈E〉 and thermodynamic susceptibilities like specific heat C are calculated for poly-valine (poly-V and poly-alanine (poly-A chains. The influence of the rate at which native contacts denature as function of ζ on thermodynamic stability is also discussed.

  3. Molecular dynamics of surfactant protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Eunice; Santana, Alberto; Cruz, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a membrane-associated protein essential for normal respiration. It has been found that the alpha-helix form of SP-C can undergo, under certain conditions, a transformation from an alpha-helix to a beta-strand conformation that closely resembles amyloid fibrils, which...... are possible contributors to the pathogenesis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Molecular dynamics simulations using the NAMD2 package were performed for systems containing from one to seven SP-C molecules to study their behavior in water. The results of our simulations show that unfolding of the protein...

  4. Porcine lung surfactant protein B gene (SFTPB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    The porcine surfactant protein B (SFTPB) is a single copy gene on chromosome 3. Three different cDNAs for the SFTPB have been isolated and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison revealed six nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), four synonymous SNPs and an in-frame deletion of 69...... bp in the region coding for the active protein. Northern analysis showed lung-specific expression of three different isoforms of the SFTPB transcript. The expression level for the SFTPB gene is low in 50 days-old fetus and it increases during lung development. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain...

  5. The Krafft temperature of surfactant solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojlović Jelena Ž.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our main motivation to revisit the solution properties of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide is related to the clear requirement for better control of the adsorption parameters to form uniform self-assembled monolayers on muscovite mica substrates. To readily monitor the temporal evolution of structural details in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions, we realized a rather simple conductivity experiment. Conductivity measurements were carried out as a function of temperature, to look closer into the Krafft temperature behavior of this surfactant. We measured the electrical conductivity of different concentrations of aqueous cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions, below and above the critical micells concentration.

  6. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  7. Endogenous surfactant turnover in preterm infants measured with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik); L.J.I. Zimmermann (Luc); J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); R.H.Th. van Beek (Ron); P.J.J. Sauer (Pieter); V.P. Carnielli (Virgilio)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWe studied surfactant synthesis and turnover in vivo in preterm infants using the stable isotope [U-13C]glucose, as a precursor for the synthesis of palmitic acid in surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC). Six preterm infants (birth weight, 916 +/- 244 g; gesta

  8. Coupled Transport of PAH and Surfactants in Natural Aquifer Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, J.; Grathwohl, P.

    1998-03-01

    Surfactants in aqueous solution adsorb onto mineral surfaces and form micelles above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) due to their physico-chemical properties. Hydrophobic organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have a high affinity for the adsorbed surfactant layers (monomers, hemimicelles and admicelles) and to the micelles in the mobile aqueous phase. The transport of PAHs is controlled by the concentration of the surfactant and the partition coefficients, of the PAHs between water and admicelles (adsolubilization: K adm) and water and micelles (solubilization: K mic), respectively. These partition coefficients were measured in laboratory batch and column experiments using phenanthrene as a chemical probe for the PAHs, a non-ionic surfactant (Terrasurf G50), natural aquifer sand (River Neckar Alluvium: RNA) and its petrographic subcomponents. The sorption of the surfactant can be described by a linear isotherm for concentrations below the CMC and a sorption maximum above the CMC, which both depend on the grain size and the surfactant accessible internal surface area of the particles. K adm was found to be higher than K mic. Both depend on the surfactant's properties, such as alkyl chain length, polar headgroup or ethoxylation. In column experiments an increasing retardation of phenanthrene was observed up to the CMC followed by a facilitated transport at surfactant concentration several times the CMC.

  9. Method of separating a surfactant from a liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, A.W.; Lems, S.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of separating a surfactant from a liquid, such as a wastewater stream from an industrial laundry. In accordance with the invention, the liquid is cooled to below the Krafft temperature of the surfactant and subjected to centrifugal forces for the separation

  10. Surfactant-assisted liquefaction of particulate carbonaceous substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A slurry of carbonaceous particles such as coal containing an oil soluble polar substituted oleophilic surfactant, suitably an amine substituted long chain hydrocarbon, is liquefied at high temperature and high hydrogen presence. The pressure of surfactant results in an increase in yield and the conversion product contains a higher proportion of light and heavy oils and less asphaltene than products from other liquefaction processes.

  11. Predictive model of cationic surfactant binding to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    The humic substances (HS) have a high reactivity with other components in the natural environment. An important factor for the reactivity of HS is their negative charge. Cationic surfactants bind strongly to HS by electrostatic and specific interaction. Therefore, a surfactant binding model is devel

  12. Enrichment of surfactant from its aqueous solution using ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Haruko; Nii, Susumu; Kawaizumi, Fumio; Takahashi, Katsuroku

    2005-08-01

    Dilute aqueous solutions of dodecyl-benzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (DBS-Na) and polyoxyethylenenonylphenyl ethers (PONPEs) were ultrasonically atomized. The surfactants were concentrated in collected mist droplets. The enrichment ratio increased with decreasing surfactant concentration. Depending on the surfactant's molecular weight and affinity to water, different enrichment ratio was observed in the range of low feed concentrations. For anionic surfactant, DBS-Na, the enrichment ratio was significantly improved by KCl addition and a peak appeared on the plot of the ratio against KCl concentration. Addition of NaCl or CaCl2 . 2H2O to the surfactant solution also enhanced the enrichment ratio; however, the effect was relatively small. Such behaviors of the ratio were interpreted as enhanced interfacial adsorption of the surfactant and a lack of supply of surfactant monomers from liquid bulk because of slow breaking of surfactant micelles. Time required for collecting an amount of mist was also observed. Among the three salt systems, the time for KCl system was twice as long as others. This fact suggested that the formation of smaller droplets in KCl system.

  13. Physical principles for developing a synthetic lung surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaehnig, F. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biologie, Tuebingen (Germany, F.R.)); Obladen, M. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Kinderklinik)

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles for developing a synthetic lung surfactant to treat the respiratory distress syndrome are discussed. Requirements for the lipid composition and preparation of the synthetic surfactant are detailed, leading to the conclusion that a suspension of large unilamellar vesicles consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and a small amount of unsaturated lipid is a promising choice.

  14. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation.

  15. New Focuses on Surfactants for Personal Care Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan

    2007-01-01

    @@ Global output of surfactants is already more than 12 million tons a year today. There are more than 10 000 varieties in the portfolio. The total market sales value is over US$10 billion. The output of surfactants in China is more than 1.5 million tons a year in recent years. China can manufacture more than 3 380 varieties.

  16. A liquid CO2-compatible hydrocarbon surfactant: experiment and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.; Kleijn, J.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants soluble in liquid CO2 are rare and knowledge on interfacial and self-assembly behaviour is fragmented. We found that polyoxyethylene (5) isooctylphenyl ether is interfacially active at the water–liquid CO2 interface. Water–liquid CO2 interfacial tension was measured at various surfactant

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION AND FIELD IMPLEMENTATION OF SURFACTANT FLOODING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the features of surfactant flooding, a mathematical model for surfactant flooding is established. The adsorption-retention, convection diffusion of surfactant and influence of concentration change upon relative permeability curve are included in the model. The novel description of adsorption quantity of surfactant and relative permeability curve are presented, which enhance the coincidence between mathematical model and field practice, the relative errors of main development indexes are within 6%. The model is applied to the numerical research of the surfactant flooding in the untabulated beds of Xing1-3 surfactant flooding pilot site of No.4 Oil Production Company of Daqing Oilfield, the influences of surfactant concentration, injection quantity, slug combination mode upon the development effect and economic benefit are quantitatively analyzed, the injection scheme is optimized as follows: surfactant concentration is 0.5%, slug volume is 0.02 PV, slug combination mode is 2 slugs. After the implementation of scheme in oilfield, the cumulative increase of oil is 2186.0 t, up to nearly 30%.

  18. Polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate ester surfactants - current knowledge and knowledge gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    information on fluorochemicals. Polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate ester surfactants (PAPs) belong to the group of polyfluorinated alkyl surfactants. They have been detected in indoor dust and are widely used in food-contact materials, from which they have the ability to migrate into food. Toxicological data...

  19. Perfluoroalkyl Epoxides: Synthesis and Conversion into Ionic Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhamid Ayari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Perfluoroalkylated surfactants having a quaternary ammonium surrounded by three hydroxyl groups as hydrophilic moiety and a perfluoroalkyl chain as tail were obtained by coupling diethanolamine with perfluoroalkylated epoxide followed by quaternisation. The amphiphilic properties of these surfactants were investigated by measuring their surface and interfacial tensions.

  20. New mechanisms for phase separation in polymer-surfactant mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Currie, E.P.K.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Borisov, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    The cooperative association of ionic surfactants with polymer chains leads to quite novel features in the phase behaviour of polymer solutions. Using an analytic mean-field model, we analyze phase equilibria in solutions of neutral polymers mixed with ionic surfactants. We predict the possibilities

  1. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy, E-mail: yuriy.zakrevskyy@fh-koeln.de; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana, E-mail: santer@uni-potsdam.de [Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd [Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  2. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes' properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate - for the first time - complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  3. Polymeric surfactants for enhanced oil recovery : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raffa, Patrizio; Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Picchioni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is surely a topic of interest, as conventional oil resources become more scarce and the necessity of exploiting heavy and unconventional oils increases. EOR methods based on polymer flooding, surfactant-polymer flooding and alkali-surfactant-polymer flooding are

  4. Aqueous foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids: 1. Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Aqueous foam is a promising drilling fluid for geothermal wells because it will minimize damage to the producing formation and would eliminate the erosion problems of air drilling. Successful use of aqueous foam will require a high foaming surfactant which will: (1) be chemically stable in the harsh thermal and chemical environment, and (2) form stable foams at high temperatures and pressures. The procedures developed to generate and test aqueous foams and the effects of a 260/sup 0/C temperature cycle on aqueous surfactant solutions are presented. More than fifty selected surfactants were evaluated with representatives from the amphoteric, anionic, cationic, and nonionic classes included. Most surfactants were severely degraded by this temperature cycle; however, some showed excellent retention of their properties. The most promising surfactant types were the alkyl and alkyl aryl sulfonates and the ethoxylated nonionics.

  5. Pulmonary Surfactants for Acute and Chronic Lung Diseases (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rozenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Part 2 of the review considers the problem of surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in adults and young and old children. It gives information on the results of surfactant therapy and prevention of ARDS in patients with severe concurrent trauma, inhalation injuries, complications due to complex expanded chest surgery, or severe pneumonias, including bilateral pneumonia in the presence of A/H1N1 influenza. There are data on the use of a surfactant in obstetric care and prevention of primary graft dysfunction during lung transplantation. The results of longterm use of surfactant therapy in Russia, suggesting that death rates from ARDS may be substantially reduced (to 20% are discussed. Examples of surfactant therapy for other noncritical lung diseases, such as permanent athelectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and asthma, as well tuberculosis, are also considered.

  6. Fate and effects of amphoteric surfactants in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M Teresa; Campos, Encarna; Marsal, Agustí; Ribosa, Isabel

    2008-10-01

    Amphoteric surfactants form part of specialty surfactants available for formulators to improve or design new formulations in response to environmental, toxicity, safety and performance demands. Nevertheless, limited information on the ecological properties of amphoterics is available. In the present work, the aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability and the aquatic toxicity of different types of amphoteric surfactants (three alkyl betaines, one alkylamido betaine and three alkyl imidazoline derivatives) were studied. The amphoteric surfactants tested were readily biodegradable under aerobic conditions (CO2 headspace test) and alkylamido betaines and alkyl imidazoline derivatives were also easily biodegradable under anaerobic conditions (test based on the ECETOC method). Toxicity to Photobacterium phosphoreum and Daphnia magna increased with the fatty chain length of the surfactant. The EC50 toxicity values of the amphoterics tested were higher than 5 mg/L, and alkyl imidazoline derivatives, with EC50 values from 20 to > 200 mg/L, showed the lowest aquatic toxicity.

  7. Enhanced solubilization of curcumin in mixed surfactant vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S K; Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Mehta, S K

    2016-05-15

    Self-assemblies of equimolar double and single chain mixed ionic surfactants, with increasing numbers of carbon atoms of double chain surfactant, were analyzed on the basis of fluorescence and conductivity results. Attempts were also made to enhance the solubilization of curcumin in aqueous equimolar mixed surfactant systems. Mixed surfactant assembly was successful in retarding the degradation of curcumin in alkaline media (only 25-28 40% degraded in 10h at pH 13). Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching methods were employed to predict the binding position and mechanism of curcumin with self-assemblies. Results indicate that the interactions take place according to both dynamic and static quenching mechanisms and curcumin was distributed in a palisade layer of mixed aggregates. Antioxidant activity (using DPPH radical) and biocompatibility (using calf-thymus DNA) of curcumin-loaded mixed surfactant formulations were also evaluated. The prepared systems improved the stability, solubility and antioxidant activity of curcumin and additionally are biocompatible.

  8. Factors Affecting Surfactant Responsiveness: Influence of mode of administration and ventilation, disease stage and type of surfactant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractHistorically, Kurt von Neergaard was the first to suggest that surface tension plays an important role in lung elasticity. He showed, in 1929, that the pressure necessary for fIlling the lung with liquid was less than half the pressure necessary for filling the lung WiOl air, and conclud

  9. Heat-regulated foaming in surfactant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletnev, M.Y.; Eremina, L.D.; Vlasenko, I.G.

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the mechanism of the foam-inhibiting action resulting from the use of propylene oxide derivatives in solutions both of anionic and of nonionic surfactants. The objective is the creation of a detergent composition with heat-regulated foaming, which would foam well at 30-50/sup 0/ and poorly at 80-90/sup 0/, which is the usual temperature of washing machines. It is demonstrated that foaming can be regulated by the variation of the cloud points of solutions with the aid of additions of polypropylene glycols and their alkyl derivatives or block copolymers in solutions of surfactants. Foaming and foam stability decrease sharply above the cloud points of the solutions due to the foam-inhibiting action of the coacervate phase on the coexisting foam-forming solution. The foam inhibition of polypropylene glycols increases and becomes apparent at lower concentrations with the increase of the average molecular weight of the hydrophobic blocks, the increase of their relative content (in block copolymers with oxyethylene groups), and upon the introduction of alkyl groups.

  10. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  11. Role of lung surfactant in respiratory disease: current knowledge in large animal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, U; Buechner-Maxwell, V A; Witonsky, S G; Hite, R D

    2009-01-01

    Lung surfactant is produced by type II alveolar cells as a mixture of phospholipids, surfactant proteins, and neutral lipids. Surfactant lowers alveolar surface tension and is crucial for the prevention of alveolar collapse. In addition, surfactant contributes to smaller airway patency and improves mucociliary clearance. Surfactant-specific proteins are part of the innate immune defense mechanisms of the lung. Lung surfactant alterations have been described in a number of respiratory diseases. Surfactant deficiency (quantitative deficit of surfactant) in premature animals causes neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Surfactant dysfunction (qualitative changes in surfactant) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome and asthma. Analysis of surfactant from amniotic fluid allows assessment of fetal lung maturity (FLM) in the human fetus and exogenous surfactant replacement therapy is part of the standard care in premature human infants. In contrast to human medicine, use and success of FLM testing or surfactant replacement therapy remain limited in veterinary medicine. Lung surfactant has been studied in large animal models of human disease. However, only a few reports exist on lung surfactant alterations in naturally occurring respiratory disease in large animals. This article gives a general review on the role of lung surfactant in respiratory disease followed by an overview of our current knowledge on surfactant in large animal veterinary medicine.

  12. A multicenter, randomized trial comparing synthetic surfactant with modified bovine surfactant extract in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, E; Vollman, J; Giebner, D; Maurer, M; Dreyer, G; Bailey, L; Anderson, M; Mefford, L; Beaumont, E; Sutton, D; Puppala, B; Mangurten, HH; Secrest, J; Lewis, WJ; Carteaux, P; Bednarek, F; Welsberger, S; Gosselin, R; Pantoja, AF; Belenky, A; Campbell, P; Patole, S; Duenas, M; Kelly, M; Alejo, W; Lewallen, P; DeanLieber, S; Hanft, M; Ferlauto, J; Newell, RW; Bagwell, J; Levine, D; Lipp, RW; Harkavy, K; Vasa, R; Birenbaum, H; Broderick, KA; Santos, AQ; Long, BA; Gulrajani, M; Stern, M; Hopgood, G; Hegyi, T; Alba, J; Christmas, L; McQueen, M; Nichols, N; Brown, M; Quissell, BJ; Rusk, C; Marks, K; Gifford, K; Hoehn, G; Pathak, A; Marino, B; Hunt, P; Fox, [No Value; Sharpstein, C; Feldman, B; Johnson, N; Beecham, J; Balcom, R; Helmuth, W; Boylan, D; Frakes, C; Magoon, M; Reese, K; Schwersenski, J; Schutzman, D; Soll, R; Horbar, JD; Leahy, K; Troyer, W; Juzwicki, C; Anderson, P; Dworsky, M; Reynolds, L; Urrutia, J; Gupta, U; Adray, C

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of a synthetic surfactant (Exosurf Neonatal, Burroughs-Wellcome Co) and a modified bovine surfactant extract (Survanta, Ross Laboratories) in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Design. Multicenter, randomized trial. Setting. Thirty-eight

  13. The binding and insertion of imidazolium-based ionic surfactants into lipid bilayers: the effects of the surfactant size and salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwankyu; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2015-02-28

    Imidazolium-based ionic surfactants with hydrocarbon tails of different sizes were simulated with lipid bilayers at different salt concentrations. Starting with the random position of ionic surfactants outside the bilayer, surfactants with long tails mostly insert into the bilayer, while those with short tails show the insertion of fewer surfactant molecules, indicating the effect of the tail length. In particular, surfactants with a tail of two or four hydrocarbons insert and reversibly detach from the bilayer, while the inserted longer surfactants cannot be reversibly detached because of the strong hydrophobic interaction with lipid tails, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Longer surfactants insert more deeply and irreversibly into the bilayer and thus increase lateral diffusivities of the bilayer, indicating that longer surfactants more significantly disorder lipid bilayers, which also agrees with experiments regarding the effect of the tail length of ionic surfactants on membrane permeability and toxicity. Addition of NaCl ions weakens the electrostatic interactions between headgroups of surfactants and lipids, leading to the binding of fewer surfactants into the bilayer. In particular, our simulation findings indicate that insertion of ionic surfactants can be initiated by either the hydrophobic interaction between tails of surfactants and lipids or the electrostatic binding between imidazolium heads and lipid heads, and the strength of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions depends on the tail length of surfactants.

  14. Fuel utilization improvement in PWRs using the denatured /sup 233/U-Th cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.M.; Schwenk, G.A.; Toops, E.C.; Yotinen, V.O.

    1980-06-01

    A number of changes in PWR core design and/or operating strategy were evaluated to assess the fuel utilization improvement achievable by their implementation in a PWR using thorium-based fuel and operating in a recycle mode. The reference PWR for this study was identical to the B and W Standard Plant except that the fuel pellets were of denatured (/sup 233/U//sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/. An initial scoping study identified the three most promising improvement concepts as (1) a very tight lattice, (2) thorium blankets, and (3) ThO/sub 2/ rods placed in available guide tubes. A conceptual core design incorporating these changes was then developed, and the fuel utilization of this modified design was compared with that of the reference case.

  15. New Primers for Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Analysis of Nitrate-Reducing Bacterial Community in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.PASTORELLI; R.PICCOLO; S.SIMONCINI; S.LANDI

    2013-01-01

    The narG gene is frequently used as a molecular marker for bacterial nitrate-reducing community analysis.In this study,a new set of primers targeting the narG gene was designed and applied to semi-nested polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) assay.The potential of the new primers was verified on DNA directly extracted from soils from five different experimental sites distributed in Central and Southern Italy.Specificity of the primers was determined by excision,amplification,and sequencing of bands resolved by DGGE.A phylogenetic analysis showed the correlation between the sequences retrieved from the soils studied and the narG sequences from β and γ-Proteobacteria.These primers expanded the existing molecular tools for ecological study on the size and diversity of nitrate-reducing bacterial community in soil.

  16. Investigating the fermentation of cocoa by correlating denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles and near infrared spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Snitkjær, Pia; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2008-01-01

    Raw cocoa has an astringent, unpleasant taste and flavour, and has to be fermented, dried and roasted in order to obtain the characteristic cocoa flavour and taste. During the fermentation microbial activity outside the cocoa beans induces biochemical and physical changes inside the beans...... of the beans and the chemical processes inside the beans have been carried out previously. Recently it has been shown that Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) offers an efficient tool for monitoring the microbiological changes taking place during the fermentation of cocoa. Near Infrared (NIR......) spectroscopy has previously been used to determine various components in cocoa beans, offering a rapid alternative compared to traditional analytical methods for obtaining knowledge about changes in the chemical composition of the cocoa beans during fermentation. During a number of cocoa fermentations bean...

  17. An approach for protein to be completely reversible to thermal denaturation even at autoclave temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, M; Nakamura, D; Takenawa, T; Mitsuishi, Y

    2001-08-01

    Reversibility of protein denaturation is a prerequisite for all applications that depend on reliable enzyme catalysis, particularly, for using steam to sterilize enzyme reactors or enzyme sensor tips, and for developing protein-based devices that perform on-off switching of the protein function such as enzymatic activity, ligand binding and so on. In this study, we have successfully constructed an immobilized protein that retains full enzymatic activity even after thermal treatments as high as 120 degrees C. The key for the complete reversibility was the development of a new reaction that allowed a protein to be covalently attached to a surface through its C-terminus and the protein engineering approach that was used to make the protein compatible with the new attachment chemistry.

  18. Denatured G-protein coupled receptors as immunogens to generate highly specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmont, Franck; Moulédous, Lionel; Boué, Jérôme; Mollereau, Catherine; Dietrich, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a major role in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, GPCRs have become the most frequent targets for development of new therapeutic drugs. In this context, the availability of highly specific antibodies may be decisive to obtain reliable findings on localization, function and medical relevance of GPCRs. However, the rapid and easy generation of highly selective anti-GPCR antibodies is still a challenge. Herein, we report that highly specific antibodies suitable for detection of GPCRs in native and unfolded forms can be elicited by immunizing animals against purified full length denatured recombinant GPCRs. Contrasting with the currently admitted postulate, our study shows that an active and well-folded GPCR is not required for the production of specific anti-GPCR antibodies. This new immunizing strategy validated with three different human GPCR (μ-opioid, κ-opioid, neuropeptide FF2 receptors) might be generalized to other members of the GPCR family.

  19. Third-strand in situ hybridization (TISH) to non-denatured metaphase spreads and interphase nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M D; Fresco, J R

    1999-07-01

    A methodology has been developed for binding oligodeoxyribonucleotide 'third strands' to duplex DNA targets in fixed but not additionally denatured metaphase spreads and interphase nuclei under conditions found to be optimal in solution. Third-strand in situ hybridization (TISH) at pH 6.0 of a psoralen- and biotin-modified 16-nucleotide homopyrimidine third strand to a unique multicopy target sequence in human chromosome 17 alpha-satellite (D17Z1 locus) is described. UVA-photofixed third strands, rendered fluorescent by fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled avidin, are reproducibly centromere-specific for chromosome 17, and visible without amplification of the signal in lymphocyte and somatic cell hybrid spreads and interphase nuclei. Two third-strand-specific D17Z1 haplotypes were identified. TISH has potential diagnostic, biochemical, and flow cytometric applicability to native metaphase and interphase chromatin.

  20. Light flux density threshold at which protein denaturation is induced by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A J; Janes, Robert W; Brown, A; Clarke, D T; Sutherland, J C; Tao, Y; Wallace, B A; Hoffmann, S V

    2008-07-01

    New high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines are providing important information for structural biology, but can potentially cause denaturation of the protein samples under investigation. This effect has been studied at the new CD1 dedicated SRCD beamline at ISA in Denmark, where radiation-induced thermal damage effects were observed, depending not only on the radiation flux but also on the focal spot size of the light. Comparisons with similar studies at other SRCD facilities worldwide has lead to the estimation of a flux density threshold under which SRCD beamlines should be operated when samples are to be exposed to low-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet radiation for extended periods of time.