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Sample records for affect patient adherence

  1. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence

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    M Y H Moosa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine changes in adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-positive patients with depression, following treatment with an antidepressant or psychotherapy. Methods. The study was prospective, randomised and controlled. Consenting volunteers aged ≥18 years and stable on ART for ≥6 months were included in the study. Sociodemographic data were obtained, and a clinical diagnostic evaluation and the Hamilton Depression rating scale (HAMD were performed on all subjects at entry to and at the end of the study. Participants found to be depressed were randomly assigned antidepressant treatment (20 mg citalopram or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT (5 sessions. Medication was dispensed at each visit and patients were asked to return all unused medication to determine ART adherence. The study was approved by the University of the Witwatersrand. Results. Sixty-two HIV-positive persons receiving ART participated; 30 were not depressed (control group and 32 were depressed (patient group. No significant differences in demographic characteristics existed between the control and patient groups. Mean ART adherence at the start of the study was 99.5% (standard error (SE ±0.46 and 92.1% (SE ±1.69 in the control and patients groups, respectively. Mean ART adherence at the end of the study changed marginally in the control group (99.7%; SE ±0.46 and increased significantly in the patient group (99.5%; SE± 0.13 (p>0.05. The mean ART adherence rate of patients who received pharmacotherapy increased from 92.8% to 99.5%, and of those who received psychotherapy increased from 91.1% to 99.6% (p>0.05. There was no significant association between the increased adherence in the patient group and baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, irrespective of antidepressant therapy or IPT (p>0.05. Conclusion. Successful treatment of depression with an antidepressant or psychotherapy was associated with improved ART adherence, independent of the type

  2. Factors affecting medication adherence in patients with hypertension.

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    Karakurt, Papatya; Kaşikçi, Mağfiret

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study descriptive study was to evaluate concordance with medication and those factors that affect the use of medicine in patients with hypertension. Data were collected using a questionnaire completed by 750 patients with hypertension between December 25, 2003, and April 30, 2004, in an outpatient hypertension clinic in Erzincan, Turkey. It was found that 57.9% of the patients did not use their medicines as prescribed. Forgetfulness, aloneness, and negligence were ranked as the top three reasons for this non-concordance, accounting for almost half (49.3%) of all patients with hypertension studied; price (expensive medicines) accounted for another quarter (26.5%). A statistically significant relationship with non-concordance was found for age, education level and profession. Patients' lack of knowledge related to the complications of hypertension was also found to have a statistically significant relationship with not taking medicines as prescribed. Gender, location of residence and salary were not found to be statistically related to concordance. These results indicate the need to educate patients with hypertension on how to use their medicine regularly and indicate also the target populations for this. PMID:23127428

  3. Factors that affect adherence to recommended treatment among diabetes patients in Kampala

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlén, Elin; Davidsson, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is an increasing global health problem and this puts high demands on the health care system. Patients with diabetes demand continuous treatment and monitoring in order to control the disease and avoid complications. Adherence to recommended treatment was important in order for the treatment to give positive effect. In this context adherence was defined as the extent to which the patients follow medical instructions.Aim: The aim of this study was to identify factors that c...

  4. Factors affecting adherence to the treatment regimen of tuberculosis patients: Assessing the efficiency of health belief model constructs

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    Mahmood Karimy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low adherence to the treatment regimen in tuberculosis patients has been recognized as a major threat for tuberculosis (TB control program. Thus, the present study was conducted to assess the factors affecting adherence to the treatment regimen of TB patients via Health Belief Model (HBM. Methods: In this cross-sectional study,110 tuberculosis patients attending anti-TB center in Zabol were selected and included in the study using census method. Data were collected using Health Belief Model (HBM questionnaire and reviewing the patients' medical files. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS software using t-test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis with 95 % confidence level. Results: The mean age of the participants was 55.7±18.6 years. 89% of the patients had pulmonary tuberculosis and 11% had extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. The multiple regression analysis showed knowledge, self-efficacy, perceived benefits and perceived threat were significant predictors of adherence to the treatment regimen. The HBM constructs accounted for 29% of the variance observed in adherence to the treatment regimen. Conclusion: The findings of the study highlight the need to increase awareness and change the patients’ beliefs about the risks of low adherence to the treatment regimen in patients.

  5. The challenge of patient adherence.

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    Martin, Leslie R; Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; Dimatteo, M Robin

    2005-09-01

    Quality healthcare outcomes depend upon patients' adherence to recommended treatment regimens. Patient nonadherence can be a pervasive threat to health and wellbeing and carry an appreciable economic burden as well. In some disease conditions, more than 40% of patients sustain significant risks by misunderstanding, forgetting, or ignoring healthcare advice. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research studies agree that successful attempts to improve patient adherence depend upon a set of key factors. These include realistic assessment of patients' knowledge and understanding of the regimen, clear and effective communication between health professionals and their patients, and the nurturance of trust in the therapeutic relationship. Patients must be given the opportunity to tell the story of their unique illness experiences. Knowing the patient as a person allows the health professional to understand elements that are crucial to the patient's adherence: beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, cultural context, social supports, and emotional health challenges, particularly depression. Physician-patient partnerships are essential when choosing amongst various therapeutic options to maximize adherence. Mutual collaboration fosters greater patient satisfaction, reduces the risks of nonadherence, and improves patients' healthcare outcomes. PMID:18360559

  6. How do care-provider and home exercise program characteristics affect patient adherence in chronic neck and back pain: a qualitative study

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    de Oliveira Sousa Silvana L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to explore perceptions of people with chronic neck or low back pain about how characteristics of home exercise programs and care-provider style during clinical encounters may affect adherence to exercises. Methods This is a qualitative study consisting of seven focus groups, with a total of 34 participants presenting chronic neck or low back pain. The subjects were included if they were receiving physiotherapy treatment and were prescribed home-based exercises. Results Two themes emerged: home-based exercise programme conditions and care provider's style. In the first theme, the participants described their positive and negative experiences regarding time consumption, complexity and effects of prescribed exercises. In the second theme, participants perceived more bonding to prescribed exercises when their care provider presented knowledge about the disease, promoted feedback and motivation during exercise instruction, gave them reminders to exercise, or monitored their results and adherence to exercises. Conclusions Our experiential findings indicate that patient's adherence to home-based exercise is more likely to happen when care providers' style and the content of exercise programme are positively experienced. These findings provide additional information to health care providers, by showing which issues should be considered when delivering health care to patients presenting chronic neck or back pain.

  7. Adherence to the Treatment in Psychiatric Patients

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    Mehmet Emin Demirkol

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Although medical treatments and drug industry develop day by day, there have been no changes in the treatment adherence ratios in the past years. To generate possible solutions, treatment adherence should be assessed in all clinical interviews and if patient is non-adherent this issue should be handled seriously. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 555-568

  8. Family Social Status and Dietary Adherence of Patients with Phenylketonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Latif Gachkar; Gelareh Asadzadeh-Totonchi; Mohammadreza Alaei; Shirin Farivar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:There are several problems associated to the management of patients with phenylketonuria (PKU). Social status could be one of the affecting factors on dietary adherence in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate family social status and dietary adherence of PKU patients in Iranian population. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we studied 105 Iranian PKU patients (born 1984 to 2010), treated and followed at Mofid Childrens Hospital, Tehran. Social status was defined b...

  9. Patient adherence to aromatase inhibitor treatment in the adjuvant setting

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, S.; Madarnas, Y.; Sehdev, S.; Martin, G; Bajcar, J.

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in adjuvant systemic therapy and detection of early disease have resulted in a decline of breast cancer death rates across all patient age groups in Canada. Non-adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy in the setting of early breast cancer may significantly affect patient outcome. Factors associated with medication adherence are complex and may be patient-related, therapy-related, and health care provider–related. To date, there is a gap in the literature concerning a comprehensive...

  10. Challenges of treatment adherence in older patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L; Ruscin, J Mark

    2009-01-01

    Patient adherence to a medication regimen is critical to treatment outcome, quality of life and future healthcare costs. For elderly patients with Parkinson's disease, obstacles to adherence can be particularly complex. Beyond age-related and economic factors, elderly patients with Parkinson's disease often require complicated dosing or titration schedules and have multiple co-morbidities that necessitate administration of therapies from multiple drug classes. In addition, neuropsychiatric disturbances and cognitive impairment, which are often part of the disease process, can affect adherence, as can variable responses to anti-parkinsonian agents as the disease progresses. Several recent studies in patients with Parkinson's disease point to the need for establishing good adherence patterns early and maintaining these throughout the course of treatment. To achieve optimal adherence in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease, a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches appears to be the best strategy for success. Examples include a strong provider-patient relationship, educational intervention by phone or face-to-face contact, simplified dosing and administration schedules, management and understanding of medication adverse events, and the use of adherence aids such as pill boxes and hour-by-hour organizational charts. Research into new avenues that include improved drug monitoring, pharmacogenetics and neuroprotective regimens may give rise to better adherence in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease in the future. PMID:19220071

  11. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients.

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    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = -0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = -0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  12. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients

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    Azin Behnood-Rod

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8 was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88. About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6% showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6. There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r=-0.231, P<0.001 as well as diastolic BP (r=-0.280, P<0.001. In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B=-0.52, P=0.02, previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B=-0.79, P=0.001, and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B=-0.51, P=0.04 were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence.

  13. 高血压患者治疗依从性影响因素结构方程模型的分析%Factors affecting treatment adherence for patients with hypertension by structural equation model

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    马春花; 陈少贤; 尤黎明; 周薇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the factors of treatment adherence for patients with hypertension.Methods Data were collected among 520 patients with essential hypertension from 2009 to 2010.It investigated the factors of treatment adherence for patients with hypertension by self-report scales.Results Structural equation model analysis showed age,self-rated health,self-eificacy,quality of life,family function and health concept were all directly associated with treatment adherence,and these variables explained 52.0% of the total variance.Self-efficacy and quality of life were regarded as mediators in predicting treatment adherence of hypertensive patients,other variables indirectly affected adherence behavior by two mediators.Age and self-efficacy showed a strong independent predictive role to adherence.Conclusions Healthcare providers should take effective measures to improve treatment adherence for patients with hypertension based on patients characteristic once they make reasons for adherence clear,which can enhance quality of life,control blood pressure and prevent complications.%目的 探讨影响高血压患者治疗依从性的主要因素.方法 2009年至2010年采取问卷调查的方法对520例原发性高血压患者进行了调查,分析其影响治疗依从性的相关因素.结果 年龄、自我健康评价、生活质量、自我效能与家庭功能对依从性行为均有直接影响,模型变量可以解释依从性总变异的52.0%.年龄、社会支持与家庭功能对依从性有间接影响,自我效能、生活质量是影响依从性行为的中介变量.年龄与自我效能对高血压患者治疗依从性行为的影响较大.结论 医务人员在清楚地认识到影响患者依从性原因的基础上,根据患者个体与疾病特征针对性地采取个体化护理干预措施,改善患者的生活质量,对血压控制与并发症的预防有着现实意义.

  14. Improving medication adherence in patients with hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Pottegård, Anton;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: and Purpose: In patients with hypertension, medication adherence is often suboptimal, thereby increasing the risk of ischemic heart disease and stroke. In a randomized trial, we investigated the effectiveness of a multifaceted pharmacist intervention in a hospital setting to improve...... medication adherence in hypertensive patients. Motivational interviewing was a key element of the intervention. METHODS: Patients (N=532) were recruited from 3 hospital outpatient clinics and randomized to usual care or a 6-month pharmacist intervention comprising collaborative care, medication review......, tailored adherence counselling including motivational interviewing and telephone follow-ups. The primary outcome was composite medication possession ratio (MPR) to antihypertensive and lipid-lowering agents, at one-year follow-up, assessed by analyzing pharmacy records. Secondary outcomes at 12 months...

  15. Immunosuppressants and the renal transplant recipient: factors affecting adherence

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    Cairns, Jasmin

    2012-01-01

    In renal transplantation, immunosuppressants are prescribed to patients to prevent graft loss. Although the extent of adherence required for such treatment to prevent graft loss has not been determined, it is thought to be high. Despite this, research suggests adherence rates for renal transplant recipients to be only between 50% and 95%. Considering the impact of graft loss on the renal patient, the national healthcare budget and on the limited resource of donor organs, it is important to id...

  16. Approaches to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia

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    Shuler KM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly M Shuler Shuler Counseling and Consulting, Fayetteville, AR, USA Purpose: In patients with schizophrenia, nonadherence to prescribed medications increases the risk of patient relapse and hospitalization, key contributors to the costs associated with treatment. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the impact of nonadherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia as it relates to health care professionals, particularly social workers, and to identify effective team approaches to supporting patients based on studies assessing implementation of assertive community treatment teams. Materials and methods: A systematic review of the medical literature was conducted by searching the Scopus database to identify articles associated with treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia. Articles included were published from January 1, 2003, through July 15, 2013, were written in English, and reported findings concerning any and all aspects of nonadherence to prescribed treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Results: Of 92 unique articles identified and formally screened, 47 met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. The burden of nonadherence in schizophrenia is significant. Factors with the potential to affect adherence include antipsychotic drug class and formulation, patient-specific factors, and family/social support system. There is inconclusive evidence suggesting superior adherence with an atypical versus typical antipsychotic or with a long-acting injectable versus an oral formulation. Patient-specific factors that contribute to adherence include awareness/denial of illness, cognitive issues, stigma associated with taking medication, substance abuse, access to health care, employment/poverty, and insurance status. Lack of social or family support may adversely affect adherence, necessitating the assistance of health care professionals, such as social workers. Evidence supports the concept that an

  17. Self-reported adherence to a home-based exercise program among patients affected by psoriatic arthritis with minimal disease activity.

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    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Triggianese, Paola; Conigliaro, Paola; Santoro, Matteo; Lucchetti, Ramona; Perricone, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    More than half of all patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) exhibit progressive erosive arthritis, associated with severe functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Biologics have been suggested to be more effective in inducing minimal disease activity" (MDA) than disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Behavioral patient education appears to be more effective in encouraging patients to increase their physical activity (PA) levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of home-based exercises program on disease activity and quality of life in MDA-PsA patients treated with an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and DMARD therapy. We observed a self-reported adherence rate to home-based exercise of 76.6% and data showed the impact of the exercise program on self-reported health and mental assessment. A positive relationship between patient and therapist is crucial, influencing the quality of the performance, the emotional support, and increasing motivation in PsA patients. PMID:25381979

  18. Factors affecting adherence to antihypertensive medication in Greece: results from a qualitative study

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    Vassiliki Tsiantou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Vassiliki Tsiantou1, Polina Pantzou2, Elpida Pavi1, George Koulierakis2, John Kyriopoulos11Department of Health Economics, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health, Athens, GreeceIntroduction: Although hypertension constitutes a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, research on adherence to antihypertensive treatment has shown that at least 75% of patients are not adherent because of the combined demographic, organizational, psychological, and disease- and medication-related factors. This study aimed to elicit hypertensive patients’ beliefs on hypertension and antihypertensive treatment, and their role to adherence.Methods: Transcripts from semistructured interviews and focus groups were content analyzed to extract participants’ beliefs about hypertension and antihypertensive treatment, and attitudes toward patient–physician and patient–pharmacist relationships.Results: Hypertension was considered a very serious disease, responsible for stroke and myocardial infarction. Participants expressed concerns regarding the use of medicines and the adverse drug reactions. Previous experience with hypertension, fear of complications, systematic disease management, acceptance of hypertension as a chronic disease, incorporation of the role of the patient and a more personal relationship with the doctor facilitated adherence to the treatment. On the other hand, some patients discontinued treatment when they believed that they had controlled their blood pressure.Conclusion: Cognitive and communication factors affect medication adherence. Results could be used to develop intervention techniques to improve medication adherence.Keywords: hypertension, medication adherence, patient compliance, doctor–patient communication, antihypertensive medicine

  19. ART adherence changes among patients in community substance use treatment: a preliminary analysis from MACH14

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    Rosen Marc I

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opiate substitution treatment has been associated with better adherence to lifesaving antiretroviral medications, but the impact of other substance abuse treatment on adherence is unknown. Findings In this study, 215 patients who had been in adherence-focused research studies provided electronically-measured adherence data and a measure of whether the patient had recently been in substance abuse treatment. Recent engagement in substance abuse treatment was independently associated with significantly higher adherence, after covarying for recent substance use and other factors potentially affecting adherence. Conclusions The findings suggest that substance abuse treatment is associated with better adherence. Potential mechanisms by which substance abuse treatment improves adherence, such as more stability or more future-orientation, require further study.

  20. Generic substitution of antihypertensive drugs : does it affect adherence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijk, Boris L G; Klungel, Olaf H; Heerdink, Eibert R; de Boer, Anthonius

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generic substitution is an important opportunity to reduce the costs of pharmaceutical care. However, pharmacists and physicians often find that patients and brand-name manufacturers have doubt about the equivalence of the substituted drug. This may be reflected by decreased adherence to

  1. Supporting patients : pharmacy based interventions to improve medication adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Kooij, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    For many patients it is not easy to adhere to the agreed treatment with medication. Adherence has been defined as “the extent to which a person’s behaviour - taking medication - corresponds with agreed recommendations from a health care provider”. Numerous factors influence this taking behaviour and non-adherence must not be seen as the patients’ problem only. Health care providers, including pharmacists, should support patients to adhere. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate interv...

  2. Factors affecting treatment adherence to atomoxetine in ADHD: a systematic review

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    Treuer T

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tamás Treuer,1 Luis Méndez,2 William Montgomery,3 Shenghu Wu4 1Neuroscience Research, Eli Lilly and Company, Budapest, Hungary; 2Eli Lilly de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Global Patient Outcomes and Real World Evidence, Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, NSW, Australia; 4Neuroscience Research, Eli Lilly Asia, Inc, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the literature related to research about the factors affecting treatment adherence and discontinuation of atomoxetine in pediatric, adolescent, and adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Medline was systematically searched using the following prespecified terms: “ADHD”, “Adherence”, “Compliance”, “Discontinuation”, and “Atomoxetine”. We identified 31 articles that met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. The findings from this review indicate that persistence and adherence to atomoxetine treatment were generally high. Factors found to influence adherence and nonadherence to atomoxetine treatment in ADHD in this review include age, sex, the definition of response used, length of treatment, initial dose of treatment, comorbid conditions, and reimbursement. Tolerability was cited as an important reason for treatment discontinuation. More research is needed to understand those factors that can help to identify patients at risk for poor adherence and interventions that could improve treatment adherence early in the stage of this illness to secure a better long-term prognosis. Keywords: atomoxetine, treatment discontinuation, adherence, compliance, ADHD medication, relapse

  3. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

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    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.

  4. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jones Gareth; Hawkins Kim; Mullin Rebecca; Nepusz Tamás; Naughton Declan P; Sheeran Paschal; Petróczi Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95%) of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80%) of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investiga...

  5. Evaluation of medication adherence in Lebanese hypertensive patients.

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    Yassine, Mohammad; Al-Hajje, Amal; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Zein, Salam; Bawab, Wafa; Bou Zeid, Mayssam; El Hajj, Maya; Salameh, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    Controlling hypertension is essential in cardiovascular diseases. Poor medication adherence is associated with poor disease outcomes, waste of healthcare resources, and contributes to reduced blood pressure control. This study evaluates treatment adherence to antihypertensive therapy in Lebanese hypertensive patients by estimating the proportion of adherent hypertensive patients using a validated tool and investigates what factors predict this behavior. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 210 hypertensive outpatients selected from clinics located in tertiary-care hospitals and from private cardiology clinics located in Beirut. Adherence level was measured using a validated 8-item Modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMMAS). Among 210 patients, 50.5% showed high adherence, 27.1% medium adherence, and 22.4% low adherence to medication. Mean MMMAS score was 6.59±2.0. In bivariate analyses, having controlled blood pressure (p=0.003) and taking a combination drug (p=0.023) were predictors of high adherence. Forgetfulness (p<0.01), complicated drug regimen (p=0.001), and side effects (p=0.006) were predictors of low adherence after multiple liner regression. Logistic regression results showed that calcium channel blockers (p=0.030) were associated with increased adherence levels. In conclusion, developing multidisciplinary intervention programs to address the factors identified, in addition to educational strategies targeting healthcare providers, are necessary to enhance patient adherence. PMID:26232704

  6. The Effect of Patient Medication Adherence on the Outcome of Cardiovascular-Related Diseases

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    Rita Suhadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term adherence is affected by the patient behavior to medicine administration, diet management, and/or life-style changes as the result of the patients’ concordance to the health-providers’ recommendations. Therapy persistence is defined as the medication sustainability of the patients or the duration without discontinue of the therapy. Patients’ medication adherence is affected by health care system, patients, socioeconomics, therapies, and disease condition factors. This article aimed to evaluate the studies on adherence, and the outcome therapy due to adherence. Purposive method was performed to select the articles from reliable journal database and websites. The result showed that there was inconsistent result of nonpharmacological intervention to enhance the medication adherence; the effect of adherence on therapeutic outcome was found from no and mild effect to intense effect. Though the effect of adherence on therapeutic outcome was inconsistent, efforts to increase adherence should be implemented to ensure that the patients get appropriate administration of the medicine. Medication adherence improved prognosis among hypertensive patients, meanwhile nonadherence increased the patients’ mortality rate, hospital admission, and cost of therapy.

  7. Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Disorder: A Comprehensive Review.

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    Levin, Jennifer B; Krivenko, Anna; Howland, Molly; Schlachet, Rebecca; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-09-01

    Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem that causes disability and suffering as well as extensive financial costs among individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). Barriers to adherence are numerous and cross multiple levels, including factors related to bipolar pathology and those unique to an individual's circumstances. External factors, including treatment setting, healthcare system, and broader health policies, can also affect medication adherence in people with BD. Fortunately, advances in research have suggested avenues for improving adherence. A comprehensive review of adherence-enhancement interventions for the years 2005-2015 is included. Specific bipolar adherence-enhancement approaches that target knowledge gaps, cognitive patterns, specific barriers, and motivation may be helpful, as may approaches that capitalize on technology or novel drug-delivery systems. However, much work remains to optimally facilitate long-term medication adherence in people with BD. For adherence-enhancement approaches to be widely adapted, they need to be easily accessible, affordable, and practical. PMID:27435356

  8. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenic Patients

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    García, Saínza; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; López-Zurbano, Saioa; Zorrilla, Iñaki; López, Purificación; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Antipsychotics are the drugs prescribed to treat psychotic disorders; however, patients often fail to adhere to their treatment, and this has a severe negative effect on prognosis in these kinds of illnesses. Among the wide range of risk factors for treatment nonadherence, this systematic review covers those that are most important from the point of view of clinicians and patients and proposes guidelines for addressing them. Analyzing 38 studies conducted in a total of 51,796 patients, including patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, we found that younger age, substance abuse, poor insight, cognitive impairments, low level of education, minority ethnicity, poor therapeutic alliance, experience of barriers to care, high intensity of delusional symptoms and suspiciousness, and low socioeconomic status are the main risk factors for medication nonadherence in both types of disorder. In the future, prospective studies should be conducted on the use of personalized patient-tailored treatments, taking into account risk factors that may affect each individual, to assess the ability of such approaches to improve adherence and hence prognosis in these patients. PMID:27307187

  9. Health Games - Modern Tools for Enhancing Patient Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Bhaskar GOKHALE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low patient adherence remains a major public health challenge globally and imposes a considerable economic burden on healthcare systems. It is critical to develop an effective intervention to improve patient adherence. Factors such as physician-patient relation, patient's health literacy, attitude, cultural variations, and patient’s involvement in decision making are responsible for improving adherence. Information technology has revolutionized almost all industries including healthcare but its use has not shown its full promise to boost adherence. Recent developments in smart phone market penetration, gamification, and easy to navigate user experience have made it possible for healthcare providers to effectively connect with patients using innovative ways enabled by technology. Leveraging on this fact, healthcare industry should be focusing on development and use of interactive health games. Indication-wise games can be developed in collaboration with physicians, academics, thought leaders and experienced media companies. In summary, gamification mayeffectively be used to improve patient adherence.

  10. Associations between patients' adherence and GPs' attitudes towards risk, statin therapy and management of non-adherence-a survey and register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte L; Paulsen, Maja S; Christensen, Palle M;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that doctors' personal lifestyle, risk taking personality and beliefs about risk reducing therapies may affect their clinical decision-making. Whether such factors are further associated with patients' adherence with medication is largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: T...

  11. Patient adherence to medical treatment. A review of reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Sluijs, E.; Dijk, L. van; Ridder, D. de; Heerdink, R.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' non-adherence to medical treatment remains a persistent problem. Many interventions to improve patient adherence are unsuccessful and sound theoretical foundations are lacking. Innovations in theory and practice are badly needed. A new and promising way could be to review the e

  12. Belonging to a peer support group enhance the quality of life and adherence rate in patients affected by breast cancer: A non-randomized controlled clinical trial*

    OpenAIRE

    Tehrani, Afsaneh Malekpour; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Rajabi, Fariborz Mokarian; Zamani, Ahmad Reza

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It seems that breast cancer patients benefit from meeting someone who had a similar experience. This study evaluated the effect of two kinds of interventions (peer support and educational program) on quality of life in breast cancer patients. METHODS: This study was a controlled clinical trial on women with non-metastatic breast cancer. The patients studied in two experimental and control groups. Experimental group took part in pee...

  13. Do changes in prescription practice in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with biological agents affect treatment response and adherence to therapy? Results from the nationwide Danish DANBIO Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, M L; Lindegaard, H M; Hansen, A;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prescription practice for tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibitors has changed towards treating patients with lower disease activity. OBJECTIVE: To determine the trend in treatment response in cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who started TNFalpha inhibitor...... treatment between 2000 and 2005. METHODS: 1813 patients with RA starting treatment with biological agents in 2000-5 were registered prospectively in the nationwide DANBIO Registry. Baseline disease activity and 12 months' treatment responses were determined in cohorts based on start year (2000/1; 2002; 2003...

  14. The effect of reminder systems on patients' adherence to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenerty SD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah D Fenerty1, Cameron West1, Scott A Davis1, Sebastian G Kaplan3, Steven R Feldman1,2,41Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, 4Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USABackground: Patient adherence is an important component of the treatment of chronic disease. An understanding of patient adherence and its modulating factors is necessary to correctly interpret treatment efficacy and barriers to therapeutic success.Purpose: This meta-analysis aims to systematically review published randomized controlled trials of reminder interventions to assist patient adherence to prescribed medications.Methods: A Medline search was performed for randomized controlled trials published between 1968 and June 2011, which studied the effect of reminder-based interventions on adherence to self-administered daily medications.Results: Eleven published randomized controlled trials were found between 1999 and 2009 which measured adherence to a daily medication in a group receiving reminder interventions compared to controls receiving no reminders. Medication adherence was measured as the number of doses taken compared to the number prescribed within a set period of time. Meta-analysis showed a statistically significant increase in adherence in groups receiving a reminder intervention compared to controls (66.61% versus 54.71%, 95% CI for mean: 0.8% to 22.4%. Self-reported and electronically monitored adherence rates did not significantly differ (68.04% versus 63.67%, P = 1.0. Eight of eleven studies showed a statistically significant increase in adherence for at least one of the reminder group arms compared to the control groups receiving no reminder intervention.Limitations: The data are limited by imperfect measures of adherence due to variability in data collection methods. It is also likely

  15. Objective Assessment of Adherence to Inhalers by COPD Patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman, Imran; Cushen, Breda; Greene, Garrett; Seheult, Jansen; Seow, Dexter; Rawat, Fiona; MacHale, Elaine; Mokoka, Matshediso; Moran, Catherine Nora; Bhreathnach, Aoife Sartini; MacHale, Philippa; Tappuni, Shahed; Deering, Brenda; Jackson, Mandy; McCarthy, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Objective adherence to inhaled therapy by patients with COPD has not been reported. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to objectively quantify adherence to preventer DiskusTM inhaler therapy by patients with COPD with an electronic audio recording device (INCATM). METHODS: This was a prospective observational study. On discharge from hospital patients were given a salmeterol/fluticasone inhaler with an INCATM device attached. Analysis of this audio quantified the frequency...

  16. [Concept analysis of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ying; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy plays an important role in the management of chronic diseases. However, many patients with chronic disease do not adhere to their medication regimen. This results in worsening symptoms and frequent re-hospitalizations. As a result, healthcare providers may view these patients as bad. Medication adherence is a complex concept. Analyzing this concept may assist nurses to improve patient-centered care. This paper uses Walker & Avant's method to conduct a concept analysis of medication adherence. Results show the defining attributes of medication adherence as: (1) knowing and agreeing to the medication; (2) communicating and negotiating the regimen; and (3) active, continuous involvement in and appraisal of the treatment effect. Identified antecedents of medication adherence included the patient having: (1) a prescribed medication regimen; (2) cognitive and action abilities in her / his role as a patient; and (3) level of preparation for medication treatment. Identified consequences of medication adherence include: (1) improving symptom control; (2) decreasing re-hospitalizations and mortality; (3) reducing medical care costs; (4) restoring self-esteem; and (5) diminishing depression. It is hoped that this concept analysis provides a reference for nurses to achieve a better understanding of medication adherence and further improve nursing practice. PMID:24899565

  17. Adherence to lipid-lowering treatment: the patient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casula M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Manuela Casula,1 Elena Tragni,1 Alberico Luigi Catapano1,21Epidemiology and Preventive Pharmacology Centre (SEFAP, Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; 2IRCCS MultiMedica, Sesto San Giovanni, ItalyAbstract: Despite the widespread prescription of highly effective lipid-lowering medications, such as the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins, a large portion of the population has lipid levels higher than the recommended goals. Treatment failures have been attributed to a variety of causes but the most important is likely to be poor adherence to therapy in the form of irregular or interrupted intake and the high frequency of discontinuation or lack of persistence. Adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon determined by the interplay of patient factors, physician factors, and health care system factors. Patients' knowledge and beliefs about their illness, motivation to manage it, confidence in their ability to engage in illness-management behaviors, and expectations regarding the outcome of treatment and the consequences of poor adherence interact to influence adherence behavior. Patient-related factors account for the largest incremental explanatory power in predicting adherence. This article provides an overview of this critical issue, focusing on patient role in determining adherence level to lipid-lowering therapy.Keywords: hyperlipidemia/drug therapy, medication adherence, patient preference, health behavior

  18. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Gareth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95% of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80% of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investigate a wide range of psychological and personality factors that may lead to adherence/non-adherence to medical treatment and exercise programmes. Methods HIV positive patients who are referred to the physiotherapist-led 10-week exercise programme as part of the standard care are continuously recruited. Data on social cognitive variables (attitude, intention, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and outcome beliefs about the goal and specific behaviours, selected personality factors, perceived quality of life, physical activity, self-reported adherence and physical assessment are collected at baseline, at the end of the exercise programme and again 3 months later. The project incorporates objective measures of both exercise (attendance log and improvement in physical measures such as improved fitness level, weight loss, improved circumferential anthropometric measures and medication adherence (verified by non-invasive hair analysis. Discussion The novelty of this project comes from two key aspects, complemented with objective information on exercise and medication adherence. The project assesses beliefs about both the underlying goal such as following prescribed treatment; and about the specific behaviours such as undertaking the exercise or taking the medication, using both implicit and explicit assessments of patients’ beliefs and attitudes. We predict that i the way people think about the underlying goal of their treatments explains medication and exercise

  19. Household Contact Screening Adherence among Tuberculosis Patients in Northern Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremedhin Berhe Gebregergs

    Full Text Available Household contacts of active tuberculosis cases are at high risk of getting tuberculosis disease. Tuberculosis detection rate among contacts of household members is high. Hence, this study investigated household contact screening adherence and associated factors among tuberculosis patients in Amhara region, Ethiopia.A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 10 - June 30, 2013 in five urban districts of Amhara region, where 418 patients receiving treatment at tuberculosis clinic were interviewed. All patients were interviewed using structured and pre-tested questionnaire. Bringing at least one household contact to TB clinic was regarded as adherent to household contacts screening. Bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to investigate association.The overall adherence to household contact screening in Amhara region was 33.7%. Adherence was higher among Muslims than Christians. Adherence was high if patient took health education from Health Care Worker [AOR: 3.22, 95% CI: 1.88 to 5.51] and 2.17 times higher if patient had sufficient knowledge on tuberculosis [AOR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.29 to 3.67] during interview. Relationship with contact was a significant [AOR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2 to 0.9] social related factor.One third of tuberculosis patients adhered to household contact screening in health facilities during their treatment course. Promoting knowledge of tuberculosis in the community and continuous health education to tuberculosis patients are recommended.

  20. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Lilli B; Jacobson, Judith S

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be 80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up. Based on a raw vegan dietary adherence score (range 0-42) created for this study, mean adherence (SD) increased from 15.1 (5.4) to 17.0 (5.8) over 12 weeks (p=0.03). Baseline predictors of adherence included: education (beta=0.95), severity of disease (beta=0.98), and self-efficacy to adhere (beta=0.72). Future interventions that evaluate this diet should address self-efficacy, an important, potentially remediable predictor of adherence.

  1. Predictors of duloxetine adherence and persistence in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Z

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhanglin Cui, Yang Zhao, Diego Novick, Douglas FariesEli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USAObjectives: Adherence to medication for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM is predictive of lower overall health-care costs, and thus a lower burden on both patients and providers. The objectives of this study were to examine the predictors of adherence to and persistence with duloxetine therapy among commercially insured FM patients, and to identify subgroups of patients with high duloxetine persistence and adherence.Study design: This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed medical and pharmacy records over 1 year for patients in the US aged 18–64 years with FM who initiated (no prior 90-day use duloxetine treatment in 2008.Methods: Adherence to duloxetine was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR, with high adherence defined as MPR ≥ 0.8. Persistence was defined as the duration of therapy from the index date to the earliest of: the ending date of the last prescription, the date of the first gap of >15 days between prescriptions, or the end of the study period (12 months. Demographic and clinical predictors of adherence were examined via multiple logistic regression (MLR, and subgroups of duloxetine-persistent and -adherent patients were identified using classification and regression trees (CART.Results: Among 4660 duloxetine patients, 33% achieved high adherence. Factors associated with high adherence from MLR included older age, North Central and Northeast regions, prior venlafaxine, pregabalin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, or other antidepressant use, or comorbid dyslipidemia or osteoarthritis (all P < 0.05. CART analysis revealed that patients with prior antidepressant use, aged ≥46, or prior osteoarthritis had higher MPR (all P < 0.05, and patients aged ≥45 with a history of SSRI, venlafaxine, or anticonvulsant use had longer duration of therapy (all P < 0.05.Conclusions: Patients with high adherence to and

  2. Prevalence and predictors of patient adherence to health recommendations after acute coronary syndrome: data for targeted interventions?

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, WL; Abdullah, KL; Bulgiba, AM; Abidin, IZ

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poor adherence is a significant nursing and public health concern because it affects patients’ quality of life. It compounds the disease burden of the growing coronary heart disease population. Promoting optimal patient adherence to cardiac-health enhancing recommendations by healthcare providers can reduce mortality and morbidity risk after acute coronary syndrome (ACS).  Aim: This paper sought to examine rates and predictors of patient adherence to health recommen...

  3. Geopolitical and cultural factors affecting ARV adherence on the US-Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlin, Michele G; Decena, Carlos Ulises; Beltran, Oscar

    2013-10-01

    The data discussed represent the findings from a study by the NIH-funded Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center, exploring the influence of institutional and psychosocial factors on adherence to antiretroviral medications by Mexican-origin persons living with AIDS on the US-Mexico Border. A qualitative approach was utilized consisting of clinic observations, baseline and follow-up interviews with patients (N = 113), key informant interviews (N = 9) and focus groups (5) with patients and health providers. Findings include the social-normative, institutional and geo-political factors affecting treatment and service delivery as well as individual variation and culturally patterned behaviors. ARV adherence and retention were found to depend on complex interactions and negotiation of co-occurring factors including the experience of medications and side-effects, patient/provider relationships, cultural norms and the changing dynamics of international borders. We note effects of drug-related violence which created border-crossing obstacles influencing mobility, access to services and adherence. PMID:22797951

  4. Medication adherence: the critical step towards better patient outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Desai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence is defined as patient's adherence to take their medications as prescribed and continue to take the prescribed medication for stipulated time frame. Medication non-adherence is a growing concern to physicians, healthcare systems, and other stakeholders (e.g., payers and there is an increasing evidence of its prevalence and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes eventually resulting into higher costs of care. The cost of non-adherence has been estimated at $100 billion to $300 billion annually, including costs from avoidable hospitalizations, nursing home admissions, and premature deaths. Improving adherence to medication is critical to improve the quality of health care, to encourage better chronic care management, and promote better health outcomes. Reasons for non-adherence are multiple and complex. Studies have reported that poor adherence to drug dosage is due to patient perception that the disease is non-significant, adverse drug effects, lack of treatment effectiveness, and the patient's poor or incomplete knowledge of the disease and (cost. A multifactorial approach is required to tackle this complex problem as a single approach will be ineffective for all patients. The most effective intervention is to use a combination of approaches and address literacy, behavior, and organizational issues. There are challenges as well as opportunities in addressing the public health issue of medication adherence. Changing healthcare reforms, advances in digital health media, social media and modern technologies can now provide alternatives to tackle this issue. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 748-754

  5. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet

    OpenAIRE

    Link, Lilli B.; Jacobson, Judith S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be ≥80% raw ve...

  6. [Adherence and fidelity in patients treated with intragastric balloon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazure, R A; Cancer, E; Martínez Olmos, M A; De Castro, M L; Abilés, V; Abilés, J; Bretón, I; Álvarez, V; Peláez, N; Culebras, J M

    2014-01-01

    A correct treatment of obesity needs a program of habits modification regardless of the selected technique, especially if it is minimally invasive as the intragastric balloon (BIG). The adherence of the obese patients with regard to recommended drugs measures to medium- and long-term is less than 50%. Given that the results obtained using the technique of gastric balloon must be seen influenced by adherence to the modification of habits program and its fulfillment, we reviewed series published in attention to the program proposed with the BIG. The series published to date provide few details about the used Therapeutic Programs as well as the adherence of patients to them, and even less concerning the Monitoring Plan and the loyalty of the patient can be seen. We conclude the convenience to agree on a follow-up strategy, at least the 6 months during which the BIG remain in the stomach. PMID:24483961

  7. Medication Adherence in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Effect of Patient Education, Health Literacy, and Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Joplin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting <1% of the population. Incompletely controlled RA results in fatigue, joint and soft tissue pain, progressive joint damage, reduced quality of life, and increased cardiovascular mortality. Despite an increasing range of disease modifying agents which halt disease progression, poor patient adherence with medication is a significant barrier to management. Objective. The goal of this review was to examine the effectiveness of measures to improve patient medication adherence. Methods. Studies addressing treatment adherence in patients with RA were identified by trawling PsycINFO, Medline, Cochrane, Pubmed, and ProQuest for studies published between January 2000 and October 2014. Articles were independently reviewed to identify relevant studies. Results. Current strategies were of limited efficacy in improving patient adherence with medications used to treat RA. Conclusion. Poor medication adherence is a complex issue. Low educational levels and limited health literacy are contributory factors. Psychological models may assist in explaining medication nonadherence. Increasing patient knowledge of their disease seems sensible. Existing educational interventions appear ineffective at improving medication adherence, probably due to an overemphasis on provision of biomedical information. A novel approach to patient education using musculoskeletal ultrasound is proposed.

  8. Adherence and neurocognitive screening in Romanian HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Arbune

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adherence is critical for the effectiveness of antiretroviral HIV therapy (ART, accordingly decreasing the opportunistic diseases and increasing the quality of life. Neurocognitive disorders (NCD are still frequent in ART era and could impair the adherence, but how ethical is to refer ART in patients with NCD? Objective: To assess the relation between NCD and adherence in HIV Romanian patients. Material and methods: Cross-sectional screening study on 151 patients under ART, no drug users, from HIV Clinic - Galati, assessed by HIV-Associated Dementia Scale (HDS, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS [1], ART CNS-effectiveness Letendre scores [2] and adherence assessment questionnaire CNLAS- Romania. Normal values: HDS >10; anxiety/ depression <8. Statistical analysis performed: Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney test, with 5% significance level. Results: Characteristics of the patients: median age 22 [20; 56] years old; sex ratio F/M 1.17; median educational level 8 [0; >12] years; HBV co-infection 27.8%; AIDS stage 85.3%; current median CD4 526/mm3 [8; 1605] and 65% undetectable HIV-RNA levels. 49.6% (75/151 patients attain HDS scores <10 and imply probable NCD. Scores below 8 for anxiety are more frequent than for depression: 24% vs 13%. The median ART CNS penetration score is 8 [5; 12]. Adherence is considered for 66% patients and is correlating with CD4 number (p=0.001, educational level >4 years (p=0.001; OR=4.2, HDS >10 (p=0.01; OR=2.4 and ART-CNS penetration score >7 (p=0.023; OR=2.4. Low HDS are influenced by old age (p=0.003, depression (p=0.02 and ART-CNS penetration scores <7 (p=0.01. Anxiety is related neither with adherence nor with NCD by HDS, but females are obvious anxious than males (p<0.001. Conclusions: Basic educational level is sufficient for developing ART adherence. High scores of HDS screening should be predictors for ART adherence. Referring ART as well to patients with low HDS scores is rational and

  9. How payment scheme affects patients’ adherence to medications? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hamiza; Hatah, Ernieda; Makmor Bakry, Mohd; Islahudin, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Background A previous systematic review reported that increase in patients’ medication cost-sharing reduced patients’ adherence to medication. However, a study among patients with medication subsidies who received medication at no cost found that medication nonadherence was also high. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the influence of different medication payment schemes on patients’ medication adherence. Objective This study aims to review research reporting the influence of payment schemes and their association with patients’ medication adherence behavior. Methods This study was conducted using systematic review of published articles. Relevant published articles were located through three electronic databases Medline, ProQuest Medical Library, and ScienceDirect since inception to February 2015. Included articles were then reviewed and summarized narratively. Results Of the total of 2,683 articles located, 21 were included in the final analysis. There were four types of medication payment schemes reported in the included studies: 1) out-of-pocket expenditure or copayments; 2) drug coverage or insurance benefit; 3) prescription cap; and 4) medication subsidies. Our review found that patients with “lower self-paying constraint” were more likely to adhere to their medication (adherence rate ranged between 28.5% and 94.3%). Surprisingly, the adherence rate among patients who received medication as fully subsidized was similar (rate between 34% and 84.6%) as that of other payment schemes. The studies that evaluated patients with fully subsidized payment scheme found that the medication adherence was poor among patients with nonsevere illness. Conclusion Although medication adherence was improved with the reduction of cost-sharing such as lower copayment, higher drug coverage, and prescription cap, patients with full-medication subsidies payment scheme (received medication at no cost) were also found to have poor adherence to their medication. Future

  10. Patients' adherence to hard acrylic interocclusal appliance treatment in general dental practice in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Erik; Helkimo, Martti; Magnusson, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate patient adherence to treatment with hard acrylic interocclusal appliance in general dentistry in Sweden and to see if some general factors could predict patient adherence or non-adherence. During the period January - May 2009 a postal questionnaire was sent to all adult patients (> or = 20 years of age) that had received a hard acrylic interocclusal appliance from the public dental health service in the County of Uppsala during 2007 (n=388). The same questionnaire was also sent to all adult patients that had received a hard acrylic interocclusal appliance at a specialist clinic during the same year (n=69). The response rate in general dental practice was 71% and at the specialist clinic the response rate was 91%. In general dental practice, 97% of the hard acrylic interocclusal appliances were stabilisation appliances. At the specialist clinic other types of interocclusal appliances was used to a greater extent. A vast majority of patients in both general dental practice and at the specialist clinic experienced that the interocclusal appliance had a positive treatment effect. In general dental practice, 73% of the patients still used their interocclusal appliances 1 1/2-2 years after they had received them. The corresponding figure at the specialist clinic was 54%. The main reasons for not using the interocclusal appliance, besides disappearance/reduction of TMD symptoms, were different kinds of comfort problems. From the results of this study it is concluded that the patient adherence to hard acrylic stabilisation appliances made in general dental practice in Sweden is good. It can also be concluded that a perceived good treatment effect, as well as treatment of more long-term conditions, predicted a better patient adherence to hard acrylic stabilisation appliances. More studies concerning factors affecting patient adherence in TMD therapy are warranted.

  11. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and associated factors among patients living with HIV/AIDS in Dessie Referral Hospital, Northern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhanu Demeke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antiretroviral therapy has transformed the HIV infection into a chronic manageably disease. Optimal adherence (≥ 95% has required to achieve treatment success; however, still non-adherence remains major problem among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. The aim of this study was to determine adherences rate and evaluate factors affecting adherence among patients on ART in Dessie Referral Hospital (DRH. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study employing both qualitative and quantitative methods was used. A total of 130 people living with HIV/AIDS on ART were included. All patients who came to the hospital during study period were considered based on convenient sampling technique. Chi-Square test is used to examine the association of adherence with associated factors. Both data entry and analysis was done using SPSS version 16. Results: Of 130 respondents, 58(44.6% were males and 72(55.4% were females and 107 (82.3% had 100% adherences, 10(7.7% had 95 -100% and the rest, 13(10% had <95% adherences with overall adherence rate of 90% for last month prior to the study period. The main reasons for non-adherence were 12(37.5% forgetfulness, 7(21.8% being away from home and 4 (12.5% being extremely ill. Use of other medications in addition to antiretroviral drugs (p=0.01, treatment fit into daily routines (p=0.01, family disclosure (p=0.01, active substance use (p=0.04 and living condition (p=0.00 were significantly associated with adherence to ART. Conclusion: The self reported adherence rate to ART (90% was found to be relatively higher which needs inclusion of other methods to ensure consistency of this value. Forgetfulness, being away from home and being extremely ill were the foremost reasons for non-adherence. The patients should be encouraged to maintain this high level of adherence.

  12. Adherence and resource use among patients treated with biologic drugs: findings from BEETLE study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Esposti, Luca; Sangiorgi, Diego; Perrone, Valentina; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio; Perone, Francesco; Buda, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Systemic administration of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF alpha) leads to an anti-inflammatory and joint protective effect in pathologies such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn’s disease. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to therapy, persistence in treatment (no switches or interruptions), and consumption of care resources (drugs, outpatient services, hospitalizations). Methods We conducted an observational retrospective cohort analysis using the administrative databases of five local health units. Patients filling at least one prescription for anti-TNF alpha between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included and followed up for 1 year. Patients were defined as adherent if >80% of the follow-up period was covered by drugs dispensation. Results A total of 1,219 patients were analyzed (mean age 49.6±14.6, male 47%). Among enrolled patients, 36% were affected by rheumatoid arthritis, and 31% and 10% were affected by psoriasis and Crohn’s disease, respectively; other indications remained below these percentages. Thirty-four percent of patients (420) were treated with adalimumab, 51% (615) with etanercept, and 15% (184) with infliximab. Among the 94% of patients who did not switch, those treated with infliximab had a higher rate of adherence across all indications (51% overall) when compared to that observed in patients treated with etanercept (27%) or adalimumab (23%). The mean annual nonpharmacological expenditure for each patient in analysis was €988 for adherent and €1,255 for nonadherent patients. Infliximab was associated with the lowest cost for all indications as determined by the multivariate generalized linear model. Conclusions Patients treated with infliximab were associated with higher adherence and persistence in treatment and lower costs, as compared to those treated with adalimumab or etanercept. PMID:25258545

  13. Belonging to a peer support group enhance the quality of life and adherence rate in patients affected by breast cancer: A non-randomized controlled clinical trialFNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Malekpour Tehrani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It seems that breast cancer patients benefit from meeting someone who had a similar experience. This study evaluated the effect of two kinds of interventions (peer support and educational program on quality of life in breast cancer patients. Methods: This study was a controlled clinical trial on women with non-metastatic breast cancer. The patients studied in two experimental and control groups. Experimental group took part in peer support program and control group passed a routine educational program during 3 months. The authors administered SF-36 for evaluating the quality of life pre-and post intervention. Also, patient′s adherence was assessed by means of a simple checklist. Results: Two groups were similar with respect of age, age of onset of the disease, duration of having breast cancer, marital status, type of the treatment receiving now, and type of the received surgery. In the control group, there were statistically significant improvements in body pain, role-physical, role-emotional and social functioning. In experimental group, role-physical, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional and mental health showed significant improvement. Vitality score and mental health score in experimental group was significantly higher than that of the control group, both with p < 0.001. Also, it was shown that adherence was in high levels in both groups and no significant difference was seen after the study was done. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, supporting the patients with breast cancer by forming peer groups or by means of educational sessions could improve their life qualities.

  14. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larrey D

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dominique Larrey,1,2 Marie-Pierre Ripault,1 Georges-Philippe Pageaux11Département d'Hépato-Gastroentérologie et Transplantation, Hôpital Saint Eloi, 2IRB-INSERM1040, Montpellier, FranceAbstract: The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education.Keywords: adherence to treatment, quality of life, therapeutic education, hepatitis C

  15. Assessment of adherence problems in patients with serious and persistent mental illness: recommendations from the Expert Consensus Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velligan, Dawn I; Weiden, Peter J; Sajatovic, Martha; Scott, Jan; Carpenter, Daniel; Ross, Ruth; Docherty, John P

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to medication treatment can have devastating consequences for patients with serious mental illness. The literature review and recommendations in this article concerning assessment of adherence are reprinted from The Expert Consensus Guideline Series: Adherence Problems in Patients with Serious and Persistent Mental Illness, published in 2009. The expert consensus survey contained 39 questions (521 options) that asked about defining nonadherence, extent of adherence problems in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, risk factors for nonadherence, assessment methods, and interventions for specific types of adherence problems. The survey was completed by 41 (85%) of the 48 experts to whom it was sent. When evaluating adherence, the experts considered it important to assess both behavior and attitude, although they considered actual behavior most important. They also noted the importance of distinguishing patients who are not willing to take medication from those who are willing but not able to take their medication as prescribed due to forgetfulness, misunderstanding of instructions, or financial or environmental problems, since this will affect the type of intervention needed. Although self- and physician report are most commonly used to clinically assess adherence, they are often inaccurate and may underestimate nonadherence. The experts believe that more accurate information will be obtained by asking about any problems patients are having or anticipate having taking medication rather than if they have been taking their medication; They also recommended speaking with family or caregivers, if the patient gives permission, as well as using more objective measures (e.g., pill counts, pharmacy records, smart pill containers if available, and, when appropriate, medication plasma levels). Use of a validated self-report scale may also help improve accuracy. For patients who appear adherent to medication, the experts recommended monthly assessments for

  16. Patient adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla A Munro

    2007-07-01

    themes across all studies produced a line-of-argument synthesis describing how four major factors interact to affect adherence to TB treatment: structural factors, including poverty and gender discrimination; the social context; health service factors; and personal factors. The findings of this study are limited by the quality and foci of the included studies. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to the long course of TB treatment is a complex, dynamic phenomenon with a wide range of factors impacting on treatment-taking behaviour. Patients' adherence to their medication regimens was influenced by the interaction of a number of these factors. The findings of our review could help inform the development of patient-centred interventions and of interventions to address structural barriers to treatment adherence.

  17. Effect of a telephonic intervention on the adherence of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Stewart

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a telephonic intervention in increasingpatients’ adherence to a health behaviour modification programme was tested. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups, the Experimental group receiving the telephonic intervention. Patients in the Experimental group showed greater adherence to the programme than the Control group (p=0.007. Their knowledge of hypertension improved (p=0.001 and was better than the control group (p=0.03, their exercise capacity improved (p=0.003 but not significantly more than the control group (p=0.09. They had a greater reduction in weight (p=0.004 which was significantly different from the Control group (p= 0.03. They were significantly less tired than the Control group (p=0.008. The Experimental group showed a reduction inthe number of patients with headaches (p=0.05 and dizziness (p=0.001. These changes were significant within the Experimental group but not between the two groups. The self reported risk factor modification revealed that more patients in the Experimental group could control their stress (p=0.05; more were controlling their salt intake (p=0.02 and more knew and were adhering to their medication regime (p=0.05. Both groups showed small reductions in blood pressure. The telephonic intervention involving the support of a health-care practitioner and a family member appeared to be effective in changing aspects of health behaviour.

  18. Assessment of medication adherence among hypertensive patients: a cross-sectional study

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    Anup Bhusal

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Overall the medication adherence was poor in hypertensive patients. Adherence to therapeutic regimens is an important factor in blood pressure control among hypertensive patients and needs priority. Health education related to medication adherence needs be improved in hypertensive patients. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1606-1612

  19. A mobile application improves therapy-adherence rates in elderly patients undergoing rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Alexander; Brandl, Christopher; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Schlick, Christopher; Neumann, Till; Kribben, Andreas; Meister, Sven; Diamantidis, Clarissa Jonas; Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Horn, Peter; Becker, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Medication adherence is crucial for success in the management of patients with chronic conditions. This study analyzes whether a mobile application on a tablet aimed at supporting drug intake and vital sign parameter documentation affects adherence in elderly patients. Patients with coronary heart disease and no prior knowledge of tablet computers were recruited. They received a personal introduction to the mobile application Medication Plan, installed on an Apple iPad. The study was conducted using a crossover design with 3 sequences: initial phase, interventional phase (28 days of using the app system), and comparative phase (28 days of using a paper diary). Users experienced the interventional and comparative phases alternately. A total of 24 patients (12 males; mean age 73.8 years) were enrolled in the study. The mean for subjectively assessed adherence (A14-scale; 5-point Likert scale, from “never” to “very often” which results in a score from 0 to 56) before the study was 50.0 (SD = 3.44). After both interventions there was a significant increase, which was more pronounced after the interventional phase (54.0; SD = 2.01) than after the comparative phase (52.6; SD = 2.49) (for all pairs after both interventions, P <0.001). Neither medical conditions nor the number of drug intake (amount and frequency of drug taking) per day affected subjective adherence. Logging data showed a significantly stronger adherence for the medication app than the paper system for both blood pressure recordings (P <0.001) and medication intake (P = 0.033). The majority of participants (n = 22) stated that they would like to use the medication app in their daily lives and would not need further assistance with the app. A mobile app for medication adherence increased objectively and subjectively measured adherence in elderly users undergoing rehabilitation. The findings have promising clinical implications: digital tools can assist chronic disease patients achieve

  20. Does Quality of Healthcare Service Determine Patient Adherence? Evidence from the Primary Healthcare Sector in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekoth, Nandakumar; Dalvi, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    Patient adherence is extremely important to achieve positive outcome. While quality of healthcare service has been studied as a determinant of patient satisfaction and loyalty, its impact on patient adherence has not been examined. The authors attempt to determine dimensions of quality and their impact on patient adherence in primary healthcare in India. Exploratory factor analysis resulted into seven factors. Factor scores were used for regression to identify the influence of dimensions of service quality on patient adherence. Quality of healthcare emerged as a determinant of patient adherence. PMID:26652042

  1. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27074696

  2. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes.

  3. Factors Associated with the Accuracy of Physicians’ Predictions of Patient Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L. Alison; Leventhal, Elaine A.; Leventhal, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Objective Physicians are inaccurate in predicting non-adherence in patients, a problem that interferes with physicians’: 1) appropriate prescribing decisions and 2) effective prevention/intervention of non-adherence. The purpose of the current study is to investigate potential reasons for the poor accuracy of physicians’ adherence-predictions and conditions under which their predictions may be more accurate. Methods After the medical encounter, predictions of patient-adherence and other ratings from primary-care physicians (n=24) regarding patient-factors that may have influenced their predictions were collected. Patients (n=288) rated their agreement regarding the prescribed treatment after the encounter and reported adherence one month later. Results Several factors were related to physicians’ adherence-predictions, including physicians’ perceptions of patient-agreement regarding treatment. However, some factors were not related to adherence and agreement-perceptions were inaccurate overall, potentially contributing to the poor accuracy of adherence-predictions. The degree to which physicians discussed treatment-specifics with the patient moderated agreement-perception accuracy but not adherence-prediction accuracy. Conclusions Training providers to discuss certain treatment-specifics with patients may improve their ability to perceive patient-agreement regarding treatment and may directly improve patient-adherence. Practice Implications Discussing treatment-specifics with patients may directly improve adherence, but providers should not rely on these discussions to give them accurate estimates of the patients’ likely adherence. PMID:21501943

  4. Adherence and resource use among patients treated with biologic drugs: findings from BEETLE study

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    Degli Esposti L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Luca Degli Esposti,1 Diego Sangiorgi,1 Valentina Perrone,2 Sonia Radice,2 Emilio Clementi,3,4 Francesco Perone,4,5 Stefano Buda1 1CliCon Srl Health, Economics and Outcomes Research, Ravenna, Italy; 2Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, L Sacco University Hospital, Università di Milano, Milan, Italy; 3Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, CNR Institute of Neuroscience, L Sacco University Hospital, Università di Milano, Milan, Italy; 4Scientific Institute, IRCCS E Medea, Lecco, Italy; 5Local Health Unit, Caserta, Italy Objectives: Systemic administration of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF alpha leads to an anti-inflammatory and joint protective effect in pathologies such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to therapy, persistence in treatment (no switches or interruptions, and consumption of care resources (drugs, outpatient services, hospitalizations. Methods: We conducted an observational retrospective cohort analysis using the administrative databases of five local health units. Patients filling at least one prescription for anti-TNF alpha between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included and followed up for 1 year. Patients were defined as adherent if >80% of the follow-up period was covered by drugs dispensation. Results: A total of 1,219 patients were analyzed (mean age 49.6±14.6, male 47%. Among enrolled patients, 36% were affected by rheumatoid arthritis, and 31% and 10% were affected by psoriasis and Crohn's disease, respectively; other indications remained below these percentages. Thirty-four percent of patients (420 were treated with adalimumab, 51% (615 with etanercept, and 15% (184 with infliximab. Among the 94% of patients who did not switch, those treated with infliximab had a higher rate of adherence across all indications (51% overall when compared to that

  5. Medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a critical appraisal of the existing literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemt, B.J.F. van den; Zwikker, H.E.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to medication in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is low, varying from 30 to 80%. Improving adherence to therapy could therefore dramatically improve the efficacy of drug therapy. Although indicators for suboptimal adherence can be useful to identify nonadherent patients, and could funct

  6. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

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    Ogundele OA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Olukunle Ayodeji Ogundele,1 Deshendran Moodley,1 Anban W Pillay,1 Christopher J Seebregts1,2 1UKZN/CSIR Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Health Architecture Laboratory, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, 2Jembi Health Systems NPC, Cape Town, South Africa Purpose: Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA.Methods: An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion: The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is

  7. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

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    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  8. The guardians' perspective on paediatric cancer treatment in Malawi and factors affecting adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Israels; C. Chirambo; H. Caron; J. de Kraker; E. Molyneux; R. Reis

    2008-01-01

    Background: Abandonment of paediatric cancer treatment is a common problem in developing countries. Little is known about the guardians' perspective on cancer treatment in these countries, especially the factors that affect adherence. Methods: Following a pilot study enquiring into the possible caus

  9. Adherence and Readiness to Antiretroviral Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Södergård, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy places extraordinarily high demands on adherence, since non-adherence affects both individuals and society due to the spread of resistant viral strains. The aims of the thesis were to investigate the prevalence of adherence in Swedish HIV-infected patients, changes in adherence over time, and factors associated with adherence, including patients’ readiness to adhere. Further, to investigate the collaboration between nurses, doctors and pharmacists after the introduction...

  10. Can the common-sense model predict adherence in chronically ill patients? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Kim; Mullan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore whether mental representations, derived from the common-sense model of illness representations (CSM), were able to predict adherence in chronically ill patients. Electronic databases were searched for studies that used the CSM and measured adherence behaviour in chronically ill patients. Correlations from the included articles were meta-analysed using a random-size effect model. A moderation analysis was conducted for the type of adherence behaviour. The effect sizes for the different mental representations and adherence constructs ranged from -0.02 to 0.12. Further analyses showed that the relationship between the mental representations and adherence did not differ by the type of adherence behaviour. The low-effect sizes indicate that the relationships between the different mental representations of the CSM and adherence are very weak. Therefore, the CSM may not be the most appropriate model to use in predictive studies of adherence.

  11. Refill adherence and polypharmacy among patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bruggen, Rykel; Gorter, Kees; Stolk, Ronald P.; Zuithoff, Peter; Klungel, Olaf H.; Rutten, Guy E. H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Non-adherence is considered a major barrier to better outcomes of diabetes care. A relationship has been established between polypharmacy and patients' adherence. This study aims to investigate the occurrence of polypharmacy and non-adherence in general practice, their mutual rel

  12. Evaluation of adherence to therapy in patients of chronic kidney disease

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    Smita Sontakke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate adherence to medication and study factors associated with non-adherence in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional, questionnaire based study was conducted in Nephrology department of a super specialty hospital. Patients above 18 years of age, suffering from CKD from six months or more were interviewed using self-designed, semi-structured questionnaire to get information about adherence to medication, diet restriction and lifestyle modification (n = 150. Morisky medication adherence questionnaire was used to calculate overall adherence. In this higher score indicates poor adherence. Main outcome measures included prevalence of non-adherence and factors associated with the same. Results: Average number of medicines taken by each patient was 8.0+1.612 (mean+SD per day. Non-adherence to medication schedule was reported in 34% patients. Common causes of non-adherence were high cost (21.3%, complex dosing schedule (20%, fear of adverse effects (16%. Sixty-eight% patients were not aware about importance of taking each medicine. Sixteen% stopped taking medicines due to high cost. Forty-two% suggested that government should adopt measures to provide free medicines to poor patients. In Morisky medication adherence questionnaire high, medium and low adherence was reported in 7.3%, 55.3% and 37.3% of patients, respectively. Moderately positive correlation was observed between poor adherence and number of concurrent illnesses and number of medicines taken. Conclusion: Since majority of patients were not aware about importance of taking each medicine, creating awareness about the same is essential for improving adherence to therapy. Measures to provide free medicines to non-affording patients need to be implemented since high cost was other major cause of non-adherence.

  13. Patient centered primary care is associated with patient hypertension medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumie, Christianne L; Greevy, Robert; Wallston, Kenneth A; Elasy, Tom A; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Kotter, Kristen; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that patient centered care, including communication skills, is an essential component to chronic illness care. Our aim was to evaluate patient centered primary care as a determinant of medication adherence. We mailed 1,341 veterans with hypertension the Short Form Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) which measures elements of patient centered primary care. We prospectively collected each patient's antihypertensive medication adherence for 6 months. Patients were characterized as adherent if they had medication for >80%. 654 surveys were returned (50.7%); and 499 patients with complete data were analyzed. Antihypertensive adherence increased as scores in patient centered care increased [RR 3.18 (95% CI 1.44, 16.23) bootstrap 5000 resamples] for PCAS score of 4.5 (highest quartile) versus 1.5 (lowest quartile). Future research is needed to determine if improving patient centered care, particularly communication skills, could lead to improvements in health related behaviors such as medication adherence and health outcomes.

  14. Exploring beliefs about heart failure treatment in adherent and nonadherent patients: use of the repertory grid technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cottrell WN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available William Neil Cottrell,1 Charles P Denaro,2,3 Lynne Emmerton1,41School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Aged Care, The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; 3School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; 4Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, School of Pharmacy, Curtin University, Perth, WA, AustraliaPurpose: Beliefs about medicines impact on adherence, but eliciting core beliefs about medicines in individual patients is difficult. One method that has the potential to elicit individual core beliefs is the "repertory grid technique." This study utilized the repertory grid technique to elicit individuals' beliefs about their heart failure treatment and to investigate whether generated constructs were different between adherent and nonadherent patients.Methods: Ninety-two patients with heart failure were interviewed using a structured questionnaire that applied the repertory grid technique. Patients were asked to compare and contrast their medicines and self-care activities for their heart failure. This lead to the generation of individual constructs (perceptions towards medicines, and from these, beliefs were elicited about their heart failure treatment, resulting in the generation of a repertory grid. Adherence was measured using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS. Patients with a MARS score ≥ 23 were categorized as "adherent" and those with a score ≤ 22 as "nonadherent." The generated grids were analyzed descriptively and constructs from all grids themed and the frequency of these constructs compared between adherent and nonadherent patients.Results: Individual grids provided insight into the different beliefs that patients held about their heart failure treatment. The themed constructs "related to water," "affect the heart," "related to weight," and "benefit to the heart" occurred more frequently in adherent

  15. Patient medication adherence and physician prescribing among congestive heart failure patients of Yemen

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    K M Alakhali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congestive heart failure has been associated with high morbidity and mortality requiring hospitalisation and is further complicated by noncompliance and under prescriptions. We aim to determine medication adherence and percentage deviation among Asians population in general and Yemenis in particular. A cross-sectional, prospective observational study with purposive sampling was conducted at two cardiac outpatient centers in 70 congestive heart failure patients for a period of 3 months. An Arabic translated Morisky 4 item scale assessed the adherence of patients. Deviation in prescribing was determined by chart review. All 70 patients had mean age of 56.6΁16 years. Morisky 4 item scale predicted low adherence (n=33; 47.1% and overall nonadherencerate (n=38; 54.2% was slightly higher than adherence. Percentage nonadherence versus adherence was high with diuretics (53 vs. 46% and, digoxin (40 vs. 29%. The adherence percentage of angiotensin receptor blockers (9% and beta blockers (8% was low. Diuretics were the most prescribed drugs (n=69; 99%, followed by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (n=51; 73%, cardiac glycoside (n=48; 69%, few patients were on angiotensin receptor blockers (n=8; 11% and (n=9; 13% beta blockers. The maximum prescribing rate deviation was seen with angiotensin receptor blockers (−89% and beta blockers (−87% followed by nitrates (−77%. Digoxin (−31% and angiotensin converting enzymes (−27% deviated comparatively less. Prescribing as well as utilisation rates generally were low resulting in nonachievement of therapeutic goals which could be resolved using multimodel approach.

  16. The patient's duty to adhere to prescribed treatment: an ethical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B

    2005-04-01

    This article examines the ethical basis for the patient's duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions. The article argues that patients have a moral duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions, once they have accepted treatment. Since patients still retain the right to refuse medical treatment, their duty to adhere to treatment prescriptions is a prima facie duty, which can be overridden by their other ethical duties. However, patients do not have the right to refuse to adhere to treatment prescriptions if their non-adherence poses a significant threat to other people. This paper also discusses the use of written agreements between physicians and patients as a strategy for promoting patient adherence.

  17. Guideline adherence and patient satisfaction in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disorders – an evaluation study

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    Holtmann Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are the most frequent inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD. IBD cause a significant burden to society due to extensive health care utilization from the first clinical symptoms until diagnosis and thereafter due to direct and indirect costs. Besides the socio-economic impact of CD and UC, gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms affect quality of life, but there is remarkably little data about the quality of treatment as assessed by patient satisfaction, quality of life and adherence to guidelines. Thus the aim of this study was to identify variables that influence quality of treatment and quality of life as well as patient satisfaction. Methods The Essener Zirkel Study was a cross sectional study of 86 IBD-patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CD or UC. They were recruited at primary, secondary and tertiary care settings. Quality of treatment, quality of life and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Consulting behaviour and number of examinations, duration of disease and variables regarding adherence to guidelines were evaluated, too. Results 59 (69% patients had CD and 27 had UC (31%. 19% spent more than four years until the suspected diagnosis of IBD was confirmed and visited more than five physicians. All patients showed a significantly reduced quality of life compared to the 1998 German normative population. In spite of being under medical treatment, nearly half of the patients suffered from strong quality of life restricting symptoms. Over all, 35% described their treatment as moderate or bad. Patients who consulted psychotherapists and non-medical practitioners suffered significantly less from depression. Conclusion Besides structural deficiencies due to the health care policy, we revealed the adherence to guidelines to be a problem area. Our findings support the assumption, that providing better health care and especially maintaining constant patient

  18. Multifaceted medication adherence intervention for patients with hypertension in secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla; Hallas, Jesper; Nielsen, Lene Ravn-Vestergaard;

    Background and Objectives Medication adherence is often suboptimal among patients with hypertension. Non-adherence is a multi-dimensional problem and a successful adherence intervention requires multiple components to address the underlying reason for non-adherence. The objective of the present...... study was to describe the content and process outcomes of an adherence program developed for hypertensive patients in a hospital setting. Methods The intervention development was based on adherence and behavioral theories, and evidence of effective interventions. The intervention was pharmacist...... to the questionnaire, 44.2% of the patients had at least one item indicated an adherence problem. The DRAW©-tool used at the interview, identified 416 problems, 60% medication-related and 40% life style-related. In total 528 actions were taken divided into 8 categories. Motivational interviewing was the most frequent...

  19. Stroke and TIA survivors' cognitive beliefs and affective responses regarding treatment and future stroke risk differentially predict medication adherence and categorised stroke risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L Alison; Diefenbach, Michael A; Abrams, Jessica; Horowitz, Carol R

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive beliefs and affective responses to illness and treatment are known to independently predict health behaviours. The purpose of the current study is to assess the relative importance of four psychological domains - specifically, affective illness, cognitive illness, affective treatment and cognitive treatment - for predicting stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) survivors' adherence to stroke prevention medications as well as their objective, categorised stroke risk. We assessed these domains among stroke/TIA survivors (n = 600), and conducted correlation and regression analyses with concurrent and prospective outcomes to determine the relative importance of each cognitive and affective domain for adherence and stroke risk. As hypothesised, patients' affective treatment responses explained the greatest unique variance in baseline and six-month adherence reports (8 and 5%, respectively, of the variance in adherence, compared to 1-3% explained by other domains). Counter to hypotheses, patients' cognitive illness beliefs explained the greatest unique variance in baseline and six-month objective categorised stroke risk (3 and 2%, respectively, compared to 0-1% explained by other domains). Results indicate that domain type (i.e. cognitive and affective) and domain referent (illness and treatment) may be differentially important for providers to assess when treating patients for stroke/TIA. More research is required to further distinguish between these domains and their relative importance for stroke prevention. PMID:25220292

  20. Adherence to interferon β-1b treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Fernández

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to interferon β-1b (INFβ-1b therapy is essential to maximize the beneficial effects of treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS. For that reason, the main objectives of this study are to assess adherence to INFβ-1b in patients suffering from MS in Spain, and to identify the factors responsible for adherence in routine clinical practice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study including 120 Spanish patients with MS under INFβ-1b treatment. Therapeutic adherence was assessed with Morisky-Green test and with the percentage of doses received. The proportion of adherent patients assessed by Morisky-Green test was 68.3%, being indicative of poor adherence. Nevertheless, the percentage of doses received, which was based on the number of injected medication, was 94.3%. The main reason for missing INFβ-1b injections was forgetting some of the administrations (64%. Therefore, interventions that diminish forgetfulness might have a positive effect in the proportion of adherent patients and in the percentage of doses received. In addition, age and comorbidities had a significant effect in the number of doses injected per month, and should be considered in the management of adherence in MS patients. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Among all the available methods for assessing adherence, the overall consumption of the intended dose has to be considered when addressing adherence.

  1. Symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence among patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peggy Bosch; Janina Waberg; Maurits van den Noort; Heike Staudte; Sabina Lim; Jos Egger

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Treatment non-adherence is a common problem in patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression. This study investigated the possible relationships between symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence.Methods: Thirty outpatients with schizophrenia and 58 outpatients with depression were enroled in this study. The beck depression Inventory-II, the positive and negative syndrome scale, and the pittsburgh sleep quality index were used to assess symptom severity and quality of sleep, and sleep log data were used to measure treatment adherence.Results: The preliminary results showed no signiifcant relationship between symptom severity and treatment adherence or between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with depression. However, a signiifcant positive relationship was found between negative symptoms and treatment adherence and a signiifcant negative relationship between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia.Conclusion: The present exploratory study revealed a positive relationship between symptom severity and treatment adherence and a negative relationship between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia, but no signiifcant relationships in patients with depression were found. Future studies are needed in order to gain a better understanding of possible risk factors related to treatment non-adherence.

  2. Importance of doctor-patient relationship for patient adherence with medication regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Vedsted, Peter

    Aim: It has been supposed that the relation between the doctor and the patient has implications for the adherence to medication. This study explores the effect of patient reported doctor-patient relationship on patient adherence with medication regiments. Methods: Design: Prospective cohort study......) in 48 practices. Doctor-patient relationship was measured from The Danish version of the 23-item EUROPEP questionnaire measuring patient evaluation of general practice. From the register data on prescriptions we drew all subsidised drugs redeemed at pharmacies for each patient in 2002-2005. Patients......, who did not have any drug prescriptions one year prior to the evaluation and had at least one new drug prescription for chronic conditions (statins, antihypertensives, SSRI/SNRI, oral antidiabetics) in the year after the evaluation were included as incident, new users of this medication.   The...

  3. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenic Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Saínza; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; López-Zurbano, Saioa; Zorrilla, Iñaki; López, Purificación; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotics are the drugs prescribed to treat psychotic disorders; however, patients often fail to adhere to their treatment, and this has a severe negative effect on prognosis in these kinds of illnesses. Among the wide range of risk factors for treatment nonadherence, this systematic review covers those that are most important from the point of view of clinicians and patients and proposes guidelines for addressing them. Analyzing 38 studies conducted in a total of 51,796 patients, including patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, we found that younger age, substance abuse, poor insight, cognitive impairments, low level of education, minority ethnicity, poor therapeutic alliance, experience of barriers to care, high intensity of delusional symptoms and suspiciousness, and low socioeconomic status are the main risk factors for medication nonadherence in both types of disorder. In the future, prospective studies should be conducted on the use of personalized patient-tailored treatments, taking into account risk factors that may affect each individual, to assess the ability of such approaches to improve adherence and hence prognosis in these patients. PMID:27307187

  4. Medication adherence in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Frances Yap, BSc (Pharm) (Hons); Thiru Thirumoorthy, MBBS, FRCP (London), FAMS; Yu Heng Kwan, BSc (Pharm) (Hons)

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is a crucial component in the treatment of chronic diseases. In the elderly, clinicians are faced with a unique set of problems associated with adherence that they may not have been adequately trained for. In this paper, we demonstrate the importance of medication adherence in the elderly through a case study. The different factors affecting medication adherence in the elderly are highlighted: patient, medication, health care providers, health care system, and socioeconom...

  5. Determinants of Adherence to Treatment in Hypertensive Patients of African Descent and the Role of Culturally Appropriate Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinema, Jennita G.; van Dijk, Nynke; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In Western countries, better knowledge about patient-related determinants of treatment adherence (medication and lifestyle) is needed to improve treatment adherence and outcomes among hypertensive ethnic minority patients of African descent. Objective To identify patient-related determina

  6. Bromide as marker for drug adherence in hypertensive patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, R.L.; Uum, S.H.M. van; Lenders, J.W.M.; Thien, Th.

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: Insufficient drug adherence is an important reason for inadequate blood pressure control. Currently, methods that measure drug adherence objectively are lacking. Objective methods are needed to help improve blood pressure control and outcome in hypertensive

  7. A Patient Education Program to Improve Adherence Rates with Antituberculosis Drug Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisky, Donald E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An incentive scheme to reward positive health behaviors (adherence to antituberculosis drug regimens) was tested with 88 active and 117 preventive patients randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. Preventive patients who received incentives were significantly more likely to continue care and had higher adherence levels. Actives showed…

  8. Body Consciousness, Illness-Related Impairment, and Patient Adherence in Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Alan J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the joint effects of private body consciousness (PBC) and degree of illness-related physical impairment on treatment regimen adherence in a sample of 52 hemodialysis patients. Predicted the effect of PBC on adherence would vary as a function of patients' level of illness-related physical impairment. Results are discussed in terms of…

  9. Predictors of poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quach, Phuong Le; Mors, Ole; Christensen, Torben Østergaard;

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to identify predictors for poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder.......This study sought to identify predictors for poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder....

  10. Improved long-term antiretroviral treatment outcomes amongst patients receiving community-based adherence support in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatti, Geoffrey; Mothibi, Eula; Shaikh, Najma; Grimwood, Ashraf

    2016-11-01

    Retaining high levels of patients in care who are virally suppressed over long treatment periods has been an important challenge for antiretroviral treatment (ART) programmes in sub-Saharan Africa, the region having the highest HIV burden globally. Clinic-linked community-based adherence support (CBAS) programmes provide home-based adherence and psychosocial support for ART patients. However, there is little evidence of their longer-term impact. This study assessed the effectiveness of CBAS after eight years of ART. CBAS workers are lay healthcare personnel providing regular adherence and psychosocial support for ART patients and their households through home visits addressing household challenges affecting adherence. A multicentre cohort study using routinely collected data was undertaken at six public ART sites in a high HIV-prevalence South African district. Patient retention, loss to follow-up (LTFU), viral suppression and CD4 cell restoration were compared between patients with and without CBAS, using competing-risks regression, linear mixed models and log-binomial regression. 3861 patients were included, of whom 1616 (41.9%) received CBAS. Over 14,792 patient-years of observation, the cumulative incidence of LTFU was 37.3% and 46.2% amongst patients with and without CBAS, respectively, following 8 years of ART; adjusted subhazard ratio (CBAS vs. no CBAS) = 0.74 (95% CI: 0.66-0.84; P resource-limited settings. PMID:27251459

  11. 61. The effect of depression on medication adherence in patients with heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zeineddine, M.; Farah, I.; S. Alanzi; A. Alsaud; B. Bdeir

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a major and growing public health problem; approximately 5 million patients in the USA have heart failure. Depression is a serious mental illness that interferes with daily life activities and quality of life of Heart Failure Patients. Aim: To determine the association between depression and the medication adherence in patients with heart failure. Depression will reduce adherence to medication in patients with heart failure Quality project involving 50 patients with heart fai...

  12. The effect of patient satisfaction with pharmacist consultation on medication adherence: an instrumental variable approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gu NY; Gai Y; Hay JW

    2008-01-01

    There are limited studies on quantifying the impact of patient satisfaction with pharmacist consultation on patient medication adherence. Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of patient satisfaction with pharmacist consultation services on medication adherence in a large managed care organization. Methods: We analyzed data from a patient satisfaction survey of 6,916 patients who had used pharmacist consultation services in Kaiser Permanente Southern California fro...

  13. When tuberculosis treatment fails. A social behavioral account of patient adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumartojo, E

    1993-05-01

    Several conclusions about measuring adherence can be drawn. Probably the best approach is to use multiple measures, including some combination of urine assays, pill counts, and detailed patient interviews. Careful monitoring of patient behavior early in the regimen will help predict whether adherence is likely to be a problem. Microelectronic devices in pill boxes or bottle caps have been used for measuring adherence among patients with tuberculosis, but their effectiveness has not been established. The use of these devices may be particularly troublesome for some groups such as the elderly, or precluded for those whose life styles might interfere with their use such as the homeless or migrant farm workers. Carefully designed patient interviews should be tested to determine whether they can be used to predict adherence. Probably the best predictor of adherence is the patient's previous history of adherence. However, adherence is not a personality trait, but a task-specific behavior. For example, someone who misses many doses of antituberculosis medication may successfully use prescribed eye drops or follow dietary recommendations. Providers need to monitor adherence to antituberculosis medications early in treatment in order to anticipate future problems and to ask patients about specific adherence tasks. Ongoing monitoring is essential for patients taking medicine for active tuberculosis. These patients typically feel well after a few weeks and either may believe that the drugs are no longer necessary or may forget to take medication because there are no longer physical cues of illness. Demographic factors, though easy to measure, do not predict adherence well. Tending to be surrogates for other causal factors, they are not amenable to interventions for behavior change. Placing emphasis on demographic characteristics may lead to discriminatory practices. Patients with social support networks have been more adherent in some studies, and patients who believe in the

  14. Correlates of antiretroviral and antidepressant adherence among depressed HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottonari, Kathryn A; Tripathi, Shanti P; Fortney, John C; Curran, Geoff; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Gifford, Allen L; Pyne, Jeffrey M

    2012-05-01

    Although crucial for efficacy of pharmacotherapy, adherence to prescribed medication regimens for both antiretrovirals and antidepressants is often suboptimal. As many depressed HIV-infected individuals are prescribed both antiretrovirals and antidepressants, it is important to know whether correlates of nonadherence are similar or different across type of regimen. The HIV Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (HI-TIDES) study was a single-blinded, longitudinal, randomized controlled effectiveness trial comparing collaborative care to usual depression care at three Veterans Affairs HIV clinics. The current investigation utilized self-report baseline interview and chart-abstracted data. Participants were 225 depressed HIV-infected patients who were prescribed an antidepressant (n=146), an antiretroviral (n=192), or both (n=113). Treatment adherence over the last 4 days was dichotomized as "less than 90% adherence" or "90% or greater adherence." After identifying potential correlates of nonadherence, we used a seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) bivariate probit model, in which the probability of adherence to HIV medications and the probability of adherence to antidepressant medications are modeled jointly. Results indicated that 75.5% (n=146) of those prescribed antiretrovirals reported 90%-plus adherence to their antiretroviral prescription and 76.7% (n=112) of those prescribed antidepressants reported 90%-plus adherence to their antidepressant prescription, while 67% of those prescribed both (n=113) reported more than 90% adherence to both regimens. SUR results indicated that education, age, and HIV symptom severity were significant correlates of antiretroviral medication adherence while gender and generalized anxiety disorder diagnosis were significant correlates of adherence to antidepressant medications. In addition, antiretroviral adherence did not predict antidepressant adherence (β=1.62, p=0.17), however, antidepressant adherence

  15. Process- and patient-reported outcomes of a multifaceted medication adherence intervention for hypertensive patients in secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla; Hallas, Jesper; Ravn-Nielsen, Lene Vestergaard;

    2015-01-01

    potential adherence problems. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate process outcomes and patient- and pharmacist-reported outcomes of a pharmacist adherence intervention for hypertensive patients treated in hospital outpatient clinics. Secondly, to determine the agreement between two different adherence metrics...... calls. Two tools were used to identify adherence problems: The Drug Adherence Work-up (DRAW) tool and an adherence questionnaire. Process data included drug-related problems (DRPs) with recommendations to the physicians, medication- and lifestyle problems identified at the patient interview, actions......-related and 40% lifestyle-related. In connection with the interview, 528 actions were taken within 8 different categories. MI was a central technique applicable for most problems and was employed in nearly all patients (94%). About half of the patients reported increased focus on lifestyle change, and 21...

  16. Adherence and Quality of Life of Hypertension Patients in Gunung Jati Hospital, Cirebon, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah A.Perwitasari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment effectiveness of hypertension could be influenced by patients’ characteristics and patients’ adherence with medication. Besides reaching the goal of blood pressure decrease after the treatment, their quality of life has become the main concern regarding effectiveness of hypertension treatment. This study aimed to explore the hypertension patients’ adherence and quality of life. In addition, it was studied which factors associated with adherence and quality of life in hypertension patients treated with antihypertensive at Gunung Jati Hospital, Cirebon. We recruited 85 adult hypertension patients who were treated with antihypertensive agents for at least 6 months. The patients’ adherence was measured by Medication Adherence Report Scale and the patients’ quality of life was measured by Indonesian version of Short Form-36 questionnaire. The patients’ adherence was found as 24.03 (SD: 1.98 and there were no significant differences of patients’ adherence using monotherapy and combination therapy. The patients’ characteristics such as, age, gender and education level could not predict patients’ adherence (p>0.05. The average of Physical Component Summary (PCS and Mental Component Summary (MCS were 43.35 (SD: 9.4 and 52.13 (SD:5.59. Age and gender may predict PCS, however, education and comorbidity may predict MCS (p<0.05. Hypertension patients’ adherence in Gunung Jati hospital is good. The PCS and MCS scores in this study are comparable to the other previous studies. The patients’ characteristic could not be the predictor of patients’ adherence.

  17. Efficacy and safety of a multifactor intervention to improve therapeutic adherence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD: protocol for the ICEPOC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prados-Torres Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low therapeutic adherence to medication is very common. Clinical effectiveness is related to dose rate and route of administration and so poor therapeutic adherence can reduce the clinical benefit of treatment. The therapeutic adherence of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is extremely poor according to most studies. The research about COPD adherence has mainly focussed on quantifying its effect, and few studies have researched factors that affect non-adherence. Our study will evaluate the effectiveness of a multifactor intervention to improve the therapeutic adherence of COPD patients. Methods/Design A randomized controlled clinical trial with 140 COPD diagnosed patients selected by a non-probabilistic method of sampling. Subjects will be randomly allocated into two groups, using the block randomization technique. Every patient in each group will be visited four times during the year of the study. Intervention: Motivational aspects related to adherence (beliefs and behaviour: group and individual interviews; cognitive aspects: information about illness; skills: inhaled technique training. Reinforcement of the cognitive-emotional aspects and inhaled technique training will be carried out in all visits of the intervention group. Discussion Adherence to a prescribed treatment involves a behavioural change. Cognitive, emotional and motivational aspects influence this change and so we consider the best intervention procedure to improve adherence would be a cognitive and emotional strategy which could be applied in daily clinical practice. Our hypothesis is that the application of a multifactor intervention (COPD information, dose reminders and reinforcing audiovisual material, motivational aspects and inhalation technique training to COPD patients taking inhaled treatment will give a 25% increase in the number of patients showing therapeutic adherence in this group compared to the control group. We will

  18. Let's talk about medication: concordance in rating medication adherence among multimorbid patients and their general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ose, D.; Mahler, C.; Vogel, I.; Ludt, S.; Szecsenyi, J.; Freund, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication adherence can be essential for improving health outcomes. Patients with multiple chronic conditions, often receiving multiple medications, are at higher risk for medication nonadherence. Previous research has focused on concordance between patients and providers about which me

  19. Patient and hospital characteristics associated with variation in guideline adherence in intrauterine insemination care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Haagen, E.C.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Tepe, E.M.; Akkermans, R.P.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of patient and hospital characteristics with adherence to guidelines for intrauterine insemination (IUI) care. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study using multilevel regression analysis. Characteristics studied at the patient level were female age, type and duration

  20. Improving Post-Discharge Medication Adherence in Patients with CVD: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo D. Oliveira-Filho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective interventions to improve medication adherence are usually complex and expensive. Objective: To assess the impact of a low-cost intervention designed to improve medication adherence and clinical outcomes in post-discharge patients with CVD. Method: A pilot RCT was conducted at a teaching hospital. Intervention was based on the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-4. The primary outcome measure was medication adherence assessed using the eight-item MMAS at baseline, at 1 month post hospital discharge and re-assessed 1 year after hospital discharge. Other outcomes included readmission and mortality rates. Results: 61 patients were randomized to intervention (n = 30 and control (n = 31 groups. The mean age of the patients was 61 years (SD 12.73, 52.5% were males, and 57.4% were married or living with a partner. Mean number of prescribed medications per patient was 4.5 (SD 3.3. Medication adherence was correlated to intervention (p = 0.04 and after 1 month, 48.4% of patients in the control group and 83.3% in the intervention group were considered adherent. However, this difference decreased after 1 year, when adherence was 34.8% and 60.9%, respectively. Readmission and mortality rates were related to low adherence in both groups. Conclusion: The intervention based on a validated patient self-report instrument for assessing adherence is a potentially effective method to improve adherent behavior and can be successfully used as a tool to guide adherence counseling in the clinical visit. However, a larger study is required to assess the real impact of intervention on these outcomes.

  1. Belonging to a peer support group enhance the quality of life and adherence rate in patients affected by breast cancer: A non-randomized controlled clinical trialFNx01

    OpenAIRE

    Afsaneh Malekpour Tehrani; Ziba Farajzadegan; Fariborz Mokarian Rajabi; Ahmad Reza Zamani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It seems that breast cancer patients benefit from meeting someone who had a similar experience. This study evaluated the effect of two kinds of interventions (peer support and educational program) on quality of life in breast cancer patients. Methods: This study was a controlled clinical trial on women with non-metastatic breast cancer. The patients studied in two experimental and control groups. Experimental group took part i...

  2. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV/AIDS patients: a cross-sectional study in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A.T. Pinheiro

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted on HIV-infected adults being treated with antiretroviral drugs at a reference service in Southern Brazil. Participants answered a sociodemographic questionnaire and were tested by scales assessing sociocognitive variables. Adherence to treatment was assessed by a self-report inventory developed for the study. Clinical information was obtained from the patients' records. Significance tests were conducted using univariate logistic regressions followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 195 patients participated in the study and 56.9% of them reported > or = 95% adherence on the previous two days. In univariate analysis, the odds of adherence increased with self-efficacy (a person's conviction that he/she can successfully execute the behavior required to produce a certain desired outcome in taking medications as prescribed (OR = 3.50, 95% CI 1.90-6.55, and decreased with perception of negative affect and physical concerns (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.53-0.95. The odds were lower for taking antiretroviral medications >4 times a day (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.20-0.94 and higher for patients with 8 years of schooling (OR = 2.28, 95% CI 1.12-4.66. In the multivariate analysis, self-efficacy (OR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.69-6.56 and taking medication >4 times a day (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.80 were independently associated with adherence. Self-efficacy was the most important predictor of adherence, followed by number of times antiretroviral medication was taken per day. Among sociodemographic and clinical variables, only the number of years of schooling was associated with adherence. Motivational interventions based on self-efficacy may be useful for increasing treatment adherence.

  3. Understanding and improving treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorders: A review and a proposed intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B.P. Staring (Anton); C.L. Mulder (Niels); M. van der Gaag (Mark); J.-P. Selten; A.J.M. Loonen (Anne); M.W. Hengeveld (Michiel)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractNon-adherence to treatment of patients with psychotic disorders is related to higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Important predictors of non-adherence include poor social structure, cognitive deficits, negative medication attitude, side effects, depression, a sealing-

  4. Adherence to oral anti-diabetic drugs among patients attending a Ghanaian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce SP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The burden of diabetes mellitus, especially Type-2, continues to increase across the world. Medication adherence is considered an integral component in its management. Poor glycemic controls due to medication nonadherence accelerates the development of long-term complications which consequently leads to increased hospitalization and mortality. Objective: This study examined the level of adherence to oral antidiabetic drugs among patients who visited the teaching hospital and explored the probable contributory factors to non-adherence. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study using systematic sampling to collect quantitative data was undertaken. Questionnaires were administered to out-patients of the medical department of a teaching hospital in Ghana. Logistic regression was performed with statistical significance determined at p<0.05. Results: A total of 200 diabetic patients participated in the study. Using the Morisky Medication Adherence scale, the level of adherence determined was 38.5%. There were significant correlations between level of adherence and educational level [(OR=1.508; (CI 0.805- 2.825, P=0.019, and mode of payment [(OR=1.631; (CI 0.997- 2.669, P=0.05. Conclusion: Adherence in diabetic patients was low among respondents and this can be improved through education, counseling and reinforcement of self-care. There were several possible factors that contributed to the low adherence rate which could benefit from further studies.

  5. Can the common-sense model predict adherence in chronically ill patients? A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Brandes; B. Mullan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore whether mental representations, derived from the common-sense model of illness representations (CSM), were able to predict adherence in chronically ill patients. Electronic databases were searched for studies that used the CSM and measured adherence behav

  6. Improving Treatment Regimen Adherence in Coronary Heart Disease by Targeting Patient Types

    OpenAIRE

    Turpin, Robin S.; Jeffrey B. Simmons; Janice F. Lew; Alexander, Charles M; Marie A. Dupee; Patricia Kavanagh; Ellen R. Cameron

    2004-01-01

    Patient adherence to a treatment plan is central to the control of coronary heart disease (CHD) and in the prevention of complications; it is reported to be the single most important challenge in the management of CHD and related conditions. The following article provides an overview of adherence in CHD, with particular emphasis on two important theories of behavior change: the

  7. Coping with Treatment-Related Stress: Effects on Patient Adherence in Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Alan J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the relation of coping to adherence among 57 hemodialysis patients. As predicted, coping efforts involving planful problem solving were associated with more favorable adherence when used in response to stressors involving a relatively controllable aspect of the hemodialysis context. For less controllable stressors, coping efforts…

  8. Non-adherence to drug therapy and drug acquisition costs in a national population - a patient-based register study

    OpenAIRE

    Hovstadius Bo; Petersson Göran

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients' non-adherence to drug therapy is a major problem for society as it is associated with reduced health outcomes. Generally, approximately only 50% of patients with chronic disease in developed countries adhere to prescribed therapy, and the most common non-adherence refers to chronic under-use, i.e. patients use less medication than prescribed or prematurely stop the therapy. Patients' non-adherence leads to high additional costs for society in terms of poor health...

  9. Hypoglycemia Unawareness Is Associated With Reduced Adherence to Therapeutic Decisions in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Charlotte B.; Choudhary, Pratik; Pernet, Andrew; Hopkins, David; Amiel, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hypoglycemia unawareness increases severe hypoglycemia risk. Hypoglycemia avoidance restores awareness, but it is difficult to sustain. We compared adherence to treatment changes by awareness status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Case notes of 90 type 1 diabetic patients were analyzed retrospectively, identifying awareness status and insulin regimens over four visits. The proportion of patients adhering to advice and percent advice taken were calculated. RESULTS A total of 31 patients...

  10. Assessment of patient knowledge of diabetic goals, self-reported medication adherence, and goal attainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitley HP

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication adherence is an integral aspect of disease state management for patients with chronic illnesses, including diabetes mellitus. It has been hypothesized that patients with diabetes who have poor medication adherence may have less knowledge of overall therapeutic goals and may be less likely to attain these goals. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess self-reported medication adherence, knowledge of therapeutic goals (hemoglobin A1C [A1C], low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C] and blood pressure [BP], and goal attainment in adult patients with diabetes. Methods: A survey was created to assess medication adherence, knowledge of therapeutic goals, and goal attainment for adult patients with diabetes followed at an internal medicine or a family medicine clinic. Surveys were self-administered prior to office visits. Additional data were collected from the electronic medical record. Statistical analysis was performed. Results: A total of 149 patients were enrolled. Knowledge of therapeutic goals was reported by 14%, 34%, and 18% of survived patients for LDL-C, BP, and A1C, respectively. Forty-six percent, 37%, and 40% of patients achieved LDL-C, BP, and A1C goals, respectively. Low prescribing of cholesterol-lowering medications was an interesting secondary finding; 36% of patients not at LDL-C goal had not been prescribed a medication targeted to lower cholesterol. Forty-eight percent of patients were medication non-adherent; most frequently reported reasons for non-adherence were forgot (34% and too expensive (14%. Patients at A1C goal were more adherent than patients not at goal (p=0.025. Conclusion: The majority did not reach goals and were unknowledgeable of goals; however, most were provided prescriptions to treat these parameters. Goal parameters should be revisited often amongst multidisciplinary team members with frequent and open communications. Additionally, it is imperative that practitioners discuss

  11. The Change in HbA1c Associated with Initial Adherence and Subsequent Change in Adherence among Diabetes Patients Newly Initiating Metformin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gregory A; Rosales, A Gabriela; Kimes, Teresa M; Tunceli, Kaan; Kurtyka, Karen; Mavros, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Whether changes in adherence are associated with changes in HbA1c is assumed but not known. Methods. We conducted a observational study of 2,844 type 2 diabetes patients who initiated metformin as their first antihyperglycemic drug. Using HbA1c measures before, 6-12 months after, and up to 3 years after metformin initiation, we analyzed HbA1c change as a function of initial adherence and change in adherence. Results. Compared with no adherence, initial adherence of 50-79% was associated with an adjusted reduction in HbA1c of 0.45% while adherence ≥80% was associated with HbA1c reduction of 0.73%. Change from some initial adherence (1-79%) to total nonadherence was associated with 0.25% increase in HbA1c. Change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.15%. Those associations were accentuated among patients not in glycemic control: change from some to no adherence was associated with an HbA1c increase of 0.63% and change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.40%. Conclusions. Initial adherence to newly prescribed metformin therapy produces substantial HbA1c reduction. Among those with modest adherence but suboptimal glycemic control, the difference between moving to full adherence versus nonadherence results in lower HbA1c of one percentage point. PMID:27579326

  12. Impact of pharmaceutical care on adherence, hospitalisations and mortality in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Charlotte; Harbig, Philipp; Buus, Kirsten Marie;

    2014-01-01

    Background Elderly polypharmacy patients may be more at risk of not adhering to medication. If so, the underlying reasons may be more readily disclosed during private discussions with patients. Hence pharmaceutical care discussions at home might improve treatment adherence. Objective The aim...... of this study was to investigate the impact of pharmaceutical care on medication adherence, hospitalisation and mortality in elderly patients prescribed polypharmacy. Setting Pharmaceutical care discussed at home. Methods A randomised controlled trial with two arms; pharmaceutical care (n = 315) and controls (n...... % confidence interval 0.71–2.82). Conclusions Pharmaceutical care given to our elderly polypharmacy patients made no significant impact on medication adherence, hospitalisation or mortality, when compared to comparable control patients....

  13. The Danish version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale: preliminary validation in cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale (DMARS-4) adapted to measure adherence to analgesic regimen among cancer patients. METHODS: The validated English version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale was translated...... into Danish following the repeated back-translation procedure. Cancer patients for the study were recruited from specialized pain management facilities. Thirty-three patients responded to the DMARS-4, the Danish Barriers Questionnaire II, The Danish version of Patient Perceived Involvement in Care Scale...... measuring the quality of patient-physician pain communication, and the Danish Brief Pain Inventory pain severity scale. RESULTS: A factor analysis of the DMARS-4 resulted in one factor. Mean (SD) score on the cumulative scale ranging from 4 to 20, with higher scores indicating better medication adherence...

  14. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  15. Counseling patients on facial volume replacement and adherence with posttreatment instructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Day

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Doris DayDay Dermatology and Aesthetics New York, USAAbstract: Use of injectable volume replacement products has increased dramatically in the US in recent years. An optimal outcome with volume replacement depends on a thorough ­knowledge of the products on the part of the dermatologic/aesthetic physician specialist, identification of patients with a likelihood of benefiting from volume replacement procedures, selection of an appropriate product for the individual patient, and effective patient counseling to ensure adherence to posttreatment care instructions. Adherence to physician instructions in the field of dermatology appears limited, and there is very little published information on adherence to physician instructions following facial volume replacement procedures. The purpose of this review is to provide strategies for understanding and overcoming the barriers to adherence with the widely used dermal fillers. Strategies include using patient-centered techniques, such as a motivational interview encouraging the patient to follow postprocedure care instructions, eg, massage. In this case, demonstrating massage techniques while the patient is still in the office, with patient participation and detailed feedback, also contributes to good adherence with posttreatment care instructions. Telephone counseling, reminder postcards, and text messages may help improve clinic attendance for follow-up. Motivated patients who demonstrate good ­adherence to physician instructions generally respond well to volume replacement treatments, and usually experience fewer adverse events than patients who do not follow instructions. Although promoting adherence to pretreatment and posttreatment protocols remains a challenge, patient counseling throughout the treatment process can lead to successful results.Keywords: improving adherence, injectable volume replacement, product selection, ­rejuvenation procedure, soft tissue augmentation

  16. Quality of life associated with treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Valdivia-Martínez José J; Rascón-Pacheco Ramón A.; Prado-Aguilar Carlos A; Martínez Yolanda V

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite certain contradictions, an association has been identified between adherence to drug treatment and the quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes. The contradictions observed emphasize the importance of using different methods to measure treatment adherence, or the association of psychological precursors of adherence with quality of life. For this reason, we have used an indirect method to measure adherence (pill count), as well as two adherence behaviour pre...

  17. Factors Supporting and Inhibiting Adherence to HIV Medication Regimen in Women: A Qualitative Analysis of Patient Interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Fagbami, Oluwakemi; Oluwasanjo, Adetokunbo; Fitzpatrick, Carrie; Fairchild, Rebecca; Shin, Ann; Donato, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy reduces morbidity and mortality; however rates of non-adherence are variable among women for unclear reasons. This study was a single-center qualitative analysis of interviews with 18 female HIV-positive non-adherent patients (defined by virologic failure) to explore psychosocial factors impacting adherence. Factors identified were categorized as promoting, inhibiting or having no effect on adherence. Three themes, characterized as social factors, illness f...

  18. Diagnosing medication non-adherence in a patient with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqin eYe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMedication non-adherence continues to be a major challenge facing the healthcare system. A case is presented of a 48 year-old man with myocardial infarction who was found to be non-adherent to multiple medications. Conceptual models are reviewed along with current approaches for assessment and treatment of medication non-adherence.DesignCase report and literature review.DiscussionA theoretical model for medication non-adherence built on the Theory of Planned Behavior is presented. Empirical evidence is reviewed for determinants of non-adherent behavior such as health beliefs and self-efficacy. Current methods to assess medication non-adherence, including self-report, pill count, biological drug levels, pharmacy refill, and electronic bottles are summarized along with their limitations. Finally, an individualized approach for assessment is described using the case presented and the conceptual framework outlined above. Follow-up for the patient and potential interventions to improve medication adherence are discussed. ConclusionDespite the challenges, a conceptual framework for medication non-adherence can guide assessment and treatment. Further research for innovative and effective methods to detect and treat medication non-adherence is urgently needed to aid clinicians in treating this pervasive behavioral problem.

  19. Medication adherence in schizophrenia: Exploring patients', carers' and professionals' views

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Kikkert; A.H. Schene; M.W.J. Koeter; D. Robson; A. Born; H. Helm; M. Nose; C. Goss; G. Thornicroft; R.J. Gray

    2006-01-01

    One of the major clinical problems in the treatment of people with schizophrenia is suboptimal medication adherence. Most research focusing on determinants of nonadherence use quantitative research methods. These studies have some important limitations in exploring the decision-making process of pat

  20. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients in Kathmandu District, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigdel R

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rajesh Shigdel,1 Elise Klouman,2 Anita Bhandari,2 Luai A Ahmed11Department of Health and Care Sciences, 2Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, NorwayPurpose: There are a high number of HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in the Kathmandu District of Nepal, but information on adherence and factors influencing it are scarce in this population. The present study aimed to estimate ART adherence among HIV-infected patients in the Kathmandu District of Nepal, and to determine the factors associated with ART adherence.Patients and methods: This study included 316 HIV-infected patients attending three ART centers in the Kathmandu District. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, and ART use for the previous 7 days was collected via interview. Participants were considered adherent if they reported taking ≥95% of their ART as prescribed. The association between explanatory variables and ART adherence was measured using logistic regression and reported as odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI.Results: Male participants accounted for 64.6% (n=204. Overall ART adherence was 86.7%. ART adherence in men and women were 84.3% and 91.1%, respectively. Age (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.00–1.09, travel time to ART centers (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.12–1.71, history of illegal drug use (OR 3.98; 95% CI 1.71–9.24, and adverse effects (OR 4.88; 95% CI 1.09–21.8, were all independently and negatively associated with ART adherence. Use of reminder tools (OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.33–8.91 was independently and positively associated with ART adherence.Conclusion: The observed ART adherence in this study is encouraging. Travel time to ART centers, self-reported adverse effects, illegal drug use, and not using reminder tools were the major determinants of ART adherence. Interventions that take these factors into account could further improve ART

  1. Quality of life and treatment adherence in Parkinson’s disease patients

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    Sara Mínguez-Mínguez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life and adherence to treatment are parameters of high relevance in those patients with chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to ascertain the quality of life and adherence to treatment of Parkinson’s disease patients. To this end, we performed a cross sectional study in patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease who belong to one of Albacete’s associations of patients and their families. The PDQ-39 and Morisky-Green questioners were used to determine the quality of life and adherence to treatment for a sample of 95 patients. Our data showed an average score of 33.47% in the PDQ-39, being the worst score domains mobility and bodily discomfort. On the other hand, a 31.6% of the patients were classified as adherent to treatment. The main factor associated with adequate adherence is the importance given to the medication by the patient. We found no association between adherence and quality of life.

  2. ROLE OF COUNSELING ON MEDICAL ADHERENCE AND GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Anoop Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes Mellitus (DM refers to a group of common metabolic disorders that share the phenotype of hyperglycemia. It is the leading cause of of end stage renal disease, non-traumatic limb amputation and adult blindness. The studies have shown that complications of DM can be prevented by the proper control of blood glucose, which is dependent on the patient’s adherence to medication, life style modification, frequent monitoring of blood glucose etc. and can be influenced by proper education and counseling of the patient. The patients with DM should receive education about exercise, care of DM during illness and medications to lower plasma glucose1 . This study aims to assess the impact of patients counseling on the medication adherence in type 2DM. METHOD: This is a prospective randomized study that includes 100 patients with type 2 DM in the out-patient department of internal medicine in a tertiary care teaching hospital, north Kerala. After getting informed consent, they were kept in two groups by simple randomization technique and were assessed and followed at 4 weeks interval. Data related to the medication adherence was collected using Morisky Medication Adherence Scale questionnaire (MMAS-8. RESULTS: Out of 100 patients 33% were male and 67% female. Both baseline and 1st follow up showed a low adherence value (<6 both in control and intervention group. In the second follow up most of the patients in intervention group showed a moderate adherence (6-8, whereas control group did not show any improvement. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that there is a stastically significant improvement in the adherence level after patient counseling and education. Knowledge about the disease and treatment has improved the patient’s adherence to medication.

  3. Peer counselors' role in supporting patients' adherence to ART in Ethiopia and Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Gusdal, Annelie Karin; Obua, Celestino; Andualem, Tenaw; Wahlström, Rolf; Chalker, John; Fochsen, Grethe

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Our aim was to explore peer counselors? work and their role in supporting patients? adherence to ART in resource-limited settings in Ethiopia and Uganda. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 79 patients, 17 peer counselors and 22 providers in ART facilities in urban and rural areas of Ethiopia and Uganda. Two main categories with related subcategories emerged from the analysis. The first main category, Peer counselors as facilitators of adherence, des...

  4. The effect of reminder systems on patients' adherence to treatment

    OpenAIRE

    West, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Sarah D Fenerty1, Cameron West1, Scott A Davis1, Sebastian G Kaplan3, Steven R Feldman1,2,41Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, 4Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USABackground: Patient adherence is an important component of the treatment of chronic disease. An understanding of patient adherence and its modulating fa...

  5. Depressive Symptoms and Dietary Adherence in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Amani A.; Frazier, Susan K; LENNIE, TERRY A.; Sawaya, B. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Depressive symptoms may be associated with fluid and dietary non-adherence which could lead to poorer outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and fluid and dietary adherence in 100 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving haemodialysis. A descriptive, cross-sectional design with a convenience sample of 100 patients with ESRD receiving maintenance haemodialysis completed instruments that measured self reported depressive sym...

  6. A study to assess the feasibility of undertaking a randomized controlled trial of adherence with eye drops in glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cliff Richardson,1 Lisa Brunton,1 Nicola Olleveant,1 David B Henson,1 Mark Pilling,1 Jane Mottershead,2 Cecilia H Fenerty,2 Anne Fiona Spencer,2 Heather Waterman1 1School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, 2Royal Manchester Eye Hospital, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom Background: Adherence with therapy could influence the progression of glaucoma and ultimately affect the onset of visual impairment in some individuals. This feasibility study evaluated the measures to be used for a future randomized controlled trial assessing the effects of group-based education on adherence with eye drops. Methods: People diagnosed with glaucoma within the previous 12 months attending a regional ophthalmology clinic in the North West of England were recruited. A two-session education program delivered one week apart had been devised as part of a previous project. A combined adult learning and health needs approach to education was taken. Outcomes measured were knowledge of glaucoma, self-report of adherence, illness perception, beliefs about medicines, patient enablement, and general health (Short Form-12. Adherence was also measured objectively using a Medical Events Monitoring System device. Results: Twenty-six participants consented to undertake the educational program and 19 produced analyzable data. Knowledge of glaucoma, illness perception, beliefs about medicine, and patient enablement all showed statistically significant improvements after education. Mean adherence with eye drops was maintained above 85% before and for 3 months after attendance at the educational program. Self-report exaggerated adherence by at least 10% when compared with the objective Medical Events Monitoring System data, and in fact the kappa agreement was zero. Conclusion: All questionnaires other than the Short Form-12 were considered to be valuable measures and use of a Medical Events Monitoring System device was

  7. Adherence to inhaled therapies, health outcomes and costs in patients with asthma and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkelä, Mika J; Backer, Vibeke; Hedegaard, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    , adverse effects and medication costs. Age is of particular concern given the increasing prevalence of asthma in the young and increased rates of non-adherence in adolescents compared with children and adults. The correlation between adherence to inhaled pharmacological therapies for asthma and COPD...... and clinical efficacy is positive, with improved symptom control and lung function shown in most studies of adults, adolescents and children. Satisfaction with inhaler devices is also positively correlated with improved adherence and clinical outcomes, and reduced costs. Reductions in healthcare utilisation......Suboptimal adherence to pharmacological treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has adverse effects on disease control and treatment costs. The reasons behind non-adherence revolve around patient knowledge/education, inhaler device convenience and satisfaction, age...

  8. What puts heart failure patients at risk for poor medication adherence?

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    Knafl GJ

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available George J Knafl,1 Barbara Riegel2,31School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Leonard Davis Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USABackground: Medication nonadherence is a major cause of hospitalization in patients with heart failure (HF, which contributes enormously to health care costs. We previously found, using the World Health Organization adherence dimensions, that condition and patient level factors predicted nonadherence in HF. In this study, we assessed a wider variety of condition and patient factors and interactions to improve our ability to identify those at risk for hospitalization. Materials and methods: Medication adherence was measured electronically over the course of 6 months, using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS. A total of 242 HF patients completed the study, and usable MEMS data were available for 218 (90.1%. Participants were primarily white (68.3%, male (64.2%, and retired (44.5%. Education ranged from 8–29 years (mean, 14.0 years; standard deviation, 2.9 years. Ages ranged from 30–89 years (mean, 62.8 years; standard deviation, 11.6 years. Analyses used adaptive methods based on heuristic searches controlled by cross-validation scores. First, individual patient adherence patterns over time were used to categorize patients in poor versus better adherence types. Then, risk factors for poor adherence were identified. Finally, an effective model for predicting poor adherence was identified based on identified risk factors and possible pairwise interactions between them. Results: A total of 63 (28.9% patients had poor adherence. Three interaction risk factors for poor adherence were identified: a higher number of comorbid conditions with a higher total number of daily medicines, older age with poorer global sleep quality, and fewer months since diagnosis of HF with poorer

  9. Variation in medication adherence across patient behavioral segments: a multi-country study in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy R

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Robert Sandy, Ulla Connor CoMac Analytics, Inc, Providence, RI, USA Objectives: This study determines the following for a hypertensive patient population: 1 the prevalence of patient worldview clusters; 2 differences in medication adherence across these clusters; and 3 the adherence predictive power of the clusters relative to measures of patients’ concerns over their medication’s cost, side effects, and efficacy. Methods: Members from patient panels in the UK, Germany, Italy, and Spain were invited to participate in an online survey that included the Medication Adherence Report Scale-5 (MARS-5 adherence instrument and a patient segmentation instrument developed by CoMac Analytics, Inc, based on a linguistic analysis of patient talk. Subjects were screened to have a diagnosis of hypertension and treatment with at least one antihypertensive agent. Results: A total of 353 patients completed the online survey in August/September 2011 and were categorized against three different behavioral domains: 1 control orientation (n=176 respondents [50%] for I, internal; n=177 respondents [50%] for E, external; 2 emotion (n=100 respondents [28%] for P, positive; n=253 respondents [72%] for N, negative; and 3 agency or ability to act on choices (n=227 respondents [64%] for H, high agency; n=126 [36%] for L, low agency. Domains were grouped into eight different clusters with EPH and IPH being the most prevalent (88 respondents [25%] in each cluster. The prevalence of other behavior clusters ranged from 6% (22 respondents, INH to 12% (41 respondents, IPL. The proportion of patients defined as perfectly adherent (scored 25 on MARS-5 varied sharply across the segments: 51% adherent (45 of 88 respondents for the IPH vs 8% adherent (2 of 25 respondents classified as INL. Side effects, being employed, and stopping medicine because the patient got better were all significant determinants of adherence in a probit regression model. Conclusion: By categorizing

  10. Association between patients' beliefs and oral antidiabetic medication adherence in a Chinese type 2 diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu P

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ping Wu,1 Naifeng Liu2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Basic Medical Sciences and Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, 2Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Southeast University Medical School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The objective of this study was to identify, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB, patients’ beliefs about taking oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs as prescribed, and to measure the correlations between beliefs and medication adherence.Patients and methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of type 2 diabetic patients using structured questionnaires in a Chinese tertiary hospital. A total of 130 patients were enrolled to be interviewed about TPB variables (behavioral, normative, and control beliefs relevant to medication adherence. Medication adherence was assessed using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8. Spearman’s rank correlation was used to assess the association between TPB and MMAS-8. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between different variables and MMAS-8, with statistical significance determined at P<0.05.Results: From 130 eligible Chinese patients with an average age of 60.6 years and a male proportion of 50.8%, a nonsignificant relationship between behavioral, normative, and the most facilitating control beliefs and OAD adherence was found in our study. Having the OADs on hand (P=0.037 was the only facilitating control belief associated with adherence behavior. Being away from home or eating out (P=0.000, not accepting the disease (P=0.000, ignorance of life-long drug adherence (P=0.038, being busy (P=0.001, or poor memory (P=0.008 were control belief barriers found to be correlated with poor adherence. TPB is the only important determinant influencing OAD adherence among all the factors (P=0.011.Conclusion: The results indicate that the TPB model could be used to examine adherence to OADs. One

  11. Bypassing non-adherence via PEG in a critically ill HIV-1-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipe, J; Hueber, A J; Rech, J; Harrer, T

    2008-08-01

    This case study describes a 44-year-old, chronically non-adherent, HIV-infected male with relapsing, life threatening toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) and other recurring opportunistic infections. Non-adherence resulted in critical illness, suppressed CD4 lymphocyte count and elevated viral load. In order to bypass the patient's complete psychological aversion to taking medication, and after exhausting various psychological interventions, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG) tube was inserted for delivery of indispensable medication. During the 15-month follow-up the patient was adherent, exhibiting a consistently undetectable viral load, high CD4 count and a remission of the opportunistic infections. This is an interesting case study demonstrating life-saving and long-term benefit of PEG in an exceptional setting, which has implications for future research and treatment of non-adherent HIV-infected patients.

  12. Bypassing non-adherence via PEG in a critically ill HIV-1-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipe, J; Hueber, A J; Rech, J; Harrer, T

    2008-08-01

    This case study describes a 44-year-old, chronically non-adherent, HIV-infected male with relapsing, life threatening toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) and other recurring opportunistic infections. Non-adherence resulted in critical illness, suppressed CD4 lymphocyte count and elevated viral load. In order to bypass the patient's complete psychological aversion to taking medication, and after exhausting various psychological interventions, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG) tube was inserted for delivery of indispensable medication. During the 15-month follow-up the patient was adherent, exhibiting a consistently undetectable viral load, high CD4 count and a remission of the opportunistic infections. This is an interesting case study demonstrating life-saving and long-term benefit of PEG in an exceptional setting, which has implications for future research and treatment of non-adherent HIV-infected patients. PMID:18608059

  13. Patients' and Spouses' Contribution Toward Adherence to Self-Care Behaviors in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M Graça; Costa, Vera; Oliveira, Daniela; Ferreira, Gabriela; Pedras, Susana; Sousa, Maria Rui; Machado, José C

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on patients' and partners' variables regarding adherence to self-care, in recently diagnosed patients with Type 2 diabetes. One hundred four patients and partners were included. Instruments answered were Family Inventory of Life Events and Changes (family stress), Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales (family coping), Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (dyadic adjustment), Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire (partner support) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (psychological morbidity). Results showed adherence to diet to be positively predicted by patient dyadic adjustment and patient positive support and negatively by partner depression and partner negative support. Adherence to exercise was predicted by patient's family stress and negatively by partner anxiety. Adherence to glucose monitoring was predicted by partner positive support. Psychological variables were not associated with adherence to foot care. Finally, positive partner support moderated the relationship between family stress and dyadic adjustment in patients. The results emphasize the need to treat the patient in the context of the dyad. Future research should focus on partners' specific instrumental behaviors that promote patients' self-care behaviors.

  14. Non-adherence to life-style modification and its factors among type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Jahan Mumu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-adherence to preventive and therapeutic life-style recommendations among patients with diabetes is special challenge in the management of these patients. This study aimed to measure the proportion of non-adherence to life-style modification and factors associated with these among a group of Bangladeshi type 2 diabetic patients. Under an analytical cross-sectional design 374 type 2 diabetic patients (age >20 years, diagnosed for at least 1 year, were selected from different health care centers operated by the Diabetic Association of Bangladesh. Non-adherence rate were assessed for: Diet (88%, exercise (25%, routine blood glucose testing (32%, foot care (70%, smoking (6% and betel quid chewing habit (25%. Binary logistic regression suggests that higher education group (P = 0.013, rural area (P = 0.013 and attendance to diabetes education classes (P = 0.043 showed good adherence to diet and non-attendance to diabetes education class (P = 0.014, older age (P = 0.037 are associated to non-adherence to exercise. Unemployed patients showed more non-adherence to blood glucose testing (P = 0.045 than others. Non-attendance to diabetes education class (P = 0.037 and business occupation group (P = 0.039 showed significant association to smoking and betel quid intake habit respectively.

  15. Poor adherence and low persistency rates for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christina; Chen, Vincent; Vu, Vinh; Le, An; Nguyen, Linda; Zhao, Changqing; Wong, Carrie R.; Nguyen, Nghia; Li, Jiayi; Zhang, Jian; Trinh, Huy; Nguyen, Mindie H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our goal was to examine rates and predictors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) surveillance adherence and persistency, since studies of such adherence and persistency in patients with chronic hepatitis (CHB) are currently limited. Consecutive CHB patients (N = 1329) monitored for ≥1 year at 4 US clinics from January 1996 to July 2013 were retrospectively studied. Surveillance adherence was evaluated based on the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines. Kaplan–Meier method was used to analyze surveillance persistency of 510 patients who had initially fair adherence (having at least annual surveillance imaging with further follow-up). Mean age was 48, with the majority being male (58%), Asian (92%), foreign-born (95%), and medically insured (97%). Patients with cirrhosis and those seen at university liver clinics were more likely to have optimal HCC surveillance than those without cirrhosis and those seen at community clinics (38.4% vs 21.6%, P <0.001 and 33.5% vs 14.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). HCC diagnosed in optimally adherent patients trended toward smaller tumor size (P < 0.08). On multivariate analysis also inclusive of age, sex, clinical visits, cirrhosis, clinic setting and antiviral therapy use, strong independent predictors for having at least annual imaging were a history of more frequent clinical visits (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, P < 0.001) and university-based care (OR = 5.2, P < 0.001). Even for those with initially fair adherence, persistency dropped to 70% at 5 years. Adherence and persistency to HCC surveillance in CHB patients is generally poor. More frequent clinic visits and university-based settings were significant and strong predictors of at least annual HCC surveillance adherence. PMID:27583921

  16. The use of capecitabine in daily practice: a study on adherence and patients' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmers L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lonneke Timmers,1 Eleonora L Swart,1 Christel CLM Boons,1 Dirk Mangnus,1 Peter M van de Ven,2 Godefridus J Peters,3 Epie Boven,3 Jacqueline G Hugtenburg11Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy, 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 3Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsBackground: Adherence to pharmacological therapy is a complex and multifactorial issue that can substantially alter the outcome of treatment. Especially when using long-term medication, cancer patients have adherence rates similar to those of patients with other diseases. The consequences of poor adherence are poor health outcomes and increased health care costs. Only few studies have focused on the use of oral anticancer agents in daily practice. Information about the reasons for nonadherence is essential for the development of interventions that may improve adherence. This report presents the CAPER-capecitabine protocol, which is designed to study the adherence to capecitabine and the influence of patient attitudes towards medication and self-reported side effects. Furthermore, the relationships between patient characteristics, disease characteristics, side effects, quality of life, patient beliefs and attitudes towards disease and medication, dose adjustments, reasons for discontinuation, and plasma concentration of three of the main metabolites, including the active compound 5-fluorouracil, will be explored.Methods: In this multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study, 90 patients aged 18 years or older starting treatment with capecitabine will be included and followed for a period up to five cycles. The main study parameters are adherence, patient attitudes towards medication, and the number and grade of patient-reported side effects. At baseline and during week 2 of cycles 1, 3 and 5, patients will be asked to donate blood and fill out a questionnaire. Blood samples will be analyzed for plasma

  17. Non-adherence in patients on peritoneal dialysis: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstadina Griva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been increasingly recognized that non-adherence is an important factor that determines the outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD therapy. There is therefore a need to establish the levels of non-adherence to different aspects of the PD regimen (dialysis procedures, medications, and dietary/fluid restrictions. METHODS: A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature was performed in PubMed, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases using PRISMA guidelines in May 2013. Publications on non-adherence in PD were selected by two reviewers independently according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Relevant data on patient characteristics, measures, rates and factors associated with non-adherence were extracted. The quality of studies was also evaluated independently by two reviewers according to a revised version of the Effective Public Health Practice Project assessment tool. RESULTS: The search retrieved 204 studies, of which a total of 25 studies met inclusion criteria. Reported rates of non-adherence varied across studies: 2.6-53% for dialysis exchanges, 3.9-85% for medication, and 14.4-67% for diet/fluid restrictions. Methodological differences in measurement and definition of non-adherence underlie the observed variation. Factors associated with non-adherence that showed a degree of consistency were mostly socio-demographical, such as age, employment status, ethnicity, sex, and time period on PD treatment. CONCLUSION: Non-adherence to different dimensions of the dialysis regimen appears to be prevalent in PD patients. There is a need for further, high-quality research to explore these factors in more detail, with the aim of informing intervention designs to facilitate adherence in this patient population.

  18. Association between Medication Adherence and Duration of Outpatient Treatment in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuyama, Hiroki; Ohta, Munehiro; Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Okamura, Takehiko; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Medication adherence is important in the treatment of schizophrenia, and critical periods during treatment may be associated with relapse. However, the relationship between adherence and duration of outpatient treatment (DOT) remains unclear. The authors aimed to clarify the relationship between adherence and DOT at a psychiatric hospital in Japan. Methods For outpatients with schizophrenia who regularly visit Shin-Abuyama hospital, the authors conducted a single questionnaire survey (five questions covering gender, age, DOT, medication shortages, and residual medication) over one month period. Participants were divided into two groups whether DOT were from more than one year to within five years or not. Mantel-Haenszel analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed on the data regarding the medication adherence. Results Effective answers were received for 328 patients. The residual medication rate was significantly higher among those receiving outpatient treatment from more than one year to within five years than five years than those receiving outpatient treatment for more than five years or less than one year (p=0.016). Conclusion This survey suggests that there are critical periods during which patients are most prone to poor adherence. Because poor adherence increases the risk of relapse, specific measures must be taken to improve adherence during these periods.

  19. Adherence to statin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: An important dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Farsaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the importance of patients′ adherence to their drug treatments for achieving desired therapeutic goals and the proven role 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins for the health status of patients with cardiovascular diseases, there is not enough information regarding diabetic patients′ adherence to statin therapy in developing countries. In this clinical study we aimed to assess the adherence of diabetes type 2 patients to statin therapy in a research based community clinic in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this prospective clinical study which was done at Isfahan Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, 204 diabetic type 2 patients under treatment with statin were interviewed twice and their demographic data (age, gender, body mass index, education, statin information (type, dose and their serum lipid profile were recorded. Three months after the initial visits, patients were assessed using pill counting method and according to patients′ self-reporting and also assessed low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol goal attainment <100 mg/dl. Results: Adherence rate was 79.7% and 69% according to pill counting and self-reporting among study population. Moreover, 68.4% of patients achieved their LDL cholesterol goal of <100 mg/dl and adherent patients reached therapeutic goal significantly more than those who were considered non-adherence to statin therapy (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Adherence to statin therapy, as reflected by pill count method, is significantly related to LDL cholesterol goal achievement in patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia. Pill count method can be used to identify patients who are nonadherent to statin therapy and at high risk for failure to attain LDL cholesterol goals.

  20. Development of the CoMac Adherence Descriptor™: a linguistically-based survey for segmenting patients on their worldviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Ulla M; Mac Neill, Robert S; Mzumara, Howard R; Sandy, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medication and healthy behaviors is a pressing health care issue. Much research has been conducted in this area under a variety of labels, such as compliance, disease management and, most recently, adherence. However, the complex factors related to predicting and, more importantly, understanding and explaining adherence, have nevertheless remained elusive. However, through an in-depth linguistic analysis of patient talk, the International Center for Intercultural Communication (ICIC) at Indiana University has produced a psycholinguistic coding system that uses patients' own language to cluster them into distinct groups based on their worldviews. ICIC's studies have shown, for example, that patients reveal their fundamental perceptions about themselves and their environment in their life narratives; clustering of individual patients based on these different perceptions is possible via the use of differential language in survey questions, and differential language can be used to tailor messages for individual patients in a manner that these individuals prefer over generically worded communication. In grant-funded research, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the ICIC reviewed the literature and identified three basic psychosocial tenets related to adherence: control orientation, based on locus of control research; agency, based on self-efficacy; and affect or attitude and emotion. These three constructs were selected because, in the published literature, they have been consistently found to be connected to patient adherence. Based on this research, a survey, the CoMac Descriptor™ was developed. This report shows that The Descriptor™ questions and responses are valid and reliable in segmenting patients across psychosocial constructs, which will have positive implications for health care providers and patients. PMID:25848230

  1. Low-Cost Method to Monitor Patient Adherence to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Using Multiplex Cathepsin Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Manu O; Evans, Denise; Keegan, Philip M; McNamara, Lynne; Parker, Ivana K; Roberts, LaDeidra M; Caulk, Alexander W; Gleason, Rudolph L; Seifu, Daniel; Amogne, Wondwossen; Penny, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring patient adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) by patient survey is inherently error prone, justifying a need for objective, biological measures affordable in low-resource settings where HIV/AIDS epidemic is highest. In preliminary studies conducted in Ethiopia and South Africa, we observed loss of cysteine cathepsin activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-positive patients on ART. We optimized a rapid protocol for multiplex cathepsin zymography to quantify cysteine cathepsins, and prospectively enrolled 350 HIV-positive, ART-naïve adults attending the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa, to test if suppressed cathepsin activity could be a biomarker of ART adherence (103 patients were included in final analysis). Poor adherence was defined as detectable viral load (>400 copies/ml) or simplified medication adherence questionnaire, 4-6 months after ART initiation. 86 % of patients with undetectable viral loads after 6 months were cathepsin negative, and cathepsin-positive patients were twice as likely to have detectable viral loads (RR 2.32 95 % CI 1.26-4.29). Together, this demonstrates proof of concept that multiplex cathepsin zymography may be an inexpensive, objective method to monitor patient adherence to ART. Low cost of this electrophoresis-based assay makes it a prime candidate for implementation in resource-limited settings. PMID:26589706

  2. Non-adherence to drug therapy and drug acquisition costs in a national population - a patient-based register study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovstadius Bo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' non-adherence to drug therapy is a major problem for society as it is associated with reduced health outcomes. Generally, approximately only 50% of patients with chronic disease in developed countries adhere to prescribed therapy, and the most common non-adherence refers to chronic under-use, i.e. patients use less medication than prescribed or prematurely stop the therapy. Patients' non-adherence leads to high additional costs for society in terms of poor health. Non-adherence is also related to the unnecessary sale of drugs. The aim of the present study was to estimate the drug acquisition cost related to non-adherence to drug therapy in a national population. Methods We constructed a model of the drug acquisition cost related to non-adherence to drug therapy based on patient register data of dispensed out-patient prescriptions in the entire Swedish population during a 12-month period. In the model, the total drug acquisition cost was successively adjusted for the assumed different rates of primary non-adherence (prescriptions not being filled by the patient, and secondary non-adherence (medication not being taken as prescribed according to the patient's age, therapies, and the number of dispensed drugs per patient. Results With an assumption of a general primary non-adherence rate of 3%, and a general secondary non-adherence rate of 50%, for all types of drugs, the acquisition cost related to non-adherence totalled SEK 11.2 billion (€ 1.2 billion, or 48.5% of total drug acquisition costs in Sweden 2006. With the assumption of varying primary non-adherence rates for different age groups and different secondary non-adherence rates for varying types of drug therapies, the acquisition cost related to non-adherence totalled SEK 9.3 billion (€ 1.0 billion, or 40.2% of the total drug acquisition costs. When the assumption of varying primary and secondary non-adherence rates for a different number of dispensed drugs

  3. Adherence to diet on diabetic patients: effects of an intervention program

    OpenAIRE

    María De Lourdes Rodríguez Campuzano; Antonia Rentería Rodríguez; Juan Carlos García Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of an intervention program on the self-reported adherence to a prescribed diet for diabetic patients. Because of the impact and consequences of this chronic illness, it is important to make the necessary efforts in order to achieve this dietary adherence goal, since diet is one of the main bases for the treatment of diabetes. According to an interbehavioral approach, an intervention program was designed and applied to ninety diabetic p...

  4. Treatment Adherence in Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Perceptions from Adolescent Patients and Their Families

    OpenAIRE

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Odell, Shannon; Sander, Emily; Baldassano, Robert N.; Barg, Frances K.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine patient- and parent-perceived factors that impact adherence to inflammatory bowel disease treatment using a qualitative descriptive individual interview approach. Sixteen adolescents and their parents were recruited from May through August 2007 and interviewed about medication adherence using an open-ended semi-structured interview format. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded into themes. Parent-child dyads identified forgetting, in...

  5. Improving medication adherence of patients with chronic heart failure: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah D

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Deval Shah,1 Kim Simms,2 Debra J Barksdale,3 Jia-Rong Wu3 1Internal Medicine, Wake Forest Baptist Hospital, Winston-Salem, 2Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Heart failure is a chronic debilitating illness that affects 5.7 million Americans. The financial burden of heart failure in the US toppled $31 billion in 2012, which is one of the highest among all chronic medical conditions. Medication adherence is a major component of heart failure self-care behaviors. Therefore, medication non-adherence is associated with more emergency department visits, frequent rehospitalizations, and higher medical cost. Medication adherence rates have varied from 10% to 98% depending on the definition and measurement used to assess and analyze adherence. Many factors contribute to medication non-adherence such as lack of support, finances, absent of symptoms, cognitive decline, adverse reactions, depression, poor attention span, poor knowledge about medication, multiple medications, difficulty swallowing large pills, and inconveniences of urinary frequency with diuretics. Researchers have explored various strategies such as the use of pharmacists, nurses, telemedicine, and interdisciplinary teams to provide interventions to improve medication adherence in heart failure. Health care providers should continue to provide education, constantly reinforce the importance of taking medication as prescribed, and when feasible, utilize one of the successful evidence-based strategies to increase adherence. Keywords: pharmacy, tele-health, interdisciplinary, registered nurse, interventions

  6. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. OBJECTIVE: To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM, a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV? and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?". A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA <48 copies/mL at the time of the survey. We used SEM to test hypothesized relationships. RESULTS: The analyses included 489 patients (94% of eligible patients. The patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2 on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all p<.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Patient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  7. Does fasting during Ramadan trigger non-adherence to oral hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate the effect of fasting during Ramadan (the ninth lunar month) on adherence to oral hormonal therapies (OHT) among breast cancer (BC) patients. Patients and Methods: During Ramadan 2010, 139 BC patients were interviewed at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute. They were asked about fasting as well as intake of OHT in Ramadan and in the preceding month. Results: The median age was 50 years and most patients were postmenopausal with good performance status and non-metastatic disease. The median number of fasting days was 18% and 93% of patients were fasting 80% or more of Ramadan. Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors were used in 64% and 36%, respectively. Adherence to OHT during Ramadan and its preceding month were 94.2% and 95.7%, respectively (p = 0.77). In univariate analysis, non-adherence prior to Ramadan and shorter duration of OHT were predictors of non-adherence during Ramadan (P < 0.001, 0.003, respectively). Fasting, age, performance status, presence of metastases and type of hormonal therapy were not good predictors of adherence. Conclusions: While most of patients receiving OHT for BC are fasting during Ramadan, this does not negatively impact compliance with treatment

  8. Strategies to optimize treatment adherence in adolescent patients with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishay, Lara C; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    While development of new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to a significant improvement in survival age, routine daily treatment for CF is complex, burdensome, and time intensive. Adolescence is a period of decline in pulmonary function in CF, and is also a time when adherence to prescribed treatment plans for CF tends to decrease. Challenges to adherence in adolescents with CF include decreased parental involvement, time management and significant treatment burden, and adolescent perceptions of the necessity and value of the treatments prescribed. Studies of interventions to improve adherence are limited and focus on education, without significant evidence of success. Smaller studies on behavioral techniques do not focus on adolescents. Other challenges for improving adherence in adolescents with CF include infection control practices limiting in-person interactions. This review focuses on the existing evidence base on adherence intervention in adolescents with CF. Future directions for efforts to optimize treatment adherence in adolescents with CF include reducing treatment burden, developing patient-driven technology to improve tracking, communication, and online support, and rethinking the CF health services model to include assessment of individualized adherence barriers. PMID:27799838

  9. The relationship between depression, anxiety and medication adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Adriaan; Kagee, Ashraf

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, a small but growing body of literature on the associations between common mental disorders and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has emerged. The present study builds on the growing body of research by investigating associations between symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and adherence to ART. We studied a convenience sample of 101 South African ART users to determine the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety and their association with self-reported adherence to ART. Based on the standardised cut-off scores recorded using the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition (BDI II), 40.4% of participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of depression. Moreover, results from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) indicated that 28.7% of the study participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Biserial correlations and logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and adherence. The results indicate that patients reporting non-perfect adherence were approximately three times more likely (OR=2.73; CI=1.09-6.82) to have moderate to severe symptoms of depression than those reporting perfect adherence. The present findings are in keeping with those of previous studies, suggesting that depression may act as a barrier to ART adherence.

  10. Delivery of patient adherence support: a systematic review of the role of pharmacists and doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Malin Andersson,1,2 Sara Garfield,1,2 Lina Eliasson,3,4 Christina Jackson,3 David K Raynor5 1The Centre for Medication Safety and Service Quality, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London, 2UCL School of Pharmacy, London, 3Atlantis Healthcare, London, 4Centre for Haematology, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, 5School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Abstract: We conducted a systematic review of adherence support programs involving doctors and pharmacists. We searched MEDLINE®, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, PsycINFO®, and CINAHL using the keywords "pharmacist" or "doctor" and "adhere*" or "compli*" and "randomized controlled trials". We found 89 studies involving pharmacists; in contrast, only 14 studies involved doctors. The roles of pharmacists and doctors ranged from providing education and counseling to adjusting treatment. Most interventions that specified a patient group were carried out with patients with chronic conditions (n=79 and only six included short-term treatments. The majority of interventions improved adherence and clinical outcomes to some extent, although the size of effect size was sometimes small. Resource utilization (eg, hospitalization rates, visits to doctors did not change in the majority of studies that reported it. Few studies included cost analyses. All but one study had high risk of performance bias due to the nature of the interventions, which made it impossible to blind the participants. The majority of studies did not report tailoring the interventions to patient needs and the vast majority of papers did not report taking a concordant patient-centered approach or considering patients' own views and experiences when providing adherence support. In addition, the majority of studies did not describe training for the health care professionals involved in providing adherence support. Providing training for doctors and pharmacists to

  11. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundez, Gabriela; Perez-Freixo, Hugo; Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar; Herrador, Zaida

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country.

  12. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundez, Gabriela; Perez-Freixo, Hugo; Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar; Herrador, Zaida

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country. PMID:27622461

  13. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country. PMID:27622461

  14. How well are European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines adhered to in patients with syncope?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, C

    2010-01-01

    The ESC guidelines on syncope were published in 2001 and updated in 2004. Adherence to the recommendations enables early stratification of low and high risk patients and prevents unnecessary investigations and admissions. Vasovagal syncope (VVS) is the commonest cause of syncope in all age groups and a low risk condition. The study objective was to determine whether the ESC guidelines were adhered to prior to referral to a syncope unit; 100 consecutive patients with unexplained syncope (52 +\\/- 23 (15-91) years); 53 female. Sixty-six patients had VVS. Forty nine (75%) of patients with VVS had undergone unnecessary investigations prior to diagnosis and 31 (47%) were admitted to hospital for investigation. Research from other countries confirms that adherence to the ESC guidelines expediates accurate diagnosis, improves resource utilization and reduces health care cost. Greater awareness amongst Irish practitioners of guidelines may improve syncope management and reduce costs.

  15. Effectiveness and drug adherence of biologic monotherapy in routine care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Tanja Schjodt; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Christensen, Robin;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of Danish RA patients currently on biologic monotherapy and compare the effectiveness and drug adherence of biologic therapies applied as monotherapy. METHODS: All RA patients registered in the Danish biologics database (DANBIO) as receiving biologic DMARD (b...... for prevalence, effectiveness and drug adherence of bDMARD monotherapy were calculated. RESULTS: Of the 775 patients on bDMARD monotherapy, adalimumab (21.3%), etanercept (36.6%) and tocilizumab (15.3%) were the most prevalent biologic agents administered. At the 6-month follow-up, the overall crude clinical...... disease activity index remission rate in patients still on a biologic drug was 22%, the 28-joint DAS remission rate was 41% and the response rate of those with a 50% improvement in ACR criteria was 28%. At the 6-month follow-up, the drug adherence rates were similar for the different b...

  16. Treatment adherence to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yunfei Xia,1,* Rulan Yin,1,2,* Ting Fu,1,2 Lijuan Zhang,1,2 Qiuxiang Zhang,1,2 Genkai Guo,1 Liren Li,2 Zhifeng Gu11Department of Rheumatology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 2School of Nursing, Nantong University, Nantong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Nonadherence in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs may lead to joint damage and function loss. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore Chinese RA patients’ adherence rates and investigate potential risk factors for nonadherence.Methods: A total of 122 RA patients were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University from January 2014 to April 2015. Patients were asked to complete a set of standardized self-report questionnaires (Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Short Form-36 questionnaire, 28-joint Disease Activity Score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Visual Analog Scale. Independent samples t-tests, chi-square analyses, and logistic regression modeling were used to analyze these data.Results: Based on Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology, 38% of the patients adhered to DMARDs. Adherence was associated with education, income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs. Other demographic and clinical characteristics were not associated with adherence. Logistic regression models identified income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs as predictors of medication nonadherence.Conclusion: In this study, 62% of patients with RA were not adherent to their DMARD prescription. Education, income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs were associated with medication adherence, and income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs were independent predictors of medication adherence in patients with RA. These findings could help medical personnel develop helpful interventions to improve

  17. Treatment adherence in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease: perceptions from adolescent patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Kevin A; Odell, Shannon; Sander, Emily; Baldassano, Robert N; Barg, Frances K

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine patient- and parent-perceived factors that impact adherence to inflammatory bowel disease treatment using a qualitative descriptive individual interview approach. Sixteen adolescents and their parents were recruited from May through August 2007 and interviewed about medication adherence using an open-ended semi-structured interview format. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded into themes. Parent-child dyads identified forgetting, interfering activities, parent-child conflict and oppositional behaviour and inadequate planning for treatment as challenges to adherence. Participants reported that family support and good parent-child relationships, routines, monitoring and reminding and organisational tools such as pill boxes facilitated treatment adherence. Other issues that emerged included immediacy of treatment effects and parent-adolescent responsibility for treatment. Patients and parents experience a number of challenges related to adherence within behavioural, educational, organisational and health belief domains. Behavioural interventions should focus on these issues, reduction of perceived barriers, and effective transition of responsibility for treatment adherence. Future research considerations are discussed. PMID:21143544

  18. Monitoring Therapy Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients by using Video-Enabled Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Alistair; Garfein, Richard S.; Hayward, Andrew; Rusovich, Valiantsin; Dadu, Andrei; Soltan, Viorel; Oprunenco, Alexandru; Collins, Kelly; Sarin, Rohit; Quraishi, Subhi; Sharma, Mukta; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Varadarajan, Maithili

    2016-01-01

    A recent innovation to help patients adhere to daily tuberculosis (TB) treatment over many months is video (or virtually) observed therapy (VOT). VOT is becoming increasingly feasible as mobile telephone applications and tablet computers become more widely available. Studies of the effectiveness of VOT in improving TB patient outcomes are being conducted. PMID:26891363

  19. Characteristics of patients who suffer major osteoporotic fractures despite adhering to alendronate treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; Rubin, Katrine Hass; Eiken, Pia Agnete;

    2013-01-01

    Antiresorptive treatment reduces the risk of fractures, but most patients remain at elevated risk. We used health registers to identify predictors of new major osteoporotic fractures in patients adhering to alendronate. Risk factors showed a different pattern than in the general population and in...

  20. Development and content of a group-based intervention to improve medication adherence in non-adherent patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Zwikker, H.; Bemt, B. van den; Ende, C. van den; W. van Lankveld; Broeder, A. den; Hoogen, F. van den; Mosselaar, B. van de; Dulmen, S. van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the systematic development and content of a short intervention to improve medication adherence to disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in non-adherent patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The intervention mapping (IM) framework was used to develop the intervention. The following IM steps were conducted: (1) a needs assessment; (2) formulation of specific intervention objectives; (3) inventory of methods and techniques needed to design the intervention and...

  1. Adherence to Wearing Prescription Custom-Made Footwear in Patients With Diabetes at High Risk for Plantar Foot Ulceration

    OpenAIRE

    Waaijman, Roelof; Keukenkamp, Renske; Haart, Mirjam de; Polomski, Wojtek P.; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Prescription custom-made footwear can only be effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers if worn by the patient. Particularly, the high prevalence of recurrent foot ulcers focuses the attention on adherence, for which objective data are nonexisting. We objectively assessed adherence in patients with high risk of ulcer recurrence and evaluated what determines adherence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 107 patients with diabetes, neuropathy, a recently healed plantar foot ulcer, and ...

  2. A systematic review of patient self-reported barriers of adherence to antihypertensive medications using the world health organization multidimensional adherence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhurair, Suliman A; Hughes, Christine A; Simpson, Scot H; Guirguis, Lisa M

    2012-12-01

    Multiple barriers can influence adherence to antihypertensive medications. The aim of this systematic review was to determine what adherence barriers were included in each instrument and to describe the psychometric properties of the identified surveys. Barriers were characterized using the World Health Organization (WHO) Multidimensional Adherence Model with patient, condition, therapy, socioeconomic, and health care system/team-related barriers. Five databases (Medline, Embase, Health and Psychological Instruments, CINHAL, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts [IPA]) were searched from 1980 to September 2011. Our search identified 1712 citations; 74 articles met inclusion criteria and 51 unique surveys were identified. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was the most commonly used survey. Only 20 surveys (39%) have established reliability and validity evidence. According to the WHO Adherence Model domains, patient-related barriers were most commonly addressed, while condition, therapy, and socioeconomic barriers were underrepresented. The complexity of adherence behavior requires robust self-report measurements and the inclusion of barriers relevant to each unique patient population and intervention.

  3. Correlation between lamivudine plasma concentrations and patient self-reported adherence to antiretroviral treatment in experienced HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzi OM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available OM Minzi1, V Mugoyela2, LL Gustafsson31Unit of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; 3Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART is important to achieve treatment success in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. Most HIV clinics apply the patient self-report (PSR method. However, the reliability of this method in experienced HIV patients remains questionable.Purpose: To validate the PSR method for measuring adherence to ART using lamivudine (3TC plasma concentrations in experienced HIV patients.Methods: The study was conducted in Dar Es Salaam and involved 220 patients who were receiving ART services at HIV clinics for more than 12 months. Self-reported adherence information to ART was obtained on the day of HIV clinic visit. The patients were asked to mention the number of doses missed within the past 7 days. In addition, blood samples (2 mL were collected from each patient on the same day. The blood samples were determined for 3TC plasma concentrations. The target 3TC plasma concentration as indicator concentration for adherent patients was determined in 20 patients who took their evening dose of antiretrovirals under supervision. The blood from these patients was drawn 3 hours after drug administration.Results: Complete drug levels of 3TC and self-reported adherence data was obtained in 200 treatment-experienced HIV patients. Lamivudine plasma concentrations obtained in these patients ranged between 0.02–17.36 µg/mL. The mean time from dose administration to blood drawing was 3.1 ± 1.2 hours with coefficient of variation >39%. The mean 3TC plasma concentration obtained in 20 patients who took their antiretroviral dose under supervision was

  4. Exercise adherence improving long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.G.; Twisk, J.W.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence within the prescribed physical therapy treatment period and after physical therapy discharge on patients' outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or kn

  5. Examining adherence among challenging patients in public and private HIV care in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah; Cook, Ryan; Cecchini, Diego; Sued, Omar; Bofill, Lina; Weiss, Stephen; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Lopez, Maria R; Spence, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Treatment engagement, retention and adherence to care are required for optimal HIV outcomes. Yet, patients may fall below the treatment recommendations for achieving undetectable viral load or not be retained in care. This study examined the most challenging patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina, those non-adherent to HIV care. Men (n = 61) and women (n = 59) prescribed antiretrovirals (ARVs) and non-adherent to treatment in the prior 3 to 6 months were enrolled and assessed regarding adherence, knowledge, motivation and attitudes regarding treatment. Private clinic patients had lower viral load and higher self-reported adherence than public clinic patients. Motivations to be adherent and positive beliefs regarding ARVs were associated with increased adherence in public clinic participants. Increased self-efficacy was associated with increased adherence among participants from both clinics. Results support patient and provider interventions that strengthen the characteristics supporting adherence, engagement and retention in public and private clinic settings. Resumen El compromiso, la retención en el cuidado y adherencia al tratamiento son esenciales para el manejo óptimo del paciente con VIH. Sin embargo, muchos pacientes con VIH no siguen las el tratamiento para lograr tener una carga viral indetectable, o no permanecen bajo cuidado médico. Este estudio examina los pacientes más difíciles de retener en el cuidado médico en Buenos Aires, Argentina. Hombres (n = 61) y mujeres (n = 59) a los que se les habían recetado antiretrovirales pero seguían el tratamiento en los últimos 3 - 6 meses participaron en el estudio. Adherencia, conocimiento, motivación y actitudes frente al tratamiento fueron evaluados. Los pacientes en la clínica privada tenían menor carga viral y mejor adherencia que los de la clínica pública. Motivación y pensamientos positivos con respecto a antiretrovirales estaban asociados con mejor adherencia en los pacientes de la clínica p

  6. Interventions to Improve Adherence in Patients with Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Depont

    Full Text Available In patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders, poor adherence to medication is associated with increased healthcare costs, decreased patient satisfaction, reduced quality of life and unfavorable treatment outcomes.To determine the impact of different interventions on medication adherence in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders.Systematic review.MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library.Included studies were clinical trials and observational studies in adult outpatients treated for psoriasis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis or multiple sclerosis.Intervention approaches were classified into four categories: educational, behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and multicomponent interventions. The risk of bias/study limitations of each study was assessed using the GRADE system.Fifteen studies (14 clinical trials and one observational study met eligibility criteria and enrolled a total of 1958 patients. Forty percent of the studies (6/15 was conducted in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, half (7/15 in rheumatoid arthritis patients, one in psoriasis patients and one in multiple sclerosis patients. Seven out of 15 interventions were classified as multicomponent, four as educational, two as behavioral and two as cognitive behavioral. Nine studies, of which five were multicomponent interventions, had no serious limitations according to GRADE criteria. Nine out of 15 interventions showed an improvement of adherence: three multicomponent interventions in inflammatory bowel disease; one intervention of each category in rheumatoid arthritis; one multicomponent in psoriasis and one multicomponent in multiple sclerosis.The assessment of interventions designed for increasing medication adherence in IMID is rare in the literature and their methodological quality may be improved in upcoming studies. Nonetheless, multicomponent interventions showed the strongest evidence for

  7. Mobile Application Use in Monitoring Patient Adherence to Perioperative Total Knee Arthroplasty Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kelvin; Pham, Diep; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-04-01

    The potential for using mobile applications (apps) as an effective tool to monitor patients in an outpatient setting is promising. Past studies have investigated the use of applications in preoperative and postoperative settings as well as in monitoring and treating chronic illnesses such as diabetes, congestive heart failure (CHF), and multiple sclerosis. However, there is limited data on its specific use in the context of total knee arthroplasty. Given the complicated nature and crucial role of patient adherence to protocols during the preparatory and recovery phases of the procedure, the use of an app can serve as a helpful tool in aiding patients throughout this process. We present a pilot study to assess the efficacy of using such an app in order to monitor patient adherence to total knee arthroplasty-specific preoperative and postoperative protocols. Preoperative protocols used in this study included a 5-item medication protocol and multiple activity instructions. Postoperative patient protocols included following instructions on topics such as recording responses to quality-of-life questions, when and how to contact the clinical team if patients had non-emergent concerns or questions, and carrying out daily physical therapy (PT) exercises. Patients received and recorded responses to these preoperative and postoperative instructions using the iGetBetter program application installed on an iPad Mini, provided to the participants. Patient adherence was based on the data gathered from the patient responses inputted on this app. Adherence rates were comparable to those reported in various past studies that also investigated rates of adherence to health management-related instructions communicated through mobile apps. PMID:27042789

  8. Mobile Application Use in Monitoring Patient Adherence to Perioperative Total Knee Arthroplasty Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kelvin; Pham, Diep; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-04-01

    The potential for using mobile applications (apps) as an effective tool to monitor patients in an outpatient setting is promising. Past studies have investigated the use of applications in preoperative and postoperative settings as well as in monitoring and treating chronic illnesses such as diabetes, congestive heart failure (CHF), and multiple sclerosis. However, there is limited data on its specific use in the context of total knee arthroplasty. Given the complicated nature and crucial role of patient adherence to protocols during the preparatory and recovery phases of the procedure, the use of an app can serve as a helpful tool in aiding patients throughout this process. We present a pilot study to assess the efficacy of using such an app in order to monitor patient adherence to total knee arthroplasty-specific preoperative and postoperative protocols. Preoperative protocols used in this study included a 5-item medication protocol and multiple activity instructions. Postoperative patient protocols included following instructions on topics such as recording responses to quality-of-life questions, when and how to contact the clinical team if patients had non-emergent concerns or questions, and carrying out daily physical therapy (PT) exercises. Patients received and recorded responses to these preoperative and postoperative instructions using the iGetBetter program application installed on an iPad Mini, provided to the participants. Patient adherence was based on the data gathered from the patient responses inputted on this app. Adherence rates were comparable to those reported in various past studies that also investigated rates of adherence to health management-related instructions communicated through mobile apps.

  9. Applying the Resources and Supports in Self-Management Framework to Examine Ophthalmologist-Patient Communication and Glaucoma Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleath, B.; Carpenter, D. M.; Blalock, S. J.; Sayner, R.; Muir, K. W.; Slota, C.; Giangiacomo, A. L.; Hartnett, M. E.; Tudor, G.; Robin, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how ophthalmologist-patient communication over time is associated with glaucoma patient long-term adherence. The purpose of our study was to examine the association between provider use of components of the resources and supports in self-management model when communicating with patients and adherence to glaucoma medications…

  10. Approaches to improve adherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Shuler KM

    2014-01-01

    Kimberly M Shuler Shuler Counseling and Consulting, Fayetteville, AR, USA Purpose: In patients with schizophrenia, nonadherence to prescribed medications increases the risk of patient relapse and hospitalization, key contributors to the costs associated with treatment. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the impact of nonadherence to pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia as it relates to health care professionals, particularly social workers, and to identify effective tea...

  11. Analysis of reasons for low adherence to antiepileptic therapy in patients with symptomatic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Vagina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the major factors that influence treatment adherence.Patients and methods. One hundred patients aged 20 to 68 years (mean age 42.9±3.0 years for women and 43.3±5.0 years for men diagnosed with a ≥3-year history of symptomatic epilepsy were screened. The minimal and maximal durations of the disease were 5 and 59 years, respectively (mean 20.8±3.9 years.Results and discussion. There was a female preponderance in the treatment adherence group. The patients who had secondary special education were unemployed, disabled, and single were in both comparison groups. These data are indicative of social stigmatization in epileptic patients. Patients with severe epilepsy on multiple drug therapy were prevalent. Neuropsychological testing revealed higher levels of anxiety and depression among those who were non-adherent to therapy.Conclusion. The sex, age, and social characteristics (education level, disability of patients with epilepsy and its clinical picture, neurological symptoms and changes were ascertained by magnetic resonance imaging had no significant impact on therapy adherence.The factors influencing treatment adherence should include multiple drug therapy (co-administration of two or three drugs and the high frequency of drug use, which is more frequently observed in patients with severe treatment-resistant epilepsy. Anxiety and depressive disorders in epileptic patients resulted in impaired compliance with anticonvulsant therapy.

  12. The adherence to initial processes of care in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K Stuck

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess whether elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE receive recommended initial processes of care and to identify predictors of process adherence.We prospectively studied in- and outpatients aged ≥65 years with acute symptomatic VTE in a multicenter cohort study from nine Swiss university- and non-university hospitals between September 2009 and March 2011. We systematically assessed whether initial processes of care, which are recommended by the 2008 American College of Chest Physicians guidelines, were performed in each patient. We used multivariable logistic models to identify patient factors independently associated with process adherence.Our cohort comprised 950 patients (mean age 76 years. Of these, 86% (645/750 received parenteral anticoagulation for ≥5 days, 54% (405/750 had oral anticoagulation started on the first treatment day, and 37% (274/750 had an international normalized ratio (INR ≥2 for ≥24 hours before parenteral anticoagulation was discontinued. Overall, 35% (53/153 of patients with cancer received low-molecular-weight heparin monotherapy and 72% (304/423 of patients with symptomatic deep vein thrombosis were prescribed compression stockings. In multivariate analyses, symptomatic pulmonary embolism, hospital-acquired VTE, and concomitant antiplatelet therapy were associated with a significantly lower anticoagulation-related process adherence.Adherence to several recommended processes of care was suboptimal in elderly patients with VTE. Quality of care interventions should particularly focus on processes with low adherence, such as the prescription of continued low-molecular-weight heparin therapy in patients with cancer and the achievement of an INR ≥2 for ≥24 hours before parenteral anticoagulants are stopped.

  13. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  14. STUDY ON ADHERENCE TO CAPECITABINE AMONG PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER AND METASTATIC BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiel Goes de FIGUEIREDO JUNIOR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Capecitabine, an oral drug, is as effective as traditional chemotherapy drugs. Objectives To investigate the adhesion to treatment with oral capecitabine in breast and colorectal cancer, and to determine any correlation with changes in patient’s quality of life. Methods Patients with colorectal cancer or breast cancer using capecitabine were included. The patients were asked to bring any medication left at the time of scheduled visits. The QLQ-C30 questionnaire was applied at the first visit and 8-12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty patients were evaluated. Adherence was 88.3% for metastatic colon cancer, 90.4% for non-metastatic colon cancer, 94.3% for rectal cancer and 96.2% for metastatic breast cancer. No strong correlation between adherence and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 functional or symptom scale rates had been found. There was no statistically significant correlation between compliance and the functional and symptom scales of the questionnaire before and after chemotherapy, with the exception of dyspnea. Conclusions Although no absolute adherence to oral capecitabine treatment had been observed, the level of adherence was good. Health professionals therefore need a greater focus in the monitoring the involvement of patients with oral treatment regimens. Patients with lesser degrees of dyspnea had greater compliance.

  15. Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Gerner Hansen, Niels-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study The Danish National guidelines have since 2008 suggested serial follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months for nodules between 5 and 10 mm and at 12 and 24 months for nodules less than 5 mm in accor...... is that management of the follow-up of small nodules did improve in 2008-2009, but adherence to the guidelines was still limited. We will now implement a prospective program for monitoring the adherence to the follow-up CTs.......Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study The Danish National guidelines have since 2008 suggested serial follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months for nodules between 5 and 10 mm and at 12 and 24 months for nodules less than 5 mm...... in the four year period 2006-2009. In 72 cases, 19 in 2006-2007 and 51 in 2008-2009, one or more small nodules, with diameter ≤ 10 mm, were detected on CT in patients with no known recent malignant disease. For these patients follow-up was suggested, either with CT or PET-CT. One of the 70 patients from 2008...

  16. Orally disintegrating olanzapine review: effectiveness, patient preference, adherence, and other properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery W

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available William Montgomery1, Tamas Treuer2, Jamie Karagianis3, Haya Ascher-Svanum4, Gavan Harrison51Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Sydney, Australia; 2Emerging Markets Business Unit (Neuroscience, Eli Lilly and Company, Budapest, Hungary; 3Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 5Asia-Pacific Medical Communications, Eli Lilly and Company, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: Orally disintegrating olanzapine (ODO is a rapid-dissolving formulation of olanzapine which disintegrates in saliva almost immediately, developed as a convenient and adherence-enhancing alternative to the standard olanzapine-coated tablet (SOT. Clinical studies, which form the basis of this review, have shown ODO and SOT to have similar efficacy and tolerability profiles. However, ODO appears to have a number of advantages over SOT in terms of adherence, patient preference, and reduction in nursing burden. Overall, the existing clinical data suggests that compared to SOT, ODO is not only well-suited for difficult-to-treat, agitated, and/or nonadherent patients but, due to its potential ability to improve adherence and greater patient preference, may also be an appropriate formulation for the majority of patients for which olanzapine is the antipsychotic of choice.Keywords: orodispersible formulation, orally disintegrating, olanzapine, atypical antipsychotics, patient adherence, preference, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder

  17. The effect of patient satisfaction with pharmacist consultation on medication adherence: an instrumental variable approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu NY

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There are limited studies on quantifying the impact of patient satisfaction with pharmacist consultation on patient medication adherence. Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of patient satisfaction with pharmacist consultation services on medication adherence in a large managed care organization. Methods: We analyzed data from a patient satisfaction survey of 6,916 patients who had used pharmacist consultation services in Kaiser Permanente Southern California from 1993 to 1996. We compared treating patient satisfaction as exogenous, in a single-equation probit model, with a bivariate probit model where patient satisfaction was treated as endogenous. Different sets of instrumental variables were employed, including measures of patients' emotional well-being and patients' propensity to fill their prescriptions at a non-Kaiser Permanente (KP pharmacy. The Smith-Blundell test was used to test whether patient satisfaction was endogenous. Over-identification tests were used to test the validity of the instrumental variables. The Staiger-Stock weak instrument test was used to evaluate the explanatory power of the instrumental variables. Results: All tests indicated that the instrumental variables method was valid and the instrumental variables used have significant explanatory power. The single equation probit model indicated that the effect of patient satisfaction with pharmacist consultation was significant (p<0.010. However, the bivariate probit models revealed that the marginal effect of pharmacist consultation on medication adherence was significantly greater than the single equation probit. The effect increased from 7% to 30% (p<0.010 after controlling for endogeneity bias. Conclusion: After appropriate adjustment for endogeneity bias, patients satisfied with their pharmacy services are substantially more likely to adhere to their medication. The results have important policy implications given the increasing focus

  18. Effect of Medicine Adherence on the Occurrence of Cerebrovascular Disorders in Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Il-Su; Sohn, Hae-Sook

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess the association between the occurrence of cerebrovascular disorders and a medication adherence in diabetes mellitus patients. METHODS Medical records from 1,114 new patients with diabetes mellitus were collected and the occurrence of cerebrovascular disorders was observed. Data was gathered from the health examination records of diabetes mellitus patients registered at the Korean Metabolic Syndrome Research from 1996 to 2005, medication records from the National Health In...

  19. Impact of Physician's Education on Adherence to Tuberculosis Treatment for Patients of Low Socioeconomic Status in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Shinwon; Khan, Omar Faruk; Seo, Jeong Ho; Kim, Dong Yeon; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Jung, Sook-In; Chung, Eun-Kyung; Jang, Hee-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Successful tuberculosis control depends on good adherence to treatment. Yet, limited data are available on the efficacy of methods for improving the adherence of patients of low socioeconomic status. We evaluated the impact of physician-provided patient education on adherence to anti-tuberculosis medication in a low socioeconomic status and resource-limited setting. A pre-/post-intervention study was conducted at a suburban primary health care clinic in Bangladesh where an intensive education...

  20. Adherence to depot versus oral antipsychotic medication in schizophrenic patients during the long-term therapy

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    Stanković Žana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. There is a high rate of schizophrenic patients who do not adhere to their prescribed therapy, despite the implementation of antipsychotic long-acting injections and the introduction of atypical antipsychotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in sociodemographic, clinical and medication adherence variables between the two groups of schizophrenic patients on maintenance therapy with depot antipsychotic fluphenazine decanoate and oral antipsychotics only as well as a correlation between the medication adherence and other examined variables. Methods. A total of 56 patients of both genders, aged < 60 years, with the diagnosis of schizophrenia (F20 (ICD-10, 1992 clinically stable for at least 6 months were introduced in this cross-sectional study. The patients from the depot group (n = 19 were on classical depot antipsychotic fluphenazine decanoate administering intramuscularly every 4 weeks (with or without oral antipsychotic augmentation and the patients from the oral group (n = 37 were on oral therapy alone with classical or atypical antipsychotics, either as monotherapy or combined. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS was used to assess symptom severity. Item G12 of the PANSS was used to assess insight into the illness. The patients completed the Medical Adherence Rating Scale (MARS was used to assess adherence to the therapy. A higher MARS score indicates behavior [Medical Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ subscale] and attitudes toward medication [Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI subscale] that are more consistent with treatment adherence. The exclusion criteria were determined. The Pearson's χ2 test was used to compare categorical variables, Student's t-test to compare continuous variables and Pearson's correlation to test the correlation significance; p = 0.05. Results. Significant betweengroup differences in age, illness duration, chlorpromazine equivalents, PANSS score and DAI subscore were found

  1. Patient Adherence Predicts Outcome from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Helen Blair; Maher, Michael J.; Wang, Yuanjia; Bao, Yuanyuan; Foa, Edna B.; Franklin, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of patient adherence on outcome from exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) therapy in adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Thirty adults with OCD were randomized to EX/RP (n = 15) or EX/RP augmented by motivational interviewing strategies (n = 15). Both treatments included 3 introductory…

  2. Using Different Calculations of Pharmacy Refill Adherence to Predict Virological Failure Among HIV-Infected Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. de Boer; J.M. Prins; M.A.G. Sprangers; P.T. Nieuwkerk

    2010-01-01

    Background: Refill data are increasingly used to assess adherence in HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy. However, it is not clear how feasible this method is when multiple pharmacies are involved. Also, the effects of inclusion of leftover medication from previous refills an

  3. Statin adherence and treatment LDL-cholesterol response in type 2 diabetes patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Dianna; Voorham, Jaco; Hak, Eelko; Denig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Background: In clinical practice statins are not optimally used and lipid targets are not achieved in at least a third of the patients. This lack of treatment response could be due to undertreatment (low-dose statin) and low adherence to treatment. Objectives: To determine the relationship between s

  4. Factors predicting treatment adherence in patients with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerci, Bengi; Taskıran, Sarper; Tufan, Evren; Şanlı, Işın

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to elicit patient- and treatment-related factors that can potentially predict treatment adherence in adult ADHD. Subjects who were over 18 and received a diagnosis of ADHD were included in the study. Chart review data of 102 subjects regarding demographics, medications, comorbidities, concomitant medications and domains of functional impairment were collected, and predictors were assessed using a binominal logistical regression model. One hundred and two patients (78.4 % male) with a mean age of 28.8 (SD = 9.8, range = 18-55) years were enrolled in the study. Childhood diagnosis of ADHD, agents used for treatment (MPH or atomoxetine), individual domains of dysfunction and use of additional psychotropic drugs were not found to be related to treatment adherence. Patients with a university education and those referred for family history of ADHD were more likely to adhere to treatment (p = 0.05 and 0.03, respectively). On the other hand, reasons for referral other than ADHD were significantly more frequently related to non-adherence (p = 0.02). Treatment noncompliance remains a significant problem despite therapeutic effects of medications. Identification of predictors of non-adherence can lead to heightened awareness of special populations at risk. We have found that prior awareness on ADHD (via past history/media/friends) leading to self/clinician referral to rule out ADHD and pervasiveness of symptoms across functional domains led to better compliance in our sample. Future research with prospective design utilizing objective tools for adherence is required. PMID:27056071

  5. One-year adherence to oral antihyperglycemic medication and risk prediction of patient outcomes for adults with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Carola A.; Rapold, Roland; Brüngger, Beat; Reich, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Medication adherence is essential in preventing adverse intermediate outcomes, but little is known on hard outcomes. The aims of this study were to determine the 1-year adherence to oral antihyperglycemic drugs (OADs) and to predict the risk of subsequent health outcomes among (non)adherent patients with diabetes. Using a large Swiss healthcare claims database from 2011 to 2014, we identified all patients aged ≥18 years with diabetes and treated with at least 1 OAD prescription. Adherence to OADs was measured as the proportion of days covered (PDC) over 1 year and subdivided into 2 categories: adherent (PDC ≥ 80%), nonadherent (PDC < 80%). We estimated the relative risk of hospitalization and mortality at follow-up using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Based on a sample of 26,713 patients, adherence to OADs was quite low: 42% of the patients achieved a PDC of ≥80% during the 1-year observation period. A 7% reduction in the hospitalization risk and a 10% reduction in the risk of mortality could be observed in adherent patients compared to nonadherent patients (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89–0.97]; HR, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.82–0.99]). Subgroup analysis showed that an intensified diabetes therapy had no significant influence on the risk of both outcomes in adherent patients. Poor medication adherence increases the risk of subsequent hospitalizations and premature mortality in patient with diabetes, regardless of disease severity and comorbidities. This emphasizes the need for an earlier identification of patients with poor medication adherence. The awareness of physicians and patients regarding the importance of adherence in diabetes treatment should be increased. PMID:27368004

  6. LOW ADHERENCE TO TREATMENT AFTER MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: CAUSES AND WAYS OF ADJUSTMENT CONSIDERING PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL STATE OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuzheleva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the reasons of low adherence to treatment in patients after myocardial infarction as well as methods of its correction considering the mental and emotional state of patients. Material and methods. Patients (n=115 after myocardial infarction registered in "Acute Myocardial Infarction Register» were enrolled into the study. The Moriscos-Green scale was used to determine the degree of adherence to treatment, and psycho-emotional state of patients was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. The special questionnaire was used to study the causes of poor adherence. Results. Only 45% of patients after myocardial infarction have a high commitment to the doctor's recommendations. The main reason for low adherence was forgetfulness (42%. Among other reasons were: fear of side effects (16%; lack of therapeutic effect according to patients' opinion (12%; doubts about the doctor's prescriptions (14%; a large number of prescribed drugs (12%; high cost of drugs (4%. The structure of the causes of poor adherence to treatment varied greatly depending on the psycho-emotional status. Adherence to treatment can be improved by specific physician’s actions (48.5% of patients. At the same time 14% of patients did not want to take drugs for a long time under any circumstances. Conclusion. Adherence to treatment of patients after myocardial infarction deserves attention from doctors. The personalized approach considering patient’s opinion, as well as their specific features, is essential for the development of ways to improve adherence.

  7. [Treatment adherence as a social ability: a case of patients with schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrant-Boga, M; Holtzmann, J; Allenet, B; Debeauchamp, I; Giraud-Baro, E

    2009-09-01

    Psychosocial rehabilitation programs are available for schizophrenic patients to develop social abilities. Taking into account deficits in drug compliance of such patients, psycho-educational programs have been developed to tackle patients' abilities to take their drugs. One year after discharge from psychiatric facilities however, only 50% of the psychotic patients are still compliant with their drug treatment. The aim of our paper is to describe concepts associated with drug adherence as a social ability, and to illustrate these concepts with a program designed for psychotic patients. First, we define the concept of social rehabilitation, second, we describe strategies available to enhance adherence to drug treatment, third, we present a psycho-educational program developed at St. Egrève Hospital, France. This program is centered on the patient's own capacities to become adherent. Individual in-patient consultations, developed by a team of 3 professionals (psychiatrist, pharmacist, nurse) are linked to indiviual follow-up at home. Their scope is to identify specific targets for the patient's self-efficacy to run his drug treatment in an autonomous way. PMID:19873850

  8. Patient education and adherence to tuberculosis treatment : - Indonesian nurses share their experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Pettersson, Olivia; Wennfalk, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Indonesian nurses’ experiences of patient education and patients’ adherence to TB treatment. Background Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that 9.6 million people in the world suffer from. Indonesia is one of the world’s 22 high-burden countries with over 320.000 cases of TB in 2014. The UN’s (United Nation) goal is to have ended the TB epidemics by the year 2030. Nurses play a central role in accomplishing adherence to treatment an...

  9. Exercise adherence improves long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.; Twisk, J.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence, within the prescribed physiotherapy treatment period and after discharge, on patients’ outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Relevance: The p

  10. Self-reported versus 'true' adherence in heart failure patients : a study using the Medication Event Monitoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, M. M. W.; Jaarsma, T.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.; van der Wal, M. H. L.

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to (non)pharmacological treatment is important in heart failure (HF) patients, since it leads to better clinical outcome. Although self-reported and objectively measured medication adherence in HF patients have been compared in previous studies, none of these studies have used an evidence-

  11. Limited patient adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection in an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwkerk, PT; Sprangers, MAG; Burger, DM; Hoetelmans, RMW; Hugen, PWH; Danner, SA; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Schneider, MME; Schrey, G; Meenhorst, PL; Sprenger, HG; Kauffmann, RH; Jambroes, M; Chesney, MA; de Wolf, F; Lange, JMA

    2001-01-01

    Background: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency syndrome type 1 (HIV-1) infection is essential to sustain viral suppression and prevent drug resistance. We investigated adherence to HAART among patients in a clinical cohort study. Methods: Patients re

  12. The impact of the Danish Oxygen Register on adherence to guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy in COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J; Lange, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of The Danish Oxygen Register on COPD patients' treatment modalities, survival, and adherence to guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT).......To evaluate the impact of The Danish Oxygen Register on COPD patients' treatment modalities, survival, and adherence to guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT)....

  13. Adherence to Monitoring Tests in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, Marcel; Nasr, Fadi; Sakr, Riwa; Hawi, Jenny; Kerbage, Fouad; Chahine, Georges

    2016-08-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether the adherence to regular follow-up assessments using standardized real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and/or cytogenetic tests in Lebanese patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) meet the European LeukemiaNet recommendations. The present study was a retrospective analysis of 34 patients diagnosed with chronic phase CML who had been treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monitored with regular cytogenetic tests and/or measurement of the BCR-ABL transcript level at 3, 6, and 12 months from 2006 until 2015 in 3 university hospitals in Lebanon. All patients were included and monitored in an adherence program (SAWA program). The male/female ratio was 3:1. The median age was 50 years, and the mean age was 50 years. As frontline treatment, 29 patients started imatinib and 5 patients received second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We defined compliance to the monitoring tests as regulary realizing the qPCR at 3, 6, and 12 months. Of the 36 patients, 15 underwent the recommended tests at 3, 6, and 12 months, representing a compliance rate of 41.6%; 28 of the 34 patients underwent the recommended tests only twice in the first follow-up year. Only 14 patients underwent qPCR at 3 months. We believe that despite the inclusion of our patients in an adherence program, the compliance rate is still low. We also believe that greater effort is required to improve the adherence to regular follow-up examinations. PMID:27220473

  14. Concordance between two methods in measuring treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Simarro F

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flora López-Simarro,1 Carlos Brotons,2 Irene Moral,2 Alba Aguado-Jodar,3 Cèlia Cols-Sagarra,1 Sònia Miravet-Jiménez11Primary Health Care Center Martorell, Institut Català de la Salut, Barcelona, Spain; 2Research Unit, Sardenya Primary Health Care Center, Biomedical Research Institute Sant Pau (IIB Sant Pau, Teaching Unit of Family Medicine ACEBA, Barcelona, Spain; 3CAP Sagrada Família, Consorci Sanitari Integral, Barcelona, SpainObjective: We analyzed the concordance between two methods for measuring treatment adherence (TA and studied the determinants of TA in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study in a primary care center, involving 320 diabetic patients. TA was measured using the Haynes–Sackett (H–S adherence test during the patient interview and based on pharmacy refill data. TA was calculated globally and by drug groups (antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidiabetic drugs.Results: Poor TA as measured by the H–S test was observed in 11.2% of the patients. Based on pharmacy refill data, there was a poor global TA rate of 30.3%, which was 33.3%, 26.6%, and 34.2% for oral antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and lipid-lowering drugs, respectively. Concordance between the two methods was poor. There was no relationship between the degree of disease control and TA as measured by the H–S test. Good TA measured based on pharmacy refill data for antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs was associated with lower glycosylated hemoglobin and diastolic blood pressure values, respectively. Patients with good global TA showed lower glycosylated hemoglobin, diastolic blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values. The multivariate analysis found good oral antidiabetic adherence to be associated to free pharmacy service; good antihypertensive drug adherence to the existence of comorbidities; and good lipid-lowering drug adherence to a history of ischemic heart disease

  15. Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence in Hypertensive Patients: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S; Ruppar, Todd M; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pamela S

    2015-12-01

    This systematic review applied meta-analytic procedures to synthesize medication adherence interventions that focus on adults with hypertension. Comprehensive searching located trials with medication adherence behavior outcomes. Study sample, design, intervention characteristics, and outcomes were coded. Random-effects models were used in calculating standardized mean difference effect sizes. Moderator analyses were conducted using meta-analytic analogues of ANOVA and regression to explore associations between effect sizes and sample, design, and intervention characteristics. Effect sizes were calculated for 112 eligible treatment-vs.-control group outcome comparisons of 34,272 subjects. The overall standardized mean difference effect size between treatment and control subjects was 0.300. Exploratory moderator analyses revealed interventions were most effective among female, older, and moderate- or high-income participants. The most promising intervention components were those linking adherence behavior with habits, giving adherence feedback to patients, self-monitoring of blood pressure, using pill boxes and other special packaging, and motivational interviewing. The most effective interventions employed multiple components and were delivered over many days. Future research should strive for minimizing risks of bias common in this literature, especially avoiding self-report adherence measures. PMID:26560139

  16. Relationship between patient safety climate and standard precaution adherence: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessels, A J; Larson, E L

    2016-04-01

    Standard precaution (SP) adherence is universally suboptimal, despite being a core component of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) prevention and healthcare worker (HCW) safety. Emerging evidence suggests that patient safety climate (PSC) factors may improve HCW behaviours. Our aim was to examine the relationship between PSC and SP adherence by HCWs in acute care hospitals. A systematic review was conducted as guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. Three electronic databases were comprehensively searched for literature published or available in English between 2000 and 2014. Seven of 888 articles identified were eligible for final inclusion in the review. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using a validated quality tool. The seven articles were assigned quality scores ranging from 7 to 10 of 10 possible points. Five measured all aspects of SP and two solely measured needlestick and sharps handling. Three included a secondary outcome of HCW exposure; none included HCAIs. All reported a statistically significant relationship between better PSC and greater SP adherence and used data from self-report surveys including validated PSC measures or measures of management support and leadership. Although limited in number, studies were of high quality and confirmed that PSC and SP adherence were correlated, suggesting that efforts to improve PSC may enhance adherence to a core component of HCAI prevention and HCW safety. More clearly evident is the need for additional high-quality research.

  17. Effectiveness of Electronic Reminders to Improve Medication Adherence in Tuberculosis Patients: A Cluster-Randomised Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiu Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile text messaging and medication monitors (medication monitor boxes have the potential to improve adherence to tuberculosis (TB treatment and reduce the need for directly observed treatment (DOT, but to our knowledge they have not been properly evaluated in TB patients. We assessed the effectiveness of text messaging and medication monitors to improve medication adherence in TB patients.In a pragmatic cluster-randomised trial, 36 districts/counties (each with at least 300 active pulmonary TB patients registered in 2009 within the provinces of Heilongjiang, Jiangsu, Hunan, and Chongqing, China, were randomised using stratification and restriction to one of four case-management approaches in which patients received reminders via text messages, a medication monitor, combined, or neither (control. Patients in the intervention arms received reminders to take their drugs and reminders for monthly follow-up visits, and the managing doctor was recommended to switch patients with adherence problems to more intensive management or DOT. In all arms, patients took medications out of a medication monitor box, which recorded when the box was opened, but the box gave reminders only in the medication monitor and combined arms. Patients were followed up for 6 mo. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patient-months on TB treatment where at least 20% of doses were missed as measured by pill count and failure to open the medication monitor box. Secondary endpoints included additional adherence and standard treatment outcome measures. Interventions were not masked to study staff and patients. From 1 June 2011 to 7 March 2012, 4,292 new pulmonary TB patients were enrolled across the 36 clusters. A total of 119 patients (by arm: 33 control, 33 text messaging, 23 medication monitor, 30 combined withdrew from the study in the first month because they were reassessed as not having TB by their managing doctor (61 patients or were switched to a different

  18. Patient adherence and the choice of antihypertensive drugs: focus on lercanidipine

    OpenAIRE

    Burnier, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Menno T Pruijm, Marc P Maillard, Michel BurnierService of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Lausanne, SwitzerlandAbstract: Despite the development of many effective antihypertensive drugs, target blood pressures are reached in only a minority of patients in clinical practice. Poor adherence to drug therapy and the occurrence of side effects are among the main reasons commonly reported by patients and physicians to explain the poor results of actual anti...

  19. Pharmacist interventions for obesity: improving treatment adherence and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan MA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Melanie A Jordan, Jonathan HarmonCollege of Pharmacy – Glendale, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, USAAbstract: Obesity is currently a worldwide pandemic, with overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2 and obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2 estimated at 35% and 12% of the global adult population, respectively. According to data collected from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, approximately 68.8% of US adults are overweight or obese. Additionally, a large burden of health care costs can be attributed directly to obesity as well as multiple, potentially preventable, comorbidities such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. As a result, national and international organizations, such as the US Centers for Disease Control and World Health Organization, have made halting the rise of the obesity epidemic a top priority. Pharmacists, commonly considered one of the most trustworthy and accessible health care professionals, are ideally situated to provide counseling for weight and lifestyle management. This review presents examples of pharmacist-led as well as collaborative practices that have been somewhat successful in educating and monitoring patient progress in attaining weight-loss goals. Common barriers and potential solutions to administration of lifestyle counseling and monitoring programs, such as limited pharmacist time and resources, lack of expertise and/or confidence in program administration, and patient perception and awareness, are also discussed.Keywords: pharmacy, obesity, counseling, weight loss, lifestyle management

  20. [Adherence as a result of a "particular relationship". HIV-infected patients about their physician-patient relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbach, Ute; Dannecker, Martin; Kaufhold, Johannes; Lenz, Cynthia; Grabhorn, Ralph

    2008-06-01

    This qualitative study examines the relationship between doctors and HIV-infected patients with regard to problems of adherence. Objective hermeneutics was used to analyze the scene of a doctor-patient conversation produced through psychodrama. Specific traits shared by the patients in question were a confused regulation of closeness and distance as well as a non-maintenance of the traditional asymmetry within the doctor-patient relation. The patients faced the doctors on a level of diffuse social relations and showed the tendency to involve the doctor into their community. The conclusion for a model explaining patients' adherence may be: it exist an individual level of the need for being accepted by the doctor as somebody particular. If this level is reached, i. e. individual claims are met and personal desires are satisfied, the patient will follow the physician's advice. Authors discuss whether the model is compatible with the conflict of self-esteem.

  1. Oncology clinicians' defenses and adherence to communication skills training with simulated patients: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Mathieu; de Roten, Yves; Despland, Jean-Nicolas; Stiefel, Friedrich

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to assess the impact of clinicians' defense mechanisms-defined as self-protective psychological mechanisms triggered by the affective load of the encounter with the patient-on adherence to a communication skills training (CST). The population consisted of oncology clinicians (N=31) who participated in a CST. An interview with simulated cancer patients was recorded prior and 6 months after CST. Defenses were measured before and after CST and correlated with a prototype of an ideally conducted interview based on the criteria of CST-teachers. Clinicians who used more adaptive defense mechanisms showed better adherence to communication skills after CST than clinicians with less adaptive defenses (F(1, 29) =5.26, p=0.03, d=0.42). Improvement in communication skills after CST seems to depend on the initial levels of defenses of the clinician prior to CST. Implications for practice and training are discussed. Communication has been recognized as a central element of cancer care [1]. Ineffective communication may contribute to patients' confusion, uncertainty, and increased difficulty in asking questions, expressing feelings, and understanding information [2, 3], and may also contribute to clinicians' lack of job satisfaction and emotional burnout [4]. Therefore, communication skills trainings (CST) for oncology clinicians have been widely developed over the last decade. These trainings should increase the skills of clinicians to respond to the patient's needs, and enhance an adequate encounter with the patient with efficient exchange of information [5]. While CSTs show a great diversity with regard to their pedagogic approaches [6, 7], the main elements of CST consist of (1) role play between participants, (2) analysis of videotaped interviews with simulated patients, and (3) interactive case discussion provided by participants. As recently stated in a consensus paper [8], CSTs need to be taught in small groups (up to 10

  2. Rethinking adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform. PMID:23070491

  3. Attrition and Adherence in a Web-Based Distress Management Program for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients (WEBCARE): Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habibovic, M.; Cuijpers, P.; Alings, M.;

    2014-01-01

    . Conclusions: Current findings underline the importance of focusing on adherence and dropout, as this remains a significant problem in behavioral Web-based trials. Examining possibilities to address barriers indicated by patients might enhance treatment engagement and improve patient outcomes....

  4. Interdisciplinary care for adequate adherence totreatment in patients with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Gaviria-García

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The review is based on the contribution that each discipline should provide the patient for a holistic care, which include medical assessment, monitoring and counselling as emotional support, assessment and nutritional monitoring as a key element in core requirements, physical activity that optimize the quality of life, social activities that can enter the individual in active groups, follow-up by nurses to the fulfillment of the ordered drug treatment, car care and orientation education to the family. The novelty of this proposal is to basically carry out care of the interdisciplinary team for treatment adherence. This review concluded that patients with lupus nephritis (NL treated after assessment and follow-up holistic, such as system monitoring and adherence to the treatment of comprehensive care, provides better quality of life, and minimizes the risks of complication of the patient, avoiding recurrent hospitalizations.

  5. The patient-physician interaction as a meeting of experts: one solution to the problem of patient non-adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelovich, Mary-Clair

    2016-08-01

    Patient non-adherence is a common and important concern in clinical medicine. Some cases of patient non-adherence are cases in which the patient disagrees with the physician's recommended treatment based on particular reasons. Drawing upon science and technology studies literature, specifically the discussion by Collins and Evans and Wynne of how best to understand scientific controversies, I relate their ideas to the analogous conflict that may occur within a clinical interaction. I draw upon their recognition of the importance of contributory expertise and interactional expertise in providing legitimate knowledge. I also draw upon Wynne's idea of the 'negotiation of meanings' as an important element of the clinical interaction. To resolve potential conflicts between patient and physician before they develop into 'non-adherence', I propose the implementation of a new epistemological framework that recognizes legitimate knowledge offered by the patient as well as the physician. By situating this patient expertise framework within the paradigm of patient-centred medicine, and by assuming the goal of medical treatment to be treatment of suffering, patient expertise becomes centralized as a means of determining the nature of patient suffering. Two aspects of the patient's tacit knowledge - the body aspect and the meaning aspect - both of which are context-dependent and directly accessible only to the patient, are thus recognized as knowledge essential to the success of the interaction. The physician's role becomes that of both medical expert and possessor of 'interactional expertise', by which the physician recognizes and includes patient expertise in the treatment decision. By recognizing and incorporating the negotiation of meanings into the development of a treatment plan, this epistemological model of patient expertise should prevent cases of non-adherence based on disagreement. PMID:27189520

  6. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ogundele OA; Moodley D; Pillay AW; Seebregts CJ

    2016-01-01

    Olukunle Ayodeji Ogundele,1 Deshendran Moodley,1 Anban W Pillay,1 Christopher J Seebregts1,2 1UKZN/CSIR Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Health Architecture Laboratory, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, 2Jembi Health Systems NPC, Cape Town, South Africa Purpose: Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factor...

  7. Drug adherence behavior among hypertensive out-patients at a tertiary health institution in Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukora-Mutseyekwa FN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fadzai NN Mukora-Mutseyekwa, Elizabeth M ChadambukaFaculty of Health Sciences, Africa University, Mutare, ZimbabweObjectives: This study investigated the level of drug adherence among hypertensive outpatients at a tertiary hospital in Zimbabwe. Specific objectives included measurement of blood pressure (BP control achievement, estimating prevalence of drug adherence behavior, and establishing the association between drug adherence behavior and achievement of BP control.Methods and materials: An analytic cross sectional design was applied on a convenience sample of 102 participants using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Self-reported adherence was assessed using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale.Findings: The median age of participants was 68.5 years (Q1 61; Q3 76. The majority were female (n = 71; 69.6%. BP control (<140/90 mmHg was achieved in 52% (n = 53. Self-reported drug adherence was 40.2% (n = 42. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, participants with normal BP measurements were more than three times as likely to report maximal adherence to prescribed drug schedules (odds ratio 3.37; 95% confidence interval: 1.38–8.24.Conclusion: Poor drug adherence behavior prevails among hypertensive outpatients. This contributes to poor achievement of BP control. The hospital is recommended to set up a specialized hypertension clinic in the Out-patients' Department where an intensified health education package can be introduced as well as community awareness programs on the importance of medication adherence.Keywords: drug adherence, behavior, hypertension

  8. Goal Setting and Treatment Adherence among Patients with Chronic Illness and Depressive Symptoms: Applying a Patient-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Eric; Tatum, Alexander K.; Guy, Arryn; Mikrut, Cassandra; Yoder, Wren

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Poor treatment adherence is a major problem among individuals with chronic illness. Research indicates that adherence is worsened when accompanied by depressive symptoms. In this preliminary study, we aimed to describe how a patient-centered approach could be employed to aid patients with depressive symptoms in following their treatment regimens. Methods: The sample consisted of 14 patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV who reported clinically-significant depressive symptoms. Participant ratings of 23 treatment-related statements were examined using two assessment and analytic techniques. Interviews were conducted with participants to determine their views of information based on the technique. Results: Results indicate that while participants with optimal adherence focused on views of treatment associated with side effects to a greater extent than participants with poor adherence, they tended to relate these side effects to sources of intrinsic motivation. Conclusion: The study provides examples of how practitioners could employ the assessment techniques outlined to better understand how patients think about treatment and aid them in effectively framing their health-related goals. PMID:26755463

  9. Adherence with screening guidelines for hepatitis C testing among HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jonckheere

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: Co-infection with HIV / hepatitis C virus (HCV occurs commonly due to similar routes of transmission, mainly in MSM and IVDU patients. In 2009, EACS guidelines introduced the notion of systematic annual HCV screening among HIV-infected patients. This study evaluated staff knowledge, adherence to HCV screening recommendations and seroconversion rates for HCV in our HIV Reference Centre. Methods: Eight physicians (HIV specialists were interviewed on recommendations and perceived adherence to EACS clinical guidelines on HCV screening [1]. We then reviewed medical records of our cohort of HIV-infected patients on regular follow-up in our centre each year, from 2008 to 2011. We considered a patient to be on regular follow-up when records showed at least two clinical reviews and one HIV viral load testing during the year. Demographic features and HCV serology tests were collected from the operating software of our institution (Medical Explorer v3r9, 2008. Diagnosis of HCV was retained when serology became positive and HCV RNA was detected. Summary of results: Though knowledge of current guidelines was excellent (100%, staff claimed a 87.5% adherence rate to these recommendations. Rate of screening rose gradually between 2008 and 2011, especially after introduction of EACS guidelines in 2009 (Table 1 and Fig. 1. The maximal screening rate was in 2011, with 44% of patients tested among the general HIV population and 57% among MSM bisexual patients. This trend was statistically significant in both populations (p<0.01. The year 2011 displayed a marked increase in diagnosis of HCV infection, with 8 new patients diagnosed in a 963-patient-large cohort (all were MSM. Conclusion: In our centre, knowledge of EACS guidelines on screening for HCV was good but adherence to these recommendations is poor, though it improves over time. It is consistent with published rates of compliance to clinical guidelines on screening policies for HCV among

  10. Adherence to nutritional recommendations and sociodemographic variables in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia Zanetti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVETo determine if there is a relationship between adherence to nutritional recommendations and sociodemographic variables in Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.METHODSCross-sectional observational study using a stratified random sample of 423 individuals. The Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ was used, and the Fisher's exact test was applied with 95% confidence interval (p<0.05.RESULTSOf the 423 subjects, 66.7% were women, mean age of 62.4 years (SD = 11.8, 4.3 years of schooling on average (SD = 3.6 and family income of less than two minimum wages. There was association between the female gender and adherence to diet with adequate cholesterol content (OR: 2.03; CI: 1.23; 3.34, between four and more years of education and adherence to fractionation of meals (OR: 1 92 CI: 1.19; 3.10, and income of less than two minimum wages and adherence to diet with adequate cholesterol content (OR: 1.74; CI: 1.03, 2.95.CONCLUSIONAdherence to nutritional recommendations was associated with the female gender, more than four years of education and family income of less than two minimum wages.

  11. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  12. Effect of self-measurement of blood pressure on adherence to treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onzenoort, H.A.W. van; Verberk, W.J.; Kroon, A.A.; Kessels, A.G.; Nelemans, P.J.; Kuy, P.H. van der; Neef, C.; Leeuw, P.W. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to treatment is one of the major problems in the treatment of hypertension. Self blood pressure measurement may help patients to improve their adherence to treatment. METHOD: In this prospective, randomized, controlled study coordinated by a university hospital, a total of

  13. Assessment of self-reported adherence among patients with type 2 diabetes in Matlala District Hospital, Limpopo Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbola, Sadeen A.; Govender, Indiran; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.O.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Complications associated with Diabetes Mellitus are a burden to health services, especially in resource poor settings. These complications are associated with substandard care and poor adherence to treatment plans. The aim of the study was to assess the self-reported adherence to treatment amongst patients with type 2 diabetes in Matlala District Hospital, Limpopo Province. Methods This cross-sectional study used convenience sampling with a standardised, validated questionnaire. Data were collected over 4 months, and Microsoft Excel was used for data capturing. Results We found that 137 (70%) of the participants considered themselves adherent to their diabetes medication. Younger age (p = 0.028), current employment (p = 0.018) and keeping appointment were factors significantly associated with adherence. Reasons given for poor adherence were that the clinic did not have their pills (29%), they had forgotten to take their medication (16%) and gone travelling without taking enough pills (14%). Reasons given for poor adherences to a healthy lifestyle were being too old (29%), 22% had no specific reason, 13% struggled to motivate themselves and 10% simply forgot what to do. Sixty-eight percent of the adhered participants recommended the use of medication at meal times, 14% set a reminder, and 8% used the assistance of a treatment supporter Conclusions and recommendations The study revealed a higher than expected reported level of adherence to diabetes treatment. Further research is needed to assess whether self-reported adherence corresponds to the metabolic control of the patients and to improve services. PMID:27543285

  14. A mobile application improves therapy-adherence rates in elderly patients undergoing rehabilitation: A crossover design study comparing documentation via iPad with paper-based control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Alexander; Brandl, Christopher; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Schlick, Christopher; Neumann, Till; Kribben, Andreas; Meister, Sven; Diamantidis, Clarissa Jonas; Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Horn, Peter; Becker, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Medication adherence is crucial for success in the management of patients with chronic conditions. This study analyzes whether a mobile application on a tablet aimed at supporting drug intake and vital sign parameter documentation affects adherence in elderly patients.Patients with coronary heart disease and no prior knowledge of tablet computers were recruited. They received a personal introduction to the mobile application Medication Plan, installed on an Apple iPad. The study was conducted using a crossover design with 3 sequences: initial phase, interventional phase (28 days of using the app system), and comparative phase (28 days of using a paper diary). Users experienced the interventional and comparative phases alternately.A total of 24 patients (12 males; mean age 73.8 years) were enrolled in the study. The mean for subjectively assessed adherence (A14-scale; 5-point Likert scale, from "never" to "very often" which results in a score from 0 to 56) before the study was 50.0 (SD = 3.44). After both interventions there was a significant increase, which was more pronounced after the interventional phase (54.0; SD = 2.01) than after the comparative phase (52.6; SD = 2.49) (for all pairs after both interventions, P mobile app for medication adherence increased objectively and subjectively measured adherence in elderly users undergoing rehabilitation. The findings have promising clinical implications: digital tools can assist chronic disease patients achieve adherence to medication and to blood pressure measurement. Although this requires initial offline training, it can reduce complications and clinical overload because of nonadherence.

  15. Quality of life associated with treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdivia-Martínez José J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite certain contradictions, an association has been identified between adherence to drug treatment and the quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes. The contradictions observed emphasize the importance of using different methods to measure treatment adherence, or the association of psychological precursors of adherence with quality of life. For this reason, we have used an indirect method to measure adherence (pill count, as well as two adherence behaviour precursors (attitude and knowledge, to assess the association between adherence and the quality of life in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods A cross-sectional comparative study on a random sample of 238 type 2 diabetic patients was carried out over one year in four family medicine units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS in Aguascalientes, Mexico. Treatment adherence was measured using the indirect method of pill count to assess adherence behaviour, obtaining information at two home visits. In the first we recorded the medicine prescribed and in the second, we counted the medicine remaining to determine the proportion of the medicine taken. We also assessed two adherence behaviour precursors: the patients' knowledge regarding their medical prescription measured through a structured questionnaire; and attitudes to treatment adherence using a Likert scale. Quality of life was measured through the WHOQOL-100 (the WHO Quality of Life questionnaire. Information concerning both knowledge and attitude was obtained through interviews with the patients. A multiple linear regression model was constructed to establish the relationship between each quality of life domain and the variables related to adherence, controlling for covariates. Results There was no association between quality of life and treatment adherence behaviour. However, the combination of strong knowledge and a positive attitude was associated with five of the six quality of life domains

  16. Complex antithrombotic therapy: determinants of patient preference and impact on medication adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham NS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neena S Abraham,1,2 Aanand D Naik,3,4 Richard L Street Jr,3–5 Diana L Castillo,3 Anita Deswal,6 Peter A Richardson,3,4 Christine M Hartman,3 George Shelton Jr,3,4 Liana Fraenkel7,8 1Division of Gastroenterology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA; 2Divison of Healthcare Policy and Research, Department of Health Services Research, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness, and Safety at the Michael E DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 5Department of Communication, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 6Cardiology, Michael E DeBakey VAMC, Houston, TX, USA; 7Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA; 8Department of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA Purpose: For years, older patients have been prescribed multiple blood-thinning medications (complex antithrombotic therapy [CAT] to decrease their risk of cardiovascular events. These therapies, however, increase risk of adverse bleeding events. We assessed patient-reported trade-offs between cardioprotective benefit, gastrointestinal bleeding risk, and burden of self-management using adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA. As ACA could be a clinically useful tool to obtain patient preferences and guide future patient-centered care, we examined the clinical application of ACA to obtain patient preferences and the impact of ACA on medication adherence.Patients and methods: An electronic ACA survey led 201 respondents through medication risk–benefit trade-offs, revealing patients’ preferences for the CAT risk/benefit profile they valued most. The post-ACA prescription regimen was categorized as concordant or discordant with elicited preferences. Adherence was measured using VA pharmacy refill data to measure persistence of use prior to and 1 year following preference-elicitation. Additionally, we analyzed qualitative interviews of 56 respondents

  17. Adherence to diet on diabetic patients: effects of an intervention program

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    María De Lourdes Rodríguez Campuzano

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of an intervention program on the self-reported adherence to a prescribed diet for diabetic patients. Because of the impact and consequences of this chronic illness, it is important to make the necessary efforts in order to achieve this dietary adherence goal, since diet is one of the main bases for the treatment of diabetes. According to an interbehavioral approach, an intervention program was designed and applied to ninety diabetic patients from different Mexican public health institutions. This program was developed in three stages. The first stage consisted of a pre-test to assess body weight and habits related to daily meals. The second stage comprehended an intervention divided in two parts, the first one to provide patients with useful knowledge about diabetes and nutrition and the second one to train several behavioral techniques a post-test was applied to participants. Results showed that each intervention’s part had a positive effect on self-reported adherence to diet, and so the complete program. These results were supported by weight data. In this sense, it was found a statistically significant difference between pre and post-test values. It is suggested to continue these efforts in order to contribute on the solution of this public health problem.

  18. A mobile application improves therapy-adherence rates in elderly patients undergoing rehabilitation: A crossover design study comparing documentation via iPad with paper-based control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Alexander; Brandl, Christopher; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Schlick, Christopher; Neumann, Till; Kribben, Andreas; Meister, Sven; Diamantidis, Clarissa Jonas; Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Horn, Peter; Becker, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Medication adherence is crucial for success in the management of patients with chronic conditions. This study analyzes whether a mobile application on a tablet aimed at supporting drug intake and vital sign parameter documentation affects adherence in elderly patients.Patients with coronary heart disease and no prior knowledge of tablet computers were recruited. They received a personal introduction to the mobile application Medication Plan, installed on an Apple iPad. The study was conducted using a crossover design with 3 sequences: initial phase, interventional phase (28 days of using the app system), and comparative phase (28 days of using a paper diary). Users experienced the interventional and comparative phases alternately.A total of 24 patients (12 males; mean age 73.8 years) were enrolled in the study. The mean for subjectively assessed adherence (A14-scale; 5-point Likert scale, from "never" to "very often" which results in a score from 0 to 56) before the study was 50.0 (SD = 3.44). After both interventions there was a significant increase, which was more pronounced after the interventional phase (54.0; SD = 2.01) than after the comparative phase (52.6; SD = 2.49) (for all pairs after both interventions, P digital tools can assist chronic disease patients achieve adherence to medication and to blood pressure measurement. Although this requires initial offline training, it can reduce complications and clinical overload because of nonadherence. PMID:27603339

  19. Guideline Adherence of Antithrombotic Treatment Initiated by General Practitioners in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: A Danish Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandes, Axel; Overgaard, Mikkel; Plauborg, Liane;

    2013-01-01

    .001) of the patients. Of all patients, 66.3% were treated with oral anticoagulants, 18.7% with antiplatelet drugs only, and 15% received no antithrombotic therapy. Based on the CHADS(2) score, 75.7% of the patients were treated in adherence with the guidelines, 16% were undertreated, and 8.4% overtreated....... The corresponding numbers for the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score were 75.4%, 22.7%, and 1.8%, respectively. The differences in guideline adherence applying the 2 scores were significant (P therapy, 64.1% were treated in adherence to the guidelines according to the CHADS(2...

  20. Adherence to self-care in patients with heart failure in the HeartCycle study

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    Stut W

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wim Stut,1 Carolyn Deighan,2 John G Cleland,3 Tiny Jaarsma4 1Philips Research Europe, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; 2The Heart Manual Department, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, UK; 3National Heart and Lung Institute, Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals Imperial College, London, UK; 4Department of Social and Welfare studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel online education and coaching program to promote self-care among patients with heart failure. In this program, education and coaching content is automatically tailored to the knowledge and behavior of the patient. Patients and methods: The evaluation of the program took place within the scope of the HeartCycle study. This multi-center, observational study examined the ability of a third generation telehealth system to enhance the management of patients recently (<60 days admitted to the hospital for worsening heart failure or outpatients with persistent New York Heart Association (NYHA Functional Classification III/IV symptoms. Self-reported self-care behavior was assessed at baseline and study-end by means of the 9-item European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior scale. Adherence to daily weighing, blood pressure monitoring, and reporting of symptoms was determined by analyzing the system’s database. Results: Of 123 patients enrolled, the mean age was 66±12 years, 66% were in NYHA III and 79% were men. Self-reported self-care behavior scores (n=101 improved during the study for daily weighing, low-salt diet, physical activity (P<0.001, and fluid restriction (P<0.05. Average adherence (n=120 to measuring weight was 90%±16%, to measuring blood pressure was 89%±17% and to symptom reporting was 66%±32%. Conclusion: Self-reported self-care behavior scores improved significantly during the period of observation, and the objective evidence of adherence to daily weight and blood pressure measurements was

  1. Care Management: Adherence to Therapies Among Patients at Bu-Alicina Clinic, Qazvin, Iran

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    S Asefzadeh

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-adherence to treatment is a problem of increasing concern for all stakeholders. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of non-adherence among the clients consulting internists or cardiologists at Bu-Alicina Clinic in Qazvin. Methods: A total number of 400 clients came to Bu-Alicina Clinic (center for internal medicine and cardiology were randomly interviewed through a questionnaire during a two month period in 2003. Self-administered methods were used if the clients applied. The data were interpreted using statistical methods. Results: The clients were between 14 and 78 years old (33.7+8.5 and 57.5% of them were women and 42.5% were men. Of total number, 30.7% were consulting for continuation of their therapies and of these clients, 41.5% had pooradherence to their current therapies. The more educated clients were 1.6 times (OR=1.62; 95% CI=0.71, 3.74 likely to be more adherent to the therapies.There was no significant difference between the internal diseases patients and cardiology patients in this regard (41.7%vs 40%. Of the total number of 400 clients, 79.5% had history of consulting to medical clinics during the last three months and 37.4% of them had non-adherence to their past therapies. The more frequent factors were: forgetfulness (13.3%, not to be able to afford to pay for treatment costs (10.3%, disbelieve to the doctor and consulting another ones (8.4%, long distance (8.4%, feeling that it is not important to take medications (7.4%, side effects (7.4%, disbelieve to the diagnosis (7.1%, religious considerations (6.5%, and misunderstanding or lack of information about the prescription (5.8%. No significant difference was found between men and women on this aspect. Conclusion: Patients need advice, supported information from professionals about their health and therapies. Certain studies must be done to determine the pitfalls and effective interventions address that barriers can be developed. Keywords

  2. Factors associated with adherence to medication among depressed patients from Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study

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    Al Jumah K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Khalaf Al Jumah,1 Mohamed Azmi Hassali,2 Dalal Al Qhatani,1 Kamal El Tahir3 1Department of Pharmacy, Al Amal Psychiatric Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia; 3College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: Several studies have investigated the factors associated with adherence to antidepressants, with inconsistent conclusions. However, no similar study has investigated this issue among patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study is to explore patients’ adherence to antidepressant medications, and the factors associated with adherence.Methods: A non-experimental cross-sectional design was used to measure adherence to antidepressants among major depressive disorder patients, and the factors associated with adherence. The patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between August 2013 and January 2014. Eligible participants met with one of the research coordinators for assessment of their adherence. Adherence was investigated indirectly by use of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, and patients’ beliefs were assessed through the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire. Information about the severity of their depression, demographics, and other study variables were collected.Results: A total of 403 patients met the inclusion criteria and participated in the study. Of those, 203 (50.37% were females, while the remaining 200 (49.6% were males. There was an average age of 39 years (standard deviation, ±11 years. Half of the patients (52.9% reported low adherence to their antidepressant medication, with statistically significant differences between the low adherence and high adherence scores relating to sex, age, and duration of illness. Conclusion: Low medication adherence is a common problem among major depressive disorder

  3. Indicators of adherence to physiotherapy attendance among Saudi female patients with mechanical low back pain: a clinical audit

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    Al-Eisa Einas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among current musculoskeletal interventions used to treat low back pain (LBP, physiotherapy exercise has the highest evidence of effectiveness in avoiding recurrence and chronic disability. However, effectiveness of physiotherapy is thought to be directly related to the patients' adherence to physiotherapy. Since adherence is reported to be directly influenced by socio-cultural factors, this study was conducted to investigate factors related to patients' adherence in a group of Saudi female patients with LBP. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted on female LBP patients referred to the department of physiotherapy at a local tertiary hospital over a 12 month period. A total of 98 charts were reviewed. Two physiotherapists specialized in musculoskeletal rehabilitation collected information from the medical files. Data were classified in three categories: patients' personal demographics, patients' medical condition and history, and type of physiotherapy administered. Contingency tables and chi-square test were computed to test for differences in proportions. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was calculated to examine relationships among variables. Results Subjects who attended their scheduled appointments were classified as adherent (40%, and those who failed to attend 2 consecutive scheduled appointments and got discharged were classified as non-adherent (60%. Factors that significantly correlated with adherence included: age (r = 0.7, p Conclusion This study reveals an alarming level of non-adherence to physiotherapy among patients with LBP. It remains unclear as to what level of adherence is required to achieve beneficial effect of treatment. It is quite evident however, that early withdrawal from treatment would not allow the therapeutic benefits of the treatment to be realized. Future research should be directed toward developing strategies to improve adherence.

  4. Patient retention and adherence to antiretrovirals in a large antiretroviral therapy program in Nigeria: a longitudinal analysis for risk factors.

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    Man Charurat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Substantial resources and patient commitment are required to successfully scale-up antiretroviral therapy (ART and provide appropriate HIV management in resource-limited settings. We used pharmacy refill records to evaluate risk factors for loss to follow-up (LTFU and non-adherence to ART in a large treatment cohort in Nigeria. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We reviewed clinic records of adult patients initiating ART between March 2005 and July 2006 at five health facilities. Patients were classified as LTFU if they did not return >60 days from their expected visit. Pharmacy refill rates were calculated and used to assess non-adherence. We identified risk factors associated with LTFU and non-adherence using Cox and Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE regressions, respectively. Of 5,760 patients initiating ART, 26% were LTFU. Female gender (p 350 and 2 hours to the clinic (p = 0.03, had total ART duration of >6 months (p200 at ART initiation were at a higher risk of non-adherence. Patients who disclosed their HIV status to spouse/family (p = 0.01 and were treated with tenofovir-containing regimens (p < or = 0.001 were more likely to be adherent. CONCLUSIONS: These findings formed the basis for implementing multiple pre-treatment visit preparation that promote disclosure and active community outreaching to support retention and adherence. Expansion of treatment access points of care to communities to diminish travel time may have a positive impact on adherence.

  5. Partners' representations of diabetes as mediators between patients' representations and adherence to self-care behaviors, in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M Graça; Pedras, Susana; Machado, José C; Ferreira, Gabriela

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze partners' representations of diabetes as mediators between patients' illness representations and adherence to all self-care behaviors, in recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. The sample included 340 patients and their respective partners. The instruments used were: Revised Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (RSDSCA); Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS); and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire  (Brief-IPQ). A mediational effect of partners' representation of diabetes consequences was found between the same patients' representations and  exercise, foot care, and self-monitoring of blood glucose. Partners' representations of personal and treatment control, were mediators between the same partners' representations and self-monitoring of blood glucose. No partners' representations mediated patients' representation and adherence to medication or diet . This study emphasized partners' representations on patient's adherence to exercise, foot care and monitoring of blood glucose, in recent diagnosed T2DM patients. Interventions to promote adherence in T2DM should promote convergence between patients and partners' diabetes representations. This study provides some evidence for the need to treat T2DM within the dyad to improve adherence, starting after the diagnosis. PMID:26718034

  6. Patient engagement and patient support programs in allergy immunotherapy: a call to action for improving long-term adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoly, Pascal; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Sastre, Joaquin; Wahn, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Allergy immunotherapy (AIT) is acknowledged to produce beneficial mid- and long-term clinical and immunologic effects and increased quality of life in patients with allergic respiratory diseases (such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma). However, poor adherence to AIT (due to intentional and/or non-intentional factors) is still a barrier to achieving these benefits. There is an urgent need for patient support programs (PSPs) that encompass communication, educational and motivational components. In the field of AIT, a PSP should be capable of (1) improving adherence, (2) boosting patient engagement, (3) explaining how AIT differs from pharmacological allergy treatments; (4) increasing health literacy about chronic, progressive, immunoglobulin-E-mediated immune diseases, (5) helping the patient to understand and manage local or systemic adverse events, and (6) providing and/or predicting local data on aeroallergen levels. We reviewed the literature in this field and have identified a number of practical issues to be addressed when implementing a PSP for AIT: the measurement of adherence, the choice of technologies, reminders, communication channels and content, the use of "push" messaging and social networks, interactivity, and the involvement of caregivers and patient leaders. A key issue is "hi-tech" (i.e. approaches based mainly on information technology) vs. "hi-touch" (based mainly on interaction with humans, i.e. family members, patient mentors and healthcare professionals). We conclude that multistakeholder PSPs (combining patient-, provider and society-based actions) must now be developed and tested with a view to increasing adherence, efficacy and safety in the field of AIT. PMID:27478445

  7. Development of the CoMac Adherence Descriptor™: a linguistically-based survey for segmenting patients on their worldviews

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    Connor UM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ulla M Connor,1 Robert S Mac Neill Jr,1 Howard R Mzumara,2 Robert Sandy1 1International Center for Intercultural Communication (ICIC, Indiana University – Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Testing Center – Division of Planning and Institutional Improvement, Indiana University – Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Nonadherence to prescribed medication and healthy behaviors is a pressing health care issue. Much research has been conducted in this area under a variety of labels, such as compliance, disease management and, most recently, adherence. However, the complex factors related to predicting and, more importantly, understanding and explaining adherence, have nevertheless remained elusive. However, through an in-depth linguistic analysis of patient talk, the International Center for Intercultural Communication (ICIC at Indiana University has produced a psycholinguistic coding system that uses patients’ own language to cluster them into distinct groups based on their worldviews. ICIC’s studies have shown, for example, that patients reveal their fundamental perceptions about themselves and their environment in their life narratives; clustering of individual patients based on these different perceptions is possible via the use of differential language in survey questions, and differential language can be used to tailor messages for individual patients in a manner that these individuals prefer over generically worded communication. In grant-funded research, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the ICIC reviewed the literature and identified three basic psychosocial tenets related to adherence: control orientation, based on locus of control research; agency, based on self-efficacy; and affect or attitude and emotion. These three constructs were selected because, in the published literature, they have been consistently found to be connected to patient adherence. Based on this research, a survey, the Co

  8. A review of studies concerning treatment adherence of patients with anxiety disorders

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    Santana L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lívia Santana1, Leonardo F Fontenelle1–31Anxiety and Depression Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Institute of Community Health, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil; 3D’Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilObjective: This paper aimed at describing the most consistent correlates and/or predictors of nonadherence to treatment of patients with different anxiety disorders.Method: The authors retrieved studies indexed in PubMed/MedLine, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge using the following search terms: attrition OR dropout OR attrition rates OR patient dropouts OR treatment adherence AND anxiety disorders. Research was limited to articles published before January 2010.Results: Sixteen studies were selected that investigated the impact of sociodemographic, clinical, or cognitive variables on adherence to treatment for anxiety disorders. While no consistent pattern of sociodemographic or clinical features associated with nonadherence emerged, all studies that investigated cognitive variables in panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder found that expectations and opinions about treatment were related to adherence.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that it is essential to consider anxiety disorder patients’ beliefs about illness and treatment strategies to increase their compliance with the therapeutic plan.Keywords: attrition, dropout, OCD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder

  9. Adherence styles of schizophrenia patients identified by a latent class analysis of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS): a six-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Susanne; Pfiffner, Carmen; Weiser, Prisca; Kilian, Reinhold; Becker, Thomas; Längle, Gerhard; Eschweiler, Gerhard Wilhelm; Croissant, Daniela; Schepp, Wiltrud; Steinert, Tilman

    2012-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to examine patients' response profiles to the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and to evaluate the potential of response styles as predictors of the future course of psychotic disorders in terms of rehospitalisation and maintenance of medication. A total of 371 psychiatric in-patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were taking part in a naturalistic long-term study completed a German version of the MARS. A Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was performed. Five latent classes of response styles could be identified: "moderately adherent", "critical discontinuers", "good compliers", "careless and forgetful", and "compliant sceptics". Class membership was found to be related to the severity of symptoms, level of functioning, insight into illness, insight into necessity of treatment, treatment satisfaction and medication side effects. At a six-month follow-up appointment, significant differences between the classes persisted. Participants showing a "good compliers" response pattern had a significantly better prognosis in terms of rehospitalisation rate and maintenance of the original medication than "critical discontinuers". Evaluation of the MARS by studying response profiles provides informative results that reach beyond the results obtained by an evaluation by scores. Patients can be classified into adherence groups that are of predictive value for long-term patient outcome.

  10. Treatment acceptance and adherence in HIV disease: patient identity and the perceived impact of physician–patient communication

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    Laws MB

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available M Barton Laws,1 Gary S Rose,2 Tanya Bezreh,1 Mary Catherine Beach,3 Tatiana Taubin,1 Laura Kogelman,4 Marcia Gethers,3 Ira B Wilson11Department of Health Services Policy and Practice, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 2Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology, Boston, MA, USA; 3Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Studies have found that physician–patient relationships and communication quality are related to medication adherence and outcomes in HIV care. Few qualitative studies exist of how people living with HIV experience clinical communication about their self-care behavior. Eight focus groups with people living with HIV in two US cities were conducted. Participants responded to a detailed discussion guide and to reenactments of actual physician–patient dialogue about antiretroviral adherence. The 82 participants were diverse in age, sex, and ethnicity. Most had been living with HIV for many years and had stable relationships with providers. They appreciated providers who knew and cared about their personal lives, who were clear and direct about instructions, and who were accessible. Most had struggled to overcome addiction, emotional turmoil, and/or denial before gaining control over their lives and becoming adherent to medications. They made little or no causal attribution for their transformation to any outside agency, including their providers. They generally saw medication adherence as a function of autonomous motivation. Successful coping with HIV with its prevalent behavioral comorbidities, stigma, and other challenges requires a transformation of identity and internalization of motivation to maintain health. Effective methods for clinicians to support such development are needed.Keywords: HIV, physician–patient communication, treatment adherence

  11. Adherence is associated with the quality of professional-patient interaction in Directly Observed Treatment Short-course, DOTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Pranaya; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Sabroe, Svend;

    2006-01-01

    : Better communication between health professionals, particularly dispensers, and patients is essential for improving treatment adherence in TB treatment, even under DOTS. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Drug dispensers should be trained to develop their communication skills about the use of medications, associated...

  12. Effect of a Multi-Dimensional and Inter-Sectoral Intervention on the Adherence of Psychiatric Patients.

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    Anne Pauly

    Full Text Available In psychiatry, hospital stays and transitions to the ambulatory sector are susceptible to major changes in drug therapy that lead to complex medication regimens and common non-adherence among psychiatric patients. A multi-dimensional and inter-sectoral intervention is hypothesized to improve the adherence of psychiatric patients to their pharmacotherapy.269 patients from a German university hospital were included in a prospective, open, clinical trial with consecutive control and intervention groups. Control patients (09/2012-03/2013 received usual care, whereas intervention patients (05/2013-12/2013 underwent a program to enhance adherence during their stay and up to three months after discharge. The program consisted of therapy simplification and individualized patient education (multi-dimensional component during the stay and at discharge, as well as subsequent phone calls after discharge (inter-sectoral component. Adherence was measured by the "Medication Adherence Report Scale" (MARS and the "Drug Attitude Inventory" (DAI.The improvement in the MARS score between admission and three months after discharge was 1.33 points (95% CI: 0.73-1.93 higher in the intervention group compared to controls. In addition, the DAI score improved 1.93 points (95% CI: 1.15-2.72 more for intervention patients.These two findings indicate significantly higher medication adherence following the investigated multi-dimensional and inter-sectoral program.German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00006358.

  13. Chitosan nanoparticles affect acid tolerance response in adhered cells of strpetococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilands, Julia; Sutherland, Duncan S; Resin, Anton;

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells...... appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD (R) technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction...

  14. Peer counselors' role in supporting patients' adherence to ART in Ethiopia and Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusdal, Annelie K; Obua, Celestino; Andualem, Tenaw; Wahlstrom, Rolf; Chalker, John; Fochsen, Grethe

    2011-06-01

    Our aim was to explore peer counselors' work and their role in supporting patients' adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in resource-limited settings in Ethiopia and Uganda. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 79 patients, 17 peer counselors, and 22 providers in ART facilities in urban and rural areas of Ethiopia and Uganda. Two main categories with related subcategories emerged from the analysis. The first main category, peer counselors as facilitators of adherence, describes how peer counselors played an important role by acting as role models, raising awareness, and being visible in the community. They were also recognized for being close to the patients while acting as a bridge to the health system. They provided patients with an opportunity to individually talk to someone who was also living with HIV, who had a positive and life-affirming attitude about their situation, and were willing to share personal stories of hope when educating and counseling their patients. The second main category, benefits and challenges of peer counseling, deals with how peer counselors found reward in helping others while at the same time acknowledging their limitations and need of support and remuneration. Their role and function were not clearly defined within the health system and they received negligible financial and organizational support. While peer counseling is acknowledged as an essential vehicle for treatment success in ART support in sub-Saharan Africa, a formal recognition and regulation of their role should be defined. The issue of strategies for disclosure to support adherence, while avoiding or reducing stigma, also requires specific attention. We argue that the development and implementation of support to peer counselors are crucial in existing and future ART programs, but more research is needed to further explore factors that are important to sustain and strengthen the work of peer counselors. PMID:21347887

  15. GPs' perspectives of type 2 diabetes patients' adherence to treatment: A qualitative analysis of barriers and solutions

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    Sabbe Bernard

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The problem of poor compliance/adherence to prescribed treatments is very complex. Health professionals are rarely being asked how they handle the patient's (poor therapy compliance/adherence. In this study, we examine explicitly the physicians' expectations of their diabetes patients' compliance/adherence. The objectives of our study were: (1 to elicit problems physicians encounter with type 2 diabetes patients' adherence to treatment recommendations; (2 to search for solutions and (3 to discover escape mechanisms in case of frustration. Methods In a descriptive qualitative study, we explored the thoughts and feelings of general practitioners (GPs on patients' compliance/adherence. Forty interested GPs could be recruited for focus group participation. Five open ended questions were derived on the one hand from a similar qualitative study on compliance/adherence in patients living with type 2 diabetes and on the other hand from the results of a comprehensive review of recent literature on compliance/adherence. A well-trained diabetes nurse guided the GPs through the focus group sessions while an observer was attentive for non-verbal communication and interactions between participants. All focus groups were audio taped and transcribed for content analysis. Two researchers independently performed the initial coding. A first draft with results was sent to all participants for agreement on content and comprehensiveness. Results General practitioners experience problems with the patient's deficient knowledge and the fact they minimize the consequences of having and living with diabetes. It appears that great confidence in modern medical science does not stimulate many changes in life style. Doctors tend to be frustrated because their patients do not achieve the common Evidence Based Medicine (EBM objectives, i.e. on health behavior and metabolic control. Relevant solutions, derived from qualitative studies, for better compliance/adherence

  16. Adherence to Disease Modifying Drugs among Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in Germany: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Kerstin Hansen

    Full Text Available Long-term therapies such as disease modifying therapy for Multiple Sclerosis (MS demand high levels of medication adherence in order to reach acceptable outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe adherence to four disease modifying drugs (DMDs among statutorily insured patients within two years following treatment initiation. These drugs were interferon beta-1a i.m. (Avonex, interferon beta-1a s.c. (Rebif, interferon beta-1b s.c. (Betaferon and glatiramer acetate s.c. (Copaxone.This retrospective cohort study used pharmacy claims data from the data warehouse of the German Institute for Drug Use Evaluation (DAPI from 2001 through 2009. New or renewed DMD prescriptions in the years 2002 to 2006 were identified and adherence was estimated during 730 days of follow-up by analyzing the medication possession ratio (MPR as proxy for compliance and persistence defined as number of days from initiation of DMD therapy until discontinuation or interruption.A total of 52,516 medication profiles or therapy cycles (11,891 Avonex, 14,060 Betaferon, 12,353 Copaxone and 14,212 Rebif from 50,057 patients were included into the analysis. Among the 4 cohorts, no clinically relevant differences were found in available covariates. The Medication Possession Ratio (MPR measured overall compliance, which was 39.9% with a threshold MPR≥0.8. There were small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was compliant for the following medications: Avonex (42.8%, Betaferon (40.6%, Rebif (39.2%, and Copaxone (37%. Overall persistence was 32.3% at the end of the 24 months observation period, i.e. during only one third of all included therapy cycles patients did not discontinue or interrupt DMD therapy. There were also small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was persistent as follows: Avonex (34.2%, Betaferon (33.4%, Rebif (31.7% and Copaxone (29.8%.Two years after initiating MS-modifying therapy, only

  17. The Relationship Between Social Support and Adherence of Dietary and Fluids Restrictions among Hemodialysis Patients in Iran

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    Shahnaz Ahrari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient’s noncompliance dietary and fluids intake can lead to a build-up of toxic fluids and metabolic end-products in the blood stream which may result in an increased morbidity and premature death. The aim of the study is investigate relationship between the social support and adherence to dietary and fluid restrictions in hemodialysis patients. Methods: In this correlational study upon 237 hemodialysis patients, the data was collected with the dialysis diet and fluids non-adherences hemodialysis questionnaire (DDFQ, and the multidimensional scale of perceived Social Support (MSP. Interdialytic weight gain, predialytic serum potassium levels, and predialytic serum phosphate levels was considered as biochemical indicators of dietary and fluid adherence. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver.11.5. Results: About 41.1% of patients reported non-adherence to diet and 45.2% of them reported non-adherence to fluid. Frequency of non-adherence to fluid was more common in patients. The highest level of perceived support was the family support 11.19 (1.34. There was a significant relationship between social support and adherence to dietary and fluid restrictions. Noncompliances to dietary and fluid restrictions were related to laboratory results. Conclusion: This way those patients who more supported had more adherences of diet and fluid restrictions and had lower level of phosphorus and potassium in laboratory results. Nurses have the main role to identify different methods providing social support for patients, also to encourage the families to support their hemodialysis patients.

  18. Adherence to WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations and metabolic syndrome in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Eleonora; Gargano, Giuliana; Villarini, Anna; Traina, Adele; Johansson, Harriet; Mano, Maria Piera; Santucci De Magistris, Maria; Simeoni, Milena; Consolaro, Elena; Mercandino, Angelica; Barbero, Maggiorino; Galasso, Rocco; Bassi, Maria Chiara; Zarcone, Maurizio; Zagallo, Emanuela; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Bellegotti, Manuela; Berrino, Franco; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), conventionally defined by the presence of at least three out of five dismetabolic traits (abdominal obesity, hypertension, low plasma HDL-cholesterol and high plasma glucose and triglycerides), has been associated with both breast cancer (BC) incidence and prognosis. We investigated the association between the prevalence of MetS and a score of adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) recommendations for the prevention of cancer in a cross-sectional study of BC patients. The DIet and ANdrogen-5 study (DIANA-5) for the prevention of BC recurrences recruited 2092 early stage BC survivors aged 35-70. At recruitment, all women completed a 24-hour food frequency and physical activity diary on their consumption and activity of the previous day. Using these diaries we created a score of adherence to five relevant WCRF/AICR recommendations. The prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of MetS associated with the number of recommendations met were estimated using a binomial regression model. The adjusted PRs of MetS decreased with increasing number of recommendations met (p < 0.001). Meeting all the five recommendations versus meeting none or only one was significantly associated with a 57% lower MetS prevalence (95% CI 0.35-0.73). Our results suggest that adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations is a major determinant of MetS and may have a clinical impact.

  19. Current issues in patient adherence and persistence: focus on anticoagulants for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P Kneeland

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Patrick P Kneeland, Margaret C FangThe University of California, San Francisco Division of Hospital Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Warfarin therapy reduces morbidity and mortality related to thromboembolism. Yet adherence to long-term warfarin therapy remains challenging due to the risks of anticoagulantassociated complications and the burden of monitoring. The aim of this paper is to review determinants of adherence and persistence on long-term anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. We evaluate what the current literature reveals about the impact of warfarin on quality of life, examine warfarin trial data for patterns of adherence, and summarize known risk factors for warfarin discontinuation. Studies suggest only modest adverse effects of warfarin on quality of life, but highlight the variability of individual lifestyle experiences of patients on warfarin. Interestingly, clinical trials comparing anticoagulant adherence to alternatives (such as aspirin show that discontinuation rates on warfarin are not consistently higher than in control arms. Observational studies link a number of risk factors to warfarin non-adherence including younger age, male sex, lower stroke risk, poor cognitive function, poverty, and higher educational attainment. In addition to differentiating the relative impact of warfarin-associated complications (such as bleeding versus the lifestyle burdens of warfarin monitoring on adherence, future investigation should focus on optimizing patient education and enhancing models of physician–patient shared-decision making around anticoagulation.Keywords: anticoagulation, warfarin, adherence, persistence, thromboembolism

  20. The impact of patient support programs on adherence, clinical, humanistic, and economic patient outcomes: a targeted systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguli A; Clewell J; Shillington AC

    2016-01-01

    Arijit Ganguli,1 Jerry Clewell,2 Alicia C Shillington3 1Department of Health Economics and Outcomes Research, 2Department of Medical Affairs, AbbVie, North Chicago, IL, USA; 3EPI-Q Inc., Oak Brook, IL, USA Background: Patient support programs (PSPs), including medication management and counseling, have the potential to improve care in chronic disease states with complex therapies. Little is known about the program’s effects on improving clinical, adherence, humanistic, and cost ou...

  1. Prescription and adherence to statins of patients with coronary artery disease and hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Antonio P.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Statins have proved to be safe and effective in the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease, but the level of prescription and the reasons for nonadherence to treatment in many coronariopathy treatment centers has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to identify reasons for nonadherence to statin therapy. METHODS: We analyzed 207 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease and hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol > or = 200mg/dL or LDL - cholesterol > or = 130mg/dL. Patients' average age was 61.7±10 year; 111 (53.6% male were and 94 (46.6% were female. We analyzed the level of prescription and adherence to treatment with statins. RESULTS: Statins were prescribed for 139 (67% patients, but only 85 (41% used the drug. In spite of being indicated, statins were not prescribed in 68 (33% patients. Of 54 (26% patients, nonadherent to statins, 67% did not use the drug due to its high cost, 31% due to the lack of instruction, and only 2% due to side effects. Total cholesterol (260.3±42.2 vs 226.4±51.9; p<0.0001 and LDL cholesterol (174.6±38.1 vs 149.6±36.1; p<0.0001 were lower in patients on medication. HDL-cholesterol increased from 37.6±9.6 to 41.5±12.9mg/dL (p=0.02, and triglycerides were not modified in patients using statins. CONCLUSION: The prescription of statins in patients with coronary artery disease and dyslipidemia is high; however, its adherence is far from satisfactory, due to the high cost of the medication. Reduction in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels did not reach the targets recommended by the Brazilian Consensus on Dyslipidemia.

  2. Lactoferrin affects the adherence and invasion of Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Fiona; Beecher, Christine; Chaurin, Valerie; Sweeney, Torres; Giblin, Linda

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae is an important causative agent of bovine mastitis worldwide. Lactoferrin is an innate immune protein that is associated with many functions including immunomodulatory, antiproliferative, and antimicrobial properties. This study aimed to investigate the interactions between lactoferrin and a clinical bovine mastitis isolate, Strep. dysgalactiae ssp. dysgalactiae DPC5345. Initially a deliberate in vivo bovine intramammary challenge was performed with Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345. Results demonstrated a significant difference in lactoferrin mRNA levels in milk cells between the control and infused quarters 7h postinfusion. Milk lactoferrin levels in the Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345 infused quarters were significantly increased compared with control quarters at 48h postinfusion. In vitro studies demonstrated that lactoferrin had a bacteriostatic effect on the growth of Strep. dysgalactiae DPC5345 and significantly decreased the ability of the bacteria to internalize into HC-11 mammary epithelial cells. Confocal microscopy images of HC-11 cells exposed to Strep. dysgalactiae and lactoferrin further supported this effect by demonstrating reduced invasion of bacteria to HC-11 cells. The combined data suggest that a bovine immune response to Strep. dysgalactiae infection includes a significant increase in lactoferrin expression in vivo, and based on in vitro data, lactoferrin limits mammary cell invasion of this pathogen by binding to the bacteria and preventing its adherence. PMID:27016824

  3. Association between oral 5-ASA adherence and health care utilization and costs among patients with active ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Debanjali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational cohort study to assess the association between adherence to oral 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASAs and all-cause costs and health care utilization among patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC in the United States. Methods Retrospective analysis of insurance claims from June 1997 to August 2006 in the LifeLink Database. Patient criteria: aged 18 or older with one or more claim(s between June 1997 and August 2005 for a UC diagnosis and at least one oral 5-ASA prescription on or after the first observed UC diagnosis; continuous enrollment for at least 6 months prior to and 12 months following 5-ASA initiation (index date. As a proxy for active disease, patients needed to have at least two UC-specific non-pharmacy claims, at least 30 days of 5-ASA treatment and at least one corticosteroid prescription within the 12-month post-index period. Cumulative exposure to oral 5-ASAs over the 12-month period was calculated using the medication possession ratio (MPR. Patients with an MPR of at least 0.80 were classified as adherent. All-cause medical and pharmacy resource utilization and costs were computed over the 12-month post-index period and compared between adherent and nonadherent patients. Results 1,693 UC patients met study inclusion criteria: 72% were nonadherent to 5-ASA treatment (n = 1,217 and 28% were adherent (n = 476 in the 12-month study period. Compared with nonadherent patients, adherent patients had 31% fewer hospitalizations (P = 0.0025 and 34% fewer emergency department admissions (P = 0.0016. Adherent patients had 25% more pharmacy prescriptions overall (P P P = 0.0002. After adjusting for covariates, total all-cause costs were 29% higher for nonadherent patients than for adherent patients (mean [95% confidence interval]: $13,465 [$13,094, $13,835] vs $17,339 [$17,033, $17,645]. Conclusions Approximately three-quarters of patients with active UC were not adherent with their

  4. Correlation between the use of 'over-the-counter' medicines and adherence in elderly patients on multiple medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Charlotte; Harbig, Philipp; Barat, Ishay;

    2014-01-01

    of OTC medicines and adherence to prescribed medications in elderly patients. Setting Non-institutionalised elderly patients in Denmark. Methods Elderly unassisted patients aged ≥65 prescribed five or more prescription drugs were included in the study. Information on the use of concurrent OTC medications...

  5. Perception of hypertensive patients about their non-adherence to the use of medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Nadia Sanches; Santos, Mariana Fonseca Dos; Moro, André Dos Santos

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study aims to analyze the perception of patients with hypertension on their non-adherence to medication. 13 participants were interviewed, classified as non-adherent.The analysis was performed using the technique of thematic content analysis. Data points to contradictions in the approach of what is being adherent or not, the difficulty of adhering to the use of medication due to lifestyle habits, that forgetting is understood as a justification for non-compliance, and reinforces factors that hinder such practice, such as the use of many drugs, the presence of signs and symptoms and changes in daily routine. With complex conditions that involve non-adherence to treatment and the current context of the predominance of chronic diseases, it is essential to invest in innovative strategies of care for such people. Estudo qualitativo que se propõe a analisar a percepção do portador de hipertensão arterial sobre a sua não adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso. Foram entrevistados treze participantes classificados como não aderente. A analise foi realizada pela técnica de analise de conteúdo modalidade temática. Os dados apontam para contradições na abordagem sobre o que é ser ou não aderente, a dificuldade de aderir ao uso dos medicamentos devido ao hábito de vida, que o esquecimento é compreendido como uma justificativa para a não adesão, além de reforçarem fatores que dificultam tal prática, como o uso de muitos medicamentos, presença de sinais e sintomas e mudanças na rotina diária. As complexas condições que envolvem a não adesão ao tratamento e ao o atual contexto de predomínio de doenças crônicas, é primordial que se invista em estratégias inovadoras de cuidado a tais pessoas.

  6. Simplified Assessment of Antiretroviral Adherence and Prediction of Virological Efficacy in HIV-Infected Patients in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Segeral

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adherence to antiviral therapy is important for HIV-infected people living in low- and middle-income countries, because of poor access to alternative regimens. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adherence in Cambodian patients enrolled in the ESTHER program and treated with WHO first-line regimen for at least 6 months. The survey was based on a self-report questionnaire, drug assay, MCV measurement, visual analog scale, and viral load HIV RNA. Results. Two hundred fifty-nine patients treated for a median of 16 months participated in the survey. At inclusion in the program, 158 patients (61% were ARV-naïve. The virological success rate was 71% overall and 81% in previously ARV-naive patients. Considered individually, the measures suggested perfect adherence in 71% to 93% of patients. In multivariate analysis adjusted for sex and therapeutic status before HAART initiation, only the biological markers were associated with virological efficacy. Self-funded treatment before entry to the program was highly predictive of virological failure. Conclusion. Adherence was excellent in these Cambodian patients. Biological markers were predictive of virological efficacy. MCV might thus serve as a simple alternative for assessing adherence and predicting virological efficacy among patients receiving AZT- or d4T-based regimens.

  7. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nischal K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has transformed HIV infection into a treatable, chronic condition. However, the need to continue treatment for decades rather than years, calls for a long-term perspective of ART. Adherence to the regimen is essential for successful treatment and sustained viral control. Studies have indicated that at least 95% adherence to ART regimens is optimal. It has been demonstrated that a 10% higher level of adherence results in a 21% reduction in disease progression. The various factors affecting success of ART are social aspects like motivation to begin therapy, ability to adhere to therapy, lifestyle pattern, financial support, family support, pros and cons of starting therapy and pharmacological aspects like tolerability of the regimen, availability of the drugs. Also, the regimen′s pill burden, dosing frequency, food requirements, convenience, toxicity and drug interaction profile compared with other regimens are to be considered before starting ART. The lack of trust between clinician and patient, active drug and alcohol use, active mental illness (e.g. depression, lack of patient education and inability of patients to identify their medications, lack of reliable access to primary medical care or medication are considered to be predictors of inadequate adherence. Interventions at various levels, viz. patient level, medication level, healthcare level and community level, boost adherence and overall outcome of ART.

  8. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment and correlation with risk of hospitalization among commercially insured HIV patients in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Sax

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A lower daily pill burden may improve adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART and clinical outcomes in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. This study assessed differences in adherence using the number of pills taken per day, and evaluated how adherence correlated with hospitalization. METHODOLOGY: Commercially insured patients in the LifeLink database with an HIV diagnosis (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification code 042.xx between 6/1/2006 and 12/31/2008 and receipt of a complete ART regimen were selected for inclusion. Patients were grouped according to their daily pill count and remained on ART for at least 60 days. Outcomes included adherence and rates of hospitalization. Adherence was measured as the proportion of days between the start and end of the regimen in which the patient maintained supply of all initiated ART components. Logistic regressions assessed the relationship between pills per day, adherence, and hospitalization, controlling for demographics, comorbidities, and ART-naïve (vs. experienced status. RESULTS: 7,073 patients met the study inclusion criteria, and 33.4%, 5.8%, and 60.8% received an ART regimen comprising one, two, or three or more pills per day, respectively. Regression analysis showed patients receiving a single pill per day were significantly more likely to reach a 95% adherence threshold versus patients receiving three or more pills per day (odds ratio [OR] = 1.59; P<0.001. Regardless of the number of pills received per day, patients were over 40% less likely to have a hospitalization if they were adherent to therapy (OR = 0.57; P<0.001. Patients receiving a single pill per day were 24% less likely to have a hospitalization versus patients receiving three or more pills per day (OR = 0.76; P = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: ART consisting of a single pill per day was associated with significantly better adherence and lower risk of hospitalization in patients

  9. Early Warning and Risk Estimation methods based on Unstructured Text in Electronic Medical Records to Improve Patient Adherence and Care

    OpenAIRE

    Sairamesh, Jakka; Rajagopal, Ram; Nemana, Ravi; Argenbright, Keith

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present risk-estimation models and methods for early detection of patient non-adherence based on unstructured text in patient records. The primary objectives are to perform early interventions on patients at risk of non-adherence and improve outcomes. We analyzed over 1.1 million visit notes corresponding to 30,095 Cancer patients, spread across 12 years of Oncology practice. Our risk analysis, based on a rich risk-factor dictionary, revealed that a staggering 30% of the pati...

  10. Development of the CoMac Adherence Descriptor™: a linguistically-based survey for segmenting patients on their worldviews

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, Ulla M; Mac Neill, Robert S; Mzumara, Howard R; Sandy, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medication and healthy behaviors is a pressing health care issue. Much research has been conducted in this area under a variety of labels, such as compliance, disease management and, most recently, adherence. However, the complex factors related to predicting and, more importantly, understanding and explaining adherence, have nevertheless remained elusive. However, through an in-depth linguistic analysis of patient talk, the International Center for Intercultural Co...

  11. Medication Adherence, Work Performance and Self-Esteem among Psychiatric Patients Attending Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services at Bangalore, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sailaxmi Gandhi; Rajitha Pavalur; Sivakumar Thanapal; Nirmala B Parathasarathy; Geetha Desai; Poornima Bhola; Mariamma Philip; Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Work benefits mental health in innumerable ways. Vocational rehabilitation can enhance self-esteem. Medication adherence can improve work performance and thereby the individuals′ self-esteem. Aim: To test the hypothesis that there would be a significant correlation between medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem. Setting and Design: A quantitative, descriptive correlational research design was adopted to invite patients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services to ...

  12. Mechanisms of adherence of a probiotic Lactobacillus strain during and after in vivo assessment in ulcerative colitis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dunne, Colum; Kelly, Peter; O'Halloran, Sile; Soden, Declan; Bennett, Mary; von Wright, Atte; Vilpponen-Salmela, Terttu; Kiely, Barry; O'Mahony, Liam; Collins, J. Kevin; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Shanahan, Fergus

    2004-01-01

    In a pilot-scale, open-label study to determine the ability of well-characterized probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 cells to adhere to human epithelial cells in situ , the bacterial strain was administered to ulcerative colitis patients at approximately 109 CFU/day for 12 days. Microbiological analysis of biopsy specimens demonstrated that the ingested bacteria effectively adhered to both inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa of the large bowel in significant numbers. In previous report...

  13. Improving the adherence of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with pharmacy care: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Antoine, Sunya-Lee; Pieper, Dawid; Mathes, Tim; Eikermann, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral medication for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus plays an important role in diabetes care and is associated with a high level self-care behavior and self-management. However, poor adherence to diabetes treatment is common which causes severe health complications and increased mortality. Barriers to adherence may consist of complex treatment regimens often along with long-term multi-therapies, side effects due to the medication as well as insufficient, incomprehensible or ...

  14. Influence of patients' representations and beliefs about diabetes and its treatment on their adherence to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, P; Maldonato, A; Grieco, R; Santini, A

    2001-06-01

    Research in the last 25 years has shown that diabetic patients' adhesion to medical advice is a multi-factor phenomenon. Most recent research has focused on a patient-centred approach, on the representations that the patient has with respect to medicine, health and disease (with particular regard to the perceived self-efficiency in managing the disease, trust in conventional medicine, treatment, drugs, etc) and on the level of agreement between the patient's representations and those of the health care provider. These representations can potentially act as barriers/facilitators on patients' adhesion to treatment; the best adherence can only be obtained if the real needs of the patient are met, matching therapy with his/her representations and expectations, and acknowledging the constraints that everyday life puts on the individual. The indication is therefore to avoid exclusively considering the physical burdens of the disease, while ignoring the personal and social significance of the experience that the patient is having. It will take time for this to become routine in health care, since it requires a complex change from a traditional, bio-medical approach to an integrated bio-psycho-social approach. The aim of this review is to show how those disease representations of diabetes, and the treatment having considerable impact on patients' adhesion, are being considered in recent literature, and how this nonetheless still constitutes a little explored aspect in medical consultation and research. PMID:11476361

  15. Is Adherence to Imatinib Mesylate Treatment Among Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Associated with Better Clinical Outcomes in Qatar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dewik, Nader I.; Morsi, Hisham M.; Samara, Muthanna M.; Ghasoub, Rola S.; Gnanam, Cinquea C.; Bhaskaran, Subi K.; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J.; Al-Jurf, Rana M.; Ismail, Mohamed A.; AlSharshani, Mohammed M.; AlSayab, Ali A.; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg I.; Khatib, Rani B.; Yassin, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the revolutionary success of introducing tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib mesylate (IM), for treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a substantial proportion of patients’ treatments fail. AIM This study investigates the correlation between patient adherence and failure of TKIs’ treatment in a follow-up study. METHODS This is a follow-up study of a new cohort of CML patients. Adherence to IM is assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS 6 TrackCap, AARDEX Ltd). The 9-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, medication possession ratio (MPR) calculation, and the electronic medical records are used for identifying potential factors that influence adherence. Clinical outcomes are assessed according to the European Leukemia Net 2013 guidelines via reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction measurement of the level of BCR-ABL1 transcripts in peripheral blood. Response is classified at the hematological, cytogenetic, and molecular levels into optimal, suboptimal, or failure. RESULTS A total of 36 CML patients (5 citizens and 31 noncitizen residents) consented to participate in the study. The overall mean MEMS score was 89. Of the 36 patients, 22 (61%) were classified as adherent (mean: 95) and 14 (39%) were classified as nonadherent (mean: 80.2). Adherent patients were significantly more likely to obtain optimal response (95%) compared to the nonadherent group (14.3%; P health-care teams, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and patients are essential components for maximizing the benefits of TKI therapy and could rectify this problem. The preliminary results show that patients’ response to treatment may be directly linked to patients’ adherence to treatment. However, further in-depth and specific analysis may be necessary in a larger cohort. PMID:27721664

  16. The effect of clinician-patient alliance and communication on treatment adherence in mental health care: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Laura

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonadherence to mental health treatment incurs clinical and economic burdens. The clinician-patient alliance, negotiated through clinical interaction, presents a critical intervention point. Recent medical reviews of communication and adherence behaviour exclude studies with psychiatric samples. The following examines the impact of clinician-patient alliance and communication on adherence in mental health, identifying the specific mechanisms that mobilise patient engagement. Methods In December 2010, a systematic search was conducted in Pubmed, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Embase and Cinahl and yielded 6672 titles. A secondary hand search was performed in relevant journals, grey literature and reference. Results 23 studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The methodological quality overall was moderate. 17 studies reported positive associations with adherence, only four of which employed intervention designs. 10 studies examined the association between clinician-patient alliance and adherence. Subjective ratings of clinical communication styles and messages were assessed in 12 studies. 1 study examined the association between objectively rated communication and adherence. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity of methods. Findings were presented as a narrative synthesis. Conclusions Clinician-patient alliance and communication are associated with more favourable patient adherence. Further research of observer rated communication would better facilitate the application of findings in clinical practice. Establishing agreement on the tasks of treatment, utilising collaborative styles of communication and discussion of treatment specifics may be important for clinicians in promoting cooperation with regimens. These findings align with those in health communication. However, the benefits of shared decision making for adherence in mental health are less conclusive than in general medicine.

  17. Adherence and persistence with branded antidepressants and generic SSRIs among managed care patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianchen Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Xianchen Liu1,2, Yi Chen3, Douglas E Faries31Former employee, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; 2Indiana University Department of Psychiatry, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; 3Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAObjective: This study compared adherence and persistence of three branded antidepressants: the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs duloxetine and venlafaxine XR, and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI escitalopram; and generic selective SSRIs, and examined demographic and clinical predictors of adherence and persistence in patients with major depressive disorder in usual care settings.Method: A total of 44,026 patients (18 to 64 years from a large commercial administrative claims database were classified as initiators of duloxetine (n = 7,567, venlafaxine XR (n = 6,106, escitalopram (n = 10,239, or generic SSRIs (n = 20,114 during 2006. Adherence was defined as the medication possession ratio of ≥ 0.8 and persistence as the length of therapy without exceeding a 15-day gap. Pairwise comparisons from multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were performed to examine predictors of adherence and persistence.Results: Adherence rate after one year was significantly higher in duloxetine recipients (38.1% than patients treated with venlafaxine XR (34.0%, escitalopram (25.4%, or generic SSRIs (25.5% (all P < 0.01. Duloxetine recipients stayed on medication longer (158.5 days than those receiving venlafaxine XR (149.6 days, escitalopram (129.1 days, or generic SSRIs (130.2 days (all P < 0.001. Compared with patients treated with escitalopram or generic SSRIs, venlafaxine XR recipients had better adherence and longer persistence (P < 0.001. In addition, being aged 36 years or more, hypersomnia, anxiety disorders, and prior use of antidepressants were associated with increased adherence and persistence, while the opposite was true for comorbid chronic pain

  18. Adherence to drug–drug interaction alerts in high-risk patients: a trial of context-enhanced alerting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jon D; Li, Xiaochun; Dexter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective Drug–drug interaction (DDI) alerting is an important form of clinical decision support, yet physicians often fail to attend to critical DDI warnings due to alert fatigue. We previously described a model for highlighting patients at high risk of a DDI by enhancing alerts with relevant laboratory data. We sought to evaluate the effect of this model on alert adherence in high-risk patients. Methods A 6-month randomized controlled trial involving 1029 outpatient physicians was performed. The target interactions were all DDIs known to cause hyperkalemia. Alerts in the intervention group were enhanced with the patient's most recent potassium and creatinine levels. The control group received unmodified alerts. High -risk patients were those with baseline potassium >5.0 mEq/l and/or creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dl (132 μmol/l). Results We found no significant difference in alert adherence in high-risk patients between the intervention group (15.3%) and the control group (16.8%) (p=0.71). Adherence in normal risk patients was significantly lower in the intervention group (14.6%) than in the control group (18.6%) (p<0.01). In neither group did physicians increase adherence in patients at high risk. Conclusions Physicians adhere poorly to hyperkalemia-associated DDI alerts even in patients with risk factors for a clinically significant interaction, and the display of relevant laboratory data in these alerts did not improve adherence levels in the outpatient setting. Further research is necessary to determine optimal strategies for conveying patient-specific DDI risk. PMID:23161895

  19. Obedience and motivation as mechanisms for adherence to medication: a study in obese type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reach G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Reach Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolic Diseases, Avicenne Hospital APHP, and EA 3412, CRNH-IdF, Paris 13 University, Bobigny, France Objective: To clarify the mechanisms of adherence. Methods: A cross-sectional, multicenter French study using a self-questionnaire administered by 116 general practitioners to 782 obese type 2 diabetic patients. Results: The analysis of 670 completed questionnaires revealed a strong association between the adherence to medication and the behavior of fastening the seatbelt when seated in the rear of a car. Multivariate analysis indicated that this behavior was an independent determinant of adherence to medication (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–3.6, P < 0.001 with the same OR as the motivation to adhere to medical prescriptions (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3–3.6, P = 0.003 in a model with good accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.774. A multiple correspondence analysis suggested that adherence to medication and seatbelt behavior are “homologous” behaviors, with homology between phenomena defined by the fact that they share a common etiology. Conclusion: Adherence may have two dimensions: passive (obedience, the main determinant of seatbelt behavior and active (motivation. This conclusion has theoretical and practical implications. Firstly, empowerment through patient education can be defined as a process that replaces the passive mechanism of adherence in patients’ minds with an active, conscious choice. Secondly, recognizing these two dimensions may help to establish a tailored patient-physician relationship to prevent nonadherence. Keywords: adherence, compliance, motivation, obedience, reactance, patience, seatbelt, medication

  20. Insulin adherence behaviours and barriers in the multinational Global Attitudes of Patients and Physicians in Insulin Therapy study

    OpenAIRE

    Peyrot, M.; Barnett, A. H.; Meneghini, L F; Schumm-Draeger, P-M

    2012-01-01

    Aims To examine patient and physician beliefs regarding insulin therapy and the degree to which patients adhere to their insulin regimens. Methods Internet survey of 1250 physicians (600 specialists, 650 primary care physicians) who treat patients with diabetes and telephone survey of 1530 insulin-treated patients (180 with Type 1 diabetes, 1350 with Type 2 diabetes) in China, France, Japan, Germany, Spain, Turkey, the UK or the USA. Results One third (33.2%) of patients reported insulin omis...

  1. The impact of patient support programs on adherence, clinical, humanistic, and economic patient outcomes: a targeted systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganguli A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Arijit Ganguli,1 Jerry Clewell,2 Alicia C Shillington3 1Department of Health Economics and Outcomes Research, 2Department of Medical Affairs, AbbVie, North Chicago, IL, USA; 3EPI-Q Inc., Oak Brook, IL, USA Background: Patient support programs (PSPs, including medication management and counseling, have the potential to improve care in chronic disease states with complex therapies. Little is known about the program’s effects on improving clinical, adherence, humanistic, and cost outcomes. Purpose: To conduct a targeted review describing medical conditions in which PSPs have been implemented; support delivery components (eg, face-to-face, phone, mail, and internet; and outcomes associated with implementation. Data sources: MEDLINE – 10 years through March 2015 with supplemental handsearching of reference lists. Study selection: English-language trials and observational studies of PSPs providing at minimum, counseling for medication management, measurement of ≥1 clinical outcome, and a 3-month follow-up period during which outcomes were measured. Data extraction: Program characteristics and related clinical, adherence, humanistic, and cost outcomes were abstracted. Study quality and the overall strength of evidence were reviewed using standard criteria. Data synthesis: Of 2,239 citations, 64 studies met inclusion criteria. All targeted chronic disease processes and the majority (48 [75%] of programs offered in-clinic, face-to-face support. All but 9 (14.1% were overseen by allied health care professionals (eg, nurses, pharmacists, paraprofessionals. Forty-one (64.1% reported at least one significantly positive clinical outcome. The most frequent clinical outcome impacted was adherence, where 27 of 41 (66% reported a positive outcome. Of 42 studies measuring humanistic outcomes (eg, quality of life, functional status, 27 (64% reported significantly positive outcomes. Only 15 (23.4% programs reported cost or utilization-related outcomes, and, of

  2. Risk factors for cost-related medication non-adherence among older patients with diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James; X; Zhang; Jhee; U; Lee; David; O; Meltzer

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the risk factors for cost-related medication non-adherence(CRN) among older patients with diabetes in the United States. METHODS: We used data from the 2010 Health and Retirement Study to assess risk factors for CRN including age, drug insurance coverage, nursing home residence, functional limitations, and frequency of hospitalization. CRN was self-reported. We conducted multivariate regression analysis to assess the effect of each risk factor. RESULTS: Eight hundred and seventy-five(18%) of 4880 diabetes patients reported CRN. Age less than 65 years, lack of drug insurance coverage, and frequent hospitalization significantly increased risk for CRN. Limitation in both activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living were also generally associated with increased risk of CRN. Residence in a nursing home and Medicaid coverage significantly reduced risk.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that expandingprescription coverage to uninsured, sicker, and community-dwelling individuals is likely to produce the largest decreases in CRN.

  3. Adherence to national guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral regimens in HIV patients: a Danish nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, TS; Andersen, SE; Gerstoft, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    -four% initiated a recommended regimen or were included in a clinical trial. Intravenous drug use predicted initiation of a non-recommended regimen and delay in start of HAART, while non-Caucasians were less likely to be included in clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS In a Western world setting, the adherence to national......WHAT IS ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS SUBJECT • National guidelines for start of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) in HIV infected patients are available in many Western world countries. However the impact of the guidelines on clinical practice is poorly documented. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS...... risk factors for delayed initiation of treatment and chance of being included in clinical trials. RESULTS The study included 3223 patients, 74% of whom initiated HAART in the study period. Ninety-four% fulfilled the criteria for start of HAART, with minor differences over calendar periods. Ninety...

  4. Intensive management program to improve glycosylated hemoglobin levels and adherence to diet in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Sun; Kim, Hee-Seung

    2009-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of a diabetes outpatient intensive management program (DOIMP) on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1)c) levels and adherence to diabetes control recommendations over a 12-week follow-up period for patients with diabetes. The DOIMP was composed of multidisciplinary diabetes education, complication monitoring, and telephone counseling. Twenty-five patients in the intervention group participated in the DOIMP, whereas 24 in the control group were briefed on the conventional description of diabetes mellitus by diabetes education nurses. Patients in the intervention group decreased their mean HbA(1)c levels by 2.3%, as compared with 0.4% in the control group. There was a significant increase in adherence to diet for the intervention group as compared with the control group. These findings indicate that the DOIMP can improve HbA(1)c levels and adherence to diet in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  5. Treatment adherence in schizophrenia: a patient-level meta-analysis of combined CATIE and EUFEST studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czobor, Pál; Van Dorn, Richard A; Citrome, Leslie; Kahn, Rene S; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Volavka, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) obtained a sample of 1493 chronic schizophrenia patients. The European First Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST) studied a sample of 498 patients. We have combined these two samples to study the predictors and correlates of adherence to treatment. Here we report on adherence to pharmacological treatment at the six and twelve month assessments of these trials with a combined subsample of 1154 schizophrenia patients. Individual patients׳ data were used for analyses. We used logistic regression to examine the effects of substance use, akathisia, parkinsonism, dyskinesia, hostility, and insight on pharmacological adherence. The results showed that reduced adherence to pharmacological treatment was associated with substance use (p=0.0003), higher levels of hostility (p=0.0002), and impaired insight (p<0.0001). Furthermore, poor adherence to study medication was associated with earlier discontinuation in the combined data. The clinical implications of the results point to the importance of routine assessments and interventions to address patients׳ insight and comorbid substance use and the establishment of therapeutic alliance.

  6. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Real-Time Adherence Device among HIV-Positive IDU Patients in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Bachman DeSilva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We collected data on feasibility and acceptability of a real-time web-linked adherence monitoring container among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU in China. “Wisepill” uses wireless technology to track on-time medication dosing. Ten patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART at the Guangxi CDC HIV clinic in Nanning, China, used Wisepill for one ART medication for one month. We monitored device use and adherence and explored acceptability of the device among patients. Mean adherence was 89.2% (SD 10.6%. Half of the subjects reported a positive overall experience with Wisepill. Seven said that it was inconvenient, supported by comments that it was large and conspicuous. Five worried about disclosure of HIV status due to the device; no disclosures were reported. Twelve signal lapses occurred (5.4% of prescribed doses, of which one was due to technical reasons, nine to behavioral reasons (both intentional and unintentional, and two to unclear reasons. Although the technical components must be monitored carefully, and acceptability to patients presents challenges which warrant further exploration, the Wisepill device has potential for adherence interventions that deliver rapid adherence-support behavioral feedback directly to patients, including IDU. The use of wireless technology appears uniquely promising for providing time-sensitive communication on patient behavior that can be harnessed to maximize the benefits of HIV treatment.

  7. Intervention strategies for improving patient adherence to follow-up in the era of mobile information technology: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haotian Lin

    Full Text Available Patient adherence to follow-up plays a key role in the medical surveillance of chronic diseases and affects the implementation of clinical research by influencing cost and validity. We previously reported a randomized controlled trial (RCT on short message service (SMS reminders, which significantly improved follow-up adherence in pediatric cataract treatment.RCTs published in English that reported the impact of SMS or telephone reminders on increasing or decreasing the follow-up rate (FUR were selected from Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library through February 2014. The impacts of SMS and telephone reminders on the FUR of patients were systematically evaluated by meta-analysis and bias was assessed.We identified 13 RCTs reporting on 3276 patients with and 3402 patients without SMS reminders and 8 RCTs reporting on 2666 patients with and 3439 patients without telephone reminders. For the SMS reminders, the majority of the studies (>50% were at low risk of bias, considering adequate sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, evaluation of incomplete outcome data, and lack of selective reporting. For the studies on the telephone reminders, only the evaluation of incomplete outcome data accounted for more than 50% of studies being at low risk of bias. The pooled odds ratio (OR for the improvement of follow-up adherence in the SMS group compared with the control group was 1.76 (95% CI [1.37, 2.26]; P<0.01, and the pooled OR for the improvement of follow-up adherence in the telephone group compared with the control group was 2.09 (95% CI [1.85, 2.36]; P<0.01; both sets showed no evidence of publication bias.SMS and telephone reminders could both significantly improve the FUR. Telephone reminders were more effective but had a higher risk of bias than SMS reminders.

  8. Refining Measurement of Social Cognitive Theory Factors Associated with Exercise Adherence in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Laura Q; Fogleman, Amanda; Verhulst, Steven; Bhugra, Mudita; Rao, Krishna; Malone, James; Robbs, Randall; Robbins, K Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) measures related to exercise adherence in head and neck cancer (HNCa) patients were developed. Enrolling 101 HNCa patients, psychometric properties and associations with exercise behavior were examined for barriers self-efficacy, perceived barriers interference, outcome expectations, enjoyment, and goal setting. Cronbach's alpha ranged from.84 to.95; only enjoyment demonstrated limited test-retest reliability. Subscales for barriers self-efficacy (motivational, physical health) and barriers interference (motivational, physical health, time, environment) were identified. Multiple SCT constructs were cross-sectional correlates and prospective predictors of exercise behavior. These measures can improve the application of the SCT to exercise adherence in HNCa patients.

  9. Effect of Comorbid Depression on Outcomes in Diabetes and Its Relationship to Quality of Care and Patient Adherence: A Statewide Primary Care Ambulatory Research and Resources Consortium Study

    OpenAIRE

    Katerndahl, David; Calmbach, Walter L.; Becho, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether current depression was associated with poorer quality of care and poorer patient adherence to treatment regimens and whether current depression was associated with patient diabetes outcomes independent of its relationships to quality of care and patient adherence among patients with diabetes.

  10. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: Findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Alison D. Grant; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N; Fielding, Katherine; Karim, Salim S. Abdool

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n=150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n=147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43....

  11. Barriers to adherence in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis: a questionnaire study in young patients and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bregnballe V

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibeke Bregnballe1, Peter Oluf Schiøtz1, Kirsten A Boisen2, Tacjana Pressler3, Mikael Thastum4 1Department of Paediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Centre of Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Cystic Fibrosis Centre, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark Background: Treatment adherence is crucial in patients with cystic fibrosis, but poor adherence is a problem, especially during adolescence. Identification of barriers to treatment adherence and a better understanding of how context shapes barriers is of great importance in the disease. Adolescent reports of barriers to adherence have been studied, but studies of their parents' experience of such barriers have not yet been carried out. The aim of the present study was to explore barriers to treatment adherence identified by young patients with cystic fibrosis and by their parents. Methods: A questionnaire survey of a cohort of young Danish patients with cystic fibrosis aged 14–25 years and their parents was undertaken. Results: Barriers to treatment adherence were reported by 60% of the patients and by 62% of their parents. Patients and parents agreed that the three most common barriers encountered were lack of time, forgetfulness, and unwillingness to take medication in public. We found a significant positive correlation between reported number of barriers and perceived treatment burden. We also found a statistically significant relationship between the reported number of barriers and treatment adherence. A significant association was found between the number of barriers and the reactions of adolescents/young adults and those of their mothers and fathers, and between the number of barriers and the way the family communicated about cystic fibrosis. Conclusion: The present study showed that the majority of adolescents

  12. Self-reported adherence supports patient preference for the single tablet regimen (STR in the current cART era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Sterrantino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze self-reported adherence to antiretroviral regimens containing ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI, raltegravir, and maraviroc. Methods: Overall, 372 consecutive subjects attending a reference center for HIV treatment in Florence, Italy, were enrolled in the study, from December 2010 to January 2012 (mean age 48 years. A self-report questionnaire was filled in. Patients were defined as “non-adherent” if reporting one of the following criteria:<90% of pills taken in the last month, ≥1 missed dose in the last week, spontaneous treatment interruptions reported, or refill problems in the last 3 months. Gender, age, CD4, HIV-RNA, years of therapy, and type of antiretroviral regimen were analyzed with respect to adherence. Results: At the time of the questionnaire, 89.8% of patients had <50 copies/mL HIV-RNA and 14.2% were on their first combined antiretroviral therapy. 57% of patients were prescribed a regimen containing ritonavir boosted protease inhibitors (boosted PI, 41.7% NNRTI, 17.2% raltegravir, and 4.8% maraviroc; 49.5% of the subjects were on bis-in-die regimens, while 50.5% were on once-daily regimens, with 23.1% of these on the single tablet regimen (STR: tenofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz. The non-adherence proportion was lower in NNRTI than in boosted-PI treatments (19.4% vs 30.2%, and even lower in STR patients (17.4%. In multivariable logistic regression, patients with the NNRTI regimen (OR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.34–0.94 and the STR (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22–0.92 reported lower non-adherence. Efavirenz regimens were also associated with lower non-adherence (OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21–0.83, while atazanavir/ritonavir regimens were associated with higher non-adherence. No other relation to specific antiretroviral drugs was found. A higher CD4 count, lower HIV-RNA, and older age were also found to be associated with lower non-adherence, while a longer time on

  13. Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroids and Patient Perception : Towards a better understanding and individualised care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menckeberg, T.T.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we aimed to further deepen knowledge on factors associated with nonadherence to provide means to improve adherence. We evaluated several methods of assessing adherence. At first, we evaluated the accuracy of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS), a structured method for eliciti

  14. Adherence and satisfaction of rheumatoid arthritis patients with a long-term intensive dynamic exercise program (RAPIT program).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.; Jong, Z. de; Zwinderman, A.H.; Jansen, A.; Ronday, H.K.; Peter, W.F.; Boonman, D.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate adherence and satisfaction of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a long-term intensive dynamic exercise program. METHODS: A total of 146 RA patients started an intensive (strength and endurance training for 75 minutes, twice a week, for 2 years) exercise program (Rheum

  15. Diet and Exercise Adherence and Practices among Medically Underserved Patients with Chronic Disease: Variation across Four Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, Kathryn M.; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative ("n" = 71) and quantitative ("n" = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study among patients with…

  16. Medication adherence and persistence in the treatment of Canadian ulcerative colitis patients: analyses with the RAMQ database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachaine Jean

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although high non-adherence to medication has been noticed for ulcerative colitis (UC, little is known about adherence to mesalamine treatments and determinants that can predict adherence. The objective of this study was to assess adherence and persistence to mesalamine treatments and their potential determinants in mild to moderate UC patients in a real-life setting in Quebec, Canada. Methods A retrospective prescription and medical claims analysis was conducted using a random sample of mesalamine users with UC. For inclusion, patients were required to initiate an oral mesalamine treatment between January 2005 and December 2009. Patients with a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease were excluded. Treatment adherence (medication possession ratio [MPR] and persistence were evaluated over a 1-year period after the index prescription using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test and stepwise regression to identify potential determinants. Results A sample of 1,681 of the new oral mesalamine users (mean age = 55.3 patients was obtained. Overall, the percentage of patients with a MPR of 80% or greater at 12 months was 27.7%, while persistence was 45.5%. Among patients treated with mesalamine delayed/extended-release tablets (Mezavant®, adherence and persistence were 40.9% and 71.9%, respectively. Predictors of high adherence included, male gender (OR=1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.1–1.6, older age (>60 years; OR=1.6; 95% CI=1.3–2.0 and current use of corticosteroids (OR=1.4; 95% CI=1.1–1.8. Predictors of high persistence included male sex (OR=1.4; 95% CI=1.1–1.7, current use of corticosteroids (OR=1.4; 95% CI=1.1–1.7 and presence of hypertension or respiratory diseases (OR=1.2; 95% CI=1.01–1.55. Conclusions The majority of patients with UC exhibited low adherence and persistence to mesalamine treatments. Various determinants of improved adherence and persistence were identified.

  17. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. T. Miller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (. The majority of participants were males (63%, black (93%, and Hispanic (11.4% and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%. Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%. The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%. Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE < 10. Ninety-six percent reported owning a mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily ( and use their phone for text messages (. The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication.

  18. “My patients are better than yours”: optimistic bias about patients’ medication adherence by European health care professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyne, Wendy; McLachlan, Sarah; Mshelia, Comfort; Jones, Peter; De Geest, Sabina; Ruppar, Todd; Siebens, Kaat; Dobbels, Fabienne; Kardas, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the perceptions of European physicians, nurses, and pharmacists about the extent of nonadherence by patients in their country relative to their perception of nonadherence by their own patients, and to investigate the occurrence of optimistic bias about medication adherence. The study explored a key cognitive bias for prevalence and likelihood estimates in the context of health care professionals’ beliefs about patients’ use of medicines. Methods A cross-sectional online survey of 3,196 physicians (855), nurses (1,294), and pharmacists (1,047) in ten European countries (Austria, Belgium, England, France, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, and Switzerland) was used. Results Participants differed in their perceptions of the prevalence of medication adherence initiation, implementation, and persistence present in their own patients with a chronic illness in comparison to patients with a chronic illness in general. Health care professionals demonstrated optimistic bias for initiation and persistence with medicine taking, perceiving their own patients to be more likely to initiate and persist with treatment than other patients, but reported significantly lower prevalence of medication adherence levels for their own patients than for patients in general. This finding is discussed in terms of motivational and cognitive factors that may foster optimistic bias by health care professionals about their patients, including heightened knowledge of, and positive beliefs about, their own professional competence and service delivery relative to care and treatment provided elsewhere. Conclusion Health care professionals in Europe demonstrated significant differences in their perceptions of medication adherence prevalence by their own patients in comparison to patients in general. Some evidence of optimistic bias by health care professionals about their patients’ behavior is observed. Further social

  19. Development of Motivate4Change Using the Intervention Mapping Protocol: An Interactive Technology Physical Activity and Medication Adherence Promotion Program for Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterom-Calo, Rony; te Velde, Saskia J; Stut, Wim; Brug, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Background It is important that heart failure (HF) patients adhere to their medication regimen and engage in physical activity. Evidence shows that adherence to these HF self-management behaviors can be improved with appropriate interventions. Objective To further promote medication adherence and physical activity among HF patients, we developed an intervention for hospitalized HF patients. Methods The intervention mapping protocol was applied in the development of the intervention. This enta...

  20. A randomized, controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a glaucoma patient navigator to improve appointment adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Hark, Lisa A.; Johnson, Deiana M; Berardi,Giuliana; Patel, Neal S.; Zeng, Lichuan; Dai, Yang; Mayro, Eileen L; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, L Jay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with glaucoma who do not keep their follow-up eye care appointments are at risk for developing more severe ocular disease. The primary aim of the current study was to evaluate whether the use of a patient navigator altered adherence to follow-up eye care appointments in community-versus office-based settings. Patients and methods Patients diagnosed with a glaucoma-related condition following a comprehensive eye examination at 43 community sites in Philadelphia, PA, USA, were ...

  1. Associations between adherence and outcomes among older, type 2 diabetes patients: evidence from a Medicare Supplemental database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boye KS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristina Secnik Boye,1 Sarah E Curtis,1 Maureen J Lage,2 Luis-Emilio Garcia-Perez3 1Global Patient Outcomes and Real World Evidence, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN, 2HealthMetrics Outcomes Research, LLC, Bonita Springs, FL, 3Global Medical Affairs, Lilly Diabetes, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: To examine the association between adherence to glucose-lowering agents and patient outcomes, including costs, acute-care resource utilization, and complications, in an older, type 2 diabetic population.Data and methods: The study used Truven’s Medicare Supplemental database from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2014. Patients aged 65 years or older were included if they had at least two type 2 diabetes diagnoses and received a glucose-lowering agent from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011. Multivariable analyses examined the relationships among 3-year patient outcomes and levels of adherence, proxied by the proportion of days covered. Outcomes included all-cause medical costs, diabetes-related medical costs, acute-care resource utilization, and acute complications.Results: In this study (N=123,235, higher adherence was linked to reduced costs and improved health outcomes. For example, comparing an individual with adherence of proportion of days covered <20% to one with proportion of days covered ≥80% illustrates an average saving of $28,824 in total 3-year costs. Furthermore, a 1% increase in adherence among 1,000 patients was associated with all-cause savings of $65,464 over 3 years. The probability of a hospitalization, an emergency room (ER visit, or an acute complication decreased monotonically as adherence levels got higher, as did the number of hospitalizations, ER visits, and days hospitalized (P<0.005.Conclusion: Higher adherence was associated with substantially less need for acute care, as indicated by a lowered probability of hospitalization or ER use, a reduced

  2. Evaluation of a community pharmacy-based intervention for improving patient adherence to antihypertensives: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDowell Jenny

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of patients using antihypertensive medications fail to achieve their recommended target blood pressure. Poor daily adherence with medication regimens and a lack of persistence with medication use are two of the major reasons for failure to reach target blood pressure. There is no single intervention to improve adherence with antihypertensives that is consistently effective. Community pharmacists are in an ideal position to promote adherence to chronic medications. This study aims to test a specific intervention package that could be integrated into the community pharmacy workflow to enable pharmacists to improve patient adherence and/or persistence with antihypertensive medications - Hypertension Adherence Program in Pharmacy (HAPPY. Methods/Design The HAPPY trial is a multi-centre prospective randomised controlled trial. Fifty-six pharmacies have been recruited from three Australian states. To identify potential patients, a software application (MedeMine CVD extracted data from a community pharmacy dispensing software system (FRED Dispense®. The pharmacies have been randomised to either 'Pharmacist Care Group' (PCG or 'Usual Care Group' (UCG. To check for 'Hawthorne effect' in the UCG, a third group of patients 'Hidden Control Group' (HCG will be identified in the UCG pharmacies, which will be made known to the pharmacists at the end of six months. Each study group requires 182 patients. Data will be collected at baseline, three and six months in the PCG and at baseline and six months in the UCG. Changes in patient adherence and persistence at the end of six months will be measured using the self-reported Morisky score, the Tool for Adherence Behaviour Screening and medication refill data. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first research testing a comprehensive package of evidence-based interventions that could be integrated into the community pharmacy workflow to enable pharmacists to improve patient

  3. Effect of pill burden on dosing preferences, willingness to pay, and likely adherence among patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauber AB

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A Brett Hauber,1 Steven Han,2,3 Jui-Chen Yang,1 Ira Gantz,2 Kaan Tunceli,2 Juan Marcos Gonzalez,1 Kimberly Brodovicz,2 Charles M Alexander,2 Michael Davies,2 Kristy Iglay,2 Qiaoyi Zhang,2 Larry Radican2 1Health Preference Assessment, Research Triangle Institute (RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Merck Sharp and Dohme Corporation, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Purpose: To quantify willingness-to-pay (WTP for reducing pill burden and dosing frequency among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and to examine the effect of dosing frequency and pill burden on likely medication adherence. Patients and methods: Participants were US adults with T2DM on oral antihyperglycemic therapy. Each patient completed an online discrete-choice experiment (DCE with eight choice questions, each including a pair of hypothetical medication profiles. Each profile was defined by reduction in average glucose (AG, daily dosing, chance of mild-to-moderate stomach problems, frequency of hypoglycemia, weight change, incremental risk of congestive heart failure (CHF, and cost. Patients were asked to rate their likely adherence to the profiles presented in each question. Choice questions were based on a predetermined experimental design. Choice data were analyzed using random-parameters logit. Likely treatment adherence was analyzed using a Heckman two-stage model. Results: Of the 1,114 patients who completed the survey, 90 had lower dosing burden (<5 pills/day taken once/day or as needed for all medications, and 1,024 had higher dosing burden (≥5 pills/day or more than once/day. Reduction in AG was valued most highly by patients. Hypoglycemia, chance of mild-to-moderate stomach problems, weight change, incremental risk of CHF, and daily dosing were less valued. Patients with higher current dosing burden had lower WTP for more convenient dosing schedules than patients with lower current dosing burden

  4. Stroke and TIA survivors’ cognitive beliefs and affective responses regarding treatment and future stroke risk differentially predict medication adherence and categorised stroke risk

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, L. Alison; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Abrams, Jessica; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive beliefs and affective responses to illness and treatment are known to independently predict health behaviours. The purpose of the current study is to assess the relative importance of four psychological domains – specifically, affective illness, cognitive illness, affective treatment and cognitive treatment – for predicting stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) survivors’ adherence to stroke prevention medications as well as their objective, categorised stroke risk. We assessed...

  5. Do patients adhere to over-the-counter artemisinin combination therapy for malaria? evidence from an intervention study in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Jessica L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing affordability of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT in the African retail sector could be critical to expanding access to effective malaria treatment, but must be balanced by efforts to protect the efficacy of these drugs. Previous research estimates ACT adherence rates among public sector patients, but adherence among retail sector purchasers could differ substantially. This study aimed to estimate adherence rates to subsidized, over-the-counter ACT in rural Uganda. Methods An intervention study was conducted with four licensed drug shops in Eastern Uganda in December 2009. Artemether-lumefantrine (AL was made available for sale at a 95% subsidy over-the counter. Customers completed a brief survey at the time of purchase and then were randomly assigned to one of three study arms: no follow-up, follow-up after two days or follow-up after three days. Surveyors recorded the number of pills remaining through blister pack observation or through self-report if the pack was unavailable. The purpose of the three-day follow-up arm was to capture non-adherence in the sense of an incomplete treatment course ("under-dosing". The purpose of the two-day follow-up arm was to capture whether participants completed the full course too soon ("over-dosing". Results Of the 106 patients in the two-day follow-up sample, 14 (13.2% had finished the entire treatment course by the second day. Of the 152 patients in the three-day follow-up sample, 49 (32.2% were definitely non-adherent, three (2% were probably non-adherent and 100 (65.8% were probably adherent. Among the 52 who were non-adherent, 31 (59.6% had more than a full day of treatment remaining. Conclusions Overall, adherence to subsidized ACT purchased over-the-counter was found to be moderate. Further, a non-trivial fraction of those who complete treatment are taking the full course too quickly. Strategies to increase adherence in the retail sector are needed in the context of

  6. The impact of ribavirin on real-world adherence rates in hepatitis C patients treated with sofosbuvir plus simeprevir

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    Walker DR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available David R Walker, Timothy R Juday, Shivaji R Manthena, Yonghua Jing, Vipan Sood Health Economics and Outcomes Research, AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA Background: Combination therapy with sofosbuvir (SOF and simeprevir (SIM is used to treat patients with hepatitis C virus infection. It is currently unknown whether adding ribavirin (RBV to SOF + SIM, which raises the pill count from two up to eight pills a day, impacts adherence. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of pill count on real-world adherence rates in patients treated with SOF + SIM with and without RBV. Methods: This retrospective study assessed composite adherence to SOF and SIM over 12 weeks of treatment for two cohorts of hepatitis C patients: one initiating SOF + SIM therapy, and the other initiating SOF + SIM + RBV therapy. Analyses were conducted using MarketScan® and Optum US commercial pharmacy claims and enrollment data. Adherence was adjusted by treatment regimen, age, sex, co-pay, presence/absence of cirrhosis, treatment history, and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results: There was a significant difference in composite unadjusted and adjusted adherence rates for SOF and SIM for the SOF + SIM vs SOF + SIM + RBV cohorts based on MarketScan data (unadjusted, 92.6% and 89.7%, respectively; P=0.0423; adjusted, 92.2% and 88.7%, respectively; P=0.0176, but not based on Optum data (unadjusted, 94.8% and 95.6%, respectively; P=0.5618; adjusted, 94.8% and 95.1%, respectively; P=0.8589. In the MarketScan and Optum databases, there were no statistical differences in unadjusted and adjusted adherence rates for SOF. Unadjusted and adjusted adherence rates for SIM were mixed, as they were for composite adherence. Conclusion: The impact of the addition of RBV to SOF + SIM therapy was mixed. The impact of RBV on SOF adherence was not significant in either database. Keywords: adherence, hepatitis C, direct acting antiviral, sofosbuvir, simeprevir, ribavirin

  7. Impact of symptomatic hypoglycemia on medication adherence, patient satisfaction with treatment, and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Walz L

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lotta Walz,1,3 Billie Pettersson,2,3 Ulf Rosenqvist,4 Anna Deleskog,3,5 Gunilla Journath,6 Per Wändell7 1Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 2Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, 3Merck Sharp and Dohme (Sweden AB, Sollentuna, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Motala Hospital, Motala, 5Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, 6Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 7Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Centre for Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of symptomatic hypoglycemia on medication adherence, satisfaction with treatment, and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes based on the treatment goals stated in the Swedish national guidelines. Methods: This cross-sectional, multicenter study was carried out between January and August 2009 in 430 consecutive primary health care patients on stable doses of metformin and sulfonylureas for at least 6 months. The patients completed questionnaires covering their experiences of low blood glucose and adherence, as well as barriers to and satisfaction with drug treatment (using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication. Physicians collected the data from medical records. Results: Patients who experienced moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia reported poorer adherence to medication (46% versus 67%; P<0.01 and were more likely to perceive barriers such as “bothered by medication side effects” (36% versus 14%; P<0.001 compared with patients with no or mild symptoms. Patients with moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia were less satisfied with their treatment than those with no or mild symptoms as determined by the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-Global satisfaction (67.0 versus 71.2; P<0.05. Overall, achievement of target glycated hemoglobin

  8. Adherence to an overweight and obesity treatment: how to motivate a patient?

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    Isaac Kuzmar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore anthropometric changes in normal-weight, overweight and obese subjects who did not dropout or fail a weight loss program over the 16 treatment weeks to improve patient motivation and treatment adherence. Methods. A clinical intervention study was conducted among 271 (including 100 dropouts and/or failures obese and overweight patients who consulted a nutrition clinic in Barranquilla (Colombia for the purpose of nutritional assessment. They were subject to a personalized weekly follow-up consultation over the course of 16 weeks in which initial and the final Body Mass Index (BMI, kg/m2, photographs, food consumption patterns, percentage weight loss, waist and hip circumference were registered and grouped according to BMI, measuring treatment response. Data’s nonparametric statistical comparison was made. Results. In 62 patients from the BMI 30 group, there is weight loss of 4.8% (3.7 SD, 7.0% (3.6 SD in waist circumference loss and 3.9% (2.4 SD in hip circumference loss. Monitoring is done every 4 weeks by the Friedman test, with significant differences between the three groups (p < 0.001. Patients do not drop out of treatment because they start to see physical results in waist decrease. When comparing final values of initial waist/hip circumference ratios and waist/height ratios, a clear decrease in the three BMI groups was observed (p < 0.001. Conclusion. After three weeks of continuous treatment patients improved in all overweight and obesity parameter indicators; there were not statistically significant differences in hip circumference (HC and waist loss (WC (% among the three BMI groups (normal-weight, overweight, and obesity. In contrast, there were statistically significant differences in weight loss (% and waist-to-hip ratios. Based on anthropometric outcomes and patient perception of their body image it can be concluded that the waist circumference loss is the parameter that retains obese patients in the weight

  9. Impact of patient programs on adherence and persistence in inflammatory and immunologic diseases: a meta-analysis

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    Burudpakdee C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chakkarin Burudpakdee,1,2 Zeba M Khan,3 Smeet Gala,1 Merena Nanavaty,1 Satyin Kaura3 1Market Access Solutions, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USA; 2University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA; 3Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ, USA Objectives: Patient adherence and persistence is important to improve outcomes in chronic conditions, including inflammatory and immunologic (I&I diseases. Patient programs that aim at improving medication adherence or persistence play an essential role in optimizing care. This meta-analysis assessed the effectiveness of patient programs in the therapeutic area of I&I diseases.Methods: A global systematic literature review was conducted with inclusion criteria of: patient programs in I&I diseases; published in English language between January 2008 and September 2013; and reporting measures of adherence or persistence, including medication possession ratio >80% and persistence rate. A meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model. Subgroup analyses based on the type of program was performed whenever feasible.Results: Of 67 studies reviewed for eligibility, a total of 17 studies qualified for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Overall, patient programs increased adherence (odds ratio [OR]=2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.68–3.64, P<0.00001 as compared with standard of care. Combination patient programs that used both informational and behavioral strategies were superior in improving adherence (OR=3.68, 95% CI=2.20–6.16, P<0.00001 compared with programs that used only informational (OR=2.16, 95% CI=1.36–3.44, P=0.001 or only behavioral approaches (OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.00–3.45, P=0.05. Additionally, patients were more likely to be persistent (OR=2.26, 95% CI=1.16–4.39, P=0.02 in the intervention group as compared with the control group. Persistence (in days was significantly (P=0.007 longer, by 42 additional days, in the intervention group than in the control group.Conclusions: Patient programs can

  10. Improving physician's adherence to completing vaccination schedules for patients with type 2 diabetes attending non-communicable diseases clinics in West Bay Health Center, Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Hassan; Bashwar, Zelaikha; Al-Ali, Amal; Salem, Mohamed; Abdelbagi, Isameldin

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete vaccination for patients with type 2 diabetes attending non-communicable diseases (NCD) clinics is an issue that could affect patient's health and wellness negatively and puts patients at high risk of serious diseases. We aimed to improve physicians adherence to complete vaccination schedule for patients with type 2 diabetes attending NCD clinics in west bay health center according to American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendation by 25% by January 2015. In the pre-intervention phase: the quality improvement team designed a checklist to collect the percentage of physician's adherence of prescription of the recommended vaccination for patients with type 2 diabetes. The percentage of complete vaccination in patients with diabetes attending NCD clinic in West Bay Health Center was 20% . In the intervention phase the intervention was in the form of: the creation a vaccination form and attached to the (NCD) progress note; to distribute and remind the physicians about the ADA guidelines vaccination recommendations; a summary of the vaccination schedule developed and attached to (NCD) form; development of vaccination reminder posters and posters in the waiting area, nurse station, and physician clinics and education and orientation sessions for NCD clinic staff. In the post-intervention phase the average percentage of complete vaccination in patients with diabetes attending NCD clinic in West Bay Health Center increased to 69%.

  11. Medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem among psychiatric patients attending psychosocial rehabilitation services at Bangalore, India

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    Sailaxmi Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Work benefits mental health in innumerable ways. Vocational rehabilitation can enhance self-esteem. Medication adherence can improve work performance and thereby the individuals′ self-esteem. Aim: To test the hypothesis that there would be a significant correlation between medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem. Setting and Design: A quantitative, descriptive correlational research design was adopted to invite patients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services to participate in the research. Material and Methods: Data was collected from a convenience sample of 60 subjects using the ′Medication Adherence Rating scale′, ′Griffiths work behaviour scale′ and the ′Rosenberg′s Self-esteem scale′. Statistical analysis used: Analysis was done using spss18 with descriptive statistics, Pearsons correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results: There were 36 males and 24 females who participated in this study. The subjects had good mean medication adherence of 8.4 ± 1.5 with median of 9.00, high mean self-esteem of 17.65 ± 2.97 with median of 18.0 and good mean work performance of 88.62 ± 22.56 with median of 93.0. Although weak and not significant, there was a positive correlation (r = 0.22, P = 0.103 between medication adherence and work performance; positive correlation between (r = 0.25, P = 0.067 medication adherence and self-esteem; positive correlation between (r = 0.136, P = 0.299 work performance and self-esteem. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant predictors for medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem among patients with psychiatric illness. Conclusions: Medication monitoring and strengthening of work habit can improve self-esteem thereby, strengthening hope of recovery from illness.

  12. Medication adherence in patients with diabetes mellitus: does physician drug dispensing enhance quality of care? Evidence from a large health claims database in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Carola A; Reich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The drug-dispensing channel is a scarcely explored determinant of medication adherence, which is considered as a key indicator for the quality of care among patients with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we investigated the difference in adherence between diabetes patients who obtained their medication directly from a prescribing physician (physician dispensing [PD]) or via a pharmacy. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large health care claims database from 2011 to 2014. Patients with diabetes of all ages and receiving at least one oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) prescription were included. We calculated patients’ individual adherence to OADs defined as the proportion of days covered (PDC), which was measured over 1 year after patient identification. Good adherence was defined as PDC ≥80%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the PDC and the dispensing channel (PD, pharmacy). Results We identified a total of 10,430 patients prescribed drugs by a dispensing physician and 16,292 patients receiving drugs from a pharmacy. Medication adherence was poor in both patient groups: ~40% of the study population attained good adherence to OADs. We found no significant impact of PD on the adherence level in diabetes patients. Covariates associated significantly with good adherence were older age groups, male sex, occurrence of comorbidity and combined diabetes drug therapy. Conclusion In conclusion, adherence to antihyperglycemic medication is suboptimal among patients with diabetes. The results of this study provide evidence that the dispensing channel does not have an impact on adherence in Switzerland. Certainly, medication adherence needs to be improved in both supply settings. Physicians as well as pharmacists are encouraged to develop and implement useful tools to increase patients’ adherence behavior. PMID:27695299

  13. Medication adherence in patients with diabetes mellitus: does physician drug dispensing enhance quality of care? Evidence from a large health claims database in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Carola A; Reich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The drug-dispensing channel is a scarcely explored determinant of medication adherence, which is considered as a key indicator for the quality of care among patients with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we investigated the difference in adherence between diabetes patients who obtained their medication directly from a prescribing physician (physician dispensing [PD]) or via a pharmacy. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large health care claims database from 2011 to 2014. Patients with diabetes of all ages and receiving at least one oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) prescription were included. We calculated patients’ individual adherence to OADs defined as the proportion of days covered (PDC), which was measured over 1 year after patient identification. Good adherence was defined as PDC ≥80%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the PDC and the dispensing channel (PD, pharmacy). Results We identified a total of 10,430 patients prescribed drugs by a dispensing physician and 16,292 patients receiving drugs from a pharmacy. Medication adherence was poor in both patient groups: ~40% of the study population attained good adherence to OADs. We found no significant impact of PD on the adherence level in diabetes patients. Covariates associated significantly with good adherence were older age groups, male sex, occurrence of comorbidity and combined diabetes drug therapy. Conclusion In conclusion, adherence to antihyperglycemic medication is suboptimal among patients with diabetes. The results of this study provide evidence that the dispensing channel does not have an impact on adherence in Switzerland. Certainly, medication adherence needs to be improved in both supply settings. Physicians as well as pharmacists are encouraged to develop and implement useful tools to increase patients’ adherence behavior.

  14. Adherence to antidepressants

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    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  15. Adherence, persistence, and medication discontinuation in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder – a systematic literature review

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    Gajria K

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Kavita Gajria,1 Mei Lu,2 Vanja Sikirica,1 Peter Greven,3,4 Yichen Zhong,2 Paige Qin,2 Jipan Xie2 1Global Health Economics, Outcomes Research and Epidemiology, Shire, Wayne, PA, USA; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Analysis Group, Inc., Boston, MA, USA; 3Institute of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Social Pediatrics, Berlin, Germany; 4Department of Psychology and Mental Health, H:G University of Health and Sport, Technology and Arts, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Untreated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD can lead to substantial adverse social, economic, and emotional outcomes for patients. The effectiveness of current pharmacologic treatments is often reduced, due to low treatment adherence and medication discontinuation. This current systematic literature review analyzes the current state of knowledge surrounding ADHD medication discontinuation, focusing on: 1 the extent of patient persistence; 2 adherence; and 3 the underlying reasons for patients’ treatment discontinuation and how discontinuation rates and reasons vary across patient subgroups. We selected 91 original studies (67 with persistence/discontinuation results, 26 with adherence results, and 41 with reasons for discontinuation, switching, or nonadherence and 36 expert opinion reviews on ADHD medication discontinuation, published from 1990 to 2013. Treatment persistence on stimulants, measured by treatment duration during the 12-month follow-up periods, averaged 136 days for children and adolescents and 230 days for adults. Owing to substantial study heterogeneity, comparisons across age or medication type subgroups were generally inconclusive; however, long-acting formulations and amphetamines were associated with longer treatment duration than short-acting formulations and methylphenidates. The medication possession ratio, used to measure adherence, was <0.7 for all age groups and medication classes during a 12-month period. Adverse

  16. Perceived need to take medication is associated with medication non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Zwikker HE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hanneke E Zwikker,1,2 Sandra van Dulmen,3–5 Alfons A den Broeder,1,2 Bart J van den Bemt,1,2,6 Cornelia H van den Ende1,2 1Department of Rheumatology, 2Department of Pharmacy, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 3Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 4NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 5Department of Health Science, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Drammen, Norway; 6Department of Pharmacy, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Background: This is the first cross-sectional study that aims to examine associations between beliefs about medication and non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, taking potential psychological confounders into account.Methods: Eligible patients (diagnosed with RA for ≥1 year or ≥18 years, using greater than or equal to one disease-modifying antirheumatic drug were included by their rheumatologist during regular outpatient visits between September 2009 and September 2010. Included patients received questionnaires. The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire was used to measure the perceived need to take medication (necessity beliefs, the concerns about taking medication (concern beliefs, general medication beliefs, and attitudes toward taking medication. Medication non-adherence (no/yes was measured using the Compliance Questionnaire Rheumatology (CQR. Associations between beliefs and non-adherence, and the influence of demographical, clinical, and psychological factors (symptoms of anxiety/depression, illness cognitions, self-efficacy were assessed using logistic regression.Results: A total of 580 of the 820 eligible patients willing to participate were included in the analyses (68% female, mean age 63 years, 30% non-adherent to their medication. Weaker necessity beliefs (OR [odds ratio]: 0.8, 95% CI

  17. Dissemination strategies and adherence predictors for web-based interventions-how efficient are patient education sessions and email reminders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweier, R; Romppel, M; Richter, C; Grande, G

    2016-06-01

    The Internet offers the potential to efficaciously deliver health interventions at a low cost and with a low threshold across any distance. However, since many web-based interventions are confronted with low use and adherence, proactive dissemination strategies are needed. We, therefore, tested the efficacy of a 1-h patient education session as part of a rehabilitation program and an email reminder 4 weeks later on the publicity and use of a web-based intervention aimed at lifestyle changes in patients with either coronary heart disease or chronic back pain (CBP) and examined adherence predictors. The website www.lebensstil-aendern.de is a cost-free, German-language website providing more than 1000 patient narratives about successful lifestyle changes. To test the efficacy of the dissemination strategies and to examine adherence predictors, we conducted a sequential controlled trial with heart and CBP patients recruited from German inpatient rehabilitation centers. The dissemination strategies were found to be efficient. Use rates, however, remained low. The email reminder and internal health locus of control emerged as notable factors in motivating patients to participate in the web-based intervention. Other factors that have been suggested to be related to nonuse, e.g. sociodemographic characteristics and medical condition, did not predict use or adherence. PMID:27107431

  18. Cross-cultural adaptation to Brazil of Medication Adherence Rating Scale for psychiatric patients

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    Icaro Carvalho Moreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this research was to make a cross-cultural adaptation of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS for psychiatric patients to the Brazilian context. Methods The procedure consisted of four phases: translation of the original scale, back-translation, review by an Expert Committee and Pre-test study with a patients’ sample. Results The Expert Committee corrected the items’ translation when necessary and modified the scale administration format and its instructions from self-report to face-to-face interview form in order to ensure easy understanding by the target population. During Pre-test, the instructions and most of the items were properly understood by patients, with the exception of three of them which had to be changed in order to ensure better understanding. The Pre-test sample was composed by 30 psychiatric patients, with severe and persistent disorders mainly single (46.7%, female (60.0%, with a mean age of 43.8 years old and an average of five years of education. Conclusion The Brazilian version of MARS scale is now adapted to the Brazilian Portuguese language and culture and is easily understood by the psychiatric target population. It is necessary to do further research to evaluate the scale psychometric qualities of validity and reliability in order to use it in Brazil.

  19. A consensus approach to improving patient adherence and persistence with topical treatment for actinic keratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockfleth, Eggert; Peris, Ketty; Guillen, Carlos; Cerio, Rino; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Foley, Peter; Sanches, José; Culshaw, Alex; Erntoft, Sandra; Lebwohl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Topical therapy is important in the treatment of actinic keratosis, but guidance for improving adherence/persistence during topical therapy is still lacking. Objectives To utilize expert consensus to generate a list of recommendations to improve real-world efficacy when prescribing topical therapy for actinic keratosis. Methods An expert panel of eight dermatologists was convened to generate recommendations based on facilitated discussion and consensus generation using a modified Delphi session. The recommendations were ratified with the expert panel. Results Facilitated discussion generated 31 issues within five themes, which were prioritized using expert voting. Consensus was achieved on the importance of short and simple treatment regimens for maximizing patient compliance, physician awareness of the progression of actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma, provision of appropriate patient information, and the use of effective communication strategies to educate physicians about actinic keratosis. Based on these key findings, eight recommendations were generated. Conclusions The recommendations will assist physicians when prescribing topical actinic keratosis therapy. Further research should focus on the types of patient outcomes that are influenced by the characteristics of topical field therapy. PMID:25865875

  20. A Qualitative Study of Patient Motivation to Adhere to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    van Loggerenberg, F; Gray, D.; Gengiah, S; Kunene, P; Gengiah, TN; Naidoo, K.; Grant, AD

    2015-01-01

    Taken as prescribed, that is, with high adherence, combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV infection and disease from being a sure predictor of death to a manageable chronic illness. Adherence, however, is difficult to achieve and maintain. The CAPRISA 058 study was conducted between 2007 and 2009 to test the efficacy of individualized motivational counselling to enhance ART adherence in South Africa. As part of the overall trial, a qualitative sub-study was conducted, includ...

  1. Treatment adherence and other patient-reported outcomes as cost determinants in multiple sclerosis: a review of the literature

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    Lizán L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Luis Lizán,1 Marta Comellas,1 Silvia Paz,1 José Luis Poveda,2 Dennis M Meletiche,3 Carlos Polanco4 1Outcomes’10, Castellón, Spain; 2Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 3EMD Serono Inc., Rockland, MA, USA; 4Merck S.L., Madrid, SpainBackground: Treatment adherence is one of the key factors for achieving optimal clinical outcomes. In order to assess costs related to adherence to, and persistence and compliance with, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, a narrative review of the literature was performed. Satisfaction with and preference for DMTs and their delivery devices were also assessed, as both can have an influence on patients’ adherence and persistence. Methods: Electronic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, congress proceedings were searched to identify publications analyzing MS costs related to adherence, persistence, satisfaction, and preferences for MS treatments. Bibliographic references were hand searched. English or Spanish studies published between January 2007 and January 2013 were selected. Results: A total of 398 titles were identified, of which 12 met the inclusion criteria. Six studies evaluated the impact of adherence, persistence, and compliance on treatment costs; four publications analyzed satisfaction with DMTs; and two assessed treatment preferences based on attributes of the delivery device. Increased adherence and persistence were associated with better clinical outcomes, leading to lower relapse risk (odds ratio [OR]: 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59–0.85 and a decrease in health care resource use, such as MS-related hospitalizations (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47–0.83 and emergency department visits (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.60–1.07. This reduction in resource use led to a patient/year total cost reduction (excluding DMT costs of up to 22%. Conclusion: This review highlights the importance of ensuring adequate adherence in MS patients through treatments

  2. A technology-enabled adherence enhancement system for people with bipolar disorder: results from a feasibility and patient acceptance analysis

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    Sajatovic M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Martha Sajatovic,1 Michael S Davis,2 Kristin A Cassidy,3 Joseph Nestor,2 Johnny Sams,3 Edna Fuentes-Casiano3 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurological and Behavioral Outcomes Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2MedicaSafe, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA Objective: As poor medication adherence is common in bipolar disorder (BD, technology-assisted approaches may help to monitor and enhance adherence. This study evaluated preliminary feasibility, patient satisfaction and effects on adherence, BD knowledge, and BD symptoms associated with the use of a multicomponent technology-assisted adherence enhancement system. Methods: This prospective study tested the system in five BD patients over a 15-day period. System components included: 1 an automated pill cap with remote monitoring sensor; 2 a multimedia adherence enhancement program; and 3 a treatment incentive program. This study evaluated system usability, patient satisfaction and effects on adherence (Morisky scale, knowledge (treatment knowledge test [TKT], and symptoms (internal state scale [ISS]. Results: Mean age of the sample was 62 years, 4/5 (80% Caucasian, and 4/5 (80% single/divorced or widowed. Most participants (4/5, 80% were on a single BD medication. Participants had BD for an average of 21 years. Challenges included attaching the pill sensor to standard pharmacy bottles for individuals using very large pill containers or those with multiday pill boxes. Three of five (60% individuals completed the full 15-day period. Usability scores were high overall. Mean Morisky scores improved. Means on all four subscales of the ISS were all in the direction of improvement. On the TKT, there was a 40% increase in mean scores. Conclusion: A multicomponent technology-assisted BD

  3. Non-adherence to diet and exercise recommendations amongst patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending Extension II Clinic in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Ganiyu, Adewale B.; Mabuza, Langalibalele H.; Nomsa H. Malete; Indiran Govender; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Extension II Clinic in Botswana have difficulty in adhering to the lifestyle modifications recommended by healthcare practitioners. Poor adherence to lifestyle recommendations leads to poor control of the condition and consequently to complications.Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine reasons for poor adherence to lifestyle recommendations amongst the patients. The objectives were to determine: reasons for pooradhere...

  4. Patient education improves adherence to peg-interferon and ribavirin in chronic genotype 2 or 3 hepatitis C virus infection: A prospective, real-life, observational study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrice Cacoub; Denis Ouzan; Pascal Melin; Jean-Philippe Lang; Michel Rotily; Thierry Fontanges; Marina Varastet; Michel Chousterman; Patrick Marcellin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of therapeutic education on adherence to antiviral treatment and sustained virological response (SVR) in a real-life setting in genotype 2/3 hepatitis C, as there are few adherence data in genotype 2/3 infection, even from randomized trials. METHODS: This prospective survey included genotype 2/3 patients who received peg-interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. There was no intervention. Adherence was self-reported over the past 4 wk (peg-interferon) or 7 d (ribavirin). Adherence to bitherapy was defined as adherence to the two drugs for≥20 wk. SVR was defined as undetectable RNA≥12 wk after the end of treatment. RESULTS: 370/674 patients received education during the first 3 mo of treatment. After 6 mo, adherence to bitherapy was higher in educated patients (61% vs 47%, P=0.01). Adherence to peg-interferon was 78% vs 69% (P=0.06). Adherence to ribavirin was 70% vs 56% (P=0.006). The SVR (77% vs 70%, P = 0.05) and relapse (10% w 16%, P = 0.09) rates tended to be improved. After adjustment for baseline differences, education improved adherence [Odds ratio (OR) 1.58, P=0.04] but not the SVR (OR 1.54, P=0.06). CONCLUSION: In genotype 2/3 patients, therapeutic education helped maintain real-life adherence to bitherapy.

  5. Adherence to HAART: a systematic review of developed and developing nation patient-reported barriers and facilitators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Mills

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART medication is the greatest patient-enabled predictor of treatment success and mortality for those who have access to drugs. We systematically reviewed the literature to determine patient-reported barriers and facilitators to adhering to antiretroviral therapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We examined both developed and developing nations. We searched the following databases: AMED (inception to June 2005, Campbell Collaboration (inception to June 2005, CinAhl (inception to June 2005, Cochrane Library (inception to June 2005, Embase (inception to June 2005, ERIC (inception to June 2005, MedLine (inception to June 2005, and NHS EED (inception to June 2005. We retrieved studies conducted in both developed and developing nation settings that examined barriers and facilitators addressing adherence. Both qualitative and quantitative studies were included. We independently, in duplicate, extracted data reported in qualitative studies addressing adherence. We then examined all quantitative studies addressing barriers and facilitators noted from the qualitative studies. In order to place the findings of the qualitative studies in a generalizable context, we meta-analyzed the surveys to determine a best estimate of the overall prevalence of issues. We included 37 qualitative studies and 47 studies using a quantitative methodology (surveys. Seventy-two studies (35 qualitative were conducted in developed nations, while the remaining 12 (two qualitative were conducted in developing nations. Important barriers reported in both economic settings included fear of disclosure, concomitant substance abuse, forgetfulness, suspicions of treatment, regimens that are too complicated, number of pills required, decreased quality of life, work and family responsibilities, falling asleep, and access to medication. Important facilitators reported by patients in developed nation settings included having a sense of

  6. Medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders: an observational survey involving patients before they switch to long-acting injectable risperidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baylé FJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Franck Jean Baylé,1 Arnaud Tessier,2,3 Sophie Bouju,4 David Misdrahi2,3 1Sainte-Anne Hospital (SHU, Paris V-Descartes University, Paris, 2Hôpital Charles Perrens, Pôle de Psychiatrie Adulte, 3CNRS UMR 5287-INCIA, Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, 4Janssen-Cilag France, Issy Les Moulineaux, Paris, France Background: Maintaining antipsychotic therapy in psychosis is important in preventing relapse. Long-acting depot preparations can prevent covert non-adherence and thus potentially contribute to better patient outcomes. In this observational survey the main objective is to evaluate medication adherence and its determinants for oral treatment in a large sample of patients with psychosis.Methods: In this cross-sectional survey medication adherence for oral treatment was assessed by patients using the patient-rated Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ. Data were collected by physicians on patients with a recent acute psychotic episode before switching to long-acting injectable risperidone. Other evaluations included disease severity (Clinical Global Impression – Severity, patients’ insight (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale item G12, treatment acceptance (clinician-rated Compliance Rating Scale, and therapeutic alliance (patient-rated 4-Point ordinal Alliance Scale.Results: A total of 399 psychiatrists enrolled 1,887 patients (mean age 36.8±11.9 years; 61.6% had schizophrenia. Adherence to oral medication was “low” in 53.2% of patients, “medium” in 29.5%, and “high” in 17.3%. Of patients with psychiatrist-rated active acceptance of treatment, 70% had “medium” or “high” MAQ scores (P<0.0001. Medication adherence was significantly associated with therapeutic alliance (4-Point ordinal Alliance Scale score; P<0.0001. Patient age was significantly associated with adherence: mean age increased with greater adherence (35.6, 36.7, and 38.6 years for patients with “low”, “medium”, and “high” levels of adherence

  7. Health status, adherence with health recommendations, self-efficacy and social support in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, Erik; Rasker, Johannes J.; Seydel, Erwin; Wiegman, Oene

    1993-01-01

    A study was performed in 86 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to assess their health problems, the problems they experience in adhering to health recommendations and the relationships of these problems with self-efficacy and social support. Feeling dependent, disability and pain were the most

  8. Dissemination Strategies and Adherence Predictors for Web-Based Interventions--How Efficient Are Patient Education Sessions and Email Reminders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweier, R.; Romppel, M.; Richter, C.; Grande, G.

    2016-01-01

    The Internet offers the potential to efficaciously deliver health interventions at a low cost and with a low threshold across any distance. However, since many web-based interventions are confronted with low use and adherence, proactive dissemination strategies are needed. We, therefore, tested the efficacy of a 1-h patient education session as…

  9. Validation of the Persian Version of the 8-Item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) in Iranian Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharamzad, Yashar; Saadat, Habibollah; Nakhjavan Shahraki, Babak; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Morisky, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    The reliability and validity of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was assessed in a sample of Iranian hypertensive patients. In this multi-center study which lasted from August to October 2014, a total of 200 patients who were suffering from hypertension (HTN) and were taking anti-hypertensive medication(s) were included. The cases were accessed through private and university health centers in the cities of Tehran, Karaj, Kermanshah, and Bafgh in Iran and were interviewed face-to-face by the research team. The validated Persian translation of the MMAS-8 was provided by the owner of this scale. This scale contains 7 questions with "Yes" or "No" response choices and an additional Likert-type question (totally 8 questions). The total score ranges from 0 to 8 with higher scores reflecting better medication adherence. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.57 (±1.86). There were 108 (54%), 62 (31%), and 30 (15%) patients in the low, moderate, and high adherence groups. Internal consistency was acceptable with an overall Cronbach's ? coefficient of 0.697 and test-retest reliability showed good reproducibility (r= 0.940); Ptool in future studies to determine medication adherence of Persian-speaking patients with chronic conditions. PMID:25946926

  10. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beto JA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Judith A Beto, Katherine A Schury, Vinod K Bansal Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Healthcare System, Loyola University of Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coordinates multiple diet components including calories, protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and fluid. Dietary intake studies have shown difficulty in adhering to the scope and complexity of the CKD diet parameters. No single educational or clinical strategy has been shown to be consistently effective across CKD populations. Highest adherence has been observed when both diet and education efforts are individualized to each patient and adapted over time to changing lifestyle and CKD variables. This narrative review and commentary summarizes nutrition education literature and published strategies for providing nutritional advice in CKD. A cohort of practical and effective strategies for increasing dietary adherence to nutritional advice are provided that include communicating with "talking control" principles, integrating patient-owned technology, acknowledging the typical food pattern may be snacking rather than formal meals, focusing on a single goal rather than multiple goals, creating active learning and coping strategies (frozen sandwiches, visual hands-on activities, planting herb gardens, and involving the total patient food environment. Keywords: talking control, technology-enhanced learning, hemodialysis, nutrition education, education strategies

  11. Perceived need to take medication is associated with medication non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwikker, H.E.; Dulmen, S. van; Broeder, A.A. den; Bemt, B.J.F van den; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This is the first cross-sectional study that aims to examine associations between beliefs about medication and non-adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, taking potential psychological confounders into account. METHODS: Eligible

  12. Long-term adherence to CPAP treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: importance of educational program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Piana GE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Emanuele La Piana1, Alessandro Scartabellati1, Lodovico Chiesa1, Luca Ronchi1, Paola Raimondi1, Miriam A Carro1, Silvia Zibetti1, Stefano Aiolfi2 1Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit, S. Marta Hospital, Rivolta D'Adda; 2Unit of Pneumology, AO Ospedale Maggiore di Crema, Crema, Italy Background: Lack of adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy is the major cause of treatment failure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. We evaluated the effectiveness of our intensive educational program on adherence in the short term and the long term. Methods: The educational program consisted of: intensive training, whereby each patient performed individual and collective sessions of three hours receiving information about obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, familiarizing themselves with CPAP tools, on six consecutive days; long-term training; and support meetings, with reassessment at three months and one year. Results: In 202 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, the mean (standard deviation apnea/hypopnea index was 45 ± 22, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 14 ± 5, and the average titration pressure was 10 ± 2 cm H2O. At three months, 166 patients (82% used CPAP for an average of 7.3 hours per night. At one year, 162 (80% used CPAP for about seven hours per night. At two years, 92 patients (43% used CPAP for about five hours per night. The level of satisfaction remained higher in patients in ventilation. Conclusion: Our data show strong adherence to CPAP at three months and one year, with a decrease at two years. The initial educational program seems to play an important role in adherence. This effect is lost in the long term, suggesting that periodic reinforcement of educational support would be helpful. Keywords: adherence, continuous positive airway pressure, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, educational program

  13. Blood pressure levels and adherence to treatment of hypertensive patients, users of a school pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Rieckmann Martins dos Santos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to pharmacological treatment for hypertension is considered a key factor in guaranteeing successful therapy outcomes. Knowledge of the disease, its complications, as well as the need for changes in lifestyle, call for patient motivation and continuous interactive education. The evidence regarding the beneficial effects of changes in life style by hypertensive individuals in reducing the complications of the disease, as well as in its prevention are indisputable. However, the challenges posed by patient adherence to treatment prescribed by doctors remain. The aim of this study was to assess blood pressure levels together with degree of adherence to pharmacological treatment with Enalapril Maleate by means of the Morisky-Green Test, in hypertensive patients who were users of a School Pharmacy. Of the 102 patients interviewed, 65.7% had controlled blood pressure, but only 36.3% indicated total compliance with the pharmacological treatment. The Morisky-Green test proved ineffective in associating controlled blood pressure levels and positive attitudes toward taking antihypertensive medicines.A adesão ao tratamento farmacológico da hipertensão arterial sistêmica é considerada uma das etapas essenciais para a garantia do seu sucesso. Para tanto, o conhecimento da doença, suas complicações e necessidade de mudanças em relação ao estilo de vida, requer do paciente, além da motivação, a educação contínua e de modo compartilhado. A evidência quanto aos efeitos benéficos da mudança do estilo de vida pelo portador de hipertensão na redução das complicações desta doença, bem como em sua prevenção, já não são mais questionados, porém o desafio continua residindo na adesão do indivíduo ao padrão de tratamento prescrito pelo médico. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar os níveis de pressão arterial, assim como o nível de adesão ao tratamento farmacológico com maleato de enalapril de pacientes portadores de

  14. “My patients are better than yours”: optimistic bias about patients’ medication adherence by European health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyne W

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wendy Clyne,1 Sarah McLachlan,2 Comfort Mshelia,3 Peter Jones,4 Sabina De Geest,5,6 Todd Ruppar,7 Kaat Siebens,6 Fabienne Dobbels,6 Przemyslaw Kardas8 1Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, 2Department of Physiotherapy, King’s College London, London, 3Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, 4Institute of Science and Technology in Medicines, Keele University, Keele, UK; 5Institute of Nursing Science, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 6Academic Center for Nursing and Midwifery, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 7Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA; 8Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the perceptions of European physicians, nurses, and pharmacists about the extent of nonadherence by patients in their country relative to their perception of nonadherence by their own patients, and to investigate the occurrence of optimistic bias about medication adherence. The study explored a key cognitive bias for prevalence and likelihood estimates in the context of health care professionals’ beliefs about patients’ use of medicines.Methods: A cross-sectional online survey of 3,196 physicians (855, nurses (1,294, and pharmacists (1,047 in ten European countries (Austria, Belgium, England, France, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, and Switzerland was used.Results: Participants differed in their perceptions of the prevalence of medication adherence initiation, implementation, and persistence present in their own patients with a chronic illness in comparison to patients with a chronic illness in general. Health care professionals demonstrated optimistic bias for initiation and persistence with medicine taking, perceiving their own patients to be more likely to initiate and persist with treatment than other patients, but reported significantly lower prevalence

  15. A patient perspective of the impact of medication side effects on adherence: results of a cross-sectional nationwide survey of patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiBonaventura Marco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antipsychotic medications often have a variety of side effects, however, it is not well understood how the presence of specific side effects correlate with adherence in a real-world setting. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between these variables among community-dwelling patients with schizophrenia. Methods Data were analyzed from a 2007-2008 nationwide survey of adults who self-reported a diagnosis of schizophrenia and were currently using an antipsychotic medication (N = 876. The presence of side effects was defined as those in which the patient reported they were at least "somewhat bothered". Adherence was defined as a score of zero on the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. To assess the relationship between side effects and adherence, individual logistic regression models were fitted for each side effect controlling for patient characteristics. A single logistic regression model assessed the relationship between side effect clusters and adherence. The relationships between adherence and health resource use were also examined. Results A majority of patients reported experiencing at least one side effect due to their medication (86.19%. Only 42.5% reported complete adherence. Most side effects were associated with a significantly reduced likelihood of adherence. When grouped as side effect clusters in a single model, extra pyramidal symptoms (EPS/agitation (odds ratio (OR = 0.57, p = 0.0007, sedation/cognition (OR = 0.70, p = 0.033, prolactin/endocrine (OR = 0.69, p = 0.0342, and metabolic side effects (OR = 0.64, p = 0.0079 were all significantly related with lower rates of adherence. Those who reported complete adherence to their medication were significantly less likely to report a hospitalization for a mental health reason (OR = 0.51, p = 0.0006, a hospitalization for a non-mental health reason (OR = 0.43, p = 0.0002, and an emergency room (ER visit for a mental health reason (OR = 0.60, p

  16. Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli Strains from Patients with Crohn's Disease Survive and Replicate within Macrophages without Inducing Host Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Glasser, Anne-Lise; Boudeau, Jerome; Barnich, Nicolas; Perruchot, Marie-Helene; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains recovered from Crohn's disease (CD) lesions are able to adhere to and invade cultured intestinal epithelial cells. We analyzed the behavior within macrophages of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) strains isolated from patients with CD. All the 15 AIEC strains tested were able to replicate extensively within J774-A1 cells: the numbers of intracellular bacteria increased 2.2- to 74.2-fold at 48 h over that at 1 h postinfection. By use of murine peritoneal macrophages and...

  17. Coping strategies used by poorly adherent patients for self-managing bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blixen, Carol; Levin, Jennifer B; Cassidy, Kristin A; Perzynski, Adam T; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic mental illness associated with reduced quality of life, high rates of suicide, and high financial costs. Evidence indicates that psychosocial stress might play an important role in the onset and course of BD. Objective The objective of this study was to address the gap between coping theory and the clinical use of coping strategies used to self-manage BD. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 21 poorly adherent patients with BD. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analysis with an emphasis on dominant themes. Results Transcript-based analysis generated two major domains of coping strategies used to self-manage BD: 1) problem focused (altering eating habits, managing mood-stabilizing medications, keeping psychiatric appointments, seeking knowledge, self-monitoring, and socializing) and 2) emotion focused (distracting activities, denial, isolation, modifying/avoiding, helping others, and seeking social support). Participants used both types of coping strategies to deal with stressful situations brought about by the internal and external demands associated with self-management of BD. Conclusion This qualitative study provided a first step in evaluating coping strategies as a possible mediator in the self-management of BD and has implications for health care providers. Being able to characterize an individual’s coping behaviors can help patients modify or replace more maladaptive coping with better coping strategies in the self-management of this chronic mental illness. PMID:27524888

  18. Patient Characteristics and Variability in Adherence and Competence in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, James F.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E.; Bullis, Jacqueline; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Although associations with outcome have been inconsistent, therapist adherence and competence continues to garner attention, particularly within the context of increasing interest in the dissemination, implementation, and sustainability of evidence-based treatments. To date, research on therapist adherence and competence has focused on average…

  19. Women's experiences of factors affecting treatment engagement and adherence in internet delivered Behavioural Activation for Postnatal Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. O'Mahen

    2015-03-01

    Discussion: Open access, self-help internet interventions are acceptable to women with postnatal depression, but it is critical to provide tailoring and support to help overcome barriers and improve treatment adherence.

  20. Measuring Patient Adherence to Malaria Treatment: A Comparison of Results from Self-Report and a Customised Electronic Monitoring Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Bruxvoort

    Full Text Available Self-report is the most common and feasible method for assessing patient adherence to medication, but can be prone to recall bias and social desirability bias. Most studies assessing adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs have relied on self-report. In this study, we use a novel customised electronic monitoring device--termed smart blister packs--to examine the validity of self-reported adherence to artemether-lumefantrine (AL in southern Tanzania.Smart blister packs were designed to look identical to locally available AL blister packs and to record the date and time each tablet was removed from packaging. Patients obtaining AL at randomly selected health facilities and drug stores were followed up at home three days later and interviewed about each dose of AL taken. Blister packs were requested for pill count and extraction of smart blister pack data.Data on adherence from both self-report verified by pill count and smart blister packs were available for 696 of 1,204 patients. There was no difference between methods in the proportion of patients assessed to have completed treatment (64% and 67%, respectively. However, the percentage taking the correct number of pills for each dose at the correct times (timely completion was higher by self-report than smart blister packs (37% vs. 24%; p<0.0001. By smart blister packs, 64% of patients completing treatment did not take the correct number of pills per dose or did not take each dose at the correct time interval.Smart blister packs resulted in lower estimates of timely completion of AL and may be less prone to recall and social desirability bias. They may be useful when data on patterns of adherence are desirable to evaluate treatment outcomes. Improved methods of collecting self-reported data are needed to minimise bias and maximise comparability between studies.

  1. Effect of an Educational Program on Adherence to Therapeutic Regimen among Chronic Kidney Disease Stage5 (CKD5) Patients under Maintenance Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deif, Hala I. Abo; Elsawi, Khiria; Selim, Mohga; NasrAllah, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease on health care services worldwide is growing and the increased development of educational interventions which help patients to better manage their conditions is evident internationally. It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients. Adherence to fluid…

  2. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics-A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization's culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence. PMID:26835016

  3. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics—A scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization’s culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence. PMID:26835016

  4. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics-A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization's culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence.

  5. Associations between adherence and outcomes among older, type 2 diabetes patients: evidence from a Medicare Supplemental database

    OpenAIRE

    Lage, Maureen; Boye,Kristina; Curtis, Sarah; Garcia-Perez,Luis-Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Kristina Secnik Boye,1 Sarah E Curtis,1 Maureen J Lage,2 Luis-Emilio Garcia-Perez3 1Global Patient Outcomes and Real World Evidence, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN, 2HealthMetrics Outcomes Research, LLC, Bonita Springs, FL, 3Global Medical Affairs, Lilly Diabetes, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: To examine the association between adherence to glucose-lowering agents and patient outcomes, including costs, acute-...

  6. The Relationship Between Social Support and Adherence of Dietary and Fluids Restrictions among Hemodialysis Patients in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Shahnaz Ahrari; Mahdi Moshki; Mahnaz Bahrami

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Patient’s noncompliance dietary and fluids intake can lead to a build-up of toxic fluids and metabolic end-products in the blood stream which may result in an increased morbidity and premature death. The aim of the study is investigate relationship between the social support and adherence to dietary and fluid restrictions in hemodialysis patients. Methods: In this correlational study upon 237 hemodialysis patients, the data was collected with the dialysis diet and fluids non-adh...

  7. Common Dyadic Coping Is Indirectly Related to Dietary and Exercise Adherence via Patient and Partner Diabetes Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Matthew D.; Anderson, Jared R.; Walker, Ann; Wilcox, Allison; Lewis, Virginia L.; Robbins, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Using cross-sectional data from 117 married couples in which one member is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the current study sought to explore a possible indirect association between common dyadic coping and dietary and exercise adherence via the mechanism of patient and spouse reports of diabetes efficacy. Results from the structural equation model analysis indicated common dyadic coping was associated with higher levels of diabetes efficacy for both patients and spouses which, in turn, was ...

  8. A randomized, controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a glaucoma patient navigator to improve appointment adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Lichuan; Hark, Lisa A.; Johnson,Deiana; Berardi,Giuliana; Patel, Neal; Dai, Yang; Mayro,Eileen; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, L Jay

    2016-01-01

    Lisa A Hark, Deiana M Johnson, Giuliana Berardi, Neal S Patel, Lichuan Zeng, Yang Dai, Eileen L Mayro, Michael Waisbourd, L Jay Katz On behalf of the Glaucoma Research Group Wills Eye Hospital Glaucoma Research Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA Purpose: Patients with glaucoma who do not keep their follow-up eye care appointments are at risk for developing more severe ocular disease. The primary aim of the current study was to evaluate whether the use of a patient navigator altered adherence to...

  9. Blood pressure control and treatment adherence in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome: protocol of a randomized controlled study based on home blood pressure telemonitoring vs. conventional management and assessment of psychological determinants of adherence (TELEBPMET Study).

    OpenAIRE

    Parati Gianfranco; Omboni Stefano; Compare Angelo; Grossi Enzo; Callus Edward; Venco Achille; Destro Maurizio; Villa Giuseppe; Palatini Paolo; Rosei Enrico Agabiti; Scalvini Simonetta; Taddei Stefano; Manfellotto Dario; Favale Stefano; De Matteis Carmine

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inadequate blood pressure control and poor adherence to treatment remain among the major limitations in the management of hypertensive patients, particularly of those at high risk of cardiovascular events. Preliminary evidence suggests that home blood pressure telemonitoring (HBPT) might help increasing the chance of achieving blood pressure targets and improve patient’s therapeutic adherence. However, all these potential advantages of HBPT have not yet been fully investig...

  10. Adherence to a six-dose regimen of artemether-lumefantrine among uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum patients in the Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemma Hailemariam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, Ethiopia switched its first-line treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine to a fixed artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, artemether-lumefantrine (AL. Patient adherence to AL regimen is a major determining factor to achieve the desired therapeutic outcome. The aim of this study was to measure patient adherence levels to the six-dose AL regimen for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria and to identify its determinant factors in rural areas of the Tigray region, Ethiopia Methods The study was conducted under routine health service delivery at health posts level. Patients/caregivers were not informed about their home visit and were traced on the day after they finished the AL regimen. By combining the response to a structured questionnaire and the tablet count from the blister, adherence level was classified into three categories: definitely non-adherent, probably non-adherent and probably adherent. Reasons for being definitely non-adherent were also assessed. For the purpose of examine risk factors, definitely non-adherent and probably non-adherent was merged into a non-adherent group. Variables found significantly associated (p Results Out of the total initially enrolled 180 patients, 86.1% completed the follow-up. Out of these, 38.7% were classified as probably adherent, 34.8% as probably non-adherent, and 26.5% were definitely non-adherent. The most common reasons that definitely non-adherents gave for not taking the full dose were "too many tablets" (37.3% and to "felt better before finished the treatment course" (25.5%. The adherence of the patients was associated with the ownership of a radio (adjusted odd ratio, AOR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.66-8.75, the belief that malaria can be treated traditionally (AOR: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01-0.78 and a delay of more than one day in seeking treatment after the onset of fever (AOR: 5.39; 95% CI: 1.83-15.88. Conclusion

  11. Integration of Provider, Pharmacy, and Patient-Reported Data to Improve Medication Adherence for Type 2 Diabetes: A Controlled Before-After Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, Brian E.; Alzeer, Abdullah H; Phillips, Erin O'Kelly; Marrero, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes often have poor adherence to using medications as prescribed. The reasons why, however, are not well understood. Furthermore, most health care delivery processes do not routinely assess medication adherence or the factors that contribute to poor adherence. Objective The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility of an integrated informatics approach to aggregating and displaying clinically relevant data with the potential to identify issues that may...

  12. Lanthanum carbonate oral powder: satisfaction, preference and adherence in French and Spanish patients with end-stage renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Michael; de Sequera, Patricia; Clair, François; Pedersini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders, such as lanthanum carbonate, control elevated serum-phosphate levels in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Lanthanum carbonate is available in oral powder and tablet form. The aim of this survey was to investigate satisfaction with, preference for, and adherence to lanthanum carbonate oral powder in patients with ESRD. Scope Patients from France and Spain who had been taking lanthanum carbonate powder for at least 4 weeks, and who had experience of other phosphate binders of any formulation, were asked to complete an online or telephone survey. Treatment satisfaction was measured using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-9; preference was measured using 5-point Likert scale agreement ratings; and adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4. Data were evaluated using bivariate analyses. Findings Overall, 160 patients participated (80 per country). Lanthanum carbonate powder was reported to have a higher effectiveness rating (psubject to change over time. Although most participants completed the online survey in this study, a telephone survey was used for individuals who could not access the online version; if only one method of data recording had been used, there may have been reduced variation in responses. Conclusion Patients with ESRD report increased satisfaction with and preference for lanthanum carbonate powder over other formulations, suggesting that lanthanum carbonate powder is more convenient and easier to use than other formulations. PMID:27803726

  13. Tuberculosis Treatment Non-Adherence and Lost to Follow Up among TB Patients with or without HIV in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review.

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    Habteyes Hailu Tola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review intended to combine factors associated with tuberculosis treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up among TB patients with/without HIV in developing countries. Comprehensive remote electronic databases (MEDLINE, (PMC, Pub Med Central, Google scholar and Web of science search was conducted using the following keywords: Tuberculosis, treatment, compliance, adherence, default, behavioural factors and socioeconomic factors. All types of studies intended to assess TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up in developing countries among adult TB patient from 2008 to data extraction date were included. Twenty-six original and one-reviewed articles, which meet inclusion criteria, were reviewed. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries. The main factors associated with TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were socioeconomic factors: lack of transportation cost, lack of social support, and patients-health care worker poor communication. Behavioural factors were Feeling better after few weeks of treatments, tobacco and alcohol use, knowledge deficit about duration of treatment and consequences of non-adherence and lost to follow up. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries throughout the publication years of reviewed articles. Numerous, socioeconomic and behavioural factors were influencing TB treatment adherence and lost to follow up. Therefore, well understanding and minimizing of the effect of these associated factors is very important to enhance treatment adherence and follow up completion in developing countries.

  14. Type D Personality Predicts Poor Medication Adherence in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Six-Month Follow-Up Study.

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    Xuemei Li

    Full Text Available Type D personality and medication nonadherence have been shown to be associated with poor health outcomes. Type D personality is associated with poor medication adherence in patients with coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. However, the relationship between type D personality and medication adherence in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM remains unknown. This study aims to examine whether type D personality was associated with medication adherence in patients with T2DM.A follow-up study was conducted in general hospital of the People's Liberation Army in Beijing.412 T2DM patients (205 females, who were recruited by circular systematic random sampling, provided demographic and baseline data about medical information and completed measures of Type D personality. Then, 330 patients went on to complete a self-report measure of medication adherence at the sixth month after baseline data collection. Chi-square test, t tests, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted, as needed.Patients with type D personality were significantly more likely to have poor medication adherence (p<0.001. Type D personality predicts poor medication adherence before and after controlling for covariates when it was analyzed as a categorical variable. However, the dimensional construct of type D personality was not associated with medication adherence when analyzed as a continuous variable.Although, as a dimensional construct, type D personality may not reflect the components of the personality associated with poor medication adherence in patients with T2DM, screening for type D personality may help to identify those who are at higher risk of poor medication adherence. Interventions, aiming to improve medication adherence, should be launched for these high-risk patients.

  15. The Impact of Neuropsychological Functioning on Adherence to HAART in HIV-Infected Substance Abuse Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Applebaum, Allison J.; Reilly, Laura C.; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, Mark A.; Leveroni, Catherine L.; Steven A Safren

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the frequency of neuropsychological impairment and its relationship to adherence in a sample of HIV-infected injection drug users (IDUs) in treatment. One hundred eight participants recruited between September 2006 and October 2008 completed psychodiagnostic and neuropsychological assessments and monitored HAART adherence over a 2-week period via the use of Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) electronic pill caps and self-report. Assessment of concurrent functioning ...

  16. Trends in adherence to dietary recommendations among Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyong

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The current study examined trends in adherence to dietary recommendations and compared the levels of adherence between diagnosed and undiagnosed subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Korea over the past 14 years. SUBJECTS/METHODS Data were collected from the 1998-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES). Diagnosed diabetes was defined as giving a positive response to questions about awareness of the disease, a physician's diagnosi...

  17. Strategies to improve medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia: the role of support services

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    El-Mallakh P

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Peggy El-Mallakh, Jan FindlayCollege of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USAAbstract: The purpose of this review is to describe research over the past 10 years on the role of support services in promoting medication adherence in mental health consumers diagnosed with schizophrenia. A literature search was conducted using the terms “medication adherence,” “schizophrenia,” and “support services,” using Medline, PubMed, and CINAHL. Reference lists from published studies were also reviewed to identify additional research studies. Twenty-two articles focused on support-service intervention studies, and these were selected for review. Available support-service interventions include adherence therapy, electronic reminders via text messages and telephones, cognitive–behavioral and motivational strategies, and financial incentives. Support-service intervention strategies need to be tailored to the specific needs of mental health consumers with schizophrenia. More research is needed to investigate effective support services to enhance long-term adherence and adherence to medications for medical illnesses in this population.Keywords: schizophrenia, medication adherence, support services, therapy, interventions

  18. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

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    Stoneking, LR; Waterbrook, AL; Garst Orozco, J; Johnston, D; Bellafiore, A; Davies, C; Nuño, T; Fatás-Cabeza, J; Beita, O; Ng, V; Grall, KH; Adamas-Rappaport, W

    2016-01-01

    Background After emergency department (ED) discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit. Objectives To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. Methods Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC) and South Campus (SC). SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions. Results Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study. Complete outcome data were available for 55 patients. Overall, resident physicians spoke Spanish 58% of the time. SC resident physicians spoke Spanish with 66% of the patients versus 45% for UC resident physicians. Patients rated resident physician Spanish ability as very good in 13% of encounters – 17% for SC versus 5% for UC. Patient satisfaction with their ED visit was rated as very good in 35% of encounters – 40% for SC resident physicians versus 25% for UC resident physicians. Of the 13 patients for whom Spanish was the language used during the medical encounter who followed medical recommendations, ten (77%) of these encounters were with SC resident physicians

  19. A Social-Ecological View of Barriers and Facilitators for HIV Treatment Adherence: Interviews with Puerto Rican HIV Patients.

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    Eida M Castro

    Full Text Available To identify perceived barriers and facilitators for HAART adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in Southern Puerto Rico using a Social Ecological framework.Individual in-depths interviews were conducted with 12 HIV patients with a history of HAART non-adherence. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Content analysis was performed for each transcribed interview by three independent coders using a codebook. Using Atlas TI, super-codes and families were generated to facilitate the categorization tree as well as grounded analyses and density estimates.Most participants reported a monthly income of $500 or less (n = 7, a high school education level (n = 7, being unemployed (n = 9 and being recipients of government health insurance (n = 11. Three out of six women reported living alone with their children and most men informed living with their parents or other relatives (n = 4. For the grounded analyses, the top four sub-categories linked to high number of quotations were mental health barriers (G = 32 followed by treatment regimen (G = 28, health system (G = 24 and interpersonal relations (G = 16. The top four sub-categories linked to high number of codes are treatment regimen (D = 4, health status perception (D = 3, interpersonal relations (D = 3 and health system (D = 3.The results of this study suggest the interconnection of HIV treatment adherence barriers at various system levels. Future studies on HIV treatment barriers should explore these interactions and investigate the possible synergistic effect on non-adherent behavior.

  20. Effects of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive patients in Vietnam.

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    Nguyen, Nhung T P; Tran, Bach X; Hwang, Lu Y; Markham, Christine M; Swartz, Michael D; Vidrine, Jennifer I; Phan, Huong T T; Latkin, Carl A; Vidrine, Damon J

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is increasingly recognized as an indicator for inferior adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive patients. Given the limited body of work on this issue, we aimed to explore the relations between cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence, and ART adherence in Vietnam. A cross-sectional study of 1050 HIV-positive people was conducted from January to September 2013 in Hanoi (the capital) and Nam Dinh (a rural city). Adherence to ART during the last 30 days was measured by the 100-point visual analog scale (VAS). Smoking history and nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence) were self-reported by participants. Multiple logistic regression was performed to examine the association of current smoking and nicotine dependence with ART nonadherence. Using the established VAS cut point of 95 to indicate adequate adherence, the prevalence of ART nonadherence was 30.9%. Approximately 35.5% of the sample reported current smoking. No association between smoking status and ART nonadherence was found. However, participants with greater nicotine dependence (OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 1.0-1.2 per unit increase) were more likely to be nonadherent. Also, individuals who were female (OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.19-2.42), receiving ART in Nam Dinh (OR = 1.6, 95%CI = 1.1-2.4), and currently feeling anxiety (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1) had a higher likelihood of ART nonadherence. Additionally, current smokers reporting current pain (OR = 1.9, 95%CI = 1.2-3.1) were more likely to be nonadherent. Conversely, protective factors included living with a spouse/partner (OR = 0.5, 95%CI = 0.3-0.7) and having more than a high school education (OR = 0.4, 95%CI = 0.1-1.0). Given the high prevalence of suboptimal adherence and current smoking among HIV-positive patients, screening for smoking status and nicotine dependence during ART treatment may help to improve patients' adherence to medication. More efforts

  1. Key factors to successful adherence to dietary modifications for patients with coronary heart disease : a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kemppainen, Karri

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to find out what are the key factors that make a patient with coronary heart disease adhere to the nutritional modifications in cardiac rehabilitation using research articles produced in the years 2006-2016. This thesis was produced as a literature review. The process was as systematic as possible following the literature review guidelines from textbooks. Studies were searched using search terms “coronary heart disease” and “dietary adherence” using nursing...

  2. Beliefs About Willpower Are Related to Therapy Adherence and Psychological Adjustment in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Bernecker, Katharina; Job, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that self-control, the ability to forego immediate needs for the sake of future rewards, promotes health behavior. The present study examined the role of beliefs about willpower as predictor of self-control in the context of diabetes. Seventy-nine type 2 diabetes patients reported their beliefs about willpower, therapy adherence (i.e., self-care activities, diet, exercise), and psychological adjustment (i.e., emotional distress, well-being, life quality). Endorsing the belie...

  3. Comparison of adherence and persistence among multiple sclerosis patients treated with disease-modifying therapies: a retrospective administrative claims analysis

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    Rachel Halpern

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Halpern1, Sonalee Agarwal2, Carole Dembek2, Leigh Borton1, Maria Lopez-Bresnahan31Health Economics and Outcomes Research, i3 Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 2Health Outcomes and Pharmacoeconomics, Biogen Idec, Wellesley, MA, USA; 3Medical and Scientific Affairs, i3 Research, Waltham, MA, USAPurpose: To compare adherence and persistence among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS initiated on disease-modifying therapy (DMTs, including intramuscular (IM interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a, subcutaneous (SC IFNβ-1a, IFNβ-1b, or glatiramer acetate (GA.Methods: MS patients initiated on IM-IFNβ-1a, SC-IFNβ-1a, IFNβ-1b, or GA between January 1, 2000 and January 2, 2008 were identified from a retrospective claims database study associated with a large US health plan. The date of DMT initiation was the index date; patients were observed for 6 months before and 12–36 months after the index date. Adherence to the index DMT was measured with a medication possession ratio (MPR, the proportion of days patients possessed their index DMTs; MPR ≥0.80 was considered adherent. Persistence was time in days from index date until the earlier of a minimum 60-day gap in DMT therapy or the last DMT claim during follow-up. Adherence and persistence were modeled with logistic and Cox proportional hazard regressions, respectively.Results: The study population comprised 6,680 patients in the DMT cohorts: IM-IFNβ-1a (N = 2,305, 34.5%; IFNβ-1b (N = 894, 13.4%; GA (N = 2,270, 34.0%; and SC-IFNβ-1a (N = 1,211, 18.1%. The IM-IFNβ-1a cohort had significantly higher regression-adjusted odds of adherence relative to the other cohorts: 52.4% higher odds versus the IFNβ-1b cohort (OR = 0.656, CI = 0.561–0.768; 33.5% higher odds versus the GA cohort (OR = 0.749, CI = 0.665–0.844; and 20.6% higher odds versus the SC-IFNβ-1a cohort (OR = 0.829, CI = 0.719–0.957. There were no consistent differences in persistence between the cohorts.Conclusion: IM-IFNβ-1a patients

  4. Validation of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale in homeless patients with schizophrenia: Results from the French Housing First experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemmour, K; Tinland, A; Boucekine, M; Girard, V; Loubière, S; Resseguier, N; Fond, G; Auquier, P; Boyer, L

    2016-01-01

    The Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) is one of the most widely used measurements of adherence in schizophrenia (SZ), but there is no available data regarding its psychometric properties in homeless SZ patients (HSZ). The aim of this study was therefore to assess the psychometric properties of the MARS in a large multicenter sample of HSZ subjects. This multi-centre prospective study was conducted in the following 4 French cities: Lille, Marseille, Paris and Toulouse. Three hundred and fifty-three patients were included. The 3-factor structure of the MARS was confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis: RMSEA = 0.045, CFI = 0.98, TLI = 0.97 and WRMR = 0.76. The unidimensionality of each factor was supported by the satisfactory INFIT statistics. Item internal consistencies were all higher than 0.20 and the Kuder-Richardson were higher than to 0.6, except for factor 2, which was closed to 0.5. Significant associations with symptoms, functioning and quality of life showed satisfactory external validity. The acceptability was satisfactory with missing data lower than 5% for each dimension. The MARS is a short self-administered instrument with acceptable psychometric properties in homeless SZ patients that yields interesting information about medication adherence. PMID:27534796

  5. Psychiatrists’ awareness of adherence to antipsychotic medication in patients with schizophrenia: results from a survey conducted across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, José Manuel; Alptekin, Köksal; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Cañas, Fernando; Dubois, Vincent; Emsley, Robin; Gorwood, Philip; Haddad, Peter M; Naber, Dieter; Papageorgiou, George; Roca, Miquel; Thomas, Pierre; Martinez, Guadalupe; Schreiner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background Nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia, although the rates vary according to means of assessment and patient population. Failure to adhere to medication can have a major impact on the course of illness and treatment outcomes, including increasing the risk of relapse and rehospitalization. Understanding psychiatrists’ perception of the causes and consequences of nonadherence is crucial to addressing adherence problems effectively. Methods The Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) Spanish Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) survey was conducted by questionnaire during January–March 2010 among psychiatrists treating patients with schizophrenia in 36 countries. The survey comprised 20 questions. In addition to recording the demographic details of the 4722 respondents (~12% response rate), it canvassed their preferred methods of assessing adherence, their perceptions of adherence rates, reasons for nonadherence, and strategies to improve adherence. Results Psychiatrists estimated that 53% of their patients with schizophrenia were partially/nonadherent during the previous month. They estimated only one-third of patients who deteriorated after stopping medication were able to attribute this to nonadherence. Psychiatrists assessed adherence most often by patient interview. Lack of insight was viewed as the most important cause of medication discontinuation, followed by patients feeling better and thinking their medication unnecessary, and experiencing undesirable side effects. Considerably fewer psychiatrists viewed insufficient efficacy, cognitive impairment, or drug/alcohol abuse as the most important reasons for their patients stopping medication. Conclusion Psychiatrists throughout EMEA recognize the impact of partial/nonadherence to medication, with patient enquiry being the most commonly used means of assessment. There remains a need for more proactive management of patients with schizophrenia, particularly in

  6. Is it possible to diagnose the therapeutic adherence of patients with COPD in clinical practice? A cohort study

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    Prados-Torres Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic adherence of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is poor. It is therefore necessary to determine the magnitude of non-adherence to develop strategies to correct this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to analyse the diagnostic validity of indirect adherence methods. Methods Sample: 195 COPD patients undergoing scheduled inhaled treatment attending 5 Primary Care Centres of Malaga, Spain. Variables: Sociodemographic profile, illness data, spirometry, quality of life (St. George Respiratory Questionnaire: SGRQ, and inhaled medication counting (count of dose/pill or electronic monitoring were collected. The patient's knowledge of COPD (Batalla test:BT,their attitude towards treatment (Morisky-Green test: MGT and their self-reported therapeutic adherence (Haynes-Sackett test: HST were used as methods of evaluating adherence. The follow-up consisted four visits over one year (the recruitment visit: V0; and after 1 month:V1; 6 months:V2; and 1 year:V3. Results The mean age was 69.59 (95% CI, 68.29-70.89 years old and 93.8% were male. Other findings included: 85.4% had a low educational level, 23.6% were smokers, 71.5% mild-moderate COPD stage with a FEV1 = 56.86 (SD = 18.85; exacerbations per year = 1.41(95% CI, 1-1.8. The total SGRQ score was 44.96 (95% CI, 42.46-47.46, showing a mild self-perceived impairment in health. The prevalence of adherence (dose/pill count was 68.1% (95% CI, 60.9-75.3 at V1, 80% (95% CI, 73-87 at V2 and 84% (95% CI, 77.9 at V3. The MGT showed a specificity of 67.34% at V1, 76.19% at V2 and 69.62% at V3. The sensitivity was 53.33% at V1, 66.66% at V2 and 33.33% at V3.The BT showed a specificity of 55.1% at V1, 70.23% at V2 and 67.09% at V3. The sensitivity was 68.88% at V1, 71.43% at V2 and 46.66% at V3. Considering both tests together, the specificity was 86.73% at V1, 94.04% at V2 and 92.49% at V3 and the sensitivity was 37.77% at V1, 47.62% at V2 and 13.3% at V3

  7. Adherencia terapéutica en hipertensos: Estudio cualitativo Treatment adherence of hypertensive patients: a qualitative study

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    J. Schmidt Rio-Valle

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La prevalencia de la hipertensión en España se sitúa en torno al 25% de la población adulta. Los profesionales de la salud disponen de un amplio arsenal terapéutico y conocen los criterios higiénico-dietéticos que mantendrían los niveles arteriales dentro de la normalidad. La falta de observancia de la pauta terapéutica es común en todo proceso crónico. En el caso de la hipertensión arterial las cifras de no cumplidores alcanzan límites realmente preocupantes, cerca del 40% para el tratamiento farmacológico y entre el 60-90% en las medidas higiénico-dietéticas. Por ahora, se sabe poco sobre las opiniones y expectativas que los pacientes tienen sobre la hipertensión y su tratamiento. Para tratar esta cuestión, hemos diseñado un estudio cualitativo basado en la técnica de los grupos focales. El objetivo ha sido identificar desde la perspectiva de los usuarios las dificultades del cumplimiento, así como los factores relacionados con este fenómeno. Constatamos la dificultad a la hora de seguir las prescripciones médicas, en gran medida porque no se sienten tratados de forma individualizada para establecer el tratamiento, las medidas adecuadas y el modo de llevarlo a cabo. Consideramos que es fundamental optimizar la relación del profesional de la salud con el paciente.The prevalence of hypertension among adults in Spain reaches around 25%. Health professionals have many therapeutic means at their disposal and know all hygienic and dietetic measures needed to keep arterial levels within normality. Non-adherence to therapy is a common observable fact in all chronic processes. Concerning arterial hypertension, non-adherence percentages reach alarming levels: nearly 40% non-adherence to drug treatment and between 60-90% non-adherence to hygienic and dietetic measures. So far, little is known about patients' expectations and opinions about hypertension and its treatment. To deal with this subject, a qualitative study was designed

  8. The Effects of Negative Reinforcement on Increasing Patient Adherence to Appointments at King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyahya, Mohammad; Hijazi, Heba H; Nusairat, Farid T

    2016-01-01

    Appointment nonadherence is a health behavior that represents a burden to health care systems. On March 1, 2015, a new negative reinforcement intervention involving "service fees" for a visit without appointment was implemented at King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan. To evaluate the effect of this intervention in improving patient adherence to medical appointment, a retrospective preintervention and postintervention analysis was used, including all patients (n = 65 535) who had scheduled appointments at 39 outpatient clinics. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was first performed. Then, a multivariate linear regression model was used to identify factors that might predict individuals who are likely to attend or miss their appointments and those who have a greater tendency to visit the hospital with or without appointments. Although the average percentage of appointments attended was more than missed preintervention and postintervention, the decrease in percentage of missed appointments was more pronounced postintervention. Also, the average percentage of visits without appointments was less than visits with appointments in both times, but the decrease in the percentage of visits without appointments was more prominent after. The regression analysis revealed that younger, married and male patients were more likely to miss their appointment before and after the intervention. Also, younger patients had a tendency to attend without appointments. Conversely, patients with the lower copayment rate had a tendency to adhere to appointment times. In conclusion, negative reinforcement interventions could improve patient appointment adherence rates. Accordingly, interventions designed that consider evidence and are theory-based are needed to change patient behavior. PMID:27444505

  9. The Effects of Negative Reinforcement on Increasing Patient Adherence to Appointments at King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan

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    Mohammad Alyahya MSc, PhD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Appointment nonadherence is a health behavior that represents a burden to health care systems. On March 1, 2015, a new negative reinforcement intervention involving “service fees” for a visit without appointment was implemented at King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan. To evaluate the effect of this intervention in improving patient adherence to medical appointment, a retrospective preintervention and postintervention analysis was used, including all patients (n = 65 535 who had scheduled appointments at 39 outpatient clinics. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was first performed. Then, a multivariate linear regression model was used to identify factors that might predict individuals who are likely to attend or miss their appointments and those who have a greater tendency to visit the hospital with or without appointments. Although the average percentage of appointments attended was more than missed preintervention and postintervention, the decrease in percentage of missed appointments was more pronounced postintervention. Also, the average percentage of visits without appointments was less than visits with appointments in both times, but the decrease in the percentage of visits without appointments was more prominent after. The regression analysis revealed that younger, married and male patients were more likely to miss their appointment before and after the intervention. Also, younger patients had a tendency to attend without appointments. Conversely, patients with the lower copayment rate had a tendency to adhere to appointment times. In conclusion, negative reinforcement interventions could improve patient appointment adherence rates. Accordingly, interventions designed that consider evidence and are theory-based are needed to change patient behavior.

  10. The Effects of Negative Reinforcement on Increasing Patient Adherence to Appointments at King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyahya, Mohammad; Hijazi, Heba H; Nusairat, Farid T

    2016-01-01

    Appointment nonadherence is a health behavior that represents a burden to health care systems. On March 1, 2015, a new negative reinforcement intervention involving "service fees" for a visit without appointment was implemented at King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan. To evaluate the effect of this intervention in improving patient adherence to medical appointment, a retrospective preintervention and postintervention analysis was used, including all patients (n = 65 535) who had scheduled appointments at 39 outpatient clinics. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was first performed. Then, a multivariate linear regression model was used to identify factors that might predict individuals who are likely to attend or miss their appointments and those who have a greater tendency to visit the hospital with or without appointments. Although the average percentage of appointments attended was more than missed preintervention and postintervention, the decrease in percentage of missed appointments was more pronounced postintervention. Also, the average percentage of visits without appointments was less than visits with appointments in both times, but the decrease in the percentage of visits without appointments was more prominent after. The regression analysis revealed that younger, married and male patients were more likely to miss their appointment before and after the intervention. Also, younger patients had a tendency to attend without appointments. Conversely, patients with the lower copayment rate had a tendency to adhere to appointment times. In conclusion, negative reinforcement interventions could improve patient appointment adherence rates. Accordingly, interventions designed that consider evidence and are theory-based are needed to change patient behavior.

  11. Adherence and Associated Factors towards Antidiabetic Medication among Type II Diabetic Patients on Follow-Up at University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Mastewal Abebaw

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM is rising worldwide and is more in the developing countries which unfortunately are already suffering from communicable diseases. The aim of this study was to assess adherence and associated factors towards antidiabetic medication among type II diabetic patients in University of Gondar Hospital, Diabetic Clinic, Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods. Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted. Systematic sampling technique was used. Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS scores were used for labeling patients as adherent or nonadherent. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. To see the association of variables logistic regression with OR and 95% CI was done. Results. A total of 288 study participants were interviewed with response rate of 100%. The level of adherence was found to be 85.1%. Factors found to be significantly associated with antidiabetic medication adherence were level of education (AOR = 14.27, 95% CI = 3.0, 67.82, duration of diabetes (AOR = 6.10, 95% CI = 2.03, 18.34, and knowledge about DM and its medications (AOR = 28.05, 95% CI = 8.96, 87.8. Conclusions and Recommendations. Large proportion of respondents in this study were found to be adherent to their antidiabetic medications. Level of education, duration of diabetes, and knowledge about DM and its medication were significantly associated with antidiabetic medication adherence of patients. Health education including adherence counseling to create awareness towards DM and its medications is mandatory.

  12. Factors associated with adherence to nucleos(t)ide analogs in chronic hepatitis B patients: results from a 1-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jie; Yin, Junhua; Cai, Shaohang; Yu, Tao; Zhong, Chunxiu

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the factors associated with patient compliance with nucleos(t)ide analog (NUC) treatment for chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and adherence to NUCs among patients with CHB. A total of 211 CHB patients receiving NUC monotherapy were asked to report the number of prescribed doses of medication they had taken during the last 90 days. A total of four 3-month adherence scores were averaged to obtain a combined rate of NUC adherence during a 1-year follow up period. The mean age of the patients was 29.6 years, 79% were men, and 68% had no prior NUC treatment for CHB. Females, patients without a previous NUC treatment, and those who had NUC drug resistance showed better adherence to NUC treatment, and compliance was better with telbivudine than with lamivudine and entecavir.

  13. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy and its correlates among HIV infected pediatric patients in Ethiopia

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    Amberbir Alemayehu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART has resulted in striking reductions in HIV-related mortality. Despite increased availability of ART, children remain a neglected population. This may be due to concerns that failure to adhere appears to be related to continued viral replication, treatment failure and the emergence of drug-resistant strains of HIV. This study determines the rates and factors associated with adherence to Antiretroviral (ARV Drug therapy in HIV-infected children who were receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 2008. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in five hospitals in Addis Ababa from February 18 – April 28, 2008. The study population entailed parents/caretaker and index children who were following ART in the health facilities. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Results A total of 390 children respondents were included in the study with a response rate of 91%. The majority, equaling 205 (52.6% of the children, were greater than 9 years of age. Fifty five percent of the children were girls. A total of 339 children (86.9% as reported by caregivers were adherent to antiretroviral drugs for the past 7 days before the interview. Numerous variables were found to be significantly associated with adherence: children whose parents did not pay a fee for treatment [OR = 0.39 (95%CI: 0.16, 0.92], children who had ever received any nutritional support from the clinic [OR = 0.34 (95%CI: 0.14, 0.79] were less likely to adhere. Whereas children who took co-trimoxazole medication/syrup besides ARVs [OR = 3.65 (95%CI: 1.24, 10.74], children who did not know their sero-status [OR = 2.53 (95%CI: 1.24, 5.19] and children who were not aware of their caregiver's health problem [OR = 2.45 (95%CI: 1.25, 4.81] were more likely to adhere than their counterparts. Conclusion Adherence to HAART in children in Addis Ababa was higher than

  14. The Impact of Kt/V Urea-Based Dialysis Adequacy on Quality of Life and Adherence in Haemodialysis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofilou, Paraskevi; Togas, Constantinos; Vasilopoulou, Chrysoula; Minos, Christos; Zyga, Sofia; Tzitzikos, Giorgos

    2015-04-13

    There is clear evidence of a link between dialysis adequacy (as measured by urea kinetic modeling or urea reduction ratio) and such important clinical outcomes as morbidity and mortality. Evidence regarding the relationship between dialysis adequacy and quality of life (QOL) outcomes as well as adherence is less clear. The present paper is a study protocol which is planning to answer the following research question: what is the impact of dialysis adequacy on QOL and adherence in a sample of hemodialysis patients? The final sample size will be around 100 patients undergoing hemodialysis. Each subject's QOL and adherence will be measured using the following instruments: i) the Missoula-VITAS quality of life index 25; ii) the multidimensional scale of perceived social support and iii) the simplified medication adherence questionnaire. Dialysis adequacy is expected to be related to QOL and adherence scores.

  15. The impact of pharmacist face-to-face counseling to improve medication adherence among patients initiating statin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan I

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael Taitel1, Jenny Jiang1, Kristi Rudkin2, Susan Ewing2, Ian Duncan 1Clinical Outcomes and Analytics, Walgreens, 2Corporate Innovation Team, Walgreens, Deerfield, Illinois, USAPurpose: To evaluate the impact of a community-based pharmacist-led face-to-face counseling program on medication adherence for patients who were new to therapy (NTT for statin medications.Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated a program that was implemented in 76 national community pharmacies located in the midwest USA. It consisted of two face-to-face patient counseling sessions with a pharmacist that addressed patient barriers to adherence. A group of 2056 NTT statin patients was identified between September 1, 2010 and October 31, 2010, and was followed for 12 months. The intervention group consisted of 586 patients, and the comparison group comprised 516 patients. Outcomes were measured using the continuous medication possession ratio (MPR, categorical MPR, and medication persistency.Results: After adjusting for covariates, the intervention group had statistically greater MPR than the comparison group at every month measured. For example, at 12 months the intervention group had a MPR of 61.8% (CI, 54.5%–69.2% and the comparison group had a MPR of 56.9% (CI, 49.5%–64.3%; this 4.9% difference is significant (P < 0.01. The 12 month categorical MPR also showed significant differences between groups (χ2 = 6.12, P < 0.05; 40.9% of the intervention group and 33.7% of comparison group had a MPR greater than or equal to 80%. Finally, the intervention group had significantly greater persistency with their medication therapy than the comparison group at 60, 90, 120, and 365 days.Conclusion: Patients who participated in brief face-to-face counseling sessions with a community pharmacist at the beginning of statin therapy demonstrated greater medication adherence and persistency than a comparison group. This brief targeted intervention at the

  16. Levels of patient activation among adults with schizophrenia: associations with hope, symptoms, medication adherence, and recovery attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Salyers, Michelle P; Lysaker, Paul H

    2013-04-01

    Patient activation, defined as one's attitudes and confidence toward managing illness, has been not been thoroughly studied in consumers with schizophrenia. The current study sought to understand the relationship between patient activation and symptoms, medication adherence, recovery attitudes, and hope in a sample of 119 adults with schizophrenia. The participants were enrolled in an 18-month randomized controlled study of the Illness Management and Recovery program. Data were collected at baseline; correlations and stepwise multiple regressions were used to examine the relationships and determine the unique contribution of variables. Higher patient activation was most strongly associated with positive recovery attitudes, higher levels of hope, and fewer emotional discomfort symptoms. Patient activation was significantly related to a broad measure of illness self-management, providing evidence for the construct validity of the patient activation measure. Our findings emphasize the importance of recovery-based mental health services that recognize level of patient activation as a potential factor in consumer outcomes.

  17. Comparative study of the influence of diabetes distress and depression on treatment adherence in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional survey in the People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Jie Zhang,1 Cui-ping Xu,2 Hong-xia Wu,2 Xiu-juan Xue,2 Ze-jun Xu,3 Yan Li,4 Qing Gao,2 Qing-zhi Liu5 1Shandong Medical College, Jinan, People’s Republic of China; 2Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 3Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 4Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 5QiLu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to explore diabetes-related distress and depression and their influence on treatment adherence in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: We surveyed 200 type 2 diabetic patients from two public hospitals using the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS, Zung Self-rating Depression Scale, and Revised Treatment Adherence in Diabetes Questionnaire (RADQ. A multiple regression model was used to explore the relationship between diabetes distress, depression, and treatment adherence. Results: In the 200 eligible patients, the incidence of depression and diabetes distress was approximately 24% and 64%, respectively. The mean score on the RADQ was 23.0 ± 6.0. Multiple regression analysis showed that DDS scores (β = 5.34, P = 0.000, age (β = 0.15, P = 0.014, and family history (β = 3.2, P = 0.016 had a positive correlation with depression. DDS scores (β = −2.30, P = 0.000 and treatment methods (β = −0.93, P = 0.012 were risk factors for poor treatment adherence, whereas age (β = 0.089, P = 0.000 and cohabitation (β = 0.93, P = 0.012 increased treatment adherence. The independent-samples t-test showed that depression also affected treatment adherence (t = 2.53, P < 0.05. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the DDS is a predictor of depression and that diabetes distress plays a more important part than depression in treatment adherence. Screening for diabetes distress may be useful

  18. Adherence to stress-related mucosal damage prophylaxis guideline in patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafinazari, Niloofar; Abbasi, Saeed; Farsaei, Shadi; Mansourian, Marjan; Adibi, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Concern about adverse effects of the inconsistent use of stress-related mucosal damage prophylaxis in intensive care unit (ICU) is increasing. Hence, this study was designed to prospectively evaluate the rate of inappropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) administration upon ICU admission, at ICU discharge and determine the adherence to American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) guideline during ICU stay. Methods: In this study, 200 patients were randomly selected from all ICU admissions during 9 months. Risk factors of stress ulcer were recorded daily during ICU stay and appropriateness of SUP administration was assessed according to the ASHP criteria. Findings: Of all 160 (80%) patients who received SUP, 44.4% did not have indication; and among 95 patients with an indication for SUP administration, 6.3% did not receive it upon ICU admission. Consequently, 77 (38.5%) of 200 patients received inappropriate prophylaxis on ICU admission. In addition, 53.5% of patients had appropriate adherence to ASHP guideline during all days of ICU stay (44% and 2.5% of patients received SUP more than 120% and administration included both overutilization and underutilization in this ICU, but high prevalence of SUP overutilization caused unnecessary hospital costs, personal monetary burden, and may increase adverse drug reactions. Therefore, educating physicians and cooperation of clinical pharmacists regarding implementing standard protocols could improve patterns of SUP administration.

  19. Improving delirium care for hospitalized older patients: a qualitative study identifying barriers to guideline adherence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, L. van de; Langelaan, M.; IJkema, R.; Nugus, P.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Guidelines are intended as a means of getting research evidence into practice and ensuring provided care is of sufficient quality. However, the effect of guidelines is hindered by limited guideline adherence. The aim of this study is to identify and classify barriers

  20. Living situation affects adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adolescents in Rwanda: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe R Mutwa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART is vital for HIV-infected adolescents for survival and quality of life. However, this age group faces many challenges to remain adherent. We used multiple data sources (role-play, focus group discussions (FGD, and in-depth interviews (IDI to better understand adherence barriers for Rwandan adolescents. Forty-two HIV positive adolescents (ages 12-21 and a selection of their primary caregivers were interviewed. All were perinatally-infected and received (cART for ≥ 12 months. Topics discussed during FGDs and IDIs included learning HIV status, disclosure and stigma, care and treatment issues, cART adherence barriers. RESULTS: Median age was 17 years, 45% female, 45% orphaned, and 48% in boarding schools. We identified three overarching but inter-related themes that appeared to influence adherence. Stigma, perceived and experienced, and inadvertent disclosure of HIV status hampered adolescents from obtaining and taking their drugs, attending clinic visits, carrying their cARTs with them in public. The second major theme was the need for better support, in particular for adolescents with different living situations, (orphanages, foster-care, and boarding schools. Lack of privacy to keep and take medication came out as major barrier for adolescents living in congested households, as well the institutionalization of boarding schools where privacy is almost non-existent. The third important theme was the desire to be 'normal' and not be recognized as an HIV-infected individual, and to have a normal life not perturbed by taking a regimen of medications or being forced to disclose where others would treat them differently. CONCLUSIONS: We propose better management of HIV-infected adolescents integrated into boarding school, orphanages, and foster care; training of school-faculty on how to support students and allow them privacy for taking their medications. To provide better care and

  1. Why don't patients take their analgesics? A meta-ethnography assessing the perceptions of medication adherence in patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockerty, T; Latham, S K; Smith, T O

    2016-05-01

    Whilst analgesics and medications have demonstrated efficacy for people with osteoarthritis, their effectiveness is dependent on adherence. This has previously been reported as particularly low in this population. The purpose of this meta-ethnography was to explore possible perceptions for this. A systematic review of published and unpublished literature was undertaken. All qualitative studies assessing the attitudes or perceptions of people with osteoarthritis towards medication adherence were eligible. Study quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme qualitative tool. Analysis was undertaken using a meta-ethnography approach, distilling to a third-order construct and developing a line of argument. From 881 citations, five studies met the eligibility criteria. The meta-ethnography generated a model where medication adherence for people with osteoarthritis is perceived as a balance between the willingness and preference to take medications with the alterative being toleration of symptoms. Motivators to influence this 'balance' may fluctuate and change over time but include: severity of symptoms, education and understanding of osteoarthritis and current medications, or general health which may raise issues for poly-pharmacy as other medications are added or substituted into the patient's formulary. Medicine adherence in people with osteoarthritis is complex, involving motivators which will fluctuate in impact on individuals at different points along the disease progression. Awareness of each motivator may better inform clinicians as to what education, support or change in prescription practice should be adopted to ensure that medicine adherence is individualised to better promote long-term behaviour change.

  2. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available LR Stoneking,1 AL Waterbrook,1 J Garst Orozco,2 D Johnston,1 A Bellafiore,1 C Davies,3 T Nuño,1 J Fatás-Cabeza,4 O Beita,5 V Ng,1 KH Grall,6 W Adamas-Rappaport7 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Sinai Health System, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 4Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 5Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital, St Paul, MN, 7Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: After emergency department (ED discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit.Objectives: To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.Methods: Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC and South Campus (SC. SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions.Results: Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study

  3. Escherichia coli isolated from a Crohn's disease patient adheres, invades, and induces inflammatory responses in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Allen, Christopher A; Taormina, Joanna; Swidsinski, Alexander; Tutt, Christopher B; Jezek, G Eric; Islas-Islas, Martha; Torres, Alfredo G

    2008-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are a major health concern both in the United States and around the world. Evidence now suggests that a new category of Escherichia coli, designated Adherent Invasive E. coli (AIEC) is highly prevalent in Crohn's Disease (CD) patients. AIEC strains have been shown to colonize and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). However, the role AIEC strains play in the induction of an inflammatory response is not known. Therefore, we examined several E. coli strains (designated LF82, O83:H1, 6604 and 6655) that were isolated from CD patients for their ability to induce inflammation in two IEC, Caco-2BBe and T-84 cells. Results showed that each strain had varying abilities to adhere to and invade IEC as well as induced cytokine secretion from polarized IEC. However, E. coli O83:H1 displayed the best characteristics of AIEC strains as compared to the prototype AIEC strain LF82, inducing cytokine secretion from IEC and promoting immune cell migration through IEC. Upon further analysis, E. coli O83:H1 did not harbor virulence genes present in known pathogenic intestinal organisms. Further characterization of E. coli O83:H1 virulence determinants showed that a non-flagellated O83:H1 strain significantly decreased the organism's ability to adhere to and invade both IEC and elicit IEC cytokine secretion compared to the wild type and complemented strains. These findings demonstrate that E. coli O83:H1 possesses the characteristics of the AIEC LF82 strain that may contribute to the low-grade, chronic inflammation observed in Crohn's disease. PMID:17900983

  4. Factors predicting adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointments for patients assessed by the liaison psychiatric team in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O

    2010-01-01

    Several factors may predict adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointment for patients seen in the emergency department (ED) by liaison psychiatric teams. Awareness of these factors would allow for interventions targeted at vulnerable groups.

  5. Major drivers influencing adherence and quality of life during antiviral triple therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suceveanu Andra I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims. Triple therapy with Peg-IFNs, Ribavirin and protease inhibitors raise the treatment success for hepatitis C up to 83%, but also bring together with the significantly higher rates of sustained virologic response (SVR more side effects, interfering with patient’s quality of life (QoL and work productivity. We aimed to analyze the factors influencing the adherence and the QoL during triple therapy using Peg-IFNs, Ribavirin and protease inhibitors in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C with first line therapy failure. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to analyze determinants of retreatment initiation and treatment compliance, according to patient features. Results: We identified as major drivers of retreatment initiation the younger age, the female gender, the urban provenience, the high income, and the psychiatric and alcohol or drugs abuse history. The adherence and the QoL during retreatment therapy were similar, despite the regimen used, and obvious lower in patients with history of previous abandon, drugs and alcohol abuse or hematologic/ psychiatric decompensation. A lower capacity to work and a temporary withdrawal from job necessary to continue the therapy were seen similar in patients taking Boceprevir/Telaprevir. Abandon of therapy without a known reason was more frequent in males, with alcohol and drugs intake history, from rural region, with low income, and with psychiatric disturbances in personal history. Conclusion. Physicians should focus to develop medical strategies or drugs to increase the adherence and to provide a better QoL for patients with chronic hepatitis C making antiviral therapy.

  6. Effectiveness of pharmaceutical care for drug treatment adherence in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira-Santos, Marise; Verani, José Fernando de Souza; Camacho, Luiz Antônio Bastos; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto Ferreira; Ferrante-Silva, Rosele; Klumb, Evandro Mendes

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is a primary determinant of the success and effectiveness of healthcare. Lack of adherence can lead to treatment failure and death. Although studies have shown that pharmaceutical intervention can improve drug treatment for patients with chronic diseases, studies on pharmaceutical care are not only inconsistent, they are scarce and limited to developed countries, include few patients, and are not studied in randomized clinical trials. Systemic lupus erythematosu...

  7. The Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-Up on Medication and Dietary Adherence among Patients after Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Saeed Najafi; Maryam Shaabani; Marzieh Momennassab; Kamran Aghasadeghi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adherence to dietary and medication regimen plays an important role in successful treatment and reduces the negative complications and severity of the disease. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of nurse-led telephone follow-up on the level of adherence to dietary and medication regimen among patients after Myocardial Infarction (MI). Methods: This non-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 100 elderly patients with MI who had re...

  8. The Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-Up on Medication and Dietary Adherence among Patients after Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Seyed Saeed; Shaabani, Maryam; Momennassab, Marzieh; Aghasadeghi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adherence to dietary and medication regimen plays an important role in successful treatment and reduces the negative complications and severity of the disease. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of nurse-led telephone follow-up on the level of adherence to dietary and medication regimen among patients after Myocardial Infarction (MI). Methods: This non-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 100 elderly patients with MI who had refer...

  9. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, O.; Arroyo, R.; Martínez-Yélamos, S.; Marco, M.; Merino, J. A. García; Muñoz, D.; Merino, E.; Roque, A.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6–1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6–94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28–7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months. PMID:27526201

  10. Adherence to insulin treatment in insulin-naïve type 2 diabetic patients initiated on different insulin regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogas Yavuz D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dilek Gogas Yavuz, Sevim Ozcan, Oguzhan DeyneliDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul, TurkeyObjective: We aimed to evaluate adherence to insulin treatment in terms of treatment persistence and daily adherence to insulin injections among insulin-naïve type 2 diabetic patients initiating insulin therapy with basal (long acting, basal-bolus, and premixed insulin regimens in a tertiary endocrinology outpatient clinic.Methods: A total of 433 (mean age of 55.5±13.0 years; 52.4% females insulin-naïve type 2 diabetic patients initiated on insulin therapy were included in this questionnaire-based phone interview survey at the sixth month of therapy. Via the telephone interview questions, patients were required to provide information about persistence to insulin treatment, self-reported blood glucose values, and side effects; data on demographics and diabetes characteristics were obtained from medical records.Results: Self-reported treatment withdrawal occurred in 20.1% patients, while 20.3% patients were nonadherent to daily insulin. Negative beliefs about insulin therapy (24.1% and forgetting injections (40.9% were the most common reasons for treatment withdrawal and dose skipping, respectively. Younger age (49.5±15.0 vs 56.4±12.0 years (P=0.001 and shorter duration of diabetes (4.8±4.3 vs 8.8±6.3 years (P=0.0008 and treatment duration (5.2±2.4 vs 10.7±2.4 months (P=0.0001 were noted, respectively, in discontinuers vs continuers. Basal bolus was the most commonly prescribed insulin regimen (51.0%, while associated with higher likelihood of skipping a dose than regular use (61.3% vs. 46.0%, P=0.04.Conclusions: Persistence to insulin therapy was poorer than anticipated but appeared to be higher in patients with the basal bolus regimen. Negative perceptions about insulin therapy seemed to be the main cause for poor adherence in our cohort.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, insulin treatment adherence

  11. Level of Adherence to Prophylactic Osteoporosis Medication amongst Patients with Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Emamifar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate level of adherence to oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation as well as bisphosphonate amongst patients with PMR and GCA treated with glucocorticoids. Method. A total of 138 patients with the diagnosis of PMR and/or GCA registered in our department in December 2013. In this cross-sectional study we interviewed all the patients to measure level of adherence to calcium and vitamin D, as well as bisphosphonates. Results. Out of the 118 included patients, 88.9% of them were adherent to their prescription. Only 2 patients (1.7% did not take calcium and vitamin D at all and 10 patients (8.5% took their medication infrequently, 9 and 1 out of 10 patients took the medication 50–100% of the time and less than 50% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Sixty-one patients received additional treatment with bisphosphonate and 96.6% were adherent to this therapy. The remaining 3.4% of the patients did not take the medication at all. Forgetfulness, adverse side effects, and lack of understanding of treatment benefits were the most significant causes for nonadherence to calcium and vitamin D. Conclusions. Contrary to what we expected this study found that adherence to osteoporosis preventive medication in patients with PMR and GCA was high.

  12. Perceptions and acceptability of short message services technology to improve treatment adherence amongst tuberculosis patients in Peru: a Focus Group Study.

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    Sandra Albino

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is global health concern and a leading infectious cause of mortality. Reversing TB incidence and disease-related mortality is a major global health priority. Infectious disease mortality is directly linked to failure to adhere to treatments. Using technology to send reminders by short message services have been shown to improve treatment adherence. However, few studies have examined tuberculosis patient perceptions and attitudes towards using SMS technology to increase treatment adherence. In this study, we sought to investigate perceptions related to feasibility and acceptability of using text messaging to improve treatment adherence among adults who were receiving treatment for TB in Callao, Peru.We conducted focus group qualitative interviews with current TB positive and non-contagious participants to understand the attitudes, perceptions, and feasibility of using short message service (SMS reminders to improve TB treatment adherence. Subjects receiving care through the National TB Program were recruited through public health centers in Ventanilla, Callao, Peru. In four focus groups, we interviewed 16 patients. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic network analysis and codebook techniques were used to analyze data.Three major themes emerged from the data: limits on health literacy and information posed challenges to successful TB treatment adherence, treatment motivation at times facilitated adherence to TB treatment, and acceptability of SMS including positive perceptions of SMS to improve TB treatment adherence. The majority of patients shared considerations about how to effectively and confidentially administer an SMS intervention with TB positive participants.The overall perceptions of the use of SMS were positive and indicated that SMS technology may be an efficient way to transmit motivational texts on treatment, health education information, and simple reminders to increase treatment adherence

  13. Delivery of patient adherence support: a systematic review of the role of pharmacists and doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson M; Garfield S; Eliasson L; Jackson C; Raynor DK

    2014-01-01

    Malin Andersson,1,2 Sara Garfield,1,2 Lina Eliasson,3,4 Christina Jackson,3 David K Raynor5 1The Centre for Medication Safety and Service Quality, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London, 2UCL School of Pharmacy, London, 3Atlantis Healthcare, London, 4Centre for Haematology, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, 5School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Abstract: We conducted a systematic review of adherence support programs involvin...

  14. A consensus approach to improving patient adherence and persistence with topical treatment for actinic keratosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stockfleth, Eggert; Peris, Ketty; Guillen, Carlos; Cerio, Rino; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Foley, Peter; Sanches, José; Culshaw, Alex; Erntoft, Sandra; Lebwohl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Topical therapy is important in the treatment of actinic keratosis, but guidance for improving adherence/persistence during topical therapy is still lacking. Objectives To utilize expert consensus to generate a list of recommendations to improve real-world efficacy when prescribing topical therapy for actinic keratosis. Methods An expert panel of eight dermatologists was convened to generate recommendations based on facilitated discussion and consensus generation using a modified D...

  15. Self-reported adherence supports patient preference for the single tablet regimen (STR in the current cART era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterrantino G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Gaetana Sterrantino,1 Lucia Santoro,1 Dario Bartolozzi1,1 Michele Trotta,1 Mauro Zaccarelli21SOD Malattie Infettive, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi, Firenze, 2Istituto Nazionale per le Malattie Infettive "Lazzaro Spallanzani," Roma, ItalyObjective: To analyze self-reported adherence to antiretroviral regimens containing ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI, raltegravir, and maraviroc.Methods: Overall, 372 consecutive subjects attending a reference center for HIV treatment in Florence, Italy, were enrolled in the study, from December 2010 to January 2012 (mean age 48 years. A self-report questionnaire was filled in. Patients were defined as "nonadherent" if reporting one of the following criteria: <90% of pills taken in the last month, ≥1 missed dose in the last week, spontaneous treatment interruptions reported, or refill problems in the last 3 months. Gender, age, CD4, HIV-RNA, years of therapy, and type of antiretroviral regimen were analyzed with respect to adherence.Results: At the time of the questionnaire, 89.8% of patients had <50 copies/mL HIV-RNA and 14.2% were on their first combined antiretroviral therapy. 57% of patients were prescribed a regimen containing ritonavir boosted protease inhibitors (boosted PI, 41.7% NNRTI, 17.2% raltegravir, and 4.8% maraviroc; 49.5% of the subjects were on bis-in-die regimens, while 50.5% were on OD regimens, with 23.1% of these on the single tablet regimen (STR: tenofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz. The nonadherence proportion was lower in NNRTI than in boosted-PI treatments (19.4% vs 30.2%, and even lower in STR patients (17.4%. In multivariable logistic regression, patients with the NNRTI regimen (OR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.34–0.94 and the STR (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22–0.92 reported lower nonadherence. Efavirenz regimens were also associated with lower nonadherence (OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21–0.83, while atazanavir/ritonavir regimens were

  16. Inhaled antibiotics for the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients: challenges to treatment adherence and strategies to improve outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodnár R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Réka Bodnár,1,2 Ágnes Mészáros,2 Máté Oláh,2 Tamás Ágh3 1Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Heim Pál Children’s Hospital, Budapest, Hungary; 2University Pharmacy Department of Pharmacy Administration, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; 3Syreon Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary Background: Inhaled antibiotics (ABs are recommended for use in the therapy of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The aim of this systematic literature review was to identify level of adherence to inhaled ABs and to determine predictors and consequences of nonadherence in CF. Methods: A systematic literature search of English-language articles was conducted in April 2015 using Medline and Embase. No publication date limit was applied. The literature screening was conducted by two independent reviewers. All of the included studies were assessed for quality. Results: The search yielded 193 publications, of which ten met the inclusion criteria and underwent data extraction. Seven studies focused on inhaled tobramycin, one on inhaled colistimethate, one on inhaled levofloxacin, and one on inhaled aztreonam lysine. Medication adherence to inhaled ABs was analyzed by pharmacy refill history, daily phone diary, parent and child self-reports, vials counting, or electronic monitoring. In randomized controlled trials (n=3, proportion of adherent patients (>75%–80% of required doses taken ranged from 86% to 97%; in prospective cohort studies (n=3, adherence rates ranged between 36% and 92%, and in retrospective studies (n=4 it ranged between 60% and 70%. The adherence to inhaled ABs in CF was found to be associated with the complexity of treatment, time of drug administration, age of patients, treatment burden (adverse events, taste, and patient satisfaction. Conclusion: The high diversity of adherence data was because of the different study designs (randomized controlled trials vs real-world studies and the lack

  17. Patient-centered care in affective, non-affective, and schizoaffective groups: patients' opinions and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempier, Raymond; Hepp, Shelanne L; Duncan, C Randy; Rohr, Betty; Hachey, Krystal; Mosier, Karen

    2010-10-01

    An outcome evaluation was conducted to obtain psychiatric inpatients' perspectives on acute care mental health treatment and services. The applicability of diagnostic categories based on affective, non-affective, and schizoaffective disorder were considered in the predictability of responses to treatment regimens and the related services provided in an inpatient psychiatric unit. A multidimensional approach was used to survey patients, which included the DAI-30, the BMQ, the SERVQUAL, and the CSQ-8. Overall, findings indicate that inpatient satisfaction could be improved with tailoring treatment to suit their respective symptoms. Furthermore, this exploratory study demonstrates some preliminary support for the inclusion of patients with a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder as a separate group toward improving acute mental health care while hospitalized. PMID:20480394

  18. The Effect of Two Educational Methods on Knowledge and Adherence to Treatment in Hemodialysis Patients: Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Parvan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with chronic renal disease (CRD deal with many potential problems with hemodialysis for all their life. Regarding the importance of preventing dialysis adverse effects, which are in close connection with lack of knowledge and report on how to train the patients? This study aims at comparing the impact of two methods of face to face training and training pamphlet on complying and informing of hemodialysis treatments. Methods: This clinical trial study was conducted on 58 hemodialysis patients who visited Shahid Rahnemun Teaching hospital, Yazd, Iran, and had required conditions of the research. Data were collected through a questionnaire including personal-social information, several questions to assess the level of compliance and to inform the treatment method. The quantitative analysis of this study used the Statistical Package for Social Sciences SPSS version 13 and descriptive (frequency, mean, standard deviation and inferential (Chi-square, paired t-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA statistics were employed. Results: The mean scores for informing both groups (face to face and training pamphlet were significantly increased. The mean score for adherence to treatments was also significant.Conclusion: In this research, face to face training was found to be more effective than training pamphlet. It seemed to have more strong effect on increasing the level of information and adherence to treatment. To train these people, face to face training should be, thus, preferred.

  19. Evaluation of information retention and adherence to treatment in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus after multidisciplinary group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria da Silva Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To evaluate the retention of information after participation in multidisciplinary group in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM through a phone contact. Method: 122 pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes were included. After diagnosis of gestational diabetes, the patients were referred to the multidisciplinary group where they received medical, nutrition and nursing guidelines related to the disease. After three days these patients received one telephone call from a nurse, who made the same questions regarding the information received. In the statistical analysis, results were presented as absolute and relative frequencies. Results: Most patients 119/122 patients (97.5% were managing to do self glucose monitoring. Twenty-one patients (17.2% reported having difficulty performing the blood glucose, especially finger pricking. When questioning whether the woman was following the proposed diet, 24/122 (19.7% patients said they did not; the meal frequency was not reached by 23/122 (18.9% of the women, and forty-seven (38.5% of the women reported having ingested sugar in the days following the guidance in multidisciplinary group. Conclusion: Regarding the proposed treatment, there was good adherence of patients, especially in relation to blood glucose monitoring. As for nutritional control, we observed greater difficulty in following the guidelines demonstrating the need for long-term monitoring, as well as further clarification to the patients about the importance of nutrition in diabetes management.

  20. Multilevel Correlates of Non-Adherence in Kidney Transplant Patients Benefitting from Full Cost Coverage for Immunosuppressives: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsicano, Elisa Oliveira; Fernandes, Neimar Silva; Colugnati, Fernando Antônio Basile; Fernandes, Natalia Maria Silva; De Geest, Sabina; Sanders-Pinheiro, Helady

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence is the result of the interaction of the macro, meso, micro, and patient level factors. The macro level includes full coverage of immunosuppressive medications as is the case in Brazil. We studied the correlates of immunosuppressive non-adherence in post kidney transplant patients in the Brazilian health care system. Methods Using a cross-sectional design, adherence to immunosuppressives was assessed in a sample of 100 kidney transplant patients using a composite non-adherence score consisting of three methods (self-report [i.e., The Basel Adherence Scale for Assessment of Immunossupressives–BAASIS], collateral report, and immunosuppressive blood levels). Multilevel correlations of non-adherence were assessed (macro, meso, micro and patient level). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the correlates of non-adherence. Results Our sample consisted primarily of male (65%), Caucasians (72%) with a mean age of 45.0 ± 13.5 years old, who received grafts from a living donor (89%), with a mean time after transplantation of 72.3 ± 44.4 months. Prevalence of non-adherence was 51%. Family income higher than five reference wages (21.6 vs. 4%; OR 6.46 [1.35–30.89], p = 0.009; patient level), and having access to private health insurance (35.3% vs. 18.4%; OR 2.42 [0.96–6.10], p = 0.04; meso level) were associated with non-adherence in univariate analysis. Only the higher family income variable was retained in the multiple logistic regression model (OR 5.0; IC: 1.01–25.14; p = 0.04). Conclusions Higher family income was the only factor that was associated with immunosuppressive non-adherence. In Brazil, lower income recipients benefit from better access to care and coverage of health care costs after transplantation. This is supposed to result in a better immunosuppressive adherence compared to high-income patients who have experienced these benefits continuously. PMID:26619070

  1. Treatment adherence with the easypod™ growth hormone electronic auto-injector and patient acceptance: survey results from 824 children and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larroque Sylvain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurately monitoring adherence to treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH enables appropriate intervention in cases of poor adherence. The electronic r-hGH auto-injector, easypod™, automatically records the patient's adherence to treatment. This study evaluated adherence to treatment of children who started using the auto-injector and assessed opinions about the device. Methods A multicentre, multinational, observational 3-month survey in which children received r-hGH as part of their normal care. Physicians reviewed the recorded dose history and children (with or without parental assistance completed a questionnaire-based survey. Children missing ≤2 injections per month (92% of injections given were considered adherent to treatment. Adherence was compared between GH treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced children. Results Of 834 recruited participants, 824 were evaluated. The median (range age was 11 (1-18 years. From the recorded dose history, 87.5% of children were adherent to treatment over the 3-month period. Recorded adherence was higher in treatment-naïve (89.7%, n = 445/496 than in treatment-experienced children (81.7%, n = 152/186 [Fisher's exact test FI(X = 7.577; p = 0.0062]. According to self-reported data, 90.2% (607/673 of children were adherent over 3 months; 51.5% (421/817 missed ≥1 injection over this period (mainly due to forgetfulness. Concordance between reported and recorded adherence was 84.3%, with a trend towards self-reported adherence being higher than recorded adherence. Most children liked the auto-injector: over 80% gave the top two responses from five options for ease of use (720/779, speed (684/805 and comfort (716/804. Although 38.5% (300/780 of children reported pain on injection, over half of children (210/363 considered the pain to be less or much less than expected. Given the choice, 91.8% (732/797 of children/parents would continue using the device. Conclusions

  2. Patients’ beliefs about adherence to oral antidiabetic treatment: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Guénette, Line

    2015-01-01

    Line Guénette,1–3 Sophie Lauzier,1–3 Laurence Guillaumie,2–4 Gabriel Giguère,1 Jean-Pierre Grégoire,1–3 Jocelyne Moisan1–3 1Faculty of Pharmacy, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada; 2Chair on Adherence to Treatments, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada; 3CHU de Québec Research Center, Population Health and Optimal Practices Research Unit, Quebec City, QC, Canada; 4Faculty of Nursing, Lav...

  3. Developing an adherence support intervention for patients on antiretroviral therapy in the context of the recent IDU-driven HIV/AIDS epidemic in Estonia

    OpenAIRE

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Uusküla, Anneli; Sharma, Anjali; Jack A Dehovitz; Amico, K. Rivet

    2013-01-01

    There is limited data on and experience with interventions for antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence support for patients on ART in Eastern Europe. We sought to identify a feasible adherence support intervention for delivery amongst HIV-positive adults receiving care in Estonia, where the HIV/AIDS epidemic has been mainly concentrated among injection drug users. Our application of intervention mapping strategies used existing literature, formative research and multidisciplinary team input to...

  4. "That is why I stopped the ART": Patients' & providers' perspectives on barriers to and enablers of HIV treatment adherence in a South African workplace programme

    OpenAIRE

    Kielmann Karina; Fielding Katherine; Hamilton Robin; Charalambous Salome; Dahab Mison; Churchyard Gavin J; Grant Alison D

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background As ART programmes in African settings expand beyond the pilot stages, adherence to treatment may become an increasing challenge. This qualitative study examines potential barriers to, and facilitators of, adherence to ART in a workplace programme in South Africa. Methods We conducted key informant interviews with 12 participants: six ART patients, five health service providers (HSPs) and one human resources manager. Results The main reported barriers were denial of existen...

  5. Synchronized personalized music audio-playlists to improve adherence to physical activity among patients participating in a structured exercise program: a proof-of-principle feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Alter, David A.; O’Sullivan, Mary; Oh, Paul I.; Redelmeier, Donald A.; Marzolini, Susan; Liu, Richard; Forhan, Mary; Silver, Michael; Goodman, Jack M.; Bartel, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    Background Preference-based tempo-pace synchronized music has been shown to reduce perceived physical activity exertion and improve exercise performance. The extent to which such strategies can improve adherence to physical activity remains unknown. The objective of the study is to explore the feasibility and efficacy of tempo-pace synchronized preference-based music audio-playlists on adherence to physical activity among cardiovascular disease patients participating in a cardiac rehabilitati...

  6. Factors influencing adherence to anti-craving medications and drinking outcomes in patients with alcohol dependence: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Lohit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the factors influencing the pattern and extent of anti-craving medication adherence and drinking outcomes in alcohol-dependent patients. Materials and Methods: Demographic data from 102 inpatients were collected at discharge from hospital. The pattern of anti-craving medication, extent of adherence, and drinking outcome was collected at 1 st , 3 rd , 8 th , and 12 th week follow-up. Patients′ self-reported adherence, medication diary, and simplified medication adherence questionnaire were used and data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Majority (99% were male patients with a mean age of 41.17 ± 9.86 years and 70% belonged to middle socioeconomic status. There was a decrease in the number of patients coming for follow-up over time from 99.01% to 77.45% on day 90. Acamprosate was used in 74% and naltrexone and disulfiram in 7% of patients each. A significant reduction in adherence to acamprosate and naltrexone (P < 0.001 was associated with simultaneous decrease in days to alcohol abstinence and increase in relapse rate compared to adherent group (P < 0.001. Main barriers to adherence included younger age (odds ratio = 1.05 95% [1.01-1.09]; P < 0.01, self-decision, emotional factors, and adverse effects. Conclusions: The study demonstrated the need for safer therapeutic options along with suitable intervention at "grass root level" for sustenance of adherence to anti-craving medication among young adults to prevent relapse and achieve near-complete abstinence from alcohol dependence.

  7. Trust and expectation on psychiatrist and its correlation with satisfaction and adherence in patients with mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUSHAD RAM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Trust and expectation are important aspect of doctor patient relationship and its role in patient’s satisfaction and medication adherence is unclear. Objective To study the levels of trust and expectation on psychiatrist and its relationship with patient’s satisfaction and treatment adherence. Methods One hundred and twenty three consecutive outpatients were recruited on follow-up if they satisfied the selection criteria. They were assessed with socio-demographic and clinical proforma designed for this study, Patient Trust Scale, Patient Satisfaction Survey, Patient Expectations Questionnaire and Medication Adherence Rating Scale. Results There was a high mean score on trust scale (Mean 38.9, SD 8.5 and expectation questionnaire (Mean 13.5, SD 3.3. On Kruskal-Wallis H test significant group differences were observed in nuclear vs joint family type (c2 = 18.496, h2 = .151, df = 1, Sig. = .000 and knowledge of treatment option (medication only vs medication + psychotherapy treatment option (c2 = 18.100, h2 = .148, df = 2, Sig. = .000 and occupational status (employed vs unemployed (c2 = 3.165, h2 =.029, df = 1, Sig. = .056 on the score of PTS. Similar differences were also observed in method of treatment sought before (no treatment vs allopathic (c2 = .065, h2 = .065, df = 3, Sig. = .005, knowledge about treatment option (medication only vs medication + psychotherapy (c2 = .026, h2 = .161, df = 2, Sig. = .000 and occupation (employed vs unemployed (c2 = .061, h2 = .061, df = 1, Sig. = .006 on the score of PEQ. On regression analysis (R2 = .723, F = 156.46, p = .000 value of the score on patient satisfaction was statistically significant as predicted by score on measure of expectation (beta = -0.095, t = -1.966, p = 0.052 and trust (beta = .842, t = 17.504, p = .000. Discussion Levels of patients trust and expectation on physician varies with knowledge about treatment option & occupational status, and significantly associated with

  8. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Grant, Alison D; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N; Fielding, Katherine; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n = 150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n = 147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43.1 % male), CD4+ cell count (median 121.5 cells/μl) and viral load (median 119,000 copies/ml). Virologic suppression at 9 months was achieved in 89.8 % of didactic and 87.9 % of motivational counselling participants (risk ratio [RR] 0.98, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.07, p = 0.62). 82.9 % of didactic and 79.5 % of motivational counselling participants achieved >95 % adherence by pill count at 6 months (RR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.85-1.09, p = 0.51). Participants receiving intensive motivational counselling did not achieve higher treatment adherence or virological suppression than those receiving routinely provided didactic adherence counselling. These data are reassuring that less resource intensive didactic counselling was adequate for excellent treatment outcomes in this setting.

  9. Pastoral power in the community pharmacy: A Foucauldian analysis of services to promote patient adherence to new medicine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Latif, Asam; Boyd, Matthew; Barber, Nick; Elliott, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Community pharmacists play a growing role in the delivery of primary healthcare. This has led many to consider the changing power of the pharmacy profession in relation to other professions and patient groups. This paper contributes to these debates through developing a Foucauldian analysis of the changing dynamics of power brought about by extended roles in medicines management and patient education. Examining the New Medicine Service, the study considers how both patient and pharmacist subjectivities are transformed as pharmacists seek to survey patient's medicine use, diagnose non-adherence to prescribed medicines, and provide education to promote behaviour change. These extended roles in medicines management and patient education expand the 'pharmacy gaze' to further aspects of patient health and lifestyle, and more significantly, established a form of 'pastoral power' as pharmacists become responsible for shaping patients' self-regulating subjectivities. In concert, pharmacists are themselves enrolled within a new governing regime where their identities are conditioned by corporate and policy rationalities for the modernisation of primary care.

  10. An observational, retrospective, UK and Ireland audit of patient adherence to subcutaneous interferon beta-1a injections using the RebiSmart® injection device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Helen Willis,1 Julie Webster,1 Anne Marie Larkin,2 Laura Parkes,31Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, Essex, United Kingdom; 2MySupport Nurse, Quintiles Ireland Ltd, Dublin, Ireland; 3Medical Affairs, Merck Serono Ltd, Feltham, United KingdomBackground: Poor adherence to disease-modifying drugs is associated with an increased risk of relapse in patients with multiple sclerosis. However, adherence is difficult to assess objectively. RebiSmart® (Merck Serono SA, Geneva, Switzerland, a device for subcutaneous (sc injection of interferon (IFN β-1a, features an electronic injection log that can assist in objective monitoring of adherence.Objective: To assess adherence to sc IFN β-1a injections using data from RebiSmart®.Methods: This was a single-group, observational, retrospective audit. Adherence data were collected from patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom and Ireland who had been prescribed sc IFN β-1a and had been using RebiSmart® for a minimum of 24 months.Results: In total, 225 patients were included in the full analysis set; 72% were in the United Kingdom, and 28% were in Ireland. Overall, the mean age was 44.1 years, and 73% were women. Patients received sc IFN β-1a 44 µg (68% or 22 µg (32% three times per week. Mean adherence over the course of 24 months was 95.0% (median, 99.4%, and similar values were observed across all periods. The proportion of patients with 80% or higher adherence was 92.0% at 12 months and 91.1% at 24 months.Conclusion: High adherence to sc IFN β-1a was observed across all patient groups using RebiSmart®, according to 2-year treatment adherence data. This may be partly attributed to the expert support patients received, supplemented by routine and regular contact from the MySupport patient-support program, as well as the self-motivation of patients who persisted with treatment for 2 or more years.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, support program, persistence, objective

  11. Modification of solid phase red cell adherence assay for the detection of platelet antibodies in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%.

  12. A Theory-Based Approach for Developing Interventions to Change Patient Behaviours: A Medication Adherence Example from Paediatric Secondary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Heath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce a Health Psychology approach to changing patient behaviour, in order to demonstrate the value of Health Psychology professional practice as applied within healthcare settings. Health Psychologists are experts in understanding, predicting and changing health-related behaviours at the individual, group and population level. They combine psychological theory, research evidence and service-user views to design interventions to solve clinically relevant behavioural problems and improve health outcomes. We provide a pragmatic overview of a theory and evidence-based Intervention Mapping approach for developing, implementing and evaluating interventions to change health-related behaviour. An example of a real behaviour change intervention designed to improve medication adherence in an adolescent patient with poorly controlled asthma is described to illustrate the main stages of the intervention development process.

  13. A Theory-Based Approach for Developing Interventions to Change Patient Behaviours: A Medication Adherence Example from Paediatric Secondary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Gemma; Cooke, Richard; Cameron, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    In this article we introduce a Health Psychology approach to changing patient behaviour, in order to demonstrate the value of Health Psychology professional practice as applied within healthcare settings. Health Psychologists are experts in understanding, predicting and changing health-related behaviours at the individual, group and population level. They combine psychological theory, research evidence and service-user views to design interventions to solve clinically relevant behavioural problems and improve health outcomes. We provide a pragmatic overview of a theory and evidence-based Intervention Mapping approach for developing, implementing and evaluating interventions to change health-related behaviour. An example of a real behaviour change intervention designed to improve medication adherence in an adolescent patient with poorly controlled asthma is described to illustrate the main stages of the intervention development process. PMID:27417822

  14. The impact of the Danish Oxygen Register on adherence to guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy in COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbæk, Thomas Jørgen; Lange, Peter

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of The Danish Oxygen Register on COPD patients' treatment modalities, survival, and adherence to guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT). DESIGN: The Danish Oxygen Register. SUBJECTS: 8487 COPD patients who received LTOT in the study period from November 1....... 2000: 74.4% vs. 82.2%, Poxygen 15-24h/day (66.2% vs. 85.5%, Poxygen concentrator or liquid oxygen (77.8% vs. 96.9%, Poxygen (29.9% vs. 42.8%, P... with the possibility of re-evaluation of the criteria for LTOT and adjustment for oxygen flow, with no change during the study period (P=0.43). In a representative subsample, 77.1% had smoking habits or measurement of CO-level registered in 1995 compared to 79.6% in year 2000 (P=0.65), and 25.1% vs. 21.2% (P=0...

  15. Factors associated with adherence to nucleos(tide analogs in chronic hepatitis B patients: results from a 1-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jie Peng, Junhua Yin, Shaohang Cai, Tao Yu, Chunxiu Zhong Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Little is known about the factors associated with patient compliance with nucleos(tide analog (NUC treatment for chronic hepatitis B (CHB. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and adherence to NUCs among patients with CHB. A total of 211 CHB patients receiving NUC monotherapy were asked to report the number of prescribed doses of medication they had taken during the last 90 days. A total of four 3-month adherence scores were averaged to obtain a combined rate of NUC adherence during a 1-year follow up period. The mean age of the patients was 29.6 years, 79% were men, and 68% had no prior NUC treatment for CHB. Females, patients without a previous NUC treatment, and those who had NUC drug resistance showed better adherence to NUC treatment, and compliance was better with telbivudine than with lamivudine and entecavir. Keywords: chronic hepatitis B, nucleos(tide analogues, adherence, follow-up, resistance

  16. Patient adherence to evidence-based pharmacotherapy in systolic heart failure and the transition of follow-up from specialized heart failure outpatient clinics to primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, Anne; Schou, Morten; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias;

    2013-01-01

    of evidence-based pharmacotherapy during and after participation in specialized HFCs. METHODS AND RESULTS: Initiation, dosages, and adherence were studied in patients with systolic HF attending HFCs in Denmark from 2002 to 2009. Information was obtained from an electronic patient file and research database...... initiated renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors and beta-blockers. Adherence after 1 year was 93% for RAS inhibitors, 92% for beta-blockers, and 86% for spironolactone. After 3 years, it was 90% for RAS inhibitors, 88% for beta-blockers, and 74% for spironolactone. For patients referred back...

  17. Factors affecting patient dose in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two stages in the X-ray image forming process; first the irradiation of the patient to produce the X-ray pattern in space, known as the primary radiological image, and second, the conversion of this pattern into a visible form. This report discusses the first stage and its interrelation with image quality and patient dose

  18. Adherence to oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation—a population-based retrospective cohort study linking health information systems in the Valencia region, Spain: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Sanfélix-Gimeno, G; Rodríguez-Bernal, C L; Hurtado, I.; Baixáuli-Pérez, C; Librero, J; Peiró, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment, vitamin K antagonists or new oral anticoagulants, is an essential element for effectiveness. Information on adherence to OAC in atrial fibrillation (AF) and the impact of adherence on clinical outcomes using real-world data barely exists. We aim to describe the patterns of adherence to OAC over time in patients with AF, estimate the associated factors and their impact on clinical events, and assess the same issues with convention...

  19. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesellassie M Bezabhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. RESULTS: Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. CONCLUSIONS: Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved

  20. Impact of hypoglycemia on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their quality of life, work productivity, and medication adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez JMS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Janice MS Lopez,1 Kathy Annunziata,2 Robert A Bailey,1 Marcia FT Rupnow,1 Donald E Morisky31Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Raritan, NJ, 2Kantar Health, Princeton, NJ, 3University of California at Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM that correlate with greater risk of hypoglycemia and determine the impact of hypoglycemia on health-related quality of life, work productivity, and medication adherence from a patient perspective.Methods: Data from a large web-based survey were retrospectively analyzed. Adults with a diagnosis of T2DM taking antihyperglycemic agents were included in the analysis. Participants with knowledge of their hypoglycemic history were divided into three groups: those experiencing recent hypoglycemia (previous 3 months, those experiencing nonrecent hypoglycemia, and those never experiencing hypoglycemia.Results: Of the participants with T2DM taking antihyperglycemic agents who were knowledgeable of their hypoglycemia history, 55.7% had ever experienced hypoglycemia. Of those, 52.7% had recent hypoglycemia. Compared with those who never experienced hypoglycemia, those who experienced hypoglycemia tended to: be younger; be more aware of their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels; have higher HbA1c levels; have a higher body mass index; have higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores; be on insulin, sulfonylureas, and/or glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists; and be less adherent to their antihyperglycemic agents. Hypoglycemia interfered with social activities, caused more missed work (absenteeism, more impairment while at work (presenteeism, and decreased overall work productivity compared with patients who had never experienced hypoglycemia. Overall health-related quality of life, as determined by the Short Form-36 health questionnaire, was negatively impacted by hypoglycemia. Both

  1. Predictors and consequences of adherence to the treatment of pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Central Europe and East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Jihyung Hong,1 Diego Novick,1 Tamás Treuer,2 William Montgomery,3 Virginia S Haynes,4 Shenghu Wu,5 Josep Maria Haro61Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Neuroscience Research, Budapest, Hungary; 3Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, NSW, Australia; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, US; 5Eli Lilly China, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 6Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainPurpose: To assess baseline predictors and consequences of medication non-adherence in the treatment of pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD from Central Europe and East Asia.Patients and methods: Data for this post-hoc analysis were taken from a 1-year prospective, observational study that included a total of 1,068 newly-diagnosed pediatric patients with ADHD symptoms from Central Europe and East Asia. Medication adherence during the week prior to each visit was assessed by treating physicians using a 5-point Likert scale, and then dichotomized into either adherent or non-adherent. Clinical severity was measured by the Clinical Global Impressions-ADHD-Severity (CGI-ADHD scale and the Child Symptom Inventory-4 (CSI-4 Checklist. Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL was measured using the Child Health and Illness Profile-Child Edition (CHIP-CE. Regression analyses were used to assess baseline predictors of overall adherence during follow-up, and the impact of time-varying adherence on subsequent outcomes: response (defined as a decrease of at least 1 point in CGI, changes in CGI-ADHD, CSI-4, and the five dimensions of CHIP-CE.Results: Of the 860 patients analyzed, 64.5% (71.6% in Central Europe and 55.5% in East Asia were rated as adherent and 35.5% as non-adherent during follow-up. Being from East Asia was found to be a strong predictor of non-adherence. In East Asia, a family history of ADHD and parental emotional

  2. Sialidases affect the host cell adherence and epsilon toxin-induced cytotoxicity of Clostridium perfringens type D strain CN3718.

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    Jihong Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens type B or D isolates, which cause enterotoxemias or enteritis in livestock, produce epsilon toxin (ETX. ETX is exceptionally potent, earning it a listing as a CDC class B select toxin. Most C. perfringens strains also express up to three different sialidases, although the possible contributions of those enzymes to type B or D pathogenesis remain unclear. Type D isolate CN3718 was found to carry two genes (nanI and nanJ encoding secreted sialidases and one gene (nanH encoding a cytoplasmic sialidase. Construction in CN3718 of single nanI, nanJ and nanH null mutants, as well as a nanI/nanJ double null mutant and a triple sialidase null mutant, identified NanI as the major secreted sialidase of this strain. Pretreating MDCK cells with NanI sialidase, or with culture supernatants of BMC206 (an isogenic CN3718 etx null mutant that still produces sialidases enhanced the subsequent binding and cytotoxic effects of purified ETX. Complementation of BMC207 (an etx/nanH/nanI/nanJ null mutant showed this effect is mainly attributable to NanI production. Contact between BMC206 and certain mammalian cells (e.g., enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells resulted in more rapid sialidase production and this effect involved increased transcription of BMC206 nanI gene. BMC206 was shown to adhere to some (e.g. Caco-2 cells, but not all mammalian cells, and this effect was dependent upon sialidase, particularly NanI, expression. Finally, the sialidase activity of NanI (but not NanJ or NanH could be enhanced by trypsin. Collectively these in vitro findings suggest that, during type D disease originating in the intestines, trypsin may activate NanI, which (in turn could contribute to intestinal colonization by C. perfringens type D isolates and also increase ETX action.

  3. THE EFFECT OF PHENYLACETATE ON THE EXPANSION AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF ADHERENT LAK CELLS FROM PATIENTS WITH HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑宁; 叶胜龙; 孙瑞霞; 赵燕; 汤钊猷

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To improve the preparation of adherent lymphokine-activated killer (A-LAK) cells and study the synergistic anti-tumor effect of phenylacetate (PA) and A-LAK cells. Methods:\tA-LAK cells were obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by using L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PME) to deplete immunosuppressive monocytes. The proliferation of SMMC7721 cell line treated with PA was studied. A-LAK cells were treated with the supernatant of SMMC7721 cells which had been pretreated with PA and the changes of the proliferation and anti-tumor activity of A-LAK cells were investigated. Results: The expansion of A-LAK cells was significantly higher than that of non-adherent LAK (NA-LAK) cells as well as regular LAK cells. The growth of SMMC7721 cells was significantly suppressed by PA. The supernatant of cultured tumor cells intensively suppressed the proliferation and cytotoxicity of A-LAK cells, but the suppressive effect of supernatant treated with PA previously was decreased. Conclusion: A-LAK cells could be simply prepared by using PME, and showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with the combination of PA.

  4. Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160304.html Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival 2 studies highlight disparities in outcomes for uninsured and Medicaid patients To use the sharing features on this ...

  5. Drug adherence and multidisciplinary care in patients with multiple sclerosis: Protocol of a prospective, web-based, patient-centred, nation-wide, Dutch cohort study in glatiramer acetate treated patients (CAIR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepman Theodora

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, for which no definitive treatment is available. Most patients start with a relapsing-remitting course (RRMS. Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs reduce relapses and disability progression. First line DMDs include glatiramer acetate (GA, interferon-beta (INFb-1a and INFb-1b, which are all administered via injections. Effectiveness of DMD treatment depends on adequate adherence, meaning year-long continuation of injections with a minimum of missed doses. In real-life practice DMD-treated patients miss 30% of doses. The 6-month discontinuation rate is up to 27% and most patients who discontinue do so in the first 12 months. Treatment adherence is influenced by the socio-economic situation, health care and caregivers, disease, treatment and patient characteristics. Only a few studies have dealt with adherence-related factors in DMD-treated patients. Self-efficacy expectations were found to be related to GA adherence. Patient education and optimal support improve adherence in general. Knowledge of the aspects of care that significantly relate to adherence could lead to adherence-improving measures. Moreover, identification of patients at risk of inadequate adherence could lead to more efficient care. In the near future new drugs will become available for RRMS. Detailed knowledge on factors prognostic of adherence and on care aspects that are associated with adequate adherence will improve the chances of these drugs becoming effective treatments. We investigate in RRMS patients the relationship between drug adherence and multidisciplinary care, as well as factors associated with adherence. Given the differences in the frequency of administration and in the side effects between the DMDs we decided to study patients treated with the same DMD, GA. Methods/design The Correlative analyses of Adherence In Relapsing remitting MS (CAIR study is

  6. Factors affecting mortality in patients with burns

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    Halil Erbiş

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The increase in life quality and expectancy causes an increase in the elderly population. Improvements in burn treatment resulted in decreased mortality in children and young adults but in elderly patients burns are still an important trauma that should be handed differently than other age groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors effecting mortality in patients with burns over 45 years old. Methods: Fifty-eight patients over 45 years of age, who were treated in our burns unit in the last 3 years were included in our study. Their age, burn percentage and depth, coexisting diseases and mortality rates were examined retrospectively. Results: The average age of surviving patients was 57.4 years while it was 70 years for nonsurviving patients (p=0.002. The width of burn area was 21.1 % in surviving and 50 % in nonsurviving patients (p<0.01. The effect of additional coexistent diseases on mortality was significant (p=0.001. The most common reasons of mortality were sepsis and congestive heart failure. Conclusion: We found out that the age, percentage of burns and coexistent diseases had a negative effect on success of treatment and mortality. Mortality rates will decrease in these cases with careful follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 240-243

  7. Genetically Guided Statin Therapy on Statin Perceptions, Adherence, and Cholesterol Lowering: A Pilot Implementation Study in Primary Care Patients

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    Josephine H. Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Statin adherence is often limited by side effects. The SLCO1B1*5 variant is a risk factor for statin side effects and exhibits statin-specific effects: highest with simvastatin/atorvastatin and lowest with pravastatin/rosuvastatin. The effects of SLCO1B1*5 genotype guided statin therapy (GGST are unknown. Primary care patients (n = 58 who were nonadherent to statins and their providers received SLCO1B1*5 genotyping and guided recommendations via the electronic medical record (EMR. The primary outcome was the change in Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire, which measured patients’ perceived needs for statins and concerns about adverse effects, measured before and after SLCO1B1*5 results. Concurrent controls (n = 59 were identified through the EMR to compare secondary outcomes: new statin prescriptions, statin utilization, and change in LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c. GGST patients had trends (p = 0.2 towards improved statin necessity and concerns. The largest changes were the “need for statin to prevent sickness” (p < 0.001 and “concern for statin to disrupt life” (p = 0.006. GGST patients had more statin prescriptions (p < 0.001, higher statin use (p < 0.001, and greater decrease in LDL-c (p = 0.059 during follow-up. EMR delivery of SLCO1B1*5 results and recommendations is feasible in the primary care setting. This novel intervention may improve patients’ perceptions of statins and physician behaviors that promote higher statin adherence and lower LDL-c.

  8. Adherencia a Psicoterapia en Pacientes con Trastornos de Ansiedad Adherence to Psychotherapy in Patients With Anxiety Disorders

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    Mariana Krebs

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available El estudio tuvo por objetivo detectar los factores de riesgo para la adherencia a psicoterapia en una muestra intencionada de 188 pacientes diagnosticados con trastornos de ansiedad, ingresados al Programa de Trastornos por Ansiedad de un centro de salud mental en Santiago de Chile entre los años 2005 y 2009. Se examinaron las variables sexo, nivel socioeconómico (NSE, nivel de ansiedad inicial medido por la escala de Hamilton, comorbilidad con trastorno depresivo, presencia de coterapia farmacológica, existencia de tratamientos anteriores, inasistencias avisadas y no avisadas previamente a sesión de psicoterapia y nivel de experiencia del terapeuta. Utilizando x², el test exacto de Fisher, t de Student para muestras independientes y regresión logística, se encontró que el NSE, el nivel de ansiedad inicial y las inasistencias sin previo aviso del paciente se asociaron con la adherencia a psicoterapia.The goal of this study was to detect the risk factors for adherence to psychotherapy in patients with anxiety disorders. The sample consists of 188 subjects who entered the Anxiety Disorders Program of a mental health center in Santiago, Chile during the 2005-2009 period. The variables examined were sex, socioeconomic status (SES, initial anxiety level according to the Hamilton Scale, comorbidity with depressive disorder, presence of pharmacological co-therapy, existence of prior treatments, absences from the therapeutic sessions with and without prior notice from the patient, and the therapists' expertise level. Using the x² test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test for independent samples and logistic regression, it was found that SES, initial anxiety level, and absences from the therapeutic sessions without prior notice from the patient were associated with adherence to psychotherapy.

  9. ADHERENCIA AL TRATAMIENTO DE PACIENTES HIPERTENSOS ATENDIDOS EN ASSBASALUD ESE, MANIZALES (COLOMBIA 2011 Treatment adherence of hypertensive patients' being attended by Assbasalud ESE, Manizales (Colombia 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jaime Castaño-Castrillón

    2012-09-01

    hypertensive disease. Objective. Studying adherence to treatment concerning hypertensive patients being attended in Manizales, Colombia, by the state-run Assbasalud programme in 2011. Materials and Methods. This was a cross-sectional study involving a population of 200 hypertensive people (73.5% were female, average age was 63.76 years being attended by the state-run Assbasalud ESE, Manizales, during the second half of 2011. The Martín-Bayarre-Grau (MBG and Morisky-Green (MG questionnaires were used for evaluating the social support network, as well as the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS questionnaire. Results.45% of patients were totally adherent according to MG and 51% totally adherent according to MBG. Regarding the MOS questionnaire, 12.29 people on average were in a patient's social support network, 74.83% received emotional support, 80.45% material aid, 78.61% were involved in leisure and entertainment-related activities, 83.28% were receiving affective support and enalapril was the drug most used in treatment (17.9%, followed by verapamil (10.1%. According to the MBG questionnaire, adherence significantly depended on variables such as education (p=0.000, knowledge about the disease (p=0.032 and MOS social support questionnaire results (p=0.000. The MG questionnaire revealed very few significant relationships for treatment adherence. Conclusion. The study revealed low adherence levels associated with having a low educational level, poor knowledge regarding the disease and poor social support, thereby making it necessary that Assbasalud ESE take more effective action, especially through its healthcare personnel. The MBG questionnaire had greater consistency regarding a description of adherence than the MG questionnaire.

  10. Evidence-based medication adherence in Hispanic patients with systolic heart failure in a disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Kathy; Beltran, Julieta; Tamariz, Leonardo; Julian, Elyse; Dias, Andre; Trahan, Pat; Arcement, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The Hispanic population is the fastest growing minority in the United States, yet there is a paucity of data regarding patient follow-up in heart failure disease management programs (HFDMPs) and evidence-based medication adherence. The purpose of this study is to measure the compliance of evidence-based medication use, specifically measuring angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers (BBs) in the Hispanic population, and compare these data to the white and black population. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of 561 patients enrolled in an HFDMP at Jackson Medical Hospital in Miami, Florida. At the first visit, 82% of Hispanic, 75% of white, and 79% of black patients were taking ACEIs/ARBs, but only 21% of Hispanic, 35% of white, and 32% of black patients were taking target doses. Hispanic patients are as compliant with ACEI/ARB and BB regimens as are the white and black populations in HFDMPs in a setting of similar socioeconomic features.

  11. Adherence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to epithelial cells in vitro and in pig gut loops is affected by bacterial culture conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Xianhua; Feng, Yanni; Wheatcroft, Roger; Chambers, James; Gong, Joshua; Gyles, Carlton L.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of bacterial culture conditions on adherence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain 86-24 in vivo to pig enterocytes and to compare the results with adherence in vitro to cultured HEp-2 and IPEC-J2 cells. Growth of O157:H7 in MacConkey broth (MB) resulted in almost no adherence to both HEp-2 and IPEC-J2 cells; prior exposure of the bacteria to pH 2.5 reduced adherence. There was greater adherence by bacteria from s...

  12. Adherence to drug-refill is a useful early warning indicator of virologic and immunologic failure among HIV patients on first-line ART in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad El-Khatib

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Affordable strategies to prevent treatment failure on first-line regimens among HIV patients are essential for the long-term success of antiretroviral therapy (ART in sub-Saharan Africa. WHO recommends using routinely collected data such as adherence to drug-refill visits as early warning indicators. We examined the association between adherence to drug-refill visits and long-term virologic and immunologic failure among non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI recipients in South Africa. METHODS: In 2008, 456 patients on NNRTI-based ART for a median of 44 months (range 12-99 months; 1,510 person-years were enrolled in a retrospective cohort study in Soweto. Charts were reviewed for clinical characteristics before and during ART. Multivariable logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis assessed associations with virologic (two repeated VL>50 copies/ml and immunologic failure (as defined by WHO. RESULTS: After a median of 15 months on ART, 19% (n = 88 and 19% (n = 87 had failed virologically and immunologically respectively. A cumulative adherence of <95% to drug-refill visits was significantly associated with both virologic and immunologic failure (p<0.01. In the final multivariable model, risk factors for virologic failure were incomplete adherence (OR 2.8, 95%CI 1.2-6.7, and previous exposure to single-dose nevirapine or any other antiretrovirals (adj. OR 2.1, 95%CI 1.2-3.9, adjusted for age and sex. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, the virologic failure rate by month 48 was 19% vs. 37% among adherent and non-adherent patients respectively (logrank p value = 0.02. CONCLUSION: One in five failed virologically after a median of 15 months on ART. Adherence to drug-refill visits works as an early warning indicator for both virologic and immunologic failure.

  13. The Influence of Physical Therapy Guideline Adherence on Healthcare Utilization and Costs among Patients with Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinliang; Kolber, Morey J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is common and associated healthcare costs are significant. While clinical practice guidelines have been established in an attempt to reduce costs and healthcare utilization, it is unclear if adherence to physical therapy guidelines for those with LBP is efficacious. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess current evidence and evaluate the impact of physical therapy guideline adherence on subsequent healthcare costs and utilization for patients with LBP. Methods An electronic search was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL (EBSCO Host), AMED (Ovid), and PEDro. Studies included in this review were published in peer reviewed journals and the primary mode of treatment was administered by a physical therapist. Also, the definition of adherence was clearly defined based on claims data and at least one measure of cost or utilization reported. Quality assessment was evaluated via a modified Downs and Black checklist. Due to the conceptual heterogeneity in variable measurements, data were qualitatively synthesized and stratified by reported utilization and cost measures. Results A total of 256 results were identified and after omitting duplicates, 4 articles were retained, which were all retrospective in nature. Quality scores ranged between 19 and 21 points out of a possible 26 on the modified Downs and Black checklist. All identified studies used the same definition of guideline adherence, which focused on billing active codes and minimizing use of passive codes. The results demonstrated trends that, with a few exceptions, suggested those patients with LBP that were treated with an adherent guideline program demonstrated decreased healthcare utilization and an overall healthcare savings. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that adherence to established clinical practice guidelines may assist with decreasing healthcare utilization and costs. Additional research based on prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to provide

  14. A pilot study to improve adherence among MS patients who discontinue treatment against medical advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jared; Bruce, Amanda; Lynch, Sharon; Strober, Lauren; O'Bryan, Sean; Sobotka, Deborah; Thelen, Joan; Ness, Abigail; Glusman, Morgan; Goggin, Kathy; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Catley, Delwyn

    2016-04-01

    Between 30 and 50% of MS patients may prematurely discontinue disease modifying therapies. Little research has examined how to best talk with patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether telephone counseling increases disease modifying therapy (DMT) re-initiation among nonadherent patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants were eligible if they had relapsing-remitting disease, had stopped taking a DMT, and had no plan to re-initiate treatment despite a provider recommendation. Following a baseline assessment, 81 patients were randomly assigned to either five 20 min, weekly sessions of Motivational Interviewing/Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MI-CBT) or Treatment as Usual (TAU) with brief education. At 10 weeks, patients initially assigned to TAU switched over to MI-CBT. Compared to patients in the TAU group, patients undergoing MI-CBT were significantly more likely to indicate they were re-initiating DMT (41.7 vs. 14.3%). These significant results were replicated among patients crossing over from TAU to MI-CBT. Treatment satisfaction was high, with 97% of participants reporting that they would recommend MI-CBT to other patients with MS. Results of this pilot study provide initial support for the use of MI-CBT among MS patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice.Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01925690.

  15. A pilot study to improve adherence among MS patients who discontinue treatment against medical advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jared; Bruce, Amanda; Lynch, Sharon; Strober, Lauren; O'Bryan, Sean; Sobotka, Deborah; Thelen, Joan; Ness, Abigail; Glusman, Morgan; Goggin, Kathy; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Catley, Delwyn

    2016-04-01

    Between 30 and 50% of MS patients may prematurely discontinue disease modifying therapies. Little research has examined how to best talk with patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether telephone counseling increases disease modifying therapy (DMT) re-initiation among nonadherent patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants were eligible if they had relapsing-remitting disease, had stopped taking a DMT, and had no plan to re-initiate treatment despite a provider recommendation. Following a baseline assessment, 81 patients were randomly assigned to either five 20 min, weekly sessions of Motivational Interviewing/Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MI-CBT) or Treatment as Usual (TAU) with brief education. At 10 weeks, patients initially assigned to TAU switched over to MI-CBT. Compared to patients in the TAU group, patients undergoing MI-CBT were significantly more likely to indicate they were re-initiating DMT (41.7 vs. 14.3%). These significant results were replicated among patients crossing over from TAU to MI-CBT. Treatment satisfaction was high, with 97% of participants reporting that they would recommend MI-CBT to other patients with MS. Results of this pilot study provide initial support for the use of MI-CBT among MS patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice.Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01925690. PMID:26563147

  16. Adherence to surveillance guidelines for dysplasia and colorectal carcinoma in ulcerative and Crohn's colitis patients in the Netherlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne F van Rijn; Paul Fockens; Peter D Siersema; Bas Oldenburg

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study adherence to the widely accepted surveillance guidelines for patients with long-standing colitis in the Netherlands. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all 244 gastroenterologists in the Netherlands. RESULTS: The response rate was 63%. Of all gastroenterologists, 95% performed endoscopic surveillance in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and 65% in patients with Crohn's colitis. The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) guidelines were followed by 27%, while 27% and 46% followed their local hospital protocol or no specific protocol, respectively. The surveillance was correctly initiated in cases of pancolitis by 53%, and in cases of left-sided colitis by 44% of the gastroenterologists. Although guidelines recommend 4 biopsies every 10 cm, less than 30 biopsies per colonoscopy were taken by 73% of the responders. Only 31%, 68% and 58% of the gastroenterologists referred patients for colectomy when low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or Dysplasia Associated Lesion or Mass (DALM) was present, respectively. CONCLUSION: Most Dutch gastroenterologists perform endoscopic surveillance without following international recommended guidelines. This practice potentially leads to a decreased sensitivity for dysplasia, rendering screening for colorectal cancer in this population highly ineffective.

  17. A self-regulation lifestyle program for post-cardiac rehabilitation patients has long-term effects on exercise adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Veronica; De Gucht, Veronique; van Exel, Henk; Maes, Stan

    2014-04-01

    As maintenance of lifestyle change and risk factor modification following completion of cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to be notoriously difficult, we developed a brief self-regulation lifestyle program for post-cardiac rehabilitation patients. Randomized-controlled trial. Following completion of cardiac rehabilitation 210 patients were randomized to receive either a lifestyle maintenance program (n = 112) or standard care (n = 98). The program was based on self-regulation principles and consisted of a motivational interview, 7 group sessions and home assignments. Risk factors and health behaviors were assessed at baseline (end of cardiac rehabilitation), and 6 and 15 months thereafter. ANCOVAs showed a significant effect of the lifestyle program on exercise behavior at 15-month follow-up. Mediation analysis demonstrated that the treatment effect on exercise behavior could be explained by self-regulation skills. Chi squared tests showed that patients in the intervention group had significantly fewer uncontrolled risk factors as compared to the control group. Finally, the lifestyle intervention program was associated with a 12 % reduction in self-reported cardiac hospital admission rates. This trial indicates that a relatively brief, theory-based lifestyle program is capable of inciting and maintaining improvements in exercise adherence. It is suggested that patients may need ongoing attention and guidance, for example in the form of (internet-based) booster sessions, as long-term consolidation of changes is arduous. PMID:23334387

  18. ADHERENCE TO LONG-TERM TREATMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND NON-COMPLIANCE WITH MEDICAL RECOMMENDATIONS: THE OPINION OF PATIENTS AND PHYSICIANS BY THE RESULTS OF FOCUSED INTERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Semenova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the subjective opinion of patients and doctors about their individual experiences with adherence to treatment for chronic cardiovascular diseases in the group focused interview of patients and their physicians.Material and methods. 3 groups of patients from clinical studies adhering to the doctor's recommendations (focus-group 1 and 3 groups of patients hospitalized for cardiovascular events, not adhering to recommendations after discharge (focus-group 2 and one focus-group of doctors were analyzed. Group discussion was performed by a moderator (experienced sociologist, with no medical training who was not familiar with the patients and physicians.Results. 47 patients (25 (53.2 % men and 22 (46.8% women and 6 doctors participated in the study. Paternalistic model of communication with doctors present in the minds of all patients. In patients of the first group this results in a full confidence in the doctor and compliance with all recommendations while in patients of the second group lack of care in the outpatient clinic makes them "offended" by the underestimation of their trust and causes non-compliance. Physicians intuitively divide patients into less and more "attractive" for themselves. This "division" on the one hand may have some predictive value in respect of patients’ adherence to a further treatment, and on the other hand, the "doctors’ prejudice" in relation to the patient may adversely effect the behavior of the patients and failure to follow the recommendations in the future.Conclusion. The significant paternalism on the part of the patient on the one hand increases the responsibility of the physician for his patient, and on the other hand – increases opportunities for his influence on the patients’ behavior.

  19. Exercise training in older patients with systolic heart failure: Adherence, exercise capacity, inflammation and glycemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming;

    2009-01-01

    ). There were no changes in quality of life. Conclusions. The effect of exercise training in these older CHF-patients was not as impressive as reported in younger and more selected patients. More studies on the efficiency of exercise training that reflect the age- and co-morbidity of the majority of CHF......Objectives. Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF. Design. All patients diagnosed with CHF over 3 years were screened for inclusion and exclusion criteria. Fifty two patients with systolic CHF...... (LVEFexercise training twice weekly for 8 weeks. Results. Mean age was 68.2 (+/-SD 11.3) years. Despite marked improvements in physical fitness (workload, 6 minute walk test, incremental shuttle walk test and sit to stand test), there were no changes in serological...

  20. Roundtable on public policy affecting patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Robert M; Raymond, Brian

    2011-03-01

    On April 15, 2010, patient safety experts were assembled to discuss the adequacy of the public policy response to the Institute of Medicine report "To Err is Human" 10 years after its publication. The experts concluded that additional government actions should be considered. Actions that deserve consideration include the development of an educational campaign to improve public and provider understanding of the issue as a means to support change similar to successful public health campaigns, support the evolution of payment reform away from fee for service, create a clearer aim or goal for patient safety activities, support the development and use of better safety measures to judge status and improvement, and support for additional learning of what works particularly on implementation issues. Participants included: Moderator Robert Crane, senior advisor, Kaiser Permanente Participants Doug Bonacum, vice president, Safety Management, Kaiser Permanente Janet Corrigan, PhD, president and CEO, National Quality Forum Helen Darling, MA, president and CEO, National Business Group on Health Susan Edgman-Levitan, PA, executive director, John D. Stoeckle Center for Primary Care Innovation, Massachusetts General Hospital David M. Lawrence, MD, MPH, chairman and CEO (Retired), Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals, Inc Lucian Leape, MD, adjunct professor of Health Policy, Harvard School of Public Health Diane C. Pinakiewicz, president, National Patient Safety Foundation Robert M. Wachter, MD, professor and associate chairman, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. PMID:22026014

  1. Study on medication adherence in patients with chronic heart failure%慢性心力衰竭患者服药依从性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟静; 康晓凤; 李峥; 吕蓉

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the status of nedication adherence among patients with heart failure(HF) and analyze its influencing factors.Methods A total of 200 HF patients in wards or emergency observation rooms were recruited and were investigated with questionnaires about general information,HF knowledge,medication related beliefs,confidence of medication adherence,and behaviors of medication adherence.Multiple ordinal regression was used to analyze the influencing factors of medication adherence.Results Medication adherence in the participants was in low level.The complete adherence rate was 40.00%.Multiple ordinal regression showed that age ,history of HF ,HF knowledge and medication related beliefs were influencing factors of medication adherence ( P <0.01 or P <0.05).Conclusion The status of medication adherence is not optimistic among patients with chronic heart failure.Special attention should be paid to the elderly and patients with long disease history,and interventions about HF knowledge and drug -related beliefs should be implemented to improve their medication adherence and ensure the therapeutic effect.%目的 调查慢性心力衰竭患者的服药依从状况,并探讨其影响因素.方法 采用一般资料问卷、心力衰竭知识问卷、服药相关信念问卷、坚持服药的信心评分表及服药依从性问卷对200例住院和急诊留观的慢性心力衰竭患者进行调查,并采用多元有序Ordinal回归对患者服药依从性的影响因素进行分析.结果 患者服药依从性差,完全依从的仅有40.00%;回归结果提示年龄、病程、心力衰竭知识与服药相关信念是服药依从性的影响因素(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 慢性心力衰竭患者的服药依从性不容乐观,应特别关注老年及病程长的患者,并针对其心力衰竭知识、服药相关信念给予干预,以提高其服药依从性,进而保证治疗效果.

  2. Affective disorders in patients with HIV infection: impact of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the AIDS pandemic, affective disorders (such as depressed mood) were seen in a considerable number of HIV-1-infected individuals. These disorders were a result of the poor physical condition of the patients, brain involvement by the virus (e.g. encephalopathy) or a reaction to disadvantageous living conditions (losing friends, jobs, etc.). In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), mental illness related to physical weakness is declining, as is the incidence of HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. However, depressed mood and fatigue caused by efavirenz (a standard component of HAART) is becoming increasingly important, particularly in individuals who are infected long-term with HIV-1. Whatever the cause of affective disorders, their presence has been shown to negatively influence adherence to HAART and HIV-1 disease progression. Specialist knowledge of HIV-1 infection, and HAART and its psychiatric complications (particularly in subgroups of patients such as drug abusers and older people), is needed to care adequately for patients. Furthermore, prospective studies are needed to more fully differentiate between the various aetiologies of affective disorders seen in individuals living with HIV/AIDS and to determine their incidence and prevalence. Such information is important to ensure that affective disorders are recognised and adequately treated, which will in turn improve the efficacy of HAART. PMID:16734500

  3. [Adherence to psychopharmacological treatment: Psychotherapeutic strategies to enhance adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencer, R; Korn, D

    2015-05-01

    Effective psychopharmacological medication with good tolerability represents the cornerstone of treatment for severe mental illness; however, the 1-year adherence rates are only approximately 50%. The term adherence emphasizes the collaborative responsibility of the clinician and the patient for a positive treatment outcome. Reasons for non-adherence are manifold and include patient-specific factors, such as self-stigmatization, lack of social and familial support, cognitive impairment and substance use besides insufficient effectiveness and the occurrence of side effects of the psychotropic drugs. To enhance adherence, both clinician and patient have to fully understand all the reasons for and against adherence to medication before a collaborative decision is made on future long-term treatment. A positive attitude towards medication critically depends on whether patients feel that the medication supports the attainment of the individual goals. PMID:25903501

  4. Effectiveness of motivational interviewing to improve therapeutic adherence in patients over 65 years old with chronic diseases: A cluster randomized clinical trial in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Moral, Roger; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Pulido Ortega, Laura; Criado Larumbe, Margarita; Roldán Villalobos, Ana; Fernández García, José Ángel; Parras Rejano, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) in improving medication adherence in older patients being treated by polypharmacy. Methods: Cluster randomized clinical trial in 16 primary care centers with 27 health care providers and 154 patients. Thirty-two health care providers were assigned to an experimental (EG) or control group (CG). Interventions: MI training program and review of patient treatments. Providers in the EG carried out MI, whereas...

  5. Importance of family/social support and impact on adherence to diabetic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Miller TA; DiMatteo MR

    2013-01-01

    Tricia A Miller, M Robin DiMatteoDepartment of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, USAAbstract: Diabetes mellitus affects 24 million individuals in the US. In order to manage their diabetes successfully, patients must adhere to treatment regimens that include dietary restrictions, physical activity goals, and self-monitoring of glucose levels. Numerous factors affect patients' ability to adhere properly, eg, self-efficacy, treatment expectations, health bel...

  6. Drug adherence behavior among hypertensive out-patients at a tertiary health institution in Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Mukora-Mutseyekwa FN; Chadambuka EM

    2013-01-01

    Fadzai NN Mukora-Mutseyekwa, Elizabeth M ChadambukaFaculty of Health Sciences, Africa University, Mutare, ZimbabweObjectives: This study investigated the level of drug adherence among hypertensive outpatients at a tertiary hospital in Zimbabwe. Specific objectives included measurement of blood pressure (BP) control achievement, estimating prevalence of drug adherence behavior, and establishing the association between drug adherence behavior and achievement of BP control.Methods and materials:...

  7. Counseling patients on facial volume replacement and adherence with posttreatment instructions

    OpenAIRE

    Doris Day

    2010-01-01

    Doris DayDay Dermatology and Aesthetics New York, USAAbstract: Use of injectable volume replacement products has increased dramatically in the US in recent years. An optimal outcome with volume replacement depends on a thorough ­knowledge of the products on the part of the dermatologic/aesthetic physician specialist, identification of patients with a likelihood of benefiting from volume replacement procedures, selection of an appropriate product for the individual patient, and effecti...

  8. Adherence and health care costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuga AO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aurel O Iuga,1,2 Maura J McGuire3,4 1Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Johns Hopkins University, 3Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Medication nonadherence is an important public health consideration, affecting health outcomes and overall health care costs. This review considers the most recent developments in adherence research with a focus on the impact of medication adherence on health care costs in the US health system. We describe the magnitude of the nonadherence problem and related costs, with an extensive discussion of the mechanisms underlying the impact of nonadherence on costs. Specifically, we summarize the impact of nonadherence on health care costs in several chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma. A brief analysis of existing research study designs, along with suggestions for future research focus, is provided. Finally, given the ongoing changes in the US health care system, we also address some of the most relevant and current trends in health care, including pharmacist-led medication therapy management and electronic (e-prescribing. Keywords: patient, medication, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, noncompliance, cost

  9. Three types of self-efficacy associated with medication adherence in patients with co-occurring HIV and substance use disorders, but only when mood disorders are present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reif S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Reif,1 Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell,1,2 Jia Yao,1 Sara LeGrand,1,2 Anna Uehara,2 Edgar Asiimwe,2 Evelyn Byrd Quinlivan31Duke Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, 2Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, 3Center for Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Adherence with medication regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a life-saving behavior for people with HIV infection, yet adherence is challenging for many individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. Medication-taking self-efficacy, which is the confidence that one can take one's medication as prescribed, is associated with better adherence with HIV medication. However, little is known about the influence that other kinds of self-efficacy have on adherence with HIV medication, especially among HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. We sought to examine the relationship between adherence with HIV medication among substance users and three specific kinds of self-efficacy, ie, one's confidence that one can communicate with medical providers, get support, and manage one's mood. We further sought to examine whether symptoms of depression and anxiety moderate these relationships.Methods: Patients were recruited from three HIV clinics in the southeastern United States as part of an integrated study of treatment for HIV and substance use.Results: We interviewed 154 patients with HIV and substance use who reported taking HIV medications. Based on symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, 63% had probable depression and/or anxiety. Higher levels of self-efficacy in provider communication (β = 3.86, P < 0.01, getting needed support (β = 2.82, P < 0.01, and mood management (β = 2.29, P < 0.05 were related to better self-reported adherence with HIV

  10. Adherent invasive Escherichia coli strains from patients with Crohn's disease survive and replicate within macrophages without inducing host cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, A L; Boudeau, J; Barnich, N; Perruchot, M H; Colombel, J F; Darfeuille-Michaud, A

    2001-09-01

    Escherichia coli strains recovered from Crohn's disease (CD) lesions are able to adhere to and invade cultured intestinal epithelial cells. We analyzed the behavior within macrophages of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) strains isolated from patients with CD. All the 15 AIEC strains tested were able to replicate extensively within J774-A1 cells: the numbers of intracellular bacteria increased 2.2- to 74.2-fold at 48 h over that at 1 h postinfection. By use of murine peritoneal macrophages and human monocyte-derived-macrophages, the reference AIEC strain LF82 was confirmed to be able to survive intracellularly. Transmission electron micrographs of AIEC LF82-infected macrophages showed that at 24 h postinfection, infected cells harbored large vacuoles containing numerous bacteria, as a result of the fusion of several vacuoles occurring after 8 h postinfection. No lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, no sign of DNA fragmentation or degradation, and no binding to fluorescein isothlocyanate-labeled annexin V were observed with LF82-infected J774-A1 cells, even after 24 h postinfection. LF82-infected J774-A1 cells secreted 2.7-fold more tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) than cells stimulated with 1 microg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/ml. No release of interleukin-1beta was observed with LPS-prestimulated J774-A1 cells infected with AIEC LF82. These findings showed that (i) AIEC strains are able to survive and to replicate within macrophages, (ii) AIEC LF82 replication does not induce any cell death of the infected cells, and (iii) LF82-infected J774-A1 cells release high levels of TNF-alpha. These properties could be related to some features of CD and particularly to granuloma formation, one of the hallmarks of CD lesions. PMID:11500426

  11. Adherence with Preventive Medication in Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burgess

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal adherence with preventive medication is common and often unrecognised as a cause of poor asthma control. A number of risk factors for nonadherence have emerged from well-conducted studies. Unfortunately, patient report a physician's estimation of adherence and knowledge of these risk factors may not assist in determining whether non-adherence is a significant factor. Electronic monitoring devices are likely to be more frequently used to remind patients to take medication, as a strategy to motivate patients to maintain adherence, and a tool to evaluate adherence in subjects with poor disease control. The aim of this paper is to review non-adherence with preventive medication in childhood asthma, its impact on asthma control, methods of evaluating non-adherence, risk factors for suboptimal adherence, and strategies to enhance adherence.

  12. Importance of family/social support and impact on adherence to diabetic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller TA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tricia A Miller, M Robin DiMatteoDepartment of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, USAAbstract: Diabetes mellitus affects 24 million individuals in the US. In order to manage their diabetes successfully, patients must adhere to treatment regimens that include dietary restrictions, physical activity goals, and self-monitoring of glucose levels. Numerous factors affect patients' ability to adhere properly, eg, self-efficacy, treatment expectations, health beliefs, and lack of social support. Consequently, diabetes management can be quite complex, requiring lifelong commitment and drastic changes to the patient's lifestyle. Empirical studies have shown positive and significant relationships between social support and treatment adherence among patients with diabetes. Social support from family provides patients with practical help and can buffer the stresses of living with illness. However, the exact mechanism by which social support affects patient adherence is not yet completely understood. Further research is needed to address how the differences in types of support, such as functional or emotional support, are linked to outcomes for patients. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is known of the impact of social and family support on treatment adherence in patients with diabetes and to explore the current methods and interventions used to facilitate family support for diabetic patients.Keywords: patient adherence, patient compliance, diabetes management, support, family, social

  13. Anticoagulation and Clinical Outcomes in Heart Failure Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: Findings From the ADHERE Registry

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    Zubin J. Eapen, MD; Xiaojuan Mi, PhD; Gregg C. Fonarow, MD; Soko Setoguchi, MD, DrPH;

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The risks and benefits of anticoagulation for patients with both heart failure and atrial fibrillation are unclear. We hypothesized that anticoagulation was associated with improved clinical outcomes of heart failure patients with atrial fibrillation independent of other risk factors. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for new users of oral anticoagulation (warfarin without contraindications, discharged home alive, and stratified by CHADS2 score. Outcomes of interest were propensity score-adjusted estimates of the effects of warfarin at discharge on all-cause mortality, thromboembolic events, major adverse cardiovascular events, and bleeding events. Among 10,494 patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation, the 2249 patients newly treated with warfarin had lower 1-year mortality (27.7% vs 39.3% for CHADS2 score ≤ 3 [P 3 [P 3: 0.78 [0.66-0.93]. In conclusion, warfarin use in heart failure patients with atrial fibrillation was associated with improved survival at 1 year independent of baseline CHADS2 score. However, there was no significant reduction in clinical events, such as thromboembolic or major adverse cardiovascular events at 1 year that might simply explain the survival benefit associated with warfarin.

  14. The Effect of Medicinal Education on Adherence Taking Warfarin in Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS and Atrial Fibrilation (AF Patients at PKU Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jastria Pusmarani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve warfarin medication adherence in patient with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS and Atrial Fibrillation (AF, giving education with leaflet administration is one of the solutions. This study was aim to know the impact of pharmacist education with using prepared leaflet on the adherence to warfarin in ACS and AF patients. This study used pre test and post test with control group design. Data were collected prospectively during 8 weeks in June–July 2014 at the ambulatory ACS and AF patients at PKU Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta hospital, Indonesia. Data were collected by medical record and the questionnaire using Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS. Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis. The results shows pre test and post test value in the control group was p=0.194 and pre and post test value in the test group was p=0.058. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 after giving education with leaflet. The education with leaflet had no effect to adherence in warfarin in ACS and AF patients at PKU Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta hospital.

  15. Predictors of Patient Cognitive Therapy Skills and Symptom Change in Two Randomized Clinical Trials: The Role of Therapist Adherence and the Therapeutic Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christian A.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Shelton, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous research has found that therapist adherence to concrete, problem-focused cognitive therapy (CT) techniques predicts depressive symptom change (e.g., Feeley, DeRubeis, & Gelfand, 1999). More recently, Strunk, DeRubeis, Chui, and Alvarez (2007) demonstrated that in-session evidence of patients' use of CT skills was related to a…

  16. Adherence to standard-dose or low-dose statin treatment and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol response in type 2 diabetes patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, F. M.; Voorham, J.; Hak, E.; Denig, P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between adherence, dose and LDL-cholesterol response in patients with type 2 diabetes initiating statin treatment. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This cohort study was performed using data for 2007-2012 from the Groningen Initiative to Analyse Type 2 Diabetes Tr

  17. The Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-Up on Medication and Dietary Adherence among Patients after Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Seyed Saeed; Shaabani, Maryam; Momennassab, Marzieh; Aghasadeghi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adherence to dietary and medication regimen plays an important role in successful treatment and reduces the negative complications and severity of the disease. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of nurse-led telephone follow-up on the level of adherence to dietary and medication regimen among patients after Myocardial Infarction (MI). Methods: This non-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 100 elderly patients with MI who had referred to the cardiovascular clinics in Shiraz. Participants were selected and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups using balanced block randomization method. The intervention group received a nurse-led telephone follow-up. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, Morisky’s 8-item medication adherence questionnaire, and dietary adherence questionnaire before and three months after the intervention. Data analysis was done by the SPSS statistical software (version 21), using paired t-test for intra-group and Chi-square and t-test for between groups comparisons. Significance level was set at0.05). However, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in this regard after the intervention (P<0.05). The mean differences of dietary and medication adherence scores between pre- and post-tests were significantly different between the two groups. Independent t-test showed these differences (P=0.001). Conclusion: The results of the present study confirmed the positive effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up as a method of tele-nursing on improvement of adherence to dietary and medication regimen in the patients with MI. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201409148505N8 PMID:27382586

  18. A Comparison between The Effectiveness of Short Message Service and Reminder Cards Regarding Medication Adherence in Patients with Hypertension: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslakpak, Masumeh Hemmati; Safaie, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is increasing rapidly in developing countries. Today, modern technologies are suggested as the tools used to enhance medication adherence. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of short message service (SMS) to reminder cards with regard to medication adherence in patients with hypertension. Methods: The present study is a randomized controlled clinical trial. The subjects consisted of 123 patients with hypertension at the clinical-educational center of Sayyed-Al Shohada, Urmia, who met the study criteria. Selected based on the convenience method, the samples were randomly divided into three groups: the SMS group, the reminder-cards group, and the control group. The subjects in the SMS group were sent 6 text messages a week for three months, and the subjects in the reminder-cards group were trained in how and in what order to use their cards. Hill-Bone medication adherence scale was completed by all the participants before and three months after the intervention. Data analysis was performed in SPSS software, using one-way ANOVA. Hill-Bone medication adherence scale was completed by all the participants before and three months after the intervention. Data analysis was performed in SPSS software, using one-way ANOVA. Results: The results of ANOVA test demonstrated that the mean scores of medication adherence were statistically different among the three groups of control (46.63±2.99), SMS (57.70±2.75) and the reminder cards (57.51±2.69) after the intervention (P0.05). Conclusion: The findings of the present research demonstrated that training and distance-monitoring via SMS and reminder cards promote medication adherence of patients. Therefore, healthcare teams and nurses are recommended to apply such training methods. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2015110917059N2 PMID:27382587

  19. Hypertension knowledge in urban elderly patients: comparison between adherents to traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangping Lin; Huining Lei; Fang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare knowledge about hypertension between elderly Chinese urban patients with preferences for either traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) or Western medicine (WM).Methods Elderly (≥ 65 years old) patients with hypertension who prefer TCM treatment (n=112) or WM (n=126) were questioned about hypertension.Their answers were compared.Results Only 32.6% of participants correctly identified hypertension as a main risk factor of coronary heart disease and stroke,22.3% of patients answered that the main purpose of hypertension control was preventing cardiovascular disease.Other major reasons for these patients to seek medical treatment for their hypertension included:persuasion by physicians or their family members (21.6%),alleviating symptoms such as headache and dizziness (16.8%),lowering blood pressure without knowing specific reason (12.4%).The predictors for poor knowledge of hypertension were similar irrespective of preference for WM or TCM treatment,and included those with lower levels of education and older age.Television and newspaper (46.8%) were the most frequent sources of hypertension information for both groups.Among those who preferred TCM treatment,"TCM has fewer side effects than WM" and "TCM cures disease while WM only alleviates symptoms" were common beliefs held.Conclusion This study shows that knowledge of hypertension is similar among Chinese urban patients with preferences for either WM or TCM treatment and that misunderstandings about hypertension are common among the elderly patients.In order to control hypertension effectively,public health education is necessary.This should target those with a lower level of education and older age.

  20. Significant improvements in self-reported gastrointestinal tolerability, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and adherence with lopinavir/ritonavir tablet formulation compared with soft gel capsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parekh Paras

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tablet formulation of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r; Kaletra® has many advantages over the soft gel capsule (SGC formulation, including lower pill count, no refrigeration requirement, and no dietary restrictions. These advantages may help improve patient compliance and therefore increase adherence to treatment. However, there are limited data regarding patient preferences and only recently was the comparative efficacy and tolerability data of LPV/r SGC versus tablet formulation presented at an international conference. To address this deficit, we conducted a market research survey to assess potential tolerability benefits, patient satisfaction, changes in adherence, and formulation preference in patients switching from SGCs to the tablet formulation. Data from 332 patients who switched from LPV/r SGCs twice-daily (BID to tablets BID and 41 patients who switched from LPV/r SGCs BID or once daily (QD to tablets QD were analyzed. Results Switching from SGCs to a tablet formulation of LPV/r was associated with increased patient satisfaction, tolerability and self-reported adherence to treatment; gastrointestinal side effects were reduced. In addition, respondents indicated that they preferred the tablet formulation to the SGC. Conclusion The LPV/r tablet formulation provides HIV-infected patients with multiple benefits over the SGC in terms of tolerability and convenience. Additional assessments to further define the tolerability profile of the LPV/r tablet, including studies using once-daily dosing, are warranted.

  1. Manipulation of patient-provider interaction: discussing illness representations or action plans concerning adherence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, N.C.M.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Bensing, J.M.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    According to Leventhal's Self-Regulatory Model of Illness, patients have ideas and action plans related to the management of their disease. The aim of this study is to examine whether ideas and action plans relating to hypertension change as a result of general practitioner's (GP's) discussing them

  2. Choroidal Freckling in Pediatric Patients Affected by Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagge, Aldo; Nelson, Leonard B; Capris, Paolo; Traverso, Carlo Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Greater understanding of choroidal freckling in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has changed the previous belief that choroidal lesions are unusual in eyes with this disease. In fact, the high frequency of freckling suggests that the choroid is a structure commonly affected in patients with NF1. A review of patients aged 16 years or younger was performed. Recent studies using near-infrared reflectance imaging have shown that choroidal freckling frequently occurred in pediatric patients. As a result of these findings, some authors have suggested that choroidal freckling should be considered as a new diagnostic criterion for NF1. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53(5):271-274.].

  3. Developing an adherence support intervention for patients on antiretroviral therapy in the context of the recent IDU-driven HIV/AIDS epidemic in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Uusküla, Anneli; Sharma, Anjali; DeHovitz, Jack A; Amico, K Rivet

    2013-01-01

    There is limited data on and experience with interventions for antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence support for patients on ART in Eastern Europe. We sought to identify a feasible adherence support intervention for delivery amongst HIV-positive adults receiving care in Estonia, where the HIV/AIDS epidemic has been mainly concentrated among injection drug users (IDUs). Our application of intervention mapping (IM) strategies used existing literature, formative research and multidisciplinary team input to produce a brief clinic-based intervention entitled the Situated Optimal Adherence Intervention Estonia (sOAI Estonia) which uses both Next-Step Counseling (NSC) and Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model approach to facilitate integration of ART into the context and demands of daily life. We present the intervention development process, the resulting sOAI Estonia approach, and describe a randomized controlled trial (RCT) which is under way to evaluate the intervention (results due in spring 2013). PMID:23391132

  4. Patient adherence to and tolerability of self-administered interferon β-1a using an electronic autoinjection device: a multicentre, open-label, phase IV study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lugaresi Alessandra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achieving good adherence to self-injected treatments for multiple sclerosis can be difficult. Injection devices may help to overcome some of the injection-related barriers to adherence that can be experienced by patients. We sought to assess short-term adherence to, and tolerability of, interferon (IFN β-1a administered via electronic autoinjection device in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS. Methods BRIDGE (RebiSmart to self-inject Rebif serum-free formulation in a multidose cartridge was a 12-week, multicentre, open-label, single-arm, observational, Phase IV study in which patients self-administered IFN β-1a (titrated to 44 μg, subcutaneously (sc, three times weekly, via electronic autoinjection device. Patients were assessed at baseline and 4-weekly intervals to Week 12 or early termination (ET for: physical examinations; diary card completion (baseline, Weeks 4, 8 only; neurological examinations (baseline, Week 12/ET only; MS Treatment Concern Questionnaire (MSTCQ; Weeks 4, 8, 12 only; Convenience Questionnaire (Week 12 only; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS; and Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT; baseline only. Adherence was defined as administration of ≥ 80% of scheduled injections, recorded by the autoinjection device. Results Overall, 88.2% (105/119; intent-to-treat population of patients were adherent; 67.2% (80/119 administered all scheduled injections. Medical reasons accounted for 35.6% (31/87 of missed injections, forgetfulness for 20.6% (18/87. Adherence did not correlate with baseline Expanded Disability Status Scale (P = 0.821 or PASAT (P = 0.952 scores, or pre-study therapy (P = 0.303. No significant changes (baseline-Week 12 in mean HADS depression (P = 0.482 or anxiety (P = 0.156 scores were observed. 'Overall convenience' was the most important reported benefit of the autoinjection device. Device features associated with handling and ease of use were highly

  5. Reminder systems to improve patient adherence to tuberculosis clinic appointments for diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qin; Abba, Katharine; Alejandria, Marissa M; Sinclair, David; Balanag, Vincent M; Lansang, Mary Ann D

    2014-01-01

    Background People with active tuberculosis (TB) require six months of treatment. Some people find it difficult to complete treatment, and there are several approaches to help ensure completion. One such system relies on reminders, where the health system prompts patients to attend for appointments on time, or re-engages people who have missed or defaulted on a scheduled appointment. Objectives To assess the effects of reminder systems on improving attendance at TB diagnosis, prophylaxis, and ...

  6. Patient adherence to tuberculosis treatment: A systematic review of qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Munro, Salla A; Lewin, Simon A; Smith, Helen J; Engel, Mark E; Atle Fretheim; Jimmy Volmink

    2007-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Every year nearly nine million people develop tuberculosis—a contagious infection, usually of the lungs—and about two million people die from the disease. Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, bacteria that are spread in airborne droplets when people with active tuberculosis sneeze or cough. Tuberculosis can be cured by taking several strong antibiotics daily for at least six months but many patients fail to complete this treatment because the drug...

  7. Psychiatrists’ awareness of adherence to antipsychotic medication in patients with schizophrenia: results from a survey conducted across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares JM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available José Manuel Olivares,1 Köksal Alptekin,2 Jean-Michel Azorin,3 Fernando Cañas,4 Vincent Dubois,5 Robin Emsley,6 Philip Gorwood,7 Peter M Haddad,8 Dieter Naber,9 George Papageorgiou,10 Miquel Roca,11 Pierre Thomas,12 Guadalupe Martinez,13 Andreas Schreiner141Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Meixoeiro, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, Spain; 2Department of Psychiatry, Dokuz Eylül University School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey; 3Department of Psychiatry, Sainte Marguerite Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Dr R Lafora, Madrid, Spain; 5Cliniques Universitaires St-Luc, Bruxelles, Belgium; 6Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa; 7Sainte-Anne Hospital, Paris Descartes University and INSERM U894, Paris, France; 8Greater Manchester West Mental Health National Health Service Foundation Trust and Department of Psychiatry, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 9Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Hamburg, Germany; 10Department of Psychiatry, Evangelismos General Hospital, Athens, Greece; 11Unidad de Psiquiatría, Hospital Juan March, Institut Universitari d’Investigació en Ciències de la Salut, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; 12Department of Psychiatry, Fontan Hospital CHRU Lille, UDSL, University North of France, Lille, France; 13Medical Affairs, Janssen, Madrid, Spain; 14Medical Affairs, Janssen, Neuss, GermanyBackground: Nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia, although the rates vary according to means of assessment and patient population. Failure to adhere to medication can have a major impact on the course of illness and treatment outcomes, including increasing the risk of relapse and rehospitalization. Understanding psychiatrists’ perception of the causes and consequences of nonadherence is crucial to addressing adherence problems

  8. Non-Persistence and Non-Adherence of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Therapy with GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Thomas; Mueller, Sabrina; Groth, Antje;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our main aim was to assess the level of persistence and adherence to therapy with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in the United Kingdom (UK) and Germany, also by comparing once- (OD) with twice-a-day (BID) therapy. METHODS...... with the first prescription of a GLP-1 receptor agonist. Non-persistence (NP) was defined as treatment gap >90 days. Non-adherence (NA) was defined as medication possession ratio 90 days) only. RESULTS: In the UK sample......, 1905 T2DM patients started a treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists (mean age: 55.5 years, 47.2% female). In the German sample, 1627 T2DM patients started a treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists (mean age: 56.6 years, 51.4% female). Percentage of NP patients after 12 months was 29.5% in the UK and 36...

  9. Cue-responding behaviors during pharmacy counseling sessions with patients with asthma about inhaled corticosteroids: Potential relations with medication beliefs and self-reported adherence.

    OpenAIRE

    Driesenaar, J.A.; de Smet, P A G M; Van Hulten, R; Noordman, J.; van Dulmen, A M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine cue-responding behavior at the pharmacy while counseling about inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in relation to medication adherence and medication beliefs. Patients with asthma aged ≥18 years using ICS were recruited from 12 pharmacies. Counseling sessions were video-recorded. Patients' emotional and informational cues and pharmacists' and pharmacy technicians' cue-responding behaviors were coded using an expanded version of the Medical Interview Aural Rating...

  10. Cue-Responding Behaviors During Pharmacy Counseling Sessions With Patients With Asthma About Inhaled Corticosteroids: Potential Relations With Medication Beliefs and Self-Reported Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driesenaar, Jeanine A; De Smet, Peter A G M; van Hulten, Rolf; Noordman, Janneke; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine cue-responding behavior at the pharmacy while counseling about inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in relation to medication adherence and medication beliefs. Patients with asthma aged ≥18 years using ICS were recruited from 12 pharmacies. Counseling sessions were video-recorded. Patients' emotional and informational cues and pharmacists' and pharmacy technicians' cue-responding behaviors were coded using an expanded version of the Medical Interview Aural Rating Scale. The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire assessed patients' ICS concern and necessity beliefs. Self-reported ICS adherence was measured by four questions. During the 86 sessions, patients expressed on average 2.3, mostly informational, cues (70.8%). In 26.7% of the sessions, no cues were expressed. Pharmacists' and technicians' responses to emotional cues (59.3%) were mostly inadequate, and to informational cues mostly appropriate (63.6%). Providing inappropriate information (20.3%) was related to higher concerns post session (p < .05), and cue exploration to higher self-reported adherence at 3 months (p < .05). Apparently, providers' responses to patients' cues might have therapeutic value. In addition, patients might need to be encouraged to ask questions and express their concerns. PMID:26940701

  11. Symptom dimensions of affective disorders in migraine patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, M. A.; Pijpers, J. A.; Wardenaar, K. J.; van Zwet, E. W.; van Hemert, A. M.; Zitman, F. G.; Ferrari, M. D.; Penninx, B. W.; Tervvindt, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A strong association has been established between migraine and depression. However, this is the first study to differentiate in a large sample of migraine patients for symptom dimensions of the affective disorder spectrum. Methods: Migraine patients (n = 3174) from the LUMINA (Leiden Univ

  12. Changes in biochemical, hemodynamic, and dialysis adherence parameters in hemodialysis patients during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamsi, Shaikha; Binsaleh, Fatima; Hejaili, Fayez; Karkar, Ayman; Moussa, Dujana; Raza, Hamad; Parbat, Parkash; Al Suwida, Abdulkareem; Alobaili, Saad; AlSehli, R; Al Sayyari, Abdulla

    2016-04-01

    This paper aimed to study the effect of Ramadan fasting on biochemical and clinical parameters and compliance for dialysis. A prospective multicenter observational cross-sectional study comparing fasting with a non-fasting stable adult hemodialysis patients for demographic and biochemical parameters, compliance with dialysis, inter-dialytic weight gain, pre- and post-blood pressure, and frequency of intradialytic hypotensive episodes was carried out. Six hundred thirty-five patients, of whom 64.1% fasted, were studied. The fasters were younger (53.3 ± 16.2 vs. 58.4 ± 16.1 years; P = 0.001) but had similar duration on dialysis (P = 0.35). More fasters worked (22.0% vs. 14.6%; P = 0.001) and missed dialysis sessions during Ramadan. No differences were noted between groups in sex, diabetic status, or dialysis shift or day. There were no differences in the pre- and post-dialysis blood pressure; serum potassium, albumin or weight gain; diabetic status; sex; and dialysis shift time or days. However, serum phosphorous was significantly higher in the fasting group (2.78 ± 1.8 vs. 2.45 ± 1.6 mmol/L; P = 0.045). There were no intragroup differences in any of the parameters studied when comparing the findings during Ramadan with those in the month before Ramadan. Fasters were significantly younger and more likely to be working, to miss dialysis sessions, and to have higher serum phosphorous levels. No other differences were observed. PMID:26420510

  13. Associations among correlates of schedule adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART): a path analysis of a sample of crack cocaine using sexually active African-Americans with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J S; Schönnesson, L Nilsson; Williams, M L; Timpson, S C

    2008-02-01

    Adherence to HIV medication regimens is a function of multiple dimensions including psychological functioning, social support, adherence self-efficacy and optimism regarding treatment. Active substance use can also negatively affect adherence. An understanding of the nature of the associations among the correlates of adherence can better inform the design of interventions to improve adherence. This study developed an exploratory path model of schedule adherence using data from a sample 130 African-American HIV-positive crack cocaine users on highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART). This model was based on the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping developed by Lazarus and Folkman. Following the theory, the effects of psychological distress on schedule adherence were mediated by patients' relationship with their doctor and optimism towards antiretroviral treatment. Adherence was also associated with patients' self-efficacy regarding their medical regimen which, in turn, was associated with their social support.

  14. New aspects on patients affected by dysferlin deficient muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinge, Lars; Aboumousa, Ahmed; Eagle, Michelle; Hudson, Judith; Sarkozy, Anna; Vita, Gianluca; Charlton, Richard; Roberts, Mark; Straub, Volker; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene lead to limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy and distal anterior compartment myopathy. A cohort of 36 patients affected by dysferlinopathy is described, in the first UK study of clinical, genetic, pathological and biochemical data. The diagnosis was established by reduction of dysferlin in the muscle biopsy and subsequent mutational analysis of the dysferlin gene. Seventeen mutations were novel; the majority of mutations were small deletions/insertions, and no mutational hotspots were identified. Sixty-one per cent of patients (22 patients) initially presented with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, 31% (11 patients) with a Miyoshi phenotype, one patient with proximodistal mode of onset, one patient with muscle stiffness after exercise and one patient as a symptomatic carrier. A wider range of age of onset was noted than previously reported, with 25% of patients having first symptoms before the age of 13 years. Independent of the initial mode of presentation, in our cohort of patients the gastrocnemius muscle was the most severely affected muscle leading to an inability to stand on tiptoes, and lower limbs were affected more severely than upper limbs. As previous anecdotal evidence on patients affected by dysferlinopathy suggests good muscle prowess before onset of symptoms, we also investigated pre-symptomatic fitness levels of the patients. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were very active and sporty before the onset of symptoms which makes the clinical course of dysferlinopathy unusual within the different forms of muscular dystrophy and provides a challenge to understanding the underlying pathomechanisms in this disease. PMID:19528035

  15. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  16. Does adherence to treatment mediate the relationship between patients' treatment outcome expectancies and the outcomes of pain intensity and recovery from acute low back pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haanstra, Tsjitske M; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Spriensma, Alette S; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Christopher G; de Vet, Henrica C W; Ostelo, Raymond W J G

    2015-08-01

    It is believed that patients' expectancies about the effectiveness of treatment influence their treatment outcomes, but the working mechanism is rarely studied in patients with low back pain. Theoretical models suggest that adherence to treatment may be an important pathway. The aim of this study was to assess the mediating role of adherence to treatment in the relationship between expectancies and the outcomes of recovery and pain intensity in patients with acute low back pain. This study used data from a randomized placebo-controlled trial of paracetamol for acute low back pain. Expectancies were measured with the Credibility Expectancy Questionnaire. Adherence was measured with a medication diary. Pain intensity was recorded daily in a diary on a 0 to 10 pain scale, and recovery was defined as the first of 7 consecutive days scoring 0 or 1 on a 6-point pain scale. Cox regression (dependent variable: recovery) and linear mixed-model analyses (dependent variable: daily pain intensity scores) were performed. The "difference in coefficients" approach was used to establish mediation. A total of 1573 participants were included in current analyses. There was a small but highly significant relationship between expectancies and outcomes; 3.3% of the relationship between expectancies and recovery and 14.2% of the relationship between expectancies and pain intensity were mediated by adherence to treatment. This study does not convincingly support the theory that adherence is a key pathway in the relationship between treatment outcome expectancies and recovery and pain intensity in this acute low back pain population. PMID:25906348

  17. Are physicians' ratings of pain affected by patients' physical attractiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, H D; Ross, M A; von Baeyer, C L

    1990-01-01

    The degree to which physical attractiveness and nonverbal expressions of pain influence physicians' perceptions of pain was investigated. Photographs of eight female university students were represented in four experimental conditions created by the manipulation of cosmetics, hairstyles, and facial expressions: (a) attractive-no pain, (b) attractive-pain, (c) unattractive-no pain, and (d) unattractive-pain. Each photograph was accompanied by a brief description of the patient's pain problem that was standard across conditions. Medical residents (N = 60) viewed the photographs and rated each patient's pain, distress, negative affective experience, health, personality, blame for the situation, and the physician's own solicitude for the patient. The results showed that physicians' ratings of pain were influenced both by attractiveness of patients and by nonverbal expressions of pain. Unattractive patients, and patients who were expressing pain, were perceived as experiencing more pain, distress, and negative affective experiences than attractive patients and patients who were not expressing pain. Unattractive patients also received higher ratings of solicitude on the doctor's part and lower ratings of health than attractive patients. Physician's assessments of pain appear to be influenced by the physical attractiveness of the patient. PMID:2367884

  18. A comparison of patient adherence and preference of packaging method for oral anticancer agents using conventional pill bottles versus daily pill boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, P W; Pond, G R; Pond, B J; Leung, V; Siu, L L

    2007-07-01

    Adherence to medications is an important issue in oncology due to the increasing number of anticancer agents, such as targeted therapies, formulated for oral dosing. A prospective, crossover design was utilized in which patients on capecitabine were randomly assigned to one of two packaging methods for one cycle, and then switched over to the alternate packaging method in the subsequent cycle. Twenty-five patients were accrued to this study. Adherence rates were similar when using the daily pill boxes (17/21 = 81%) and when using the conventional pill bottles (18/21 = 86%). However, more patients were satisfied with the daily pill boxes (61% versus 11%, P = 0.027), preferred the daily pill boxes (61% versus 17%, P = 0.061), and thought the daily pill boxes were more helpful in reminding them to take their medications (50% versus 11%, P = 0.070). In conclusion, this small pilot study did not demonstrate that the use of daily pill boxes improved patient adherence with capecitabine, but patient satisfaction and preference for this packaging method were greater than for the conventional pill bottles. Further exploration of this intervention in a larger study is warranted. PMID:17587364

  19. Patient survey to identify reasons for non-adherence and elicitation of quality of life concepts associated with immunosuppressant therapy in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muduma G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorden Muduma,1 Francis C Shupo,2 Sophie Dam,3 Natalia A Hawken,3 Samuel Aballéa,3 Isaac Odeyemi,1 Mondher Toumi4 1Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd, Chertsey, 2Creativ-Ceutical Ltd, London, UK; 3Creativ-Ceutical Ltd, Paris, 4Public Health (EA 3279, Faculty of Medicine, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France Background: Renal transplantation (RT is considered the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease compared to dialysis, offering better health-related quality of life (HRQoL and higher survival rates. However, immunosuppressants are essential for the long-term survival of kidney grafts and patients’ non-adherence to their medication leads to poor outcomes. Immunosuppressants can also significantly alter patients’ HRQoL because of their side effects and the complex chronic medication regimen they represent. Purpose: To elicit key concepts related to adherence to immunosuppressant therapy (IT and reasons for non-adherence in terms of patient reported outcomes, side effects, and the impact of the medication on HRQoL in RT population, including patient preference of once daily over twice-daily immunosuppressive regimen. Results were used to develop an IT-specific conceptual framework and provide suggestions for improving patients’ adherence to IT. Materials and methods: Interviews were conducted with three clinical experts to determine key concepts related to RT and immunosuppressants. Thirty-seven participants in four focus groups were asked to cite important concepts related to adherence and impact of IT on HRQoL and to rate them. Qualitative analysis was conducted to code participants’ responses. Results: Non-adherence among participants where admitted was unintentional. The reason for this included forgetfulness, interference with lifestyle, being asleep at the time the medication should be taken, change in routine, and impact of side effects. Overall, participants reported that the evening dose was more problematic to remember

  20. Effect of number and type of antidiabetes medications on adherence and glycemia of ambulatory type 2 diabetes patients in southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisa R

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the influence of number and type of antidiabetes medications on adherence and glycemia of ambulatory type 2 diabetes patients in southwestern Nigeria.Methods: A cross-sectional study using pre-tested structured questionnaire among 176 consented patients recruited from the endocrinology clinics of two teaching hospitals between November, 2010 and January, 2011; and a retrospective review of case notes of the cohort for details of prescribed medications and blood glucose values. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Tests of proportions were evaluated using Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test as appropriate. The differences in mean fasting blood glucose (FBG between and among categorical variables were compared using student t-test and ANOVA respectively, with p4 medications. Adherence was better among patients on >4 medications compared to those on ≤4 medications (p=0.05. However, patients on >4 medications were mostly older adults (>60 years of age, and they were in the majority (66.7% who had tertiary education compared to 33.3% of those on ≤4 medications who had tertiary education (p=0.02. Adherence rates to antidiabetes medications were in the ranking of oral antidiabetes medications (OAM alone (50.0% > insulin plus OAM (44.0% > insulin alone (41.7% with no significant difference (p=0.77. There was a significant difference in mean FBG among patients on >4 medications (172.1 ±61.1mg/dL versus (198.8 ±83.8mg/dL among those on ≤4 medications (p=0.02. Conclusion: Prescribing more than four medications is linked to improved adherence and glycemic outcome. However, age and educational background of patients are important factors that need to be considered when prescribing multiple medications for type 2 diabetes.