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Sample records for affect stability binding

  1. Stability of the octameric structure affects plasminogen-binding capacity of streptococcal enolase.

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    Amanda J Cork

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen. Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen binding and activation.

  2. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  3. Changes to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor extracellular loops differentially affect GnRH analog binding and activation: evidence for distinct ligand-stabilized receptor conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Kevin D G; Pawson, Adam J; Millar, Robert P

    2008-06-01

    GnRH and its structural variants bind to GnRH receptors from different species with different affinities and specificities. By investigating chimeric receptors that combine regions of mammalian and nonmammalian GnRH receptors, a greater understanding of how different domains influence ligand binding and receptor activation can be achieved. Using human-catfish and human-chicken chimeric receptors, we demonstrate the importance of extracellular loop conformation for ligand binding and agonist potency, providing further evidence for GnRH and GnRH II stabilization of distinct active receptor conformations. We demonstrate examples of GnRH receptor gain-of-function mutations that apparently improve agonist potency independently of affinity, implicating a role for extracellular loops in stabilizing the inactive receptor conformation. We also show that entire extracellular loop substitution can overcome the detrimental effects of localized mutations, thereby demonstrating the importance of considering the conformation of entire domains when drawing conclusions from point-mutation studies. Finally, we present evidence implicating the configuration of extracellular loops 2 and 3 in combination differentiating GnRH analog binding modes. Because there are two endogenous forms of GnRH ligand but only one functional form of full-length GnRH receptor in humans, understanding how GnRH and GnRH II can elicit distinct functional effects through the same receptor is likely to provide important insights into how these ligands can have differential effects in both physiological and pathological situations. PMID:18356273

  4. Atmospheric stability affects wind turbine power collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power generated by a wind turbine largely depends on the wind speed. During time periods with identical hub-height wind speeds but different shapes to the wind profile, a turbine will produce different amounts of power. This variability may be induced by atmospheric stability, which affects profiles of mean wind speed, direction and turbulence across the rotor disk. Our letter examines turbine power generation data, segregated by atmospheric stability, in order to investigate power performance dependences at a West Coast North American wind farm. The dependence of power on stability is clear, regardless of whether time periods are segregated by three-dimensional turbulence, turbulence intensity or wind shear. The power generated at a given wind speed is higher under stable conditions and lower under strongly convective conditions: average power output differences approach 15%. Wind energy resource assessment and day ahead power forecasting could benefit from increased accuracy if atmospheric stability impacts were measured and appropriately incorporated in power forecasts, e.g., through the generation of power curves based on a range of turbulence regimes. (letter)

  5. Factors affecting chromatin stability of bovine spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, T A A; Rekkas, C A; Lymberopoulos, A G; Sioga, A; Dimitriadis, I; Papanikolaou, Th

    2008-03-01

    The structural stability of transcriptionally inert paternal chromatin is of vital importance for the fertilization process and early embryonic development. Accordingly, a series of eight experiments were conducted during a 7-month period to investigate: (1) effects of bull breed, individuality, successive ejaculations, semen quality characteristics (SQC), semen dilution rates and hypothermic storage of semen in a Tris-egg yolk extender on incidence of sperm nuclear chromatin instability (NCI), and (2) effects of the interaction between variation of NCI within a frozen ejaculate and variation of oocytes quality due to maturation time and/or season on the efficiency of in vitro embryo production (IVEP). Semen samples were collected once a week from six bulls using an AV and only ejaculates (n=220) of >0.30x10(9) sperm/ml and >or=60% motility were used. NCI was measured by: (1) detection of lysine-rich histones in sperm chromatin using aniline blue staining, (2) sperm susceptibility to acid-induced nuclear DNA denaturation in situ using acridine orange test, and (3) sperm susceptibility to nuclear chromatin decondensation (NCD). Bovine oocytes (n=695) were matured in vitro for 18 or 24 h, fertilized after sperm selection through a swim-up procedure and cultured for 72 h. The results showed that the 2nd ejaculates were superior to the 1st ones with respect to chromatin stability. Dilution of semen to 49.67+/-8.56x10(6) sperm/ml (1:19) decreased resistance of sperm to NCD. Cooling of semen had no significant effect on chromatin stability. Cryopreservation of semen augmented sperm vulnerability to DNA denaturation. Improvement of SQC (semen volume, sperm motility, velocity, viability and morphological normalcy) was generally concomitant with increase of sperm resistance to NCI. While Blonde d'Aquitaine bulls had a resistance to NCD higher than Limousine bulls in fresh semen, the former showed a greater susceptibility to DNA denaturation than the latter in cooled semen

  6. Factors Affecting the Binding of a Recombinant Heavy Metal-Binding Domain (CXXC motif Protein to Heavy Metals

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    Kamala Boonyodying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of heavy metal-binding proteins have been used to study bioremediation. CXXC motif, a metal binding domain containing Cys-X-X-Cys motif, has been identified in various organisms. These proteins are capable of binding various types of heavy metals. In this study, heavy metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein encoded from mcsA gene of S. aureus were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The factors involved in the metal-binding activity were determined in order to analyze the potential of recombinant protein for bioremediation. A recombinant protein can be bound to Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The thermal stability of a recombinant protein was tested, and the results showed that the metal binding activity to Cu2+ and Zn2+ still exist after treating the protein at 85ºC for 30 min. The temperature and pH that affected the metal binding activity was tested and the results showed that recombinant protein was still bound to Cu2+ at 65ºC, whereas a pH of 3-7 did not affect the metal binding E. coli harboring a pRset with a heavy metal-binding domain CXXC motif increased the resistance of heavy metals against CuCl2 and CdCl2. This study shows that metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein can be effectively bound to various types of heavy metals and may be used as a potential tool for studying bioremediation.

  7. Alcohol Binding to the Odorant Binding Protein LUSH: Multiple Factors Affecting Binding Affinities

    OpenAIRE

    Ader, Lauren; Jones, David N. M.; Lin, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Density function theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of alcohols to the odorant binding protein LUSH from Drosophila melanogaster. LUSH is one of the few proteins known to bind to ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations and where high-resolution structural information is available for the protein bound to alcohol at these concentrations. The structures of the LUSH–alcohol complexes identify a set of specific hydrogen-bonding interactions as cr...

  8. Stability of Facial Affective Expressions in Schizophrenia

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    H. Fatouros-Bergman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-two videorecorded interviews were conducted by two interviewers with eight patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Each patient was interviewed four times: three weekly interviews by the first interviewer and one additional interview by the second interviewer. 64 selected sequences where the patients were speaking about psychotic experiences were scored for facial affective behaviour with Emotion Facial Action Coding System (EMFACS. In accordance with previous research, the results show that patients diagnosed with schizophrenia express negative facial affectivity. Facial affective behaviour seems not to be dependent on temporality, since within-subjects ANOVA revealed no substantial changes in the amount of affects displayed across the weekly interview occasions. Whereas previous findings found contempt to be the most frequent affect in patients, in the present material disgust was as common, but depended on the interviewer. The results suggest that facial affectivity in these patients is primarily dominated by the negative emotions of disgust and, to a lesser extent, contempt and implies that this seems to be a fairly stable feature.

  9. Stability and Sugar Recognition Ability of Ricin-Like Carbohydrate Binding Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jianzhuang [ORNL; Nellas, Ricky B [ORNL; Glover, Mary M [ORNL; Shen, Tongye [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Lectins are a class of proteins known for their novel binding to saccharides. Understanding this sugar recognition process can be crucial in creating structure-based designs of proteins with various biological roles. We focus on the sugar binding of a particular lectin, ricin, which has two -trefoil carbohydrate-binding domains (CRDs) found in several plant protein toxins. The binding ability of possible sites of ricin-like CRD has been puzzling. The apo and various (multiple) ligand-bound forms of the sugar-binding domains of ricin were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. By evaluating structural stability, hydrogen bond dynamics, flexibility, and binding energy, we obtained a detailed picture of the sugar recognition of the ricin-like CRD. Unlike what was previously believed, we found that the binding abilities of the two known sites are not independent of each other. The binding ability of one site is positively affected by the other site. While the mean positions of different binding scenarios are not altered significantly, the flexibility of the binding pockets visibly decreases upon multiple ligand binding. This change in flexibility seems to be the origin of the binding cooperativity. All the hydrogen bonds that are strong in the monoligand state are also strong in the double-ligand complex, although the stability is much higher in the latter form due to cooperativity. These strong hydrogen bonds in a monoligand state are deemed to be the essential hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, by examining the structural correlation matrix, the two domains are structurally one entity. Galactose hydroxyl groups, OH4 and OH3, are the most critical parts in both site 1 and site 2 recognition.

  10. Binding energy and stability of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnikov, N.N.

    2012-01-01

    Three different ways for description of binding energy of superheavy nuclei are discussed. First, one can consider superheavy nuclei as a part of a whole system of nuclei for which a global mass formula is found. Another way is the detailed local description of energy of superheavy nuclei taking into account the effects of shells and subshells. The third way of description, applied for nuclei in the region limited by principal magic numbers, is attached to the beta-stability line.

  11. Mutation of the Zinc-Binding Metalloprotease Motif Affects Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Activity but Does Not Affect Propeptide Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Augusto A.; Buckwold, Simy L.; Shin, Jai W.; Ascon, Miguel; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the zinc-binding metalloprotease in Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) processing and activity, the zinc-binding consensus sequences (H348, E349, H352, G355, H358, and M366) were mutated by site-directed-mutagenesis. Our results indicated that single point mutations in the zinc-binding metalloprotease motif do not affect BFT processing but do reduce or eliminate BFT biologic activity in vitro.

  12. Mutation of the Zinc-Binding Metalloprotease Motif Affects Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Activity but Does Not Affect Propeptide Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Augusto A.; Buckwold, Simy L.; Shin, Jai W.; Ascon, Miguel; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the zinc-binding metalloprotease in Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) processing and activity, the zinc-binding consensus sequences (H348, E349, H352, G355, H358, and M366) were mutated by site-directed-mutagenesis. Our results indicated that single point mutations in the zinc-binding metalloprotease motif do not affect BFT processing but do reduce or eliminate BFT biologic activity in vitro. PMID:16041055

  13. Factors affecting the stability of chloroplast membranes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoki, T.; Torres-Pereira, J.; Packer, L.

    1974-01-01

    Factors which affect the stability of light-induced atebrin fluorescence quenching activity in chloroplast membranes, a measure of the electron transport dependent formation of energy-linked H/sup +/ gradients, were investigated in vitro. Class II spinach chloroplast membranes were isolated and stored at 0 to 4/sup 0/C and aliquots were subsequently tested for their retention of energizing capacity. The main factors which increase the stability of this activity were found to be (a) isolation in a potassium-containing medium but storage in a sucrose medium containing a low concentration of electrolytes; (b) the presence of butylated hydroxytoluene (an antioxidant), and a protein such as bovine serum albumin to remove free fatty acids in the medium during storage. Under these conditions, the energization capacity of chloroplasts is retained for more than 40 days.

  14. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final 125I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. 125I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors

  15. The Stability of Unsaturated Soil Slope Affected by Rainfall Seeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shilin; Wang Guochen; Shao Longtan

    2007-01-01

    Because rainfall seeping makes losing stability of unsaturated soil slope, and arouses great loss to production and human being safety, the stability of unsaturated soil slope has been researched by many scholars recently. This article mainly uses the model for the prediction of shear strength with respect to soil suction, developed by Vanapalli and Fredlund to formulate rainfall seeping how to affect the stability of unsaturated soil slope. Firstly, volumetric water content of unsaturated soil slope changes with rainfall duration, and effective saturation changes with its volumetric water content. Secondly, soil volume weight changes with its volumetric water content. Thirdly, matric suction also changes with its volumetric water content. According to these causes, this article researches how much they make the contribution to the minimum safety coefficient respectively. At last, these factors roundly considered, this article gets the rule of minimum safety coefficient of unsaturated soil slope with rainfall duration that is minimum safety coefficient gradually increasing firstly, then decreasing that is composed of two sectors, first is slowly decreasing, then is fast decreasing after some value.

  16. The stability of triplex DNA is affected by the stability of the underlying duplex

    OpenAIRE

    Rusling, David A.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Brown, Tom; Fox, Keith R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have studied the formation of DNA triple helices in different sequence contexts and show that, for the most stable triplexes, their apparent stability is affected by the stability of the underlying duplex. For a 14-mer parallel triplex-forming oligonucleotide (generating C+.GC and T.AT triplets) at pH 5.0 the Tm is more than 10?C lower with an intermolecular 14-mer duplex target, than it is with an intramolecular duplex, or one which is flanked by 6 GC base pairs at eit...

  17. Carboxymethyl modification of konjac glucomannan affects water binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Man; Dai, Shuhong; Wang, Le; Ni, Xuewen; Yan, Wenli; Fang, Yapeng; Corke, Harold; Jiang, Fatang

    2015-10-01

    The water binding properties of konjac glucomannan (KGM) and carboxymethyl konjac glucomannan (CMKGM) are important for their application in food, pharmaceutical, and chemical engineering fields. The equilibrium moisture content of CMKGM was lower than that of KGM at the relative humidity in the range 30-95% at 25°C. The water absorption and solubility of CMKGM in water solution were lower than that of KGM at 25°C. Carboxymethyl modification of KGM reduces the water adsorption, absorption, and solubility. Both carboxymethylation and deacetylation could confer hydrophobicity for CMKGM. These data provide the basis for expanding CMKGM application. PMID:26076594

  18. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Thuesen, Cathrine K; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A;

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless......, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with...... therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to...

  19. Nuclear ubiquitination by FBXL5 modulates Snail1 DNA binding and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas-Castells, Rosa; Frías, Álex; Robles-Lanuza, Estefanía; Zhang, Kun; Longmore, Gregory D; García de Herreros, Antonio; Díaz, Víctor M

    2014-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor Snail1 regulates epithelial to mesenchymal transition, repressing epithelial markers and activating mesenchymal genes. Snail1 is an extremely labile protein degraded by the cytoplasmic ubiquitin-ligases β-TrCP1/FBXW1 and Ppa/FBXL14. Using a short hairpin RNA screening, we have identified FBXL5 as a novel Snail1 ubiquitin ligase. FBXL5 is located in the nucleus where it interacts with Snail1 promoting its polyubiquitination and affecting Snail1 protein stability and function by impairing DNA binding. Snail1 downregulation by FBXL5 is prevented by Lats2, a protein kinase that phosphorylates Snail1 precluding its nuclear export but not its polyubiquitination. Actually, although polyubiquitination by FBXL5 takes place in the nucleus, Snail1 is degraded in the cytosol. Finally, FBXL5 is highly sensitive to stress conditions and is downregulated by iron depletion and γ-irradiation, explaining Snail1 stabilization in these conditions. These results characterize a novel nuclear ubiquitin ligase controlling Snail1 protein stability and provide the molecular basis for understanding how radiotherapy upregulates the epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducer Snail1. PMID:24157836

  20. How the Nature of Information Affects Binding in Visual Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Walt, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    The question of whether binding information affects the capacity of visual working memory has not been established to date. Different trends in thought have hypothesized different effects for the way information is stored in this memory system. Using a change-detection paradigm this study tested the binding of colour with colour (Experiment 1) and colour with shape (Experiment 2) in visual working memory with the aim of replicating the previously found decrement in binding perf...

  1. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Dupont

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126 with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA. We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126 binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12 binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site.

  2. Spastin binds to lipid droplets and affects lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisovalantis Papadopoulos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in SPAST, encoding spastin, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. HSP is characterized by weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs, owing to progressive retrograde degeneration of the long corticospinal axons. Spastin is a conserved microtubule (MT-severing protein, involved in processes requiring rearrangement of the cytoskeleton in concert to membrane remodeling, such as neurite branching, axonal growth, midbody abscission, and endosome tubulation. Two isoforms of spastin are synthesized from alternative initiation codons (M1 and M87. We now show that spastin-M1 can sort from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to pre- and mature lipid droplets (LDs. A hydrophobic motif comprised of amino acids 57 through 86 of spastin was sufficient to direct a reporter protein to LDs, while mutation of arginine 65 to glycine abolished LD targeting. Increased levels of spastin-M1 expression reduced the number but increased the size of LDs. Expression of a mutant unable to bind and sever MTs caused clustering of LDs. Consistent with these findings, ubiquitous overexpression of Dspastin in Drosophila led to bigger and less numerous LDs in the fat bodies and increased triacylglycerol levels. In contrast, Dspastin overexpression increased LD number when expressed specifically in skeletal muscles or nerves. Downregulation of Dspastin and expression of a dominant-negative variant decreased LD number in Drosophila nerves, skeletal muscle and fat bodies, and reduced triacylglycerol levels in the larvae. Moreover, we found reduced amount of fat stores in intestinal cells of worms in which the spas-1 homologue was either depleted by RNA interference or deleted. Taken together, our data uncovers an evolutionarily conserved role of spastin as a positive regulator of LD metabolism and open up the possibility that dysfunction of LDs in axons may contribute to the pathogenesis of HSP.

  3. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is Functionally Affected by Mutations on Actin Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hai Dong; Wei-Ping Tang; Jia-Yao Liu

    2013-01-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin,and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments.To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L.AtADF1,we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo.Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G-and F-actin binding.The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A,R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding.Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L.plants overexpressing these mutants,we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth.Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional,unless the affinity foractin monomers is also affected.The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding,depolymerization of actin polymers,and therefore in the control of actin organization.

  4. Engineering of binding affinity at metal ion binding sites for the stabilization of proteins: Subtilisin as a test case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A weak Ca2+ binding site in the bacterial serine protease subtilisin BPN' was chosen as a model to explore the feasibility of stabilizing a protein by increasing the binding affinity at a metal ion binding site. The existence of this weak Ca2+ binding site was first discovered through a study of the rate of thermal inactivation of wild-type subtilisin BPN' at 65/degrees/C as a function of the free [Ca2+]. Increasing the [Ca2+] in the range of 0.10-100 mM caused a 100-fold decrease in the rate of thermal inactivation. The data were found to closely fit a theoretical titration curve for a single Ca2+ specific binding site with an apparent log K/sub a/ = 1.49. A series of refined X-ray crystal structures of subtilisin in the presence of 0.0, 25.0, and 40.0 mM CaCl2 has allowed a detailed structural characterization of this Ca2+ binding site. Negatively charged side chains were introduced in the vicinity of the bound Ca2+ by changing Pro 172 and Gly 131 to Asp residues through site-directed and random mutagenesis techniques, respectively. These changes were found to increase the affinity of the Ca2+ binding site by 3.4- and 2-fold, respectively, when compared with the wild-type protein. X-ray studies of these new variants of subtilisin revealed the carboxylate side chains to be 6.8 and 13.2 /Angstrom/, respectively, from the bound Ca2+. These distances and the degree of enhanced binding are consistent with simple electrostatic theory. Moreover, when both Asp changes were introduced together, the binding affinity for Ca2+ was found to be increased about 6-fold over that for the wild-type protein, suggesting an independent and nearly additive effect on the total electrostatic potential at this locus

  5. Binding three-particles at the edge of stability

    CERN Document Server

    Frederico, T; Tomio, L

    2002-01-01

    The stability threshold for an Efimov state is determined as a function of the physical scales of the system. Light exotic nuclei and triatomic molecules (isotopes of helium ( sup 3 He and sup 4 He) together with isotopes of lithium ( sup 6 Li and sup 7 Li) and sodium ( sup 2 sup 3 Na)) are investigated. Scaling, universality, and renormalization-group invariance properties are discussed in this context. The Efimov states energies of sup 4 He sub 3 , sup 4 He sub 2 - sup 7 Li, and sup 2 sup 0 C were found. Refs. 13 (author/nevyjel)

  6. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor

  7. DNA binding during expanded bed adsorption and factors affecting adsorbent aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Mathiasen, N.; Hobley, Timothy John

    2008-01-01

    tolerance of anion exchangers when binding DNA. However, more importantly. with the adsorbents examined here. attempts to reduce bed aggregation by feedstock conditioning with added salt may increase DNA binding leading to a reduction in expanded bed adsorption performance compromising protein capture...... ligand densities to be examined. Very high dynamic binding capacities at 10% breakthrough were found in the absence of added salt. However, the highest binding capacities (similar to 10 and similar to 19mg DNA ml(-1) gel) were found in buffers containing added salt at concentrations of either 0.25 or 0......) even though the dynamic binding capacity was reduced as DNA concentration was increased. The extent of bed contraction during DNA loading was found to be a function of added salt concentration and ligand density of the adsorbent. The results imply that ligand density significantly affects the salt...

  8. A cation binding motif stabilizes the compound I radical of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M A; Han, G W; Kraut, J

    1994-11-01

    Cytochrome c peroxidase reacts with peroxide to form compound I, which contains an oxyferryl heme and an indolyl radical at Trp-191. The indolyl free radical has a half-life of several hours at room temperature, and this remarkable stability is essential for the catalytic function of cytochrome c peroxidase. To probe the protein environment that stabilizes the compound I radical, we used site-directed mutagenesis to replace Trp-191 with Gly or Gln. Crystal structures of these mutants revealed a monovalent cation binding site in the cavity formerly occupied by the side chain of Trp-191. Comparison of this site with those found in other known cation binding enzymes shows that the Trp-191 side chain resides in a consensus K+ binding site. Electrostatic potential calculations indicate that the cation binding site is created by partial negative charges at the backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms of residues 175 and 177, the carboxyl end of a long alpha-helix (residues 165-175), the heme propionates, and the carboxylate side chain of Asp-235. These features create a negative potential that envelops the side chain of Trp-191; the calculated free energy change for cation binding in this site is -27 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.184J). This is more than sufficient to account for the stability of the Trp-191 radical, which our estimates suggest is stabilized by 7.8 kcal/mol relative to a Trp radical in solution. PMID:7972020

  9. Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding induce conformational stability of Calfumirin-1 from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bairagi C Mallick; Sa-Ouk Kang; Suman Jha

    2014-05-01

    The apo-Calfumirin-1 (CAF-1) binds to Ca2+ with high affinity and also to Mg2+ with high positive cooperativity. The thermal unfolding curves of wtCAF-1 monitored at neutral pH by CD spectroscopy are reversible and show different thermal stabilities in the absence or presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions. Metalfree wtCAF-1 shows greater thermal stability than EF-IV mutant protein. We observed that GdnHCl-induced unfolding of apo-wtCAF-1 monitored by CD and fluorescence spectroscopies increases co-operative folding with approximately same C values. Binding of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions to CAF-1 dramatically altered the fluorescence and CD spectra, indicating metal ion-induced conformational changes both in the wild-type and mutant proteins. The hydrophobic probe, ANS is used to observe alteration in surface hydrophobicity of the protein in different ligation states. In apo-wtCAF-1, the exposed hydrophobic surfaces are able to bind ANS which is in contrast to the unfolded or the metal ions ligated conformations. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) resultsshow two possible independent binding sites of comparable affinity for the metal ions. However, their binding to the EF-IV E helix-loop-F helix mutant apo-protein happens with different affinities. The present study demonstrates that Ca2+ or Mg2+ binding plays a possible role in the conformational stability of the protein.

  10. Platelet [3H]imipramine binding in affective disorders: trait versus state characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet [3H]imipramine binding (Bmax) was determined in 67 patients with major affective illness (33 euthymic bipolar, 34 depressed unipolar) and 58 normal control subjects. Bipolar patients had significantly lower Bmax values than did control subjects. The mean Bmax in the unipolar patients was lower than in the control subjects, but the difference was not statistically significant. Dissociation constant (Kd) values did not distinguish patients in either category from control subjects. The significantly lower Bmax in euthymic bipolar patients and the apparent state independence of Bmax in some but not all unipolar patients suggest that platelet imipramine binding may be a trait marker in a subset of affective disorders

  11. Structural investigations into the binding mode of novel neolignans Cmp10 and Cmp19 microtubule stabilizers by in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shubhandra; Kumar, Akhil; Kumar, B Sathish; Negi, Arvind S; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Microtubule stabilizers provide an important mode of treatment via mitotic cell arrest of cancer cells. Recently, we reported two novel neolignans derivatives Cmp10 and Cmp19 showing anticancer activity and working as microtubule stabilizers at micromolar concentrations. In this study, we have explored the binding site, mode of binding, and stabilization by two novel microtubule stabilizers Cmp10 and Cmp19 using in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and binding free energy calculations. Molecular docking studies were performed to explore the β-tubulin binding site of Cmp10 and Cmp19. Further, MD simulations were used to probe the β-tubulin stabilization mechanism by Cmp10 and Cmp19. Binding affinity was also compared for Cmp10 and Cmp19 using binding free energy calculations. Our docking results revealed that both the compounds bind at Ptxl binding site in β-tubulin. MD simulation studies showed that Cmp10 and Cmp19 binding stabilizes M-loop (Phe272-Val288) residues of β-tubulin and prevent its dynamics, leading to a better packing between α and β subunits from adjacent tubulin dimers. In addition, His229, Ser280 and Gln281, and Arg278, Thr276, and Ser232 were found to be the key amino acid residues forming H-bonds with Cmp10 and Cmp19, respectively. Consequently, binding free energy calculations indicated that Cmp10 (-113.655 kJ/mol) had better binding compared to Cmp19 (-95.216 kJ/mol). This study provides useful insight for better understanding of the binding mechanism of Cmp10 and Cmp19 and will be helpful in designing novel microtubule stabilizers. PMID:26212016

  12. Differential Stability and Individual Growth Trajectories of Big Five and Affective Traits During Young Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Vaidya, Jatin G; Gray, Elizabeth K.; Haig, Jeffrey R.; Mroczek, Daniel K.; Watson, David

    2008-01-01

    Big Five and affective traits were measured at three assessments when participants were on average 18, 21, and 24 years old. Rank-order stability analyses revealed that stability correlations tended to be higher across the second compared to the first retest interval; however, affective traits consistently were less stable than the Big Five. Median stability coefficients for the Big Five increased from .62 (Time 1 vs. Time 2) to .70 (Time 2 to Time 3); parallel increases also were observed fo...

  13. A Novel Role of Vimentin Filaments: Binding and Stabilization of Collagen mRNAs ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Azariyas A Challa; Stefanovic, Branko

    2011-01-01

    The stem-loop in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs (5′SL) is the key element regulating their stability and translation. Stabilization of collagen mRNAs is the predominant mechanism for high collagen expression in fibrosis. LARP6 binds the 5′SL of α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs with high affinity. Here, we report that vimentin filaments associate with collagen mRNAs in a 5′SL- and LARP6-dependent manner and stabilize collagen mRNAs. LARP6 interacts with vimentin filame...

  14. Investigating the linkage between disease-causing amino acid variants and their effect on protein stability and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yunhui; Alexov, Emil

    2016-02-01

    Single amino acid variations (SAV) occurring in human population result in natural differences between individuals or cause diseases. It is well understood that the molecular effect of SAV can be manifested as changes of the wild type characteristics of the corresponding protein, among which are the protein stability and protein interactions. Typically the effect of SAV on protein stability and interactions was assessed via the changes of the wild type folding and binding free energies. However, in terms of SAV affecting protein functionally and disease susceptibility, one wants to know to what extend the wild type function is perturbed by the SAV. Here it is demonstrated that relative, rather than the absolute, change of the folding and binding free energy serves as a good indicator for SAV association with disease. Using HumVar as a source for disease-causing SAV and experimentally determined free energy changes from ProTherm and SKEMPI databases, correlation coefficients (CC) between the disease index (Pd) and relative folding (Ppr,f) and binding (Ppr,b) probability indexes, respectively, was achieved. The obtained CCs demonstrated the applicability of the proposed approach and it served as good indicator for SAV association with disease. PMID:26650512

  15. How the spatial variation of tree roots affects slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhun; Stokes, A.; Jourdan, C.; Rey, H.; Courbaud, B.; Saint-André, L.

    2010-05-01

    It is now widely recognized that plant roots can reinforce soil against shallow mass movement. Although studies on the interactions between vegetation and slope stability have significantly augmented in recent years, a clear understanding of the spatial dynamics of root reinforcement (through additional cohesion by roots) in subalpine forest is still limited, especially with regard to the roles of different forest management strategies or ecological landscapes. The architecture of root systems is important for soil cohesion, but in reality it is not possible to measure the orientation of each root in a system. Therefore, knowledge on the effect of root orientation and anisotropy on root cohesion on the basis of in situ data is scanty. To determine the effect of root orientation in root cohesion models, we investigated root anisotropy in two mixed, mature, naturally regenerated, subalpine forests of Norway spruce (Picea abies), and Silver fir (Abies alba). Trees were clustered into islands, with open spaces between each group, resulting in strong mosaic heterogeneity within the forest stand. Trenches within and between clusters of trees were dug and root distribution was measured in three dimensions. We then simulated the influence of different values for a root anisotropy correction factor in forests with different ecological structures and soil depths. Using these data, we have carried out simulations of slope stability by calculating the slope factor of safety depending on stand structure. Results should enable us to better estimate the risk of shallow slope failure depending on the type of forest and species.

  16. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance of the...

  17. Lamb meat colour stability as affected by dietary tannins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pennisi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one male Comisana lambs were divided into three groups at 45 days of age and were individually penned for 60 days. Seven lambs were fed a concentrate-based diet (C, seven lambs received the same concentrate with the addiction of tannins from quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii; T, whereas the remaining animals were fed exclusively fresh vetch (Vicia sativa; H. Colour descriptors (a*, b* and H* and metmyoglobin (MMb percentages were measured on minced semimembranosus muscle over 14 days of refrigerated storage in a high oxygen atmosphere. Regardless of dietary treatment, meat redness decreased, while yellowness and hue angle increased (P < 0.001 over storage duration. However, higher a* values, lower b* values and lower H* values were observed in meat from both H- and T-fed animals as compared to meat from C-fed lambs (P = 0.012; P = 0.02; P = 0.003, respectively. Metmyoglobin formation increased over time (P < 0.001, but H diet resulted in lower metmyoglobin percentages than C diet (P = 0.007. We conclude that the inclusion of tannins into the concentrate improved meat colour stability compared to a tannin-free concentrate. Moreover, the protective effect of tannins against meat discolouration was comparable to that obtained by feeding lambs fresh herbage.

  18. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  19. Gemini surfactants affect the structure, stability, and activity of ribonuclease Sa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Razieh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Laurents, Douglas V

    2014-09-11

    Gemini surfactants have important advantages, e.g., low micromolar CMCs and slow millisecond monomer ↔ micelle kinetics, for membrane mimetics and for delivering nucleic acids for gene therapy or RNA silencing. However, as a prerequisite, it is important to characterize interactions occurring between Gemini surfactants and proteins. Here NMR and CD spectroscopies are employed to investigate the interactions of cationic Gemini surfactants with RNase Sa, a negatively charged ribonuclease. We find that RNase Sa binds Gemini surfactant monomers and micelles at pH values above 4 to form aggregates. Below pH 4, where the protein is positively charged, these aggregates dissolve and interactions are undetectable. Thermal denaturation experiments show that surfactant lowers RNase Sa's conformational stability, suggesting that surfactant binds the protein's denatured state preferentially. Finally, Gemini surfactants were found to bind RNA, leading to the formation of large complexes. Interestingly, Gemini surfactant binding did not prevent RNase Sa from cleaving RNA. PMID:25133582

  20. OMP decarboxylase: phosphodianion binding energy is used to stabilize a vinyl carbanion intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Amyes, Tina L; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2011-05-01

    Orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) catalyzes the exchange for deuterium from solvent D(2)O of the C-6 proton of 1-(β-d-erythrofuranosyl)-5-fluorouracil (FEU), a phosphodianion truncated product analog. The deuterium exchange reaction of FEU is accelerated 1.8 × 10(4)-fold by 1 M phosphite dianion (HPO(3)(2-)). This corresponds to a 5.8 kcal/mol stabilization of the vinyl carbanion-like transition state, which is similar to the 7.8 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition state for OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of a truncated substrate analog by bound HPO(3)(2-). These results show that the intrinsic binding energy of phosphite dianion is used in the stabilization of the vinyl carbanion-like transition state common to the decarboxylation and deuterium exchange reactions. PMID:21486036

  1. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept. PMID:25016978

  2. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Jun Han

    Full Text Available Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1 regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116 cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target.

  3. Radiation effects on the stability of benzimidazole, which directly affects the stability of human DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As all of us know that DNA is the genetic material and that is therefore stood at the very center of the study of life. Among the four important nitrogenous bases found in DNA one is purine which is nothing but a benzimidazole structure substituted by two nitrogens at 1 and 3 positions. Denaturation and renaturation duo to radiation are the two important incidents in DNA life which are the reason of many diseases and also the remedy of many diseases. These two incidents occur due to environmental effect on the parent part of DNA such as purine or we may say that benzimidazole structure. Since benzimidazole is an important part of human DNA structure so its response on different environment causes e huge effect on human gen. To study such response different types of benzimidazole molecules have been studied and two of such benzimidazole molecules are 2-Acetyl Benzomidazole (2ABI) and 2-Benzoyl Benzimidazole (2BBI). Usually these molecules show excited state proton transfer characteristics in polar and nonpolar environment. Proton transfer effect is very important behavior in DNA bases which is the fundamental phenomenon of different drug designing. To control such effect or to produce the effect as much as we want we have tried to restrict the molecule in different nano cavities. Michroheterogeneous media such as micelles as usual has enormous environmental effect on charge transfer phenomenon. The specialty of this media is that they have an ability to concentrate guest molecules into relatively small effective volumes and then to promote the re-encounter of such molecules. This property also makes micelles a good device for inducing efficient electrostatic interactions between the micelle head groups and the guest molecules. This electrostatic interaction has a direct effect on the stability of 2ABI and 2BBI molecule in ground state as well as in excited state due to micellization and this stability has enormous effect on human gene stability. (authors)

  4. The Tubulin Binding Mode of Microtubule Stabilizing Agents Studied by Electron Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, James H.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    Since tubulin was discovered in 1967, drug probes have been used to manipulate mechanisms of microtubule polymerization and disassembly. In parallel, advances in optical imagery, electron microscopy, along with both electron and X-ray diffraction have provided ability to "see" the molecular underpinning of these machines. Nanoscale mapping of different tubulin polymers formed in the presence of different drugs and cofactors provide a context for examining the dynamic features relevant to their biological activity. Models built from EM maps have been used to understand the binding of stabilizing drugs such as taxanes and epothilones, to predict more effective molecules, and to explain mutation based resistance. Here, we discuss drug binding in the context of different polymeric forms and propose a trigger mechanism associated with microtubules' dynamic instability.

  5. Methodical design for stability assessments of permafrost-affected high-mountain rock walls

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, L.; C. Huggel

    2008-01-01

    Slope stability of steep rock walls in glacierised and permafrost-affected high-mountain regions is influenced by a number of different factors and processes. For an integral assessment of slope stability, a better understanding of the predisposing factors is particularly important, especially in view of rapid climate-related changes. This study introduces a methodical design that includes suitable methods and techniques for investigations of different predisposing factors in high-mountain ro...

  6. Hand Proximity Differentially Affects Visual Working Memory for Color and Orientation in a Binding Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane P. Kelly

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Observers determined whether two sequentially presented arrays of six lines were the same or different. Differences, when present, involved either a swap in the color of two lines or a swap in the orientation of two lines. Thus, accurate change detection required the binding of color and orientation information for each line within visual working memory. Holding viewing distance constant, the proximity of the arrays to the hands was manipulated. Placing the hands near the to-be-remembered array decreased participants’ ability to remember color information, but increased their ability to remember orientation information. This pair of results indicates that hand proximity differentially affects the processing of various types of visual information, a conclusion broadly consistent with functional and anatomical differences in the magnocellular and parvocellular pathways. It further indicates that hand proximity affects the likelihood that various object features will be encoded into integrated object files.

  7. Hand proximity differentially affects visual working memory for color and orientation in a binding task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Shane P; Brockmole, James R

    2014-01-01

    Observers determined whether two sequentially presented arrays of six lines were the same or different. Differences, when present, involved either a swap in the color of two lines or a swap in the orientation of two lines. Thus, accurate change detection required the binding of color and orientation information for each line within visual working memory. Holding viewing distance constant, the proximity of the arrays to the hands was manipulated. Placing the hands near the to-be-remembered array decreased participants' ability to remember color information, but increased their ability to remember orientation information. This pair of results indicates that hand proximity differentially affects the processing of various types of visual information, a conclusion broadly consistent with functional and anatomical differences in the magnocellular and parvocellular pathways. It further indicates that hand proximity affects the likelihood that various object features will be encoded into integrated object files. PMID:24795671

  8. Diabetes may affect intracranial aneurysm stabilization in older patients: Analysis based on intraoperative findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jihye; Shin, Yong Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Only a small proportion of aneurysms progress to rupture. Previous studies have focused on predicting the rupture risk of intracranial aneurysms. Atherosclerotic aneurysm wall appears resistant to rupture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and morphological factors affecting atherosclerosis of an aneurysm and identify the parameters that predict aneurysm stabilization. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 253 consecutive patients with 291 unruptured aneurysms who underwent clipping surgery in a single institution between January 2012 and October 2013. Aneurysms were categorized based on intraoperative video findings and assessed morphologic and demographic data. Aneurysms which had the atherosclerotic wall without any super thin and transparent portion were defined as stabilized group and the others as a not-stabilized group. Results: Of the 207 aneurysms, 176 (85.0%) were assigned to the not-stabilized group and 31 (15.0%) to the stabilized group. The relative proportion of stabilized aneurysms increased significantly as the age increased (P logistic analysis showed that age ≥65 years (P logistic analysis showed that age ≥65 years (P = 0.009) and hypertension (P = 0.041) were strongly correlated with stable aneurysms. In older patients (≥65 years of age), multivariate logistic regression revealed that only diabetes was associated with stabilized aneurysms (P = 0.027). Conclusions: In patients ≥65 years of age, diabetes mellitus may highly predict the stabilized aneurysms. These results provide useful information in determining treatment and follow-up strategies, especially in older patients.

  9. Structure and stability of recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein: II. Unfolding of the monomeric forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Olga V.; Roginskii, Denis O.; Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.

    2016-01-01

    In a family of monomeric odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), bovine OBP (bOBP), that lacks conserved disulfide bond found in other OBPs, occupies unique niche because of its ability to form domain-swapped dimers. In this study, we analyzed conformational stabilities of the recombinant bOBP and its monomeric variants, the bOBP-Gly121+ mutant containing an additional glycine residue after the residue 121 of the bOBP, and the GCC-bOBP mutant obtained from the bOBP-Gly121+ form by introduction of the Trp64Cys/His155Cys double mutation to restore the canonical disulfide bond. We also analyzed the effect of the natural ligand binding on the conformational stabilities of these bOBP variants. Our data are consistent with the conclusion that the unfolding-refolding pathways of the recombinant bOBP and its mutant monomeric forms bOBP-Gly121+ and GCC-bOBP are similar and do not depend on the oligomeric status of the protein. This clearly shows that the information on the unfolding-refolding mechanism is encoded in the structure of the bOBP monomers. However, the process of the bOBP unfolding is significantly complicated by the formation of the domain-swapped dimer, and the rates of the unfolding-refolding reactions essentially depend on the conditions in which the protein is located. PMID:27114857

  10. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke;

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks......, allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes...... chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication....

  11. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties. PMID:27444879

  12. Stability and binding effects of silver(I) complexes at lipoxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrontaki, Eleni; Leonis, Georgios; Avramopoulos, Aggelos; Papadopoulos, Manthos G; Simčič, Mihael; Grdadolnik, Simona Golič; Afantitis, Antreas; Melagraki, Georgia; Hadjikakou, Sotiris K; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    An anti-inflammatory complex of Ag(I), namely [Ag(tpp)3(asp)](dmf) [tpp = triphenylphosphine, aspH = aspirin, dmf = N,N-dimethylformamide], was synthesized in an attempt to develop novel metallotherapeutic molecules. STD (1)H NMR experiments were used to examine if this complex binds to LOX-1. The (1)H NMR spectra in buffer Tris/D2O betrayed the existence of two complexes: the complex of aspirin and the complex of salicylic acid produced after deacetylation of aspirin. Nevertheless, the STD spectra showed that only the complex of salicylic acid is bound to the enzyme. Molecular docking and dynamics were used to complement our study. The complexes were stabilized inside a large LOX-1 cavity by establishing a network of hydrogen bonds and steric interactions. The complex formation with salicylic acid was more favorable. The in silico results provide a plausible explanation of the experimental results, which showed that only the complex with salicylic acid enters the binding cavity. PMID:25373502

  13. Structure and stability of copper clusters: A tight-binding molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we propose a tight-binding molecular dynamics with parameters fitted to first-principles calculations on the smaller clusters and with an environment correction, to be a powerful technique for studying large transition-metal/noble-metal clusters. In particular, the structure and stability of Cun clusters for n=3-55 are studied by using this technique. The results for small Cun clusters (n=3-9) show good agreement with ab initio calculations and available experimental results. In the size range 10≤n≤55 most of the clusters adopt icosahedral structure which can be derived from the 13-atom icosahedron, the polyicosahedral 19-, 23-, and 26-atom clusters, and the 55-atom icosahedron, by adding or removing atoms. However, a local geometrical change from icosahedral to decahedral structure is observed for n=40-44 and return to the icosahedral growth pattern is found at n=45 which continues. Electronic 'magic numbers' ( n=2, 8, 20, 34, 40) in this regime are correctly reproduced. Due to electron pairing in highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs), even-odd alternation is found. A sudden loss of even-odd alternation in second difference of cluster binding energy, HOMO-LUMO (LUMO, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) gap energy and ionization potential is observed in the region n∼40 due to structural change there. Interplay between electronic and geometrical structure is found

  14. Cyclophilin A stabilizes the HIV-1 capsid through a novel non-canonical binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Perilla, Juan R.; Ning, Jiying; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Ramalho, Ruben; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Byeon, In-Ja; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Prevelige, Peter E.; Rousso, Itay; Aiken, Christopher; Polenova, Tatyana; Schulten, Klaus; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-03-01

    The host cell factor cyclophilin A (CypA) interacts directly with the HIV-1 capsid and regulates viral infectivity. Although the crystal structure of CypA in complex with the N-terminal domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) has been known for nearly two decades, how CypA interacts with the viral capsid and modulates HIV-1 infectivity remains unclear. We determined the cryoEM structure of CypA in complex with the assembled HIV-1 capsid at 8-Å resolution. The structure exhibits a distinct CypA-binding pattern in which CypA selectively bridges the two CA hexamers along the direction of highest curvature. EM-guided all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and solid-state NMR further reveal that the CypA-binding pattern is achieved by single-CypA molecules simultaneously interacting with two CA subunits, in different hexamers, through a previously uncharacterized non-canonical interface. These results provide new insights into how CypA stabilizes the HIV-1 capsid and is recruited to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

  15. Emulsifier type, metal chelation and pH affect oxidative stability of n-3-enriched emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has shown that the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions is affected by the type of surfactant used as emulsifier. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of real food emulsifiers as well as metal chelation by EDTA and pH on the oxidative stability of a 10% n-3......-enriched oil-in-water emulsion. The selected food emulsifiers were Tween 80, Citrem, sodium caseinate and lecithin. Lipid oxidation was evaluated by determination of peroxide values and secondary volatile oxidation products. Moreover, the zeta potential and the droplet sizes were determined. Twen resulted...... in the least oxidatively stable emulsions, followed by Citrem. When iron was present, caseinate-stabilized emulsions oxidized slower than lecithin emulsions at pH 3, whereas the opposite was the case at pH 7. Oxidation generally progressed faster at pH 3 than at pH 7, irrespective of the addition of...

  16. Centromere binding and a conserved role in chromosome stability for SUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loes A L van de Pasch

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Slx5/8 complex is the founding member of a recently defined class of SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs. Slx5/8 has been implicated in genome stability and transcription, but the precise contribution is unclear. To characterise Slx5/8 function, we determined genome-wide changes in gene expression upon loss of either subunit. The majority of mRNA changes are part of a general stress response, also exhibited by mutants of other genome integrity pathways and therefore indicative of an indirect effect on transcription. Genome-wide binding analysis reveals a uniquely centromeric location for Slx5. Detailed phenotype analyses of slx5Δ and slx8Δ mutants show severe mitotic defects that include aneuploidy, spindle mispositioning, fish hooks and aberrant spindle kinetics. This is associated with accumulation of the PP2A regulatory subunit Rts1 at centromeres prior to entry into anaphase. Knockdown of the human STUbL orthologue RNF4 also results in chromosome segregation errors due to chromosome bridges. The study shows that STUbLs have a conserved role in maintenance of chromosome stability and links SUMO-dependent ubiquitination to a centromere-specific function during mitosis.

  17. Centromere binding and a conserved role in chromosome stability for SUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pasch, Loes A L; Miles, Antony J; Nijenhuis, Wilco; Brabers, Nathalie A C H; van Leenen, Dik; Lijnzaad, Philip; Brown, Markus K; Ouellet, Jimmy; Barral, Yves; Kops, Geert J P L; Holstege, Frank C P

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Slx5/8 complex is the founding member of a recently defined class of SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs). Slx5/8 has been implicated in genome stability and transcription, but the precise contribution is unclear. To characterise Slx5/8 function, we determined genome-wide changes in gene expression upon loss of either subunit. The majority of mRNA changes are part of a general stress response, also exhibited by mutants of other genome integrity pathways and therefore indicative of an indirect effect on transcription. Genome-wide binding analysis reveals a uniquely centromeric location for Slx5. Detailed phenotype analyses of slx5Δ and slx8Δ mutants show severe mitotic defects that include aneuploidy, spindle mispositioning, fish hooks and aberrant spindle kinetics. This is associated with accumulation of the PP2A regulatory subunit Rts1 at centromeres prior to entry into anaphase. Knockdown of the human STUbL orthologue RNF4 also results in chromosome segregation errors due to chromosome bridges. The study shows that STUbLs have a conserved role in maintenance of chromosome stability and links SUMO-dependent ubiquitination to a centromere-specific function during mitosis. PMID:23785440

  18. Stability junction at a common mutation site in the collagenous domain of the mannose binding lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohs, Angela; Li, Yingjie; Doss-Pepe, Ellen; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2005-02-15

    Missense mutations in the collagen triple-helix that replace one of the required Gly residues in the (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)(n)() repeating sequence have been implicated in various disorders. Although most hereditary collagen disorders are rare, a common occurrence of a Gly replacement mutation is found in the collagenous domain of mannose binding lectin (MBL). A Gly --> Asp mutation at position 54 in MBL is found at a frequency as high as 30% in certain populations and leads to increased susceptibility to infections. The structural and energetic consequences of this mutation are investigated by comparing a triple-helical peptide containing the N-terminal Gly-X-Y units of MBL with the homologous peptide containing the Gly to Asp replacement. The mutation leads to a loss of triple-helix content but only a small decrease in the stability of the triple-helix (DeltaT(m) approximately 2 degrees C) and no change in the calorimetric enthalpy. NMR studies on specifically labeled residues indicate the portion of the peptide C-terminal to residue 54 is in a highly ordered triple-helix in both peptides, while residues N-terminal to the mutation site have a weak triple-helical signal in the parent peptide and are completely disordered in the mutant peptide. These results suggest that the N-terminal triplet residues are contributing little to the stability of this peptide, a hypothesis confirmed by the stability and enthalpy of shorter peptides containing only the region C-terminal to the mutation site. The Gly to Asp replacement at position 54 in MBL occurs at the boundary of a highly stable triple-helix region and a very unstable sequence. The junctional position of this mutation minimizes its destabilizing effect, in contrast with the significant destabilization seen for Gly replacements in peptides modeling collagen diseases. PMID:15697204

  19. Study on the Gas Phase Stability of Heme-binding Pocket in Cytochrome Tb5 and Its Mutants by Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU,Chong-Tian(余翀天); GUO,Yin-Long(郭寅龙); L(U),Long(吕龙); WANG,Yun-Hua(王韵华); YAO,Ping(姚萍); HUANG,Zhong-Xian(黄仲贤)

    2002-01-01

    To ehucidate the effect of various amino acid residues on the heme-binding pocket in cytochrome Tbs, several residues were chosen for replacement by means of site-directed mutagenesis.Comparison of the mass spectrmn between the F35Y mutant and the wild type shows that the relative abundance of holoprotein ion of F35Y is lower than that of the wild type in gas phase. It is concluded that mutation from Phe35 residue to tyrosine decreases the hydrophobic character of cytochrome Tbs heme pocket, which decreases the stability of heme-binding pocket. ESI-MS spectra of the mutants V61E, V61K, V61H and V61Y show various contribution of amino acid to the stability of heme-binding pocket. The small and non-polar residue Vat61 was replaced with large or polar residues, resulting in enhancing the trend of heme leaving from the pocket. In addition, comparison of the mass relative abundance of bolo-proteins among all the Va161-mutants, shows that their stability in gas phase appropriately submit the following order: wild type > V61H > V61E > V61K ≈ V61Y. The extra great stability of quadruple sites mutant E44/48/56A/D60A shows that reduction of electrostatic or hydrogen bond interactions among the residues locating in the outside region of the heme edge remarkably affect the stability of heme. The results of analyzing the oxidation states of heme iron in Tbs and its mutants by insource-CAD experiment suggest that the charge states of heme iron maintain inflexible in mutation process.

  20. Structure and stability of recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein: I. Design and analysis of monomeric mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Olga V.; Roginskii, Denis O.; Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine odorant-binding protein (bOBP) differs from other lipocalins by lacking the conserved disulfide bond and for being able to form the domain-swapped dimers. To identify structural features responsible for the formation of the bOBP unique dimeric structure and to understand the role of the domain swapping on maintaining the native structure of the protein, structural properties of the recombinant wild type bOBP and its mutant that cannot dimerize via the domain swapping were analyzed. We also looked at the effect of the disulfide bond by designing a monomeric bOBPs with restored disulfide bond which is conserved in other lipocalins. Finally, to understand which features in the microenvironment of the bOBP tryptophan residues play a role in the defining peculiarities of the intrinsic fluorescence of this protein we designed and investigated single-tryptophan mutants of the monomeric bOBP. Our analysis revealed that the insertion of the glycine after the residue 121 of the bOBP prevents domain swapping and generates a stable monomeric protein bOBP-Gly121+. We also show that the restored disulfide bond in the GCC-bOBP mutant leads to the noticeable stabilization of the monomeric structure. Structural and functional analysis revealed that none of the amino acid substitutions introduced to the bOBP affected functional activity of the protein and that the ligand binding leads to the formation of a more compact and stable state of the recombinant bOBP and its mutant monomeric forms. Finally, analysis of the single-tryptophan mutants of the monomeric bOBP gave us a unique possibility to find peculiarities of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues which were not previously described. PMID:27114880

  1. Nanog RNA-binding proteins YBX1 and ILF3 affect pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuanliang; Xue, Yan; Yang, Guanheng; Yin, Shang; Shi, Wansheng; Cheng, Yan; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Fan, Shuyue; Zhang, Huijun; Zeng, Fanyi

    2016-08-01

    Nanog is a well-known transcription factor that plays a fundamental role in stem cell self-renewal and the maintenance of their pluripotent cell identity. There remains a large data gap with respect to the spectrum of the key pluripotency transcription factors' interaction partners. Limited information is available concerning Nanog-associated RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the intrinsic protein-RNA interactions characteristic of the regulatory activities of Nanog. Herein, we used an improved affinity protocol to purify Nanog-interacting RBPs from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and 49 RBPs of Nanog were identified. Among them, the interaction of YBX1 and ILF3 with Nanog mRNA was further confirmed by in vitro assays, such as Western blot, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), and ex vivo methods, such as immunofluorescence staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), MS2 in vivo biotin-tagged RNA affinity purification (MS2-BioTRAP). Interestingly, RNAi studies revealed that YBX1 and ILF3 positively affected the expression of Nanog and other pluripotency-related genes. Particularly, downregulation of YBX1 or ILF3 resulted in high expression of mesoderm markers. Thus, a reduction in the expression of YBX1 and ILF3 controls the expression of pluripotency-related genes in ESCs, suggesting their roles in further regulation of the pluripotent state of ESCs. PMID:26289635

  2. IL-8 dictates glycosaminoglycan binding and stability of IL-18 in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reeves, Emer P

    2010-02-01

    Dysregulation of airway inflammation contributes to lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF). Inflammation is mediated by inflammatory cytokines, including IL-8, which illustrates an increase in biological half-life and proinflammatory activity when bound to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The aim of this project was to compare IL-8 and IL-18 for their relative stability, activity, and interaction with GAGs, including chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, and heparan sulfate, present in high quantities in the lungs of patients with CF. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected from patients with CF (n = 28), non-CF controls (n = 14), and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 12). Increased levels of IL-8 and reduced concentrations of IL-18 were detected in bronchial samples obtained from CF individuals. The low level of IL-18 was not a defect in IL-18 production, as the pro- and mature forms of the molecule were expressed and produced by CF epithelial cells and monocytes. There was, however, a marked competition between IL-8 and IL-18 for binding to GAGs. A pronounced loss of IL-18 binding capacity occurred in the presence of IL-8, which displaced IL-18 from these anionic-matrices, rendering the cytokine susceptible to proteolytic degradation by neutrophil elastase. As a biological consequence of IL-18 degradation, reduced levels of IL-2 were secreted by Jurkat T lymphocytes. In conclusion, a novel mechanism has been identified highlighting the potential of IL-8 to determine the fate of other inflammatory molecules, such as IL-18, within the inflammatory milieu of the CF lung.

  3. Size and molecular flexibility affect the binding of ellagitannins to bovine serum albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Dobreva, Marina; Green, R. J.; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Salminen, J.-P.; Howlin, B.J.; Frazier, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Binding to bovine serum albumin of monomeric (vescalagin and pedunculagin) and dimeric ellagitannins (roburin A, oenothein B, and gemin A) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated two types of binding sites. Stronger and more specific sites exhibited affinity constants, K1, of 104–106 M–1 and stoichiometries, n1, of 2–13 and dominated at low tannin concentrations. Weaker and less-specific binding sites had K2 constants of 103–105 M–1 ...

  4. Increases thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase by fusion of cellulose binding domain derived from Trichoderma reesei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The CSLP and fusion enzyme were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris. ► The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 °C for 120-min. ► The fusion enzyme was responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. ► The fusion enzyme has an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization. -- Abstract: To improve the thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase (CSLP), the cellulose-binding domain originates from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I was engineered into C-terminal region of the CSLP (CSLP-CBD). The CSLP and CSLP-CBD were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris using the strong methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter and the secretion signal sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (α factor). The recombinant CSLP and CSLP-CBD were secreted into culture medium and estimated by SDS–PAGE to be 22 and 27 kDa, respectively. The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 °C and retained more than 80% of its activity after 120-min incubation at this temperature. Our results also found that the fusion of fungal exoglucanase cellulose-binding domain to CSLP is responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. This attribute should make it an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization.

  5. Increases thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase by fusion of cellulose binding domain derived from Trichoderma reesei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongekkaew, Jantaporn, E-mail: jantaporn_25@yahoo.com [Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, Ubon-Ratchathani University, Warinchumrab, Ubon-Ratchathani 34190 (Thailand); Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki [Application Research Division, National Research Institute of Brewing, 3-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CSLP and fusion enzyme were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 Degree-Sign C for 120-min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme was responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme has an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization. -- Abstract: To improve the thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase (CSLP), the cellulose-binding domain originates from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I was engineered into C-terminal region of the CSLP (CSLP-CBD). The CSLP and CSLP-CBD were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris using the strong methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter and the secretion signal sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ({alpha} factor). The recombinant CSLP and CSLP-CBD were secreted into culture medium and estimated by SDS-PAGE to be 22 and 27 kDa, respectively. The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 Degree-Sign C and retained more than 80% of its activity after 120-min incubation at this temperature. Our results also found that the fusion of fungal exoglucanase cellulose-binding domain to CSLP is responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. This attribute should make it an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization.

  6. Bile acid salt binding with colesevelam HCl is not affected by suspension in common beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that anions in common beverages may bind to bile acid sequestrants (BAS), reducing their capacity for binding bile acid salts. This study examined the ability of the novel BAS colesevelam hydrochloride (HCl), in vitro, to bind bile acid sodium salts following suspension in common beverages. Equilibrium binding was evaluated under conditions of constant time and varying concentrations of bile acid salts in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). A stock solution of sodium salts of glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC), and glycocholic acid (GC), was added to each prepared sample of colesevelam HCl. Bile acid salt binding was calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Kinetics experiments were conducted using constant initial bile acid salt concentrations and varying binding times. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of colesevelam HCl binding for GCDC, TDC, and GC were not significantly altered after suspension in water, carbonated water, Coca-Cola, Sprite, grape juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or Gatorade. The amount of bile acid sodium salt bound as a function of time was unchanged by pretreatment with any beverage tested. The in vitro binding characteristics of colesevelam HCl are unchanged by suspension in common beverages. PMID:16937334

  7. Kit preparation of 153Sm-EDTMP and factors affecting radiochemical purity and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast kit method was developed for the production of 153Sm-EDTMP in two steps avoiding the use of nitric acid, evaporation and sterilization of the final solution by autoclave. Methods of analysis for the determination of chemical and radiochemical purity in the radiopharmaceutical solution were established. Factors affecting radiochemical purity and stability of the complex as the molar ratio of EDTMP/Sm, concentration of phosphate buffer and neutralization of EDTMP prior kit preparation were also analyzed. The use of this radiopharmaceutical in rabbits and patients showed selective skeletal uptake. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Nucleobases bind to and stabilize aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile, providing a viable mechanism for the emergence of protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Roy A; Blosser, Matthew C; Stottrup, Benjamin L; Tavakley, Ravi; Deamer, David W; Keller, Sarah L

    2013-08-13

    Primordial cells presumably combined RNAs, which functioned as catalysts and carriers of genetic information, with an encapsulating membrane of aggregated amphiphilic molecules. Major questions regarding this hypothesis include how the four bases and the sugar in RNA were selected from a mixture of prebiotic compounds and colocalized with such membranes, and how the membranes were stabilized against flocculation in salt water. To address these questions, we explored the possibility that aggregates of decanoic acid, a prebiotic amphiphile, interact with the bases and sugar found in RNA. We found that these bases, as well as some but not all related bases, bind to decanoic acid aggregates. Moreover, both the bases and ribose inhibit flocculation of decanoic acid by salt. The extent of inhibition by the bases correlates with the extent of their binding, and ribose inhibits to a greater extent than three similar sugars. Finally, the stabilizing effects of a base and ribose are additive. Thus, aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile bind certain heterocyclic bases and sugars, including those found in RNA, and this binding stabilizes the aggregates against salt. These mutually reinforcing mechanisms might have driven the emergence of protocells. PMID:23901105

  9. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  10. Stability, protein binding and clearance studies of [99mTc]DTPA. Evaluation of a commercially available dry-kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehling, M

    1988-01-01

    quality of a commercial [99mTc]DTPA preparation (C.I.S., France) with reference to stability, protein binding and accuracy of the determined plasma clearance values as a measure of GFR. The stability of the preparations was studied by thin-layer chromatography, the in vitro protein binding by Sephadex...... filtration after incubation with human serum albumin and in vivo protein binding by filtration of human plasma. The accuracy of the plasma clearance values was investigated by comparison with the simultaneously measured plasma clearance of [51Cr]EDTA. There was no detectable free pertechnetate or hydrolysed...... reduced technetium in eight vials five and six hours after the preparation. The in vitro protein binding 10 (20), 120 and 300 min after the preparation of eight vials was 2.3% (0.8%), 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively. The in vivo protein binding in 12 patients 5, 90 and 180 min after the injection was 0.3%, 0...

  11. Function of plastid mRNA 3' inverted repeats. RNA stabilization and gene-specific protein binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastid protein coding regions in plants are generally flanked by 3' inverted repeat (IR) sequences. In a previous work, we have shown that their role may be in RNA stabilization and as a processing signal that establishes the mature mRNA 3' end. In this report we have investigated the stability and protein interaction of chloroplast mRNA 3' IR-RNA sequences in more detail. Progressive deletions into the 3' IR-RNA sequences for the chloroplast cytochrome b6/f subunit IV (petD) mRNA reduce the stability of the RNA, indicating that the potential to form a stem/loop is a minimum requirement for petD 3' IR-RNA stability in vitro. Specific point mutants also destabilize the processed 3' IR-RNA, suggesting an important role for the primary sequence. Gel mobility shift and UV-cross-linking analysis has shown that 3' IR-RNAs of petD and two other chloroplast mRNAs (rbcL and psbA) interact with proteins in vitro. Comparison of the bound petD 3' IR-RNA proteins with proteins that bind to rbcL and psbA reveals that binding of certain proteins is gene-specific. Also, precursor and processed petD 3' IR-RNAs bind different sets of proteins. A single nucleotide transversion (T----A) near the base of the stem eliminates the binding of a 29-kDa protein to the petD 3' IR-RNA precursor. We discuss the possible role of 3' IR-RNA-protein interactions in plastid mRNA 3' end maturation and differential mRNA stability

  12. Factors affecting the fatty acid composition and fat oxidative stability in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Vehovsky

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of selected factors affecting fatty acids (FA composition in pig fat. In the experiment, the influence of nutrition, gender, carcass weight, lean meat proportion (LMP and intramuscular fat (IMF were monitored. The effect of diet, specifically the influence of added linseed or corn on the fatty acids composition in the backfat was studied in pigs. From the perspective of the required increase of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA only the addition of the linseed proved to have a significant effect. Another evaluated aspect concerning the FA spectrum was the gender. While the backfat in barrows showed higher (P≤0.05 amount of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, the backfat in gilts displayed a significantly higher proportion (P≤0.01 of the PUFA and total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA. A significant effect on the PUFA proportion has also been demonstrated for the lean meat proportion (LMP parameter, which therefore represents not only a qualitative carcass meat parameter but also plays an important role in relation to the FA composition in the fat in pigs. In connection to the FA proportion changes the study also monitored the fat oxidative stability with the use of the TBARS method. Concerning the oxidative stability the effects of nutrition, FA groups, gender, carcass weight and LMP were studied. The relationship between the above mentioned factors and oxidative stability was found to be insignificant.

  13. Mapping the Binding Site of the Inhibitor Tariquidar That Stabilizes the First Transmembrane Domain of P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2015-12-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are clinically important because drug pumps like P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) confer multidrug resistance and mutant ABC proteins are responsible for many protein-folding diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Identification of the tariquidar-binding site has been the subject of intensive molecular modeling studies because it is the most potent inhibitor and corrector of P-gp. Tariquidar is a unique P-gp inhibitor because it locks the pump in a conformation that blocks drug efflux but activates ATPase activity. In silico docking studies have identified several potential tariquidar-binding sites. Here, we show through cross-linking studies that tariquidar most likely binds to sites within the transmembrane (TM) segments located in one wing or at the interface between the two wings (12 TM segments form 2 divergent wings). We then introduced arginine residues at all positions in the 12 TM segments (223 mutants) of P-gp. The rationale was that a charged residue in the drug-binding pocket would disrupt hydrophobic interaction with tariquidar and inhibit its ability to rescue processing mutants or stimulate ATPase activity. Arginines introduced at 30 positions significantly inhibited tariquidar rescue of a processing mutant and activation of ATPase activity. The results suggest that tariquidar binds to a site within the drug-binding pocket at the interface between the TM segments of both structural wings. Tariquidar differed from other drug substrates, however, as it stabilized the first TM domain. Stabilization of the first TM domain appears to be a key mechanism for high efficiency rescue of ABC processing mutants that cause disease. PMID:26507655

  14. Creating Prebiotic Sanctuary: Self-Assembling Supramolecular Peptide Structures Bind and Stabilize RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carny, Ohad; Gazit, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Any attempt to uncover the origins of life must tackle the known `blind watchmaker problem'. That is to demonstrate the likelihood of the emergence of a prebiotic system simple enough to be formed spontaneously and yet complex enough to allow natural selection that will lead to Darwinistic evolution. Studies of short aromatic peptides revealed their ability to self-assemble into ordered and stable structures. The unique physical and chemical characteristics of these peptide assemblies point out to their possible role in the origins of life. We have explored mechanisms by which self-assembling short peptides and RNA fragments could interact together and go through a molecular co-evolution, using diphenylalanine supramolecular assemblies as a model system. The spontaneous formation of these self-assembling peptides under prebiotic conditions, through the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) pathway was demonstrated. These peptide assemblies possess the ability to bind and stabilize ribonucleotides in a sequence-depended manner, thus increase their relative fitness. The formation of these peptide assemblies is dependent on the homochirality of the peptide monomers: while homochiral peptides (L-Phe-L-Phe and D-Phe-D-Phe) self-assemble rapidly in aqueous environment, heterochiral diastereoisomers (L-Phe-D-Phe and D-Phe-L-Phe) do not tend to self-assemble. This characteristic consists with the homochirality of all living matter. Finally, based on these findings, we propose a model for the role of short self-assembling peptides in the prebiotic molecular evolution and the origin of life.

  15. Cloning and mutational analysis of the gamma gene from Azotobacter vinelandii defines a new family of proteins capable of metallocluster binding and protein stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Luis M; Rangaraj, Priya; Homer, Mary J; Roberts, Gary P; Ludden, Paul W

    2002-04-19

    Dinitrogenase is a heterotetrameric (alpha(2)beta(2)) enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium and contains the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) at its active site. Certain Azotobacter vinelandii mutant strains unable to synthesize FeMo-co accumulate an apo form of dinitrogenase (lacking FeMo-co), with a subunit composition alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2), which can be activated in vitro by the addition of FeMo-co. The gamma protein is able to bind FeMo-co or apodinitrogenase independently, leading to the suggestion that it facilitates FeMo-co insertion into the apoenzyme. In this work, the non-nif gene encoding the gamma subunit (nafY) has been cloned, sequenced, and found to encode a NifY-like protein. This finding, together with a wealth of knowledge on the biochemistry of proteins involved in FeMo-co and FeV-co biosyntheses, allows us to define a new family of iron and molybdenum (or vanadium) cluster-binding proteins that includes NifY, NifX, VnfX, and now gamma. In vitro FeMo-co insertion experiments presented in this work demonstrate that gamma stabilizes apodinitrogenase in the conformation required to be fully activable by the cofactor. Supporting this conclusion, we show that strains containing mutations in both nafY and nifX are severely affected in diazotrophic growth and extractable dinitrogenase activity when cultured under conditions that are likely to occur in natural environments. This finding reveals the physiological importance of the apodinitrogenase-stabilizing role of which both proteins are capable. The relationship between the metal cluster binding capabilities of this new family of proteins and the ability of some of them to stabilize an apoenzyme is still an open matter. PMID:11823455

  16. Hydrophobicity of reactive site loop of SCCA1 affects its binding to hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Chen; Tong Cheng; Chen-Yu Xu; Ting Wu; Shan-Hai Ou; Tao Zhang; Jun Zhang; Ning-Shao Xia

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of SCCA2 and other SCCA1 molecules in the process of hepatitis B virus (HBV) binding to mammalian cells.METHODS: SCCA1 and SCCA2 were isolated from HepG2. Binding protein (BP) genes were obtained through PCR. Recombinant baculoviruses expressing SCCA1, SCCA2, BP, and different mutants were constructed and utilized to infect mammalian cells to investigate the binding ability of infected cells to HBV.RESULTS: A SCCA1 gene (A1) was isolated from HepG2, but it appeared to lack the binding ability of infected cells to HBV. Two mutants, A1-BP and BP-A1, were constructed by interchanging the carboxyl terminal of A1 and BP. Cells expressing A1-BP showed an increased virus bindingcapacity, but not BP-A1. Comparison of A1 sequence with the sequence of BP indicated the presence of only three amino acid changes in the carboxyl terminal, two of them were found in the reactive site loop (RSL) of SCCA1. Primary structure assay revealed that the hydrophobicity of BP and AJ515706 in this domain was strong, but A1 was relatively weak. Changing the aa349 of A1 from low hydrophobic glutamic acid to high hydrophobic valine enhanced HBV binding. In contrast, HBV binding was reduced by changing the aa349 of BP from valine to glutamic acid. CONCLUSION: The reslts suggest that the hydrophobicity of RSL of SCCA1 may play an important role in HBV binding to cells.

  17. Conserved residues and their role in the structure, function, and stability of acyl-coenzyme A binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Poulsen, K; Andersen, K V; Baldursson, T; Krøll, J B; Neergård, T B; Jepsen, J; Roepstorff, Peter; Kristiansen, Karsten; Poulsen, F M; Knudsen, J; Stenvang, Jan

    1999-01-01

    measured by the extent of binding of the ligand dodecanoyl-CoA using isothermal titration calorimetry, and effects on protein stability were measured with chemical denaturation followed by intrinsic tryptophan and tyrosine fluorescence. The sequence sites that have been conserved for direct functional......In the family of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins, a subset of 26 sequence sites are identical in all eukaryotes and conserved throughout evolution of the eukaryotic kingdoms. In the context of the bovine protein, the importance of these 26 sequence positions for structure, function, stability, and...... folding has been analyzed using single-site mutations. A total of 28 mutant proteins were analyzed which covered 17 conserved sequence positions and three nonconserved positions. As a first step, the influence of the mutations on the protein folding reaction has been probed, revealing a folding nucleus of...

  18. Degenerate in vitro genetic selection reveals mutations that diminish alfalfa mosaic virus RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Gail; Petrillo, Jessica; Guogas, Laura; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-08-01

    The alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; however, the mechanisms describing coat protein's role during replication are disputed. We reasoned that mechanistic details might be revealed by identifying RNA mutations in the 3'-terminal coat protein binding domain that increased or decreased RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding. Degenerate (doped) in vitro genetic selection, based on a pool of randomized 39-mers, was used to select 30 variant RNAs that bound coat protein with high affinity. AUGC sequences that are conserved among AMV and ilarvirus RNAs were among the invariant nucleotides in the selected RNAs. Five representative clones were analyzed in functional assays, revealing diminished viral RNA expression resulting from apparent defects in replication and/or translation. These data identify a set of mutations, including G-U wobble pairs and nucleotide mismatches in the 5' hairpin, which affect viral RNA functions without significant impact on coat protein binding. Because the mutations associated with diminished function were scattered over the 3'-terminal nucleotides, we considered the possibility that RNA conformational changes rather than disruption of a precise motif might limit activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the 3' RNA conformation was indeed altered by nucleotide substitutions. One interpretation of the data is that coat protein binding to the AUGC sequences determines the orientation of the 3' hairpins relative to one another, while local structural features within these hairpins are also critical determinants of functional activity. PMID:15254175

  19. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  20. Disruption of NAD~+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manali; Phadke; Natalia; Krynetskaia; Anurag; Mishra; Carlos; Barrero; Salim; Merali; Scott; A; Gothe; Evgeny; Krynetskiy

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH),and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS:We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters(diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching(FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding.RESULTS:Using MALDI-TOF analysis,we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94,S98,and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH,we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH inthe nuclear fractions of A549,HCT116,and SW48 cancer cel s after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis,and estimated enzymatic properties,intranuclear distribution,and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+(Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99 I vs 57 ± 11.1 μmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP(fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION:Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners.

  1. ZipA binds to FtsZ with high affinity and enhances the stability of FtsZ protofilaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Kuchibhatla

    Full Text Available A bacterial membrane protein ZipA that tethers FtsZ to the membrane is known to promote FtsZ assembly. In this study, the binding of ZipA to FtsZ was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. ZipA was found to bind to FtsZ with high affinities at three different (6.0, 6.8 and 8.0 pHs, albeit the binding affinity decreased with increasing pH. Further, thick bundles of FtsZ protofilaments were observed in the presence of ZipA under the pH conditions used in this study indicating that ZipA can promote FtsZ assembly and stabilize FtsZ polymers under unfavorable conditions. Bis-ANS, a hydrophobic probe, decreased the interaction of FtsZ and ZipA indicating that the interaction between FtsZ and ZipA is hydrophobic in nature. ZipA prevented the dilution induced disassembly of FtsZ polymers suggesting that it stabilizes FtsZ protofilaments. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled ZipA was found to be uniformly distributed along the length of the FtsZ protofilaments indicating that ZipA stabilizes FtsZ protofilaments by cross-linking them.

  2. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  3. Emulsification technique affects oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Horsewell, Andy; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    In oil-in-water emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used, and the structure at the interface is therefore expected to be of great importance for lipid oxidation in emulsions. Previous studies have shown that e...... study was therefore to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared by two different kinds of high pressure homogenizers i.e. a microfluidizer and a two valve high pressure homogenizer. Emulsions were made with equal droplet sizes, and with either 1% sodium caseinate or 1% whey.......g. homogenization pressure can affect how proteins locate themselves at the interface of an emulsion. The hypothesis is therefore that emulsions produced with different emulsification equipments differ in their oxidative stability due to differences in the behaviour of the proteins at the interface. The aim of this...

  4. Harvest date affects aronia juice polyphenols, sugars, and antioxidant activity, but not anthocyanin stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolling, Bradley W; Taheri, Rod; Pei, Ruisong; Kranz, Sarah; Yu, Mo; Durocher, Shelley N; Brand, Mark H

    2015-11-15

    The goal of this work was to characterize how the date of harvest of 'Viking' aronia berry impacts juice pigmentation, sugars, and antioxidant activity. Aronia juice anthocyanins doubled at the fifth week of the harvest, and then decreased. Juice hydroxycinnamic acids decreased 33% from the first week, while proanthocyanidins increased 64%. Juice fructose and glucose plateaued at the fourth week, but sorbitol increased 40% to the seventh harvest week. Aronia juice pigment density increased due to anthocyanin concentration, and polyphenol copigmentation did not significantly affect juice pigmentation. Anthocyanin stability at pH 4.5 was similar between weeks. However, addition of quercetin, sorbitol, and chlorogenic acid to aronia anthocyanins inhibited pH-induced loss of color. Sorbitol and citric acid may be partially responsible for weekly variation in antioxidant activity, as addition of these agents inhibited DPPH scavenging 13-30%. Thus, aronia polyphenol and non-polyphenol components contribute to its colorant and antioxidant functionality. PMID:25977015

  5. Radiation Power Affected by Current and Wall Radius in Water Cooled Vortex Wall-stabilized Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Toru; Nakamura, Takaya; Yanagi, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2015-11-01

    The arc lighting to obtain the environment to evacuate, save the life, keep the safety and be comfortable are focus on. The lack of radiation intensity and color rendering is problem because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched the arc lamp mixed with metal vapor for improvement of color rendering spectrum. The metal vapor can emit the high intense radiation. In addition, the radiation is derived from the high temperature medium. Because the arc temperature can be controlled by current and arc radius, the radiation can be controlled by the current and arc radius. This research elucidates the radiation power affected by the current and wall radius in wall-stabilized arc of water-cooled vortex type. As a result, the radiation power increases with increasing the square of current / square of wall radius because of the temperature distribution which is derived from the current density at the simulation.

  6. Size and molecular flexibility affect the binding of ellagitannins to bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobreva, Marina A; Green, Rebecca J; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Howlin, Brendan J; Frazier, Richard A

    2014-09-17

    Binding to bovine serum albumin of monomeric (vescalagin and pedunculagin) and dimeric ellagitannins (roburin A, oenothein B, and gemin A) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated two types of binding sites. Stronger and more specific sites exhibited affinity constants, K1, of 10(4)-10(6) M(-1) and stoichiometries, n1, of 2-13 and dominated at low tannin concentrations. Weaker and less-specific binding sites had K2 constants of 10(3)-10(5) M(-1) and stoichiometries, n2, of 16-30 and dominated at higher tannin concentrations. Binding to stronger sites appeared to be dependent on tannin flexibility and the presence of free galloyl groups. Positive entropies for all but gemin A indicated that hydrophobic interactions dominated during complexation. This was supported by an exponential relationship between the affinity, K1, and the modeled hydrophobic accessible surface area and by a linear relationship between K1 and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, K(SV). PMID:25162485

  7. How Chain Length and Charge Affect Surfactant Denaturation of Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kell Kleiner; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, equilibria and kinetics of unfolding of acyl coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) have been investigated in sodium alkyl sulfate surfactants of different chain length (8-16 carbon atoms) and with different proportions of the nonionic surfactant dodecyl maltos...

  8. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca2+-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  9. Cytosine methylation does not affect binding of transcription factor Sp1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA methylation may be a component of a multilevel control mechanism that regulates eukaryotic gene expression. The authors used synthetic oligonucleotides to investigate the effect of cytosine methylation on the binding of the transcription factor Sp1 to its target sequence (a G+C-rich sequence known as a GC box). Concatemers of double-stranded 14-mers containing a GC box successfully competed with the human metallothionein IIA promoter for binding to Sp1 in DNase I protection experiments. The presence of 5-methylcytosine in the CpG sequence of the GC box did not influence Sp1 binding. The result was confirmed using double-stranded 20-mers containing 16 base pairs of complementary sequence. Electrophoretic gel retardation analysis of annealed 28-mers containing a GC box incubated with an Sp1-containing HeLa cell nuclear extract demonstrated the formation of DNA-protein complexes; formation of these complexes was not inhibited when an oligomer without a GC box was used as a competitor. Once again, the presence of a 5-methylcytosine residue in the GC box did not influence the binding of the protein to DNA. The results therefore preclude a direct effect of cytosine methylation on Sp1-DNA interactions

  10. Plant species richness and functional traits affect community stability after a flood event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Felícia M; Wright, Alexandra J; Eisenhauer, Nico; Ebeling, Anne; Roscher, Christiane; Wagg, Cameron; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Pillar, Valério D

    2016-05-19

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events. It is therefore of major importance to identify the community attributes that confer stability in ecological communities during such events. In June 2013, a flood event affected a plant diversity experiment in Central Europe (Jena, Germany). We assessed the effects of plant species richness, functional diversity, flooding intensity and community means of functional traits on different measures of stability (resistance, resilience and raw biomass changes from pre-flood conditions). Surprisingly, plant species richness reduced community resistance in response to the flood. This was mostly because more diverse communities grew more immediately following the flood. Raw biomass increased over the previous year; this resulted in decreased absolute value measures of resistance. There was no clear response pattern for resilience. We found that functional traits drove these changes in raw biomass: communities with a high proportion of late-season, short-statured plants with dense, shallow roots and small leaves grew more following the flood. Late-growing species probably avoided the flood, whereas greater root length density might have allowed species to better access soil resources brought from the flood, thus growing more in the aftermath. We conclude that resource inputs following mild floods may favour the importance of traits related to resource acquisition and be less associated with flooding tolerance. PMID:27114578

  11. Periodic Tail Motion Linked to Wing Motion Affects the Longitudinal Stability of Ornithopter Flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-seong Lee; Joong-kwan Kim; Jae-hung Han; Charles P. Ellington

    2012-01-01

    During slow level flight of a pigeon,a caudal muscle involved in tail movement,the levator caudae pars vertebralis,is activated at a particular phase with the pectoralis wing muscle.Inspired by mechanisms for the control of stability in flying animals,especially the role of the tail in avian flight,we investigated how periodic tail motion linked to motion of the wings affects the longitudinal stability of omithopter flight.This was achieved by using an integrative ornithopter flight simulator that included aeroelastic behaviour of the flexible wings and tail.Trim flight trajectories of the simulated ornithopter model were calculated by time integration of the nonlinear equations of a flexible multi-body dynamics coupled with a semi-empirical flapping-wing and tail aerodynamic models.The unique trim flight characteristics of ornithopter,Limit-Cycle Oscillation,were found under the sets of wingbeat frequency and tail elevation angle,and the appropriate phase angle of tail motion was determined by parameter studies minimizing the amplitude of the oscillations.The numerical simulation results show that tail actuation synchronized with wing motion suppresses the oscillation of body pitch angle over a wide range of wingbeat frequencies.

  12. Nectar vs. pollen loading affects the tradeoff between flight stability and maneuverability in bumblebees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountcastle, Andrew M; Ravi, Sridhar; Combes, Stacey A

    2015-08-18

    Bumblebee foragers spend a significant portion of their lives transporting nectar and pollen, often carrying loads equivalent to more than half their body mass. Whereas nectar is stored in the abdomen near the bee's center of mass, pollen is carried on the hind legs, farther from the center of mass. We examine how load position changes the rotational moment of inertia in bumblebees and whether this affects their flight maneuverability and/or stability. We applied simulated pollen or nectar loads of equal mass to Bombus impatiens bumblebees and examined flight performance in a wind tunnel under three conditions: flight in unsteady flow, tracking an oscillating flower in smooth flow, and flower tracking in unsteady flow. Using an inertial model, we estimated that carrying a load on the legs rather than in the abdomen increases a bee's moment of inertia about the roll and yaw axes but not the pitch axis. Consistent with these predictions, we found that bees carrying a load on their legs displayed slower rotations about their roll and yaw axes, regardless of whether these rotations were driven by external perturbations or self-initiated steering maneuvers. This allowed pollen-loaded bees to maintain a more stable body orientation and higher median flight speed in unsteady flow but reduced their performance when tracking a moving flower, supporting the concept of a tradeoff between stability and maneuverability. These results demonstrate that the types of resources collected by bees affect their flight performance and energetics and suggest that wind conditions may influence resource selection. PMID:26240364

  13. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies showed that CBP KIX mutation affects the stability of CBP:c-Myb complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoux, Anne; Jindal, Darren; Tamas, Tamara C; Lim, Benjamin W H; Pollard, Drake; Xu, Wu

    2016-06-01

    The coactivators CBP (CREBBP) and its paralog p300 (EP300), two conserved multi-domain proteins in eukaryotic organisms, regulate gene expression in part by binding DNA-binding transcription factors. It was previously reported that the CBP/p300 KIX domain mutant (Y650A, A654Q, and Y658A) altered both c-Myb-dependent gene activation and repression, and that mice with these three point mutations had reduced numbers of platelets, B cells, T cells, and red blood cells. Here, our transient transfection assays demonstrated that mouse embryonic fibroblast cells containing the same mutations in the KIX domain and without a wild-type allele of either CBP or p300, showed decreased c-Myb-mediated transcription. Dr. Wright's group solved a 3-D structure of the mouse CBP:c-Myb complex using NMR. To take advantage of the experimental structure and function data and improved theoretical calculation methods, we performed MD simulations of CBP KIX, CBP KIX with the mutations, and c-Myb, as well as binding energy analysis for both the wild-type and mutant complexes. The binding between CBP and c-Myb is mainly mediated by a shallow hydrophobic groove in the center where the side-chain of Leu302 of c-Myb plays an essential role and two salt bridges at the two ends. We found that the KIX mutations slightly decreased stability of the CBP:c-Myb complex as demonstrated by higher binding energy calculated using either MM/PBSA or MM/GBSA methods. More specifically, the KIX mutations affected the two salt bridges between CBP and c-Myb (CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306; CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294). Our studies also revealed differing dynamics of the hydrogen bonds between CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306 and between CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294 caused by the CBP KIX mutations. In the wild-type CBP:c-Myb complex, both of the hydrogen bonds stayed relatively stable. In contrast, in the mutant CBP:c-Myb complex, hydrogen bonds between R646 and E306 showed an increasing trend followed by a decreasing trend, and hydrogen

  14. Dynamic Factors Affecting Gaseous Ligand Binding in an Artificial Oxygen Transport Protein‡

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Andersen, Eskil M.E.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Koder, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the functional analysis of an artificial hexacoordinate oxygen transport protein, HP7, which operates via a mechanism similar to that of human neuroglobin and cytoglobin: the destabilization of one of two heme-ligating histidine residues. In the case of HP7 this is the result of the coupling of histidine side chain ligation with the burial of three charged glutamate residues on the same helix. Here we compare gaseous ligand binding, including rates, affinities and oxyferrous state l...

  15. Serotonin Transporter Genotype Affects Serotonin 5-HT1A Binding in Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Christian, Bradley T; Wooten, Dustin W.; Hillmer, Ansel T; Tudorascu, Dana L.; Converse, Alexander K.; Moore, Colleen F.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Barnhart, Todd E; Kalin, Ned H.; Barr, Christina S.; Schneider, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the serotonin system has been implicated in anxiety and depression and a related genetic variation has been identified that may predispose individuals for these illnesses. The relationship of a functional variation of the serotonin transporter promoter gene (5-HTTLPR) on serotonin transporter binding using in vivo imaging techniques have yielded inconsistent findings when comparing variants for short (s) and long (l) alleles. However, a significant 5-HTTLPR effect on receptor bi...

  16. Starch-Binding Domain Affects Catalysis in Two Lactobacillus α-Amylases

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R.; Ruiz, B; Guyot, J P; Sanchez, S.

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in α-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus α-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to b...

  17. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  18. Does 14-3-3 protein affect conformation FoxO4 DNA-binding domain?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhán, Jan; Bouřa, Evžen; Vácha, Pavel; Herman, P.; Večeř, J.; Obšil, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 102, Suppl.1 (2007), s. 276-276. ISSN 0022-3042. [Biennial meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry /21./ and Annual meeting of the American Society for Neurochemistry /38./. 19.08.2007-24.08.2007, Cancun] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0565; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB500110601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * FoxO4 DNA-Binding-Domain * 14-3-3 protein * molecular anvil Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. Preparation of 125I-labeled human growth hormone of high quality binding properties endowed with long-term stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    125I-labeled human growth hormone (125I-labeled.hGH) was prepared by using two variants of the chloramine T labelling procedure and purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the reaction mixture. Variant A produced a tracer with high specific activity (100 +/- 10 microCi/microgram), high maximal binding capacity to antibodies (93%) and long-term stability (at least 150 days at -20/degree/C). No diiodinated tyrosil residues could be detected in this tracer. Variant B was devised to obtain higher yields of labeled hormone. The electrophoresis of the iodination mixture revealed two radioactive components with Rm values of 0.49 and 0.55 which result from the iodination of hGH variants preexisting in the starting material. Both tracers had similar specific activities (70 +/- 10 microCi/microgram), high maximal binding capacity to antibodies or receptors (80-100%, after 80 days of their obtention) and high stability (at least 100 days at -20/degree/C). It is concluded that the iododerivatives of hGH obtained by either method are adequate to perform radioimmunoassay and receptor studies and have long-term stability

  20. Stabilizing a flexible interdomain hinge region harboring the SMB binding site drives uPAR into its closed conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai; Luo, Zhipu; Li, Rui; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Sidenius, Nicolai; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael

    2015-03-27

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a multidomain glycolipid-anchored membrane protein, which facilitates extracellular matrix remodeling by focalizing plasminogen activation to cell surfaces via its high-affinity interaction with uPA. The modular assembly of its three LU (Ly6/uPAR-like) domains is inherently flexible and binding of uPA drives uPAR into its closed conformation, which presents the higher-affinity state for vitronectin thus providing an allosteric regulatory mechanism. Using a new class of epitope-mapped anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), we now demonstrate that the reciprocal stabilization is indeed also possible. By surface plasmon resonance studies, we show that these mAbs and vitronectin have overlapping binding sites on uPAR and that they share Arg91 as hotspot residue in their binding interfaces. The crystal structure solved for one of these uPAR·mAb complexes at 3.0Å clearly shows that this mAb preselects the closed uPAR conformation with an empty but correctly assembled large hydrophobic binding cavity for uPA. Accordingly, these mAbs inhibit the uPAR-dependent lamellipodia formation and migration on vitronectin-coated matrices irrespective of the conformational status of uPAR and its occupancy with uPA. This is the first study to the best of our knowledge, showing that the dynamic assembly of the three LU domains in uPARwt can be driven toward the closed form by an external ligand, which is not engaging the hydrophobic uPA binding cavity. As this binding interface is also exploited by the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin, therefore, this relationship should be taken into consideration when exploring uPAR-dependent cell adhesion and migration in vitronectin-rich environments. PMID:25659907

  1. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen presenting cells (APCs sample the extra cellular space and present peptides from here to T helper cells, which can be activated if the peptides are of foreign origin. The peptides are presented on the surface of the cells in complex with major histocompatibility class II (MHC II molecules. Identification of peptides that bind MHC II molecules is thus a key step in rational vaccine design and developing methods for accurate prediction of the peptide:MHC interactions play a central role in epitope discovery. The MHC class II binding groove is open at both ends making the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance of the method is validated on a large MHC class II benchmark data set covering 14 HLA-DR (human MHC and three mouse H2-IA alleles. Results The predictive performance of the SMM-align method was demonstrated to be superior to that of the Gibbs sampler, TEPITOPE, SVRMHC, and MHCpred methods. Cross validation between peptide data set obtained from different sources demonstrated that direct incorporation of peptide length potentially results in over-fitting of the binding prediction method. Focusing on amino terminal peptide flanking residues (PFR, we demonstrate a consistent gain in predictive performance by favoring binding registers with a minimum PFR length of two amino acids. Visualizing the binding motif as obtained by the SMM-align and TEPITOPE methods highlights a series of fundamental discrepancies between the two predicted motifs. For the DRB1*1302 allele for instance, the TEPITOPE method favors basic amino acids at most anchor positions, whereas the SMM-align method identifies a preference for hydrophobic or neutral amino acids at the anchors. Conclusion

  2. Soil water retention and structure stability as affected by water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrakh I. Mamedov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In arid and semi-arid zones with a short water resources studying the effects of water quality on soil water retention and structure is important for the development of effective soil and water conservation and management practices. Three water qualities (electrical conductivity, EC ~ 2, 100 and 500 μS cm-1 with a low SAR representing rain, canal-runoff and irrigation water respectively and semi-arid loam and clay soils were tested to evaluate an effect of soil texture and water quality on water retention, and aggregate and structure stability using the high energy moisture characteristic (HEMC method. The water retention curves obtained by the HEMC method were characterized by the modified van Genuchten (1980 model that provides (i model parameters α and n, which represent the location (of the inflection point and the steepness of the S-shaped water retention curve respectively, and (ii a volume of drainable pores (VDP, which is an indicator for the quantity of water released by the tested sample over the range of suction studied, and modal suction (MS, which corresponds to the most frequent pore sizes, and soil structure index, SI =VDP/MS. Generally (i treatments significantly affected the shape of the water retention curves (α and n and (ii contribution of soil type, water EC, and wetting rate and their interaction had considerable effect on the stability induces and model parameters. Most of changes due to the water quality and wetting condition were in the range of matric potential (ψ, 1.2-2.4; and 2.4-5.0 J kg-1 (pore size 125-250 μm and 60-125 μm. The VDP, SI and α increased, and MS and n decreased with the increase in clay content, water EC and the decrease in rate of aggregate wetting. The SI increased exponentially with the increase in VDP, and with the decrease in MS. Contribution of water EC on stability indices and model parameters was not linear and was soil dependent, and could be more valuable at medium water EC. Effect of

  3. Glycation of Ribonuclease A affects its enzymatic activity and DNA binding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinda, Amit Kumar; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2015-11-01

    Prolonged non-enzymatic glycation of proteins results in the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that cause several diseases. The glycation of Ribonuclease A (RNase A) at pH 7.4 and 37 °C with ribose, glucose and fructose has been monitored by UV-vis, fluorescence, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization spectroscopy-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) methods. The enzymatic activity and DNA binding ability of glycated RNase A was also investigated by an agarose gel-based assay. A precipitation assay examined the ribonucleolytic activity of the glycated enzyme. An increase in incubation time resulted in the formation of high molecular weight AGEs with a decrease in ribonucleolytic activity. Ribose exhibits the highest potency as a glycating agent and showed the greatest reduction in the ribonucleolytic activity of the enzyme. Interestingly, glycated RNase A was unable to bind with the ribonuclease inhibitor (RI) and DNA. The glycated form of the protein was also found to be ineffective in DNA melting unlike native RNase A. PMID:26365067

  4. A DNA binding winged helix domain in CAF-1 functions with PCNA to stabilize CAF-1 at replication forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuo; Gao, Yuan; Li, Jingjing; Burgess, Rebecca; Han, Junhong; Liang, Huanhuan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Liu, Yingfang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) is a histone H3–H4 chaperone that deposits newly synthesized histone (H3–H4)2 tetramers during replication-coupled nucleosome assembly. However, how CAF-1 functions in this process is not yet well understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of C terminus of Cac1 (Cac1C), a subunit of yeast CAF-1, and the function of this domain in stabilizing CAF-1 at replication forks. We show that Cac1C forms a winged helix domain (WHD) and binds DNA in a sequence-independent manner. Mutations in Cac1C that abolish DNA binding result in defects in transcriptional silencing and increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, and these defects are exacerbated when combined with Cac1 mutations deficient in PCNA binding. Similar phenotypes are observed for corresponding mutations in mouse CAF-1. These results reveal a mechanism conserved in eukaryotic cells whereby the ability of CAF-1 to bind DNA is important for its association with the DNA replication forks and subsequent nucleosome assembly. PMID:26908650

  5. Charged histidine affects alpha-helix stability at all positions in the helix by interacting with the backbone charges.

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, K M; Baldwin, R L

    1993-01-01

    To determine whether a charged histidine side chain affects alpha-helix stability only when histidine is close to one end of the helix or also when it is in the central region, we substitute a single histidine residue at many positions in two reference peptides and measure helix stability and histidine pKa. The position of a charged histidine residue has a major effect on helix stability in 0.01 M NaCl: the helix content of a 17-residue peptide is 24% when histidine is at position 3 compared ...

  6. Bridging Binding Modes of Phosphine-Stabilized Nitrous Oxide to Zn(C6F5)2

    OpenAIRE

    Neu, Rebecca C.; Otten, Edwin; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Reaction of [tBu3PN2O(B(C6H4F)3)] with 1, 1.5, or 2 equivalents of Zn(C6F5)2 affords the species [{tBu3PN2OZn(C6F5)2}2], [{tBu3PN2OZn(C6F5)2}2Zn(C6F5)2], and [tBu3PN2O{Zn(C6F5)2}2] displaying unique binding modes of Zn to the phosphine-stabilized N2O fragment.

  7. Stability of Anthocyanins from Rubus glaucus and Solanum betaceum as affected by Temperature and Water Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garzon Monroy Gloria Astrid

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability of sprayed-dried microencapsulated anthocyanins from Andes berry (Rubus glaucus and Tamarillo (Solanum betaceum, as affected by storage time, water activity (Aw and temperature was compared. The fruits were osmotically dehydrated with ethanol and the anthocyanin extract was microencapsulated with maltodextrin DE 20 by spray drying. Half life of the anthocyanins; changes in color, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity of the powders, were analyzed during storage at two different temperatures (25 °C and 40 °C and two Aw levels (0.20 and 0.35. A decrease in monomeric anthocyanin was observed in both samples. The half life of the Andes berry pigments ranged between 11 and 32 days while the half life of the tamarillo pigments ranged between 9 and 21 days. A darkening effect occurred in both samples as a result of storage time.  The antioxidant activity decreased while the phenolic content increased with time. Antioxidant activity of Andes berry samples was highly correlated with anthocyanin content and total phenolic content while the antioxidant activity of tamarillo samples was highly correlated with total phenolic content. These results would be useful in developing applications for spray-dried anthocyanin as powdered food-grade colorants.

  8. Screening Effects on the Binding Energy and Stability of Quarkonia States

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatt, Palak; Patel, Smruti; Vinodkumar, P C

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the thermal stability of Quarkonia states by computing the effects of color-screening and vacuum screening based on a temperature dependent screened coulomb plus power potential for the quark-antiquark interaction. Medium effects on the properties of charmonia and bottomonia states are studied. The color screening and the vacuum screening effects on the stability of the quarkonia states are also separately calculated for comparison.

  9. A cation binding motif stabilizes the compound I radical of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M.A.; Han, G W; Kraut, J

    1994-01-01

    Cytochrome c peroxidase reacts with peroxide to form compound I, which contains an oxyferryl heme and an indolyl radical at Trp-191. The indolyl free radical has a half-life of several hours at room temperature, and this remarkable stability is essential for the catalytic function of cytochrome c peroxidase. To probe the protein environment that stabilizes the compound I radical, we used site-directed mutagenesis to replace Trp-191 with Gly or Gln. Crystal structures of these mutants revealed...

  10. TANK-binding kinase-1 broadly affects oyster immune response to bacteria and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xueying; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-09-01

    As a benthic filter feeder of estuaries, the immune system of oysters provides one of the best models for studying the genetic and molecular basis of the innate immune pathway in marine invertebrates and examining the influence of environmental factors on the immune system. Here, the molecular function of molluscan TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK1) (which we named CgTBK1) was studied in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Compared with known TBK1 proteins in other model organisms, CgTBK1 contains a conserved S-TKc domain and a coiled coil domain at the N- and C-terminals but lacks an important ubiquitin domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of CgTBK1 was ubiquitous in all selected tissues, with highest expression in the gills. CgTBK1 expression was significantly upregulated in response to infections with Vibrio alginolyticus, ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1 reference strain and μvar), and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid sodium salt, suggesting its broad function in immune response. Subcellular localization showed the presence of CgTBK1 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells, suggesting its potential function as the signal transducer between the receptor and transcription factor. We further demonstrated that CgTBK1 interacted with CgSTING in HEK293T cells, providing evidence that CgTBK1 could be activated by direct binding to CgSTING. In summary, we characterized the TBK1 gene in C. gigas and demonstrated its role in the innate immune response to pathogen infections. PMID:27422757

  11. Whole genome sequencing identifies a deletion in protein phosphatase 2A that affects its stability and localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawen Lin

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and small insertions/deletions (indels among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3 in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating.

  12. Binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Replacing GLY residue in 8GLY with ALA residue had a positive effect on binding stability to the sites in some cases although the replacing had a negative effect on it in other cases. Furthermore the replacing had a negative effect on the chance of binding to the sites. Residue in peptide should be replaced on the basis of systematic exploration of its position.

  13. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K.;

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present da...... exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video_abstract....

  14. Variation in Biofilm Stability with Decreasing pH Affects Porous Medium Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, M. F.; Santillan, E. F.; McGrath, L. K.; Altman, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    Changes to microbial communities caused by subsurface CO2 injection may have many consequences, including possible impacts to CO2 transport. We used column experiments to examine how decreasing pH, a geochemical change associated with CO2 injection, will affect biofilm stability and ultimately the hydraulic properties of porous media. Columns consisted of 1 mm2 square capillary tubes filled with 105-150 µm diameter glass beads. Artificial groundwater medium containing 1 mM glucose was pumped through the columns at a rate of 0.01 mL/min (q = 14.4 m/day; Re = 0.03). Columns were inoculated with 3 × 10^8 CFU (avg.) of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a model biofilm former, transformed with a green fluorescent protein. Biomass distribution and transport was examined using scanning laser confocal microscopy and effluent plating. Variation in the bulk hydraulic properties of the columns was measured using manometers. In an initial experiment, biofilm growth was allowed to occur for seven days in medium with pH 7.3. Within this period, cells uniformly coated bead surfaces, effluent cell numbers stabilized at 1 × 10^9 CFU/mL, and hydraulic conductivity (K) decreased 77%. Next, medium with pH 4 was introduced. As a result, biomass within the reactor redistributed from bead surfaces to pores, effluent cell numbers decreased to 3 × 10^5 CFU/mL, and K decreased even further (>94% reduction). This decreased K was maintained until the experiment was terminated, seven days after introducing low pH medium. These results suggest that changes in biomass distribution as a result of decreased pH may initially limit transport of solubility-trapped CO2 following CO2 injection. Experiments in progress and planned will test this result in more detail and over longer periods of time. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office

  15. Exchanging murine and human immunoglobulin constant chains affects the kinetics and thermodynamics of antigen binding and chimeric antibody autoreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Torres

    Full Text Available Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V and human (C chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of C(H glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by C(H region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the C(H domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids.

  16. Starch-binding domain affects catalysis in two Lactobacillus alpha-amylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R; Ruiz, B; Guyot, J P; Sanchez, S

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in alpha-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus alpha-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to be quite different. To investigate whether the observed differences in the SBDs have an effect on the hydrolytic capability of the enzymes, a kinetic study of L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amylases was developed, with both enzymes acting on several starch sources in granular and gelatinized forms. Results showed that the amylolytic capacities of these enzymes are quite different; the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase is, on average, 10 times more efficient than the L. plantarum enzyme in hydrolyzing all the tested polymeric starches, with only a minor difference in the adsorption capacities. PMID:15640201

  17. Structure-based stabilization of HIV-1 gp120 enhances humoral immune responses to the induced co-receptor binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Dey

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, possesses conserved binding sites for interaction with the primary virus receptor, CD4, and also for the co-receptor, generally CCR5. Although gp120 is a major target for virus-specific neutralizing antibodies, the gp120 variable elements and its malleable nature contribute to evasion of effective host-neutralizing antibodies. To understand the conformational character and immunogenicity of the gp120 receptor binding sites as potential vaccine targets, we introduced structure-based modifications to stabilize gp120 core proteins (deleted of the gp120 major variable regions into the conformation recognized by both receptors. Thermodynamic analysis of the re-engineered core with selected ligands revealed significant stabilization of the receptor-binding regions. Stabilization of the co-receptor-binding region was associated with a marked increase in on-rate of ligand binding to this site as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Rabbit immunization studies showed that the conformational stabilization of core proteins, along with increased ligand affinity, was associated with strikingly enhanced humoral immune responses against the co-receptor-binding site. These results demonstrate that structure-based approaches can be exploited to stabilize a conformational site in a large functional protein to enhance immunogenic responses specific for that region.

  18. A Varp-Binding Protein, RACK1, Regulates Dendrite Outgrowth through Stabilization of Varp Protein in Mouse Melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubashi, Soujiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2016-08-01

    Varp (VPS9-ankyrin repeat protein) in melanocytes is thought to function as a key player in the pigmentation of mammals. Varp regulates two different melanocyte functions: (i) transport of melanogenic enzymes to melanosomes by functioning as a Rab32/38 effector and (ii) promotion of dendrite outgrowth by functioning as a Rab21-guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The Varp protein level has recently been shown to be negatively regulated by proteasomal degradation through interaction of the ankyrin repeat 2 (ANKR2) domain of Varp with Rab40C. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Varp escapes from Rab40C and retains its own expression level remain completely unknown. Here, we identified RACK1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) as a Varp-ANKR2 binding partner and investigated its involvement in Varp stabilization in mouse melanocytes. The results showed that knockdown of endogenous RACK1 in melanocytes caused dramatic reduction of the Varp protein level and inhibition of dendrite outgrowth, and intriguingly, overexpression of RACK1 inhibited the interaction between Varp and Rab40C and counteracted the negative effect of Rab40C on dendrite outgrowth. These findings indicated that RACK1 competes with Rab40C for binding to the ANKR2 domain of Varp and regulates dendrite outgrowth through stabilization of Varp in mouse melanocytes. PMID:27066885

  19. Investigation of some parameters affecting the stability of a hingeless helicopter blade in hover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P.

    1972-01-01

    Equations of motion are used to investigate the effects of the choice of the mode shape and built-in coning angle on the stability boundaries of hingeless blades in hover. The results obtained indicate that the stability boundaries are dependent upon the mode shape to a considerable degree. It was also found that positive built-in coning is usually destabilizing while a negative amount of built-in coning can be quite stabilizing.

  20. Stability, subunit interactions and carbohydrate-binding of the seed lectin from Pterocarpus angolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echemendia-Blanco, Dannele; Van Driessche, Edilbert; Ncube, Ignatious; Read, John S; Beeckmans, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    From 1 kg of defatted Pterocarpus angolensis (mukwa tree) seed meal, 21.6 grams of an alpha,D-mannose/glucose-specific lectin can be purified on mannose-Sepharose. Relative affinities for several (oligo)saccharides and glycoproteins were studied by haemagglutination-inhibition. Gel filtration shows that the lectin exists as a dimer above pH 5 and as a monomer below pH 3.5. This is confirmed by studies on the release of lectin subunits that were adsorbed from solution to lectin monomers immobilized onto Eupergit-c. From the gel filtration patterns it is calculated that a residue with pK(a) of about 4.4 is involved in dimer dissociation. Titration of glutamic acids (E60, E209) is postulated to be involved. CD spectroscopy shows that the secondary structure of the lectin is unchanged between pH 1 and 12.5, and that the tertiary structure remains unchanged between pH 5 and 12. In the acid pH region, reversible spectral changes occur that may be due to the titration of one or more amino acids with a pK(a) value of 3.9-4.2, probably aspartic acid. These residues are implicated in sugar-binding but not in dimerization of the lectin. Only at pH 12.5, irreversible denaturation occurs. Mukwa lectin displays full carbohydrate-binding capacity between pH 4 and 12, as is concluded from ELLA (Enzyme Linked Lectin Assay) using ovalbumin and fetuin, and from binding of the same glycoproteins to immobilized lectin monomers. The lectin is rapidly and fully reversibly demetallized at pH 2.5 with 5 mM EDTA. The demetallized lectin is completely devoid of sugar-binding activity. Mukwa lectin is a very thermostable molecule (at least till 85 degrees C). However, addition of non-ionic detergents substantially lowers its thermostability. PMID:19508209

  1. Heterozygous nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 mutations affect monocyte maturation in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the function of monocytes in Crohn's disease (CD) patients and to correlate this with diseaseassociated nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) gene variants.METHODS: Monocytes from 47 consecutively referred CD patients and 9 healthy blood donors were cultured with interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or muramyldipeptide (MDP), the putative ligand of NOD2.RESULTS: We found that monocytes from CD patients differentiated in vitro to mature dendritic cells (DCs), as determined by immunophenotype and morphology.NOD2 genotype was assessed in all subjects, and we observed high CD86 expression on immature and LPS-stimulated DCs in NOD2 mutated CD patients, as compared with wtNOD2 CD patients and controls. By contrast, CD86 expression levels of DCs induced to maturity with MDP derived from NOD2-mutated subjects were comparable to those of normal subjects. The amount of IL-12p70 in patient-cell cultures was larger than in controls after LPS treatment, but not after treatment with MDP.CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that DCs obtained from patients with mutations in the NOD2 gene display an activated phenotype characterized by high CD86 expression, but have a diminished response to MDP when compared to the terminal differentiation phase. We speculate that the altered differentiation of monocytes might lead to an imbalance between inflammation and the killing ability of monocytes, and may be relevant to the pathogenesis of CD.

  2. Soil-Structural Stability as Affected by Clay Mineralogy, Soil Texture and Polyacrylamide Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil-structural stability (expressed in terms of aggregate stability and pore size distribution) depends on (i) soil inherent properties, (ii) extrinsic condition prevailing in the soil that may vary temporally and spatially, and (iii) addition of soil amendments. Different soil management practices...

  3. Soil aggregate stability as affected by clay mineralogy and polyacrylamide addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The addition of polyacrylamide (PAM) to soil leads to stabilization of existing aggregates and improved bonding between, and aggregation of adjacent soil particles However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent on soil-clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil sam...

  4. Size-dependent stability toward dissociation and ligand binding energies of phosphine-ligated gold cluster ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The stability of sub-nanometer size gold clusters ligated with organic molecules is of paramount importance to the scalable synthesis of monodisperse size-selected metal clusters with highly tunable chemical and physical properties. For the first time, a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) equipped with surface induced dissociation (SID) has been employed to investigate the time and collision energy resolved fragmentation behavior of cationic doubly charged gold clusters containing 7-9 gold atoms and 6-7 triphenylphosphine (TPP) ligands prepared by reduction synthesis in solution. The TPP ligated gold clusters are demonstrated to fragment through three primary dissociation pathways: (1) Loss of a neutral TPP ligand from the precursor gold cluster, (2) asymmetric fission and (3) symmetric fission and charge separation of the gold core resulting in formation of complementary pairs of singly charged fragment ions. Threshold energies and activation entropies of these fragmentation pathways have been determined employing Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental SID data. It is demonstrated that the doubly charged cluster ion containing eight gold atoms and six TPP ligands, (8,6)2+, exhibits exceptional stability compared to the other cationic gold clusters examined in this study due to its large ligand binding energy of 1.76 eV. Our findings demonstrate the dramatic effect of the size and extent of ligation on the gas-phase stability and preferred fragmentation pathways of small TPP-ligated gold clusters.

  5. Thermal stability of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes: an O(N) tight-binding molecular dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order(N) tight-binding molecular dynamics (TBMD) simulations are performed to investigate the thermal stability of (10,10) metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) are applied in the axial direction. The velocity Verlet algorithm along with the canonical ensemble molecular dynamics (NVT) is used to simulate the tubes at the targeted temperatures. The effects of slow and rapid temperature increases on the physical characteristics, structural stability and the energetics of the tube are investigated and compared. Simulations are carried out starting from room temperature and the temperature is raised in steps of 300 K. The stability of the simulated metallic SWCNT is examined at each step before it is heated to higher temperatures. The first indication of structural deformation is observed at 600 K. For higher heat treatments the deformations are more pronounced and the bond-breaking temperature is reached around 2500 K. Gradual (slow) heating and thermal equilibrium (fast heating) methods give the value of radial thermal expansion coefficient in the temperature range between 300 and 600 K as 0.31 x 10-5 and 0.089 x 10-5 K-1, respectively. After 600 K, both methods give the same value of 0.089 x 10-5 K-1. The ratio of the total energy per atom with respect to temperature is found to be 3 x 10-4 eV K-1

  6. Regulation of mRNA stability via BRF1 and other AU-binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidlin-Stalder, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Steady state levels of mRNAs are determined by the rate of synthesis and degradation. A well-known cis-element conferring instability to mRNA is the so-called AU-rich element (ARE), which is present in the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) of many cytokines, chemokines, growth factors or proto-oncogenes. The ARE is recognized by a variety of ARE-binding proteins (AUBPs), which decide about the fate of the RNA. Multiple signaling cascades regulate the activity of the AUBPs. Butyrate response fact...

  7. Formulation factors affecting the binding properties of Chi-nese yam (Dioscorea oppositifolia)and corn starches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adenike Okunlola; Oluwatoyin A.Odeku

    2009-01-01

    Objective:The quantitative effects of formulation and processing variables affecting the binding properties of Chinese yam starch (Dioscorea oppositifolia)in chloroquine phosphate tablet formulations have been investiga-ted in comparison with corn starch using a 23 factorial experimental design.Methods:Chinese yam starch,re-presenting the "low"level,and corn starch,representing the "high"level were used as binders at concentra-tions of 2.5 %w/w and 10 % w/w in chloroquine phosphate tablet formulations.The mechanical properties of the tablets,measured by the tensile strength (T)and brittle fracture index (BFI)as well as the release prop-erties measured by the disintegration time (DT)and dissolution time (t8 0-time for 80 % drug release),were used as assessment parameters.Results:The ranking of the individual coefficient values for the formulations on T was D >N C,on BFI was N >D C,on DT was D >N >C and on t8 0 was C >N >D while the ranking of the interaction coefficient on T was N-D >C-D  N-C,on BFI was N-D >N-C =C-D,on DT and t8 0 was N-C >N-D >C-D.Changing the binding agent from Chinese to corn starch,led to a decrease in T,DT and t8 0 but increase in BFI of the tablets.There were significant (P <0.001)interactions between the nature of binder,N and the other two variables,C and D.Conclusion:The result showed that Chinese yam possessed stronger binding capacity than corn starch and could be useful as an alternative binder when tablets with high mechanical strength with minimal problems of lamination,and slow release are required.

  8. Effect of Lysine Modification on the Stability and Cellular Binding of Human Amyloidogenic Light Chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Davern, Sandra M. [University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine; Murphy, Charles L. [University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine; Wall, Jonathan [ORNL; Deborah, Weiss T. [University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine; Solomon, Alan [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    AL amyloidosis is characterized by the pathologic deposition as fibrils of monoclonal light chains (i.e., Bence Jones proteins [BJPs]) in particular organs and tissues. This phenomenon has been attributed to the presence in amyloidogenic proteins of particular amino acids that cause these molecules to become unstable, as well as post-translational modifications and, in regard to the latter, we have investigated the effect of biotinylation of lysyl residues on cell binding. We utilized an experimental system designed to test if BJPs obtained from patients with AL amyloidosis or, as a control, multiple myeloma (MM), bound human fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells. As documented by fluorescent microscopy and ELISA, the amyloidogenic BJPs, as compared with MM components, bound preferentially and this reactivity increased significantly after chemical modification of their lysyl residues with sulfo-NHS-biotin. Further, based on tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichorism data, it was apparent that their conformation was altered, which we hypothesize exposed a binding site not accessible on the native protein. The results of our studies indicate that post-translational structural modifications of pathologic light chains can enhance their capacity for cellular interaction and thus may contribute to the pathogenesis of AL amyloidosis and multiple myeloma.

  9. Homogenization Pressure and Temperature Affect Protein Partitioning and Oxidative Stability of Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Barouh, Nathalie; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative stability of 10 % fish oil-in-water emulsions was investigated for emulsions prepared under different homogenization conditions. Homogenization was conducted at two different pressures (5 or 22.5 MPa), and at two different temperatures (22 and 72 °C). Milk proteins were used as the...... decreased the oxidative stability of emulsions with α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin. For both types of emulsions the partitioning of proteins between the interface and the aqueous phase appeared to be important for the oxidative stability. The effect of pre-heating the aqueous phase with the milk proteins...

  10. Spectroscopic study of drug-binding characteristics of unmodified and pNPA-based acetylated human serum albumin: Does esterase activity affect microenvironment of drug binding sites on the protein?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Nastaran [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghobadi, Sirous [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahlaei, Mohsen [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodarahmi, Reza, E-mail: rkhodarahmi@mbrc.ac.ir [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most prominent extracellular protein in blood plasma. There are several binding sites on the protein which provide accommodation for structurally-unrelated endogenous and exogenous ligands and a wide variety of drugs. “Esterase-like” activity (hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters) by the protein has been also reported. In the current study, we set out to investigate the interaction of indomethacin and ibuprofen with the unmodified and modified HSA (pNPA-modified HSA) using various spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence data showed that 1:1 binding of drug to HSA is associated with quenching of the protein intrinsic fluorescence. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH), alteration in drug binding affinity and change of the protein stability, after esterase-like activity and permanent acetylation of HSA, were also documented. Analysis of the quenching and thermodynamic parameters indicated that forces involved in drug–HSA interactions change upon the protein modification. - Highlights: • Binding propensity of indomethacin extremely decreased upon the protein acetylation. • There is no ibuprofen binding after protein acetylation. • Protein stability changes upon drug binding as well as protein acetylation. • Drug pharmacokinetics may be influenced under co-administration of HSA-modifier drugs.

  11. Spectroscopic study of drug-binding characteristics of unmodified and pNPA-based acetylated human serum albumin: Does esterase activity affect microenvironment of drug binding sites on the protein?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most prominent extracellular protein in blood plasma. There are several binding sites on the protein which provide accommodation for structurally-unrelated endogenous and exogenous ligands and a wide variety of drugs. “Esterase-like” activity (hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters) by the protein has been also reported. In the current study, we set out to investigate the interaction of indomethacin and ibuprofen with the unmodified and modified HSA (pNPA-modified HSA) using various spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence data showed that 1:1 binding of drug to HSA is associated with quenching of the protein intrinsic fluorescence. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH), alteration in drug binding affinity and change of the protein stability, after esterase-like activity and permanent acetylation of HSA, were also documented. Analysis of the quenching and thermodynamic parameters indicated that forces involved in drug–HSA interactions change upon the protein modification. - Highlights: • Binding propensity of indomethacin extremely decreased upon the protein acetylation. • There is no ibuprofen binding after protein acetylation. • Protein stability changes upon drug binding as well as protein acetylation. • Drug pharmacokinetics may be influenced under co-administration of HSA-modifier drugs

  12. Quality of casein based Mozzarella cheese analogue as affected by stabilizer blends

    OpenAIRE

    Jana, A. H.; Patel, H. G.; Suneeta, Pinto; Prajapati, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Suitability of xanthan gum (XG)-locust bean gum (LBG), carrageenan (CAR)-LBG, and XG-CAR in 1:1 proportion at 0.42% in the formulation was assessed in the manufacture of Mozzarella cheese analogue. The stabilizer blends did not significantly influence the composition, texture profile, organoleptic, baking qualities and pizza-related characteristics of cheese analogues. Considering the influence of stabilizer blend on the sensory quality of analogue and sensory rating of pizza pie, XG-LBG blen...

  13. Structural stability of exposed gully wall in Central Eastern Nigeria as affected by soil properties

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ejiofor; C. A. Igwe

    2005-01-01

    We studied the soil stability of a gully wall in a gully erosion prone area of Central Eastern Nigeria. The objective was to investigate the physicochemical properties of the gully wall soils and to relate them to the collapsing and stability of the gullies. Ten soil layers were sampled for analysis. The bulk density was high while the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was moderately high resulting in rapid permeability for the soil layers. The liquid limits (LL) and plastic limits (PL) w...

  14. The Role of RNA Binding Proteins in Insulin Messenger Stability and Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Fred, Rikard G.

    2010-01-01

    Although the reason for insufficient release of insulin in diabetes mellitus may vary depending on the type and stage of the disease, it is of vital importance that an amplified insulin biosynthesis can meet the increased need during periods of hyperglycemia. The insulin mRNA is highly abundant in beta cells and changes in insulin mRNA levels are, at least in part, controlled by altered rates of mRNA degradation. Since the mechanisms behind the control of insulin messenger stability and trans...

  15. Emotional modulation of control dilemmas: the role of positive affect, reward, and dopamine in cognitive stability and flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goschke, Thomas; Bolte, Annette

    2014-09-01

    Goal-directed action in changing environments requires a dynamic balance between complementary control modes, which serve antagonistic adaptive functions (e.g., to shield goals from competing responses and distracting information vs. to flexibly switch between goals and behavioral dispositions in response to significant changes). Too rigid goal shielding promotes stability but incurs a cost in terms of perseveration and reduced flexibility, whereas too weak goal shielding promotes flexibility but incurs a cost in terms of increased distractibility. While research on cognitive control has long been conducted relatively independently from the study of emotion and motivation, it is becoming increasingly clear that positive affect and reward play a central role in modulating cognitive control. In particular, evidence from the past decade suggests that positive affect not only influences the contents of cognitive processes, but also modulates the balance between complementary modes of cognitive control. In this article we review studies from the past decade that examined effects of induced positive affect on the balance between cognitive stability and flexibility with a focus on set switching and working memory maintenance and updating. Moreover, we review recent evidence indicating that task-irrelevant positive affect and performance-contingent rewards exert different and sometimes opposite effects on cognitive control modes, suggesting dissociations between emotional and motivational effects of positive affect. Finally, we critically review evidence for the popular hypothesis that effects of positive affect may be mediated by dopaminergic modulations of neural processing in prefrontal and striatal brain circuits, and we refine this "dopamine hypothesis of positive affect" by specifying distinct mechanisms by which dopamine may mediate effects of positive affect and reward on cognitive control. We conclude with a discussion of limitations of current research, point to

  16. Chemical properties and oxidative stability of perilla oils obtained from roasted perilla seeds as affected by extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dong Min; Yoon, Suk Hoo; Jung, Mun Yhung

    2012-12-01

    The chemical properties and oxidative stability of perilla oils obtained from roasted perilla seeds as affected by extraction methods (supercritical carbon dioxide [SC-CO(2)], mechanical press, and solvent extraction) were studied. The SC-CO(2) extraction at 420 bar and 50 °C and hexane extraction showed significantly higher oil yield than mechanical press extraction (P oils were virtually identical regardless of the extraction methods. The contents of tocopherol, sterol, policosanol, and phosphorus in the perilla oils greatly varied with the extraction methods. The SC-CO(2) -extracted perilla oils contained significantly higher contents of tocopherols, sterols, and policosanols than the mechanical press-extracted and hexane-extracted oils (P extracted oil showed the greatly lower oxidative stability than press-extracted and hexane-extracted oils during the storage in the oven under dark at 60 °C. However, the photooxidative stabilities of the oils were not considerably different with extraction methods. PMID:23106331

  17. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved. PMID:26142888

  18. Covalent binding of sulfamethazine to natural and synthetic humic acids: assessing laccase catalysis and covalent bond stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkowska, Anna; Sander, Michael; Hollender, Juliane; Krauss, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics form stable covalent bonds with quinone moieties in organic matter via nucleophilic addition reactions. In this work, we combined analytical electrochemistry with trace analytics to assess the catalytic role of the oxidoreductase laccase in the binding of sulfamethazine (SMZ) to Leonardite humic acid (LHA) and to four synthetic humic acids (SHAs) polymerized from low molecular weight precursors and to determine the stability of the formed bonds. In the absence of laccase, a significant portion of the added SMZ formed covalent bonds with LHA, but only a very small fraction (<0.4%) of the total quinone moieties in LHA reacted. Increasing absolute, but decreasing relative concentrations of SMZ-LHA covalent bonds with increasing initial SMZ concentration suggested that the quinone moieties in LHA covered a wide distribution in reactivity for the nucleophilic addition of SMZ. Laccase catalyzed the formation of covalent bonds by oxidizing unreactive hydroquinone moieties in LHA to reactive, electrophilic quinone moieties, of which a large fraction (5%) reacted with SMZ. Compared to LHA, the SHA showed enhanced covalent bond formation in the absence of laccase, suggesting a higher reactivity of their quinone moieties toward nucleophilic addition. This work supports that binding to soil organic matter (SOM) is an important process governing the fate, bioactivity, and extractability of sulfonamides in soils. PMID:23384282

  19. Comparison of Temperature and Additives Affecting the Stability of the Probiotic Weissella cibaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Youn-Shin; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon; Oh, Jong-Suk

    2012-12-01

    Daily use of probiotic chewing gum might have a beneficial effect on oral health, and it is important that the viability of the probiotics be maintained in this food product. In this study, we examined the stability of probiotic chewing gum containing Weissella cibaria. We evaluated the effects of various factors, including temperature and additives, on the survival of freeze-dried probiotic W. cibaria powder. No changes in viability were detected during storage at 4℃ for 5 months, whereas the viability of bacteria stored at 20℃ decreased. The stability of probiotic chewing gum decreased steadily during storage at 20℃ for 4 weeks. The viability of the freeze-dried W. cibaria mixed with various additives, such as xylitol, sorbitol, menthol, sugar ester, magnesium stearate, and vitamin C, was determined over a 4-week storage period at 20℃. Most of the freeze-dried bacteria except for those mixed with menthol and vitamin C were generally stable during a 3-week storage period. Overall, our study showed that W. cibaria was more stable at 4℃ than that at 20℃. In addition, menthol and vitamin C had a detrimental effect on the storage stability of W. cibaria. This is the first study to examine the effects of various chewing gum additives on the stability of W. cibaria. Further studies will be needed to improve the stability of probiotic bacteria for developing a novel probiotic W. cibaria gum. PMID:23323221

  20. Type of packaging affects the colour stability of vitamin E enriched beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassu, Renata T; Uttaro, Bethany; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Zawadski, Sophie; Juárez, Manuel; Dugan, Michael E R

    2012-12-01

    Colour stability is a very important parameter for meat retail display, as appearance of the product is the deciding factor for consumers at time of purchase. This study investigated the possibility of extending appearance shelf-life through the combined use of packaging method (overwrapping - OVER, modified atmosphere - MAP, vacuum skin packaging - VSP and a combination of modified atmosphere and vacuum skin packaging - MAPVSP) and antioxidants (vitamin E enriched beef). Retail attributes (appearance, lean colour, % surface discolouration), as well as colour space analysis of images for red, green and blue parameters were measured over 18days. MAPVSP provided the most desirable retail appearance during the first 4days of retail display, while VSP-HB had the best colour stability. Overall, packaging type was more influential than α-tocopherol levels on meat colour stability, although α-tocopherol levels (>4μgg(-1) meat) had a protective effect when using high oxygen packaging methods. PMID:22953936

  1. A Review on the Effects of Emulsions on Flow Behaviours and Common Factors Affecting the Stability of Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, J.S.; WONG, S.F.; M. C. Law; Y. Samyudia; S.S. Dol

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this review study is to present the current state of available research results and understanding on the effects of emulsions on flow behaviours and flow properties, as well as common factors affecting the stability of emulsions. Emulsions occur in many areas of daily life and industry settings but this review study only intends to discuss emulsions associated with upstreams crude oil production, particularly the oil pipelines transporting system. In the transporting pip...

  2. Differential stability of TATA box binding proteins from archaea with different optimal growth temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitz, Annette; Soppa, Jörg; Krejtschi, Carsten; Hauser, Karin

    2009-09-01

    The TATA box binding protein (TBP) is involved in promoter recognition, the first step of transcription initiation. TBP is universally conserved and essential in archaea and eukaryotes. In archaea, TBPs have to be stable and to function in species that cover an extremely wide range of optimal growth temperatures (OGTs), from below 0 °C to more than 100 °C. Thus, the archaeal TBP family is ideally suited to study the evolutionary adaptation of proteins to an extremely wide range of temperatures. We characterized the thermostability of one mesophilic and one thermophilic TBP by infrared spectroscopy. Transition temperatures ( Tms) of thermal unfolding have been determined using TBPs from Methanosarcina mazei (OGT 37 °C) and from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (OGT 65 °C). Furthermore, the influence of protein and salt concentration on thermostability has been characterized. Together with previous studies, our results reveal that the Tms of archaeal TBPs are closely correlated with the OGTs of the respective species. Noteworthy, this is also true for the TBP from M. mazei representing the first characterized TBP from a mesophilic archaeon. In contrast, the only characterized eukaryotic TBP of the mesophilic plant Arabidopsis thaliana has a Tm more than 40 °C above the OGT.

  3. Quality of casein based Mozzarella cheese analogue as affected by stabilizer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, A H; Patel, H G; Suneeta, Pinto; Prajapati, J P

    2010-03-01

    Suitability of xanthan gum (XG)-locust bean gum (LBG), carrageenan (CAR)-LBG, and XG-CAR in 1:1 proportion at 0.42% in the formulation was assessed in the manufacture of Mozzarella cheese analogue. The stabilizer blends did not significantly influence the composition, texture profile, organoleptic, baking qualities and pizza-related characteristics of cheese analogues. Considering the influence of stabilizer blend on the sensory quality of analogue and sensory rating of pizza pie, XG-LBG blend (1:1) was preferred over XG-CAR and CAR-LBG. PMID:23572632

  4. C11orf83, a mitochondrial cardiolipin-binding protein involved in bc1 complex assembly and supercomplex stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmurs, Marjorie; Foti, Michelangelo; Raemy, Etienne; Vaz, Frédéric Maxime; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Bairoch, Amos; Lane, Lydie

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian mitochondria may contain up to 1,500 different proteins, and many of them have neither been confidently identified nor characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that C11orf83, which was lacking experimental characterization, is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein facing the intermembrane space. This protein is specifically associated with the bc1 complex of the electron transport chain and involved in the early stages of its assembly by stabilizing the bc1 core complex. C11orf83 displays some overlapping functions with Cbp4p, a yeast bc1 complex assembly factor. Therefore, we suggest that C11orf83, now called UQCC3, is the functional human equivalent of Cbp4p. In addition, C11orf83 depletion in HeLa cells caused abnormal crista morphology, higher sensitivity to apoptosis, a decreased ATP level due to impaired respiration and subtle, but significant, changes in cardiolipin composition. We showed that C11orf83 binds to cardiolipin by its α-helices 2 and 3 and is involved in the stabilization of bc1 complex-containing supercomplexes, especially the III2/IV supercomplex. We also demonstrated that the OMA1 metalloprotease cleaves C11orf83 in response to mitochondrial depolarization, suggesting a role in the selection of cells with damaged mitochondria for their subsequent elimination by apoptosis, as previously described for OPA1. PMID:25605331

  5. Functionalized gold nanoparticles for the binding, stabilization, and delivery of therapeutic DNA, RNA, and other biological macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K DeLong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Robert K DeLong1, Christopher M Reynolds1, Yaneika Malcolm1, Ashley Schaeffer1, Tiffany Severs2, Adam Wanekaya21Department of Biomedical Science (Cell and Molecular Biology Program, 2Department of Chemistry, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, USAAbstract: Nanotechnology has virtually exploded in the last few years with seemingly limitless opportunity across all segments of our society. If gene and RNA therapy are to ever realize their full potential, there is a great need for nanomaterials that can bind, stabilize, and deliver these macromolecular nucleic acids into human cells and tissues. Many researchers have turned to gold nanomaterials, as gold is thought to be relatively well tolerated in humans and provides an inert material upon which nucleic acids can attach. Here, we review the various strategies for associating macromolecular nucleic acids to the surface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs, the characterization chemistries involved, and the potential advantages of GNPs in terms of stabilization and delivery.Keywords: gold, nanoparticles, nanomaterials, RNA, nucleic acid

  6. C11orf83, a Mitochondrial Cardiolipin-Binding Protein Involved in bc1 Complex Assembly and Supercomplex Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Michelangelo; Raemy, Etienne; Vaz, Frédéric Maxime; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Bairoch, Amos

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria may contain up to 1,500 different proteins, and many of them have neither been confidently identified nor characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that C11orf83, which was lacking experimental characterization, is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein facing the intermembrane space. This protein is specifically associated with the bc1 complex of the electron transport chain and involved in the early stages of its assembly by stabilizing the bc1 core complex. C11orf83 displays some overlapping functions with Cbp4p, a yeast bc1 complex assembly factor. Therefore, we suggest that C11orf83, now called UQCC3, is the functional human equivalent of Cbp4p. In addition, C11orf83 depletion in HeLa cells caused abnormal crista morphology, higher sensitivity to apoptosis, a decreased ATP level due to impaired respiration and subtle, but significant, changes in cardiolipin composition. We showed that C11orf83 binds to cardiolipin by its α-helices 2 and 3 and is involved in the stabilization of bc1 complex-containing supercomplexes, especially the III2/IV supercomplex. We also demonstrated that the OMA1 metalloprotease cleaves C11orf83 in response to mitochondrial depolarization, suggesting a role in the selection of cells with damaged mitochondria for their subsequent elimination by apoptosis, as previously described for OPA1. PMID:25605331

  7. Nitrogen transformation and nitrous oxide emissions affected by biochar amendment and fertilizer stabilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar as a soil amendment and the use of fertilizer stabilizers (N transformation inhibitors) have been shown to reduce N2O emissions, but the mechanisms or processes involved are not well understood. The objective of this research was to investigate N transformation processes and the relationship...

  8. Banking systems around the globe : do regulation and ownership affect the performance and stability?

    OpenAIRE

    James R. Barth; Caprio, Gerard; Levine, Ross

    2000-01-01

    The authors report cross-country data on commercial bank regulation and ownership in more than 60 countries. They evaluate the links between different regulatory/ownership practices in those countries and both financial sector performance and banking system stability. They document substantial variation in response to these questions: Should it be public policy to limit the powers of comme...

  9. CYCLIC CHOLECYSTOKININ ANALOGUES EXHIBIT HIGH BLOOD STABILITY AND BINDING AFFINITY WITH CHOLECYSTOKININ RECEPTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ha Joh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, incidence of Cholecystokinin (CCK receptor is recognized as a factor that determines the aggressive phenotype of pancreatic cancer. In this study, a novel Cholecystokinin (CCK analogues; DOTA-Nle-cyclo (Glu-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-Lys-NH2 (DOTA-cCCK and DOTA-Nle-cyclo (Glu-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-Lys-NH2 (DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK were synthesized and radiolabeled and the targeting abilities on the CCK receptor were evaluated for new CCK receptor targeting agents searching. Peptides were prepared through a solid phase synthesis method and their purity was over 98%. DOTA is the chelating agent for 68Ga-labelling, which the peptides were radiolabeled with 68Ga by a high radiolabeling yield (>98%. Peptides were stable over 98% by incubation in mouse blood at 37°C for 2 h. A competitive displacement of 125I-CCK8 on the AR42J human pancreatic carcinoma cells revealed that 50% inhibitory concentration value (IC50 were 12.31 nM of DOTA-cCCK and 1.69 nM of DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK. Stable in the blood of both DOTA-cCCK and DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK, but the binding rate with the CCK receptor on AR42J cells, DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK confirmed better than DOTA-cCCK. Therefore, it is concluded that 68Ga-DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK can be potential candidate as a targeting modality for the CCK receptor over-expressing tumors and further studies to evaluate their biological characteristics are needed.

  10. Stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates affected by application of apatite, lime, and charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongbiao; Ma, Kaiqiang; Fan, Yuchao; Peng, Xinhua; Mao, Jingdong; Zhou, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhongbin; Zhou, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Only a few studies have been reported on the stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates after soil treatments to reduce the availability of heavy metals. In this study, apatite (22.3 t ha(-1)), lime (4.45 t ha(-1)), and charcoal (66.8 t ha(-1)) were applied to a heavy metal-contaminated soil for 4 years. The stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates were investigated by dry and wet sieving. No significant change in the dry mean weight diameter was observed in any treatments. Compared with the control, three-amendment treatments significantly increased the wet mean weight diameter, but only charcoal treatment significantly increased the wet aggregate stability. The soil treatments increased the content of soil organic carbon, and the fraction 0.25-2 mm contained the highest content of soil organic carbon. Amendments' application slightly increased soil total Cu and Cd, but decreased the concentrations of CaCl2 -extractable Cu and Cd except for the fraction 2 and 0.25-2 mm contained the highest concentrations of CaCl2-extractable Cu and Cd, accounted for about 74.5-86.8 % of CaCl2-extractable Cu and Cd in soil. The results indicated that amendments' application increased the wet soil aggregate stability and decreased the available Cu and Cd. The distribution of available heavy metals in wet soil aggregates was not controlled by soil aggregate stability, but possibly by soil organic carbon. PMID:26893180

  11. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9 °C with oligomers ≥10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1 µM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9 °C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  12. PENGIKATAN GARAM EMPEDU OLEH SUSU KEDELAI TERFERMENTASI DAN STABILITASNYA TERHADAP PEPSIN DAN PANKREATIN [Binding of Bile Salts by Fermented Soymilk and Its Stability Against Pepsin and Pancreatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusmarini1*

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Processed soybean products especially the fermented ones have beneficial health effects since they are capable of reducing the level of plasmacholesterol (hypocholesterolemic effect. One of the mechanisms is by increasing the binding of bile salt. This research was aimed to assess the ability of soymilk, fermented soymilk products and fermented soymilk products combined with enzymatic hydrolysis to bind bile salts. The stability of the binding against hydrolysis by digestive enzymes (pepsin and pancreatin was also evaluated. Fermented soybean products inoculated with isolates of L. plantarum 1 R.11.1.2 was be able to bind 1.40 μmol/100 mg protein (62.26% of natrium taurocholate. This binding ability is slightly higher than that of soymilk to natrium taurocholate, i.e.1.33 μmol/100 mg protein (59.04%. Addition of a protease enzyme specific to hydrophobic amino acid (thermolysin on fermented soymilk products was able to enhance the ability of bind natrium taurocholate. Enzymatic hydrolysis products having a molecular weight of <7 kDa could bind 1.51 μmol/100 mg protein natrium taurocholate (67.4%. There was a significant increase in the binding, i.e. 7.9% by the fermented products or an increase of 13.5% from soymilk. Meanwhile peptides measuring ≥7 kDa showed no binding ability against natrium taurocholate.

  13. Caesium cell coherent population trapping clock: main effects affecting the frequency stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic clocks using coherent population trapping (CPT) allow to improve performances of vapour cell conventional microwave clocks, or else to miniaturize them thanks to of a full optical interrogation. In this paper, we describe a prototype developed at LNE-SYRTE. It combines two original techniques: an excitation scheme with two linearly and orthogonally polarized beams, and a Ramsey interrogation. This enables the observation of narrow resonances with a good signal-to-noise ratio. A few major effects influencing the frequency stability are addressed; they are the effect of the buffer gas, of the magnetic field, of the laser power, and finally the effect of the local oscillator noise or Dick effect. The measured frequency stability is 7x10-13 at 1 s and 2x10-14 at 2000 s. (authors)

  14. Comparison of Temperature and Additives Affecting the Stability of the Probiotic Weissella cibaria

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Youn-Shin; Lee, Hyun-chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon; Oh, Jong-Suk

    2012-01-01

    Daily use of probiotic chewing gum might have a beneficial effect on oral health, and it is important that the viability of the probiotics be maintained in this food product. In this study, we examined the stability of probiotic chewing gum containing Weissella cibaria. We evaluated the effects of various factors, including temperature and additives, on the survival of freeze-dried probiotic W. cibaria powder. No changes in viability were detected during storage at 4℃ for 5 months, whereas th...

  15. Polymorphism rs11085226 in the gene encoding polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 negatively affects glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Heni

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1 promotes stability and translation of mRNAs coding for insulin secretion granule proteins and thereby plays a role in β-cells function. We studied whether common genetic variations within the PTBP1 locus influence insulin secretion, and/or proinsulin conversion. METHODS: We genotyped 1,502 healthy German subjects for four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the PTBP1 locus (rs351974, rs11085226, rs736926, and rs123698 covering 100% of genetic variation with an r(2≥0.8. The subjects were metabolically characterized by an oral glucose tolerance test with insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide measurements. A subgroup of 320 subjects also underwent an IVGTT. RESULTS: PTBP1 SNP rs11085226 was nominally associated with lower insulinogenic index and lower cleared insulin response in the OGTT (p≤0.04. The other tested SNPs did not show any association with the analyzed OGTT-derived secretion parameters. In the IVGTT subgroup, SNP rs11085226 was accordingly associated with lower insulin levels within the first ten minutes following glucose injection (p = 0.0103. Furthermore, SNP rs351974 was associated with insulin levels in the IVGTT (p = 0.0108. Upon interrogation of MAGIC HOMA-B data, our rs11085226 result was replicated (MAGIC p = 0.018, but the rs351974 was not. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that common genetic variation in PTBP1 influences glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This underlines the importance of PTBP1 for beta cell function in vivo.

  16. Combined Chemical and Mineralogical Evidence for Heavy Metal Binding in Mining- and Smelting-Affected Alluvial Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. VAN(E)K; V. ETTLER; T. GRYGAR; L. BOR(U)VKA; O. (S)EBEK; O. DR(A)BEK

    2008-01-01

    The binding of metallic contaminants (Pb, Cd, and Zn) and As on soil constituents was studied on four highly con-taminated alluvial soil profiles from the mining/smelting district of Pribram (Czech Republic) using a combination of mineralogical and chemical methods. Sequential extraction analysis (SEA) was supplemented by mineralogical investi-gation of both bulk samples and hcavy mineral fractions using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS). The mineralogy of Fe and Mn oxides was studied by voltammetry of microparticles (VMP) and diffuse reflectance spectrometry (DRS). Zinc and Pb were predominantly were detected in soils by XRD and SEM/EDS. In contrast, Cd was the most mobile contaminant and was predominantly present in the exchangeable fraction. Arsenic was bound to the residual and reducible fractions (corresponding to Fe oxides or to unidentified Fe-Pb arsenates). SEM/EDS observations indicate the predominant affinity of Pb for Mn oxides,and to a lesser extent, for Fe oxidcs. Thus, a more suitable SEA procedure should be used for these mining-affected soils to distinguish between the contaminant fraction bound to Mn oxides and Fe oxides.

  17. The temporal stability and predictive validity of affect-based and cognition-based intentions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keer, M.; Conner, M.; Putte, B. van den; Neijens, P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has revealed individual differences in the extent to which people base their intentions on affect and cognition. Two studies are presented that assess whether such differences predict the strength of individuals' intention-behaviour relationships. Participants completed measures of a

  18. Redefining a Bizarre Situation: Relative Concept Stability in Affect Control Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    I analyze the process by which we react cognitively to information that contradicts our culturally held sentiments in the context of affect control theory. When bizarre, unanticipated events come to our attention and we have no opportunity to act so as to alter them, we must reidentify at least one event component: the actor, the behavior, or the…

  19. Binding properties of ruthenium(II) complexes [Ru(bpy)2(ppn)](2+) and [Ru(phen)2(ppn)](2+) with triplex RNA: As molecular "light switches" and stabilizers for poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U) triplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Sun, Yanmei; Zhu, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Hong; Tan, Lifeng

    2016-08-01

    Stable RNA triplexes play key roles in many biological processes, while triplexes are thermodynamically less stable than the corresponding duplexes due to the Hoogsteen base pairing. To understand the factors affecting the stabilization of RNA triplexes by octahedral ruthenium(II) complexes, the binding of [Ru(bpy)2(ppn)](2+) (1, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, ppn=2,4-diaminopyrimido[5,6-b]dipyrido[2,3-f:2',3'-h]quinoxaline) and [Ru(phen)2(ppn)](2+) (2, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) to poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U) (· denotes the Watson-Crick base pairing and * denotes the Hoogsteen base pairing) has been investigated. The main results obtained here suggest that complexes 1 and 2 can serve as molecular "light switches" and stabilizers for poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U), while the effectiveness of complex 2 are more marked, suggesting that the hydrophobicity of ancillary ligands has a significant effect on the two Ru(II) complexes binding to poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U). This study further advances our knowledge on the binding of RNA triplexes with metal complexes, particularly with octahedral ruthenium polypyridyl complexes. PMID:27287059

  20. Factors affecting the stability and performance of ionic liquid-based planar transient photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Simon; Reissig, Louisa; Hu, Laigui; Matsushita, Michio M; Sudo, Yuki; Awaga, Kunio

    2015-05-12

    A novel planar architecture has been developed for the study of photodetectors utilizing the transient photocurrent response induced by a metal/insulator/semiconductor/metal (MISM) structured device, where the insulator is an ionic liquid (IL-MISM). Using vanadyl 2,3-naphthalocyanine, which absorbs in the communications-relevant near-infrared wavelength region (λ(max,film) ≈ 850 nm), in conjunction with C60 as a bulk heterojunction, the high capacitance of the formed electric double layers at the ionic liquid interfaces yields high charge separation efficiency within the semiconductor layer, and the minimal potential drop in the bulk ionic liquid allows the electrodes to be offset by distances of over 7 mm. Furthermore, the decrease in operational speed with increased electrode separation is beneficial for a clear modeling of the waveform of the photocurrent signal, free from the influence of measurement circuitry. Despite the use of a molecular semiconductor as the active layer in conjunction with a liquid insulating layer, devices with a stability of several days could be achieved, and the operational stability of such devices was shown to be dependent solely on the solubility of the active layer in the ionic liquid, even under atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, the greatly simplified device construction process, which does not rely on transparent electrode materials or direct electrode deposition, provides a highly reproducible platform for the study of the electronic processes within IL-MISM detectors that is largely free from architectural constraints. PMID:25895167

  1. Genetic Stability of In vitro Multiplied Phalaenopsis gigantea Protocorm-like Bodies as Affected by Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira SAMARFARD

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a carbohydrate polymer derivative of chitin which presents in shell of crustaceans. This biopolymer is a non toxic and environmentally friendly, considered as a plant growth stimulator in some plant species. The present study investigates the effects of chitosan and media types on multiplication and genetic stability of Phalaenopsis gigantea protocorm-like bodies (PLBs. PLBs were inoculated in liquid New Dogashima Medium (NDM and Vacin and Went (VW supplemented with various concentrations of chitosan (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/L. The highest PLB multiplication was observed on VW and NDM supplemented with 10 mg/L chitosan with mean number of PLBs 177 and 147, respectively. Chitosan promoted the formation of juvenile leaves and the highest number was observed in NDM supplemented with 20 mg/L chitosan with mean number of 66 leaves after 8 weeks of culture. Genetic stability was assessed among mother plant and secondary PLBs after 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of culture in liquid media. 8 out of 10 ISSR markers produced a total of 275 clear and reproducible bands with mean of 6.9 bands per primer. The secondary PLBs produced during sub-culturing process of chitosan treated liquid culture were genetically uniform and similar to mother plant.

  2. Structural stability of exposed gully wall in Central Eastern Nigeria as affected by soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ejiofor

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the soil stability of a gully wall in a gully erosion prone area of Central Eastern Nigeria. The objective was to investigate the physicochemical properties of the gully wall soils and to relate them to the collapsing and stability of the gullies. Ten soil layers were sampled for analysis. The bulk density was high while the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks was moderately high resulting in rapid permeability for the soil layers. The liquid limits (LL and plastic limits (PL were low. The water- stable aggregates (WSA were mostly aggregates of <0.50 mm. Such soils with fine aggregate sizes erode more than those with bigger aggregate sizes. Mean-weight diameter (MWD positively correlated significantly with plasticity index but negatively correlated with soil organic matter. Soil properties that related well with the dispersion indices were water-dispersible clay (WDC, moisture at field capacity (FC, permanent wilting point (PWP, available water capacity (AWC, LL and plastic index (PI. The PI, K+, and Ca2+ were the properties which increased aggregation while soil organic matter (SOM which was low in the soil played little or no role in the aggregation of the studied soils.

  3. A mutation in the ligand binding domain of the androgen receptor of human LNCaP cells affects steroid binding characteristics and response to anti-androgens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veldscholte (Jos); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); G.W. Jenster (Guido); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract INCaP prostate tumor cells contain an abnormal androgen receptor system. Progestagens, estradiol and anti-androgens can compete with androgens for binding to the androgen receptor and can stimulate both cell growth and excretion of prostate specific acid phosphatase. We ha

  4. Amino Acid Residues in the GIY-YIG Endonuclease II of Phage T4 Affecting Sequence Recognition and Binding as Well as Catalysis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerbäck, Pernilla; Carlson, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Phage T4 endonuclease II (EndoII), a GIY-YIG endonuclease lacking a carboxy-terminal DNA-binding domain, was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis to investigate roles of individual amino acids in substrate recognition, binding, and catalysis. The structure of EndoII was modeled on that of UvrC. We found catalytic roles for residues in the putative catalytic surface (G49, R57, E118, and N130) similar to those described for I-TevI and UvrC; in addition, these residues were found to be important for substrate recognition and binding. The conserved glycine (G49) and arginine (R57) were essential for normal sequence recognition. Our results are in agreement with a role for these residues in forming the DNA-binding surface and exposing the substrate scissile bond at the active site. The conserved asparagine (N130) and an adjacent proline (P127) likely contribute to positioning the catalytic domain correctly. Enzymes in the EndoII subfamily of GIY-YIG endonucleases share a strongly conserved middle region (MR, residues 72 to 93, likely helical and possibly substituting for heterologous helices in I-TevI and UvrC) and a less strongly conserved N-terminal region (residues 12 to 24). Most of the conserved residues in these two regions appeared to contribute to binding strength without affecting the mode of substrate binding at the catalytic surface. EndoII K76, part of a conserved NUMOD3 DNA-binding motif of homing endonucleases found to overlap the MR, affected both sequence recognition and catalysis, suggesting a more direct involvement in positioning the substrate. Our data thus suggest roles for the MR and residues conserved in GIY-YIG enzymes in recognizing and binding the substrate. PMID:18539732

  5. Amino acid residues in the GIY-YIG endonuclease II of phage T4 affecting sequence recognition and binding as well as catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerbäck, Pernilla; Carlson, Karin

    2008-08-01

    Phage T4 endonuclease II (EndoII), a GIY-YIG endonuclease lacking a carboxy-terminal DNA-binding domain, was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis to investigate roles of individual amino acids in substrate recognition, binding, and catalysis. The structure of EndoII was modeled on that of UvrC. We found catalytic roles for residues in the putative catalytic surface (G49, R57, E118, and N130) similar to those described for I-TevI and UvrC; in addition, these residues were found to be important for substrate recognition and binding. The conserved glycine (G49) and arginine (R57) were essential for normal sequence recognition. Our results are in agreement with a role for these residues in forming the DNA-binding surface and exposing the substrate scissile bond at the active site. The conserved asparagine (N130) and an adjacent proline (P127) likely contribute to positioning the catalytic domain correctly. Enzymes in the EndoII subfamily of GIY-YIG endonucleases share a strongly conserved middle region (MR, residues 72 to 93, likely helical and possibly substituting for heterologous helices in I-TevI and UvrC) and a less strongly conserved N-terminal region (residues 12 to 24). Most of the conserved residues in these two regions appeared to contribute to binding strength without affecting the mode of substrate binding at the catalytic surface. EndoII K76, part of a conserved NUMOD3 DNA-binding motif of homing endonucleases found to overlap the MR, affected both sequence recognition and catalysis, suggesting a more direct involvement in positioning the substrate. Our data thus suggest roles for the MR and residues conserved in GIY-YIG enzymes in recognizing and binding the substrate. PMID:18539732

  6. Stability of micronutrients and phytochemicals of grapefruit jam as affected by the obtention process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igual, M; García-Martínez, E; Camacho, M M; Martínez-Navarrete, N

    2016-04-01

    Fruits are widely revered for their micronutrient properties. They serve as a primary source of vitamins and minerals as well as of natural phytonutrients with antioxidant properties. Jam constitutes an interesting way to preserve fruit. Traditionally, this product is obtained by intense heat treatment that may cause irreversible loss of these bioactive compounds responsible for the health-related properties of fruits. In this work, different grapefruit jams obtained by conventional, osmotic dehydration (OD) without thermal treatment and/or microwave (MW) techniques were compared in terms of their vitamin, organic acid and phytochemical content and their stability through three months of storage. If compared with heating, osmotic treatments lead to a greater loss of organic acids and vitamin C during both processing and storage. MW treatments permit jam to be obtained which has a similar nutritional and functional value than that obtained when using a conventional heating method, but in a much shorter time. PMID:25956906

  7. Stabilization of Oncostatin-M mRNA by Binding of Nucleolin to a GC-Rich Element in Its 3'UTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sucharita; Chakraborty, Alina; Bandyopadhyay, Sumita Sengupta

    2016-04-01

    Oncostatin-M (OSM) is a patho-physiologically important pleiotropic, multifunctional cytokine. OSM mRNA sequence analysis revealed that its 3'UTR contains three highly conserved GC-rich cis-elements (GCREs) whose role in mRNA stability is unidentified. In the present study, the functional role of the proximal GC-rich region of osm 3'-UTR (GCRE-1) in post-transcriptional regulation of osm expression in U937 cells was assessed by transfecting construct containing GCRE-1 at 3'-end of a fairly stable reporter gene followed by analysis of the expression of the reporter. GCRE-1 showed mRNA destabilizing activity; however, upon PMA treatment the reporter message containing GCRE-1 was stabilized. This stabilization is owing to a time-dependent progressive binding of trans-factors (at least five proteins) to GCRE-1 post-PMA treatment. Nucleolin was identified as one of the proteins in the RNP complex of GCRE-1 with PMA-treated U937 cytosolic extracts by oligo-dT affinity chromatography of poly-adenylated GCRE-1. Immuno-blot revealed time-dependent enhancement of nucleolin in the cytoplasm which in turn directly binds GCRE-1. RNA co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the GCRE-1-nucleolin interaction in vivo. To elucidate the functional role of nucleolin in stabilization of osm mRNA, nucleolin was overexpressed in U937 cells and found to stabilize the intrinsic osm mRNA, where co-transfection with the reporter containing GCRE-1 confirms the role of GCRE-1 in stabilization of the reporter mRNA. Thus, in conclusion, the results asserted that PMA treatment in U937 cells leads to cytoplasmic translocation of nucleolin that directly binds GCRE-1, one of the major GC-rich instability elements, thereby stabilizing the osm mRNA. PMID:26399567

  8. Physico-chemical factors affecting the in vitro stability of phycobiliproteins from Phormidium rubidum A09DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sonani, Ravi Raghav; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-08-01

    The functionality and stability of phycobiliproteins (PBPs) phycoerythrin (PE), phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) were investigated under various temperatures, pHs and oxidative stressors. All PBPs were thermostable up to 4-40°C; however, their concentration decreased rapidly at 60-80°C. The maximum stability of all PBPs was in the pH range 6.0-7.0. Decrease in PBPs content was found under high acidic (pH 2-4) and alkaline conditions (pH 8-12). The oxidizing agent (0.1-0.6%) showed the least effect on the stability of PBPs; however, 0.8-1.0% H2O2 caused significant loss of PBPs. Contrary to PE, PC and APC was more susceptible to an oxidizing agent. The chromophore associated with α- and β-subunit of PBPs and thus, their functionality (fluorescence) was severely affected under high temperature (60-80°C), and oxidizing agent, as well as low (2-4) and high (8-12) pH. Contrary to PC and APC, functionality of PE was surprisingly maintained even at pHs 6-12 and under oxidative stress. PMID:25958145

  9. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils. PMID:27113269

  10. Enzyme bread improvers affect the stability of deoxynivalenol and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside during breadmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Arnau; Ambrosio, Asier; Sanchis, Vicente; Ramos, Antonio J; Marín, Sonia

    2016-10-01

    The stability of deoxynivalenol (DON) and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON-3-glucoside) during the breadmaking process was studied. Some enzymes used in the bakery industry were examined to evaluate their effects on DON and DON-3-glucoside. The level of DON in breads without added enzymes was reduced (17-21%). Similarly, the addition of cellulase, protease, lipase and glucose-oxidase did not modify this decreasing trend. The effect of xylanase and α-amylase on DON content depended on the fermentation temperature. These enzymes reduced the DON content by 10-14% at 45°C. In contrast, at 30°C, these enzymes increased the DON content by 13-23%. DON-3-glucoside levels decreased at the end of fermentation, with a final reduction of 19-48% when no enzymes were used. However, the presence of xylanase, α-amylase, cellulase and lipase resulted in bread with greater quantities of DON-3-glucoside when fermentation occurred at 30°C. The results showed that wheat bran and flour may contain hidden DON that may be enzymatically released during the breadmaking process when the fermentation temperature is close to 30°C. PMID:27132852

  11. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chih Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs, and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability.

  12. Screening of mutations affecting protein stability and dynamics of FGFR1—A simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. George Priya Doss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 destabilize protein and have been implicated in several genetic disorders like various forms of cancer, Kallamann syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson Weiss syndrome, etc. In order to gain functional insight into mutation caused by amino acid substitution to protein function and expression, special emphasis was laid on molecular dynamics simulation techniques in combination with in silico tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0 and SNAP. It has been estimated that 68% nsSNPs were predicted to be deleterious by I-Mutant, slightly higher than SIFT (37%, PolyPhen 2.0 (61% and SNAP (58%. From the observed results, P722S mutation was found to be most deleterious by comparing results of all in silico tools. By molecular dynamics approach, we have shown that P722S mutation leads to increase in flexibility, and deviated more from the native structure which was supported by the decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, biophysical analysis revealed a clear insight of stability loss due to P722S mutation in FGFR1 protein. Majority of mutations predicted by these in silico tools were in good concordance with the experimental results.

  13. Residue Asn277 Affects the Stability and Substrate Specificity of the SMG1 Lipase from Malassezia globosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Lan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermostability and substrate specificity are important characteristics of enzymes for industrial application, which can be improved by protein engineering. SMG1 lipase from Malassezia globosa is a mono- and diacylglycerol lipase (MDL that shows activity toward mono- and diacylglycerols, but no activity toward triacylglycerols. SMG1 lipase is considered a potential biocatalyst applied in oil/fat modification and its crystal structure revealed that an interesting residue-Asn277 may contribute to stabilize loop 273–278 and the 3104 helix which are important to enzyme characterization. In this study, to explore its role in affecting the stability and catalytic activity, mutagenesis of N277 with Asp (D, Val (V, Leu (L and Phe (F was conducted. Circular dichroism (CD spectral analysis and half-life measurement showed that the N277D mutant has better thermostability. The melting temperature and half-life of the N277D mutant were 56.6 °C and 187 min, respectively, while that was 54.6 °C and 121 min for SMG1 wild type (WT. Biochemical characterization of SMG1 mutants were carried out to test whether catalytic properties were affected by mutagenesis. N277D had similar enzymatic properties as SMG1 WT, but N277F showed a different substrate selectivity profile as compared to other SMG1 mutants. Analysis of the SMG1 3D model suggested that N277D formed a salt bridge via its negative charged carboxyl group with a positively charged guanidino group of R227, which might contribute to confer N277D higher temperature stability. These findings not only provide some clues to understand the molecular basis of the lipase structure/function relationship but also lay the framework for engineering suitable MDL lipases for industrial applications.

  14. Thermal stability of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 carboxymethyl cellulase (CSCMCase having a cellulose binding domain from a fungal exoglucanase: Comparison to recombinant CSCMCase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantaporn Thongekkaew

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cryptococcus sp. S-2 carboxymethyl cellulase gene (CSCMCase containing 1023 nucleotides and fused to acellulose-binding domain (CBD which originated from cellobiohydrolase I of Trichoderma reesei (CSCMCase-CBD wascloned and expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. The fusion of CBD to CSCMCase resulted in a greatlyenhanced binding toward cellulose for CSCMCase-CBD compared with that for CSCMCase. This was useful for enzymepurification and enzyme immobilization. Furthermore, the recombinant CSCMCase-CBD showed high thermal stability afterincubating at 90oC for 3 h, whereas the recombinant CSCMCase rapidly lost its activity after incubating at 90oC for 1 h.

  15. Factors affecting emulsion stability and quality of oil recovered from enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S; Maurer, D; Johnson, L A

    2009-11-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess how the stability of the emulsion recovered from aqueous extraction processing of soybeans was affected by characteristics of the starting material and extraction and demulsification conditions. Adding endopeptidase Protex 6L during enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction processing (EAEP) of extruded soybean flakes was vital to obtaining emulsions that were easily demulsified with enzymes. Adding salt (up to 1.5 mM NaCl or MgCl(2)) during extraction and storing extruded flakes before extraction at 4 and 30 degrees C for up to 3 months did not affect the stabilities of emulsions recovered from EAEP of soy flour, flakes and extruded flakes. After demulsification, highest free oil yield was obtained with EAEP of extruded flakes, followed by flour and then flakes. The same protease used for the extraction step was used to demulsify the EAEP cream emulsion from extruded full-fat soy flakes at concentrations ranging from 0.03% to 2.50% w/w, incubation times ranging from 2 to 90 min, and temperatures of 25, 50 or 65 degrees C. Highest free oil recoveries were achieved at high enzyme concentrations, mild temperatures, and short incubation times. Both the nature of enzyme (i.e., protease and phospholipase), added alone or as a cocktail, concentration of enzymes (0.5% vs. 2.5%) and incubation time (1 vs. 3 h), use during the extraction step, and nature of enzyme added for demulsifying affected free oil yield. The free oil recovered from EAEP of extruded flakes contained less phosphorus compared with conventional hexane-extracted oil. The present study identified conditions rendering the emulsion less stable, which is critical to increasing free oil yield recovered during EAEP of soybeans, an environmentally friendly alternative processing method to hexane extraction. PMID:19570674

  16. The potential of denitrification for the stabilization of activated sludge processes affected by low alkalinity problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Hoffmann

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the problems provoked by nitrification of wastewater with low alkalinity were analyzed in a pilot sequencing batch activated sludge reactor (SBR. Decrease in pH resulted in disappearence of protozoa. De-flocculation of the activated sludge floc started below pH 6.5, resulting in enhanced effluent turbidity and loss of bacteria. Nitrification efficiency was affected below pH 6.2. The denitrification activity was not sufficient to keep up the pH, due to a low C/N ratio of the wastewater. Based on alkalinity and ammonia concentration of the wastewater and the necessary denitrification rate to prevent operational problems, was developed a prognostic diagram. The applicability of this diagram was tested for the SBR with excellent results. The diagram could be applied to optimize the operation of wastewater treatment plants affected by problems with low alkalinity wastewater.Os problemas provocados pela nitrificação no esgoto com baixa alcalinidade foram analisados num reator piloto do tipo lodos ativados seqüencial por batelada (RSB, alimentado por esgoto urbano. A diminuição do pH se mostrou em três níveis: com pH de 6,8 - 6,0 os protozoários, responsáveis para a filtração da fase liquida, desaparecerem; os flocos de lodos ativados começaram a se destruir abaixo pH 6,5 resultando em elevação da turbidez no efluente final e abaixo de pH 6,2-6,0 a nitrificação foi afetada. A influência da desnitrificação para manter o pH foi analisada. Devido a baixa relação C:N no esgoto pré-tratado, a desnitrificação não se mostrou suficiente para manter o pH estável. Este trabalho apresenta o cálculo da alcalinidade que considera a influência da nitrificação e desnitrificação, de acordo com os resultados obtidos no RSB. Baseado nesse cálculo, foi desenvolvida uma recomendação na forma gráfica para usar em ETE´s afetadas por baixa alcalinidade.

  17. Chemolithoautotrophy supports macroinvertebrate food webs and affects diversity and stability in groundwater communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Benjamin T; Engel, Annette Summers; Nowlin, Weston H; Schwartz, Benjamin F

    2016-06-01

    compared to the other two sites. Our results suggest that diverse OM sources and in situ, chemolithoautotrophic OM production can support complex groundwater food webs and increase species richness. Chemolithoautotrophy has been fundamental for the long-term maintenance of species diversity, trophic complexity, and community stability in this subterranean ecosystem, especially during periods of decreased photosynthetic production and groundwater recharge that have occurred over geologic time scales. PMID:27459783

  18. The Conditions of the Environment as Factors Affecting the Social and Political Stability of Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Pedrazzini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, the different conditions of the environment which could affect the well-being of the populations living on it are taken into consideration and analysed. A specific attention is paid to the phenomenon of water reduction, land degradation and consequent desertification. Such a phenomenon is particularly worrying in selected regions of the world (the Mediterranean Region and Central Asia in which a combination of several factors including climate variations, pressure of populations and increased competition for the available resources have a direct consequence on the economical, social and political conditions of the population. In addition, migrations could also take place, increasing the instability of entire regions. A proper management of water resources and the preservation of land and soil resources are essential requisites to counteract the mentioned adverse effects. Such a management is frequently a transboundary concern since it might involve different regions and countries; this is an additional reason for debating the environment degradation issues at the international level and for increasing the awareness of the civil society, the policy makers and governments.

  19. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  20. Stem-Loop Binding Protein Facilitates 3′-End Formation by Stabilizing U7 snRNP Binding to Histone Pre-mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Dominski, Zbigniew; Zheng, Lian-Xing; Sanchez, Ricardo; Marzluff, William F

    1999-01-01

    The 3′ end of histone mRNA is formed by an endonucleolytic cleavage of the primary transcript after a conserved stem-loop sequence. The cleavage reaction requires at least two trans-acting factors: the stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which binds the stem-loop sequence, and the U7 snRNP that interacts with a sequence downstream from the cleavage site. Removal of SLBP from a nuclear extract abolishes 3′-end processing, and the addition of recombinant SLBP restores processing activity of the d...

  1. Effect of sigma factor S (sigmaS) on the stability of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) of Escherichia colt K12

    OpenAIRE

    Rosane S. Machado; Douglas C. Camelo; de Almeida, Darcy F.; Ferreira, Luis C. S.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), a cell septum synthesizing protein, was analyzed at different incubation temperatures in three Escherichia coli K12 strains carrying a PBP3-overproducing plasmid. The stability of PBP3 was significantly reduced in stationary phase cells shifted to 42°C for 4 h, compared to samples incubated at 28 or 37°C. The half-life of PBP3 in the C600 strain was 60 min at 42°C, while samples incubated at 28 or 37°C had PBP3 half-lives greater than 4 h....

  2. Dynamics of aggregate stability and soil organic C distribution as affected by climatic aggressiveness: a mesocosm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Sergio; Elio Agnelli, Alessandro; Costanza Andrenelli, Maria; Barbetti, Roberto; Castelli, Fabio; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Pasqui, Massimiliano; Tomozeiu, Rodica; Razzaghi, Somayyeh; Vignozzi, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of a research project aimed at evaluating the adaptation scenarios of the Italian agriculture to the current climate change, a mesocosm experiment under controlled conditions was set up for studying the dynamics of soil aggregate stability and organic C in different size fractions. Three alluvial loamy soils (BOV - Typic Haplustalfs coarse-loamy; CAS - Typic Haplustalfs fine-loamy; MED - Typic Hapludalfs fine-loamy) along a climatic gradient (from dryer to moister pedoclimatic conditions) in the river Po valley (northern Italy), under crop rotation for animal husbandry from more than 40 years, were selected. The Ap horizons (0-30cm) were taken and placed in 9 climatic chambers under controlled temperature and rainfall. Each soil was subjected to three different climate scenarios in terms of erosivity index obtained by combining Modified Fournier and Bagnouls-Gaussen indexes: i) typical (TYP), the median year of each site related to the 1961-1990 reference period; ii) maximum aggressive year (MAX) observed in the same period, and iii) the simulated climate (SIM), obtained by projections of climate change precipitation and temperature for the period 2021-2050 as provided by the IPCC-A1B emission scenario. In the climatic chambers the year climate was reduced to six months. The soils were analyzed for particle size distribution, aggregate stability by wet and dry sieving, and organic C content at the beginning and at the end of the trial. The soils showed different behaviour in terms of aggregate stability and dynamics of organic C in the diverse size fractions. The soils significantly differed in terms of initial mean weight diameter (MWD) (CAS>MED>BOV). A general reduction of MWD in all sites was observed at the end of the experiment, with the increase of the smallest aggregate fractions (0.250-0.05 mm). In particular, BOV showed the maximum decrease of the aggregate stability and MED the lowest. C distribution in aggregate fractions significantly

  3. Binding mode of 2-amino-5-nitrothiazole (ANT) in platinum complexes, trans-[PtCl2(ANT)2], affects DNA binding, toxicity and radiosensitizing ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiosensitizer 2-amino-5-nitrothiazole (ANT) can react with platinum to form many products because of the availability of two potential nitrogen donors as ligands for metals. Two of these complexes, both with two ANT molecules in the trans configuration, differ because of their linkages. In the first, Pt is bound to ANT via the amine group (A) and in the second via the thiazole ring nitrogen (R). Isomer R is a better radiosensitizer than A in hypoxic Chinese hamster ovary cells, giving enhancement ratios of 1.6 versus 1.15 with 100 μmol dm-3 complex. The ring-bound isomer also exhibits higher toxicity than the amine bound in air and under conditions of hypoxia. Sensitization by isomer R is much higher under conditions of hypoxia than in air. In an assay to assess DNA binding, isomer R inhibited restriction enzyme cleavage of DNA but isomer A did not (up to 6 h at 300 μmol dm-3). It appears from this study on two very similar complexes that the complex which exhibits stronger binding may be targetting the radiosensitizer to the DNA, resulting in greatly improved sensitization. (author)

  4. Two glycosylation sites in H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin that affect binding preference by computer-based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentian Chen

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of H5N1 influenza viruses (IVs are responsible for human deaths, especially in North Africa and Southeast Asian. The binding of hemagglutinin (HA on the viral surface to host sialic acid (SA receptors is a requisite step in the infection process. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that H5N1 viruses can be divided into 10 clades based on their HA sequences, with most human IVs centered from clade 1 and clade 2.1 to clade 2.3. Protein sequence alignment in various clades indicates the high conservation in the receptor-binding domains (RBDs is essential for binding with the SA receptor. Two glycosylation sites, 158N and 169N, also participate in receptor recognition. In the present work, we attempted to construct a serial H5N1 HA models including diverse glycosylated HAs to simulate the binding process with various SA receptors in silico. As the SA-α-2,3-Gal and SA-α-2,6-Gal receptor adopted two distinctive topologies, straight and fishhook-like, respectively, the presence of N-glycans at 158N would decrease the affinity of HA for all of the receptors, particularly SA-α-2,6-Gal analogs. The steric clashes of the huge glycans shown at another glycosylation site, 169N, located on an adjacent HA monomer, would be more effective in preventing the binding of SA-α-2,3-Gal analogs.

  5. HIGH CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE145 Binds to and Stabilizes the psaA 5' UTR via a Newly Defined Repeat Motif in Embryophyta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manavski, Nikolay; Torabi, Salar; Lezhneva, Lina; Arif, Muhammad Asif; Frank, Wolfgang; Meurer, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    The seedling-lethal Arabidopsis thaliana high chlorophyll fluorescence145 (hcf145) mutation leads to reduced stability of the plastid tricistronic psaA-psaB-rps14 mRNA and photosystem I (PSI) deficiency. Here, we genetically mapped the HCF145 gene, which encodes a plant-specific, chloroplast-localized, modular protein containing two homologous domains related to the polyketide cyclase family comprising 37 annotated Arabidopsis proteins of unknown function. Two further highly conserved and previously uncharacterized tandem repeat motifs at the C terminus, herein designated the transcript binding motif repeat (TMR) domains, confer sequence-specific RNA binding capability to HCF145. Homologous TMR motifs are often found as multiple repeats in quite diverse proteins of green and red algae and in the cyanobacterium Microcoleus sp PCC 7113 with unknown function. HCF145 represents the only TMR protein found in vascular plants. Detailed analysis of hcf145 mutants in Arabidopsis and Physcomitrella patens as well as in vivo and in vitro RNA binding assays indicate that HCF145 has been recruited in embryophyta for the stabilization of the psaA-psaB-rps14 mRNA via specific binding to its 5' untranslated region. The polyketide cyclase-related motifs support association of the TMRs to the psaA RNA, presumably pointing to a regulatory role in adjusting PSI levels according to the requirements of the plant cell. PMID:26307378

  6. RNA-binding protein Hermes/RBPMS inversely affects synapse density and axon arbor formation in retinal ganglion cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnberg, Hanna; Wollerton-van Horck, Francis; Maurus, Daniel; Zwart, Maarten; Svoboda, Hanno; Harris, William A; Holt, Christine E

    2013-06-19

    The RNA-binding protein Hermes [RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS)] is expressed exclusively in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the CNS, but its function in these cells is not known. Here we show that Hermes protein translocates in granules from RGC bodies down the growing axons. Hermes loss of function in both Xenopus laevis and zebrafish embryos leads to a significant reduction in retinal axon arbor complexity in the optic tectum, and expression of a dominant acting mutant Hermes protein, defective in RNA-granule localization, causes similar defects in arborization. Time-lapse analysis of branch dynamics reveals that the decrease in arbor complexity is caused by a reduction in new branches rather than a decrease in branch stability. Surprisingly, Hermes depletion also leads to enhanced early visual behavior and an increase in the density of presynaptic puncta, suggesting that reduced arborization is accompanied by increased synaptogenesis to maintain synapse number. PMID:23785151

  7. Binding of calcium in the EF-hand of Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase Slt35 is important for stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, Erik J. van; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1999-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase Slt35 contains a single metal ion-binding site that resembles EF-hand calcium-binding sites. The Slt35 EF-hand is only the second observation of such a domain in a prokaryotic protein. Two crystal structures at 2.1 Å resolution show that both Ca2+ ions and

  8. Increased Stability and DNA Site Discrimination of Single Chain Variants of the Dimeric beta-Barrel DNA Binding Domain of the Human Papillomavirus E2 Transcriptional Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellarole,M.; Sanchez, I.; Freire, E.; de Prat-Gay, G.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infects millions of people worldwide and is a causal agent of cervical cancer in women. The HPV E2 protein controls the expression of all viral genes through binding of its dimeric C-terminal domain (E2C) to its target DNA site. We engineered monomeric versions of the HPV16 E2C, in order to probe the link of the dimeric {beta}-barrel fold to stability, dimerization, and DNA binding. Two single-chain variants, with 6 and 12 residue linkers (scE2C-6 and scE2C-12), were purified and characterized. Spectroscopy and crystallography show that the native structure is unperturbed in scE2C-12. The single chain variants are stabilized with respect to E2C, with effective concentrations of 0.6 to 6 mM. The early folding events of the E2C dimer and scE2C-12 are very similar and include formation of a compact species in the submillisecond time scale and a non-native monomeric intermediate with a half-life of 25 ms. However, monomerization changes the unfolding mechanism of the linked species from two-state to three-state, with a high-energy intermediate. Binding to the specific target site is up to 5-fold tighter in the single chain variants. Nonspecific DNA binding is up to 7-fold weaker in the single chain variants, leading to an overall 10-fold increased site discrimination capacity, the largest described so far for linked DNA binding domains. Titration calorimetric binding analysis, however, shows almost identical behavior for dimer and single-chain species, suggesting very subtle changes behind the increased specificity. Global analysis of the mechanisms probed suggests that the dynamics of the E2C domain, rather than the structure, are responsible for the differential properties. Thus, the plastic and dimeric nature of the domain did not evolve for a maximum affinity, specificity, and stability of the quaternary structure, likely because of regulatory reasons and for roles other than DNA binding played by partly folded dimeric or monomeric conformers.

  9. The stability and the hydrological behavior of biological soil crusts is significantly affected by the complex nature of their polysaccharidic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Philippis, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Biological crusts (BSCs) are complex microbial associations constituted by cells and microbial filaments embedded in a polysaccharidic matrix (EPS) that binds them together and with soil particles. EPSs of BSCs play a key role in structuring the soil and in affecting the hydrological processes taking place at the topsoil in desert environments. Recently, the amphiphilic nature of the EPSs, due to the contemporaneous presence in the macromolecules of hydrophilic and hydrophobic constituents, was put in relation with their capability to contribute to the structuring of the soil particles in BSCs and to hydrological behavior of the crusts. Indeed, in the EPSs the hydrophobicity due to the non-polar constituents (i.e. deoxysugars, ester-linked fatty acids, non polar aminoacids) was associated with the adhesion of the microbial cells to solid surfaces and to the clogging of micropores in the crusts. On the other hand, the hydrophilic constituents of the EPSs (i.e. acidic sugars, ketal-linked pyruvic acid, sulphate groups etc) were suggested to determine the final water content and distribution in the soil. The presence of BSCs facilitates the uptake of moisture from the atmosphere and at the same time contributes to enriching the soils with organic matter. In this lecture, the role of the EPSs in affecting the hydrological behavior of BSCs will be discussed by comparing the results obtained with natural and artificially induced BSCs also in relation with the texture of the soils. Furthermore, the contribution to the structuring of the soils of the polysaccharidic matrix of the crusts will be discussed moving from the different characteristics of two operationally-defined EPS fractions, the colloidal (C-EPS) and the EDTA extractable (tightly bound, TB-EPS) fractions. In BSCs, C-EPSs are loosely bound to cells and sediments while TB-EPSs are tightly bound to the crustal biotic and abiotic constituents of the crusts. The results obtained in a recent study suggest that the

  10. Ca ions stabilize the binding of complement factor iC3b to the pseudohyphal form of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Spötl, L; Möst, J; Dierich, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    The pseudohyphal form of Candida albicans is able to bind iC3b. This may play an important role in the pathogenesis of disseminated candidiasis and, in particular, in adherence to endothelium, protection against complement action, and iron acquisition from erythrocytes. Here we report that Ca2+ ions are required to maintain stable binding of iC3b to C. albicans pseudohyphae.

  11. Role of hydrophobic mutations on the binding affinity and stability of blood coagulation factor VIIIa: a computational molecular dynamics and free-energy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, Divi

    2014-07-18

    Factor VIIIa is a non-covalently bound hetero-trimer among A1, A2 and A3-C1-C2 domains and an essential co-factor for factor IXa enzyme during proteolytic activation of factor X zymogen. The relatively weak interactions between A2 and the interface A1/A3 domains dampen the functional stability of FVIIIa in plasma and results in rapid degradation. We studied the mutational effect of three charged residues (Asp519, Glu665 and Asp666) to several hydrophobic residues by molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the binding free energy by MM-PBSA and MM-GBSA methods shows that the mutation of Asp519 and Glu665 residues to either Val or Ala enhance the A2 domain binding affinity in agreement with the experimental site-specific mutagenesis data. Mutation of Asp666 to Val, Tyr, Met and Phe showed largest improvement in the A2-domain binding among the eight hydrophobic mutants studied. Our studies suggest that the enrichment of hydrophobic interactions in the buried surface regions of A2 domain plays crucial role in improving the overall stability of FVIIIa. PMID:24952158

  12. The kinesin-13 KLP10A motor regulates oocyte spindle length and affects EB1 binding without altering microtubule growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K. Do

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesin-13 motors are unusual in that they do not walk along microtubules, but instead diffuse to the ends, where they remove tubulin dimers, regulating microtubule dynamics. Here we show that Drosophila kinesin-13 klp10A regulates oocyte meiosis I spindle length and is haplo-insufficient – KLP10A, reduced by RNAi or a loss-of-function P element insertion mutant, results in elongated and mispositioned oocyte spindles, and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates. KLP10A knockdown by RNAi does not significantly affect microtubule growth rates in oocyte spindles, but, unexpectedly, EB1 binding and unbinding are slowed, suggesting a previously unobserved role for kinesin-13 in mediating EB1 binding interactions with microtubules. Kinesin-13 may regulate spindle length both by disassembling subunits from microtubule ends and facilitating EB1 binding to plus ends. We also observe an increased number of paused microtubules in klp10A RNAi knockdown spindles, consistent with a reduced frequency of microtubule catastrophes. Overall, our findings indicate that reduced kinesin-13 decreases microtubule disassembly rates and affects EB1 interactions with microtubules, rather than altering microtubule growth rates, causing spindles to elongate and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates to form.

  13. Thermal Treatment of Iron Oxide Stabilized APC Residues from Waste Incineration and the Effect on Heavy Metal Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Stackpoole, M.; Bender-Koch, C.;

    2000-01-01

    Iron oxide stabilized APC residues from MSWI were heat treated at 600°C and 900°C. The thermal treatments resulted in a change in product stability by forcing a transformation in the mineralogical structures of the products. The treatments, moreover, simulated somewhat the natural aging processes...

  14. Effect of sigma factor S (sigmaS on the stability of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3 of Escherichia colt K12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane S. Machado

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3, a cell septum synthesizing protein, was analyzed at different incubation temperatures in three Escherichia coli K12 strains carrying a PBP3-overproducing plasmid. The stability of PBP3 was significantly reduced in stationary phase cells shifted to 42°C for 4 h, compared to samples incubated at 28 or 37°C. The half-life of PBP3 in the C600 strain was 60 min at 42°C, while samples incubated at 28 or 37°C had PBP3 half-lives greater than 4 h. Analysis of the PBP3 content in mutants deficient in rpoS (coding for the stationary phase sigma factor, sigmaS and rpoH (coding for the heat shock sigma factor, sigma32 genes after shift to 42°C showed that stability of the protein was controlled by sigmaS but not by sigma32. These results suggest that control of the PBP3 levels in E. coli K12 is through a post-transcriptional mechanism regulated by the stationary phase regulon. We demonstrated that stability of PBP3 in E. coli K12 involves degradation of the protein. Moreover, we observed that incubation of cells at 42°C significantly reduces the stability of PBP3 in early stationary phase cells in a process controlled by sigmaS.

  15. NLRP7 affects trophoblast lineage differentiation, binds to overexpressed YY1 and alters CpG methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal-effect mutations in NLRP7 cause rare biparentally inherited hydatidiform moles (BiHMs), abnormal pregnancies containing hypertrophic vesicular trophoblast but no embryo. BiHM trophoblasts display abnormal DNA methylation patterns affecting maternally methylated germline differentially methy...

  16. A binding-site barrier affects imaging efficiency of high affinity amyloid-reactive peptide radiotracers in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a complex pathology associated with a growing number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and myeloma. The distribution and extent of amyloid deposition in body organs establishes the prognosis and can define treatment options; therefore, determining the amyloid load by using non-invasive molecular imaging is clinically important. We have identified a heparin-binding peptide designated p5 that, when radioiodinated, was capable of selectively imaging systemic visceral AA amyloidosis in a murine model of the disease. The p5 peptide was posited to bind effectively to amyloid deposits, relative to similarly charged polybasic heparin-reactive peptides, because it adopted a polar α helix secondary structure. We have now synthesized a variant, p5R, in which the 8 lysine amino acids of p5 have been replaced with arginine residues predisposing the peptide toward the α helical conformation in an effort to enhance the reactivity of the peptide with the amyloid substrate. The p5R peptide had higher affinity for amyloid and visualized AA amyloid in mice by using SPECT/CT imaging; however, the microdistribution, as evidenced in micro-autoradiographs, was dramatically altered relative to the p5 peptide due to its increased affinity and a resultant "binding site barrier" effect. These data suggest that radioiodinated peptide p5R may be optimal for the in vivo detection of discreet, perivascular amyloid, as found in the brain and pancreatic vasculature, by using molecular imaging techniques; however, peptide p5, due to its increased penetration, may yield more quantitative imaging of expansive tissue amyloid deposits.

  17. Aromatic Amino Acid Mutagenesis at the Substrate Binding Pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase Lip2 Affects Its Activity and Thermostability

    OpenAIRE

    Guilong Wang; Zimin Liu; Li Xu; Yunjun Yan

    2014-01-01

    The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2) is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100) with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F...

  18. Steroid hormones affect binding of the sigma ligand {sup 11}C-SA4503 in tumour cells and tumour-bearing rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Sijbesma, Jurgen W.; Jong, Johan R. de; Vries, Erik F. de; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Waarde, Aren van [University of Groningen, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Ishiwata, Kiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Positron Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Sigma receptors are implicated in memory and cognitive functions, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. In addition, sigma receptors are strongly overexpressed in many tumours. Although the natural ligands are still unknown, steroid hormones are potential candidates. Here, we examined changes in binding of the sigma-1 agonist {sup 11}C-SA4503 in C6 glioma cells and in living rats after modification of endogenous steroid levels. {sup 11}C-SA4503 binding was assessed in C6 monolayers by gamma counting and in anaesthetized rats by microPET scanning. C6 cells were either repeatedly washed and incubated in steroid-free medium or exposed to five kinds of exogenous steroids (1 h or 5 min before tracer addition, respectively). Tumour-bearing male rats were repeatedly treated with pentobarbital (a condition known to result in reduction of endogenous steroid levels) or injected with progesterone. Binding of {sup 11}C-SA4503 to C6 cells was increased ({proportional_to}50%) upon removal and decreased ({proportional_to}60%) upon addition of steroid hormones (rank order of potency: progesterone > allopregnanolone = testosterone = androstanolone > dehydroepiandrosterone-3-sulphate, IC{sub 50} progesterone 33 nM). Intraperitoneally administered progesterone reduced tumour uptake and tumour-to-muscle contrast (36%). Repeated treatment of animals with pentobarbital increased the PET standardized uptake value of {sup 11}C-SA4503 in tumour (16%) and brain (27%), whereas the kinetics of blood pool radioactivity was unaffected. The binding of {sup 11}C-SA4503 is sensitive to steroid competition. Since not only increases but also decreases of steroid levels affect ligand binding, a considerable fraction of the sigma-1 receptor population in cultured tumour cells or tumour-bearing animals is normally occupied by endogenous steroids. (orig.)

  19. Steroid hormones affect binding of the sigma ligand 11C-SA4503 in tumour cells and tumour-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigma receptors are implicated in memory and cognitive functions, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. In addition, sigma receptors are strongly overexpressed in many tumours. Although the natural ligands are still unknown, steroid hormones are potential candidates. Here, we examined changes in binding of the sigma-1 agonist 11C-SA4503 in C6 glioma cells and in living rats after modification of endogenous steroid levels. 11C-SA4503 binding was assessed in C6 monolayers by gamma counting and in anaesthetized rats by microPET scanning. C6 cells were either repeatedly washed and incubated in steroid-free medium or exposed to five kinds of exogenous steroids (1 h or 5 min before tracer addition, respectively). Tumour-bearing male rats were repeatedly treated with pentobarbital (a condition known to result in reduction of endogenous steroid levels) or injected with progesterone. Binding of 11C-SA4503 to C6 cells was increased (∝50%) upon removal and decreased (∝60%) upon addition of steroid hormones (rank order of potency: progesterone > allopregnanolone = testosterone = androstanolone > dehydroepiandrosterone-3-sulphate, IC50 progesterone 33 nM). Intraperitoneally administered progesterone reduced tumour uptake and tumour-to-muscle contrast (36%). Repeated treatment of animals with pentobarbital increased the PET standardized uptake value of 11C-SA4503 in tumour (16%) and brain (27%), whereas the kinetics of blood pool radioactivity was unaffected. The binding of 11C-SA4503 is sensitive to steroid competition. Since not only increases but also decreases of steroid levels affect ligand binding, a considerable fraction of the sigma-1 receptor population in cultured tumour cells or tumour-bearing animals is normally occupied by endogenous steroids. (orig.)

  20. Stability of the tumor suppressor merlin depends on its ability to bind paxillin LD3 and associate with β1 integrin and actin at the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa Manetti

    2012-08-01

    The NF2 gene encodes a tumor suppressor protein known as merlin or schwannomin whose loss of function causes Neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2. NF2 is characterized by the development of benign tumors, predominantly schwannomas, in the peripheral nervous system. Merlin links plasma membrane receptors with the actin cytoskeleton and its targeting to the plasma membrane depends on direct binding to the paxillin scaffold protein. Exon 2 of NF2, an exon mutated in NF2 patients and deleted in a mouse model of NF2, encodes the merlin paxillin binding domain (PBD1. Here, we sought to determine the role of PBD1 in regulation of merlin stability and association with plasma membrane receptors and the actin cytoskeleton in Schwann cells. Using a fluorescence-based pulse-chase technique, we measured the half-life of Halo-tagged merlin variants carrying PBD1, exon 2, and exons 2 and 3 deletions in transiently transfected Schwann cells. We found that PBD1 alone was necessary and sufficient to increase merlin's half-life from approximately three to eleven hours. Merlin lacking PBD1 did not form a complex with surface β1 integrins or associate with the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, direct binding studies using purified merlin and paxillin domains revealed that merlin directly binds paxillin LD3 (leucine-aspartate 3 domain as well as the LD4 and LD5 domains. Together these results demonstrate that a direct interaction between merlin PBD1 and the paxillin LD3–5 domains targets merlin to the plasma membrane where it is stabilized by its association with surface β1 integrins and cortical actin.

  1. Long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein, p48, mediates protein kinase B/Akt-dependent HDM2 stabilization and nuclear localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    p48 is a long isoform of the ErbB3 binding protein that has oncogenic functions including promotion of carcinogenesis and induction of malignant transformation through negative regulation of tumor suppressor p53. Here, we show that high level of p48 protein expression leads to enhance HDM2 phosphorylation by Akt and inhibits the self-ubiquitination of HDM2 by up-regulation of Akt activity, thereby promoting its protein stability. Moreover, p48 expression leads to accumulated nuclear localization of HDM2, whereas p48 depletion disturbs its nuclear localization. Hence, higher expression of p48 in cancer cells reduces p53 levels through modulation of HDM2 nuclear localization and protein stability via regulation of its Akt-mediated phosphorylation.

  2. MAP1B binds to the NMDA receptor subunit NR3A and affects NR3A protein concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Maria; Samuelsson, Helena; Björklund, Stefan;

    2010-01-01

    protein interaction between NR3A and microtubule associated-protein (MAP) 1B, which both are localized to dendritic shafts and filopodia. NR3A protein levels were increased in MAP1B deficient (-/-) mice, with a corresponding decrease in NR1 levels, but the fraction of filopodia immunoreactive for NR3A was...... equal in cells from -/- and wild type (WT) mice. NR3A has previously been shown to interact with another member of the MAP1 family, MAP1S. We showed that MAP1S binds to microtubules in a similar manner as MAP1B, and suggest that MAP1S and MAP1B both are involved in regulating trafficking of NR3A...

  3. Novel C3 mutation p.Lys65Gln in aHUS affects complement factor H binding.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.; Westra, D.; Xue, X.; Gros, P.; Kar, N.C. van de; Heuvel, L.P. van den

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is associated with mutations affecting complement proteins and regulators and with autoantibodies against complement factor H (CFH). Approximately half of the aHUS patients progress to end-stage renal disease. DNA analysis of the risk factor gene

  4. Novel C3 mutation p.Lys65Gln in aHUS affects complement factor H binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.B.; Westra, D.; Xue, X; Gros, P.; van der Kar, N.C.A.J.; van den Heuvel, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is associated with mutations affecting complement proteins and regulators and with autoantibodies against complement factor H (CFH). Approximately half of the aHUS patients progress to end-stage renal disease. DNA analysis of the risk factor genes

  5. Stabilizing a Flexible Interdomain Hinge Region Harboring the SMB Binding Site Drives uPAR into Its Closed Conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai;

    2015-01-01

    domains is inherently flexible and binding of uPA drives uPAR into its closed conformation, which presents the higher affinity state for vitronectin thus providing an allosteric regulatory mechanism. Using a new class of epitope mapped monoclonal anti-uPAR antibodies, we now demonstrate...

  6. Role of cysteines in the stability and DNA-binding activity of the hypochlorite-specific transcription factor HypT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Drazic

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species are important components of the immune response. Hypochlorite (HOCl is produced by neutrophils to kill invading microorganisms. The bactericidal activity of HOCl is due to proteome-wide unfolding and oxidation of proteins at cysteine and methionine residues. Escherichia coli cells are protected from HOCl-killing by the previously identified dodecameric transcription factor HypT (YjiE. Here, we aimed to unravel whether HOCl activates HypT directly or via a reaction product of HOCl with a cellular component. Bacterial viability assays and analysis of target gene regulation indicate that HypT is highly specific to activation by HOCl and that no reaction products of HOCl such as monochloramine, hydroxyl radicals, or methionine sulfoxide activate HypT in vivo. Surprisingly, purified HypT lost its DNA-binding activity upon incubation with HOCl or reaction products that oxidize HypT to form a disulfide-linked dimer, and regained DNA-binding activity upon reduction. Thus, we postulate that the cysteines in HypT contribute to control the DNA-binding activity of HypT in vitro. HypT contains five cysteine residues; a HypT mutant with all cysteines substituted by serine is aggregation-prone and forms tetramers in addition to the typical dodecamers. Using single and multiple cysteine-to-serine mutants, we identified Cys150 to be required for stability and Cys4 being important for oligomerization of HypT to dodecamers. Further, oxidation of Cys4 is responsible for the loss of DNA-binding of HypT upon oxidation in vitro. It appears that Cys4 oxidation upon conditions that are insufficient to stimulate the DNA-binding activity of HypT prevents unproductive interactions of HypT with DNA. Thus, Cys4 oxidation may be a check point in the activation process of HypT.

  7. Insight into factors affecting the presence, degree, and temporal stability of fluorescence intensification on ZnO nanorod ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Jiang, Ruibin; Coia, Heidi; Choi, Daniel S.; Alabanza, Anginelle; Chang, Jae Young; Wang, Jianfang; Hahm, Jong-In

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a combined experimental and simulation study identifying the key physical and optical parameters affecting the presence and degree of fluorescence intensification measured on zinc oxide nanorod (ZnO NR) ends. Previously, we reported on the highly localized, intensified, and prolonged fluorescence signal measured on the NR ends, termed fluorescence intensification on NR ends (FINE). As a step towards understanding the mechanism of FINE, the present study aims to provide insight into the unique optical phenomenon of FINE through experimental and simulation approaches and to elucidate the key factors affecting the occurrence, degree, and temporal stability of FINE. Specifically, we examined the effect of the length, width, and growth orientation of single ZnO NRs on the NR-enhanced biomolecular emission profile after decorating the NR surfaces with different amounts and types of fluorophore-coupled protein molecules. We quantitatively and qualitatively profiled the biomolecular fluorescence signal from individual ZnO NRs as a function of both position along the NR long axis and time. Regardless of the physical dimensions and growth orientations of the NRs, we confirmed the presence of FINE in all ZnO NRs tested by using a range of protein concentrations. We also showed that the manifestation of FINE is not dependent on the spectroscopic signatures of the fluorophores employed. We further observed that the degree of FINE is dependent on the length of the NR with longer NRs showing increased levels of FINE. We also demonstrated that vertically oriented NRs exhibit much stronger fluorescence intensity at the NR ends and a higher level of FINE than the laterally oriented NRs. Additionally, we employed finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods to understand the experimental outcomes and to promote our understanding of the mechanism of FINE. Particularly, we utilized the electrodynamic simulations to examine both near-field and far-field emission

  8. Expression, protein stability and transcriptional activity of retinoic acid receptors are affected by microtubules interfering agents and all-trans retinoic acid in primary rat hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Expression, protein stability and transcriptional activity of retinoic acid receptors are affected by microtubules interfering agents and all-trans retinoic acid in primary rat hepatocytes CZECH REPUBLIC (Dvorak, Zdenek) CZECH REPUBLIC Received: 2006-08-22 Revised: 2006-11-16 Accepted: 2007-01-02

  9. Examining Agreement and Longitudinal Stability among Traditional and RTI-Based Definitions of Reading Disability Using the Affected-Status Agreement Statistic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waesche, Jessica S. Brown; Schatschneider, Christopher; Maner, Jon K.; Ahmed, Yusra; Wagner, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Rates of agreement among alternative definitions of reading disability and their 1- and 2-year stabilities were examined using a new measure of agreement, the affected-status agreement statistic. Participants were 288,114 first through third grade students. Reading measures were "Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills" Oral Reading…

  10. Nerve growth factor affects 11C-nicotine binding, blood flow, EEG, and verbal episodic memory in an Alzheimer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on animal research suggesting that nerve growth factor (NGF) can stimulate central cholinergic neurons, the known losses of cholinergic innervation of the cortices in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and our experience of infusing NGF to support adrenal grafts in parkinsonian patients, we have initiated clinical trials of NGF infusions into the brain of patients with AD. Here we report a follow-up of our first case, a 69-year-old woman, with symptoms of dementia since 8 years. Intraventricular infusion of 6.6 mg NGF during three months resulted in a marked transient increase in uptake and binding of 11C-nicotine in frontal and temporal cortex and a persistent increase in cortical blood flow as measured by PET as well as progressive decreases of slow wave EEG activity. After one month of NGF, tests of verbal episodic memory were improved whereas other cognitive tests were not. No adverse effects could be ascribed to the NGF infusion. Taken together, the results of this case study indicate that NGF may counteract cholinergic deficits in AD, and suggest that further clinical trials of NGF infusion in AD are warranted. (authors)

  11. Aromatic Amino Acid Mutagenesis at the Substrate Binding Pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase Lip2 Affects Its Activity and Thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2 is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100 with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F were created. The enzymatic properties of the mutant lipases were detected and compared with the wild-type. The activities of mutant enzymes dropped to some extent towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPC16 and their optimum temperature was 35°C, which was 5°C lower than that of the wild-type. However, the thermostability of I100F increased 22.44% after incubation for 1 h at 40°C and its optimum substrate shifted from p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNPC12 to p-nitrophenyl caprate (pNPC10. The above results demonstrated that the two substituted amino acid residuals have close relationship with such enzymatic properties as thermostability and substrate selectivity.

  12. Midbrain serotonin transporter binding potential measured with [11C]DASB is affected by serotonin transporter genotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homozygote carriers of two long (L) alleles of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) regulatory region displayed in vitro a twofold increase in 5-HTT expression compared with carriers of one or two short (S) alleles. However, in vivo imaging studies yielded contradictory results. Recently, an A > G exchange leading to differential transcriptional activation of 5-HTT mRNA in lymphobalstoid cell lines was discovered in the 5-HTT regulatory region. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that [11C]DASB, a new 5-HTT ligand offers some advantages over the ligands used in previous studies in measuring 5-HTT density independent of synaptic levels of serotonin. We assessed 5-HTT binding potential (BP 2) in the midbrain of 19 healthy subjects with positron emission tomography and [11C]DASB. Accounting for the hypothesized functional similarity of LG and S in driving 5-HTT transcription, we assessed whether LALA homozygotes display increased midbrain BP2 compared with carriers of at least one S allele. BP2 in the midbrain was significantly increased in LALA homozygotes compared with carriers of at least one S allele. Interestingly, the genotype effect on the midbrain was significantly different from that on the thalamus and the amygdala where no group differences were detected. This in vivo study provides further evidence that subjects homozygous for the LA allele display increased expression of 5-HTT in the midbrain, the origin of central serotonergic projections. (author)

  13. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Arene Ru(II Complexes Induce Tumor Cell Apoptosis Through Selectively Binding and Stabilizing bcl-2 G-Quadruplex DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of arene Ru(II complexes coordinated with phenanthroimidazole derivatives, [(η6-C6H6Ru(lCl]Cl(1b L = p-ClPIP = 2-(4-Chlorophenylimidazole[4,5f] 1,10-phenanthroline; 2b L = m-ClPIP = 2-(3-Chlorophenylimidazole[4,5f] 1,10-phenanthroline; 3b L = p-NPIP = 2-(4-Nitrophenylimidazole[4,5f] 1,10-phenanthroline; 4b L = m-NPIP = 2-(3-Nitrophenyl imidazole [4,5f] 1,10-phenanthroline were synthesized in yields of 89.9%–92.7% under conditions of microwave irradiation heating for 30 min to liberate four arene Ru(II complexes (1b, 2b, 3b, 4b. The anti-tumor activity of 1b against various tumor cells was evaluated by MTT assay. The results indicated that this complex blocked the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells with an IC50 of 16.59 μM. Flow cytometric analysis showed that apoptosis of A549 cells was observed following treatment with 1b. Furthermore, the in vitro DNA-binding behaviors that were confirmed by spectroscopy indicated that 1b could selectively bind and stabilize bcl-2 G-quadruplex DNA to induce apoptosis of A549 cells. Therefore, the synthesized 1b has impressive bcl-2 G-quadruplex DNA-binding and stabilizing activities with potential applications in cancer chemotherapy.

  14. Surface binding of polypyrrole on porous silicon hollow nanospheres for Li-ion battery anodes with high structure stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fei-Hu; Li, Bo; Fu, Wei; Xiong, Yi-Jun; Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2014-09-17

    Uniform porous silicon hollow nano-spheres are prepared without any sacrificial templates through a magnesio-thermic reduction of mesoporous silica hollow nanospheres and surface modified by the following in situ chemical polymerization of polypyrrole. The porous hollow structure and polypyrrole coating contribute significantly to the excellent structure stability and high electrochemical performance of the nanocomposite. PMID:25047876

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 affects osteogenic efficacy on dental implants in rat mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattarai, Govinda; Lee, Young-Hee [Department of Oral Biochemistry, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min-Ho [Department of Dental Materials, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Il-Song [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials, Development and Institute of Biodegradable Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho-Keun, E-mail: yihokn@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Oral Biochemistry, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    Insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in bone cells and its utilization in dental implants have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to determine the osteogenic efficacy of chitosan gold nanoparticles (Ch-GNPs) conjugated with IGFBP-3 coated titanium (Ti) implants. Ch-GNPs were conjugated with IGFBP-3 plasmid DNA through a coacervation process. Conjugation was cast over Ti surfaces, and cells were seeded on coated surfaces. For in vitro analysis the expression of different proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting. For in vivo analysis, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were installed in rat mandibles. Four weeks post-implantation, mandibles were examined by microcomputed tomography (μCT), immunohistochemistry, hematoxylin & eosin and tartrate resistance acid phosphatase staining. In vitro overexpressed Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated Ti surfaces was associated with activation of extracellular signal related kinase (ERK), inhibition of the stress activated protein c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and 7 compared to control. Further, in vivo, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were associated with inhibition of implant induced osteoclastogenesis molecules, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and enhanced expression of osteogenic molecules including BMP2/7 and osteopontin (OPN). The μCT analysis demonstrated that IGFBP-3 increased the volume of newly formed bone surrounding the implants compared to control (n = 5; p < 0.05). These results support the view that IGFBP-3 overexpression diminishes osteoclastogenesis and enhances osteogenesis of Ti implants, and can serve as a potent molecule for the development of good implantation. - Highlights: • Chitosan gold nanoparticles were conjugated with IGFBP-3 and coated onto surface of the titanium implants for gene delivery to bone. • Implants were inserted in rat mandible for 4 weeks. • Parameters studied: histopathology and radiology.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 affects osteogenic efficacy on dental implants in rat mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in bone cells and its utilization in dental implants have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to determine the osteogenic efficacy of chitosan gold nanoparticles (Ch-GNPs) conjugated with IGFBP-3 coated titanium (Ti) implants. Ch-GNPs were conjugated with IGFBP-3 plasmid DNA through a coacervation process. Conjugation was cast over Ti surfaces, and cells were seeded on coated surfaces. For in vitro analysis the expression of different proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting. For in vivo analysis, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were installed in rat mandibles. Four weeks post-implantation, mandibles were examined by microcomputed tomography (μCT), immunohistochemistry, hematoxylin & eosin and tartrate resistance acid phosphatase staining. In vitro overexpressed Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated Ti surfaces was associated with activation of extracellular signal related kinase (ERK), inhibition of the stress activated protein c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and 7 compared to control. Further, in vivo, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were associated with inhibition of implant induced osteoclastogenesis molecules, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and enhanced expression of osteogenic molecules including BMP2/7 and osteopontin (OPN). The μCT analysis demonstrated that IGFBP-3 increased the volume of newly formed bone surrounding the implants compared to control (n = 5; p < 0.05). These results support the view that IGFBP-3 overexpression diminishes osteoclastogenesis and enhances osteogenesis of Ti implants, and can serve as a potent molecule for the development of good implantation. - Highlights: • Chitosan gold nanoparticles were conjugated with IGFBP-3 and coated onto surface of the titanium implants for gene delivery to bone. • Implants were inserted in rat mandible for 4 weeks. • Parameters studied: histopathology and radiology.

  17. Mutations Affecting the BHLHA9 DNA-Binding Domain Cause MSSD, Mesoaxial Synostotic Syndactyly with Phalangeal Reduction, Malik-Percin Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sajid; Percin, Ferda E.; Bornholdt, Dorothea; Albrecht, Beate; Percesepe, Antonio; Koch, Manuela C.; Landi, Antonio; Fritz, Barbara; Khan, Rizwan; Mumtaz, Sara; Akarsu, Nurten A.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Mesoaxial synostotic syndactyly, Malik-Percin type (MSSD) (syndactyly type IX) is a rare autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic digit anomaly with only two affected families reported so far. We previously showed that the trait is genetically distinct from other syndactyly types, and through autozygosity mapping we had identified a locus on chromosome 17p13.3 for this unique limb malformation. Here, we extend the number of independent pedigrees from various geographic regions segregating MSSD to a total of six. We demonstrate that three neighboring missense mutations affecting the highly conserved DNA-binding region of the basic helix-loop-helix A9 transcription factor (BHLHA9) are associated with this phenotype. Recombinant BHLHA9 generated by transient gene expression is shown to be located in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus. Transcription factors 3, 4, and 12, members of the E protein (class I) family of helix-loop-helix transcription factors, are highlighted in yeast two-hybrid analysis as potential dimerization partners for BHLHA9. In the presence of BHLHA9, the potential of these three proteins to activate expression of an E-box-regulated target gene is reduced considerably. BHLHA9 harboring one of the three substitutions detected in MSSD-affected individuals eliminates entirely the transcription activation by these class I bHLH proteins. We conclude that by dimerizing with other bHLH protein monomers, BHLHA9 could fine tune the expression of regulatory factors governing determination of central limb mesenchyme cells, a function made impossible by altering critical amino acids in the DNA binding domain. These findings identify BHLHA9 as an essential player in the regulatory network governing limb morphogenesis in humans. PMID:25466284

  18. Pin1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 increases Sp1 stability and decreases its DNA-binding activity during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang-Che; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Liu, Chia-I; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lu, Pei-Jung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2014-12-16

    We have shown that Sp1 phosphorylation at Thr739 decreases its DNA-binding activity. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of Sp1 at Thr739 alone is necessary, but not sufficient for the inhibition of its DNA-binding activity during mitosis. We demonstrated that Pin1 could be recruited to the Thr739(p)-Pro motif of Sp1 to modulate the interaction between phospho-Sp1 and CDK1, thereby facilitating CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of Sp1 at Ser720, Thr723 and Thr737 during mitosis. Loss of the C-terminal end of Sp1 (amino acids 741-785) significantly increased Sp1 phosphorylation, implying that the C-terminus inhibits CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation. Binding analysis of Sp1 peptides to Pin1 by isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that Pin1 interacts with Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide but not with Thr739-Sp1 peptide. X-ray crystallography data showed that the Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide occupies the active site of Pin1. Increased Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 during mitosis not only stabilized Sp1 levels by decreasing interaction with ubiquitin E3-ligase RNF4 but also caused Sp1 to move out of the chromosomes completely by decreasing its DNA-binding activity, thereby facilitating cell cycle progression. Thus, Pin1-mediated conformational changes in the C-terminal region of Sp1 are critical for increased CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation to facilitate cell cycle progression during mitosis. PMID:25398907

  19. Mutations in the DNA-binding domain of NR2E3 affect in vivo dimerization and interaction with CRX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Roduit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NR2E3 (PNR is an orphan nuclear receptor essential for proper photoreceptor determination and differentiation. In humans, mutations in NR2E3 have been associated with the recessively inherited enhanced short wavelength sensitive (S- cone syndrome (ESCS and, more recently, with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP. NR2E3 acts as a suppressor of the cone generation program in late mitotic retinal progenitor cells. In adult rod photoreceptors, NR2E3 represses cone-specific gene expression and acts in concert with the transcription factors CRX and NRL to activate rod-specific genes. NR2E3 and CRX have been shown to physically interact in vitro through their respective DNA-binding domains (DBD. The DBD also contributes to homo- and heterodimerization of nuclear receptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed NR2E3 homodimerization and NR2E3/CRX complex formation in an in vivo situation by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET(2. NR2E3 wild-type protein formed homodimers in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. NR2E3 homodimerization was impaired in presence of disease-causing mutations in the DBD, except for the p.R76Q and p.R104W mutant proteins. Strikingly, the adRP-linked p.G56R mutant protein interacted with CRX with a similar efficiency to that of NR2E3 wild-type and p.R311Q proteins. In contrast, all other NR2E3 DBD-mutant proteins did not interact with CRX. The p.G56R mutant protein was also more effective in abolishing the potentiation of rhodospin gene transactivation by the NR2E3 wild-type protein. In addition, the p.G56R mutant enhanced the transrepression of the M- and S-opsin promoter, while all other NR2E3 DBD-mutants did not. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest different disease mechanisms in adRP- and ESCS-patients carrying NR2E3 mutations. Titration of CRX by the p.G56R mutant protein acting as a repressor in trans may account for the severe clinical phenotype in adRP patients.

  20. Nucleobases bind to and stabilize aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile, providing a viable mechanism for the emergence of protocells

    OpenAIRE

    Black, RA; Blosser, MC; Stottrup, BL; Tavakley, R; Deamer, DW; Keller, SL

    2013-01-01

    Primordial cells presumably combined RNAs, which functioned as catalysts and carriers of genetic information, with an encapsulating membrane of aggregated amphiphilic molecules. Major questions regarding this hypothesis include how the four bases and the sugar in RNA were selected from a mixture of prebiotic compounds and colocalized with such membranes, and how the membranes were stabilized against flocculation in salt water. To address these questions, we explored the possibility that aggre...

  1. Enhanced Peptide Stability Against Protease Digestion Induced by Intrinsic Factor Binding of a Vitamin B12 Conjugate of Exendin-4

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaccorso, Ron L.; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; HOLZ, GEORGE G.; Doyle, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide digestion from proteases is a significant limitation in peptide therapeutic development. It has been hypothesized that the dietary pathway of vitamin B12 (B12) may be exploited in this area, but an open question is whether B12-peptide conjugates bound to the B12 gastric uptake protein intrinsic factor (IF) can provide any stability against proteases. Herein, we describe a new conjugate of B12 with the incretin peptide exendin 4 that demonstrates picomolar agonism of the glugacon-like ...

  2. HUMAN LIVER FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN (L-FABP) T94A VARIANT ALTERS STRUCTURE, STABILITY, AND INTERACTION WITH FIBRATES

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Gregory G.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Huang, Huan; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Although the human L-FABP T94A variant arises from the most commonly occurring SNP in the entire FABP family, there is a complete lack of understanding regarding the role of this polymorphism in human disease. It has been hypothesized that the T94A substitution results in complete loss of ligand binding ability and function analogous to L-FABP gene ablation. This possibility was addressed using recombinant human WT T94T and T94A variant L-FABP and cultured primary human hepatocytes. Non-conse...

  3. Polymorphisms of the T cell receptor CD3delta and CD3varepsilon chains affect anti-CD3 antibody binding and T cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Nielsen, Martin Weiss; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné;

    2010-01-01

    suitable embryonic stem (ES) cell lines. Traditionally, ES cell lines from the 129 mouse strains have been used followed by backcrossing to the C57BL/6 strain. In the present study, we demonstrate the existence of polymorphisms in the CD3 genes from mice of the 129 and C57BL/6 strains. These polymorphisms...... CD3delta and varepsilon ectodomains exist in mice, and that some of these polymorphisms lead to amino acid substitutions which cause structural changes and affect anti-CD3 antibody binding. Thus, functional T cell studies should be interpreted with caution when anti-CD3 antibodies are used for......T cell receptor (TCR) structure and function have been thoroughly studied for decades. Production and analyses of knock-out and knock-in mice with mutations in the CD3 chains have contributed significantly to these studies. The generation of such gene-modified mice relies on the availability of...

  4. TET2 Mutations Affect Non-CpG Island DNA Methylation at Enhancers and Transcription Factor-Binding Sites in Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R; Godley, Lucy A; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-07-15

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here, we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild-type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites [28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGI) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGI)]. TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. In contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and nonpromoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1 and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:25972343

  5. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Muhammed Shadid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability.

  6. Constrained H-Phe-Phe-NH2 analogues with high affinity to the substance P 1-7 binding site and with improved metabolic stability and cell permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Rebecca; Sköld, Christian; Kratz, Jadel M; Svensson, Richard; Artursson, Per; Nyberg, Fred; Hallberg, Mathias; Sandström, Anja

    2013-06-27

    We recently reported the discovery of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 as a small and high affinity ligand for the substance P 1-7 (SP(1-7), H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-OH) specific binding site and its intriguing ability to reduce neuropathic pain. With the overall aim to develop stable and orally bioavailable SP(1-7) mimetics, the dipeptide was chosen as a lead compound. Herein the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a set of modified H-Phe-Phe-NH2 analogues is presented together with their potential active uptake by PEPT1 transporter, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability. Local constraints via peptide backbone methylation or preparation of cyclized analogues based on pyrrolidine were evaluated and were shown to significantly improve the in vitro pharmacokinetic properties. The SAR was rationalized by deriving a plausible binding pose for the high affinity ligands. Rigidification using a 3-phenylpyrrolidine moiety in the C-terminal of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 resulted in high affinity and improved intrinsic clearance and intestinal epithelial permeability. PMID:23735006

  7. Cysteine-10 on 17 β -Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 Has Stabilizing Interactions in the Cofactor Binding Region and Renders Sensitivity to Sulfhydryl Modifying Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashev, Lyubomir G; Atanasov, Atanas G; Baker, Michael E; Odermatt, Alex

    2013-01-01

    17 β -Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17 β -HSD1) catalyzes the conversion of estrone to the potent estrogen estradiol. 17 β -HSD1 is highly expressed in breast and ovary tissues and represents a prognostic marker for the tumor progression and survival of patients with breast cancer and other estrogen-dependent tumors. Therefore, the enzyme is considered a promising drug target against estrogen-dependent cancers. For the development of novel inhibitors, an improved understanding of the structure-function relationships is essential. In the present study, we examined the role of a cysteine residue, Cys(10), in the Rossmann-fold NADPH binding region, for 17 β -HSD1 function and tested the sensitivity towards sulfhydryl modifying chemicals. 3D structure modeling revealed important interactions of Cys(10) with residues involved in the stabilization of amino acids of the NADPH binding pocket. Analysis of enzyme activity revealed that 17 β -HSD1 was irreversibly inhibited by the sulfhydryl modifying agents N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and dithiocarbamates. Preincubation with increasing concentrations of NADPH protected 17 β -HSD1 from inhibition by these chemicals. Cys(10)Ser mutant 17 β -HSD1 was partially protected from inhibition by NEM and dithiocarbamates, emphasizing the importance of Cys(10) in the cofactor binding region. Substitution of Cys(10) with serine resulted in a decreased protein half-life, without significantly altering kinetic properties. Despite the fact that Cys(10) on 17 β -HSD1 seems to have limited potential as a target for new enzyme inhibitors, the present study provides new insight into the structure-function relationships of this enzyme. PMID:24348564

  8. Cysteine-10 on 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 Has Stabilizing Interactions in the Cofactor Binding Region and Renders Sensitivity to Sulfhydryl Modifying Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomir G. Nashev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17β-HSD1 catalyzes the conversion of estrone to the potent estrogen estradiol. 17β-HSD1 is highly expressed in breast and ovary tissues and represents a prognostic marker for the tumor progression and survival of patients with breast cancer and other estrogen-dependent tumors. Therefore, the enzyme is considered a promising drug target against estrogen-dependent cancers. For the development of novel inhibitors, an improved understanding of the structure-function relationships is essential. In the present study, we examined the role of a cysteine residue, Cys10, in the Rossmann-fold NADPH binding region, for 17β-HSD1 function and tested the sensitivity towards sulfhydryl modifying chemicals. 3D structure modeling revealed important interactions of Cys10 with residues involved in the stabilization of amino acids of the NADPH binding pocket. Analysis of enzyme activity revealed that 17β-HSD1 was irreversibly inhibited by the sulfhydryl modifying agents N-ethylmaleimide (NEM and dithiocarbamates. Preincubation with increasing concentrations of NADPH protected 17β-HSD1 from inhibition by these chemicals. Cys10Ser mutant 17β-HSD1 was partially protected from inhibition by NEM and dithiocarbamates, emphasizing the importance of Cys10 in the cofactor binding region. Substitution of Cys10 with serine resulted in a decreased protein half-life, without significantly altering kinetic properties. Despite the fact that Cys10 on 17β-HSD1 seems to have limited potential as a target for new enzyme inhibitors, the present study provides new insight into the structure-function relationships of this enzyme.

  9. A sequence that affects the copy number and stability of pSW200 and ColE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Chung; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2010-07-01

    Pantoea stewartii SW2 contains 13 plasmids. One of these plasmids, pSW200, has a replicon that resembles that of ColE1. This study demonstrates that pSW200 contains a 9-bp UP element, 5'-AAGATCTTC, which is located immediately upstream of the -35 box in the RNAII promoter. A transcriptional fusion study reveals that substituting this 9-bp sequence reduces the activity of the RNAII promoter by 78%. The same mutation also reduced the number of plasmid copies from 13 to 5, as well as the plasmid stability. When a similar sequence in a ColE1 derivative, pYCW301, is mutated, the copy number of the plasmid also declines from 34 to 16 per cell. Additionally, inserting this 9-bp sequence stabilizes an unstable pSW100 derivative, pSW142K, which also contains a replicon resembling that of ColE1, indicating the importance of this sequence in maintaining the stability of the plasmid. In conclusion, the 9-bp sequence upstream of the -35 box in the RNAII promoter is required for the efficient synthesis of RNAII and maintenance of the stability of the plasmids in the ColE1 family. PMID:20494993

  10. Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibits the Motility of Pathogenic Salmonella by Affecting the Driving Forces of Motility and the Chemotactic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Guo, Yijie; Ihara, Kohei; Tomioka, Rintaro; Masuda, Mizuki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key pattern recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system, an important component of innate immunity. MBL functions as an opsonin which enhances the sequential immune process such as phagocytosis. We here report an inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of pathogenic bacteria, which occurs by affecting the energy source required for motility and the signaling pathway of chemotaxis. When Salmonella cells were treated with a physiological concentration of MBL, their motile fraction and free-swimming speed decreased. Rotation assays of a single flagellum showed that the flagellar rotation rate was significantly reduced by the addition of MBL. Measurements of the intracellular pH and membrane potential revealed that MBL affected a driving force for the Salmonella flagellum, the electrochemical potential difference of protons. We also found that MBL treatment increased the reversal frequency of Salmonella flagellar rotation, which interfered with the relative positive chemotaxis toward an attractive substrate. We thus propose that the motility inhibition effect of MBL may be secondarily involved in the attack against pathogens, potentially facilitating the primary role of MBL in the complement system. PMID:27104738

  11. Structure and stability of recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein: III. Peculiarities of the wild type bOBP unfolding in crowded milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Olga V.; Roginskii, Denis O.; Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to the majority of the members of the lipocalin family, which are stable monomers with the specific OBP fold (a β-barrel consisting of a 8-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet followed by a short α-helical segment, a ninth β-strand, and a disordered C-terminal tail) and a conserved disulfide bond, bovine odorant-binding protein (bOBP) does not have such a disulfide bond and forms a domain-swapped dimer that involves crossing the α-helical region from each monomer over the β-barrel of the other monomer. Furthermore, although natural bOBP isolated from bovine tissues exists as a stable domain-swapped dimer, recombinant bOBP has decreased dimerization potential and therefore exists as a mixture of monomeric and dimeric variants. In this article, we investigated the effect model crowding agents of similar chemical nature but different molecular mass on conformational stability of the recombinant bOBP. These experiments were conducted in order to shed light on the potential influence of model crowded environment on the unfolding-refolding equilibrium. To this end, we looked at the influence of PEG-600, PEG-4000, and PEG-12000 in concentrations of 80, 150, and 300 mg/mL on the equilibrium unfolding and refolding transitions induced in the recombinant bOBP by guanidine hydrochloride. We are showing here that the effect of crowding agents on the structure and conformational stability of the recombinant bOBP depends on the size of the crowder, with the smaller crowding agents being more effective in the stabilization of the bOBP native dimeric state against the guanidine hydrochloride denaturing action. This effect of the crowding agents is concentration dependent, with the high concentrations of the agents being more effective. PMID:27114858

  12. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  13. Water Retention and Structure Stability in Smectitic or Kaolinitic Loam and Clay Soils Affected by Polyacrylamide Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Amirakh; Levy, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Studying the effects of polyacrylamide (PAM) on soil aggregate and structure stability is important in developing effective soil and water conservation practices and in sustaining soil and water quality. Five concentrations of an anionic PAM (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg L-1) with a high molecular weight were tested on loam and clay soils having either a predominant smectitic or kaolinitic clay mineralogy. The effects of the PAM and of soil texture on soil water retention at near saturation and on aggregate and structure stability were investigated using the high energy moisture characteristic (HEMC) method. The S-shaped water retention curves obtained by the HEMC method were characterized by the modified van Genuchten (1980) model that provided: (i) the model parameters α and n, which represent the location of the inflection point and the steepness of the water retention curve, respectively; and (ii) the soil structure index, SI =VDP/MS, where VDP is the volume of drainable pores, an indicator of the quantity of water released by a soil over the range of applied suctions (0-5 J kg-1), and MS is the modal suction representing the most frequent pore sizes (> 60 μm). In general, the treatments tested (clay mineralogy, soil type and PAM concentration) resulted in: (i) a considerable modification of the shape of the water retention curves as indicated by the changes in the α and n values; and; (ii) substantial effects on the stability indices and other model parameters. The contribution of PAM concentration to soil structure stability depended on the clay mineralogy, being more effective in the smectitic soils than in the kaolinitic ones. Although kaolinitic soils are usually more stable than smectitic soils, when the latter were treated with PAM (25-200 mg L-1) the opposite trend was observed. In the loam soils, increasing the PAM concentration notably decreased the differences between values of the stability indices of the smectitic and kaolinitic samples. The

  14. Oxidative stability of egg and soy lecithin as affected by transition metal ions and pH in emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang; Wang, Tong

    2008-12-10

    Oxidative stability of egg and soy lecithin in emulsion was evaluated with two transition metal ions, cupric and ferric ion, at two concentration levels (50 and 500 microM). The effect of pH on lipid oxidation was also examined under these two concentrations for each ion. Egg lecithin (EL) had similar peroxide value (PV) development pattern as soy lecithin (SL) when treated with cupric ion under both acidic and neutral pH. Acidic pH of 3 accelerated oxidation of both EL and SL, especially under high concentration of copper. When treated with ferric ion, EL oxidized much faster than SL did. EL had higher value of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) than SL, possibly because of its higher content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Acidic pH accelerated TBARS development for both EL and SL, but EL had more significantly increased values. Cupric ion was more powerful than ferric in catalyzing oxidation of both EL and SL under both acidic and neutral pH conditions as measured by PV and TBARS. Linoleic acid may contribute to higher PV production, however, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid may have contributed more to TBARS production. Overall, SL showed better oxidative stability than EL under the experimental conditions. This study also suggests that using multiple methods is necessary in properly evaluating lipid oxidative stability. PMID:18991454

  15. Stability of Chloropyromorphite in Ryegrass Rhizosphere as Affected by Root-Secreted Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Han, Ruiming; Li, Shiyin; Wei, Zhenggui; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the stability of chloropyromorphite (CPY) is of considerable benefit for improving risk assessment and remediation strategies in contaminated water and soil. The stability of CPY in the rhizosphere of phosphorus-deficient ryegrass was evaluated to elucidate the role of root-secreted low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the dissolution of CPY. Results showed that CPY treatments significantly reduced the ryegrass biomass and rhizosphere pH. The presence of calcium nitrate extractable lead (Pb) and phosphorus (P) suggested that CPY in the rhizosphere could be bioavailable, because P and Pb uptake by ryegrass potentially provided a significant concentration gradient that would promote CPY dissolution. Pb accumulation and translocation in ryegrass was found to be significantly higher in P-sufficient conditions than in P-deficient conditions. CPY treatments significantly enhanced root exudation of LMWOAs irrigated with P-nutrient solution or P-free nutrient solution. Oxalic acid was the dominant species in root-secreted LMWOAs of ryegrass under P-free nutrient solution treatments, suggesting that root-secreted oxalic acid may be the driving force of root-induced dissolution of CPY. Hence, our work, provides clarifying hints on the role of LMWOAs in controlling the stability of CPY in the rhizosphere. PMID:27494023

  16. Factors affecting the stability and biodistribution of 99m Tc labelled Sn-pyrophosphate freeze dried kits in normal mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study has shown that about 5% of Sn (II) in 99m Tc labelled Sn-pyrophosphate (Sn-PYP) freeze dried kit was oxidized during kit formulation. Also, γ-irradiation doses of 25 and 50 KGy led to Sn (II) losses of about 9.8 and 27.7%, respectively. In-vitro stability and radiochemical purity were biologically confirmed in mice and a high quality scan was achieved on waiting for 3 hours after injection. 3 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Factors affecting the stability and biodistribution of 99 m Tc labelled Sn-pyrophosphate freeze dried kits in normal mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study has shown that about 5% of Sn(II) in 99m Tc labelled Sn-pyprophosphate (Sn-PYP) freeze dried kit was oxidized during kit formulation. Also, gamma-irradiation doses of 25 and 50 KGy led to Sn(II) losses of about 9.8 and 27.7%, respectively. In-vitro, stability and radiochemical purity were biologically confirmed in mice and a high quality scan was achieved in mice and a high quality scan was achieved on waiting for 3 hours after injection. 3 figs., 5 tabs

  18. A Study of Parameters Affecting Wear Resistance of Alumina and Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Composite Coatings on Al-6061 Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    N Krishnamurthy; Prashanthareddy, M. S.; H. P. Raju; H. S. Manohar

    2012-01-01

    In this investigation, a composite coating of alumina and yttria stabilized zirconia in equal proportion was developed on Al-6061 substrate using Atmospheric Plasma Spraying technique. Two commercially available powders of chemical composition Al 25Fe7Cr5Ni and Al2O330(Ni 20Al) were used as bond coats. The coating samples were subjected to abrasive wear test as per ASTM G99. From the results it was found that wear rate and coefficient of friction depend on various parameters such as microstru...

  19. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  20. Longevity and developmental stability in the dung fly Sepsis cynipsea, as affected by the ectoparasitic mite, Pediculoides mesembrinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Y. Martin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA is a widely employed measure of developmental stability. It has been found to increase with many stressors including parasite infection. Associations between parasites and FA may exist for several reasons in addition to parasites being the direct cause of increased FA. Developmentally stable individuals may have superior immune systems, and be less susceptible to parasite infection, and/or may be less exposed to parasites than developmentally unstable ones. Mites negatively impact host fitness in a number of insects, and if FA is a reflection of general genetic quality, as has been proposed, associations between mite number and FA are predicted. Potential relationships were investigated between an ectoparasitic mite, Pediculoides mesembrinae (Canestrini (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae and FA in the common dung fly Sepsis cynipsea (L. (Diptera: Sepsidae. While it was found that mite infested flies died much faster than flies without mites, indicating that mites indeed stress their hosts, counter to expectations, no associations between mites and FA were found in any analyses. Additionally, FA in mite-infected flies generally did not differ from previously published FA data from uninfected S. cynipsea. Nevertheless, parasitized males tended to be somewhat less asymmetrical than non-parasitized males, but based on our data, it does not appear that mite infestation is generally associated with developmental stability in S. cynipsea.

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus Chaperone PrsA Is a New Auxiliary Factor of Oxacillin Resistance Affecting Penicillin-Binding Protein 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousselin, Ambre; Manzano, Caroline; Biette, Alexandra; Reed, Patricia; Pinho, Mariana G; Rosato, Adriana E; Kelley, William L; Renzoni, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) phenotype results from the expression of the extra penicillin-binding protein 2A (PBP2A), which is encoded by mecA and acquired horizontally on part of the SCCmec cassette. PBP2A can catalyze dd-transpeptidation of peptidoglycan (PG) because of its low affinity for β-lactam antibiotics and can functionally cooperate with the PBP2 transglycosylase in the biosynthesis of PG. Here, we focus upon the role of the membrane-bound PrsA foldase protein as a regulator of β-lactam resistance expression. Deletion of prsA altered oxacillin resistance in three different SCCmec backgrounds and, more importantly, caused a decrease in PBP2A membrane amounts without affecting mecA mRNA levels. The N- and C-terminal domains of PrsA were found to be critical features for PBP2A protein membrane levels and oxacillin resistance. We propose that PrsA has a role in posttranscriptional maturation of PBP2A, possibly in the export and/or folding of newly synthesized PBP2A. This additional level of control in the expression of the mecA-dependent MRSA phenotype constitutes an opportunity to expand the strategies to design anti-infective agents. PMID:26711778

  2. The smallest capsid protein mediates binding of the essential tegument protein pp150 to stabilize DNA-containing capsids in human cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghong Dai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that causes birth defects in newborns and life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals. Among all human herpesviruses, HCMV contains a much larger dsDNA genome within a similarly-sized capsid compared to the others, and it was proposed to require pp150, a tegument protein only found in cytomegaloviruses, to stabilize its genome-containing capsid. However, little is known about how pp150 interacts with the underlying capsid. Moreover, the smallest capsid protein (SCP, while dispensable in herpes simplex virus type 1, was shown to play essential, yet undefined, role in HCMV infection. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM, we determine three-dimensional structures of HCMV capsid (no pp150 and virion (with pp150 at sub-nanometer resolution. Comparison of these two structures reveals that each pp150 tegument density is composed of two helix bundles connected by a long central helix. Correlation between the resolved helices and sequence-based secondary structure prediction maps the tegument density to the N-terminal half of pp150. The structures also show that SCP mediates interactions between the capsid and pp150 at the upper helix bundle of pp150. Consistent with this structural observation, ribozyme inhibition of SCP expression in HCMV-infected cells impairs the formation of DNA-containing viral particles and reduces viral yield by 10,000 fold. By cryoEM reconstruction of the resulting "SCP-deficient" viral particles, we further demonstrate that SCP is required for pp150 functionally binding to the capsid. Together, our structural and biochemical results point to a mechanism whereby SCP recruits pp150 to stabilize genome-containing capsid for the production of infectious HCMV virion.

  3. Can air pollution affect tear film stability? a cross-sectional study in the aftermath of an explosion accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granslo JT

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After an explosion and fire in two tanks containing contaminated oil and sulphur products in a Norwegian industrial harbour in 2007, the surrounding area was polluted. This caused an intense smell, lasting until the waste was removed two years later. The present study reports examinations of tear film break up time among the population. The examinations were carried out because many of the people in the area complained of sore eyes. The purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between living or working close to the polluted area and tear film stability one and a half years after the explosion. Methods All persons working or living in an area less than six kilometres from the explosion site were invited to take part in the study together with a similar number of persons matched for age and gender living more than 20 kilometres away. Three groups were established: workers in the explosion area and inhabitants near the explosion area (but not working there were considered to have been exposed, and inhabitants far away (who did not work in the explosion area were considered to be unexposed. A total of 734 people were examined, and the response rate was 76 percent. Tear film stability was studied by assessing non-invasive break-up time (NIBUT using ocular microscopy. In addition Self-reported Break Up Time (SBUT was assessed by recording the time the subject could keep his or hers eyes open without blinking when watching a fixed point on a wall. Background information was obtained using a questionnaire. Non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney-tests with exact p-values and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Results Both NIBUT and SBUT were shorter among the male exposed workers than among the inhabitants both near and far away from the explosion area. This was also found for SBUT among males in a multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age and smoking. Conclusions Reduced tear film stability

  4. Curcumin-Loading-Dependent Stability of PEGMEMA-Based Micelles Affects Endocytosis and Exocytosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Teddy; Trench, David; Putnam, Joshua; Stenzel, Martina H; Lord, Megan S

    2016-03-01

    Polymeric micelles were formed from poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)-block-poly(styrene) (P(PEGMEMA)-b-PS) block copolymer of two different chain lengths. The micelles formed were approximately 16 and 46 nm in diameter and used to encapsulate curcumin. Upon loading of the curcumin into the micelles, their size increased to approximately 34 and 80 nm in diameter, respectively, with a loading efficiency of 58%. The unloaded micelles were not cytotoxic to human colon carcinoma cells, whereas only the smaller loaded micelles were cytotoxic after 72 h of exposure. The micelles were rapidly internalized by the cells within minutes of exposure, with the loaded micelles internalized to a greater extent owing to their enhanced stability compared to that of the unloaded micelles. The larger micelles were more rapidly internalized and exocytosed than the smaller micelles, demonstrating the effect of micelle size and drug loading on drug delivery and cytotoxicity. PMID:26755445

  5. MAIZE YIELD AND ITS STABILITY AS AFFECTED BY TILLAGE AND CROP RESIDUE MANAGEMENT IN THE EASTERN ROMANIAN DANUBE PLAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru COCIU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rainfed crop management systems need to be optimized to provide more resilient options in order to cope with projected climatic scenarios which are forecasting a decrease in mean precipitation and more frequent extreme drought periods in the Eastern Romanian Danube Plain. This research, carried out in the period of 2011-2014, had as main purpose the determination of influence of tillage practices and residue management on rainfall use efficiency, maize yield and its stability, in order to evaluate the advantages of conservation agriculture (CA in the time of stabilization of direct seeding effects, in comparison with traditional chisel tillage. The maize grain yields are presented for each crop management practices, as follows: (1 chisel tillage, retained crop residues being chopped and incorporated (ciz; (2 zero tillage, retained crop residue chopped and kept on the field in short flat condition (rvt; (3 zero tillage, crop residues kept on the field in short root-anchored condition (1/2rva, and (4 zero tillage, crop residues kept on the field in tall root-anchored condition (1/1rva. In 2012, a year with prolonged drought during vegetative growth, yield differences between zero tillage with short root-anchored residue retention (1/2rva and chisel tillage with residue incorporation (ciz were positive, up to 840 kg ha-1. In average over 2011-2014, conservation agriculture (CA practices had a yield advantage over traditional chisel tillage practice. Zero tillage with residue retention used rainfall more efficiently so suggesting that it is a more resilient agronomic system than traditional (conventional practices involving chisel tillage with residue incorporation.

  6. Effect of the Active Site D25N Mutation on the Structure, Stability and Ligand Binding of the Mature HIV-1 Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayer, Jane M.; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M. (Pitt); (GSU)

    2008-09-03

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PR{sub D25N}) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 {+-} 0.09 {mu}m) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PR{sub D25N} in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PR{sub D25N} complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH{sub 2} (RPB), as compared with PR{center_dot}DRV and PR{center_dot}RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their T{sub m} is smaller for PR{sub D25N} (6.2 C) than for PR (8.7 C). The T{sub m} of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV increases by only 3 C relative to free PR{sub D25N}, as compared with a 22 C increase for PR{center_dot}DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV by a factor of {approx}10{sup 6} relative to PR{center_dot}DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR.

  7. Aggregate stability and associated C and N in a silty loam soil as affected by organic material inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Pan; SUI Peng; GAO Wang-sheng; WANG Bin-bin; HUANG Jian-xiong; YAN Peng; ZOU Juan-xiu; YAN Ling-ling; CHEN Yuan-quan

    2015-01-01

    To make recycling utilization of organic materials produced in various agricultural systems, ifve kinds of organic materials were applied in a ifeld test, including crop straw (CS), biogas residue (BR), mushroom residue (MR), wine residue (WR), pig manure (PM), with a mineral fertilizer (CF) and a no-fertilizer (CK) treatment as a control. Our objectives were:i) to quantify the effects of organic materials on soil C and N accumulation;i ) to evaluate the effects of organic materials on soil aggregate stability, along with the total organic carbon (TOC), and N in different aggregate fractions;and i i) to assess the relationships among the organic material components, soil C and N, and C, N in aggregate fractions. The trial was conducted in Wuqiao County, Hebei Province, China. The organic materials were incorporated at an equal rate of C, and combined with a mineral fertilizer in amounts of 150 kg N ha-1, 26 kg P ha-1 and 124 kg K ha-1 respectively during each crop season of a wheat-maize rotation system. The inputted C quantity of each organic material treatment was equivalent to the total amount of C contained in the crop straw harvested in CS treatement in the previous season. TOC, N, water-stable aggregates, and aggregate-associated TOC and N were investigated. The results showed that organic material incorpora-tion increased soil aggregation and stabilization. On average, the soil macroaggregate proportion increased by 14%, the microaggregate proportion increased by 3%, and mean-weight diameter (MWD) increased by 20%. TOC content fol owed the order of PM>WR>MR>BR>CS>CK>CF;N content fol owed the order WR>PM>MR>BR>CS>CF>CK. No signiifcant correlation was found between TOC, N, and the quality of organic material. Soil silt and clay particles contained the largest part of TOC, whereas the smal macroaggregate fraction was the most sensitive to organic materials. Our results indicate that PM and WR exerted better effects on soil C and N accumulation, fol owed by MR

  8. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. PMID:26405031

  9. Artificial climate warming positively affects arbuscular mycorrhizae but decreases soil aggregate water stability in an annual grassland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rillig, M.C.; Wright, S.F.; Shaw, M.R.; Field, C.B.

    2002-04-01

    Despite the importance of arbuscular mycorrhizae to the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems (e.g. nutrient uptake, soil aggregation), and the increasing evidence of global warming, responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to climate warming are poorly understood. In a field experiment using infrared heaters, we found effects of warming on AMF after one growing season in an annual grassland, in the absence of any effects on measured root parameters (weight, length, average diameter). AMF soil hyphal length was increased by over 40% in the warmed plots, accompanied by a strong trend for AMF root colonization increase. In the following year, root weight was again not significantly changed, and AMF root colonization increased significantly in the warmed plots. Concentration of the soil protein glomalin, a glycoprotein produced by AMF hyphae with importance in soil aggregation, was decreased in the warmed plots. Soil aggregate water stability, measured for five diameter size classes, was also decreased significantly. In the following year, soil aggregate weight in two size classes was decreased significantly, but the effect size was very small. These results indicate that ecosystem warming may have stimulated carbon allocation to AMF. Other factors either influenced glomalin decomposition or production, hence influencing the role of these symbionts in soil aggregation. The observed small changes in soil aggregation, if widespread among terrestrial ecosystems, could have important consequences for soil carbon storage and erosion in a warmed climate, especially if there are cumulative effects of warming. (au)

  10. Storage Stability of Kinnow Fruit (Citrus reticulata as Affected by CMC and Guar Gum-Based Silver Nanoparticle Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Wasim Ahmad Shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC and guargum-based coatings containing silver nanoparticles was studied on the postharvest storage stability of the kinnow mandarin (Citrus reticulata cv. Blanco for a period of 120 days (85%–90% relative humidity at 4 °C and 10 °C. Physicochemical and microbiological qualities were monitored after every 15 days of storage. Overall results revealed an increase in total soluble solid (TSS, total sugars, reducing sugars and weight loss but this increase was comparatively less significant in coated fruits stored at 4 °C. Ascorbic acid, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity was significantly enhanced in coated fruits stored at 4 °C. Titratable acidity significantly decreased during storage except for coated kinnow stored at 4 °C. In control samples stored at 10 °C, high intensity of fruit rotting and no chilling injury was observed. Total aerobic psychrotrophic bacteria and yeast and molds were noticed in all treatments during storage but the growth was not significant in coated fruits at 4 °C. Kinnow fruit can be kept in good quality after coating for four months at 4 °C and for 2 months at 10 °C.

  11. Mutational Analysis of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Protein Kinase Together with Kinome-Wide Binding and Stability Studies Suggests Context-Dependent Recognition of Kinases by the Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Tian, Ruijun; Pasculescu, Adrian; Dai, Anna Yue; Williton, Kelly; Taylor, Lorne; Savitski, Mikhail M; Bantscheff, Marcus; Woodgett, James R; Pawson, Tony; Colwill, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and cell division cycle 37 (CDC37) chaperones are key regulators of protein kinase folding and maturation. Recent evidence suggests that thermodynamic properties of kinases, rather than primary sequences, are recognized by the chaperones. In concordance, we observed a striking difference in HSP90 binding between wild-type (WT) and kinase-dead (KD) glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) forms. Using model cell lines stably expressing these two GSK3β forms, we observed no interaction between WT GSK3β and HSP90, in stark contrast to KD GSK3β forming a stable complex with HSP90 at a 1:1 ratio. In a survey of 91 ectopically expressed kinases in DLD-1 cells, we compared two parameters to measure HSP90 dependency: static binding and kinase stability following HSP90 inhibition. We observed no correlation between HSP90 binding and reduced stability of a kinase after pharmacological inhibition of HSP90. We expanded our stability study to >50 endogenous kinases across four cell lines and demonstrated that HSP90 dependency is context dependent. These observations suggest that HSP90 binds to its kinase client in a particular conformation that we hypothesize to be associated with the nucleotide-processing cycle. Lastly, we performed proteomics profiling of kinases and phosphopeptides in DLD-1 cells to globally define the impact of HSP90 inhibition on the kinome. PMID:26755559

  12. Polymorphisms at positions -22 and -348 in the promoter of the BAT1 gene affect transcription and the binding of nuclear factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Patricia; Wong, Agnes M-L; Williamson, David; Voon, Dominic; Baltic, Svetlana; Allcock, Richard J N; Boodhoo, Alvin; Christiansen, Frank T

    2004-05-01

    BAT1 (D6S81E, UAP56) lies in the central MHC between TNF and HLA-B, a region containing genes that affect susceptibility to immunopathologic disorders. BAT1 protein may be directly responsible for the genetic association, as antisense studies show it can down-regulate inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigate polymorphisms at positions -22 and -348 relative to the BAT1 transcription start site. DNA samples from healthy donors were used to confirm haplotypic associations with the type 1 diabetes-susceptible 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH; HLA-A1,B8,BAT1-22*C,BAT1-348*C,DR3 ) and the diabetes-resistant 7.1 AH (HLA-A3,B7,BAT1-22*G,BAT1-348*T,DR15). Alleles carried at BAT1-22 and -348 were in linkage disequilibrium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear proteins from T-cells (Jurkat and HT2), monocytes (THP1, U937) and epithelial cells (HeLa and MDA468) demonstrated DNA : protein complexes binding oligonucleotides spanning positions -22 and -348 on the 7.1 AH only. Competition assays, supershifts and molecular weight determinations suggest the complexes include the transcription factors YY1 (at -348) and Oct1 (at -22). Promoter activity was demonstrated using 520 bp and 336 bp fragments cloned from immediately upstream of the transcription start site and carrying all combinations of -22 and -348 alleles, suggesting an unidentified non-polymorphic sequence within 336 bp of the start site drives transcription. The 520 bp fragment of the BAT1 promoter cloned from the 8.1 AH was slightly less efficient than the equivalent from the 7.1 AH, whilst the reverse was observed with 336 bp fragments. This suggests BAT1 transcription on the 7.1 AH is modified by interactions involving DNA flanking positions -22 and -348. PMID:15028669

  13. Characterization of a clock based on coherent population trapping in a thermal cesium vapor. Main effects that may affect its mid- and long-term frequency stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes a Cs - buffer gas vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT), and the main frequency shifts affecting its mid- and long-term stability. The developed atomic clock based on CPT uses two original techniques: a so-called double-Λ scheme for the CPT-resonance excitation and a temporal Ramsey interrogation technique, which produce a high contrast and narrow resonances with reduced light shift dependence. Generally, the mid and long term stability of the vapor cell atomic clock is limited by the collisional shift induced by alkali-buffer gas collisions and the light shift (or the effects depending on the laser intensity). We report on the study of the collisional shift of Cs clock frequency in the presence of Ne, N2 or Ar buffer gas, and its temperature dependence. The coefficient values of this dependence for these three buffer gases were revealed (some of them for the first time), allowing us to realise a cell with optimal combination of buffer gases to cancel the temperature dependence around the working temperature. Following the study of the signal amplitude and the coherence relaxation rate the optimal values for such parameters as interrogation cycle, magnetic field, cell temperature, pressure of the buffer gas mixture, etc. were found for the chosen cell. The investigation on the light shift and the effects depending on the laser intensity allowed us to determine the most sensitive parameters (laser intensity ratio, temperature) and to implement the required stabilizations in order to better control them. Finally, the mid- and long-term clock frequency stability was improved by a factor 40, reaching 2.5 10-14 at 1 hour. (author)

  14. Experimentally increased temperature and hypoxia affect stability of social hierarchy and metabolism of the Amazonian cichlid Apistogramma agassizii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhann, Daiani; Campos, Derek Felipe; Val, Adalberto Luis

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal of this study was to understand how changes in temperature and oxygen could influence social behaviour and aerobic metabolism of the Amazonian dwarf cichlid Apistogramma agassizii. Social hierarchies were established over a period of 96h by observing the social interactions, feeding behaviour and shelter use in groups of four males. In the experimental environment, temperature was increased to 29°C in the high-temperature treatment, and oxygen lowered to 1.0mg·L(-1)O2 in the hypoxia treatment. Fish were maintained at this condition for 96h. The control was maintained at 26°C and 6.6mg·L(-1)O2. After the experimental exposure, metabolism was measured as routine metabolic rate (RMR) and electron transport system (ETS) activity. There was a reduction in hierarchy stability at high-temperature. Aggression changed after environmental changes. Dominant and subdominant fish at high temperatures increased their biting, compared with control-dominant. In contrast, hypoxia-dominant fish decreased their aggressive acts compared with all other fish. Shelter use decreased in control and hypoxic dominant fish. Dominant fish from undisturbed environments eat more than their subordinates. There was a decrease of RMR in fish exposed to the hypoxic environment when compared with control or high-temperature fish, independent of social position. Control-dominant fish had higher RMR than their subordinates. ETS activity increased in fish exposed to high temperatures; however, there was no effect on social rank. Our study reinforces the importance of environmental changes for the maintenance of hierarchies and their characteristics and highlights that most of the changes occur in the dominant position. PMID:26387464

  15. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David; Haugbol, Steven; Madsen, Jacob; Baaré, William; Aznar, Susana; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A...... BDNF polymorphism status is not associated with changes in the serotonergic system. Moreover, BDNF levels in blood do not correlate with either 5-HT(2A) or SERT binding.......)) receptor or serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences in 5-HT(2A) receptor or SERT binding were found between the val/val and met carriers, nor were blood BDNF values associated with SERT binding or 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. In conclusion, val66met...

  16. Factors affecting individual foraging specialization and temporal diet stability across the range of a large "generalist" apex predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam E; Nifong, James C; Heithaus, Michael R; Mazzotti, Frank J; Cherkiss, Michael S; Jeffery, Brian M; Elsey, Ruth M; Decker, Rachel A; Silliman, Brian R; Guillette, Louis J; Lowers, Russell H; Larson, Justin C

    2015-05-01

    Individual niche specialization (INS) is increasingly recognized as an important component of ecological and evolutionary dynamics. However, most studies that have investigated INS have focused on the effects of niche width and inter- and intraspecific competition on INS in small-bodied species for short time periods, with less attention paid to INS in large-bodied reptilian predators and the effects of available prey types on INS. We investigated the prevalence, causes, and consequences of INS in foraging behaviors across different populations of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), the dominant aquatic apex predator across the southeast US, using stomach contents and stable isotopes. Gut contents revealed that, over the short term, although alligator populations occupied wide ranges of the INS spectrum, general patterns were apparent. Alligator populations inhabiting lakes exhibited lower INS than coastal populations, likely driven by variation in habitat type and available prey types. Stable isotopes revealed that over longer time spans alligators exhibited remarkably consistent use of variable mixtures of carbon pools (e.g., marine and freshwater food webs). We conclude that INS in large-bodied reptilian predator populations is likely affected by variation in available prey types and habitat heterogeneity, and that INS should be incorporated into management strategies to efficiently meet intended goals. Also, ecological models, which typically do not consider behavioral variability, should include INS to increase model realism and applicability. PMID:25645268

  17. Pot1通过泛素化修饰影响自身的稳定性%The Stability of Pot1 Affected by the Ubiquitinytion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丹丹; 金蕊; 张金丁; 王亚楠; 黄君健; 魏道智

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究Pot1蛋白的稳定性。方法:利用慢病毒表达载体构建表达外源Flag-Pot1的HeLa细胞稳定克隆,在该克隆中加入CHX抑制新蛋白的合成,检测外源Pot1的半衰期,确定Pot1的稳定性;将Pot1质粒与Ub质粒共转293T细胞后,加入MG132阻止蛋白酶体途径,确定Pot1的稳定性是否受泛素化修饰的影响;构建点突变和截短突变的Pot1质粒,与Ub质粒共转293T细胞后,加入MG132阻止蛋白酶体途径,确定影响Pot1稳定性的区域。结果与结论:Pot1通过泛素化修饰影响自身稳定性;点突变和截断突变实验证实Pot1存在多个泛素化位点,且主要发生在C端400~634位氨基酸残基。%Objective: To study the stability of Pot1. Methods: The stability of Pot1 expression, the half life pe⁃riod of Pot1 expression, in HeLa cells infected retroviruses express Flag-Pot1, was detected after CHX was added to inhibite new proteins expression. In order to validate the relationship between the ubiquitinylation and the stabil⁃ity of Pot1, MG132 was used to prohibit proteasomes after the cotransfection of Pot1 plasmid and Ub plasmid in 293T cells, and then the expression of Pot1 was detected by Western blot. Point mutation and deletion plasmids of Pot1 were constructed, and then were cotransfected in 293T cells with Ub plasmid before MG132 was used to prohibit proteasomes to study definitely the region which affected the stability of Pot1. Results & Conclusion:The stability of Pot1 is affected by ubiquitinytion, and the key region is in 400~634 of Pot1 protein sequence.

  18. Revised stability constant, spectroscopic properties and binding mode of Zn(II) to FluoZin-3, the most common zinc probe in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszałek, I; Krężel, A; Goch, W; Zhukov, I; Paczkowska, I; Bal, W

    2016-08-01

    2-[2-[2-[2-[bis(carboxylatomethyl)amino]-5-methoxyphenoxy]ethoxy]-4-(2,7-difluoro-3-oxido-6-oxo-4a,9a-dihydroxanthen-9-yl)anilino]acetate (FluoZin-3) is used very broadly in life sciences as intra- and extracellular Zn(II) sensor selective for Zn(II) over Co(II), Ca(II) and Mg(II) ions at their physiological concentrations. It has been used for determination of relative and absolute levels of exchangeable Zn(II) in cells and extracellular fluids. Despite its popularity, the knowledge of its acid/base and Zn(II) coordination abilities and of its spectroscopic properties remained very limited. Also the published conditional dissociation constant ((C)Kd) values at pH7.4 are slightly discrepant, (15nM or 8.9nM). In this work we determined the (C)Kd for Zn(II) complexation by FluoZin-3 at pH7.4 with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as competitor using two independent methods: fluorimetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. For the first time, we investigated FluoZin-3 alone and complexed with Zn(II) in the wide range of pH, determining the total of eight pKa values from fluorescence spectra and from various regions of UV-Vis spectra. The validated values of (C)Kd (9.1±0.4nM; -log (C)Kd=8.04) and of the absolute (pH-independent) stability constant log βZnL (8.16±0.05) were provided by fluorescence spectroscopy experiments performed at 1μM concentrations. Our experiments demonstrated that both of aminocarboxylate moieties of FluoZin-3 bind the Zn(II) ion synergistically. PMID:27216451

  19. Apolipoprotein AI tertiary structures determine stability and phospholipid-binding activity of discoidal high-density lipoprotein particles of different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Ren, Xuefeng; Neville, Tracey; Jerome, W Gray; Hoyt, David W; Sparks, Daniel; Ren, Gang; Wang, Jianjun

    2009-05-01

    Human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a key role in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway that delivers excess cholesterol back to the liver for clearance. In vivo, HDL particles vary in size, shape and biological function. The discoidal HDL is a 140-240 kDa, disk-shaped intermediate of mature HDL. During mature spherical HDL formation, discoidal HDLs play a key role in loading cholesterol ester onto the HDL particles by activating the enzyme, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). One of the major problems for high-resolution structural studies of discoidal HDL is the difficulty in obtaining pure and, foremost, homogenous sample. We demonstrate here that the commonly used cholate dialysis method for discoidal HDL preparation usually contains 5-10% lipid-poor apoAI that significantly interferes with the high-resolution structural analysis of discoidal HDL using biophysical methods. Using an ultracentrifugation method, we quickly removed lipid-poor apoAI. We also purified discoidal reconstituted HDL (rHDL) into two pure discoidal HDL species of different sizes that are amendable for high-resolution structural studies. A small rHDL has a diameter of 7.6 nm, and a large rHDL has a diameter of 9.8 nm. We show that these two different sizes of discoidal HDL particles display different stability and phospholipid-binding activity. Interestingly, these property/functional differences are independent from the apoAI alpha-helical secondary structure, but are determined by the tertiary structural difference of apoAI on different discoidal rHDL particles, as evidenced by two-dimensional NMR and negative stain electron microscopy data. Our result further provides the first high-resolution NMR data, demonstrating a promise of structural determination of discoidal HDL at atomic resolution using a combination of NMR and other biophysical techniques. PMID:19384992

  20. Structural stability of Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilms is reliant on eDNA structure and presence of a bacterial nucleic acid binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Novotny

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common lethal inherited genetic disorder affection Caucasians. Even with medical advances, CF is life-shortening with patients typically surviving only to age 38. Infection of the CF lung by Burkholderia cenocepacia presents exceptional challenges to medical management of these patients as clinically this microbe is resistant to virtually all antibiotics, is highly transmissible and infection of CF patients with this microbe renders them ineligible for lung transplant, often the last lifesaving option. Here we have targeted two abundant components of the B. cenocepacia biofilm for immune intervention: extracellular DNA and DNABII proteins, the latter of which are bacterial nucleic acid binding proteins. Treatment of B. cenocepacia biofilms with antiserum directed at one of these DNABII proteins (integration host factor or IHF resulted in significant disruption of the biofilm. Moreover, when anti-IHF mediated destabilization of a B. cenocepacia biofilm was combined with exposure to traditional antibiotics, B. cenocepacia resident within the biofilm and thereby typically highly resistant to the action of antibiotics, were now rendered susceptible to killing. Pre-incubation of B. cenocepacia with anti-IHF serum prior to exposure to murine CF macrophages, which are normally unable to effectively degrade ingested B. cenocepacia, resulted in a statistically significant increase in killing of phagocytized B. cenocepacia. Collectively, these findings support further development of strategies that target DNABII proteins as a novel approach for treatment of CF patients, particularly those whose lungs are infected with B. cenocepacia.

  1. Expression, Purification, and Biochemical Characterization of the Antiinflammatory Tristetraprolin: A Zinc-Dependent mRNA Binding Protein Affected by Posttranslational Modifications†,‡

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Heping

    2004-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a hyperphosphorylated protein that destabilizes mRNA by binding to an AU-rich element (ARE). Mice deficient in TTP develop a severe inflammatory syndrome. The biochemical properties of TTP have not been adequately characterized, due to the difficulties in protein purification and lack of a high-titer antiserum. Full-length human TTP was expressed in human HEK293 cells and purified to at least 70% homogeneity. The purified protein was free of endogenous ARE binding act...

  2. The Factors Affecting the Counting Stability of the Spark Counter%影响火花计数器计数稳定性的因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝启辰; 过惠平; 王洪超

    2013-01-01

    设计不同的实验,对影响火花计数器计数稳定性的因素进行了研究.主要包括稳压块重量、CR-39的蚀刻情况、清扫电压以及电极表面的光滑程度.通过实验找到了适合CR-39在火花计数器上进行稳定径迹判读的工作条件.%The factors what affect the counting stability of the spark counter including the heft, the CR-39 etched, cleaning voltage and the electrode surface smoothness have been studied by the different experiments.And the best methods for the spark counter are found to interpret well.

  3. The propagation of binding interactions to remote sites in proteins: analysis of the binding of the monoclonal antibody D1.3 to lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, E

    1999-08-31

    The interaction of a ligand with a protein occurs at a local site (the binding site) and involves only a few residues; however, the effects of that interaction are often propagated to remote locations. The chain of events initiated by binding provides the basis for fundamental biological phenomena such as allosterism, signal transduction, and structural-stability modification. In this paper, a structure-based statistical thermodynamic approach is presented and used to predict the propagation of the stabilization effects triggered by the binding of the monoclonal antibody D1.3 to hen egg white lysozyme. Previously, Williams et al. [Williams, D. C., Benjamin, D. C., Poljak, R. J. & Rule, G. S. (1996) J. Mol. Biol. 257, 866-876] showed that the binding of this antibody affects the stability of hen egg white lysozyme and that the binding effects propagate to a selected number of residues at remote locations from the binding epitope. In this paper, we show that this phenomenon can be predicted from structure. The formalism presented here permits the identification of the structural path followed by cooperative interactions that originate at the binding site. It is shown that an important condition for the propagation of binding effects to distal regions is the presence of a significant fraction of residues with low structural stability in the uncomplexed binding site. A survey of protein structures indicates that many binding sites have a dual character and are defined by regions of high and low structural stabilities. The low-stability regions might be involved in the transmission of binding information to other regions in the protein. PMID:10468572

  4. C4b-binding protein is present in affected areas of myocardial infarction during the acute inflammatory phase and covers a larger area than C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leendert A Trouw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During myocardial infarction reduced blood flow in the heart muscle results in cell death. These dying/dead cells have been reported to bind several plasma proteins such as IgM and C-reactive protein (CRP. In the present study we investigated whether fluid-phase complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP would also bind to the infarcted heart tissue. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Initial studies using immunohistochemistry on tissue arrays for several cardiovascular disorders indicated that C4BP can be found in heart tissue in several cardiac diseases but that it is most abundantly found in acute myocardial infarction (AMI. This condition was studied in more detail by analyzing the time window and extent of C4BP positivity. The binding of C4BP correlates to the same locations as C3b, a marker known to correlate to the patterns of IgM and CRP staining. Based on criteria that describe the time after infarction we were able to pinpoint that C4BP binding is a relatively early marker of tissue damage in myocardial infarction with a peak of binding between 12 hours and 5 days subsequent to AMI, the phase in which infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes in the heart is the most extensive. CONCLUSIONS: C4BP, an important fluid-phase inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathway of complement activation binds to jeopardized cardiomyocytes early after AMI and co-localizes to other well known markers such as C3b.

  5. The thermodynamic stability of insulin disulfides is not affected by the C-domain of insulin-like growth factor 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭占云; 冯佑民

    2002-01-01

    Both Insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 are members of insulin superfamily. They share homologous primary and tertiary structure as well as weakly overlapping biological activity. However, their folding behavior is different: insulin and its recombinant precursor (PIP) fold into one unique tertiary structure, while IGF-1 folds into two disulfides isomers with similar thermodynamic stability. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of their different folding behavior, we prepared a single-chain hybrid of insulin and IGF-1, [B10Glu]Ins/IGF-1(C), and studied its folding behavior compared with that of PIP and IGF-1. We also separated a major non-native disulfides isomer of the hybrid and studied its refolding. The data showed that the C-domain of IGF-1 did not affect the folding thermodynamics of insulin, that is, the primary structure of the hybrid encoded only one thermodynamically stable disulfides linkage. However, the folding kinetics of insulin was affected by the C-domain of IGF-1.

  6. Mutation of light-dependent phosphorylation sites of the Drosophila transient receptor potential-like (TRPL) ion channel affects its subcellular localization and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Alexander C; Oberacker, Tina; Pfannstiel, Jens; Weigold, Sebastian; Will, Carina; Huber, Armin

    2013-05-31

    The Drosophila phototransduction cascade terminates in the opening of the ion channel transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL). Contrary to TRP, TRPL undergoes light-dependent subcellular trafficking between rhabdomeric photoreceptor membranes and an intracellular storage compartment, resulting in long term light adaptation. Here, we identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of TRPL that affect TRPL stability and localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed a light-dependent change in the TRPL phosphorylation pattern. Mutation of eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites neither affected multimerization of the channels nor the electrophysiological response of flies expressing the mutated channels. However, these mutations resulted in mislocalization and enhanced degradation of TRPL after prolonged dark-adaptation. Mutation of subsets of the eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites also led to a reduction of TRPL content and partial mislocalization in the dark. This suggests that a light-dependent switch in the phosphorylation pattern of the TRPL channel mediates stable expression of TRPL in the rhabdomeres upon prolonged dark-adaptation. PMID:23592784

  7. Mutation of Light-dependent Phosphorylation Sites of the Drosophila Transient Receptor Potential-like (TRPL) Ion Channel Affects Its Subcellular Localization and Stability*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Oberacker, Tina; Pfannstiel, Jens; Weigold, Sebastian; Will, Carina; Huber, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila phototransduction cascade terminates in the opening of the ion channel transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL). Contrary to TRP, TRPL undergoes light-dependent subcellular trafficking between rhabdomeric photoreceptor membranes and an intracellular storage compartment, resulting in long term light adaptation. Here, we identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of TRPL that affect TRPL stability and localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed a light-dependent change in the TRPL phosphorylation pattern. Mutation of eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites neither affected multimerization of the channels nor the electrophysiological response of flies expressing the mutated channels. However, these mutations resulted in mislocalization and enhanced degradation of TRPL after prolonged dark-adaptation. Mutation of subsets of the eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites also led to a reduction of TRPL content and partial mislocalization in the dark. This suggests that a light-dependent switch in the phosphorylation pattern of the TRPL channel mediates stable expression of TRPL in the rhabdomeres upon prolonged dark-adaptation. PMID:23592784

  8. The actin-binding proteins eps8 and gelsolin have complementary roles in regulating the growth and stability of mechanosensory hair bundles of mammalian cochlear outer hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Olt

    Full Text Available Sound transduction depends upon mechanosensitive channels localized on the hair-like bundles that project from the apical surface of cochlear hair cells. Hair bundles show a stair-case structure composed of rows of stereocilia, and each stereocilium contains a core of tightly-packed and uniformly-polarized actin filaments. The growth and maintenance of the stereociliary actin core are dynamically regulated. Recently, it was shown that the actin-binding protein gelsolin is expressed in the stereocilia of outer hair cells (OHCs and in its absence they become long and straggly. Gelsolin is part of a whirlin scaffolding protein complex at the stereocilia tip, which has been shown to interact with other actin regulatory molecules such as Eps8. Here we investigated the physiological effects associated with the absence of gelsolin and its possible overlapping role with Eps8. We found that, in contrast to Eps8, gelsolin does not affect mechanoelectrical transduction during immature stages of development. Moreover, OHCs from gelsolin knockout mice were able to mature into fully functional sensory receptors as judged by the normal resting membrane potential and basolateral membrane currents. Mechanoelectrical transducer current in gelsolin-Eps8 double knockout mice showed a profile similar to that observed in the single mutants for Eps8. We propose that gelsolin has a non-overlapping role with Eps8. While Eps8 is mainly involved in the initial growth of stereocilia in both inner hair cells (IHCs and OHCs, gelsolin is required for the maintenance of mature hair bundles of low-frequency OHCs after the onset of hearing.

  9. Conserved retinoblastoma protein-binding motif in human cytomegalovirus UL97 kinase minimally impacts viral replication but affects susceptibility to maribavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou Sunwen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The UL97 kinase has been shown to phosphorylate and inactivate the retinoblastoma protein (Rb and has three consensus Rb-binding motifs that might contribute to this activity. Recombinant viruses containing mutations in the Rb-binding motifs generally replicated well in human foreskin fibroblasts with only a slight delay in replication kinetics. Their susceptibility to the specific UL97 kinase inhibitor, maribavir, was also examined. Mutation of the amino terminal motif, which is involved in the inactivation of Rb, also renders the virus hypersensitive to the drug and suggests that the motif may play a role in its mechanism of action.

  10. How Do Structure and Charge Affect Metal-Complex Binding to DNA? An Upper-Division Integrated Laboratory Project Using Cyclic Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulczynska, Agnieszka; Johnson, Reed; Frost, Tony; Margerum, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory project is described that integrates inorganic, analytical, physical, and biochemical techniques to reveal differences in binding between cationic metal complexes and anionic DNA (herring testes). Students were guided to formulate testable hypotheses based on the title question and a list of different metal…

  11. Changes in ganglioside content affect the binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin to detergent-resistant membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Seiko; Tamai, Eiji; Matsushita, Osamu; Minami, Junzaburo; Okabe, Akinobu; Miyata, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Epsilon-toxin (ET) of Clostridium perfringens, which causes fatal enterotoxemia in ungulates, was previously shown to bind to and form a heptameric pore within the detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) of MDCK cells. Depletion of cholesterol has also been shown to decrease the cytotoxicity of ET and its heptamerization. In this study, we investigated the effects of changes in sphingolipids, other DRM components of MDCK cells, on the cells' susceptibility to ET. Treatment with fumonisin B1 and PDMP, inhibitors of sphingolipid and glycosphingolipid syntheses, respectively, increased the susceptibility, while D609, a sphingomyelin synthesis inhibitor, had the opposite effect. The exogenous addition of ganglioside G(M1) dramatically decreased the ET binding, heptamerization and cytotoxicity. These effects were shown not to be due to ET binding to G(M1) or to denaturation of ET. We also found that the ET cytotoxicity towards MDCK cells decreased with an increase in culture time. In accordance with the resistance observed for prolonged cultured cells, G(M3), a major ganglioside component, increased and sialidase treatment increased their susceptibility. These results suggest that membrane-anchored sialic acid of G(M3) within DRMs inhibits ET binding, leading to prevention of the heptamerization of ET and cell death. It is also suggested that sialidase produced by this organism aids the targeting of ET to MDCK cells. PMID:15781998

  12. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/nv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Daniel McCarthy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Our perception of an object’s size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour – a binding ring – and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size.

  13. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/12q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Daniel McCarthy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Our perception of an object’s size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour – a binding ring – and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size.

  14. MD and NMR analyses of choline and TMA binding to duplex DNA: on the origins of aberrant sequence-dependent stability by alkyl cations in aqueous and water-free solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portella, Guillem; Germann, Markus W; Hud, Nicholas V; Orozco, Modesto

    2014-02-26

    It has been known for decades that alkylammonium ions, such as tetramethyl ammonium (TMA), alter the usual correlation between DNA GC-content and duplex stability. In some cases it is even possible for an AT-rich duplex to be more stable than a GC-rich duplex of the same length. There has been much speculation regarding the origin of this aberration in sequence-dependent DNA duplex stability, but no clear resolution. Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy we demonstrate that choline (2-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium) and TMA are preferentially localized in the minor groove of DNA duplexes at A·T base pairs and these same ions show less pronounced localization in the major groove compared to what has been demonstrated for alkali and alkali earth metal ions. Furthermore, free energy calculations show that single-stranded GC-rich sequences exhibit more favorable solvation by choline than single-stranded AT-rich sequences. The sequence-specific nature of choline and TMA binding provides a rationale for the enhanced stability of AT-rich sequences when alkyl-ammonium ions are used as the counterions of DNA. Our combined theoretical and experimental study provides one of the most detailed pictures to date of cations localized along DNA in the solution state, and provides insights that go beyond understanding alkyl-ammonium ion binding to DNA. In particular, because choline and TMA bind to DNA in a manner that is found to be distinct from that previously reported for Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), our results reveal the important but underappreciated role that most other cations play in sequence-specific duplex stability. PMID:24490755

  15. N-Glycosylation of Human R-Spondin 1 Is Required for Efficient Secretion and Stability but Not for Its Heparin Binding Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Fang; Hsu, Li-Sung; Weng, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chih-Kai; Wang, Shu-Ying; Chou, Yi-Hwa; Liu, Yan-Yu; Yuan, Zi-Xiu; Huang, Wen-Ying; Lin, Ho; Chen, Yau-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Ning

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin 1 (Rspo1) plays an essential role in stem cell biology by potentiating Wnt signaling activity. Despite the fact that Rspo1 holds therapeutic potential for a number of diseases, its biogenesis is not fully elucidated. All Rspo proteins feature two amino-terminal furin-like repeats, which are responsible for Wnt signal potentiation, and a thrombospondin type 1 (TSR1) domain that can provide affinity towards heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Using chemical inhibitors, deglycosylase and site-directed mutagenesis, we found that human Rspo1 and Rspo3 are both N-glycosylated at N137, a site near the C-terminus of the furin repeat 2 domain, and Rspo2 is N-glycosylated at N160, a position near the N-terminus of TSR1 domain. Elimination of N-glycosylation at these sites affects their accumulation in media but have no effect on the ability towards heparin. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site to Rspo2 mutant at the position homologous to N137 in Rspo1 restored full glycosylation and rescued the accumulation defect of nonglycosylated Rspo2 mutant in media. Similar effect can be observed in the N137 Rspo1 or Rspo3 mutant engineered with Rspo2 N-glycosylation site. The results highlight the importance of N-glycosylation at these two positions in efficient folding and secretion of Rspo family. Finally, we further showed that human Rspo1 is subjected to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control in N-glycan-dependent manner. While N-glycan of Rspo1 plays a role in its intracellular stability, it had little effect on secreted Rspo1. Our findings provide evidence for the critical role of N-glycosylation in the biogenesis of Rspo1. PMID:27314333

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.; Landry, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-te...

  17. Upstream binding factor stabilizes Rib 1, the TATA-binding-protein-containing Xenopus laevis RNA polymerase I transcription factor, by multiple protein interactions in a DNA-independent manner.

    OpenAIRE

    Bodeker, M; Cairns, C; McStay, B

    1996-01-01

    Initiation of RNA polymerase I transcription in Xenopus laevis requires Rib 1 and upstream binding factor (UBF). UBF and Rib 1 combine to form a stable transcription complex on the Xenopus ribosomal gene promoter. Here we show that Rib 1 comprises TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factor components. Thus, Rib 1 is the Xenopus equivalent of mammalian SL 1. In contrast to SL 1, Rib 1 is an unstable complex that readily dissociates into TBP and associated components. We identify a no...

  18. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the extra-cellular space affects proliferation, differentiation and morphogenetic events regulated by the two molecules

    OpenAIRE

    R. Scardigli; Cargiolo, C; Tosoni, D.; Borello, U; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Sciorati, C.; Cannata, S.; E. Clementi; Brunelli, S.; Cossu, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh) to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane rece...

  19. Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 oC resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO2 g VS-1 day-1. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 oC for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L-1 d-1 and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO2 at a rate lower than 25 mg CO2 g VS-1 d-1 after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO2 g VS-1 d-1. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

  20. Insight Into Folding,Binding and Stability of Insulin by NMR%胰岛素折叠、结合与稳定性的核磁共振研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华庆新

    2004-01-01

    Insulin is one of the most important hormonal regulators of metabolism. Since the diabetes patients increase dramatically, the chemical properties, biological and physiological effects of insulin had been extensively studied. In last decade the development of NMR technique allowed us to determine the solution structures of insulin and its variety mutants in various conditions, so that the knowledge of folding, binding and stability of insulin in solution have been largely increased. The solution structure of insulin monomers is essentially identical to those of insulin monomers within the dimer and hexamer as determined by X-ray diffraction. The studies of insulin mutants at the putative residues for receptor binding explored the possible conformational change and fitting between insulin and its receptor. The systematical studies of disulfide paring coupled insulin folding intermediates revealed that in spite of the conformational variety of the intermediates, one structural feature is always remained: a "native-like B chain super-secondary structure", which consists of B9-B19 helix with adjoining B23-B26 segment folded back against the central segment of B chain, an internal cystine A20-B19 disulfide bridge and a short α-helix at C-terminal of A chain linked. The "super-secondary structure" might be the "folding nucleus" in insulin folding mechanism. Cystine A20-B19 is the most important one among three disulfides to stabilize the nascent polypeptide in early stage of the folding. The NMR structure of C.elegans insulin-like peptide resembles that of human insulin and the peptide interacts with human insulin receptor. Other members of insulin super-family adopt the "insulin fold" mostly. The structural study of insulin-insulin receptor complex, that of C.elegans and other invertebrate insulin-like peptide, insulin fibril study and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) assistant proinsulin folding study will be new topics in future to get insight into folding, binding

  1. Cleavage of the sarcin–ricin loop of 23S rRNA differentially affects EF-G and EF-Tu binding

    OpenAIRE

    García-Ortega, Lucía; Álvarez-García, Elisa; Gavilanes, José G.; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Joseph, Simpson

    2010-01-01

    Ribotoxins are potent inhibitors of protein biosynthesis and inactivate ribosomes from a variety of organisms. The ribotoxin α-sarcin cleaves the large 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at the universally conserved sarcin–ricin loop (SRL) leading to complete inactivation of the ribosome and cellular death. The SRL interacts with translation factors that hydrolyze GTP, and it is important for their binding to the ribosome, but its precise role is not yet understood. We studied the effect of α-sarcin on...

  2. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the extra-cellular space affects proliferation, differentiation and morphogenetic events regulated by the two molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Scardigli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane receptors belonging to the Frizzled family, several other molecules have been described which share homology in the CRD domain and lack the putative trans-membrane domain, such as sFRP molecules (soluble Frizzled Related Protein. Among them, sFRP-3 was originally isolated from bovine articular cartilage and also as a component of the Spemann organizer. sFRP-3 blocks Wnt-8 induced axis duplication in Xenopus embryos and binds to the surface of cells expressing a membrane-anchored form of Wnt-1. Injection of sFRP-3 mRNA blocks expression of XMyoD mRNA and leads to embryos with enlarged heads and shortened trunks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that sFRP-3 specifically blocks EGF-induced fibroblast proliferation and foci formation. Over-expression of sFRP-3 reverts EGF-mediated inhibition of hair follicle development in the mouse ectoderm while its ablation in Xenopus maintains EGF-mediated inhibition of ectoderm differentiation. Conversely, over-expression of EGF reverts the inhibition of somitic myogenesis and axis truncation in Xenopus and mouse embryos caused by sFRP-3. In vitro experiments demonstrated a direct binding of EGF to sFRP-3 both on heparin and on the surface of CHO cells where the molecule had been membrane anchored. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: sFRP-3 and EGF reciprocally inhibit their effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis and indeed are expressed in contiguous domains of the embryo, suggesting that in

  3. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part I. Importance of hydrophobic interactions in stabilization of β-hairpin structure

    OpenAIRE

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Makowska, Joanna; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously studied a 16-amino acid-residue fragment of the C-terminal β-hairpin (residues 46–61), [IG(46–61)], of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, and found that hydrophobic interactions and the turn region play an important role in stabilizing the structure. Based on these results, we carried out systematic structural studies of peptides derived from the sequence of IG(46–61) by systematically shortening the peptide by one residue at a time from bo...

  4. Deciphering Ligand Specificity of a Clostridium thermocellum Family 35 Carbohydrate Binding Module (CtCBM35) for Gluco- and Galacto- Substituted Mannans and Its Calcium Induced Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Arabinda; Luís, Ana Sofia; Brás, Joana L. A.; Pathaw, Neeta; Nikhil K. Chrungoo; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Goyal, Arun

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the role of CBM35 from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM35) in polysaccharide recognition. CtCBM35 was cloned into pET28a (+) vector with an engineered His6 tag and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. A homogenous 15 kDa protein was purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography (IMAC). Ligand binding analysis of CtCBM35 was carried out by affinity electrophoresis using various soluble ligands. CtCBM35 showed a manno-configured ligand specific binding displ...

  5. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    OpenAIRE

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C f...

  6. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. I. Importance of hydrophobic interactions in stabilization of beta-hairpin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Makowska, Joanna; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-06-01

    We previously studied a 16-amino acid-residue fragment of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of the B3 domain (residues 46-61), [IG(46-61)] of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, and found that hydrophobic interactions and the turn region play an important role in stabilizing the structure. Based on these results, we carried out systematic structural studies of peptides derived from the sequence of IG (46-61) by systematically shortening the peptide by one residue at a time from both the C- and the N-terminus. To determine the structure and stability of two resulting 12- and 14-amino acid-residue peptides, IG(48-59) and IG(47-60), respectively, we carried out circular dichroism, NMR, and calorimetric studies of these peptides in pure water. Our results show that IG(48-59) possesses organized three-dimensional structure stabilized by hydrophobic interactions (Tyr50-Phe57 and Trp48-Val59) at T = 283 and 305 K. At T = 313 K, the structure breaks down because of increased chain entropy, but the turn region is preserved in the same position observed for the structure of the whole protein. The breakdown of structure occurs near the melting temperature of this peptide (T(m) = 310 K) measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The melting temperature of IG(47-60) determined by DSC is T(m) = 330 K and its structure is similar to that of the native beta-hairpin at all (lower) temperatures examined (283-313 K). Both of these truncated sequences are conserved in all known amino acid sequences of the B domains of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from bacteria. Thus, this study contributes to an understanding of the mechanism of folding of this whole family of proteins, and provides information about the mechanism of formation and stabilization of a beta-hairpin structural element. PMID:19089955

  7. The protein binding substance Ibuprofen does not affect the T1 time or partition coefficient in contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawel Nadine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR with T1 mapping enables quantification of diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Various factors, however, can interfere with T1 measurements. The purpose of the current study was to assess the effect of co-medication with a typical protein binding drug (Ibuprofen on T1 values in vitro and in vivo. Methods 50 vials were prepared with different concentrations of gadobenate dimeglumine, Ibuprofen and human serum albumin in physiologic NaCl solution and imaged at 1.5T with a spin echo sequence at multiple TRs to measure T1 values and calculate relaxivities. 10 volunteers (5 men; 31±6.3 years were imaged at 1.5T. T1 values for myocardium and blood pool were determined for various time points after administration of 0.15mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine using a modified look-locker inversion-recovery sequence before and after administration of Ibuprofen over 24 hours. The partition coefficient was calculated as ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood, where R1=1/T1. Results In vitro no significant correlation was found between relaxivity and Ibuprofen concentration, neither in absence (r=−0.15, p=0.40 nor in presence of albumin (r=−0.32, p=0.30. In vivo there was no significant difference in post contrast T1 times of myocardium and blood, respectively and also in the partition coefficient between exam 1 and 2 (p>0.05. There was good agreement of the T1 times of myocardium and blood and the partition coefficient, respectively between exam 1 and 2. Conclusions Contrast enhanced T1 mapping is unaffected by co-medication with the protein binding substance Ibuprofen and has an excellent reproducibility.

  8. Nutritional Control of mRNA Stability Is Mediated by a Conserved AU-rich Element That Binds the Cytoplasmic Shuttling Protein HuR*

    OpenAIRE

    Yaman, Ibrahim; Fernandez, James; Sarkar, Bedabrata; Schneider, Robert J.; Snider, Martin D.; Nagy, Laura E.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The cationic amino acid transporter, Cat-1, is a high affinity transporter of the essential amino acids, arginine and lysine. Expression of the cat-1 gene increases during nutritional stress as part of the adaptive response to starvation. Amino acid limitation induces coordinate increases in stability and translation of the cat-1 mRNA, at a time when global protein synthesis decreases. It is shown here that increased cat-1 mRNA stability requires an 11 nucleotide AU-rich element within the di...

  9. Control of mRNA stability contributes to low levels of nuclear poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABPN1) in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Apponi, Luciano H.; Corbett, Anita H.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The nuclear poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABPN1) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that plays critical roles at multiple steps in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Short expansions of the polyalanine tract in the N-terminus of PABPN1 lead to oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), which is an adult onset disease characterized by eyelid drooping, difficulty in swallowing, and weakness in the proximal limb muscles. Why alanine-expanded PABPN1 leads to muscle-spec...

  10. Temperature and pressure dependence of protein stability: The engineered fluorescein-binding lipocalin FluA shows an elliptic phase diagram

    OpenAIRE

    Wiedersich, Johannes; Köhler, Simone; Skerra, Arne; Friedrich, Josef

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the equilibrium constant for the denaturation transition of the engineered fluorescein-binding lipocalin FluA as a function of pressure and temperature, taking advantage of the fact that the ligand's fluorescence is almost fully quenched when complexed with the folded protein, but reversibly reappears on denaturation. From the equilibrium constant as a function of pressure and temperature all of the involved thermodynamic parameters of protein folding, in particular the chang...

  11. Site-specific binding of a PPR protein defines and stabilizes 5′ and 3′ mRNA termini in chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Pfalz, Jeannette; Bayraktar, Omer Ali; Prikryl, Jana; Barkan, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast mRNA populations are characterized by overlapping transcripts derived by processing from polycistronic precursors. The mechanisms and functional significance of these processing events are poorly understood. We describe a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein, PPR10, whose binding defines mRNA segments derived from two transcription units in maize chloroplasts. PPR10 interacts in vivo and in vitro with two intergenic RNA regions of similar sequence. The processed 5′ and 3′ RNA te...

  12. Host factor I, Hfq, binds to Escherichia coli ompA mRNA in a growth rate-dependent fashion and regulates its stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vytvytska, O; Jakobsen, J S; Balcunaite, G;

    1998-01-01

    ompA was purified and identified as Hfq, a host factor initially recognized for its function in phage Qbeta replication. The ompA RNA-binding activity parallels the amount of Hfq, which is elevated in bacteria cultured at slow growth rate, a condition leading to facilitated degradation of the ompA m...... results suggest a regulatory role for Hfq that specifically facilitates the ompA mRNA degradation in a growth rate-dependent manner....

  13. Effects of Cu(II) and cisplatin on the stability of Specific protein 1 (Sp1)-DNA binding: Insights into the regulation of copper homeostasis and platinum drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong; Aiba, Isamu; Chen, Helen H W; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2016-08-01

    The human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) transports both Cu(I) and cisplatin (cDDP). Because Cu deficiency is lethal yet Cu overload is poisonous, hCtr1 expression is transcriptionally upregulated in response to Cu deficiency but is downregulated under Cu replete conditions in controlling Cu homeostasis. The up- and down-regulation of hCtr1 is regulated by Specific protein 1 (Sp1), which itself is also correspondingly regulated under these Cu conditions. hCtr1 expression is also upregulated by cDDP via upregulation of Sp1. The underlying mechanisms of these regulations are unknown. Using gel-electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrated here that Sp1-DNA binding affinity is reduced under Cu replete conditions but increased under reduced Cu conditions. Similarly, Sp1-DNA binding affinity is increased by cDDP treatment. This in vitro system demonstrated, for the first time, that regulation of Sp1/hCtr1 expression by these agents is modulated by the stability of Sp1-DNA binding, the first step in the Sp1-mediated transcriptional regulation process. PMID:27172866

  14. Odorant-binding proteins OBP57d and OBP57e affect taste perception and host-plant preference in Drosophila sechellia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsuo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite its morphological similarity to the other species in the Drosophila melanogaster species complex, D. sechellia has evolved distinct physiological and behavioral adaptations to its host plant Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as Tahitian Noni. The odor of the ripe fruit of M. citrifolia originates from hexanoic and octanoic acid. D. sechellia is attracted to these two fatty acids, whereas the other species in the complex are repelled. Here, using interspecies hybrids between D. melanogaster deficiency mutants and D. sechellia, we showed that the Odorant-binding protein 57e (Obp57e gene is involved in the behavioral difference between the species. D. melanogaster knock-out flies for Obp57e and Obp57d showed altered behavioral responses to hexanoic acid and octanoic acid. Furthermore, the introduction of Obp57d and Obp57e from D. simulans and D. sechellia shifted the oviposition site preference of D. melanogaster Obp57d/e(KO flies to that of the original species, confirming the contribution of these genes to D. sechellia's specialization to M. citrifolia. Our finding of the genes involved in host-plant determination may lead to further understanding of mechanisms underlying taste perception, evolution of plant-herbivore interactions, and speciation.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis reveals that GTP binding affects the interaction between the α- and γ-subunits of translation initiation factor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryotic and archaeal translation initiation factors 2, heterotrimers that consist of α-, β-, and γ-subunits, deliver methionylated initiator tRNA to a small ribosomal subunit in a manner that depends on GTP. To evaluate correlation of the function and association of the subunits, we used isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the thermodynamics of the interactions between the α- and γ-subunits in the presence or absence of a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog or GDP. The α-subunits bound to the γ-subunit with large heat capacity change (ΔCp) values. The ΔH and ΔCp values for the interaction between the α- and γ-subunits varied in the presence of the GTP analog but not in the presence of GDP. These results suggest that the binding of both the α-subunit and GTP changes the conformation of the switch region of the γ-subunit and increases the affinity of the γ-subunit for tRNA

  16. Factors Affecting the Oxidative Stability of Foods-Interesterified Soybean Oil with High Intensity Ultrasound Treatment and Trona Mineral in Packaged Fresh Meats

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jiwon

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation in oils and muscle foods has been studied for many years to understand its mechanism and furthermore to control and manage it. A series of different processing steps or different packaging techniques can alter oxidative stability. The objective of the current study was to examine oxidative stability of processed oil and to evaluate the effect of carbon dioxide generating mineral on quality of beef and chicken under different storage conditions. In Study 1 (Chapter 3), the effect of ...

  17. The MobM relaxase domain of plasmid pMV158: thermal stability and activity upon Mn2+ and specific DNA binding

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo-Diaz, F.; Dostal, L.; Coll, M.; Schildbach, J. F.; Menendez, M.; Espinosa, M

    2011-01-01

    Protein MobM, the relaxase involved in conjugative transfer of the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, is the prototype of the MOB(V) superfamily of relaxases. To characterize the DNA-binding and nicking domain of MobM, a truncated version of the protein (MobMN199) encompassing its N-terminal region was designed and the protein was purified. MobMN199 was monomeric in contrast to the dimeric form of the full-length protein, but it kept its nicking activity on pMV158 DNA. The optimal relaxase activit...

  18. TBP-TAF Complex SL1 Directs RNA Polymerase I Pre-initiation Complex Formation and Stabilizes Upstream Binding Factor at the rDNA Promoter*||

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, J. Karsten; Panov, Kostya I.; Cabart, Pavel; Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the role of components of the RNA polymerase I transcription machinery is paramount to understanding regulation of rDNA expression. We describe key findings for the roles of essential transcription factor SL1 and activator upstream binding factor (UBF). We demonstrate that human SL1 can direct accurate Pol I transcription in the absence of UBF and can interact with the rDNA promoter independently and stably, consistent with studies of rodent SL1 but contrary to previous reports o...

  19. The stability region of the Streptomyces lividans plasmid pIJ101 encodes a DNA-binding protein recognizing a highly conserved short palindromic sequence motif

    OpenAIRE

    Thoma, Lina; Sepulveda, Edgardo; Latus, Annette; Muth, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Conjugation is a driving force in the evolution and shaping of bacterial genomes. In antibiotic producing streptomycetes even small plasmids replicating via the rolling-circle mechanism are conjugative. Although they encode only genes involved in replication and transfer, the molecular function of most plasmid encoded proteins is unknown. In this work we show that the conjugative plasmid pIJ101 encodes an overlooked protein, SpdA2. We show that SpdA2 is a DNA binding protein which specificall...

  20. In vitro and in silico investigations of the binding interactions between chlorophenols and trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Binding interactions of five chlorophenols with trypsin were investigated. • The number of chlorine atoms of chlorophenols partly affected the binding ability of them to trypsin. • Noncovalent interactions stabilized the trypsin–chlorophenols complexes. • There was the one main binding site of trypsin for chlorophenols. - Abstract: Being the first-degree toxic pollutants, chlorophenols (CP) have potential carcinogenic and mutagenic activity and toxicity. Since there still lacks studies on molecular interactions of chlorophenols with trypsin, one major binding target of many exogenous environmental pollutants, the binding interactions between five chlorophenols, 2-CP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TCP and PCP and trypsin were characterized by the combination of multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The chlorophenols bind at the one main site of trypsin and the binding induces the changes of microenvironment and global conformations of trypsin. Different number of chloride atoms significantly affects the binding and the binding constants KA ranks as KA (2-CP) < KA (2,6-DCP) ≈ KA (2,4,6-TCP) < KA (2,3,4,6-TCP) < KA (PCP). These chlorophenols interacts with trypsin mainly through hydrophobic interactions and via hydrogen bonding interactions and aromatic–aromatic π–π stacking interaction. Our results offer insights into the binding mechanism of chlorophenols with trypsin and provide important information for possible toxicity risk of chlorophenols to human health

  1. Role of Hydrophobic Mutations on the Binding Affinity and Stability of Blood Coagulation Factor VIIIa: A Computational Molecular Dynamics and Free-Energy Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Venkateswarlu, Divi

    2014-01-01

    Factor VIIIa is a non-covalently bound hetero-trimer among A1, A2 and A3-C1-C2 domains and an essential co-factor for factor IXa enzyme during proteolytic activation of factor X zymogen. The relatively weak interactions between A2 and the interface A1/A3 domains dampen the functional stability of FVIIIa in plasma and results in rapid degradation. We studied the mutational effect of three charged residues (Asp519, Glu665 and Asp666) to several hydrophobic residues by molecular dynamics simulat...

  2. A transient α-helical molecular recognition element in the disordered N-terminus of the Sgs1 helicase is critical for chromosome stability and binding of Top3/Rmi1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jessica A; Daughdrill, Gary W; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2013-12-01

    The RecQ-like DNA helicase family is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all organisms. Sgs1, a member of this family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, regulates early and late steps of double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that the N-terminal 125 residues of Sgs1 are disordered and contain a transient α-helix that extends from residue 25 to 38. Based on the residue-specific knowledge of transient secondary structure, we designed proline mutations to disrupt this α-helix and observed hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and increased frequency of genome rearrangements. In vitro binding assays show that the defects of the proline mutants are the result of impaired binding of Top3 and Rmi1 to Sgs1. Extending mutagenesis N-terminally revealed a second functionally critical region that spans residues 9-17. Depending on the position of the proline substitution in the helix functional impairment of Sgs1 function varied, gradually increasing from the C- to the N-terminus. The multiscale approach we used to interrogate structure/function relationships in the long disordered N-terminal segment of Sgs1 allowed us to precisely define a functionally critical region and should be generally applicable to other disordered proteins. PMID:24038467

  3. A flexible system of remediation to stabilize a road affected by landslide in the area of Val di Maso (North-Eastern Italian Apls)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessari, G.; Cioli, C.; Floris, M.; Stevan, G.; Genevois, R.

    2012-04-01

    Slope stabilization follows different design procedures and approaches finalized to reduce the driving forces or increase resisting forces or avoid the problem at all by completely or partially remove unstable materials. But often the cost of stabilization works is very high. Therefore it is necessary to find new effective solutions with low or moderate costs. In this frame, this work reports the case study of a road in the area of Val di Maso, located in the North-Eastern Italian Alps. The road is threatened by the evolution of a mass movement occurred on November 2010 due to an extreme rainfall event that hit the entire North-Eastern sector of Italy. The complex landslide consists of a debris flow involving eluvial/colluvial deposits and past landslide debris. In the upper part, clear morphological evidences indicate that the instability is rapidly retrogressing by multiple rotational slides involving volcanic deposits that can be referred to a paleo-landslide. In the crown area, unstable materials have a thickness of around 20 m. For this reason, a stabilization system using rigid structures anchored to the stable bedrock for an appropriate length would be burdensome and costly. Starting from the geological model of the unstable slope, an innovative stabilization solution is proposed, a numerical simulation to analyze the effects of the stabilization is performed and an integrated monitoring system to control and verify the slope behaviour is planned. The proposed remediation works consist of a "floating belt", placed close to the edge of the road, and some "floating anchors" some meters further down behind the main scarp of the landslide. The system allows small displacements to induce a stress re-distribution favourable to the stability of the slope. The main advantages of the proposed solution are the adaptability to different geo-environmental situations and the low cost compared to other alternatives. On the basis of field data collected, a geological

  4. Temperature and pressure dependence of protein stability: The engineered fluorescein-binding lipocalin FluA shows an elliptic phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedersich, Johannes; Köhler, Simone; Skerra, Arne; Friedrich, Josef

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the equilibrium constant for the denaturation transition of the engineered fluorescein-binding lipocalin FluA as a function of pressure and temperature, taking advantage of the fact that the ligand's fluorescence is almost fully quenched when complexed with the folded protein, but reversibly reappears on denaturation. From the equilibrium constant as a function of pressure and temperature all of the involved thermodynamic parameters of protein folding, in particular the changes in entropy and volume, compressibility, thermal expansion, and specific heat, were deduced in a global fitting procedure. Assuming that these parameters are independent of temperature and pressure, we can demonstrate from the ratio of Δβ, Δα2, ΔCp that the phase diagram of protein folding assumes an elliptic shape. Furthermore, we can show that the thermodynamic condition for such an elliptic phase diagram is related to the degree of correlation between the fluctuations of the changes in volume and enthalpy at the phase boundary. For the protein investigated this correlation is low, as generally expected for highly degenerate systems. Our study suggests that the elliptic phase diagram is a consequence of the inherent conformational disorder of proteins and that it may be viewed as the thermodynamic manifestation of the high degeneracy of conformational energies that is characteristic for this class of macromolecules. PMID:18391216

  5. The role of N1 domain on the activity, stability, substrate specificity and raw starch binding of amylopullulanase of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the role of N1 domain (1-257 aa) in the amylopullulanase (gt-apu) of the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33, N1 deletion construct (gt-apuΔN) has been generated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuΔN) exhibits similar pH and temperature optima like gt-apu, but enhanced thermostability. The gt-apuΔN has greater hydrolytic action and specific activity on pullulan than gt-apu. The k cat (starch and pullulan) and K m (starch) values of gt-apuΔN increased, while K m (pullulan) decreased. The enzyme upon N1 deletion hydrolyzed maltotetraose as the smallest substrate in contrast to maltopentaose of gt-apu. The role of N1 domain of gt-apu in raw starch binding has been confirmed, for the first time, based on deletion and Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics. Furthermore, N1 domain appears to exert a negative influence on the thermostability of gt-apu because N1 truncation significantly improves thermostability. PMID:25573470

  6. Climate, soil texture, and soil types affect the contributions of fine-fraction-stabilized carbon to total soil organic carbon in different land uses across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Andong; Feng, Wenting; Zhang, Wenju; Xu, Minggang

    2016-05-01

    Mineral-associated organic carbon (MOC), that is stabilized by fine soil particles (i.e., silt plus clay, clay) in soil, highlighting the importance of soil texture in stabilizing organic carbon across various climate zones. In cropland, different fertilization practices and land uses (e.g., upland, paddy, and upland-paddy rotation) significantly altered MOC/TSOC ratios, but not in cropping systems (e.g., mono- and double-cropping) characterized by climatic differences. This study demonstrates that the MOC/TSOC ratio is mainly driven by soil texture, soil types, and related climate and land uses, and thus the variations in MOC/TSOC ratios should be taken into account when quantitatively estimating soil C sequestration potential of silt plus clay particles on a large scale. PMID:26905446

  7. 微种植体初期稳定性的影响因素%Factors affecting primary stability of mini-implant anchorage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁颖娟; 常少海

    2013-01-01

    Mini implant anchorage for the orthodontic treatment is an effective method, the primary stability is critical in the achievement of reliable anchorage. Therefore, it is the purpose of this review to summarize the cur-rent literature on the primary stability of mini-implant anchorage, in order to improve overall implant success.%  微种植体支抗技术是正畸治疗中一种有效和理想的方法,其初期稳定性是获得可靠支抗的必要条件。本文就影响微种植体支抗初期稳定性的患者因素、微种植体因素和操作因素等研究进展作一综述,以提高微种植体支抗的成功率。

  8. In silico docking of forchlorfenuron (FCF to septins suggests that FCF interferes with GTP binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Angelis

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that form cytoskeleton-like filaments, which are essential for many functions in eukaryotic organisms. Small molecule compounds that disrupt septin filament assembly are valuable tools for dissecting septin functions with high temporal control. To date, forchlorfenuron (FCF is the only compound known to affect septin assembly and functions. FCF dampens the dynamics of septin assembly inducing the formation of enlarged stable polymers, but the underlying mechanism of action is unknown. To investigate how FCF binds and affects septins, we performed in silico simulations of FCF docking to all available crystal structures of septins. Docking of FCF with SEPT2 and SEPT3 indicated that FCF interacts preferentially with the nucleotide-binding pockets of septins. Strikingly, FCF is predicted to form hydrogen bonds with residues involved in GDP-binding, mimicking nucleotide binding. FCF docking with the structure of SEPT2-GppNHp, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, and SEPT7 showed that FCF may assume two alternative non-overlapping conformations deeply into and on the outer side of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Surprisingly, FCF was predicted to interact with the P-loop Walker A motif GxxxxGKS/T, which binds the phosphates of GTP, and the GTP specificity motif AKAD, which interacts with the guanine base of GTP, and highly conserved amino acids including a threonine, which is critical for GTP hydrolysis. Thus, in silico FCF exhibits a conserved mechanism of binding, interacting with septin signature motifs and residues involved in GTP binding and hydrolysis. Taken together, our results suggest that FCF stabilizes septins by locking them into a conformation that mimics a nucleotide-bound state, preventing further GTP binding and hydrolysis. Overall, this study provides the first insight into how FCF may bind and stabilize septins, and offers a blueprint for the rational design of FCF derivatives that could target septins with

  9. Different sources of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids affects apparent digestibility, tissue deposition, and tissue oxidative stability in growing female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Benedito Vagner A; Gigliotti Joseph C; Altman Stephanie N; Tou Janet C; Cordonier Elizabeth L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Numerous health benefits associated with increased omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) consumption has lead to an increasing variety of available n-3 PUFA sources. However, sources differ in the type, amount, and structural form of the n-3 PUFAs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of different sources of ω-3 PUFAs on digestibility, tissue deposition, eicosanoid metabolism, and oxidative stability. Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats...

  10. OMEGA-3 fatty acids contribute to plaque stability differentially affecting the release of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases by human monocytes/macrophages in culture

    OpenAIRE

    Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata; Storelli, Carlo; Distante, Alessandro; Martines, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. High intakes of omega-3 fatty acids has been associated with protection from plaque rupture. The secretion of metalloproteinases (MMPs) by macrophages is believed to play a key role in matrix degradation underlying plaque instability. Conversely, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) would contribute to plaque stability. We therefore studied the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on the release and activity of MMPs and TIMPs in cultured human monocytoid cells. Methods. Human...

  11. The Factors Affecting the Primary Stability of Mini-implant Anchorage%影响微种植体支抗初期稳定性的因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王硕; 贺娇娇; 刘畅

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants anchorage for the orthodontic and orthopedic treatment is an effec-tive and ideal method.It enlarges the treatment scope in clinic for its stability and efficiency .According to the implantation site and the quality of local bone tissue,it is essential to select the appropriate size of the mini-implants,implantation angle and implantation method for establishing adequate initial stability .Considerable researches have been done to investigate the initial stability of orthodontic mini-implants.Here is to make a review of the influencing factors of the primary stability of orthodontic mini-implants.%利用微种植体作为支抗装置进行正畸和矫形治疗是一种高效、理想的方法。微种植体支抗的应用使临床可矫治的范围大大增加。根据植入部位和局部骨组织的质量,适当选择微种植体的尺寸与植入角度和植入方式对建立足够的初期稳定性至关重要。许多学者对微种植体支抗的初期稳定性进行了临床及试验研究。该文就影响微种植体支抗初期稳定性的因素进行综述。

  12. TGF-β activates APC through Cdh1 binding for Cks1 and Skp2 proteasomal destruction stabilizing p27kip1 for normal endometrial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlides, Savvas C; Lecanda, Jon; Daubriac, Julien; Pandya, Unnati M; Gama, Patricia; Blank, Stephanie; Mittal, Khushbakhat; Shukla, Pratibha; Gold, Leslie I

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that aberrant TGF-β/Smad2/3 signaling in endometrial cancer (ECA) leads to continuous ubiquitylation of p27(kip1)(p27) by the E3 ligase SCF-Skp2/Cks1 causing its degradation, as a putative mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of this cancer. In contrast, normal intact TGF-β signaling prevents degradation of nuclear p27 by SCF-Skp2/Cks1 thereby accumulating p27 to block Cdk2 for growth arrest. Here we show that in ECA cell lines and normal primary endometrial epithelial cells, TGF-β increases Cdh1 and its binding to APC/C to form the E3 ligase complex that ubiquitylates Cks1 and Skp2 prompting their proteasomal degradation and thus, leaving p27 intact. Knocking-down Cdh1 in ECA cell lines increased Skp2/Cks1 E3 ligase activity, completely diminished nuclear and cytoplasmic p27, and obviated TGF-β-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Protein synthesis was not required for TGF-β-induced increase in nuclear p27 and decrease in Cks1 and Skp2. Moreover, half-lives of Cks1 and Skp2 were extended in the Cdh1-depleted cells. These results suggest that the levels of p27, Skp2 and Cks1 are strongly or solely regulated by proteasomal degradation. Finally, an inverse relationship of low p27 and high Cks1 in the nucleus was shown in patients in normal proliferative endometrium and grade I-III ECAs whereas differentiated secretory endometrium showed the reverse. These studies implicate Cdh1 as the master regulator of TGF-β-induced preservation of p27 tumor suppressor activity. Thus, Cdh1 is a potential therapeutic target for ECA and other human cancers showing an inverse relationship between Cks1/Skp2 and p27 and/or dysregulated TGF-β signaling. PMID:26963853

  13. Analysis of SAT type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins and the identification of putative amino acid residues affecting virus stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Francois F; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces. PMID:23717387

  14. Paddy Soil Stability and Mechanical Properties as Affected by Long-Term Application of Chemical Fertilizer and Animal Manure in Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Wet stability, penetration resistance (PR), and tensile strength (TS) of paddy soils under a fertilization experiment for 22 years were determined to elucidate the function of soil organic matter in paddy soil stabilization. The treatments included no fertilization (CK), normal chemical fertilization (NPK), double the NPK application rates (2NPK), and NPK mixed with organic manure (NPK+OM). Compared with CK, fertilization increased soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil porosity. The results of soil aggregate fragmentation degree (SAFD) showed that fast wetting by water was the key fragmentation mechanism. Among the treatments, the NPK+OM treatment had the largest size of water-stable aggregates and greatest normal mean weight diameter (NMWD) (P ≤ 0.05), but the lowest PR and TS in both cultivated horizon (Ap) and plow pan. The CK and 2NPK treatments were measured with PR > 2.0 MPa and friability index < 0.20,respectively, in the Ap horizon, suggesting that the soils was mechanically unfavourable to root growth and tillage. In the plow pan, the fertilization treatments had greater TS and PR than in CK. TS and PR of the tested soil aggregates were negatively correlated to SOC content and soil porosity. This study suggested that chemical fertilization could cause deterioration of mechanical properties while application of organic manure could improve soil stability and mechanical properties.

  15. Analysis of SAT type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins and the identification of putative amino acid residues affecting virus stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois F Maree

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces.

  16. 植物蛋白饮料稳定性影响因素和分析方法的研究%Study on the affected factors and analysis method of stability of plant protein beverage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周超进; 何锦风; 蒲彪

    2011-01-01

    植物蛋白饮料中蛋白沉淀、脂肪上浮问题,严重影响了产品质量.本文综合叙述了环境压力和饮料自身各因素对植物蛋白饮料稳定性的影响,并介绍了一些常用快速的稳定性分析方法.%The effect of sediment protein and fat separation on the quality of plant protein beverage was significant. The factors including environmental stresses and inside factors affecting the stability of plant protein beverage were comprehensively described ,the regular and fast technologies of determining stability were introduced.

  17. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: oxidation linked to changes in protein composition at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit M.; Baron, Caroline P.; Let, Mette B.; Brüggemann, Dagmar A.; Pedersen, Lise Refstrup Linnebjerg; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed that h....... Less casein seemed to be present at the oil−water interface with increasing pressure. Overall, the results indicated that a combination of more β-lactoglobulin and less casein at the oil−water interface gave the most stable emulsions with respect to lipid oxidation....... was increased by high temperature (72 °C) and with increasing pressure. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) indicated that high temperature resulted in an increase in β-lactoglobulin adsorbed at the oil−water interface. This was even more pronounced with higher pressure......Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed that...

  18. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jocelyn S; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity. PMID:16875676

  19. A novel Rho-dependent pathway that drives interaction of fascin-1 with p-Lin-11/Isl-1/Mec-3 kinase (LIMK 1/2 to promote fascin-1/actin binding and filopodia stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayo Asier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fascin-1 is an actin crosslinking protein that is important for the assembly of cell protrusions in neurons, skeletal and smooth muscle, fibroblasts, and dendritic cells. Although absent from most normal adult epithelia, fascin-1 is upregulated in many human carcinomas, and is associated with poor prognosis because of its promotion of carcinoma cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Rac and Cdc42 small guanine triphosphatases have been identified as upstream regulators of the association of fascin-1 with actin, but the possible role of Rho has remained obscure. Additionally, experiments have been hampered by the inability to measure the fascin-1/actin interaction directly in intact cells. We investigated the hypothesis that fascin-1 is a functional target of Rho in normal and carcinoma cells, using experimental approaches that included a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET/fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM method to measure the interaction of fascin-1 with actin. Results Rho activity modulates the interaction of fascin-1 with actin, as detected by a novel FRET method, in skeletal myoblasts and human colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistically, Rho regulation depends on Rho kinase activity, is independent of the status of myosin II activity, and is not mediated by promotion of the fascin/PKC complex. The p-Lin-11/Isl-1/Mec-3 kinases (LIMK, LIMK1 and LIMK2, act downstream of Rho kinases as novel binding partners of fascin-1, and this complex regulates the stability of filopodia. Conclusions We have identified a novel activity of Rho in promoting a complex between fascin-1 and LIMK1/2 that modulates the interaction of fascin-1 with actin. These data provide new mechanistic insight into the intracellular coordination of contractile and protrusive actin-based structures. During the course of the study, we developed a novel FRET method for analysis of the fascin-1/actin interaction, with potential general

  20. Binding Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  1. Microtubular stability affects pVHL-mediated regulation of HIF-1alpha via the p38/MAPK pathway in hypoxic cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Teng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous research found that structural changes of the microtubule network influence glycolysis in cardiomyocytes by regulating the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α during the early stages of hypoxia. However, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanism of the changes of HIF-1α caused by microtubule network alternation. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL, as a ubiquitin ligase, is best understood as a negative regulator of HIF-1α. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In primary rat cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cardiac cells, microtubule-stabilization was achieved by pretreating with paclitaxel or transfection of microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4 overexpression plasmids and microtubule-depolymerization was achieved by pretreating with colchicine or transfection of MAP4 siRNA before hypoxia treatment. Recombinant adenovirus vectors for overexpressing pVHL or silencing of pVHL expression were constructed and transfected in primary rat cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells. With different microtubule-stabilizing and -depolymerizing treaments, we demonstrated that the protein levels of HIF-1α were down-regulated through overexpression of pVHL and were up-regulated through knockdown of pVHL in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Importantly, microtubular structure breakdown activated p38/MAPK pathway, accompanied with the upregulation of pVHL. In coincidence, we found that SB203580, a p38/MAPK inhibitor decreased pVHL while MKK6 (Glu overexpression increased pVHL in the microtubule network altered-hypoxic cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that pVHL plays an important role in the regulation of HIF-1α caused by the changes of microtubular structure and the p38/MAPK pathway participates in the process of pVHL change following microtubule network alteration in hypoxic cardiomyocytes.

  2. EHD3 Protein Is Required for Tubular Recycling Endosome Stabilization, and an Asparagine-Glutamic Acid Residue Pair within Its Eps15 Homology (EH) Domain Dictates Its Selective Binding to NPF Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Kriti; Xie, Shuwei; Spagnol, Gaelle; Sorgen, Paul; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2016-06-24

    An elaborate network of dynamic lipid membranes, termed tubular recycling endosomes (TRE), coordinates the process of endocytic recycling in mammalian cells. The C-terminal Eps15 homology domain (EHD)-containing proteins have been implicated in the bending and fission of TRE, thus regulating endocytic recycling. EHD proteins have an EH domain that interacts with proteins containing an NPF motif. We found that NPF-containing EHD1 interaction partners such as molecules interacting with CasL-like1 (MICAL-L1) and Syndapin2 are essential for TRE biogenesis. Also crucial for TRE biogenesis is the generation of phosphatidic acid, an essential lipid component of TRE that serves as a docking point for MICAL-L1 and Syndapin2. EHD1 and EHD3 have 86% amino acid identity; they homo- and heterodimerize and partially co-localize to TRE. Despite their remarkable identity, they have distinct mechanistic functions. EHD1 induces membrane vesiculation, whereas EHD3 supports TRE biogenesis and/or stabilization by an unknown mechanism. While using phospholipase D inhibitors (which block the conversion of glycerophospholipids to phosphatidic acid) to deplete cellular TRE, we observed that, upon inhibitor washout, there was a rapid and dramatic regeneration of MICAL-L1-marked TRE. Using this "synchronized" TRE biogenesis system, we determined that EHD3 is involved in the stabilization of TRE rather than in their biogenesis. Moreover, we identify the residues Ala-519/Asp-520 of EHD1 and Asn-519/Glu-520 of EHD3 as defining the selectivity of these two paralogs for NPF-containing binding partners, and we present a model to explain the atomic mechanism and provide new insight for their differential roles in vesiculation and tubulation, respectively. PMID:27189942

  3. Dandelion PPO-1/PPO-2 domain-swaps: the C-terminal domain modulates the pH optimum and the linker affects SDS-mediated activation and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leufken, Christine M; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E

    2015-02-01

    Plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have a conserved three-domain structure: (i) the N-terminal domain (containing the active site) is connected via (ii) a linker to (iii) the C-terminal domain. The latter covers the active site, thereby maintaining the enzyme in a latent state. Activation can be achieved with SDS but little is known about the mechanism. We prepared domain-swap variants of dandelion PPO-1 and PPO-2 to test the specific functions of individual domains and their impact on enzyme characteristics. Our experiments revealed that the C-terminal domain modulates the pH optimum curve and has a strong influence on the optimal pH value. The linker determines the SDS concentration required for full activation. It also influences the SDS concentration required for half maximal activation (kSDS) and the stability of the enzyme during prolonged incubation in buffers containing SDS, but the N-terminal domain has the strongest effect on these parameters. The N-terminal domain also determines the IC50 of SDS and the stability in buffers containing or lacking SDS. We propose that the linker and C-terminal domain fine-tune the activation of plant PPOs. The C-terminal domain adjusts the pH optimum and the linker probably contains an SDS-binding/interaction site that influences inactivation and determines the SDS concentration required for activation. For the first time, we have determined the influence of the three PPO domains on enzyme activation and stability providing insight into the regulation and activation mechanisms of type-3 copper proteins in general. PMID:25484281

  4. Factors affecting the stability of mini-implants%影响微种植体支抗稳定性的相关因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林仰东; 吴也可

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Mini-implants are widely applied in the clinical treatment of orthodontics and orthognathics, because they can provide absolute skeletal anchorage. However, the relatively high failure rates have always been their major drawback, and how to improve the success rates of mini-implants becomes the main research direction in recent years. OBJECTIVE:To summarize the factors influencing the stability of mini-implants. METHODS:A computer-based search of Wanfang, VIP and PubMed databases was performed using the keywords of “mini-implants, stability, success rate, osseointegration” in Chinese and English. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Mibni-implants are an effective means of anchorage control. In clinics, the factors such as implant design, health status of patients, implantation methods and regions, loading patterns and maintenance after implantation wil al have an influence on the stability and success rates of mini-implants. To improve the success rate of the mini-implants, the selection of appropriate implant area is necessary in clinical applications, for example, thicker cortical bone and higher mini-implants are recommended clinicaly; using reasonable and loading implants, studies have shown that non-scored mini-implants is beneficial to reduce the dropout rate of mini-implants during early orthodontic loading; maintenance during healing periods after implantation is emphasized, and currently, stress loading on the mini-implants is preferred immediately after implantation or earlier, which can have a better success rate.%背景:微种植体因能提供骨内绝对支抗而被广泛应用于正畸、正颌的临床治疗中,然而脱落率较高一直是其主要缺点,如何提高微种植体的成功率成为近年来的主要研究方向。目的:总结影响微种植体稳定性的因素。方法:应用计算机检索万方数据库、维普数据库及PubMed数据库,检索关键词为“微种植体,稳定性,成功

  5. Different sources of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids affects apparent digestibility, tissue deposition, and tissue oxidative stability in growing female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Vagner A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous health benefits associated with increased omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA consumption has lead to an increasing variety of available n-3 PUFA sources. However, sources differ in the type, amount, and structural form of the n-3 PUFAs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of different sources of ω-3 PUFAs on digestibility, tissue deposition, eicosanoid metabolism, and oxidative stability. Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats (age 28 d were randomly assigned (n = 10/group to be fed a high fat 12% (wt diet consisting of either corn oil (CO or n-3 PUFA rich flaxseed (FO, krill (KO, menhaden (MO, salmon (SO or tuna (TO oil for 8 weeks. Rats were individually housed in metabolic cages to determine fatty acid digestibility. Diet and tissue fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography and lipid classes using thin layer chromatography. Eicosanoid metabolism was determined by measuring urinary metabolites of 2-series prostaglandins (PGs and thromoboxanes (TXBs using enzyme immunoassays. Oxidative stability was assessed by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and total antioxidant capacity (TAC using colorimetric assays. Gene expression of antioxidant defense enzymes was determined by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Results Rats fed KO had significantly lower DHA digestibility and brain DHA incorporation than SO and TO-fed rats. Of the n-3 PUFA sources, rats fed SO and TO had the highest n-3 PUFAs digestibility and in turn, tissue accretion. Higher tissue n-3 LC-PUFAs had no significant effect on 2-series PG and TXB metabolites. Despite higher tissue n-3 LC-PUFA deposition, there was no increase in oxidation susceptibility indicated by no significant increase in TBARS or decrease in TAC and gene expression of antioxidant defense enzymes, in SO or TO-fed rats. Conclusions On the basis that the optimal n-3 PUFA sources should

  6. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions mannose-binding lectin deficiency mannose-binding lectin deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mannose-binding lectin deficiency is a condition that affects the immune ...

  7. The effect of dietary supplementation with the natural carotenoids curcumin and lutein on pigmentation, oxidative stability and quality of meat from broiler chickens affected by a coccidiosis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, N; Ali, S; Naeem, M; Khan, M A; Wang, T

    2014-01-01

    1. An experiment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the antioxidants curcumin (CRM) and lutein (LTN) on the quality of meat from coccidiosis-infected broilers. A total of 200 one-day-old Arbor Acre chicks were randomly assigned to a treatment group with 5 replicates. The treatments included a basal diet without carotenoid supplementation (control), with 300 mg/kg CRM, with 300 mg/kg LTN or with a combination (C + L) of 150 mg/kg CRM and 150 mg/kg LTN. All chickens were challenged with Eimeria maxima at 21 d old. 2. The results revealed that the coccidiosis reduced redness of meat, while supplementation with carotenoids improved the fresh meat's redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) and contributed to colour stability maintenance after storage (1 month at -18°C and 3 d at 4°C). 3. Coccidiosis did not produce lipid and protein oxidation in fresh meat, but after storage for one month, the malondialdehyde levels and carbonyl contents were lower in the CRM and C + L birds and the sulfhydryl contents were higher in C + L birds. 4. The sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis banding pattern showed equivalent myosin chain fragmentations in all treatment groups, whereas lower intensity actin bands were observed in the control group (CONT). Moreover, myofibril protein denaturation (differential scanning calorimetry) profiles showed a reduction in the CONT myosin and actin peaks. Coccidiosis reduced the meat's water holding capacity in non-supplemented chicken meat and was improved by natural carotenoid. 5. These results emphasise that coccidiosis did not decrease the eating quality of fresh meat, that natural carotenoids are efficient antioxidants and that CRM (300 mg/kg) fed individually or combined with LTN was the most effective supplemented antioxidant compound. PMID:24852123

  8. Improvement of polymer stability by radiation grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losses of the stabilizer due to extractability or volatility immediately affect ultimate performance of polymer product. A new approach to increase the persistence of the stabilizer in the final product is to chemically bind it to the polymer backbone. Radiation grafting or crosslinking could be an efficient method for this, when the stabilizer is polymerizable. By a mutual gamma irradiation method, photoprotector 2-hydroxy-4-(3-methacryloxy-2- hydroxy-propoxy) benzophenone (HMB) has been readily grafted to low density polyethylene (LDPE) in benzene, tetrahydrofuran and methanol solution, respectively. Surface grafting occurs in a methanol solution of stabilizer, while in benzene and tetrahydrofuran solutions of stabilizer, grafting proceeds more or less in the inner parts of the polymeric film as well. The grafted LDPE film in methanol and tetrahydrofuran (containing 1 w/w % of grafted HMB), 1 w/w % blended HMB with LDPE and nongrafted LDPE film, were all exposed to accelerated aging and natural weathering and their spectral changes, expressed by the carbonyl index, were then compared. The change of elongation at break and tensile strength were measured in the course of aging. UV stability tests on aged films and change in mechanical properties indicate a pronounced protective effect achieved by grafted stabilizer. Grafting in methanol solution appears to be an efficient photostabilization treatment and the most economical with respect to the consumption of monomer, the grafting yield being less than 0.5%. Surface grafting is an efficient photostabilization method since grafted stabilizer is chemically bound to a polymeric surface and in this way the problem of evaporation of blended stabilizers during the prolonged use of polymeric materials is eliminated. (author)

  9. Oxidative stability and antioxidant enzyme activities of dry-cured bacons as affected by the partial substitution of NaCl with KCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haizhou; Yan, Wenjing; Zhuang, Hong; Huang, Mingming; Zhao, Jianying; Zhang, Jianhao

    2016-06-15

    This study investigated the influence of partial substitution of NaCl with KCl on protein and lipid oxidation as well as antioxidant enzyme activities in dry-cured bacons during processing. The partial substitution was 0% KCl (I), 40% KCl (II), and 70% KCl (III). Compared with 0% KCl (I), the substitution of 40% NaCl with KCl did not significantly influence the protein and lipid oxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities. The bacons that were treated with 70% KCl treatment (III) showed increased lipid oxidation and antioxidant enzyme GSH-Px activity, whereas samples treated with formulas I and II showed higher protein oxidation and antioxidant enzyme catalase activity. These results demonstrate that the substitution of NaCl with KCl by more than 40% may significantly affect protein and lipid oxidation and that for the substitution of NaCl in further processed meat products with other chloride salts, salt content is very important for control of protein and lipid biochemical changes in finished products. PMID:26868571

  10. Affection of the rotor-flux error on the induction motor full-order observer stability%转子磁链误差对感应电机观测器稳定性影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许思猛; 陈冲

    2012-01-01

    The rotor flux error affection on the stability of the induction motor full-order speed adaptive rotor flux observer was studied using the voltage model. The positive-real property of the forward path transfer function of the observer equivalent error system was analyzed. Stability domain border equations in ω1 -ωs plane were derived. A modified rotor flux error model excluding a pure integrator was suggested. Affection of the modified model on open-loop zeros plots of the linearized equivalent speed control system was investigated, and the stability region distribution in all motor operation modes was studied. Research results indicate the stability region is enlarged by amplifying the rotor flux error. The observer with the modified model is stable in the low-speed region with regenerative loads but unstable in low-speed motoring mode. Simulation results illustrate the adaptive observer with combined speed adaptive laws is stable in all motor operation modes.%利用转子磁链电压模型研究转子磁链误差对感应电动机全阶转速自适应转子磁链观测器稳定性影响.通过研究观测器等效误差系统前向通道传递函数正实性,得到观测器在ω1-ωs平面中稳定区域边界方程.提出不舍纯积分器的新型转子磁链误差模型,通过分析该模型对线性化等效转速控制系统开环零点分布影响,研究不同工况下观测器稳定区域分布.研究结果表明增大转子磁链误差能够扩大稳定区域,所提出的模型解决了低速再生发电工况时观测器稳定问题,但在低速电动工况时观测器不稳定.仿真结果表明组合应用不同转速自适应律观测器在所有工况下均能稳定.

  11. Dynamic conformations of nucleophosmin (NPM1 at a key monomer-monomer interface affect oligomer stability and interactions with granzyme B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei D Duan-Porter

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin (NPM1 is an abundant, nucleolar tumor antigen with important roles in cell proliferation and putative contributions to oncogenesis. Wild-type NPM1 forms pentameric oligomers through interactions at the amino-terminal core domain. A truncated form of NPM1 found in some hepatocellular carcinoma tissue formed an unusually stable oligomer and showed increased susceptibility to cleavage by granzyme B. Initiation of translation at the seventh methionine generated a protein (M7-NPM that shared all these properties. We used deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS to perform a detailed structural analysis of wild-type NPM1 and M7-NPM, and found dynamic conformational shifts or local "unfolding" at a specific monomer-monomer interface which included the β-hairpin "latch." We tested the importance of interactions at the β-hairpin "latch" by replacing a conserved tyrosine in the middle of the β-hairpin loop with glutamic acid, generating Y67E-NPM. Y67E-NPM did not form stable oligomers and further, prevented wild-type NPM1 oligomerization in a dominant-negative fashion, supporting the critical role of the β-hairpin "latch" in monomer-monomer interactions. Also, we show preferential cleavage by granzyme B at one of two available aspartates (either D161 or D122 in M7-NPM and Y67E-NPM, whereas wild-type NPM1 was cleaved at both sites. Thus, we observed a correlation between the propensity to form oligomers and granzyme B cleavage site selection in nucleophosmin proteins, suggesting that a small change at an important monomer-monomer interface can affect conformational shifts and impact protein-protein interactions.

  12. The RNA binding protein CPEB regulates dendrite morphogenesis and neuronal circuit assembly in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bestman, Jennifer E.; Cline, Hollis T.

    2008-01-01

    Visual system development requires experience-dependent mechanisms that regulate neuronal structure and function, including dendritic arbor growth, synapse formation, and stabilization. Although RNA binding proteins have been shown to affect some forms of synaptic plasticity in adult animals, their role in the development of neuronal structure and functional circuitry is not clear. Using two-photon time-lapse in vivo imaging and electrophysiology combined with morpholino-mediated knockdown an...

  13. Vibrational Softening of a Protein on Ligand Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balog, Erica [Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; Perahia, David [Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan, Cachan, France; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Merzel, Franci [National Institute of Chemistry, Solvenia

    2011-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have demonstrated that binding of the cancer drug methotrexate softens the low-frequency vibrations of its target protein, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Here, this softening is fully reproduced using atomic detail normal-mode analysis. Decomposition of the vibrational density of states demonstrates that the largest contributions arise from structural elements of DHFR critical to stability and function. Mode-projection analysis reveals an increase of the breathing-like character of the affected vibrational modes consistent with the experimentally observed increased adiabatic compressibility of the protein on complexation.

  14. Dissection of the Critical Binding Determinants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II by Mutagenesis and Fluorescence Binding Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Crist, Rachael M.; Vaezeslami, Soheila; Goins, Sarah M.; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2009-01-01

    The binding of retinoic acid to mutants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II (CRABPII) was evaluated to better understand the importance of the direct protein/ligand interactions. The important role of Arg111 for the correct structure and function of the protein was verified and other residues that directly affect retinoic acid binding have been identified. Furthermore, retinoic acid binding to CRABPII mutants that lack all previously identified interacting amino acids was rescued by ...

  15. In vitro and in silico investigations of the binding interactions between chlorophenols and trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan-Qing, E-mail: wyqing76@126.com [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Wetland Bioresources and Environmental Protection, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Tan, Chun-Yun [Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhuang, Shu-Lin [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhai, Peng-Zhan; Cui, Yun; Zhou, Qiu-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Mei [Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Fei, Zhenghao [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Wetland Bioresources and Environmental Protection, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Binding interactions of five chlorophenols with trypsin were investigated. • The number of chlorine atoms of chlorophenols partly affected the binding ability of them to trypsin. • Noncovalent interactions stabilized the trypsin–chlorophenols complexes. • There was the one main binding site of trypsin for chlorophenols. - Abstract: Being the first-degree toxic pollutants, chlorophenols (CP) have potential carcinogenic and mutagenic activity and toxicity. Since there still lacks studies on molecular interactions of chlorophenols with trypsin, one major binding target of many exogenous environmental pollutants, the binding interactions between five chlorophenols, 2-CP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TCP and PCP and trypsin were characterized by the combination of multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The chlorophenols bind at the one main site of trypsin and the binding induces the changes of microenvironment and global conformations of trypsin. Different number of chloride atoms significantly affects the binding and the binding constants K{sub A} ranks as K{sub A} (2-CP) < K{sub A} (2,6-DCP) ≈ K{sub A} (2,4,6-TCP) < K{sub A} (2,3,4,6-TCP) < K{sub A} (PCP). These chlorophenols interacts with trypsin mainly through hydrophobic interactions and via hydrogen bonding interactions and aromatic–aromatic π–π stacking interaction. Our results offer insights into the binding mechanism of chlorophenols with trypsin and provide important information for possible toxicity risk of chlorophenols to human health.

  16. Duplex structural differences and not 2′-hydroxyls explain the more stable binding of HIV-reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) binds more stably in binary complexes with RNA–DNA versus DNA–DNA. Current results indicate that only the -2 and -4 RNA nucleotides (-1 hybridized to the 3′ recessed DNA base) are required for stable binding to RNA–DNA, and even a single RNA nucleotide conferred significantly greater stability than DNA–DNA. Replacing 2′- hydroxyls on pivotal RNA bases with 2′-O-methyls did not affect stability, indicating that interactions between hy...

  17. Towards the classification of DYT6 dystonia mutants in the DNA-binding domain of THAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne, Sébastien; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain; Gervais, Virginie

    2012-10-01

    The transcription factor THAP1 (THanatos Associated Protein 1) has emerged recently as the cause of DYT6 primary dystonia, a type of rare, familial and mostly early-onset syndrome that leads to involuntary muscle contractions. Many of the mutations described in the DYT6 patients fall within the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain (THAP domain) of THAP1 and are believed to negatively affect DNA binding. Here, we have used an integrated approach combining spectroscopic (NMR, fluorescence, DSF) and calorimetric (ITC) methods to evaluate the effect of missense mutations, within the THAP domain, on the structure, stability and DNA binding. Our study demonstrates that none of the mutations investigated failed to bind DNA and some of them even bind DNA stronger than the wild-type protein. However, some mutations could alter DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore, the most striking effect is the decrease of stability observed for mutations at positions affecting the zinc coordination, the hydrophobic core or the C-terminal AVPTIF motif, with unfolding temperatures ranging from 46°C for the wild-type to below 37°C for two mutations. These findings suggest that reduction in population of folded protein under physiological conditions could also account for the disease. PMID:22844099

  18. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Hijiri Hasegawa; Nasa Savory; Koichi Abe; Kazunori Ikebukuro

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of a...

  19. Quantification of the total Na,K-ATPase concentration in atria and ventricles from mammalian species by measuring 3H-ouabain binding to intact myocardial samples. Stability to short term ischemia reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, T A; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Haunsø, S; Kjeldsen, K

    2011-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase concentration was measured by vanadate facilitated 3H-ouabain binding to intact samples taken from various parts of porcine and canine myocardium. In porcine and canine heart 3H-ouabain binding site concentration in ventricles was 1.4-2.5 times larger than in atria. Evaluation of 3H-o...

  20. On the chemical and processing stability of pharmaceutical solids : Solid form dependent water presenting capacity and process induced solid form transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Heidarian Höckerfelt, Mina

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for improving our knowledge and understanding about formation mechanisms and nature of amorphous state in order to prevent the unintended presence of disorder in solid pharmaceutical products and reduce the related stability issues. The suggested theory that water binding capacity of amorphous cellulose affects the chemical stability of hydrolysis sensitive drugs in formulations with cellulose based excipients needs a clarification and water-cellulose interaction profiles need...

  1. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy due to portacaval shunt show differential increase of translocator protein (18 kDa) binding in different brain areas, which is not affected by chronic MAP-kinase p38 inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusti, Ana; Dziedzic, Jennifer L.; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a main role in neurological deficits in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) due to portacaval shunt (PCS). Treating PCS rats with SB239063, an inhibitor of MAP-kinase-p38, reduces microglial activation and brain inflammatory markers and restores cognitive and motor function. The translocator protein-(18-kDa) (TSPO) is considered a biomarker of neuro-inflammation. TSPO is increased in brain of PCS rats and of cirrhotic patients that died in hepatic coma. Rats with MHE show strong microglial activation in cerebellum and milder in other areas when assessed by MHC-II immunohistochemistry. This work aims were assessing: 1) whether binding of TSPO ligands is selectively increased in cerebellum in PCS rats; 2) whether treatment with SB239063 reduces binding of TSPO ligands in PCS rats; 3) which cell type (microglia, astrocytes) increases TSPO expression. Quantitative autoradiography was used to assess TSPO-selective 3H-(R)-PK11195 binding to different brain areas. TSPO expression increased differentially in PCS rats, reaching mild expression in striatum or thalamus and very high levels in cerebellum. TSPO was expressed in astrocytes and microglia. Treatment with SB239063 did not reduces 3[H]-PK11195 binding in PCS rats. SB239063 reduces microglial activation and levels of inflammatory markers, but not binding of TSPO ligands. This indicates that SB239063-induced neuroinflammation reduction in PCS rats is not mediated by effects on TSPO. Also, enhanced TSPO expression is not always associated with cognitive or motor deficits. If enhanced TSPO expression plays a role in mechanisms leading to neurological alterations in MHE, SB239063 would interfere these mechanisms at a later step. PMID:24307181

  2. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy due to portacaval shunt show differential increase of translocator protein (18 kDa) binding in different brain areas, which is not affected by chronic MAP-kinase p38 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusti, Ana; Dziedzic, Jennifer L; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Guilarte, Tomas R; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-12-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a main role in neurological deficits in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) due to portacaval shunt (PCS). Treating PCS rats with SB239063, an inhibitor of MAP-kinase-p38, reduces microglial activation and brain inflammatory markers and restores cognitive and motor function. The translocator protein-(18-kDa) (TSPO) is considered a biomarker of neuroinflammation. TSPO is increased in brain of PCS rats and of cirrhotic patients that died in hepatic coma. Rats with MHE show strong microglial activation in cerebellum and milder in other areas when assessed by MHC-II immunohistochemistry. This work aims were assessing: 1) whether binding of TSPO ligands is selectively increased in cerebellum in PCS rats; 2) whether treatment with SB239063 reduces binding of TSPO ligands in PCS rats; 3) which cell type (microglia, astrocytes) increases TSPO expression. Quantitative autoradiography was used to assess TSPO-selective (3)H-(R)-PK11195 binding to different brain areas. TSPO expression increased differentially in PCS rats, reaching mild expression in striatum or thalamus and very high levels in cerebellum. TSPO was expressed in astrocytes and microglia. Treatment with SB239063 did not reduces (3)[H]-PK11195 binding in PCS rats. SB239063 reduces microglial activation and levels of inflammatory markers, but not binding of TSPO ligands. This indicates that SB239063-induced neuroinflammation reduction in PCS rats is not mediated by effects on TSPO. Also, enhanced TSPO expression is not always associated with cognitive or motor deficits. If enhanced TSPO expression plays a role in mechanisms leading to neurological alterations in MHE, SB239063 would interfere these mechanisms at a later step. PMID:24307181

  3. Cable Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2014-01-01

    Superconductor stability is at the core of the design of any successful cable and magnet application. This chapter reviews the initial understanding of the stability mechanism, and reviews matters of importance for stability such as the nature and magnitude of the perturbation spectrum and the cooling mechanisms. Various stability strategies are studied, providing criteria that depend on the desired design and operating conditions.

  4. Influence of surface charge, binding site residues and glycosylation on Thielavia terrestris cutinase biochemical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirke, Abhijit N; Basore, Danielle; Holton, Samantha; Su, An; Baugh, Evan; Butterfoss, Glenn L; Makhatadze, George; Bystroff, Christopher; Gross, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Cutinases are esterases of industrial importance for applications in recycling and surface modification of polyesters. The cutinase from Thielavia terrestris (TtC) is distinct in terms of its ability to retain its stability and activity in acidic pH. Stability and activity in acidic pHs are desirable for esterases as the pH of the reaction tends to go down with the generation of acid. The pH stability and activity are governed by the charged state of the residues involved in catalysis or in substrate binding. In this study, we performed the detailed structural and biochemical characterization of TtC coupled with surface charge analysis to understand its acidic tolerance. The stability of TtC in acidic pH was rationalized by evaluating the contribution of charge interactions to the Gibbs free energy of unfolding at varying pHs. The activity of TtC was found to be limited by substrate binding affinity, which is a function of the surface charge. Additionally, the presence of glycosylation affects the biochemical characteristics of TtC owing to steric interactions with residues involved in substrate binding. PMID:26758295

  5. ATP binding to the pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is critical for pathogenic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarén, Henrik M; Ungureanu, Daniela; Grisouard, Jean; Skoda, Radek C; Hubbard, Stevan R; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-04-14

    Pseudokinases lack conserved motifs typically required for kinase activity. Nearly half of pseudokinases bind ATP, but only few retain phosphotransfer activity, leaving the functional role of nucleotide binding in most cases unknown. Janus kinases (JAKs) are nonreceptor tyrosine kinases with a tandem pseudokinase-kinase domain configuration, where the pseudokinase domain (JAK homology 2, JH2) has important regulatory functions and harbors mutations underlying hematological and immunological diseases. JH2 of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2 all bind ATP, but the significance of this is unclear. We characterize the role of nucleotide binding in normal and pathogenic JAK signaling using comprehensive structure-based mutagenesis. Disruption of JH2 ATP binding in wild-type JAK2 has only minor effects, and in the presence of type I cytokine receptors, the mutations do not affect JAK2 activation. However, JH2 mutants devoid of ATP binding ameliorate the hyperactivation of JAK2 V617F. Disrupting ATP binding in JH2 also inhibits the hyperactivity of other pathogenic JAK2 mutants, as well as of JAK1 V658F, and prevents induction of erythrocytosis in a JAK2 V617F myeloproliferative neoplasm mouse model. Molecular dynamic simulations and thermal-shift analysis indicate that ATP binding stabilizes JH2, with a pronounced effect on the C helix region, which plays a critical role in pathogenic activation of JAK2. Taken together, our results suggest that ATP binding to JH2 serves a structural role in JAKs, which is required for aberrant activity of pathogenic JAK mutants. The inhibitory effect of abrogating JH2 ATP binding in pathogenic JAK mutants may warrant novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25825724

  6. Influence of 3‧-3‧ inversion of polarity site within d(TGGGGT) on inter quartet cation binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šket, Primož; Korbar, Tjaša; Plavec, Janez

    2014-10-01

    Stability, dynamics and function of nucleic acids are affected by nature of cations that are involved in interaction with specific functionalities. Introduction of inversion of polarity sites represents a very useful and chemically accessible backbone modification, which can alter the binding affinity of cations. NMR study on cation binding between G-quartets in tetramolecular G-quadruplex adopted by d(5‧TGG3‧-3‧GGT5‧) with 3‧-3‧ inversion of polarity sites in the middle of G-tract showed existence of two different G-quadruplex forms with all strands in parallel orientation, where all guanine residues adopt anti conformation around glycosidic bonds in the presence of 15NH4+ ions. In one of the forms all three binding sites are equally populated, while in the second form the binding site next to the inversion of polarity site is not fully populated by 15NH4+ ions.

  7. Ligand Binding Analysis and Screening by Chemical Denaturation Shift

    OpenAIRE

    Sch n, Arne; Brown, Richard K; Hutchins, Burleigh M.; Freire, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecule ligands is an important first step in drug development, especially drugs that target proteins with no intrinsic activity. Towards this goal, it is important to have access to technologies that are able to measure binding affinities for a large number of potential ligands in a fast and accurate way. Since ligand binding stabilizes the protein structure in a manner dependent on concentration and binding affinity, the magnitude of the protein stabilization ef...

  8. Einstein universes stabilized

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Erhard

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that gravitational self-binding energy may be the source for the vacuum energy term of cosmology is studied in a Newtonian Ansatz. For spherical spaces the attractive force of gravitation and the negative pressure of the vacuum energy term form a self stabilizing system under very reasonable restrictions for the parameters, among them a characteristic coefficient \\beta of self energy. In the Weyl geometric approach to cosmological redshift, Einstein-Weyl universes with observat...

  9. Food Fortification Stability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmons, T. A.; Cooper, M. R.; Douglas, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the stability of vitamin content, sensory acceptability and color variation in fortified spaceflight foods over a period of 2 years. Findings will identify optimal formulation, processing, and storage conditions to maintain stability and acceptability of commercially available fortification nutrients. Changes in food quality are being monitored to indicate whether fortification affects quality over time (compared to the unfortified control), thus indicating their potential for use on long-duration missions.

  10. Stability Scores: Measuring Coalitional Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Michal; Meir, Reshef; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a measure for the level of stability against coalitional deviations, called \\emph{stability scores}, which generalizes widely used notions of stability in non-cooperative games. We use the proposed measure to compare various Nash equilibria in congestion games, and to quantify the effect of game parameters on coalitional stability. For our main results, we apply stability scores to analyze and compare the Generalized Second Price (GSP) and Vickrey-Clarke-Groves (VCG) ad auctions....

  11. Numerical Simulation on Landslide Stability Affected by Seepage Field Variation Caused by Tunnel Excavation%隧洞开挖渗流场变化对滑坡稳定性的影响数值模拟分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凡; 韩爱果; 任光明; 杜飞; 吴龙科; 詹可

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate in landslide’s seepage field,slope deformation and stability af-fected by tunnel excavation.On the basis of analysing the physical and mechanical and water physical properties of a landslide slope,we simulated the variation of groundwater level and seepage field before and after tunnel excava-tion using 3D finite difference software Modflow.Furthermore,by employing Geo-Studio,we analyzed the stability and deformation of landslide after water level changed in natural and excavation conditions.Results reveal that the groundwater seepage field changed after tunnel excavation,and obvious water inflow was found at the excavation ar-ea.As a result,the groundwater level decreased about 20m and apparent “sinkholes”appeared in the excavation area.The change of groundwater level was mainly reflected in the front edge of landslide.The deformation of 2 #secondary sliding body,which caused the deformation of 1 #secondary sliding body,exacerbated under the com-bined actions of weakened sliding resistance and increased effective stress.The maximum slope deformation of sec-ondary landslide above the tunnel reached 1 2.42 cm,but the stability changed slightly.%为研究隧洞开挖对滑坡渗流场、坡体变形及稳定性的影响,在对某滑坡滑体物理力学及水理性质进行研究的基础上,采用 Modflow 有限元差分三维软件对隧洞开挖前后的地下水位进行数值模拟计算,分析隧洞开挖后渗流场的变化,并以此结合 Geo-Studio 软件对滑坡处于天然及开挖情况下水位变化后的稳定性及变形进行了分析研究。结果表明:隧洞开挖后地下水渗流场发生改变,隧洞开挖处产生明显涌水现象,开挖2 a 后地下水位降低约20 m,开挖区形成明显“落水洞”,地下水位变化主要体现在滑坡前缘;隧洞上部2#次级滑体在抗滑力减弱和有效应力增大的双重作用下变形加剧,其下滑带动1#

  12. Structural stability, microbial biomass and community composition of sediments affected by the hydric dynamics of an urban stormwater infiltration basin. Dynamics of physical and microbial characteristics of stormwater sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, Anne Laure; Monier, Armelle; Volatier, Laurence; Geremia, Roberto A; Delolme, Cécile; Bedell, Jean-Philippe

    2011-05-01

    The sedimentary layer deposited at the surface of stormwater infiltration basins is highly organic and multicontaminated. It undergoes considerable moisture content fluctuations due to the drying and inundation cycles (called hydric dynamics) of these basins. Little is known about the microflora of the sediments and its dynamics; hence, the purpose of this study is to describe the physicochemical and biological characteristics of the sediments at different hydric statuses of the infiltration basin. Sediments were sampled at five time points following rain events and dry periods. They were characterized by physical (aggregation), chemical (nutrients and heavy metals), and biological (total, bacterial and fungal biomasses, and genotypic fingerprints of total bacterial and fungal communities) parameters. Data were processed using statistical analyses which indicated that heavy metal (1,841 μg/g dry weight (DW)) and organic matter (11%) remained stable through time. By contrast, aggregation, nutrient content (NH₄⁺, 53-717 μg/g DW), pH (6.9-7.4), and biological parameters were shown to vary with sediment water content and sediment biomass, and were higher consecutive to stormwater flows into the basin (up to 7 mg C/g DW) than during dry periods (0.6 mg C/g DW). Coinertia analysis revealed that the structure of the bacterial communities is driven by the hydric dynamics of the infiltration basin, although no such trend was found for fungal communities. Hydric dynamics more than rain events appear to be more relevant for explaining variations of aggregation, microbial biomass, and shift in the microbial community composition. We concluded that the hydric dynamics of stormwater infiltration basins greatly affects the structural stability of the sedimentary layer, the biomass of the microbial community living in it and its dynamics. The decrease in aggregation consecutive to rewetting probably enhances access to organic matter (OM), explaining the consecutive release

  13. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Ng, Fu Liang; Chan, Kenneth; Pu, Xiangyuan; Poston, Robin N; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Wu, Jingchun; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  14. Efficiency of the pTF-FC2 pas Poison-Antidote Stability System in Escherichia coli Is Affected by the Host Strain, and Antidote Degradation Requires the Lon Protease

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Anthony S. G.; Rawlings, Douglas E

    1998-01-01

    The stabilization of a test plasmid by the proteic, poison-antidote plasmid addiction system (pas) of plasmid pTF-FC2 was host strain dependent, with a 100-fold increase in stability in Escherichia coli CSH50, a 2.5-fold increase in E. coli JM105, and no detectable stabilization in E. coli strains JM107 and JM109. The lethality of the PasB toxin was far higher in the E. coli strains in which the pas was most effective. Models for the way in which poison-antidote systems stabilize plasmids req...

  15. Protein stability, flexibility and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2011-01-01

    Proteins rely on flexibility to respond to environmental changes, ligand binding and chemical modifications. Potentially, a perturbation that changes the flexibility of a protein may interfere with its function. Millions of mutations have been performed on thousands of proteins in quests for a...... data presented is it clear that there are specific sites (flexibility hotspots) in proteins that are important for both binding and stability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Dynamics: Experimental and Computational Approaches....

  16. Ideal Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    We define and explore the concept of ideal stabilization. The program is ideally stabilizing if its every state is legitimate. Ideal stabilization allows the specification designer to prescribe with arbitrary degree of precision not only the fault-free program behavior but also its recovery operation. Specifications may or may not mention all possible states. We identify approaches to designing ideal stabilization to both kinds of specifications. For the first kind, we state the necessary condition for an ideally stabilizing solution. On the basis of this condition we prove that there is no ideally stabilizing solution to the leader election problem. We illustrate the utility of the concept by providing examples of well-known programs and proving them ideally stabilizing. Specifically, we prove ideal stabilization of the conflict manager, the alternator, the propagation of information with feedback and the alternating bit protocol.

  17. Ganglioside binding bobath technique affect the results of rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy%神经节苷酯结合Bobath技术对脑瘫儿康复影响效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李熠; 李哲; 赖新波; 叶耀华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence effect of ganglioside binding Bobath technique spastic cerebral palsy children rehabilitation.MethodsSelect 90 cases of spastic cerebral palsy children from February 2013 to October 2014 in our hospital,randomly divide them to Ganglioside group,Bobath group and ganglioside binding Bobath group,after treatment,testing and compared three groups of children with surface electromyography,three-dimensional gait,assessing treatment effect.ResultsAfter treatment,the three groups of children with RMS,iEMG,AEMG,CR values were improved,but the degree of improvement ganglioside binding Bobath group was significantly better than ganglioside group,bobath group,and the value comparison between the two groups had statistical significance(P<0.05);After treatment,the three groups of children walking speed,stride inferior side,dominant side stride length were improved,but the degree of improvement ganglioside binding Bobath group was significantly better than ganglioside group, Bobath group,and the value comparison between the two groups had statistical significance(P<0.05).ConclusionThe ganglioside binding Bobath treatment of children with cerebral palsy children can improve surface electromyography, three-dimensional gait value, can help children with rehabilitation, which has a substantial clinical curative effect and is worthy of clinical application widely.%目的:探讨神经节苷脂结合Bobath技术对痉挛性脑瘫儿康复影响效果。方法选取2013年2月~2014年10月我院收治90例痉挛性脑瘫儿随机分为神经节苷脂组、Bobath组和神经节苷脂结合Bobath组,治疗后检测并比较三组患儿表面肌电、三维步态,评定治疗效果。结果三组患儿治疗后RMS、iEMG、AEMG、CR值均有改善,但神经节苷脂结合Bobath组改善程度明显优于神经节苷脂组、Bobath组,两组间各值比较有统计学意义(P<0.05);三组患儿治疗后步速、劣势侧跨步、优

  18. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF ALUMINOSILICATE INORGANIC POLYMERS: INFLUENCE OF THE PREPARATION PROCEDURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Kobera

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability of amorphous aluminosilicate inorganic polymer (AIP systems with regard to the structural role of water molecules incorporated in inorganic matrix is discussed. Innovative approach to preparation of amorphous AIP systems with identical chemical composition but differing in structural and mechanical behavior is introduced. It is shown that even small changes in the manufacture dramatically affect mechanical properties and the overall structural stability of AIP systems. If the required quantity of water is admixed to the reaction mixture during the initial step of AIPs synthesis the resulting amorphous aluminosilicate matrix undergoes extensive crystallization (zeolitization. On the other hand, if the amount of water is added to the reaction mixture during the last step of the preparation procedure, the inorganic matrix exhibits long-term stability without any structural defects. To find the structural reasons of the observed behavior a combination of traditional solid state NMR (1H and 29Si MAS NMR, 29Si CP/MAS NMR, 29Si inverse-T1-filtered NMR, XRPD and TGA measurements were used. The applied experiments revealed that the structural stability of AIPs can be attributed to the tight binding of water molecules into the inorganic matrix. The structural stability of the prepared amorphous AIP systems thus seems to be affected by the extent of hydration i.e. the strength of binding water into the inorganic framework.

  19. Translational Influence on Messenger Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette

    composition of the coding sequence of a gene. This thesis focussed on illuminating the impact of ribosome binding sites on the functional messenger half-life using a range of ribosome binding sites with altered binding strength. Furthermore, the additive in uence of the transcription terminator, Rho, on...... pre-termination to be a global phenomena in gene regulation. The influence of codon usage in the early coding region on messenger stability was examined, in order to establish how fast or slow the ribosome has to decode the sequence for it to protect the messenger from degradation. The experiments...

  20. Stability of p53 homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Brandt

    Full Text Available Most proteins have not evolved for maximal thermal stability. Some are only marginally stable, as for example, the DNA-binding domains of p53 and its homologs, whose kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities are strongly correlated. Here, we applied high-throughput methods using a real-time PCR thermocycler to study the stability of several full-length orthologs and paralogs of the p53 family of transcription factors, which have diverse functions, ranging from tumour suppression to control of developmental processes. From isothermal denaturation fluorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, we found that full-length proteins showed the same correlation between kinetic and thermodynamic stability as their isolated DNA-binding domains. The stabilities of the full-length p53 orthologs were marginal and correlated with the temperature of their organism, paralleling the stability of the isolated DNA-binding domains. Additionally, the paralogs p63 and p73 were significantly more stable and long-lived than p53. The short half-life of p53 orthologs and the greater persistence of the paralogs may be biologically relevant.

  1. How the change of the ligand from L = porphine, P2-, to L = P4-substituted porphine, P(P)42-, affects the electronic properties and the M-L binding energies for the first-row transition metals M = Sc-Zn: Comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Aleksey E.

    2016-05-01

    We performed comparative DFT study, including Natural Bond Orbitals (NBO) analysis, of the binding energies between all the first-row transition metals Mn+ (M = Sc-Zn) and two ligands of the similar type: porphine, P2-, and its completely P-substituted counterpart, P(P)42-. The main findings are as follows: (i) complete substitution of all the pyrrole nitrogens with P-atoms does not affect the ground spin state of metalloporphyrins; (ii) generally, for the MP(P)4 compounds the calculated HOMO/LUMO gaps and optical gaps are smaller than for their MP counterparts; (iii) the trends in the change of the binding energies between Mn+ and P(P)42-/P2- are very similar for both ligands. The complete substitution of the pyrrole nitrogens by the P-atoms decreases the Mn+-ligand binding energies; all the MP(P)4 compounds studied are stable according to the calculated Ebind values and therefore can be potentially synthesized.

  2. Affect on Boiler Economy and Stability by Blended Coal Combustion of Biomass Boiler%生物质锅炉混煤掺烧对锅炉经济性及稳定性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志前; 宋杰; 宋景慧

    2015-01-01

    Based on biomass direct combustion power generation technology,field industrial environment experiment was conducted by taking coal as main additive for studying affect on boiler economy and stability by burning different varieties and variable proportion coals of biomass direct combustion boiler,so as to determine varieties of blending combustion coal and reasonable proportion. Research results indicate that relative to direct combustion biomass,it is able to improve boiler heating efficiency and reduce heat loss by burning blending coal. Experiment indicates that with blending combustion propor-tion of 20% calorific value coal,boiler heating efficiency improves 2.34% over than that of direct combustion biomass. Af-ter burning blending coal,boiler on-load capability and combustion condition improves with increase of proportion of blend-ing coal,and then it is able to keep stable combustion and improve utilization efficiency of biomass.%基于生物质直燃发电技术,以煤作为主要添加剂进行现场工业环境试验,研究生物质直燃锅炉掺烧不同品种、不同比例煤后对锅炉经济性及稳定性的影响,以确定掺烧煤的品种和合理比例。研究结果表明:相对于纯燃生物质,掺烧煤可以提高锅炉热效率,降低锅炉热损失。试验表明,在20%热值烟煤掺烧比例下锅炉热效率比纯燃生物质提高2.34%。在掺烧煤后,锅炉带负荷能力、燃烧状况都随掺煤比例的提高而提高,进而可以进一步稳定燃烧,提高生物质的利用效率。

  3. Structural Bases for the Regulation of CO Binding in the Archaeal Protoglobin from Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Tilleman

    Full Text Available Studies of CO ligand binding revealed that two protein states with different ligand affinities exist in the protoglobin from Methanosarcina acetivorans (in MaPgb*, residue Cys(E20101 was mutated to Ser. The switch between the two states occurs upon the ligation of MaPgb*. In this work, site-directed mutagenesis was used to explore the role of selected amino acids in ligand sensing and stabilization and in affecting the equilibrium between the "more reactive" and "less reactive" conformational states of MaPgb*. A combination of experimental data obtained from electronic and resonance Raman absorption spectra, CO ligand-binding kinetics, and X-ray crystallography was employed. Three amino acids were assigned a critical role: Trp(60B9, Tyr(61B10, and Phe(93E11. Trp(60B9 and Tyr(61B10 are involved in ligand stabilization in the distal heme pocket; the strength of their interaction was reflected by the spectra of the CO-ligated MaPgb* and by the CO dissociation rate constants. In contrast, Phe(93E11 is a key player in sensing the heme-bound ligand and promotes the rotation of the Trp(60B9 side chain, thus favoring ligand stabilization. Although the structural bases of the fast CO binding rate constant of MaPgb* are still unclear, Trp(60B9, Tyr(61B10, and Phe(93E11 play a role in regulating heme/ligand affinity.

  4. Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ontko, A.

    1997-10-08

    The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a {sup 13}C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.

  5. Stability of polymer binders in Li-O2 batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Xu, Wu; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nie, Zimin; Li, Xiaohong S.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-06-24

    A number of polymers with various chemical structures were studied as binders for air electrodes in Li-O2 batteries. The nature of the polymer significantly affects the binding properties in the carbon electrodes thus altering the discharge performance of Li-O2 batteries. Stability of polymers to the aggressive reduced oxygen species generated during discharge was tested by ball milling them with KO2 and Li2O2, respectively. Most of the polymers decomposed under these conditions and mechanisms of the decompositions are proposed for some of the polymers. Polyethylene was found to have excellent stability and is suggested as robust binder for air electrodes in Li-O2 batteries.

  6. Bacterial Diversity Stabilizes Community Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Scheu, Stefan; Jousset, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Background: Stability is a crucial ecosystem feature gaining particular importance in face of increasing anthropogenic stressors. Biodiversity is considered to be a driving biotic force maintaining stability, and in this study we investigate how different indices of biodiversity affect the stability of communities in varied abiotic (composition of available resources) and biotic (invasion) contexts. Methodology/Principal Findings: We set up microbial microcosms to study the effects of geno...

  7. Taxol-stabilized microtubules promote the formation of filaments from unmodified full-length Tau in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Aranda R.; Goodson, Holly V.

    2012-01-01

    Tau is a neuronal protein that stabilizes the microtubule (MT) network, but it also forms filaments associated with Alzheimer's disease. Understanding Tau–MT and Tau–Tau interactions would help to establish Tau function in health and disease. For many years, literature reports on Tau–MT binding behavior and affinity have remained surprisingly contradictory (e.g., 10-fold variation in Tau–MT affinity). Tau–Tau interactions have also been investigated, but whether MTs might affect Tau filament ...

  8. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  9. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  10. Structure and stability of a DNA triple helix in solution: NMR studies on d(T) sub 6 ter dot d(T) sub 6 and its complex with a minor groove binding drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umemoto, Kimiko; Sarma, Mukti H.; Gupta, Goutam; Luo, Jia; Sarma, Ramaswamy H. (State Univ. of New York, Albany (USA))

    1990-05-23

    The possibility of both Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen A{center dot}T pairs can result in a triple helical structure for d(T){sub 6}{center dot}d(A){sub 6}{center dot}d(T){sub 6} in solution. In the triple helix the Watson-Crick paired T strand can run antiparallel, while the Hoogsteen paired T strand can run parallel to the A strand. On the basis of 1D/2D NMR studies, we have characterized the structural properties of the triple helix in terms of (a) nature of H-bonding, (b) chain conformations and relative chain orientations, (c) location of triplets T{center dot}A{center dot}T with respect to the helix axis, and (d) effects of NaCl and MgCl{sub 2}. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate that a minor groove specific drug Dst2 (a distamycin analogue) can bind to the triple helix. We show that the nature of thermal transition is altered by Dst2 binding; i.e., the host triple helix shows triple {yields} coil (monophasic) transition in the absence of Dst2, while in its presence the helix shows a triplex {yields} duplex {yields} coil (biphasic) transition.

  11. Thermodynamic parameters of the binding of retinol to binding proteins and to membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinol (vitamin A alcohol) is a hydrophobic compound and distributes in vivo mainly between binding proteins and cellular membranes. To better clarify the nature of the interactions of retinol with these phases which have a high affinity for it, the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions were studied. The temperature-dependence profiles of the binding of retinol to bovine retinol binding protein, bovine serum albumin, unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, and plasma membranes from rat liver were determined. It was found that binding of retinol to retinol binding protein is characterized by a large increase in entropy and no change in enthalpy. Binding to albumin is driven by enthalpy and is accompanied by a decrease in entropy. Partitioning of retinal into unilamellar vesicles and into plasma membranes is stabilized both by enthalpic and by entropic components. The implications of these finding are discussed

  12. Quantum Stabilization of Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Weigel, H; Graham, N

    2015-01-01

    In the standard model, stabilization of a classically unstable cosmic string may occur through the quantum fluctuations of a heavy fermion doublet. We review numerical results from a semiclassical expansion in a reduced version of the standard model. In this expansion the leading quantum corrections emerge at one loop level for many internal degrees of freedom. The resulting vacuum polarization energy and the binding energy of occupied fermion energy levels are of the same order, and must therefore be treated on equal footing. Populating these bound states lowers the total energy compared to the same number of free fermions. Charged strings are already stabilized for a fermion mass only somewhat larger than the top quark mass. Though obtained in a reduced version these results suggest that neither extraordinarily large fermion masses nor unrealistic couplings are required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Furthermore we also review results for a quantum stabilization mechanism that prevents close...

  13. Einstein universes stabilized

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, Erhard

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that gravitational self-binding energy may be the source for the vacuum energy term of cosmology is studied in a Newtonian Ansatz. For spherical spaces the attractive force of gravitation and the negative pressure of the vacuum energy term form a self stabilizing system under very reasonable restrictions for the parameters, among them a characteristic coefficient \\beta of self energy. In the Weyl geometric approach to cosmological redshift, Einstein-Weyl universes with observational restrictions of the curvature parameters are dynamically stable, if \\beta is about 40 % smaller than in the exact Newton Ansatz or if the space geometry is elliptical.

  14. Signatures of RNA binding proteins globally coupled to effective microRNA target sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Anders; Wen, Jiayu; Marks, Debora S;

    2010-01-01

    in 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) correlate with expression changes following transfection of small RNAs. The most significantly overrepresented motifs in down-regulated mRNAs are two novel U-rich motifs (URMs), UUUUAAA and UUUGUUU, recently discovered as binding sites for the ELAVL4 (also known as...... HuD) RNA-BP. Surprisingly, the most significantly overrepresented motif in up-regulated mRNAs is the heptanucleotide AU-rich element (ARE), UAUUUAU, which is known to affect mRNA stability via at least 20 different RNA-BPs. We show that destabilization mediated by the transfected miRNA is generally...

  15. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parenta...

  16. Binding Force Dynamics of Streptococcus mutans-glucosyltransferase B to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, G; Marsh, G; Gao, L; Waugh, R; Koo, H

    2015-09-01

    Candida albicans cells are often detected with Streptococcus mutans in plaque biofilms from children affected with early childhood caries. The coadhesion between these 2 organisms appears to be largely mediated by the S. mutans-derived exoenzyme glucosyltransferase B (GtfB); GtfB readily binds to C. albicans cells in an active form, producing glucans locally that provide enhanced binding sites for S. mutans. However, knowledge is limited about the mechanisms by which the bacterial exoenzyme binds to and functions on the fungal surface to promote this unique cross-kingdom interaction. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to understand the strength and binding dynamics modulating GtfB-C. albicans adhesive interactions in situ. Single-molecule force spectroscopy with GtfB-functionalized atomic force microscopy tips demonstrated that the enzyme binds with remarkable strength to the C. albicans cell surface (~2 nN) and showed a low dissociation rate, suggesting a highly stable bond. Strikingly, the binding strength of GtfB to the C. albicans surface was ~2.5-fold higher and the binding stability, ~20 times higher, as compared with the enzyme adhesion to S. mutans. Furthermore, adhesion force maps showed an intriguing pattern of GtfB binding. GtfB adhered heterogeneously on the surface of C. albicans, showing a higher frequency of adhesion failure but large sections of remarkably strong binding forces, suggesting the presence of GtfB binding domains unevenly distributed on the fungal surface. In contrast, GtfB bound uniformly across the S. mutans cell surface with less adhesion failure and a narrower range of binding forces (vs. the C. albicans surface). The data provide the first insights into the mechanisms underlying the adhesive and mechanical properties governing GtfB interactions with C. albicans. The strong and highly stable GtfB binding to C. albicans could explain, at least in part, why this bacterially derived exoenzyme effectively modulates this

  17. Against Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Mac Ginty

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a polemic against the concept and practice of stabilization as practiced by leading states from the global north in peace support interventions. It is not an argument against stability. Instead, it depicts stabilization as an essentially conservative doctrine that runs counter to its stated aims of enhancing local participation and legitimacy. It is an agenda of control that privileges notions of assimilation with international (western standards and mainstreams the military into peace-support operations. As a result, the value of peace is undercut.

  18. Protein stability: a crystallographer’s perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deller, Marc C., E-mail: mdeller@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Shriram Center, 443 Via Ortega, Room 097, MC5082, Stanford, CA 94305-4125 (United States); Kong, Leopold [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Building 8, Room 1A03, 8 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Rupp, Bernhard [k.-k. Hofkristallamt, 91 Audrey Place, Vista, CA 92084 (United States); Medical University of Innsbruck, Schöpfstrasse 41, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-01-26

    An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed.

  19. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    , experience and consumption are all strategic design tools applied by planners and architects. Whereas urban design in former modernist planning served merely functional or political means, urban design has increasingly become an aesthetical mediator of ideologies embedded in the urban field of life forces...... capitalism not only changes urban life and its means of production, it specifically influences the way the city is designed and how it unfolds as events (Anderson & Harrison 2010) and affective, emotional production (Pile 2009). Through examples of urban design and events in the Carlsberg City in Copenhagen...... and The High Line in Chelsea, New York, the paper sets out to define and question these affective modes of production. Whether these productions are socio-material practices consisting of ludic designs (Stevens 2007), temporary architecture or art installations or evental practices consisting of...

  20. Stability and the Evolvability of Function in a Model Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Bloom, Jesse D; Wilke, Claus O.; Arnold, Frances H; Adami, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Functional proteins must fold with some minimal stability to a structure that can perform a biochemical task. Here we use a simple model to investigate the relationship between the stability requirement and the capacity of a protein to evolve the function of binding to a ligand. Although our model contains no built-in tradeoff between stability and function, proteins evolved function more efficiently when the stability requirement was relaxed. Proteins with both high stability and high functi...

  1. Evidence for an intrinsic binding force between dodecaborate dianions and receptors with hydrophobic binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, Jonas; Jenne, Carsten; Bernarding, Johannes; Azov, Vladimir A; Plaumann, Markus

    2016-05-01

    A gas phase binding study revealed strong intrinsic intermolecular interactions between dianionic halogenated closo-dodecaborates [B12X12](2-) and several neutral organic receptors. Oxidation of a tetrathiafulvalene host allowed switching between two host-guest binding modes in a supramolecular complex. Complexes of β-cyclodextrin with [B12F12](2-) show remarkable stability in the gas phase and were successfully tested as carriers for the delivery of boron clusters into cancer cells. PMID:27087168

  2. Current stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A current stabilizer for supplying magnetic lens of β-monochromator at the electron energy up to 1 MeV is described. Stabilization method with use of reference high-stabilized source of direct voltage with switching-in loading (monochromator coil) to circuit of negative feedback of direct-current amplifier with high gain is chosen for stabilization of direct current. The range of current regulation is 0.5 A at available power up to 15 W. Current instability during 10 hour continuous work does not exceed 10-4% that makes it possible to provide instability of electron energy at the monochromator exit using 90Sr+90Y β-nucleide of not more than 10 -4% and number of electrons 2.5x10-4% respectively

  3. A Mutation in cnot8, Component of the Ccr4-Not Complex Regulating Transcript Stability, Affects Expression Levels of Developmental Regulators and Reveals a Role of Fgf3 in Development of Caudal Hypothalamic Dopaminergic Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Peter; Löhr, Heiko B.; Driever, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    While regulation of the activity of developmental control genes at the transcriptional level as well as by specific miRNA-based degradation are intensively studied, little is known whether general cellular mechanisms controlling mRNA decay may contribute to differential stability of mRNAs of developmental control genes. Here, we investigate whether a mutation in the deadenylation dependent mRNA decay pathway may reveal differential effects on developmental mechanisms, using dopaminergic diffe...

  4. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    Recently, in human geography there has been a considerable attention paid to retheorising maps; less as a product and more as practice. This refers to the notion that rather than reading maps as fixed representations, digital mapping is by nature a dynamic, performative, and participatory practice....... In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology...

  5. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  6. Geometries, stabilities, and electronic properties of Be-doped gold clusters: a density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have systematically investigated the geometrical structures, relative stabilities and electronic properties of small bimetallic AunBe (n = 1, 2, ..., 8) clusters using a density functional method at BP86 level. The optimized geometries reveal that the impurity beryllium atom dramatically affects the structures of the Aun clusters. The averaged binding energies, fragmentation energies, second-order difference of energies, the highest occupied-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gaps and chemical hardness are investigated. All of them exhibit a pronounced odd—even alternation, manifesting that the clusters with even number of gold atoms possess relatively higher stabilities. Especially, the linear Au2Be cluster is magic cluster with the most stable chemical stability. According to the natural population analysis, it is found that charge-transferring direction between Au atom and Be atom changes at the size of n = 4. (atomic and molecular physics)

  7. Geometries, stabilities, and electronic properties of Be-doped gold clusters: a density functional theory study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Dong-Dong; Kuang Xiao-Yu; Zhao Ya-Ru; Shao Peng; Li Yan-Fang

    2011-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the geometrical structures, relative stabilities and electronic properties of small bimetallic AunBe (n = 1, 2, ..., 8) clusters using a density functional method at BP86 level. The optimized geometries reveal that the impurity beryllium atom dramatically affects the structures of the Aun clusters. The averaged binding energies, fragmentation energies, second-order difference of energies, the highest occupied-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gaps and chemical hardness are investigated. All of them exhibit a pronounced odd-even alternation,manifesting that the clusters with even number of gold atoms possess relatively higher stabilities. Especially, the linear Au2Be cluster is magic cluster with the most stable chemical stability. According to the natural population analysis, it is found that charge-transferring direction between Au atom and Be atom changes at the size of n = 4.

  8. Plant Hormone Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Napier, Richard

    2004-01-01

    • Aims Receptors for plant hormones are becoming identified with increasing rapidity, although a frustrating number remain unknown. There have also been many more hormone‐binding proteins described than receptors. This Botanical Briefing summarizes what has been discovered about hormone binding sites, their discovery and descriptions, and will not dwell on receptor functions or activities except where these are relevant to understand binding.

  9. Understanding the roles of Lys33 and Arg45 in the binding-site stability of LjLTP10, an LTP related to drought stress in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Riffo, Felipe; Tapia, Gerardo; Parra-Palma, Carolina; Morales-Quintana, Luis

    2015-10-01

    In Lotus japonicus, as in most plants, long-chain fatty acids are important components of cuticular wax, one of the principal functions of which is to act as a barrier to water loss in response to drought stress. It is thought that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are involved in the process of cuticle formation. We previously described LjLTP10 as an LTP involved in cuticle formation during acclimation response to drought stress in L. japonicus. The structural model of LjLTP10 had two residues (K33 and R45) in the hydrophobic cavity, although the role of these residues was unclear. In the present work, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the transport of lipid precursors in L. japonicus and clarified the importance of the residues K33 and R45. First, in silico site-directed mutagenesis studies were carried out on the LjLTP10 structure. Structural analysis showed that LjLTP10 mutants possess similar structures but their hydrophobic cavities are somewhat different. Unfavorable energies for the interactions of the mutant proteins with different ligands were found by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. We also examined the contributions of energetic parameters to the free energy of the protein-ligand complex using the MM-GBSA method. Results showed that the different complexes present similar, favorable van der Waals interactions, whereas electrostatic interactions were not favored in the mutant structures. Our study indicates that the residues K33 and R45 play a crucial role in maintaining the binding pocket structure required for lipid transport. PMID:26404479

  10. In vitro characterization of a novel C,N-cyclometalated benzimidazole Ru(II) arene complex: stability, intracellular distribution and binding, effects on organic osmolyte homeostasis and induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støving Dam, Celina; Alejo Perez Henarejos, Sergio; Tsolakou, Theodosia; Alexander Segato, Christian; Gammelgaard, Bente; Yellol, Gorakh S; Ruiz, José; Lambert, Ian Henry; Stürup, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    In the present work a novel C,N-cyclometalated benzimidazole Ru(ii) arene complex (GY34) was characterized by applying an alternative, diverse approach considering both chemical and biological aspects. RP-HPLC-ICP-MS and RP-HPLC-ESI-MS analysis proved that GY34 in both RPMI-1640 cell medium and ammonium acetate buffer was transformed into several subspecies and the importance of evaluating and controlling analyte stability throughout experiments was demonstrated. Applying a novel cell fractionation protocol GY34 was found to target cell nuclei and mitochondria in Ehrlich Lettré Ascites (ELA) cells, with the intracellular distribution depending on GY34 concentration in the cell medium during incubation. In ELA cells 96 ± 0.2% of cytosolic GY34 was bound to high-molecular species. Furthermore, using the tracer technique GY34 was found to reduce uptake and increase release of the organic osmolyte taurine in ELA cells, with innate resistance to Cisplatin and in A2780 human ovarian cancer cells, with acquired resistance to Cisplatin. Importantly, FACS analysis revealed that GY34 induced apoptosis in ELA cells. The present data suggest the potential of GY34 in overcoming Cisplatin resistance. The methodology applied can be used as a general protocol and an additional tool in the initial evaluation of novel metal-based drugs. PMID:25805368

  11. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  12. PARALLEL STABILIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.L.LIONS

    1999-01-01

    A new algorithm for the stabilization of (possibly turbulent, chaotic) distributed systems, governed by linear or non linear systems of equations is presented. The SPA (Stabilization Parallel Algorithm) is based on a systematic parallel decomposition of the problem (related to arbitrarily overlapping decomposition of domains) and on a penalty argument. SPA is presented here for the case of linear parabolic equations: with distrjbuted or boundary control. It extends to practically all linear and non linear evolution equations, as it will be presented in several other publications.

  13. The bovine papillomavirus 1 E2 protein contains two activation domains: one that interacts with TBP and another that functions after TBP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, G; Ham, J; Lefebvre, O; Yaniv, M

    1995-01-16

    The E2 transactivator of bovine papillomavirus type-1 is unable to activate minimal promoters in vivo that contain only E2 binding sites and a TATA box. This block can be overcome by over-expression of human TATA binding protein (TBP) or by the addition of either SP1 binding sites or an initiator element to the promoter, suggesting that the binding of TFIID may normally be a rate-limiting step for activation by E2. Surprisingly, purified E2 and TBP bind co-operatively to DNA in vitro when the sites are closely spaced. E2 does not affect the on rate of association but reduces the off rate. The E2 region responsible for this effect is located in the hinge region that links the classic transactivation and DNA binding domains. We demonstrate that the TBP stabilizing domain contributes in vivo to co-operativity with co-expressed TBP and to activation of the major late minimal promoter (MLP) containing E2 sites. In contrast, promoters with SP1 sites are activated to wild-type levels by such a mutant. This promoter specificity is also evident in vitro. A truncated E2 mutant, lacking the classic transactivation domain but containing the TBP stabilizing domain, stimulates transcription of the MLP in vitro, but does not activate promoters with SP1 sites. In conclusion, our results show that the E2 transactivation domain has a modular structure. We have identified one domain which probably acts at an early step in the assembly of the pre-initiation complex and which is involved in reducing the dissociation rate of bound TBP in vitro. The classic N-terminal activation domain of E2 might affect one or several step(s) in the assembly of the preinitiation complex occurring after the binding of TFIID. PMID:7835344

  14. Influence of Fatigue in Neuromuscular Control of Spinal Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Granata, Kevin P.; Slota, Greg P.; Wilson, Sara E.

    2004-01-01

    Lifting-induced fatigue may influence neuromuscular control of spinal stability. Stability is primarily controlled by muscle recruitment, active muscle stiffness, and reflex response. Fatigue has been observed to affect each of these neuromuscular parameters and may therefore affect spinal stability. A biomechanical model of spinal stability was implemented to evaluate the effects of fatigue on spinal stability. The model included a 6-degree-of-freedom representation of the spine controlled b...

  15. Macroeconomic stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated that full employment and sustainable development not necessarily are conflicting goals. On the other hand macroeconomic stability cannot be obtained without a deliberate labour sharing policy and a shift in the composition of private consumption away from traditional material...

  16. Dendrimers bind antioxidant polyphenols and cisplatin drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Abderrezak

    Full Text Available Synthetic polymers of a specific shape and size play major role in drug delivery systems. Dendrimers are unique synthetic macromolecules of nanometer dimensions with a highly branched structure and globular shape with potential applications in gene and drug delivery. We examine the interaction of several dendrimers of different compositions mPEG-PAMAM (G3, mPEG-PAMAM (G4 and PAMAM (G4 with hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs cisplatin, resveratrol, genistein and curcumin at physiological conditions. FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyse drug binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of drug complexation on dendrimer stability and conformation. Structural analysis showed that cisplatin binds dendrimers in hydrophilic mode via Pt cation and polymer terminal NH(2 groups, while curcumin, genistein and resveratrol are located mainly in the cavities binding through both hydrophobic and hydrophilic contacts. The overall binding constants of durg-dendrimers are ranging from 10(2 M(-1 to 10(3 M(-1. The affinity of dendrimer binding was PAMAM-G4>mPEG-PAMAM-G4>mPEG-PAMAM-G3, while the order of drug-polymer stability was curcumin>cisplatin>genistein>resveratrol. Molecular modeling showed larger stability for genisten-PAMAM-G4 (ΔG = -4.75 kcal/mol than curcumin-PAMAM-G4 ((ΔG = -4.53 kcal/mol and resveratrol-PAMAM-G4 ((ΔG = -4.39 kcal/mol. Dendrimers might act as carriers to transport hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs.

  17. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  18. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Xavier; Place, Christophe; Delage, Helene; Mongelard, Fabien; Monier, Karine; Bouvet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells. PMID:27309529

  19. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gaume

    Full Text Available Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells.

  20. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome type IV: a multi-exon deletion in one of the two COL3A1 alleles affecting structure, stability, and processing of type III procollagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Superti-Furga, A.; Gugler, E.; Gitzelmann, R.; Steinmann, B.

    1988-05-05

    The authors have studied a patient with severe, dominantly inherited Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The results indicate that this patient carries a deletion of 3.3 kilobase pairs in the triple helical coding domain of one of the two alleles for the pro-..cap alpha..-chains of type III collagen (COL3A1). His cultured skin fibroblasts contain equal amounts of normal length mRNA and of mRNA shortened by approximately 600 bases, and synthesize both normal and shortened pro-..cap alpha..1(III)-chains. In procollagen molecules containing one or more shortened chains, a triple helix is formed with a length of only about 780 amino acids. The mutant procollagen molecules have decreased thermal stability, are less efficiently secreted, and are not processed as their normal counterpart. The deletion in this family is the first mutation to be described in COL3A1.

  1. Glycolipid binding preferences of Shiga toxin variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayali S Karve

    Full Text Available The major virulence factor of Shiga toxin producing E. coli, is Shiga toxin (Stx, an AB5 toxin that consists of a ribosomal RNA-cleaving A-subunit surrounded by a pentamer of receptor-binding B subunits. The two major isoforms, Stx1 and Stx2, and Stx2 variants (Stx2a-h significantly differ in toxicity. The exact reason for this toxicity difference is unknown, however different receptor binding preferences are speculated to play a role. Previous studies used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to study binding of Stx1 and Stx2a toxoids to glycolipid receptors. Here, we studied binding of holotoxin and B-subunits of Stx1, Stx2a, Stx2b, Stx2c and Stx2d to glycolipid receptors globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4 in the presence of cell membrane components such as phosphatidylcholine (PC, cholesterol (Ch and other neutral glycolipids. In the absence of PC and Ch, holotoxins of Stx2 variants bound to mixtures of Gb3 with other glycolipids but not to Gb3 or Gb4 alone. Binding of all Stx holotoxins significantly increased in the presence of PC and Ch. Previously, Stx2a has been shown to form a less stable B-pentamer compared to Stx1. However, its effect on glycolipid receptor binding is unknown. In this study, we showed that even in the absence of the A-subunit, the B-subunits of both Stx1 and Stx2a were able to bind to the glycolipids and the more stable B-pentamer formed by Stx1 bound better than the less stable pentamer of Stx2a. B-subunit mutant of Stx1 L41Q, which shows similar stability as Stx2a B-subunits, lacked glycolipid binding, suggesting that pentamerization is more critical for binding of Stx1 than Stx2a.

  2. How does real affect affect affect recognition in speech?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, Khiet Phuong

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was to develop speech-based affect recognition systems that can deal with spontaneous (‘real’) affect instead of acted affect. Several affect recognition experiments with spontaneous affective speech data were carried out to investigate what combinati

  3. Interaction of zinc and cobalt with dipeptides and their DNA binding studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Rabindra Reddy; M Radhika; K Srinivas Rao

    2004-06-01

    Interactions of zinc and cobalt with peptides cysteinylglycine and histidylglycine have been studied. The binding modes were identified and geometry assigned. Stabilities of these complexes and their ability to bind DNA have been investigated. It is demonstrated that only zinc complexes bind DNA as compared to cobalt complexes.

  4. Hydrogen binding effect on charged P2 ( = 1-7) clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhicong Fang; Xiangjun Kuang

    2013-11-01

    An all-electron (AE) calculation of the hydrogen binding effect on charged phosphorus clusters has been performed under the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Compared with the P$^{\\pm}_{2n}$ ( = 1-7) clusters, the HP$^{\\pm}_{2n}$ ( = 1-7), cluster has shorter average P-P bond length, larger binding energy and HOMOLUMO gap (HLG), higher chemical hardness and frequency of P-P mode. After binding with one hydrogen atom, the electronic structure is changed from open electronic shell to closed electronic shell. Geometrical stability, chemical stability and electronic stability are strengthened. These stability enhancements may be simply understood considering the electron pairing effect.

  5. Frequency stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, Věnceslav František

    Bratislava: Department of Radio and Electronics, FEI STU, 2006 - (Píš, P.; Krajčušková, Z.), I.1-I.9 ISBN 80-227-2388-6. [ Radio elektronika 2006. Conference proceedings. Bratislava (SK), 25.04.2006-26.04.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0852 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : noise * frequency stability * frequency control Subject RIV: JW - Navigation, Links, Detection ; Counter-Measures

  6. Python bindings for libcloudph++

    OpenAIRE

    Jarecka, Dorota; Arabas, Sylwester; Del Vento, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This technical note introduces the Python bindings for libcloudph++. The libcloudph++ is a C++ library of algorithms for representing atmospheric cloud microphysics in numerical models. The bindings expose the complete functionality of the library to the Python users. The bindings are implemented using the Boost.Python C++ library and use NumPy arrays. This note includes listings with Python scripts exemplifying the use of selected library components. An example solution for using the Python ...

  7. Plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This document describes the functional design of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS). The objective of this system is to stabilize and package plutonium metals and oxides of greater than 50% wt, as well as other selected isotopes, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE standard for safe storage of these materials for 50 years. This system will support completion of stabilization and packaging campaigns of the inventory at a number of affected sites before the year 2002. The package will be standard for all sites and will provide a minimum of two uncontaminated, organics free confinement barriers for the packaged material.

  8. Baking stability of acesulfame K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, C; von Rymon Lipinski, G W; Böttger, D

    1992-05-01

    The stability of acesulfame K during baking was investigated at different baking temperatures and baking times. The contents of acesulfame K in baked and unbaked doughs were determined by HPLC. The recovery rate of acesulfame K was independent of the baking conditions chosen and correlated with the recovery rate of acesulfame K in the unbaked doughs. As the stability of acesulfame K cannot only be affected by baking temperature and baking time but also by pH value and moisture content of the baked goods, additional stability investigations were performed with acidic fillings and apple pie. Even under these extreme baking conditions no decomposition of acesulfame K could be detected. PMID:1621451

  9. Plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the functional design of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS). The objective of this system is to stabilize and package plutonium metals and oxides of greater than 50% wt, as well as other selected isotopes, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE standard for safe storage of these materials for 50 years. This system will support completion of stabilization and packaging campaigns of the inventory at a number of affected sites before the year 2002. The package will be standard for all sites and will provide a minimum of two uncontaminated, organics free confinement barriers for the packaged material

  10. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on the binding of sanguinarine and berberine to triple and double helical DNA and RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suman; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Ray, Arghya; Maiti, Motilal

    2003-04-01

    A comparative study on the interaction of sanguinarine and berberine with DNA and RNA triplexes and their parent duplexes was performed, by using a combination of spectrophotometric, UV thermal melting, circular dichroic and thermodynamic techniques. Formation of the DNA and RNA triplexes was confirmed from UV-melting and circular dichroic measurements. The interaction process was characterized by increase of thermal melting temperature, perturbation in circular dichroic spectrum and the typical hypochromic and bathochromic effects in the absorption spectrum. Scatchard analysis indicated that both the alkaloids bound to the triplex and duplex structures in a non-cooperative manner and the binding was stronger to triplexes than to parent duplexes. Thermal melting studies further indicated that sanguinarine stabilized the Hoogsteen base paired third strand of both DNA and RNA triplexes more tightly compared to their Watson-Crick strands, while berberine stabilized the third strand only without affecting the Watson-Crick strand. However, sanguinarine stabilized the parent duplexes while no stabilization was observed with berberine under identical conditions. Circular dichroic studies were also consistent with the observation that perturbations of DNA and RNA triplexes were more compared to their parent duplexes in presence of the alkaloids. Thermodynamic data revealed that binding of sanguinarine and berberine to triplexes (T.AxT and U.AxU) and duplexes (A.T and A.U) showed negative enthalpy changes and positive entropy changes but that of sanguinarine to C.GxC(+) triplex and G.C duplex exhibited negative enthalpy and negative entropy changes. Taken together, these results suggest that both sanguinarine and berberine can bind and stabilize the DNA and RNA triplexes more strongly than their respective parent duplexes. PMID:12643773

  11. Binding of TDP-43 to the 3'UTR of its cognate mRNA enhances its solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yulong; Arslan, Pharhad E; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M; Chakrabartty, Avi

    2014-09-23

    TAR DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a broad range of neurodegenerative diseases termed TDP-43 proteinopathies, which encompass a spectrum of diseases ranging from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to frontotemporal dementia. Pathologically misfolded and aggregated forms of TDP-43 are found in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies of affected neurons in these diseases. The mechanism by which TDP-43 misfolding causes disease is not well-understood. Current hypotheses postulate that the TDP-43 aggregation process plays a major role in pathogenesis. We amplify that hypothesis and suggest that binding of cognate ligands to TDP-43 can stabilize the native functional state of the protein and ameliorate aggregation. We expressed recombinant TDP-43 containing an N-terminal Venus yellow fluorescent protein tag in Escherichia coli and induced its aggregation by altering solvent salt concentrations and examined the extent to which various oligonucleotide molecules affect its aggregation in vitro using aggregation-induced turbidity assays. We show that vYFP-TDP-43 binding to its naturally occurring RNA target that comprises a sequence on the 3'UTR region of its mRNA improves its solubility, suggesting interplay among TDP-43 solubility, oligonucleotide binding, and TDP-43 autoregulation. PMID:25171271

  12. KLF1 stabilizes GATA-1 and TAL1 occupancy in the human β-globin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yujin; Kim, Yea Woon; Yun, Jangmi; Shin, Jongo; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-01

    KLF1 is an erythroid specific transcription factor that binds to regulatory regions of erythroid genes. Binding sites of KLF1 are often found near binding sites of GATA-1 and TAL1. In the β-globin locus, KLF1 is required for forming active chromatin structure, although its role is unclear. To explore the role of KLF1 in transcribing the human γ-globin genes, we stably reduced the expression of KLF1 in erythroid K562 cells, compromising its association in the β-globin locus. The γ-globin transcription was reduced with disappearance of active chromatin structure of the locus in the KLF1 knockdown cells. Interestingly, GATA-1 and TAL1 binding was reduced in the β-globin locus, even though their expressions were not affected by KLF1 knockdown. The KLF1-dependent GATA-1 and TAL1 binding was observed in the adult locus transcribing the β-globin gene and in several erythroid genes, where GATA-1 occupancy is independent from TAL1. These results indicate that KLF1 plays a role in facilitating and/or stabilizing GATA-1 and TAL1 occupancy in the erythroid genes, contributing to the generation of active chromatin structure such as histone acetylation and chromatin looping. PMID:25528728

  13. DNS & Bind Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Cricket

    2011-01-01

    The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. Following O'Reilly's popular problem-and-solution cookbook format, this title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, "How do I get BIND?" to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. It's full of BIND configuration files that yo

  14. Python bindings for libcloudph++

    CERN Document Server

    Jarecka, Dorota; Del Vento, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This technical note introduces the Python bindings for libcloudph++. The libcloudph++ is a C++ library of algorithms for representing atmospheric cloud microphysics in numerical models. The bindings expose the complete functionality of the library to the Python users. The bindings are implemented using the Boost.Python C++ library and use NumPy arrays. This note includes listings with Python scripts exemplifying the use of selected library components. An example solution for using the Python bindings to access libcloudph++ from Fortran is presented.

  15. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T; DeGrado, William F

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol(-1)). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  16. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; Degrado, William F.

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol-1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  17. The Case against Binding Interest Arbitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Charles I.

    1984-01-01

    The author contends that districts should reject binding interest arbitration as a means of resolving an impasse in contract negotiations, charging that it hampers good faith bargaining, adversely affects fiscal and operational management of the school system, and diminishes the governing role of the board of education. (MJL)

  18. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120 and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM. Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC. A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

  19. Affective state dependence and relative trait stability of perfectionism in sleep disturbances Dependência do estado afetivo e estabilidade relativa do traço do perfeccionismo nas perturbações de sono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta R. Maia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the degree of absolute change, relative stability and state dependence of trait perfectionism in sleep disturbances in a sample of university students. METHOD: Participants completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and two items concerning sleep difficulties. The mean age at T0 (baseline was 19.59 years (SD = 1.61, range = 17-25 and 62.5% of the sample were female. RESULTS: Absolute changes in self-oriented and socially-prescribed perfectionism were found. Relative stability was found for all perfectionism dimensions. Prior and concurrent sleep disturbances explained a significant amount of variance in perfectionism. Controlling for the effects of sleep measures, prior selforiented perfectionism and other-oriented perfectionism were the only significant predictors of subsequent self-oriented perfectionism and otheroriented perfectionism, at T1 and T2. Difficulties falling asleep at T1 and socially-prescribed perfectionism at T0 were significant predictors of socially-prescribed perfectionism at T1. CONCLUSION: Despite significant changes in perfectionism mean scores over the follow-up, the correlation analyses demonstrated that participants remained quite stable in regard to their relative levels of perfectionism. As concurrent difficulties initiating sleep also predicted concurrent socially-prescribed perfectionism, this seems to be one dimension of perfectionism with trait-state characteristics.OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o grau de mudança absoluta, de estabilidade relativa e dependência do estado do perfeccionismo nas perturbações de sono numa amostra de estudantes universitários. MÉTODO: Os sujeitos completaram a Escala Multidimensional do Perfeccionismo e dois itens sobre dificuldades em dormir. Os dados foram recolhidos em três momentos de avaliação, separados por um intervalo de um ano acadêmico. A idade média dos sujeitos noT0 era de 19,59 anos (DP = 1,61, variação = 17-25; 62,5% eram mulheres

  20. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  1. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  2. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  3. DNA Sequence Determinants Controlling Affinity, Stability and Shape of DNA Complexes Bound by the Nucleoid Protein Fis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Stephen P; Stella, Stefano; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid C

    2016-01-01

    The abundant Fis nucleoid protein selectively binds poorly related DNA sequences with high affinities to regulate diverse DNA reactions. Fis binds DNA primarily through DNA backbone contacts and selects target sites by reading conformational properties of DNA sequences, most prominently intrinsic minor groove widths. High-affinity binding requires Fis-stabilized DNA conformational changes that vary depending on DNA sequence. In order to better understand the molecular basis for high affinity site recognition, we analyzed the effects of DNA sequence within and flanking the core Fis binding site on binding affinity and DNA structure. X-ray crystal structures of Fis-DNA complexes containing variable sequences in the noncontacted center of the binding site or variations within the major groove interfaces show that the DNA can adapt to the Fis dimer surface asymmetrically. We show that the presence and position of pyrimidine-purine base steps within the major groove interfaces affect both local DNA bending and minor groove compression to modulate affinities and lifetimes of Fis-DNA complexes. Sequences flanking the core binding site also modulate complex affinities, lifetimes, and the degree of local and global Fis-induced DNA bending. In particular, a G immediately upstream of the 15 bp core sequence inhibits binding and bending, and A-tracts within the flanking base pairs increase both complex lifetimes and global DNA curvatures. Taken together, our observations support a revised DNA motif specifying high-affinity Fis binding and highlight the range of conformations that Fis-bound DNA can adopt. The affinities and DNA conformations of individual Fis-DNA complexes are likely to be tailored to their context-specific biological functions. PMID:26959646

  4. Serum albumin ligand binding volumes using high pressure denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We use pressure shift assay to study the thermodynamics of decanoate and dodecanoate ligand binding to human serum albumin. ► Pressure shift assay provides information on ligand binding volumes. ► The ligands stabilized human serum albumin against both pressure and temperature denaturation. ► ANS is a strong human serum albumin stabilizer and competes with lipids for the same binding sites. - Abstract: The pressure shift assay (PSA, also termed either PressureFluor or differential pressure fluorimetry) was used to study the thermodynamics of decanoate and dodecanoate lipid binding to human serum albumin (HSA) in the temperature range from 25 °C to 80 °C and the pressure range from 0.1 MPa to 400 MPa. The ligands stabilized HSA against both pressure and temperature denaturation. The P–T phase diagram for HSA bound to saturated fatty acids is shown. Pressure induced HSA denaturation reversibility is demonstrated via either intrinsic tryptophan or extrinsic probe 1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate (ANS) fluorescence. The effect of guanidinium in a PSA was studied. PSA provides information on ligand binding volumes. The volume changes from protein–ligand binding are thermodynamically important and could be used in designing compounds with specific volumetric binding properties.

  5. Local conformational fluctuations can modulate the coupling between proton binding and global structural transitions in proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Whitten, Steven T; García-Moreno E., Bertrand; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2005-01-01

    Local conformational fluctuations in proteins can affect the coupling between ligand binding and global structural transitions. This finding was established by monitoring quantitatively how the population distribution in the ensemble of microstates of staphylococcal nuclease was affected by proton binding. Analysis of acid unfolding and proton-binding data with an ensemble-based model suggests that local fluctuations: (i) can be effective modulators of ligand-binding affinities, (ii) are impo...

  6. Axisymmetric annular curtain stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A temporal stability analysis was carried out to investigate the stability of an axially moving viscous annular liquid jet subject to axisymmetric disturbances in surrounding co-flowing viscous gas media. We investigated in this study the effects of inertia, surface tension, the gas-to-liquid density ratio, the inner-to-outer radius ratio and the gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio on the stability of the jet. With an increase in inertia, the growth rate of the unstable disturbances is found to increase. The dominant (or most unstable) wavenumber decreases with increasing Reynolds number for larger values of the gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio. However, an opposite tendency for the most unstable wavenumber is predicted for small viscosity ratio in the same inertia range. The surrounding gas density, in the presence of viscosity, always reduces the growth rate, hence stabilizing the flow. There exists a critical value of the density ratio above which the flow becomes stable for very small viscosity ratio, whereas for large viscosity ratio, no stable flow appears in the same range of the density ratio. The curvature has a significant destabilizing effect on the thin annular jet, whereas for a relatively thick jet, the maximum growth rate decreases as the inner radius increases, irrespective of the surrounding gas viscosity. The degree of instability increases with Weber number for a relatively large viscosity ratio. In contrast, for small viscosity ratio, the growth rate exhibits a dramatic dependence on the surface tension. There is a small Weber number range, which depends on the viscosity ratio, where the flow is stable. The viscosity ratio always stabilizes the flow. However, the dominant wavenumber increases with increasing viscosity ratio. The range of unstable wavenumbers is affected only by the curvature effect. (paper)

  7. Moral Hazard and Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumennasan, Norovsambuu

    2014-01-01

    Economists perceive moral hazard as an undesirable problem because it undermines efficiency. Carefully designed contracts can mitigate the moral hazard problem, but this assumes that a team is already formed. This paper demonstrates that these contracts are sometimes the reason why teams do not...... form. Formally, we study the team formation problem in which the agents’ efforts are not verifiable and the size of teams does not exceed quota r . We show that if the team members cannot make transfers, then moral hazard affects stability positively in a large class of games. For example, a stable...

  8. Topographical changes of ground surface affected by the Tarim Desert Highway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shengyu; LEI Jiaqiang; XU Xinwen; WANG Lixin; ZHOU Zhibin; LI Hongzhong

    2006-01-01

    The Tarim Desert Highway is the longest highway crossing the mobile desert in the world. The highway and its sand protection system were established in 1995. This great project must have significant effect on the aeolian environment in its neighborhoods. In 2004, we investigated the topographic changes of ground surface within the sand protection system and its external adjacent area in the hinterland of the Taklimakan Desert. The results showed that (i) the original topographic patterns of ground surface were greatly changed, and erosion as well as deposition was distributed clearly on the ground surface, affected by the road and its sand protection system; (ii) sediment deposited in the sand protection system gradually heightened the ground surface, but each part in the system changed differently: in the sand-blocking belt, a transverse sand ridge was formed in the same direction as the upright sand barrier; in the sand-binding belt, sediment was aggraded on the original surface in a certain thickness; at the initial stages since the establishment of the sand protection system, erosion had taken place in the un-stabilized area named by the deposition belt between the sand-blocking belt and the sand-binding belt, the inner of sand-binding belt, the windward slope of dunes in the sand-binding belt, and the neighboring leeward area of the sand protection system.

  9. Ligand binding and thermostability of different allosteric states of the insulin zinc-hexamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B;

    2006-01-01

    The influence of ligand binding and conformation state on the thermostability of hexameric zinc-insulin was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The insulin hexamer exists in equilibrium between the forms T6, T3R3, and R6. Phenolic ligands induce and stabilize the T3R3- and R6-states...... which are further stabilized by binding of certain anions that do not stabilize the T6-state. It was shown that the thermostability of the resorcinol-stabilized R6-state was significantly higher than that of the T6-state. Further analysis showed that phenol- and m-cresol-stabilized R6-hexamer loses...

  10. 大规模风电集中接入对电力系统暂态功角稳定性的影响(二):影响因素分析%Impact of Large-scale Wind Power Centralized Integration on Transient Angle Stability of Power Systems-Part II:Factors Affecting Transient Angle Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤蕾; 沈沉; 张雪敏

    2015-01-01

    该文作为2篇系列文章的第2篇,重点分析双馈风机组成的大规模风电场集中接入电力系统后影响系统暂态功角稳定性的关键因素。在第1篇文章理论分析的基础上,根据扩展等面积定则,讨论了同步机出力调整、风电渗透率和风电场选址等因素起主导作用时,电力系统暂态功角稳定性的变化。然后,从暂态功角稳定的角度出发,总结出风电接入情况下指导电力系统规划和调度的一般规律。最后,通过在双机互联系统上进行的数值仿真验证所提规律的正确性。结果表明,从本质上看,各种因素的变化如果有助于减小前向机群的有功出力,则有助于提高电力系统的暂态功角稳定水平。%As the second part of this two-part paper, this paper focused on the factors that had impacts on the transient angle stability of power systems with large-scale wind power farms consisted of doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG). Based on the theoretic analysis in the first part of this paper, how wind power penetration influenced power system transient angle stability was discussed according to the extended equal area criterion when the factors, such as the synchronous generator dispatch pattern, the siting of wind farms and the wind power penetration rate, played a leading role. Then general rules for power system planning and dispatching considering transient angle stability of power systems with high wind power penetration rate were summarized. Finally, the proposed rules were verified by simulations on a two-machine power system. The results show that in essence, if the variation of the factors helps reduce the active power of synchronous generators of which the power angle swings forward, it is beneficial to transient angle stability of power systems.

  11. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  12. Investigation of the binding of cis/trans-[MCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)](-) (M = Ru, Os) complexes to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dömötör, Orsolya; Rathgeb, Anna; Kuhn, Paul-Steffen; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Bačić, Goran; Enyedy, Eva Anna; Arion, Vladimir B

    2016-06-01

    Overall binding affinity of sodium or indazolium cis/trans-[MCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)] (M = Ru, Os) complexes towards human serum albumin (HSA) and high molecular mass components of the blood serum was monitored by ultrafiltration. HSA was found to be mainly responsible for the binding of the studied ruthenium and osmium complexes. In other words, this protein can provide a depot for the compounds and can affect their biodistribution and transport processes. In order to elucidate the HSA binding sites tryptophan fluorescence quenching studies and displacement reactions with the established site markers warfarin and dansylglycine were performed. Conditional stability constants for the binding to sites I and II on HSA were computed showing that the studied ruthenium and osmium complexes are able to bind into both sites with moderately strong affinity (logK' = 4.4-5.1). Site I is slightly more favored over site II for all complexes. No significant differences in the HSA binding properties were found for these metal complexes demonstrating negligible influence of the type of counterion (sodium vs indazolium), the metal ion center identity (Ru vs. Os) or the position of the nitrosyl group on the binding event. Electron paramagnetic resonance spin labeling of HSA revealed that indazolium trans-[RuCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)] and long-chain fatty acids show competitive binding to HSA. Moreover, this complex has a higher affinity for site I, but when present in excess, it is able to bind to site II as well, and displace fatty acids. PMID:26908285

  13. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stockner

    Full Text Available The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT. Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22% and (iii the extracellular loop 2 (EL2 of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  14. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n{sub b}) and apparent association constant (K{sub app}) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n{sub b} = 23.7 and log K{sub app} = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe{sup 2+} sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided.

  15. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (nb) and apparent association constant (Kapp) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at nb = 23.7 and log Kapp = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe2+ sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided

  16. The complex interplay between ligand binding and conformational structure of the folate binding protein (folate receptor)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Hansen, Steen I.

    2015-01-01

    folate, probably due to shielding of binding sites between interacting hydrophobic patches. Titration with folate removes apo-monomers, favoring dissociation of self-associated apo-FBP into apo-monomers. Folate anchors to FBP through a network of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, and the...... binding induces a conformational change with formation of hydrophilic and stable holo-FBP. Holo-FBP exhibits a ligand-mediated concentration-dependent self-association into multimers of great thermal and chemical stability due to strong intermolecular forces. Both ligand and FBP are thus protected against...

  17. Factors Affecting Biological Stability of Drinking Water Distribution Systems%超滤工艺出水管网生物稳定性影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春敏; 李星; 杨艳玲; 相坤; 赵乐乐; 郭栋

    2013-01-01

    Annular biofilm reactor was used to simulate water distribution system carrying effluent from biological activated carbon/ultrafiltration process. The effects of shear force, pipe materials and AOC on biofilm biomass on coupons as well as the relationship of the effluent turbidity and biofilm to suspended bacteria were investigated. The results showed that the effluent concentration of AOC decreased with the increase in biomass on coupons. The maximum biomasses on coupons with 100 r/min and 50 r/min in stainless steel pipe and copper pipe were of the same order of magnitude. In stainless steel pipe, the amount of suspended bacteria was the major factor affecting the effluent turbidity level. In addition, the biomass on biofilm had the positive correlation with the amount of suspended bacteria.%以活性炭/超滤出水为试验水样,采用生物膜培养反应器(BAR)模拟实际给水管网,研究了剪切力、管材以及水中可同化有机碳(AOC)对挂片生物膜上生物量的影响,以及反应器出水浊度、生物膜与悬浮菌的关系.结果表明,反应器出水AOC浓度随着挂片上生物量的增加而减少;在不锈钢管和铜管中,转速分别为100、50 r/min下挂片上最大生物量在同一数量级上;在不锈钢给水管中,悬浮菌是影响浊度的主要因素,悬浮菌量的多少影响反应器出水浊度的高低;生物膜上生物量与悬浮菌量有相同的变化趋势.

  18. Plasma Stability in Closed Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigate the stability of closed plasma configurations using the general geometric criterion of local stability developed by Mercier and co-workers. To render in an explicit form the equilibrium configuration parameters on which the stability of the configuration depends, the general geometric criterion is transformed by expanding with respect to the deviation from the magnetic axis. In the resulting criterion the terms describing the ballooning mode and plasma stabilization through deepening of the magnetic well due to the toroidal magnetic surface displacement associated with the plasma pressure are rendered explicitly. For circular magnetic surface cross-sections these terms cancel out exactly and the stability condition is found to be independent of the plasma pressure. In the case of elliptical magnetic surface cross-sections, the effect of the ballooning instability predominates over deepening of the magnetic well. In this case the plasma pressure, which is critical for stability, is limited. The resulting stability criterion is applied to a number of toroidal systems. The authors consider the conditions for stability in closed systems with a spatial magnetic axis and in systems with a circular magnetic axis of the two-turn and three-turn stellarator type. They also consider the effect of the longitudinal current on plasma stability in such systems. In closed magnetic traps without longitudinal current, plasma stabilization is relatively simple in the presence of a shallow magnetic well. The critical value of β = 2p/B22 may exceed the relative depth of the vacuum magnetic well ΦV''/V' by an order of magnitude. When there is a longitudinal current, there appear additional factors that affect the stable containment of the plasma. (author)

  19. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  20. Sulfo-SMCC Prevents Annealing of Taxol-Stabilized Microtubules In Vitro

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule structure and functions have been widely studied in vitro and in cells. Research has shown that cysteines on tubulin play a crucial role in the polymerization of microtubules. Here, we show that blocking sulfhydryl groups of cysteines in taxol-stabilized polymerized microtubules with a commonly used chemical crosslinker prevents temporal end-to-end annealing of microtubules in vitro. This can dramatically affect the length distribution of the microtubules. The crosslinker sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, sulfo-SMCC, consists of a maleimide and a N-hydroxysuccinimide ester group to bind to sulfhydryl groups and primary amines, respectively. Interestingly, addition of a maleimide dye alone does not show the same prevention of annealing in stabilized microtubules. This study shows that the sulfhydryl groups of cysteines of tubulin that are vital for the polymerization are also important for the subsequent annealing of microtubules.

  1. Radiation damage to DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA-binding properties of proteins are strongly affected upon irradiation. The tetrameric lactose repressor (a dimer of dimers) losses its ability to bind operator DNA as soon as at least two damages per protomer of each dimer occur. The monomeric MC1 protein losses its ability to bind DNA in two steps : i) at low doses only the specific binding is abolished, whereas the non-specific one is still possible; ii) at high doses all binding vanishes. Moreover, the DNA bending induced by MC1 binding is less pronounced for a protein that underwent the low dose irradiation. When the entire DNA-protein complexes are irradiated, the observed disruption of the complexes is mainly due to the damage of the proteins and not to that of DNA. The doses necessary for complex disruption are higher than those inactivating the free protein. This difference, larger for MC1 than for lactose repressor, is due to the protection of the protein by the bound DNA. The oxidation of the protein side chains that are accessible to the radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals seems to represent the inactivating damage

  2. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Gue eJo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP, which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with twenty mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action.

  3. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo; Schmidt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP), which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with 20 mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action. PMID:24959135

  4. Control Design for an Inertially Stabilized Rifle

    OpenAIRE

    White, Alejandro Porter

    2007-01-01

    An alternate method for mitigating the depredating physiological affects of a soldiers marksmanship due to combat stressors can be achieved through the design and implementation of a active stabilization system for small arms weapons. The INSTAR system is an innovative active stabilization system designed to decouple the shooterâ s disturbance effects from the barrel movement. The INSTAR system uses an piezoelectric actuator separating the barrel of the rifle from its stock to stabilize barr...

  5. Research on mood stabilizers in India

    OpenAIRE

    Avasthi, Ajit; Grover, Sandeep; Aggarwal, Munish

    2010-01-01

    Mood stabilizers have revolutionized the treatment of bipolar affective disorders. We review data originating from India in the form of efficacy, effectiveness, usefulness, safety and tolerability of mood stabilizers. Data is mainly available for the usefulness and side-effects of lithium. A few studies in recent times have evaluated the usefulness of carbamazepine, valproate, atypical antipsychotics and verapamil. Occasional studies have compared two mood stabilizers. Data for long term effi...

  6. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. → PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. → PABP depletion does not affect transcription. → PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  7. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Bag, Jnanankur, E-mail: jbag@uoguelph.ca [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. {yields} PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. {yields} PABP depletion does not affect transcription. {yields} PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  8. Incore stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides an incore stabilizer for preventing collision of neutron guide tubes with each other or with other equipments in a BWR-type reactor even if oscillations in one identical phase such as earthquakes are exerted. Namely, a first connection member connected to a reactor core shroud is inserted between a tuning fork-like branched second connecting members connected to a neutron instrumentation guide tube. A pin is pierced to the second connecting member from above through a pin hole, to connect both of the connection members by a nut disposed below. In this case, double eccentric sleeves are fitted to the first connection member and it is inserted to the second connection members, and they are connected by using pins and nuts. With such a constitution, even if the pin hole of the second connection member is eccentrically deviated, the eccentricity can easily be absorbed by rotating the double eccentric sleeves. As a result, pins can be attached easily. In addition, abrasion resistance of the inner surface of the pin hole is enhanced by using a material of high abrasion resistance for the eccentric sleeves. (I.S.)

  9. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  10. Structural Basis for Binding of RNA and Cofactor by a KsgA Methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua; (NCI)

    2009-03-27

    Among methyltransferases, KsgA and the reaction it catalyzes are conserved throughout evolution. However, the specifics of substrate recognition by the enzyme remain unknown. Here we report structures of Aquifex aeolicus KsgA, in its ligand-free form, in complex with RNA, and in complex with both RNA and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, reaction product of cofactor S-adenosylmethionine), revealing critical structural information on KsgA-RNA and KsgA-SAH interactions. Moreover, the structures show how conformational changes that occur upon RNA binding create the cofactor-binding site. There are nine conserved functional motifs (motifs IVIII and X) in KsgA. Prior to RNA binding, motifs I and VIII are flexible, each exhibiting two distinct conformations. Upon RNA binding, the two motifs become stabilized in one of these conformations, which is compatible with the binding of SAH. Motif X, which is also stabilized upon RNA binding, is directly involved in the binding of SAH.

  11. Influence of target concentration and background binding on in vitro selection of affinity reagents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid-based aptamers possess many useful features that make them a promising alternative to antibodies and other affinity reagents, including well-established chemical synthesis, reversible folding, thermal stability and low cost. However, the selection process typically used to generate aptamers (SELEX often requires significant resources and can fail to yield aptamers with sufficient affinity and specificity. A number of seminal theoretical models and numerical simulations have been reported in the literature offering insights into experimental factors that govern the effectiveness of the selection process. Though useful, these previous models have not considered the full spectrum of experimental factors or the potential impact of tuning these parameters at each round over the course of a multi-round selection process. We have developed an improved mathematical model to address this important question, and report that both target concentration and the degree of non-specific background binding are critical determinants of SELEX efficiency. Although smaller target concentrations should theoretically offer superior selection outcome, we show that the level of background binding dramatically affect the target concentration that will yield maximum enrichment at each round of selection. Thus, our model enables experimentalists to determine appropriate target concentrations as a means for protocol optimization. Finally, we perform a comparative analysis of two different selection methods over multiple rounds of selection, and show that methods with inherently lower background binding offer dramatic advantages in selection efficiency.

  12. Changes of conformation and aggregation state induced by binding of lanthanide ions to insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程驿; 李荣昌; 王夔

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of lanthanide ions (Ln3+) on the across-membrane transport of insulin and subsequent reducing blood glucose, the interactions of Ln3+with Zn-insulin and Zn-free insulin are investigated by spectroscopic methods. The results reveal that the binding of Ln3+ to insulin can induce its structure changes from secondary to quaternary structure, depending on the Ln3+ concentration. In the lower concentration, it triggers the conformational changes of insulin monomer in the binding region with insulin receptor (B(24-30)). It would affect insulin-insulin receptor interaction. Moreover, Ln3+ binding promotes the assembly of insulin monomer from dimer to polymer. The potency of Ln3+ in inducing insulin’s aggregation is stronger than that of Zn2+. Furthermore, the aggregation can be reversed partly by EDTA-treatment, indicating that it is not due to denaturation. Similar to Zn2+ effect, Ln3+ can stabilize insulin hexamer in a certain range of concentration, but is stronger than the former.

  13. Changes of conformation and aggregation state induced by binding of lanthanide ions to insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程驿; 李荣昌; 王夔

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of lanthanide ions (Ln3+) on the across-membrane transport of insulin and subsequent reducing blood glucose, the interactions of Ln3+ with Zn-insulin and Zn-free insulin are investigated by spectroscopic methods. The results reveal that the binding of Ln3+ to insulin can induce its structure changes from secondary to quaternary structure, depending on the Ln3+ concentration. In the lower concentration, it triggers the conformational changes of insulin monomer in the binding region with insulin receptor (B(24-30)). It would affect insulin-insulin receptor interaction. Moreover, Ln3+ binding promotes the assembly of insulin monomer from dimer to polymer. The potency of Ln3+ in inducing insulin's aggregation is stronger than that of Zn2+. Furthermore, the aggregation can be reversed partly by EDTA-treatment, indicating that it is not due to denaturation. Similar to Zn2+ effect, Ln3+ can stabilize insulin hexamer in a certain range of concentration, but is stronger than the former.

  14. Binding of Industrial Deposits of Heavy Metals and Arsenic in the Soil by 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzesiak Piotr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the research studies concerning binding of heavy metals and arsenic (HM+As, occurring in soils affected by emissions from Głogów Copper Smelter and Refinery, by silane nanomaterial have been described. The content of heavy metals and arsenic was determined by AAS and the effectiveness of heavy metals and arsenic binding by 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane was examined. The total leaching level of impurities in those fractions was 73.26% Cu, 74.7% – Pb, 79.5% Zn, 65.81% – Cd and 55.55% As. The studies demonstrated that the total binding of heavy metals and arsenic with nanomaterial in all fractions was about as follows: 20.5% Cu, 9.5% Pb, 7.1% Zn, 25.3% Cd and 10.89% As. The results presented how the safety of food can be cultivated around industrial area, as the currently used soil stabilization technique of HM by soil pH does not guarantee their stable blocking in a sorptive complex.

  15. An external sodium ion binding site controls allosteric gating in TRPV1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Bae, Chanhyung; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons are integrators of painful stimuli and heat, yet how they integrate diverse stimuli and sense temperature remains elusive. Here, we show that external sodium ions stabilize the TRPV1 channel in a closed state, such that removing the external ion leads to channel activation. In studying the underlying mechanism, we find that the temperature sensors in TRPV1 activate in two steps to favor opening, and that the binding of sodium to an extracellular site exerts allosteric control over temperature-sensor activation and opening of the pore. The binding of a tarantula toxin to the external pore also exerts control over temperature-sensor activation, whereas binding of vanilloids influences temperature-sensitivity by largely affecting the open/closed equilibrium. Our results reveal a fundamental role of the external pore in the allosteric control of TRPV1 channel gating and provide essential constraints for understanding how these channels can be tuned by diverse stimuli. PMID:26882503

  16. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  17. Field investigation of keyblock stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    Discontinuities in a rock mass can intersect an excavation surface to form discrete blocks (keyblocks) which can be unstable. This engineering problem is divided into two parts: block identification, and evaluation of block stability. One stable keyblock and thirteen fallen keyblocks were observed in field investigations at the Nevada Test Site. Nine blocks were measured in detail sufficient to allow back-analysis of their stability. Measurements included block geometry, and discontinuity roughness and compressive strength. Back-analysis correctly predicted stability or failure in all but two cases. These two exceptions involved situations that violated the stress assumptions of the stability calculations. Keyblock faces correlated well with known joint set orientations. The effect of tunnel orientation on keyblock frequency was apparent. Back-analysis of physical models successfully predicted block pullout force for two-dimensional models of unit thickness. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analytic models for the stability of simple pyramidal keyblocks were examined. Calculated stability is greater for 3D analyses than for 2D analyses. Calculated keyblock stability increases with larger in situ stress magnitudes, larger lateral stress ratios, and larger shear strengths. Discontinuity stiffness controls block displacement more strongly than it does stability itself. Large keyblocks are less stable than small ones, and stability increases as blocks become more slender. Rock mass temperature decreases reduce the confining stress magnitudes and can lead to failure. The pattern of stresses affecting each block face explains conceptually the occurrence of pyramidal keyblocks that are truncated near their apex.

  18. Field investigation of keyblock stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discontinuities in a rock mass can intersect an excavation surface to form discrete blocks (keyblocks) which can be unstable. This engineering problem is divided into two parts: block identification, and evaluation of block stability. One stable keyblock and thirteen fallen keyblocks were observed in field investigations at the Nevada Test Site. Nine blocks were measured in detail sufficient to allow back-analysis of their stability. Measurements included block geometry, and discontinuity roughness and compressive strength. Back-analysis correctly predicted stability or failure in all but two cases. These two exceptions involved situations that violated the stress assumptions of the stability calculations. Keyblock faces correlated well with known joint set orientations. The effect of tunnel orientation on keyblock frequency was apparent. Back-analysis of physical models successfully predicted block pullout force for two-dimensional models of unit thickness. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analytic models for the stability of simple pyramidal keyblocks were examined. Calculated stability is greater for 3D analyses than for 2D analyses. Calculated keyblock stability increases with larger in situ stress magnitudes, larger lateral stress ratios, and larger shear strengths. Discontinuity stiffness controls block displacement more strongly than it does stability itself. Large keyblocks are less stable than small ones, and stability increases as blocks become more slender. Rock mass temperature decreases reduce the confining stress magnitudes and can lead to failure. The pattern of stresses affecting each block face explains conceptually the occurrence of pyramidal keyblocks that are truncated near their apex

  19. Radiochemical stability of radiopharmaceutical preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Patricia de A.; Silva, Jose L. da; Ramos, Marcelo P.S.; Oliveira, Ideli M. de; Felgueiras, Carlos F.; Herrerias, Rosana; Zapparoli Junior, Carlos L.; Mengatti, Jair; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The 'in vitro' stability studies of the radiopharmaceutical preparations are an essential requirement for routine practice in nuclear medicine and are an important parameter for evaluating the quality, safety and efficacy required for the sanitary registration of pharmaceutical products. Several countries have published guidelines for the evaluation of pharmaceutical stability. In Brazil, the stability studies should be conducted according to the Guide for Conducting Stability Studies published in the Resolution-RE n. 1, of 29th July 2005. There are also for radiopharmaceutical products, two specific resolutions: RDC-63 regulates the Good Manufacturing Practices for Radiopharmaceuticals and RDC-64 provides the Registration of Radiopharmaceuticals, both published on the 18th December 2009. The radiopharmaceutical stability is defined as the time during which the radioisotope can be safely used for the intended purpose. The radiochemical stability can be affected by a variety of factors, including storage temperature, amount of radioactivity, radioactive concentration, presence or absence of antioxidants or other stabilizing agents. The radiochemical stability studies must be established under controlled conditions determined by the effective use of the product. The aim of this work was to evaluate the radiochemical stability of labeled molecules with {sup 131}I, {sup 123}I, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 18}F, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 111}In as well as {sup 67}Ga and {sup 201}Tl radiopharmaceuticals. Radiochemical purity was evaluated after production and in the validity period, with the maximum activity and in the recommended storage conditions. The analyses were carried out by thin-layer silica gel plate, paper chromatography and gel chromatography. The experimental results showed to be in accordance with the specified limits for all the analysed products. (author)

  20. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  1. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein for the assessment of the short-term prognosis in acute pulmonary embolism patients with hemodynamic stability on admission%心脏型脂肪酸结合蛋白对人院时血流动力学稳定的急性肺栓塞患者短期预后的评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇; 刘双; 郭伟; 王增智

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨心脏型脂肪酸结合蛋白(H-FABP)对入院时血流动力学稳定的急性肺栓塞患者短期预后评估的临床意义.方法 筛选2009年12月至2010年12月在北京安贞医院就诊并被确诊的入院时血流动力学稳定的急性肺栓塞患者156例,其中符合纳入标准90例,男37例,女53例,平均年龄(61.1±14.6)岁,留取溶栓或抗凝前的外周静脉血标本,应用双抗体夹心酶联免疫吸附法测定H-FABP浓度,非均相免疫法测定肌钙蛋白Ⅰ(cTnI)、N-末端脑钠肽前体(NT-proBNP)浓度,所有患者随访30 d,根据随访结果分为复杂临床过程组(7例)和简单临床过程组(83例),结果采用Mann-Whitney U检验、x2检验、x2检验的连续性校正及logistic回归进行分析.结果 复杂临床过程组H-FABP水平高于简单临床过程组(U =54.000,P<0.01);ROC曲线获得H-FABP的最佳预后截值为7 μg/L,H-FABP、cTnI和NT-proBNP三者之间AUC比较差异无统计学意义;单变量logistic回归分析发现H-FABP≥6 μg,/L、心率≥106次/min和晕厥(均P<0.01)可预测血流动力学稳定的急性肺栓塞患者短期不良预后;多变量logistic回归分析发现仅H-FABP≥6 μg/L和晕厥(均P<0.05)仍是独立预测因素;cTnI或NT-proBNP联合H-FABP可提高对血流动力学稳定的急性肺栓塞患者治疗30 d的预测价值.结论 单独应用H-FABP或H-FABP联合其他临床资料,可对入院时血流动力学稳定的急性肺栓塞患者治疗30 d的预后进行评估,H-FABP作为预后评估可能优于cTnI和NT-proBNP.%Objective To explore the clinical value of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP)for the assessment of the short-term prognosis in acute pulmonary embolism (APE)patients with hemodynamic stability on admission.Method A total of 156 APE patients with hemodynamic stability on admission were hospitalized in Beijing Anzhen hospital from December 2009 to December 2010,and the final study population comprised 90

  2. Thermodynamic characterization of proflavine–DNA binding through microcalorimetric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Energetics of the interaction of proflavine with DNA has been studied. • The binding reaction was favored by both negative enthalpy and positive entropy. • Enthalpy–entropy compensation phenomenon was observed. • Non-polyelectrolytic forces played a dominant role in the binding process. • Proflavine enhanced the thermal stability of DNA remarkably. - Abstract: The interaction of an important acridine dye, proflavine hydrochloride, with double stranded DNA was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. The equilibrium constant for the binding reaction was calculated to be (1.60 ± 0.04) · 105 · M−1 at T = 298.15 K. The binding of proflavine hydrochloride to DNA was favored by both negative enthalpy and positive entropy contributions to the Gibbs energy. The equilibrium constant for the binding reaction decreased with increasing temperature. The standard molar enthalpy change became increasingly negative while the standard molar entropy change became less positive with rise in temperature. However, the standard molar Gibbs free energy change varied marginally suggesting the occurrence of enthalpy–entropy compensation phenomenon. The binding reaction was dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces which remained virtually unchanged at all the salt concentrations studied. The binding also significantly increased the thermal stability of DNA against thermal denaturation

  3. [Water binding of adsorptive immobilized lipases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, S; Meusel, D; Muschter, A; Ruthe, B

    1990-01-01

    It is supposed that not only the total water content of lipase preparations but more their state of water binding is of technological importance in enzymatic interesterification reactions in systems nearly free from water. The isotherms at 65 degrees C of two microbial lipases immobilized on various adsorbents as well as different adsorbents themselves are shown. The water binding capacity in the range of water content of technological interest decreases from the anion exchange resin Amberlyst A 21 via nonpolar adsorbent Amberlite XAD-2 to kieselguhr Celite 545. It is demonstrated that water binding by lipases is depending on temperature but is also affected by adsorptive immobilization. Adsorptive immobilized lipases show hysteresis, which is very important for preparing a definite water content of the enzyme preparations. PMID:2325750

  4. Nitrogen enrichment weakens ecosystem stability through decreased species asynchrony and population stability in a temperate grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhai; Loreau, Michel; Lü, Xiaotao; He, Nianpeng; Zhang, Guangming; Han, Xingguo

    2016-04-01

    Biodiversity generally promotes ecosystem stability. To assess whether the diversity-stability relationship observed under ambient nitrogen (N) conditions still holds under N enriched conditions, we designed a 6-year field experiment to test whether the magnitude and frequency of N enrichment affects ecosystem stability and its relationship with species diversity in a temperate grassland. Results of this experiment showed that the frequency of N addition had no effect on either the temporal stability of ecosystem and population or the relationship between diversity and stability. Nitrogen addition decreased ecosystem stability significantly through decreases in species asynchrony and population stability. Species richness was positively associated with ecosystem stability, but no significant relationship between diversity and the residuals of ecosystem stability was detected after controlling for the effects of the magnitude of N addition, suggesting collinearity between the effects of N addition and species richness on ecosystem stability, with the former prevailing over the latter. Both population stability and the residuals of population stability after controlling for the effects of the magnitude of N addition were positively associated with ecosystem stability, indicating that the stabilizing effects of component populations were still present after N enrichment. Our study supports the theory predicting that the effects of environmental factors on ecosystem functioning are stronger than those of biodiversity. Understanding such mechanisms is important and urgent to protect biodiversity in mediating ecosystem functioning and services in the face of global changes. PMID:26511538

  5. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Caroline (Albany, CA)

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  6. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, J.O.; Spevak, W.R.; Dasgupta, F.; Bertozzi, C.

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10{sup 6} fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  7. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Caroline (Albany, CA)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  8. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, J.O.; Spevak, W.R.; Dasgupta, F.; Bertozzi, C.

    1999-11-16

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10{sup 6} fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  9. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA)

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  10. Tritiated imipramine binding sites are decreased in the frontal cortex of suicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding characteristics of tritiated imipramine were determined in the frontal cortex of suicides and well-matched controls. Maximal binding was significantly lower in brains from the suicides. This finding is consistent with reports of decreased tritiated imipramine binding in the platelets of patients diagnosed as having a major affective disorder

  11. Probing the Kinetic Stabilities of Friedreich’s Ataxia Clinical Variants Using a Solid Phase GroEL Chaperonin Capture Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Correia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases are caused by protein folding defects where the protein may become more susceptible to degradation or aggregation. Aberrant protein folding can affect the kinetic stability of the proteins even if these proteins appear to be soluble in vivo. Experimental discrimination between functional properly folded and misfolded nonfunctional conformers is not always straightforward at near physiological conditions. The differences in the kinetic behavior of two initially folded frataxin clinical variants were examined using a high affinity chaperonin kinetic trap approach at 25 °C. The kinetically stable wild type frataxin (FXN shows no visible partitioning onto the chaperonin. In contrast, the clinical variants FXN-p.Asp122Tyr and FXN-p.Ile154Phe kinetically populate partial folded forms that tightly bind the GroEL chaperonin platform. The initially soluble FXN-p.Ile154Phe variant partitions onto GroEL more rapidly and is more kinetically liable. These differences in kinetic stability were confirmed using differential scanning fluorimetry. The kinetic and aggregation stability differences of these variants may lead to the distinct functional impairments described in Friedreich’s ataxia, the neurodegenerative disease associated to frataxin functional deficiency. This chaperonin platform approach may be useful for identifying small molecule stabilizers since stabilizing ligands to frataxin variants should lead to a concomitant decrease in chaperonin binding.

  12. Analysis of factors affecting the stability of backfill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storage of high-level nuclear waste in subsurface repositories involves a backfill material as a physical/chemical barrier between the solid waste canisters and host rock. Chemical, structural, and textural changes due to hydrothermal reaction may degrade the backfill performance over the life of the repository. In order to evaluate the potential for such changes, we have: (1) carried out hydrothermal experiments on candidate backfill materials (smectite, illite, basalt) under conditions analogous to those at the repository, (2) performed a complete characterization of these materials before and after hydrothermal treatment using EMPA, XRD, SEM/EDS, and, especially, STEM/AEM techniques, and (3) reviewed and analyzed geologic systems which are analogous to the backfill systems. These serve as natural experimental systems with ages up to many tens of millions of years. The Umtanum basalt contains up to 25% of immiscible, two-phase glasses and late opal and nontronite in fractures. These materials are especially subject to solution effects and the glass may provide K to groundwater. The kinetics of the smectite to illite and illite to muscovite transitions are primarily controlled by Al/Si diffusion which is sluggish, rather than by rapid alkali ion diffusion. Thus, even though smectite (bentonite), mixed-layer illite/smectite and illite are all metastable phases transitional to muscovite plus other phases, reactions occur so slowly that these phases are retained even within a geologic time scale for temperatures of approximately 150, 200 and 3000C, respectively. A high ratio of Ca/K (perhaps supplied by solution of calcite) inhibits the transitions. If clay layers are compacted to form a continuous matrix, water may be prevented from penetrating the backfill and promoting the clay mineral transition

  13. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  14. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hötzel, Isidro; Cheevers, William P

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain beta-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding. PMID

  15. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain β-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding

  16. Experiencing affective interactive art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2010-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on the integration of a framework for affective move

  17. Improved assay for measuring heparin binding to bull sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of heparin to sperm has been used to study capacitation and to rank relative fertility of bulls. Previous binding assays were laborious, used 107 sperm per assay point, and required large amounts of radiolabeled heparin. A modified heparin-binding assay is described that used only 5 x 104 cells per incubation well and required reduced amounts of [3H] heparin. The assay was performed in 96-well Millititer plates, enabling easy incubation and filtering. Dissociation constants and concentrations of binding sites did not differ if analyzed by Scatchard plots, Woolf plots, or by log-logit transformed weighted nonlinear least squares regression, except in the case of outliers. In such cases, Scatchard analysis was more sensitive to outliers. Nonspecific binding was insignificant using nonlinear logistic fit regression and a proportion graph. The effects were tested of multiple free-thawing of sperm in either a commercial egg yolk extender, 40 mM Tris buffer with 8% glycerol, or 40 mM Tris buffer without glycerol. Freeze-thawing in extender did not affect the dissociation constant or the concentration of binding sites. However, freeze-thawing three times in 40 mM Tris reduced the concentration of binding sites and lowered the dissociation constant (raised the affinity). The inclusion of glycerol in the 40 mM Tris did not significantly affect the estimated dissociation constant or the concentration of binding sites as compared to 40 mM Tris without glycerol

  18. Exploration of the binding mode between (-)-zampanolide and tubulin using docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Si-Yan; Mo, Guang-Quan; Chen, Jin-Can; Zheng, Kang-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    The binding mode of (-)-zampanolide (ZMP) to tubulin was investigated using docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and binding free-energy calculations. The docking studies validated the experimental results indicating that the paclitaxel site is the binding site for (-)-ZMP. The 18 ns MD simulation shows the docking mode has changed a lot, whereas it offers more reliable binding data. MM-PBSA binding free-energy calculations further confirmed the results of the MD simulation. The study revealed that hydrophobic interactions play an important role in stabilizing the binding, and the strong hydrogen bond formed with Asp224 enhances the affinity for tubulin. Meanwhile, the results support the assumption that (-)-ZMP can be attacked by His227, leading to a nucleophilic reaction and covalent binding. These theoretical results lead to a greater understanding of the mechanism of action of binding to tubulin, and will therefore aid the design of new compounds with higher affinities for tubulin. PMID:24478043

  19. Tetrapyrrole binding affinity of the murine and human p22HBP heme-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micaelo, Nuno M; Macedo, Anjos L; Goodfellow, Brian J; Félix, Vítor

    2010-11-01

    We present the first systematic molecular modeling study of the binding properties of murine (mHBP) and human (hHBP) p22HBP protein (heme-binding protein) with four tetrapyrrole ring systems belonging to the heme biosynthetic pathway: iron protoporphyrin IX (HEMIN), protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), coproporphyrin III (CPIII), coproporphyrin I (CPI). The relative binding affinities predicted by our computational study were found to be similar to those observed experimentally, providing a first rational structural analysis of the molecular recognition mechanism, by p22HBP, toward a number of different tetrapyrrole ligands. To probe the structure of these p22HBP protein complexes, docking, molecular dynamics and MM-PBSA methodologies supported by experimental NMR ring current shift data have been employed. The tetrapyrroles studied were found to bind murine p22HBP with the following binding affinity order: HEMIN> PPIX> CPIII> CPI, which ranged from -22.2 to -6.1 kcal/mol. In general, the protein-tetrapyrrole complexes are stabilized by non-bonded interactions between the tetrapyrrole propionate groups and basic residues of the protein, and by the preferential solvation of the complex compared to the unbound components. PMID:20800521

  20. Voting behavior and budget stability

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Vicente; Ana-María Ríos; María-Dolores Guillamón

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze how the implementation of the Budgetary Stability Law has affectedPolitical Budget Cycles generated by Spanish local governments. Specifically, we study whether the evolutionof debt, budget deficit, capital spending and current spending over the electoral cycle has changed after theintroduction of this law. We use a sample of 132 Spanish municipalities with more than 50,000 inhabitants(including the provincial capitals) during the period 1995‑2009. Our resu...

  1. [The effect of cocaine on binding of tricyclic antidepressives in the synaptic plasma membranes in the brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bures, P; Krulík, R; Fisar, Z; Fuksová, K

    1993-10-01

    Effect of cocaine on binding of 3H-imipramine, 3H-desmethylimipramine, 3H-didesmethylimipramine and 3H-amitriptyline to brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) was studied. Binding of methylated tricyclic antidepressants was more affected. Cocaine inhibits 3H-imipramine binding at concentrations higher than 10(-5) mol/l. Binding stimulated by phosphatidylserine was affected more significantly. PMID:8269521

  2. Trapped particle stability for the kinetic stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, H. L.; Pratt, J.

    2011-08-01

    A kinetically stabilized axially symmetric tandem mirror (KSTM) uses the momentum flux of low-energy, unconfined particles that sample only the outer end-regions of the mirror plugs, where large favourable field-line curvature exists. The window of operation is determined for achieving magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability with tolerable energy drain from the kinetic stabilizer. Then MHD stable systems are analysed for stability of the trapped particle mode. This mode is characterized by the detachment of the central-cell plasma from the kinetic-stabilizer region without inducing field-line bending. Stability of the trapped particle mode is sensitive to the electron connection between the stabilizer and the end plug. It is found that the stability condition for the trapped particle mode is more constraining than the stability condition for the MHD mode, and it is challenging to satisfy the required power constraint. Furthermore, a severe power drain may arise from the necessary connection of low-energy electrons in the kinetic stabilizer to the central region.

  3. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  4. Trapped particle stability for the kinetic stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetically stabilized axially symmetric tandem mirror (KSTM) uses the momentum flux of low-energy, unconfined particles that sample only the outer end-regions of the mirror plugs, where large favourable field-line curvature exists. The window of operation is determined for achieving magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability with tolerable energy drain from the kinetic stabilizer. Then MHD stable systems are analysed for stability of the trapped particle mode. This mode is characterized by the detachment of the central-cell plasma from the kinetic-stabilizer region without inducing field-line bending. Stability of the trapped particle mode is sensitive to the electron connection between the stabilizer and the end plug. It is found that the stability condition for the trapped particle mode is more constraining than the stability condition for the MHD mode, and it is challenging to satisfy the required power constraint. Furthermore, a severe power drain may arise from the necessary connection of low-energy electrons in the kinetic stabilizer to the central region.

  5. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge E Suarez; Mauricio Urquiza; Hernando Curtidor; Rodriguez, Luis E.; Marisol Ocampo; Elizabeth Torres; Fanny Guzman; Manuel Elkin Patarroyo

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falcip...

  6. On hovercraft overwater heave stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchey, M. J.; Sullivan, P. A.

    1993-05-01

    The dynamic heave stability of an air cushion vehicle or hovercraft hovering over deep water without forward motion is investigated analytically. The principal feature of the analysis is the modeling of the motion of the water surface beneath the cushion caused by fluctuations in the pressure of the cushion or cavity air. This surface motion interacts with the vehicle dynamics by modulating both the volume and exit flow area of the cushion. For analytical simplicity, the geometry chosen for study is a 2D section of a rigid wall plenum chamber; this enables exploitation of classical linear wave formulas developed by Lamb for the surface motion generated by a spatially uniform surface pressure oscillating sinusoidally in time. To assess stability characteristics, the Nyquist criterion is applied to the linearized equations. Results are presented for two cases: one is representative of a small test vehicle, and the other of a large ice-breaking platform. They show that the water surface motion significantly affects stability through both of the proposed mechanisms, with cushion exit flow area modulation usually being more important. A feature of the results is that as the weight of a vehicle decreases many stability transitions occur. This suggests that simple guidelines for avoiding instability may not exist, so that stability augmentation devices may be required for vehicles designed to hover for extended periods over water.

  7. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of 35S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and free epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin

  8. Bladder endothelin-1 receptor binding of bosentan and ambrisentan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osano, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Yoshinari; Hayashi, Hideki; Itoh, Kunihiko; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu; Ito, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize bladder endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptor binding of clinically used ET-1 receptor antagonists by using [(125)I]ET-1. The inhibition of specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding was measured in the presence of ET-1 and its receptor antagonists. Specific binding of [(125)I]ET-1 in rat bladder was saturable and of high affinity, which characterized selective labeling of bladder ET-1 receptors. ET-1, bosentan, ambrisentan, and CI-1020 inhibited specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding in a concentration-dependent manner at nanomolar ranges of IC50. Nonlinear least squares regression analysis revealed the presence of high- and low-affinity ET-1 receptor sites for ambrisentan and CI-1020. Bosentan and ambrisentan significantly increased the dissociation constant for bladder [(125)I]ET-1 binding without affecting maximal number of binding sites (Bmax). Thus, bosentan and ambrisentan seem to bind to bladder ET-1 receptor in a competitive and reversible manner. Oral administration of bosentan caused a dose-dependent decrease in Bmax for bladder [(125)I]ET-1 binding, suggesting significant binding of bladder ET-1 receptors in vivo. A significant amount of pharmacologically relevant ET-1 receptors may exist in the bladder. These receptors may be implicated in the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract symptoms and may also be promising targets for the development of therapeutic agents. PMID:24389822

  9. Monomeric rhodopsin is the minimal functional unit required for arrestin binding*

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukamoto, Hisao; Sinha, Abhinav; DeWitt, Mark; Farrens, David L.

    2010-01-01

    We have tested if arrestin binding requires the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) be a dimer or multimer. To do this, we encapsulated single rhodopsin molecules into nanoscale phospholipids particles (so called nanodiscs) and measured their ability to bind arrestin. Our data clearly show that both visual arrestin and β-arrestin 1 can bind to monomeric rhodopsin and stabilize the active metarhodopsin II form. Interestingly, we find the monomeric rhodopsin in nanodiscs has a higher affinity for...

  10. Ligand photo-isomerization triggers conformational changes in iGluR2 ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wolter

    Full Text Available Neurological glutamate receptors bind a variety of artificial ligands, both agonistic and antagonistic, in addition to glutamate. Studying their small molecule binding properties increases our understanding of the central nervous system and a variety of associated pathologies. The large, oligomeric multidomain membrane protein contains a large and flexible ligand binding domains which undergoes large conformational changes upon binding different ligands. A recent application of glutamate receptors is their activation or inhibition via photo-switchable ligands, making them key systems in the emerging field of optochemical genetics. In this work, we present a theoretical study on the binding mode and complex stability of a novel photo-switchable ligand, ATA-3, which reversibly binds to glutamate receptors ligand binding domains (LBDs. We propose two possible binding modes for this ligand based on flexible ligand docking calculations and show one of them to be analogues to the binding mode of a similar ligand, 2-BnTetAMPA. In long MD simulations, it was observed that transitions between both binding poses involve breaking and reforming the T686-E402 protein hydrogen bond. Simulating the ligand photo-isomerization process shows that the two possible configurations of the ligand azo-group have markedly different complex stabilities and equilibrium binding modes. A strong but slow protein response is observed after ligand configuration changes. This provides a microscopic foundation for the observed difference in ligand activity upon light-switching.

  11. Binding of fluorescent lanthanides to rat liver mitochondrial membranes and calcium ion-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, R B; Wallach, D F

    1976-05-21

    (1) Tb3+ binding to mitochondrial membranes can be monitored by enhanced ion fluorescence at 545 nm with excitation at 285 nm. At low protein concentrations (less than 30 mug/ml) no inner filter effects are observed. (2) This binding is localized at the external surface of the inner membrane and is unaffected by inhibitors of respiration or oxidative phosphorylation. (3) A soluble Ca2+ binding protein isolated according to Lehninger, A.L. ((1971) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 42, 312-317) also binds Tb3+ with enhanced ion fluorescence upon excitation at 285 nm. The excitation spectrum of the isolated protein and of the intact mitochondria are indicative of an aromatic amino acid at the cation binding site. (4) Further characterization of the Tb3+-protein interaction revealed that there is more than one binding site per protein molecule and that these sites are clustered (less than 20 A). Neuraminidase treatment or organic solvent extraction of the protein did not affect fluorescent Tb3+ binding. (5) pH dependency studies of Tb3+ binding to the isolated protein or intact mitochondria demonstrated the importance of an ionizable group of pK greater than 6. At pH less than 7.5 the amount of Tb3+ bound to the isolated protein decreased with increase in pH as monitored by Tb3+ fluorescence. With intact mitochondria the opposite occurred with a large increase in Tb3+ fluorescence at higher pH. This increase was not observed when the mitochondria were preincubated with antimycin A and rotenone. PMID:6061

  12. Arctic Submarine Slope Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D.; Geissler, W.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine landsliding represents aside submarine earthquakes major natural hazard to coastal and sea-floor infrastructure as well as to coastal communities due to their ability to generate large-scale tsunamis with their socio-economic consequences. The investigation of submarine landslides, their conditions and trigger mechanisms, recurrence rates and potential impact remains an important task for the evaluation of risks in coastal management and offshore industrial activities. In the light of a changing globe with warming oceans and rising sea-level accompanied by increasing human population along coasts and enhanced near- and offshore activities, slope stability issues gain more importance than ever before. The Arctic exhibits the most rapid and drastic changes and is predicted to change even faster. Aside rising air temperatures, enhanced inflow of less cooled Atlantic water into the Arctic Ocean reduces sea-ice cover and warms the surroundings. Slope stability is challenged considering large areas of permafrost and hydrates. The Hinlopen/Yermak Megaslide (HYM) north of Svalbard is the first and so far only reported large-scale submarine landslide in the Arctic Ocean. The HYM exhibits the highest headwalls that have been found on siliciclastic margins. With more than 10.000 square kilometer areal extent and app. 2.400 cubic kilometer of involved sedimentary material, it is one of the largest exposed submarine slides worldwide. Geometry and age put this slide in a special position in discussing submarine slope stability on glaciated continental margins. The HYM occurred 30 ka ago, when the global sea-level dropped by app. 50 m within less than one millennium due to rapid onset of global glaciation. It probably caused a tsunami with circum-Arctic impact and wave heights exceeding 130 meters. The HYM affected the slope stability field in its neighbourhood by removal of support. Post-megaslide slope instability as expressed in creeping and smaller-scaled slides are

  13. Financial stability concept

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay Beketov

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with a relatively new concept of the economics, i.e. financial stability. The essence of the financial stability concept, academic and practical definitions of financial stability, relationships between financial stability and other notions of the theory of finance (financial crisis, financial fragility, financial soundness, etc.) are considered. The author argues convincingly that there is a need for promoting scientific debate about financial stability problems in the Rep...

  14. Trapped Particle Stability for the Kinetic Stabilizer

    CERN Document Server

    Berk, H L

    2011-01-01

    A kinetically stabilized axially symmetric tandem mirror (KSTM) uses the momentum flux of low-energy, unconfined particles that sample only the outer end-regions of the mirror plugs, where large favorable field-line curvature exists. The window of operation is determined for achieving MHD stability with tolerable energy drain from the kinetic stabilizer. Then MHD stable systems are analyzed for stability of the trapped particle mode. This mode is characterized by the detachment of the central-cell plasma from the kinetic stabilizer region without inducing field-line bending. Stability of the trapped particle mode is sensitive to the electron connection between the stabilizer and the end plug. It is found that the stability condition for the trapped particle mode is more constraining than the stability condition for the MHD mode, and it is challenging to satisfy the required power constraint. Furthermore a severe power drain may arise from the necessary connection of low-energy electrons in the kinetic stabili...

  15. Effects of STATCOM Control Mode on Voltage Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Zare

    2008-01-01

    STATCOM is one of the most popular devices that been used for voltage stability. There has been no report on the effect of SATCOM control mode on voltage stability. It is very important to understand which parameters and what value of these parameters affect the voltage stability. The results of previous studies have shown that the STATCOM have considerable effects on the improvement of voltage stability, but there have not been any investigations on the effects of the control mode of STATCOM...

  16. Temporal Stability and Authenticity of Self-Representations in Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Diehl, Manfred; Jacobs, Laurie M.; Hastings, Catherine T.

    2006-01-01

    The temporal stability of role-specific self-representations was examined in a sample of 188 young, middle-aged, and older adults. Considerable stability was observed for all self-representations. Central self-descriptors showed significantly greater temporal stability than peripheral self-descriptors. Temporal stability of self-representations was positively associated with self-concept clarity, self-esteem, and positive affect (PA). Age differences were obtained for three of the five self-r...

  17. Kinetics of binding and geometry of cells on molecular biochips

    OpenAIRE

    Chechetkin, V.R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction-diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the semispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides...

  18. Cosmic Strings Stabilized by Fermion Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Weigel, H; Graham, N

    2011-01-01

    We provide a thorough exposition of recent results on the quantum stabilization of cosmic strings. Stabilization occurs through the coupling to a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. The study combines the vacuum polarization energy of fermion zero-point fluctuations and the binding energy of occupied energy levels, which are of the same order in a semi-classical expansion. Populating these bound states assigns a charge to the string. Strings carrying fermion charge become stable if the Higgs and gauge fields are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. The vacuum remains stable in the model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored. These findings suggest that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model.

  19. A peek into tropomyosin binding and unfolding on the actin filament.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tropomyosin is a prototypical coiled coil along its length with subtle variations in structure that allow interactions with actin and other proteins. Actin binding globally stabilizes tropomyosin. Tropomyosin-actin interaction occurs periodically along the length of tropomyosin. However, it is not well understood how tropomyosin binds actin. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tropomyosin's periodic binding sites make differential contributions to two components of actin binding, cooperativity and affinity, and can be classified as primary or secondary sites. We show through mutagenesis and analysis of recombinant striated muscle alpha-tropomyosins that primary actin binding sites have a destabilizing coiled-coil interface, typically alanine-rich, embedded within a non-interface recognition sequence. Introduction of an Ala cluster in place of the native, more stable interface in period 2 and/or period 3 sites (of seven increased the affinity or cooperativity of actin binding, analysed by cosedimentation and differential scanning calorimetry. Replacement of period 3 with period 5 sequence, an unstable region of known importance for cooperative actin binding, increased the cooperativity of binding. Introduction of the fluorescent probe, pyrene, near the mutation sites in periods 2 and 3 reported local instability, stabilization by actin binding, and local unfolding before or coincident with dissociation from actin (measured using light scattering, and chain dissociation (analyzed using circular dichroism. CONCLUSIONS: This, and previous work, suggests that regions of tropomyosin involved in binding actin have non-interface residues specific for interaction with actin and an unstable interface that is locally stabilized upon binding. The destabilized interface allows residues on the coiled-coil surface to obtain an optimal conformation for interaction with actin by increasing the number of local substates that the side chains can sample. We suggest

  20. Two types of antibodies are induced by vaccination with A/California/2009 pdm virus: binding near the sialic acid-binding pocket and neutralizing both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Ohshima

    Full Text Available Many people have a history of catching the flu several times during childhood but no additional flu in adulthood, even without vaccination. We analyzed the total repertoire of antibodies (Abs against influenza A group 1 viruses induced in such a flu-resistant person after vaccination with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. They were classified into two types, with no exceptions. The first type, the products of B cells newly induced through vaccination, binds near the sialic acid-binding pocket. The second type, the products of long-lived memory B cells established before vaccination, utilizes the 1-69 VH gene, binds to the stem of HA, and neutralizes both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses with few exceptions. These observations indicate that the sialic acid-binding pocket and its surrounding region are immunogenically very potent and majority of the B cells whose growth is newly induced by vaccination produce Abs that recognize these regions. However, they play a role in protection against influenza virus infection for a short period since variant viruses that have acquired resistance to these Abs become dominant. On the other hand, although the stem of HA is immunogenically not potent, the second type of B cells eventually becomes dominant. Thus, a selection system should function in forming the repertoire of long-lived memory B cells and the stability of the epitope would greatly affect the fate of the memory cells. Acquisition of the ability to produce Abs that bind to the stable epitope could be a major factor of flu resistance.