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Sample records for affect pancreatic tumor

  1. Analysis of risk factors affecting the prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Ming; Yuan Chunhui; Xiu Dianrong; Shi Xueying; Tao Liyuan; Ma Zhaolai; Jiang Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are a type of tumors with the characteristics of easy metastasis and recurrence.Till date,the risk factors affecting the prognosis are still in the debate.In this study,several risk factors will be discussed combined with our cases and experience.Methods Thirty-three patients diagnosed as pNETs were enrolled and the clinical features,blood tests,pathological features,surgical treatment,and follow-up data of these patients were collected and analyzed.Results In this study,operation time of G3 cases was longer than G1/G2 cases (P=0.017).The elevated level of tumor markers such as AFP,CEA,Ca125,and Ca19-9 may predict easier metastasis,earlier recurrence,and poor prognosis (P=0.007).The presence of cancer embolus and nerve invasion increases along with the TNM stage (P=0.037 and P=0.040),and the incidence of positive surgical margin increased (P=0.007).When the presence of nerve invasion occurs,the chance of cancer embolus and lymph node metastasis also increases (P=0.016 and P=0.026).Conclusions pNETs were tumors with the features of easy recurrence and metastasis and many risk factors could affect its prognosis such as the elevated levels of tumor markers and the presence of nerve invasion,except some recognized risk factors.If one or more of these factors existed,postoperative treatments may be needed to improve prognosis.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 and its metabolites affect pancreatic tumor growth in vivo

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    Nuhn Philipp

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer (PaCa is a fatal human cancer due to its exceptional resistance to all current anticancer therapies. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is significantly overexpressed in PaCa and seems to play an important role in cancer resistance to anticancer treatment. The inhibition of HO-1 sensitized PaCa cells to chemo- and radiotherapy in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the effects of HO-1 and its metabolites biliverdin, carbon monoxide and iron on PaCa cells. PaCa cell lines with divergent HO-1 expression patterns were used in a murine orthotopic cancer model. HO-1 expression and activity was regulated by zinc (inhibition and cobalt (induction protoporphyrin. Furthermore, the influence of cellular HO-1 levels and its metabolites on effects of standard chemotherapy with gemcitabine was tested in vivo and in vitro. Results High HO-1 expression in PaCa cell lines was associated with increased chemoresistance in vitro. Chemoresistance to gemcitabine was increased during HO-1 induction in PaCa cells expressing low levels of HO-1. The inhibition of HO-1 activity in pancreatic tumors with high HO-1 boosted chemotherapeutic effects in vivo significantly. Furthermore, biliverdin and iron promoted PaCa resistance to chemotherapy. Consequently, specific iron chelation by desferrioxamine revealed profound anticancerous effects. Conclusion In summary, the inhibition of HO-1 and the chelation of iron in PaCa cells were associated with increased sensitivity and susceptibility of pancreatic tumors to chemotherapy in vivo. The metabolites biliverdin and iron seem to be involved in HO-1-mediated resistance to anticancer treatment. Therefore, HO-1 inhibition or direct interference with its metabolites may evolve new PaCa treatment strategies.

  3. Dynamic CT of pancreatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoki, T.

    1983-05-01

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 19 patients with clinically diagnosed pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. There were 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, three with inflammatory pancreatic masses, two with cystadenoma, one with insuloma, and three with peripancreatic tumors. Computed tomography was performed with a Varian-V-360-3 scanner; scanning was for 30 consecutive sec at 3 sec intervals after the bolus injection of 50 ml of contrast medium into the antecubital vein. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) may be more useful than conventional contrast CT because it facilitates: (1) correct evaluation of tumor vascularity allowing a differential diagnosis; (2) location of the boundary between tumor and a nontumor tissue; (3) detection of small tumors; and (4) visualization of pancreatic invasion by peripancreatic tumors. In addition, contrast enhancement and the degree of vascular proliferation can be quantitatively assessed by analyzing time-density curves.

  4. Dynamic CT of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 19 patients with clinically diagnosed pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. There were 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, three with inflammatory pancreatic masses, two with cystadenoma, one with insuloma, and three with peripancreatic tumors. Computed tomography was performed with a Varian-V-360-3 scanner; scanning was for 30 consecutive sec at 3 sec intervals after the bolus injection of 50 ml of contrast medium into the antecubital vein. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) may be more useful than conventional contrast CT because it facilitates: (1) correct evaluation of tumor vascularity allowing a differential diagnosis; (2) location of the boundary between tumor and a nontumor tissue; (3) detection of small tumors; and (4) visualization of pancreatic invasion by peripancreatic tumors. In addition, contrast enhancement and the degree of vascular proliferation can be quantitatively assessed by analyzing time-density curves

  5. Castlemans Disease Mimetizing Pancreatic Tumor

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    Franz Robert Apodaca-Torrez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Angiofollicular lymph node hyperplasia or Castleman’s disease is a rare clinical condition. Knowledge about etiology and physiopathology; and treatment management as well are yet to be defined. Unicentric presentation of this disease affecting single lymph nodes in the mediastinum seems to be the most common presentation. Castleman’s disease localized in the pancreas topographic area that mimics a pancreatic neoplasm is an even more uncommon event, with available published data of less than 15 cases until now. Case report We present a 64-year-old male patient with a six-month past history of asthenia, adynamia, and lack of general clinical conditions. Imaging studies showed a nodular hypoechoic mass in the pancreatic head. Enucleation of the lesion was performed. Histopathological study revealed unicentric form of Castleman’s Disease. Conclusions Castleman’s disease mimetizing pancreatic tumor is uncommon and it also curses with a difficult preoperative diagnosis. Surgery seems to be the best therapeutic alternative for this disease.

  6. Laparoscopy in pancreatic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Shrikhande S; Barreto S; Shukla P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, increasing number of manuscripts - original articles and case reports have attempted to provide evidence of the forays of minimal access surgery into pancreatic diseases. Many, based on the lack of Level I evidence, still believe that laparoscopy in pancreatic surgery is experimental. This article attempts to look into data exploring the existing use of minimally invasive surgery in pancreatic disease to answer a vital question - what does the evidence say on the current status of l...

  7. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Fasting glucose level Gastrin level Glucose tolerance test Secretin stimulation test for pancreas Blood glucagon ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatic Cancer Browse the ...

  8. Surgery of malignant pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the pancreas. Despite great efforts in basic and clinical pancreatic cancer research, the prognosis remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Complete surgical resection represents the only curative treatment option and 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved following curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy. Although pancreatic surgery is considered one of the most technically demanding and challenging procedures, there has been constant progress in surgical techniques and advances in perioperative care with a modern interdisciplinary approach including anesthesiology, oncology, radiology and nursing. This has reduced morbidity and especially mortality rates in high-volume centers. Among extended resection procedures multivisceral and venous resections are technically feasible and should be considered if a complete tumor resection can be achieved. Multimodal regimens have shown promising results, however, only adjuvant chemotherapy is supported by solid evidence from randomized controlled trials. (orig.)

  9. Biomarkers in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

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    Maria Serafeim Theochari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of biomarkers is to identify patients most likely to benefit from a therapeutic strategy. Pancreatic neuroendocrinetumors are rare neoplasms that arise in the endocrine tissues of the pancreas. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors represent3% of primary pancreatic neoplasms and their incidence has risen. The SMAD4 gene is located on chromosome 18q andsomeday the SMAD4 gene status may be useful for prognostic stratification and therapeutic decision. The cells respond toenvironmental signals by modulating the expressions of genes contained within the nucleus, when genes are activated aretranscribed to generate messenger RNA (mRNA. The examination of multiple expressed genes and proteins provides moreuseful information for prognostication of individual tumors. Here we summarize and discuss findings presented at the 2014ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. Anna Karpathakis et al. (Abstract #212 reported data about the role of DNAmethylation in gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors. Christina Lynn Roland et al. (Abstract #250 looked the impact OfSMAD4 on oncologic outcomes. Bong Kynn Kang et al. (Abstract #251 investigated prognostic biomarker using microRNAarray technology.

  10. Castlemans Disease Mimetizing Pancreatic Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Franz Robert Apodaca-Torrez; Benedito Herani Filho; Reinaldo Isaacs Beron; Alberto Goldenberg; Suzan Menasce Goldman; Edson José Lobo

    2012-01-01

    Context Angiofollicular lymph node hyperplasia or Castleman’s disease is a rare clinical condition. Knowledge about etiology and physiopathology; and treatment management as well are yet to be defined. Unicentric presentation of this disease affecting single lymph nodes in the mediastinum seems to be the most common presentation. Castleman’s disease localized in the pancreas topographic area that mimics a pancreatic neoplasm is an even more uncommon event, with available published data of les...

  11. Development of Orthotopic Pancreatic Tumor Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Wanglong; Gloria H. Su

    2013-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic cancer that recapitulate human pancreatic tumorigenesis have been established. However, the cost associated with generating and housing these mice can be prohibitive. Tumor latency and progression to invasive diseases in these models are also highly variable. Xenograft mouse models of human pancreatic cancer including heterotopic and orthotopic have been widely used in preclinical studies for their comparatively low cost and rapid, predictable...

  12. Surgical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.J. Jilesen

    2015-01-01

    This thesis gives an overview of the surgical management and prognosis of patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET). A systematic review including 2600 studies, was performed on complications and survival after different surgical procedures for pNETs. The overall pancreatic fistula rate

  13. Uncommon pancreatic tumors and pseudotumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Neeraj; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ganeshan, Dhakshina Moorthy; Shanbhogue, Alampady K; Dighe, Manjiri K; Tiwari, Hina Arif; Maximin, Suresh; Monti, Serena; Ragucci, Monica; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2015-01-01

    A heterogeneous group of uncommon neoplastic and non-neoplastic pancreatic pathologies exists that can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. These "imitators" are unique and may demonstrate characteristic clinical and imaging features. Imaging characteristics of some of these diverse lesions are not well described in the literature, and erroneous diagnoses of these entities as pancreatic carcinoma may be responsible for unnecessary surgeries. Knowledge of these selected pancreatic pathologies is essential to facilitate optimal patient management. PMID:25063236

  14. Pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in multidetector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hua-dan; LIU Wei; XIAO Yu; SUN Hao; WANG Xuan; LEI Jing; JIN Zheng-yu

    2011-01-01

    Objective This pictorial review aimed to summarize the most possible differential diagnosis of pancreatic islet cell tumor (PICT).Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from Medline and Pubmed in English. And all clinical images in this review were from Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.Study selection Cases of pancreatic cystadenoma, solid pseudo-papillary tumor of the pancreas, pancreatic metastasis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, para-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Castleman disease, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, splenic artery aneurysm and accessory spleen were selected in this pictorial review for differential diagnosis of PICT.Results Careful analysis of imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations may allow a more specific diagnosis. It is also important that the radiologist is familiar with the anatomic variants and disease entities which mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in order to avoid an improper treatment protocol.Conclusions Many congenital anatomic variants or other pancreatic and peri-pancreatic diseases may mimic MDCT appearance of pancreatic islet cell tumor. Radiological, clinical and pathological characteristics should be considered for the final diagnosis.

  15. Imaging of pancreatic tumors; Diagnostik von Pankreastumoren

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    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus [Universitaetklinik Ulm (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2010-12-15

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  16. Genetic ablation of Bcl-x attenuates invasiveness without affecting apoptosis or tumor growth in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

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    Jeffrey H Hager

    Full Text Available Tumor cell death is modulated by an intrinsic cell death pathway controlled by the pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Up-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members has been shown to suppress cell death in pre-clinical models of human cancer and is implicated in human tumor progression. Previous gain-of-function studies in the RIP1-Tag2 model of pancreatic islet carcinogenesis, involving uniform or focal/temporal over-expression of Bcl-x(L, demonstrated accelerated tumor formation and growth. To specifically assess the role of endogenous Bcl-x in regulating apoptosis and tumor progression in this model, we engineered a pancreatic beta-cell-specific knockout of both alleles of Bcl-x using the Cre-LoxP system of homologous recombination. Surprisingly, there was no appreciable effect on tumor cell apoptosis rates or on tumor growth in the Bcl-x knockout mice. Other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members were expressed but not substantively altered at the mRNA level in the Bcl-x-null tumors, suggestive of redundancy without compensatory transcriptional up-regulation. Interestingly, the incidence of invasive carcinomas was reduced, and tumor cells lacking Bcl-x were impaired in invasion in a two-chamber trans-well assay under conditions mimicking hypoxia. Thus, while the function of Bcl-x in suppressing apoptosis and thereby promoting tumor growth is evidently redundant, genetic ablation implicates Bcl-x in selectively facilitating invasion, consistent with a recent report documenting a pro-invasive capability of Bcl-x(L upon exogenous over-expression.

  17. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    José Jukemura; André Luis Montagnini; José Luiz Jesus de Almeida; Joaquim José Gama Rodrigues; José Eduardo Monteiro da Cunha; Marcos Vinícius Perini

    2006-01-01

    Context :Endocrine tumors are a less commonly known cause of acute pancreatitis. This report presents the case of a patient who have had acute pancreatitis secondary to a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm. The majority of the cases previously reported were nonfunctioning tumors and the pancreatitis tended to be mild. Moreover, the majority of the tumors were diagnosed in advanced stages, hindering curative treatment. Case report: A 31-year-old female patient presented with epigastric pain and a ...

  18. Incidental intraoperative discovery of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Surlin Valeriu; Ramboiu Sandu; Ghilusi Mirela; Plesea Iancu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare entity with an incidence between 2 per million to 5 per 100 000. Association with pancreatitis (acute or chronic) is rare and is considered to be determined by the tumoral obstruction of pancreatic ducts, but sometimes occurs without any apparent relationship between them. Non-functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed when either very large or metastatic. Small ones are occasionally diagnosed when imagery is performe...

  19. Novel serum tumor marker, RCAS1, in pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Enjoji, Munechika; Nakashima, Manabu; Nakamuta, Makoto; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: As tumor markers for pancreatic carcinoma, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 have been used, but the sensitivity and specificity are not enough for the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma.

  20. Pancreatic pseudocyst or a cystic tumor of the pancreas?

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ezzedien Rabie; Ismail El Hakeem; Mohammad Saad Al Skaini; Ahmad El Hadad; SalimJamil; Mian TahirShah; MahmoudObaid

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are the most common cystic lesions of the pancreas and may complicate acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic trauma. While the majority of acute pseudocysts resolve spontaneously, few may require drainage. On the other hand, pancreatic cystic tumors, which usually require extirpation, may disguise as pseudocysts. Hence, the distinction between the two entities is crucial for a successful outcome. We conducted this study to highlight the fundamental diff...

  1. Pancreatic pseudocyst or a cystic tumor of the pancreas?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ezzedien Rabie; Ismail El Hakeem; Mohammad Saad Al Skaini; Ahmad El Hadad; Salim Jamil; Mian Tahir Shah; Mahmoud Obaid

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are the most common cystic lesions of the pancreas and may complicate acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatic trauma. While the majority of acute pseudocysts resolve spontaneously, few may require drainage. On the other hand, pancreatic cystic tumors, which usualy require extirpation, may disguise as pseudocysts. Hence, the distinction between the two entities is crucial for a successful outcome. We conducted this study to highlight the fundamental differences between pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic tumors so that relevant management plans can be devised. We reviewed the data of patients with pancreatic cystic lesions that underwent intervention between June 2007 and December 2010 in our hospital. We identified 9 patients (5 males and 4 females) with a median age of 40 years (range, 30-70 years). Five patients had pseudocysts, 2 had cystic tumors, and 2 had diseases of undetermined pathology. Pancreatic pseudocysts were treated by pseudocystogastrostomy in 2 cases and percutaneous drainage in 3 cases. One case recurred after percutaneous drainage and required pseudocystogastrostomy. The true pancreatic cysts were serous cystadenoma, which was treated by distal pancreatectomy, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, which was initialy treated by drainage, like a pseudocyst, and then by distal pancreatectomy when its true nature was revealed. We conclude that every effort should be exerted to distinguish between pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic tumors of the pancreas to avoid the serious misjudgement of draining rather than extirpating a pancreatic cystic tumor. Additionaly, percutaneous drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst is a useful adjunct that may substitute for surgical drainage.

  2. Incidental intraoperative discovery of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlin Valeriu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare entity with an incidence between 2 per million to 5 per 100 000. Association with pancreatitis (acute or chronic is rare and is considered to be determined by the tumoral obstruction of pancreatic ducts, but sometimes occurs without any apparent relationship between them. Non-functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed when either very large or metastatic. Small ones are occasionally diagnosed when imagery is performed for other diagnostic reasons. Intraoperative discovery is even rarer and poses problems of differential diagnosis with other pancreatic tumors. Association with chronic pancreatitis is rare and usually due to pancreatic duct obstruction by the tumor. We describe the case of a patient with a small non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail accidentally discovered during surgery for delayed traumatic splenic rupture associated with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The tumor of 1.5cm size was well differentiated and confined to the pancreas, and was resected by a distal splenopancreatectomy. Conclusions Surgeons should be well aware of the rare possibility of a non-functional neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas, associated with chronic pancreatitis, surgical resection being the optimal treatment for cure. Histopathology is of utmost importance to establish the correct diagnosis, grade of differentiation, malignancy and prognosis. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2114470176676003.

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET) accounts for 1-2% of total pancreatic tumors and 0.4-1.5% of autopsy cases, reflecting the recently increasing trend. According to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria (2004), PET is classified by the type of hormone produced by the tumor and its biological behavior. Together with the classical clinical images and hormone markers, 11C-5-HTP-Positron emission tomography, OctreoScan ([111In-DTPA0] octreotide) scintigram, selective arterial calcium injection (SACI)-test and intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) are used for diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, if supposed to be curative and tolerable. In case of a well-differentiated endocrine tumor, with no indication of resection or interventional radiology (IVR), somatostatin analog is another therapy showing stable disease status for a long period. Systemic chemotherapy, including 5-fluorouracil (FU)+streptozotocin, and streptozotocin+doxorubicin, are used in cases of well-differentiated endocrine carcinoma, and cisplatin+etoposide are applied for poorly-differentiated endocrine carcinoma (or small cell carcinoma). Recent studies focus on molecular target therapy including small molecules and monoclonal antibody, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. (author)

  4. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor as a Possible Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

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    Okanoue T

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acute pancreatitis is not commonly seen in the first presentation of pancreatic neoplasms. Solid pseudopapillary tumor as a cause of acute pancreatitis has not yet been reported. This is the first report of acute pancreatitis resulting from solid pseudopapillary tumor. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 21-year-old female who presented with a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain associated with elevated serum pancreatic enzyme concentration. The initial diagnosis was acute pancreatitis. However, subsequent ultrasonography and computed tomography showed an abdominal mass in the tail of the pancreas, retroperitoneal fluid and left pleural effusion. There was scarce pain relief even with large doses of analgesics. A distal pancreatectomy was then performed and a final diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor was made histologically. The surrounding pancreatic tissue was characterized as hemorrhagic edematous pancreatitis. CONCLUSIONS: Solid pseudopapillary tumor is generally known as a slow-growing pancreatic neoplasm with few, if any, symptoms. However, solid pseudopapillary tumors should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute pancreatitis, especially in cases of non-alcoholic young women having an acute pancreatitis attack.

  5. A Retroperitoneal Neuroendocrine Tumor in Ectopic Pancreatic Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Al-Bassiouni, Fahim; El-Ela, Monir Abo; Al-Gemeie, Emad Hamza; Ezzat, Reem

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the relatively uncommon presence of pancreatic tissue outside the normal location of the pancreas. We report a case of abdominal pain due to retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor arising from heterotopic pancreatic tissue between the duodenal wall and the head of the pancreas. Patient underwent surgical enucleation of the tumor.

  6. Molecular Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare primary neoplasms of the pancreas and arise sporadically or in the context of genetically determined syndromes. Depending on hormone production and sensing, PNETs clinically manifest due to a hormone-related syndrome (functional PNET) or by symptoms related to tumor bulk effects (non-functional PNET). So far, radical surgical excision is the only therapy to cure the disease. Development of tailored non-surgical approaches has been impeded by the lack of experimental laboratory models and there is, therefore, a limited understanding of the complex cellular and molecular biology of this heterogeneous group of neoplasm. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of tumorigenesis of familial and sporadic PNETs on a cellular and molecular level. Open questions in the field of PNET research are discussed with specific emphasis on the relevance of disease management

  7. MR pancreatography (MRP) for mucin-producing pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR pancreatography was performed in 11 patients with mucin-producing pancreatic tumor (main duct type: four and branch duct type: seven) using HASTE with a body phased array coil on a 1.5-T unit. The results of MR pancreatography were compared with imaging of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP). In all cases, MR pancreatography demonstrated all dilated pancreatic ducts and cysts. ERP did not completely demonstrate dilated ducts and cysts because of mucinous materials. Conspicuity of an intraductal tumor was more excellent by ER pancreatography than MR pancreatography. Therefore MR pancreatography and ER pancreatography are complementary methods in diagnosis for mucin-producing pancreatic tumors. (author)

  8. Recurrent Pancreatitis Due to a Cystic Pancreatic Tumor: A Rare Presentation of Acinar Cell Carcinoma

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    Raimondo M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acinar cell carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy of the pancreas. It has characteristic histomorphology, immunohistochemistry profile, and clinicopathological behavior. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. We describe the endoscopic ultrasound characteristic, treatment and the surgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Acinar cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors presenting with recurrent pancreatitis.

  9. An unusual presentation of "silent" disseminated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dragomir Marisavljevic; Natasa Petrovic; Nikola Milinic; Vesna Cemerikic; Miodrag Krstic; Olivera Markovic; Dragoljub Bilanovic

    2004-01-01

    To present a patient diagnosed with pancreatic carcinoid that was extremely rare and produced an atypical carcinoid syndrome.We reported a 58-year old male patient who presented with long standing,prominent cervical lymphadenopathy and occasional watery diarrhea.Pathohistological and immunohistochemical examination of lymph node biopsy showed a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor,which was histological type A of carcinoid (EMA+,cytokeratin+,CEA-,NSE+,chromogranin A+,synaptophysin+,insulin-).Bone marrow biopsy showed identical findings.Primary site of the tumor was pancreas and diagnosis was made according to cytological and immunocytochemical analysis of the tumor cells obtained with aspiration biopsy of pancreatic mass (12 mm in diameter) under endoscopic ultrasound guidance.However,serotonin levels in blood and urine samples were normal.It is difficulty to establish the precise diagnosis of a "functionally inactive" pancreatic carcinoid and aspiration biopsy of pancreatic tumor under endoscopic ultrasound guidance can be used as a new potent diagnostic tool.

  10. Everolimus and mTOR inhibition in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are rare and the majority of patients present in the advanced stage. Over the past few decades, treatment for patients with metastatic well- or moderately differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors have not significantly impeded tumor progression nor improved survival. However, recent mapping of intracellular signaling pathways promoting tumor proliferation, growth, and angiogenesis has presented mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a potential target within the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway. With the development of the new-generation mTOR inhibitor everolimus, a series of clinical trials over the last 5 years have demonstrated significant benefit in delaying tumor progression. This review focuses on the mechanism of mTOR inhibition and traces the development of clinical evidence for the use of mTOR inhibitors in well- to moderately differentiated advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

  11. Novel serum tumor marker,RCAS1,in pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koji Yamaguchi; Munechika Enjoji; Manabu Nakashima; Makoto Nakamuta; Takashi Watanabe; Masao Tanaka

    2005-01-01

    AIM: As tumor markers for pancreatic carcinoma,carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 have been used, but the sensitivity and specificity are not enough for the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma.METHODS: A novel serum tumor marker, RCAS1, was compared with two conventional serum tumor markers,CEA (highly specific for pancreatic cancer) and CA 19-9 (highly sensitive for pancreatic cancer), in 48 patients with pancreatic exocrine tumors.RESULTS: When the diagnosis of benign or malignant conditions was examined by one tumor marker, the sensitivity of RCAS1 alone (55%) was higher than that of CEA alone (27%) and the specificity of RCAS1 alone (92%) was greater than that of CA19-9 alone (78%). When examined by a combination of two markers, the sensitivity of a combination of RCAS1 and CA19-9 (95%) was superior to those of CA19-9 alone (78%), RCAS1 alone (55%, P = 0.002),CEA alone (27%) (P<0.001), RCAS1 and CEA (59%) and CA19-9 and CEA (82%).CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the combination of RCASL and CA19-9 is highly sensitive for pancreatic carcinoma.

  12. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Role of Novel Agents

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    Alexios S Strimpakos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine tumors of pancreas (PNET are very rare, consisting of heterogeneous histological subtypes with a variable natural history and different clinical manifestations. Although the vast majority of these neoplasms are sporadic, it is possible to be part of a genetic syndrome such as multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN-1 or tuberous sclerosis (TSC. When systemic treatment is required the options are limited and management strategy is generally based on experts’ consensus or clinical experience. The prognosis is usually better than in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, though poorly differentiated PNET behave aggressively and survival is shortened. Since last year, there has been a significant advance in the management of PNET, after reported data confirmed the efficacy of everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in patients with advanced disease. At the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal Symposium, updated results of the phase III trial (RADIANT-3 regarding the efficacy of everolimus in PNET (Abstract #158 were reported, along with the results of a subgroup analysis of the Japanese patients enrolled in this study (Abstract #289. Another agent with promising activity in PNET which will be discussed in this review is sunitinib, a biological agent with multikinase inhibitor properties (Abstract #244.

  13. [Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and helpfulness of targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaysse, Thibaut; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-06-01

    The neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are rare tumors, but their incidence is constantly rising. Even if the management of these tumors has to be surgical as soon as possible, the disease is most often metastatic at the stage of the diagnostic. The prognostic and the therapeutic options differ from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Available treatments have evolved over the last years with recent publications of studies that bring to light the benefits of targeted therapies in this pathology. This has resulted in modifications of both practices and either French and international guidelines. Therefore, we focus on the management of the grade 1 and grade 2 well-differentiated neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors as classified in new WHO classification of neuroendocrine neoplasms published in 2010. PMID:23009947

  14. Role of the tumor microenvironment in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xian-Jun; Jiang, Ting-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Mao, Ai-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with proclivity for early metastasis, which accounts for its poor prognosis. The clinical problem of pancreatic cancer is its resistance to conventional therapies, such as chemotherapy or radiation. Based upon these challenges, the focus of research on pancreatic cancer has shifted gradually towards the tumor microenvironment. The cancer microenvironment consists of various components, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, immune cells, and endocrine cells, that interact with each other, and with the cancer cells in a complex fashion. Evidence is accumulating that the cancer microenvironment plays an active role in disease progression, and efforts are being made to target this interplay between cancer cells and host cells, to improve the prognosis of the disease. In the present review, we describe the cellular microenvironment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), the major type of pancreatic cancer. Our hope is that a better understanding of the cellular microenvironment of PDA will eventually lead to better treatments for this disease. PMID:26709759

  15. Serum Tumor Markers in Pancreatic Cancer—Recent Discoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low prevalence of pancreatic cancer remains an obstacle to the development of effective screening tools in an asymptomatic population. However, development of effective serologic markers still offers the potential for improvement of diagnostic capabilities, especially for subpopulations of patients with high risk for pancreatic cancer. The accurate identification of patients with pancreatic cancer and the exclusion of disease in those with benign disorders remain important goals. While clinical experience largely dismissed many candidate markers as useful markers of pancreatic cancer, CA19-9 continues to show promise. The present review highlights the development and the properties of different tumor markers in pancreatic cancer and their impact on the diagnostic and treatment of this aggressive disease

  16. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Rickes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Echo-enhanced ultrasound is a newly available imaging modality for the evaluation of pancreatic lesions. Neoplasms of the pancreas tend to have a characteristic vascularization pattern. Adenocarcinomas are often hypovascularized as compared to the surrounding tissue. On the other hand, neuroendocrine tumors are hypervascularized lesions. Masses associated with pancreatitis have a different vascularization pattern depending on the degree of inflammation and necrosis. Cystadenomas frequently show many vessels along fibrotic strands. Data from prospective studies have demonstrated that based on these imaging criteria, the sensitivity and the specificity of echo-enhanced sonography in diagnosing the degree of differentiation of pancreatic masses are equal to, or greater than, 85% and 90%, respectively. In conclusion, pancreatic tumors have a different vascularization pattern in echo-enhanced ultrasound. These characteristics can be used with high a diagnostic accuracy for differentiation. planning and for the evaluation of the prognosis but this difficult with current imaging techniques, even when a combination of various diagnostic procedures is employed. Although histology or cytology obtained from fine needle biopsy or surgery is the standard of reference, especially in the differential diagnosis between pancreatitis-associated lesions and adenocarcinomas, needle biopsy can produce false results due to sampling error. Endoscopic retrograde (ERCP and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP are the current imaging standards for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic lesions [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. With conventional transabdominal ultrasound, there are no characteristic findings for the differentiation of pancreatic masses and its diagnostic accuracy is less than 70% [6, 7, 8, 9]. Echo-enhanced ultrasound has been proposed as a valuable technique for the differentiation of liver lesions [10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]. We and others have demonstrated

  17. Recurrent Pancreatitis Due to a Cystic Pancreatic Tumor: A Rare Presentation of Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Raimondo M; Krishna M; Nguyen J; Scolapio J; Aqel B

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acinar cell carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy of the pancreas. It has characteristic histomorphology, immunohistochemistry profile, and clinicopathological behavior. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. We describe the endoscopic ultrasound characteristic, treatment and the surgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Acinar cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors pre...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of less common pancreatic malignancies and pancreatic tumors with malignant potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Franz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic tumors are an increasingly common finding in abdominal imaging. Various kinds of pathologies of the pancreas are well known, but it often remains difficult to classify the lesions radiologically in respect of type and grade of malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the method of choice for the evaluation of pancreatic pathologies due to its superior soft tissue contrast. In this article we present a selection of less common malignant and potentially malignant pancreatic neoplasms with their characteristic appearance on established MRI sequences with and without contrast enhancement.

  19. [Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Local Therapy of Pancreatic Tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Won Jae; Seo, Dong Wan

    2015-09-01

    The development of curvilinear EUS has enabled EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration of intra-abdominal mass lesions. With the introduction of interventional EUS, this technology has undergone several modifications in order to be applied to clinical medicine. One of the potential uses of interventional EUS is the EUS-guided local therapy of pancreatic tumors. Various treatment modalities such as fine-needle injection, radiofrequency ablation, photodynamic therapy, laser ablation, and brachytherapy have been tried under EUS guidance. Some of these modalities are being applied clinically. These methods for EUS-guided local therapy of pancreatic tumors will be reviewed in this article. PMID:26387698

  20. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis

  1. Somatostatinoma syndrome: a challenging differential diagnosis among pancreatic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Martinez Vianna

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the neuroendocrine neoplasia, the pancreatic somatostatin-producing tumors are very rare. Usually functional, these tumors produce the somatostatinoma syndrome, which encompasses diabetes mellitus, diarrhea/steatorrhoea, and cholelithiasis. Other symptoms may include dyspepsia, weight loss, anemia, and hypochlorhydria. All theses symptoms are explained by the inhibitory actions of the somatostatin released by tumoral cells originated from pancreatic delta cells or endocrine cells of the digestive tract. The diagnosis is easy to overlook since these symptoms are commonly observed in other more common syndromes. Besides the clinical features, diagnosis is based on serum determination of somatostatin, and imaging exams, such as ultrasound, computer tomography and positron emission tomography. Pathologic examination is characterized by the positivity of immunohistochemical reaction for synaptophysin, chromogranin, and somatostatin. These tumors can be classified according to tumor size, mitotic index, neural or vascular invasion, and distant metastases. The authors describe the case of a 61-year-old female patient who sought medical care because of a 6-month history of watery diarrhea, weight loss, and depression. She was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus 3 years ago. Imaging examination revealed a tumoral mass of 4 cm in its longest axis in the topography of the head of the pancreas and calculous cholecistopathy. The patient’s clinical status was unfavorable for a surgical approach. She died after 20 days of hospitalization. The definitive diagnosis was achieved with the autopsy findings, which disclosed a pancreatic somatostatinoma.

  2. Meso-pancreatectomy for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarese, Alessia; Borello, Alessandro; Gentile, Valentina; Bindi, Marco; Ferrara, Yuri; Solej, Mario; Martino, Valter; Nano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a meso-pancreatectomy performed on a pancreatic glucagonoma in a 58 years-old woman. MP is a conservative surgical treatment consisting in a resection of the body of the pancreas with the aim of reducing postoperative hormone insufficiency. This approach is curative in benign or low-malignant neoplasm of the central part of the pancreas. PMID:24859404

  3. Obstructive jaundice caused by secondary pancreatic tumor from malignant solitary fibrous tumor of pleura: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norie Yamada; Hiroshi Yotsuyanagi; Michihiro Suzuki; Fumio Itoh; Chiaki Okuse; Masahito Nomoto; Mayu Orita; Yoshiki Katakura; Toshiya Ishii; Takuo Shinmyo; Hiroaki Osada; Ichiro Maeda

    2006-01-01

    A 77-year-old man on systemic chemotherapy against postoperative bilateral multiple lung metastases of malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura suffered from pruritus and jaundice. Blood examination showed elevated levels of hepatobiliary enzymes. Abdominal computed tomography showed a tumor with peripheral enhancement in the pancreatic head, accompanied with the dilatation of intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts. He was diagnosed as having obstructive jaundice caused by a pancreatic head tumor. The pancreatic head tumor was presumably diagnosed as the metastasis of malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura, because the findings on the pancreatic head tumor on abdominal CT were similar to those on the primary lung lesion of malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura. The pancreatic tumor grew rapidly after the implantation of metallic stent in the inferior part of the common bile duct. The patient died of lymphangitis carcinomatosa of the lungs. Autopsy revealed a tumor that spread from the pancreatic head to the hepatic hilum. Microscopically, spindle-shaped cells exhibiting nuclear atypicality or division together with collagen deposition were observed. Immunohistochemically the pancreatic head tumor cells were negative for staining of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) or CD117, but positive for vimentin, CD34 and CD99. These findings are consistent with thoseon malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura. We report the first case of obstructive jaundice caused by a secondary pancreatic tumor from malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura.

  4. A pancreatic pseudopapillary tumor enucleated curatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Karakas

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Although PPT is a very rare, benign tumor, it has the potential to metastasize to adjacent and distant organs. Consequently, they should be detected early, so that they can be treated surgically before malignant conversion.

  5. Treatment of advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: potential role of everolimus

    OpenAIRE

    Cen P; Amato RJ

    2012-01-01

    Putao Cen, Robert J AmatoDivision of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (Medical School), Houston, TXAbstract: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are frequently diagnosed at unresectable stage and remain a medical challenge. Everolimus (RAD001, Afinitor®, Novartis, Basel, Switzerland), an orally administered inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration t...

  6. Perfusion CT can predict tumoral grading of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Onofrio, M., E-mail: mirko.donofrio@univr.it [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Gallotti, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Mantovani, W. [Department of Medicine and Public Health, University Hospital G.B. Rossi Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Crosara, S. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Manfrin, E. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Falconi, M. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital G.B. Rossi Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Ventriglia, A.; Zamboni, G.A.; Manfredi, R.; Pozzi Mucelli, R. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 University of Verona, Verona (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Objectives: To describe perfusion CT features of locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and to evaluate correlation with tumor grading. Methods: Thirty-two patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were included in this study. Lesions were evaluated by P-CT and biopsy after patient's informed consent. P-CT parameters have been assessed on a large single and on 6 small intratumoral ROIs. Values obtained have been compared and related to the tumor grading using Mann–Whitney U test. Sensibility, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy in predicting tumor grading have been calculated for cut-off values chosen by using ROC curves. Results: Out of 32 lesions, 12 were classified as low grade and 20 as high grade. A statistically significant difference between high and low grade neoplasms were demonstrated for PEI and BV parameters. PEI and BV cut-off values were respectively 17.8 HU and 14.8 ml/100 g. PEI identified high grade neoplasms with a 65% sensitivity, 92% specificity, 93% PPV, 61% NPV and 75% accuracy. BV identified high grade neoplasms with a 80% sensitivity, 75% specificity, 84% PPV, 69% NPV, 78% accuracy. Considering both PEI and BV, P-CT identified high grade lesions with a 60% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV, 60% NPV and 75% accuracy. Conclusions: PEI and BV perfusion CT parameters proved their efficiency in identifying high grade pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  7. Opportunities and Challenges for Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Sunitha; Jack, Rhonda M; Sahai, Vaibhav; Simeone, Diane M

    2016-09-01

    Sensitive and reproducible platforms have been developed for detection, isolation, and enrichment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs)-rare cells that enter the blood from solid tumors, including those of the breast, prostate gland, lung, pancreas, and colon. These might be used as biomarkers in diagnosis or determination of prognosis. CTCs are no longer simply detected and quantified; they are now used in ex vivo studies of anticancer agents and early detection. We review what we have recently learned about CTCs from pancreatic tumors, describing advances in their isolation and analysis and challenges to their clinical utility. We summarize technologies used to isolate CTCs from blood samples of patients with pancreatic cancer, including immunoaffinity and label-free physical attribute-based capture. We explain methods of CTC analysis and how findings from these studies might be used to detect cancer at earlier stages, monitor disease progression, and determine prognosis. We review studies that have expanded CTCs for testing of anticancer agents and how these approaches might be used to personalize treatment. Advances in the detection, isolation, and analysis of CTCs have increased our understanding of the dissemination and progression of pancreatic cancer. However, standardization of methodologies and prospective studies are needed for this emerging technology to have a significant effect on clinical care. PMID:27339829

  8. Hypothyroidism in Pancreatic Cancer: Role of Exogenous Thyroid Hormone in Tumor Invasion-Preliminary Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Gandhi, Ankit V; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y; Chipitsyna, Galina I; Yeo, Charles J; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2016-01-01

    According to the epidemiological studies, about 4.4% of American general elderly population has a pronounced hypothyroidism and relies on thyroid hormone supplements daily. The prevalence of hypothyroidism in our patients with pancreatic cancer was much higher, 14.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) or distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, from 2005 to 2012. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters including tumor stage, grade, and survival. To further understand how thyroid hormone affects pancreatic cancer behavior, functional studies including wound-induced cell migration, proliferation, and invasion were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1. We found that hypothyroid patients taking exogenous thyroid hormone were more than three times likely to have perineural invasion, and about twice as likely to have higher T stage, nodal spread, and overall poorer prognostic stage (P < 0.05). Pancreatic cancer cell line studies demonstrated that exogenous thyroid hormone treatment increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (P < 0.05). We conclude that exogenous thyroid hormone may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27123358

  9. Hypothyroidism in Pancreatic Cancer: Role of Exogenous Thyroid Hormone in Tumor Invasion—Preliminary Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Gandhi, Ankit V.; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y.; Chipitsyna, Galina I.; Yeo, Charles J.; Arafat, Hwyda A.

    2016-01-01

    According to the epidemiological studies, about 4.4% of American general elderly population has a pronounced hypothyroidism and relies on thyroid hormone supplements daily. The prevalence of hypothyroidism in our patients with pancreatic cancer was much higher, 14.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) or distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, from 2005 to 2012. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters including tumor stage, grade, and survival. To further understand how thyroid hormone affects pancreatic cancer behavior, functional studies including wound-induced cell migration, proliferation, and invasion were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1. We found that hypothyroid patients taking exogenous thyroid hormone were more than three times likely to have perineural invasion, and about twice as likely to have higher T stage, nodal spread, and overall poorer prognostic stage (P < 0.05). Pancreatic cancer cell line studies demonstrated that exogenous thyroid hormone treatment increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (P < 0.05). We conclude that exogenous thyroid hormone may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27123358

  10. Evaluation of inoperable pancreatic carcinoma based on tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many pancreatic cancers are detected only after they are far advanced, and thus show a poor prognosis. We evaluated the survival of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma, and strategy treatment. Subjects were 72 persons with advanced inoperable pancreatic carcinoma selected from among 144 examined at our department from May 1992 to March 2001. Patient factors (age, gender, and nutrition), tumor factors (hepatic metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and distant metastasis), and treatment (radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and hepatic arterial infusion therapy (HAI)) were studied and survival evaluated statistically. Overall mean survival was 175 days and the 1-year survival ratio was 13.5%. With multivariate analysis, prognostic factors were hepatic metastasis and radiotherapy. We therefore re-evaluated 56 patients treated with radiotherapy. In the group with no hepatic metastasis whose mean survival was 247 days, the prognostic factor was systemic chemotherapy. In the group with hepatic metastasis, mean survival was 140 days and the prognostic factor was the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) on admission. HAI was also a significant factor, which prolonged survival time with univariate analysis. Radiotherapy will be conducted for all inoperable pancreatic carcinomas. For the group with no hepatic metastasis, systemic chemotherapy is effective and for the group with hepatic metastasis. HAI will be selected. (author)

  11. New tumor-associated antigen SC6 in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Pei Liu; Xiao-Zhong Guo; Jian-Hua Xu; Di Wang; Hong-Yu Li; Zhong-Min Cui; Jia-Jun Zhao; Li-Nan Ren

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the concentration of a new antigen SC6 (SC6-Ag) recognized by monoclonal antibody (MAb)in patients with pancreatic cancer and other malignant or benign diseases and to understand whether SC6-Ag has any clinical significance in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from other gastrointestinal diseases.METHODS: Six hundred and ninety-five serum specimens obtained from 115 patients with pancreatic cancer, 154 patients with digestive cancer and 95patients with non-digestive cancer were used and classified in this study. Serum specimens obtained from 140 patients with benign digestive disease and 89 patients with non-benign digestive disease served as controls. Ascites was tapped from 16 pancreatic cancer patients, 19 hepatic cancer patients, 16 colonic cancer patients, 10 gastric cancer and 6 severe necrotic pancreatitis patients. The samples were quantitated by solid-phase radioimmunoassay. The cut-off values (CV)of 41, 80, and 118 U/mL were used.RESULTS: The average intra- and interassay CV detected by immunoradiometric assay of SC6-Ag was 5.4% and 8.7%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 73.0% and 90.9% respectively. The levels in most malignant and benign cases were within the normal upper limit. Among the 16 pancreatic cancer cases, the concentration of SC6-Ag in ascites was over the normal range in 93.8% patients. There was no significant difference in the concentration of SC6-Ag.Decreased expression of SC6-Ag in sera was significantly related to tumor differentiation. The concentration of SC6-Ag was higher in patients before surgery than after surgery. The specificity of SC6-Ag and CA19-9 was significantly higher than that of ultrasound and computer tomography (CT) in pancreatic cancer patients. Higher positive predictive values were indicated in 92.3% SC6-Ag and 88.5% CA19-9, but lower in 73.8% ultrasound and 76.2% CT.CONCLUSION: The combined test of SC6-Ag and CA19-9 may improve the diagnostic rate of primary cancer. The detection of

  12. Pancreatic candidiasis that mimics a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor on magnetic resonance imaging: A case report in an immunocompetent patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Min Jung; Kang, Tae Wook; Ha, Sang Yun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Candida is a commensal organism that is frequently found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is the most common organism that causes pancreatic fungal infections. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings of Candida infection in the pancreas have not been described. We report imaging findings of pancreatic candidiasis in a patient in immunocompetent condition. It presented as a multi-septated cystic mass with a peripheral solid component in the background of pancreatitis and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted image that mimicked a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor.

  13. Pancreatic Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Interstitial Cajal Like Cells, and Telocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somanath Padhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The discovery and subsequent ultrastructural characterization of the interstitial Cajal like cells (now called telocytes in virtually every anatomic sites of the human body, by Laurentiu M Popescu and co-workers, have dramatically improved the understanding the function of these cells and pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST. Pancreatic extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (pEGIST, phenotypically similar to pancreatic interstitial Cajal like cells, are extremely rare with an unpredictable biological behavior. Objective To review the clinicopathological, radiological, immunohistochemical, and therapeutic outcome data of all reported cases of pEGIST, and highlight the developments in the field of pancreatic interstitial Cajal like cells/telocytes. Methods A systematic review of English literature (January 2000 to July 2012 was done by using the search engine of PubMed, PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and the Directory of Open Access Journals. Results There have been 19 reported cases of pEGIST during the last decade, over an age range of 31 to 84 years (mean: 56 years with equal gender predilection ((male:female ratio: 9:10. Preoperative radiological characteristics have been mostly nondiagnostic though these were used, in some, for tissue diagnosis. Majority of pEGIST were localized to pancreatic head (8/19, 42.1%, and 15 of 19 patients (78.9% were symptomatic at first presentation. The mean size ranged from 2.5 to 35cm (mean: 14 cm. Histomorphological features were that of predominantly spindle cell tumor which consistently expressed c-KIT/CD117 and CD34 by immunohistochemistry, making these two as the most sensitive markers at this site. Results from studies involving discovery on gastrointestinal stromal tumor 1 (DOG-1,the most specific biomarker of GIST/EGIST, has been inconclusive and this was found to be positive in one case only. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib mesylate and sunitinib were used in few

  14. Cyclopamine disrupts tumor extracellular matrix and improves the distribution and efficacy of nanotherapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Ting; Shen, Shun; She, Xiaojian; Tuo, Yanyan; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2016-10-01

    The dense extracellular matrix in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma dramatically reduces the penetration and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Disruption of the tumor extracellular matrix may help improve the distribution and efficacy of nanotherapeutics in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we tested whether cyclopamine, a special inhibitor of the hedgehog signaling pathway with powerful anti-fibrotic activity, could promote the penetration and efficacy of nanotherapeutics in pancreatic cancer. It was shown that cyclopamine disrupted tumor extracellular fibronectins, decompressed tumor blood vessels, and improved tumor perfusion. Furthermore, cyclopamine improved the accumulation and intratumoral distribution of i.v.-administered fluorescence indicator-labeled nanoparticles. Finally, cyclopamine also significantly improved the tumor growth inhibition effect of i.v.-injected nanotherapeutics in pancreatic tumor xenograft mouse models. Thus, cyclopamine may have great potential to improve the therapeutic effects of nanomedicine in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:27376555

  15. Tumor markers in pancreatic cancer: a European Group on Tumor Markers (EGTM) status report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most difficult malignancies to diagnose and treat. The aim of this article is to review how tumor markers can aid the diagnosis and management of patients with this malignancy. The most widely used and best validated marker for pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9. Inadequate sensitivity and specificity limit the use of CA 19-9 in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. In non-jaundiced patients, however, CA 19-9 may complement other diagnostic procedures. In patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, presurgical and postresection CA 19-9 levels correlate with overall survival. In advanced disease, elevated pretreatment levels of CA 19-9 are associated with adverse patient outcome and thus may be combined with other factors for risk stratification. Most, but not all, reports indicate that serial levels of CA 19-9 correlate with response to systemic therapy. Use of CA 19-9 kinetics in conjunction with imaging is therefore recommended in monitoring therapy. Although several potential serum and tissue markers for pancreatic cancer are currently undergoing evaluation, none are sufficiently validated for routine clinical use. CA 19-9 thus remains the serum pancreatic cancer marker against which new markers for this malignancy should be judged.

  16. Suppression of CD51 in pancreatic stellate cells inhibits tumor growth by reducing stroma and altering tumor-stromal interaction in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horioka, Kohei; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Sada, Masafumi; Zheng, Biao; Moriyama, Taiki; Fujita, Hayato; Manabe, Tatsuya; Ohtsuka, Takao; Shimamoto, Masaya; Miyazaki, Tetsuyuki; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) enhance the malignant behavior of pancreatic cancer by interacting with cancer cells and producing extracellular matrix (ECM). To date, several stroma-targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have been attempted, but these therapies are still not in practical use. Integrins expressed in stromal cells are involved in fibrosis of several organs, as well as promoting tumor malignancy. We investigated whether CD51, also known as integrin αV, expressed in PSCs was associated with stromal formation of pancreatic cancer and enhancement of tumor malignancy. We also assessed the effects of suppression of CD51 in PSCs on pancreatic cancer. Immunohistochemistry for CD51 in resected pancreatic cancer tissues showed that high expression of CD51 in the tumor stroma was associated with lymph node metastasis (P=0.025), positive pathologic margin (P=0.025), and shorter patient survival times (P=0.043). Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA knockdown of CD51 decreased the proliferation and migration of PSCs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that expression levels of genes related with ECM and tumor-stromal interactions were decreased by CD51 knockdown in PSCs. In a co-implantation model of pancreatic cancer cells and PSCs, tumor growth in vivo was inhibited by CD51 knockdown in PSCs (P<0.05). We also found reduced tumor stroma and decreased proliferation of cancer cells in implanted cancer tissues with CD51-silenced PSCs (P<0.05). Our results showed that CD51 expression in pancreatic cancer stroma is associated with enhanced tumor malignancy and that CD51 may be a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26846197

  17. Priming the pancreatic cancer tumor microenvironment for checkpoint-inhibitor immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz, Eric R.; Kinkead, Heather; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Zheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Single agent immunotherapy is effective against several cancers, but has failed against poorly immunogenic cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Evaluation of pancreatic tumors following treatment with an experimental vaccine (Lutz et al. Cancer Immunology Research 2014) suggests that vaccination primes the tumor microenvironment (TME) for checkpoint-inhibitor immunotherapy, and supports a new platform for evaluating checkpoint-inhibitors in poorly immunogenic cancers.

  18. Surgical treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Cerqueira Cesar Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical approaches to pancreatic endocrine tumors associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may differ greatly from those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Presurgical diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is therefore crucial to plan a proper intervention. Of note, hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 should be surgically treated before pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 resection, apart from insulinoma. Non-functioning pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 >1 cm have a high risk of malignancy and should be treated by a pancreatic resection associated with lymphadenectomy. The vast majority of patients with gastrinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 present with tumor lesions at the duodenum, so the surgery of choice is subtotal or total pancreatoduodenectomy followed by regional lymphadenectomy. The usual surgical treatment for insulinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is distal pancreatectomy up to the mesenteric vein with or without spleen preservation, associated with enucleation of tumor lesions in the pancreatic head. Surgical procedures for glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, and vipomas/ multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 are similar to those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Some of these surgical strategies for pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 still remain controversial as to their proper extension and timing. Furthermore, surgical resection of single hepatic metastasis secondary to pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may be curative and even in multiple liver metastases surgical resection is possible. Hepatic trans-arterial chemo-embolization is usually associated with surgical resection. Liver transplantation may be needed for select cases. Finally, pre-surgical clinical and genetic diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome and

  19. Obesity Adversely Affects Survival in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Robert R.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Burch, Patrick A.; Kim, George P.; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Reid-Lombardo, Kaye; Bamlet, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Higher body-mass index (BMI) has been implicated as a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer, but its effect on survival has not been thoroughly investigated. We assessed the association of BMI with survival in a sample of pancreatic cancer patients and utilized epidemiologic and clinical information to understand the contribution of diabetes and hyperglycemia. Methods A survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards by usual adult BMI was performed on 1,861 unselected patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; analyses were adjusted for covariates that included clinical stage, age, and sex. Secondary analyses incorporated self reported diabetes and fasting blood glucose in the survival model. Results BMI as a continuous variable was inversely associated with survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma [hazard ratio 1.019 for each increased unit of BMI (kg/m2), p < 0.001] after adjustment for age, stage, and sex. In analysis by National Institutes of Health BMI category, BMI of 30–34.99 kg/m2 (HR 1.14, 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.33), 35–39.99 kg/m2 (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.08–1.62), and ≥40 (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.26–2.04) were associated with decreased survival compared to normal BMI of 18,5–24.99 kg/m2 (overall trend test p<0.001). Fasting blood glucose and diabetes did not affect the results. Conclusions Higher BMI is associated with decreased survival in pancreatic cancer. Although the mechanism of this association remains undetermined, diabetes and hyperglycemia do not appear to account for the observed association. PMID:20665496

  20. CLINICAL USE OF COMBINED DETECTION WITH TUMOR MARKERS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of clinical use of combined detection with tumor markers for pancreatic cancer. Methods Tumor markers CA242,CA19-9 and CA50 in serum of 32 patinets with pancreatic cancer;26 patients with non-pancreatic digestive tract cancers and 24 patietns with benign pancreatic or biliary tract diseases were measured by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Results The levels of three markers in serum and positive rates of patients with pancreatic cancer were higher than those of other patients. The effect of measurement combining CA242 with CA19-9 was the best. The sensitivity ,specificity and accuracy of diagnosis for pancreatic cancer were 92.6%, 73.8% and 81.2% respectively. The levels of CA242 and CA19-9 were positively relative to burden of pancreatic cancer, and serum levels of these two markers of patients with resectable pancreatic cancer were lower than those with unresectable, but on difference was observed for CA50. Conclusion Combined detection of serum CA242 and CA19-9 could prove the effectual indicator for finding the patients with pancreatic cancer in high risk population or for resectable pancreatic cancer. Pre-operative measurement of serum levels of CA242 and CA19-9 is helpful to evaluate the burden of the tumors and possiblity of resect for pancreatic cancers.

  1. Transcatheter arterial infusing chemotherapy for advanced malignant pancreatic islet cell tumors: four cases report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the clinical efficacy of transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) chemotherapy for advanced malignant pancreatic islet cell tumors. Methods: Four patients (3 malignant insulin tumors, 1 non-functional malignant pancreatic islet cell tumor) with unresectable advanced malignant tumors were carried out TAI via celiac artery. The three malignant insulin tumors with multiple hepatic metastases were further performed with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). The therapeutic cycles were repeated with intervals of 1-2 months. Results: Eleven therapeutic cycles (mean 2.8)were accomplished in 4 cases. Follow-up for 2-8 months, the clinical PR were achieved in three cases, furthermore with SD in one case. The clinical uprising blood glucose became normal in all three cases, and the abdominal distention and bellyache were relieved in the patient with non-functional malignant pancreatic islet cell tumor. No serious adverse effects occurred. Conclusions: TAI for unresectable advanced malignant pancreatic islet cell tumors is safe and effective. (authors)

  2. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor accompanied with multiple liver metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomohide; Hori; Kyoichi; Takaori; Shinji; Uemoto

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor(P-NET) is rare and slow-growing. Current classifications predict its progno-sis and postoperative recurrence. Curative resection is ideal, although often difficult, because over 80% of pa-tients have unresectable multiple liver metastases and extrahepatic metastasis. Aggressive surgery for liver metastases is important to improve survival. Aggressive or cytoreductive surgery for liver metastases is indi-cated to reduce hormone levels and improve symptoms and prognosis. Liver transplantation was originally con-ceived as an ideal therapy for unresectable liver metas-tases. Unfortunately, there is no clear consensus on the role and timing of surgery for primary tumor and liver metastases. Surgeons still face questions in deciding the best surgical scenario in patients with P-NET with unresectable liver metastases.

  3. Biotherapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Hisato; Hijioka, Masayuki; Lee, Lingaku; Ito, Tetsuhide

    2015-08-01

    Basically, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) should be treated surgically; however, in unresectable cases, a treatment that aims to improve the prognosis by inhibiting the growth of the tumor and control the clinical symptoms becomes necessary. In the case of functional tumors, the quality of life of patients is decreased by not only the symptoms with tumor invasion and/or metastasis but also by the symptoms of hormone excess. The efficacy of somatostatin analogs against the latter has been previously reported, and their sustained release formulations have been developed. Somatostatin analogs are recommended to treat the endocrine symptoms of functional PNET; however, in case they can cause hypoglycemia in patients with insulinoma. On the other hand, results from the PROMID study demonstrated a tumor-stabilizing effect when octreotide LAR (long acting repeatable) was used to treat patients with advanced midgut NET; however, there has been no consensus regarding its antitumor effect for PNET. Additionally, a recent result from the CLARINET study suggests that lanreotide autogel has an antitumor effect against nonfunctional NET including PNET. Further clinical study results are awaited. PMID:25689143

  4. Rare Solid Tumors of the Pancreas as Differential Diagnosis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Kersting

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Rare solid tumors of the pancreas can be misinterpreted as primary pancreatic cancer. Objective The aim of this study was to report our experience in the treatment of patients with rare tumor lesions of the pancreas and to discuss clinical and pathological characteristics in the context of the role of surgery. Design Data from patients of our prospective data-base with rare benign and malignant tumors of the pancreas, treated in our division from January 2004 to August 2010, were analyzed retrospectively. Results One-thousand and ninety-eight patients with solid tumors of the pancreas underwent pancreatic surgery. In 19 patients (10 women, 9 men with a mean age of 57 years (range: 20-74 years rare pancreatic tumors (metastasis, solid pseudopapillary tumor, teratoma, hemangioma, accessory spleen, lymphoepithelial cyst, hamartoma, sarcoidosis, yolk sac tumor were the reason for surgical intervention. Conclusion If rare benign and malignant pancreatic tumors, intrapancreatic metastasis, as well as pancreatic malformations or other abnormalities, present themselves as solid masses of the pancreas, they constitute an important differential diagnosis to primary pancreatic neoplasia, e.g. pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Clinical imaging techniques cannot always rule out malignancy, thus operative exploration often remains the treatment of choice to provide the correct diagnosis and initiate adequate surgical therapy.

  5. Diabetic ketoacidosis with concurrent pancreatitis, pancreatic β islet cell tumor, and adrenal disease in an obese ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phair, Kristen A; Carpenter, James W; Schermerhorn, Thomas; Ganta, Chanran K; DeBey, Brad M

    2011-07-01

    A 5.5-y-old spayed female ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with a history of adrenal disease, respiratory disease, and chronic obesity was evaluated for progressive lethargy and ataxia, diminished appetite, and possible polyuria and polydipsia. Physical examination revealed obesity, lethargy, tachypnea, dyspnea, a pendulous abdomen, significant weakness and ataxia of the hindlimbs, prolonged skin tenting, and mild tail-tip alopecia. Clinicopathologic analysis revealed severe hyperglycemia, azotemia, an increased anion gap, glucosuria, ketonuria, proteinuria, and hematuria. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hyperechoic hepatomegaly, bilateral adrenomegaly, splenic nodules, mild peritoneal effusion, and thickened and mildly hypoechoic limbs of the pancreas with surrounding hyperechoic mesentery. Fine-needle aspirates of the liver were highly suggestive of hepatic lipidosis. In light of a diagnosis of concurrent diabetic ketoacidosis and pancreatitis, the ferret was treated with fluid therapy, regular and long-acting insulin administration, and pain medication. However, electrolyte derangements, metabolic acidosis, dyspnea, and the clinical appearance of the ferret progressively worsened despite treatment, and euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed severe hepatic lipidosis, severe suppurative pancreatitis and vacuolar degeneration of pancreatic islet cells, a pancreatic β islet cell tumor, bilateral adrenal cortical adenomas, and myocardial fibrosis. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of concurrent diabetes mellitus, pancreatitis, pancreatic β islet cell tumor (insulinoma), and adrenal disease in a domestic ferret. The simultaneous existence of 3 endocrine diseases, pancreatitis, and their associated complications is a unique and clinically challenging situation. PMID:21838985

  6. The role of tumor cell-derived connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in pancreatic tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennewith, Kevin L; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M;

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CC...

  7. The comparative study of tumor angiogenesis and CT enhancement in pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the correlation of pancreatic phase Computed tomography (CT) enhancement, intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) and pathologic grades in pancreatic carcinoma and to evaluate the relationship between CT enhancement degree and the malignancy degree of pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: 34 patients with pancreatic carcinoma underwent CT scanning before resection. The enhancement degrees and forms of tumor were observed in pancreatic phase. The operational sample was stained with HE and CD34 marked by immunohistochemistry. MVD and histopathological grades of pancreatic carcinoma were examined. CT enhancement of the tumor, MVD counting in hot spot areas of neoplastic parenchymal cells and pathological grades of pancreatic carcinoma were comparatively analyzed. Result: Highly differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma was identified in 16 patients, moderately differentiated tumor in seven and poorly differentiated tumor in 11. Isodensity CT enhancement was demonstrated in 13 cases, slight low density enhancement in nine, slight low density enhancement along with small cyst lesion in nine and slight low density enhancement along with large cyst lesion in three. The counting of MVD with CD34 marked by immunohistochemistry in hot spot areas of neoplastic parenchyma cells were small in ten cases, medium in 16 and large in eight. The pathological grades correlated with CT enhancement of tumor (r=0.7857, P<0.001). The pathological grade correlated with MVD counting of tumor (r=0.3613, P<0.05). The CT enhancement of tumor correlated with MVD (r=0.6768, P<0.001). Conclusion: There was obvious and significant correlation between CT enhancement, pathological grades and MVD numbers in the hot spot areas of tumor. The extent of CT enhancement was inversely proportional to the malignancy degree of pancreatic carcinoma, and inversely proportional to MVD numbers in the hot spot areas of neoplastic parenchyma. The MVD in the hot spot areas of

  8. Contribution of bone marrow derived cells to the pancreatic tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Scarlett, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a complex, aggressive, and heterogeneous malignancy driven by the multifaceted interactions within the tumor microenvironment. While it is known that the tumor microenvironment accommodates many cell types, each playing a key role in tumorigenesis, the major source of these stromal cells is not well-understood. This review examines the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) to pancreatic carcinogenesis, with respect to their role in constituting the tumor microe...

  9. Solid Pancreatic Tumors with Unilocular Cyst-Like Appearance on CT: Differentiation from Unilocular Cystic Tumors Using CT

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ju Hee; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) with unilocular cyst-like appearance, and to compare them with those of unilocular cystic tumors of the pancreas. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was waived. We included 112 pancreatic tumors with unilocular cyst-like appearance on CT (16 solid tumors [nine NETs and seven SPTs] an...

  10. Obstructive jaundice caused by secondary pancreatic tumor from malignant solitary fibrous tumor of pleura: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Norie; Okuse, Chiaki; Nomoto, Masahito; Orita, Mayu; Katakura, Yoshiki; Ishii, Toshiya; Shinmyo, Takuo; Osada, Hiroaki; Maeda, Ichiro; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Michihiro; Itoh, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    A 77-year-old man on systemic chemotherapy against postoperative bilateral multiple lung metastases of malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura suffered from pruritus and jaundice. Blood examination showed elevated levels of hepatobiliary enzymes. Abdominal computed tomography showed a tumor with peripheral enhancement in the pancreatic head, accompanied with the dilatation of intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts. He was diagnosed as having obstructive jaundice caused by a pancreatic hea...

  11. The Role of Minimally Invasive Enucleation in the Treatment of Pancreatic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Matsuoka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic enucleation has been performed for small, benign or premalignant lesions of the pancreas. The goal of this parenchymapreserving strategy is to reduce the risk of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and potentially the risks associated with pancreatic and biliary anastomoses. Studies have shown open pancreatic enucleation to be a viable option for patients, with a debatable increased risk of pancreatic fistula. With the advent of minimally invasive techniques and increasing experience, centers have started to perform laparoscopic pancreatic enucleation. Small studies have been performed demonstrating the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic pancreatic enucleation, with patient positioning and port placement dependent upon the location of the lesion. Laparoscopic intraoperative ultrasound plays an important role in the localization of these tumors and their proximity to the pancreatic duct and vascular structures, which helps to determine appropriateness for enucleation.

  12. Computed tomography of pancreatic tumors; Computertomographie bei Pankreastumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenacher, L.; Klauss, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2009-02-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and in particular multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT), also known as multislice CT (MSCT), is ideally suited for detecting pancreatic tumors because of the high spatial resolution. The method of choice is hydro-CT which involves distension of the stomach and duodenum by administration of 1-1.5 l water as a negative contrast medium under medically induced hypotension by administration of buscopan. The patient is laid on the right side at an angle of 30-45 in order to obtain an artefact-free image of the close anatomical relationship around the pancreas head. In addition, curved MPRs or in rare cases 3D reconstructions could be very helpful in identifying the critical anatomic tumor site in the neighbourhood of the visceral vessel system. After the correct diagnosis of an adenocarcinoma has been made only 20% of all patients are shown to have a surgically resectable disease, but the overall survival rate is significantly higher after resection in combination with a multimodal tumor therapy strategy. The reason is that the correct diagnosis of the resectability of the tumor is one of the main criteria for overall survival of these patients. Currently practically all pancreatic tumors can be detected using MDCT and the detection rate varies between 70% and 100% (most recent literature references give a sensitivity of 89% and specificity up to 99%). In some rare cases the differentiation between focal necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma can be difficult even with sophisticated protocols. Resectability can be correctly diagnosed with MDCT with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 89%. MDCT is an ideal tool for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors, metastases and for the differentiation of cystic pancreatic lesions such as pseudocysts, microcystic adenomas or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Particularly, the differentiation of the latter into benign, borderline or malignant transformation is not

  13. Multiple tumor marker protein chip detection system in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fangfeng; Du, Futian; Chen, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical stage of the disease at diagnosis often determines the prognosis and survival rate of a patient with pancreatic cancer. Early symptoms of pancreatic cancer are often not obvious on imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and so on), and when patients present with weight loss, jaundice and abdominal pain and other symptoms, they are usually already in the advanced stages of pancreatic cancer. However, the examination of combined tumor markers might improve their ...

  14. The Challenging Diagnosis of Pancreatic Masses: Not All Tumors Are Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Morotti; Dario Gned; Leonardo Di Martino; Gaetano Cristaldi; Anna Alì; Paolo Nicoli; Andrea Veltri; Angelo Guerrasio

    2015-01-01

    In the elderly patients, where biopsy-induced complications could outweigh the benefit, the identification of pancreatic masses is generally referred to as a synonymous of pancreatic cancer and patients are dismissed with no further options than palliative and supportive care. Notwithstanding, not all pancreatic tumors are cancers and therefore alternative diagnoses need to be investigated, especially when patients are unfit for invasive diagnostic procedures. Here, we report a case of an age...

  15. Surgery of malignant pancreatic tumors; Chirurgie maligner Pankreastumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M.; Friess, H.; Kleeff, J. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2009-02-15

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the pancreas. Despite great efforts in basic and clinical pancreatic cancer research, the prognosis remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Complete surgical resection represents the only curative treatment option and 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved following curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy. Although pancreatic surgery is considered one of the most technically demanding and challenging procedures, there has been constant progress in surgical techniques and advances in perioperative care with a modern interdisciplinary approach including anesthesiology, oncology, radiology and nursing. This has reduced morbidity and especially mortality rates in high-volume centers. Among extended resection procedures multivisceral and venous resections are technically feasible and should be considered if a complete tumor resection can be achieved. Multimodal regimens have shown promising results, however, only adjuvant chemotherapy is supported by solid evidence from randomized controlled trials. (orig.) [German] Das duktale Adenokarzinom ist der haeufigste maligne Pankreastumor. Trotz intensiver Anstrengungen auf dem Gebiet der Pankreasforschung konnte die Gesamtprognose in den vergangenen Jahren nicht entscheidend verbessert werden. Die einzige potenziell kurative Therapie ist die chirurgische Resektion. In Kombination mit einer adjuvanten Chemotherapie liegen die 5-Jahres-Ueberlebensraten aktuell bei 20-25%. Dank kontinuierlicher Weiterentwicklung der chirurgischen Operationstechnik und Verbesserungen der perioperativen Versorgung der Patienten mit einer engen interdisziplinaeren Zusammenarbeit (Chirurgie, Anaesthesie, Onkologie, Radiologie und Pflege) konnten die perioperative Morbiditaets- und Mortalitaetsraten in den vergangenen Jahren deutlich gesenkt werden. Unter den erweiterten Resektionsverfahren sind Venen- oder multiviszerale Resektionen technisch sicher

  16. Cancer Stem Cells, EMT, and Developmental Pathway Activation in Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindriksen, Sanne; Bijlsma, Maarten F., E-mail: m.f.bijlsma@amc.uva.nl [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-12

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease with remarkably poor patient survival rates. The frequent presence of metastases and profound chemoresistance pose a severe problem for the treatment of these tumors. Moreover, cross-talk between the tumor and the local micro-environment contributes to tumorigenicity, metastasis and chemoresistance. Compared to bulk tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) have reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy. CSC are tumor cells with stem-like features that possess the ability to self-renew, but can also give rise to more differentiated progeny. CSC can be identified based on increased in vitro spheroid- or colony formation, enhanced in vivo tumor initiating potential, or expression of cell surface markers. Since CSC are thought to be required for the maintenance of a tumor cell population, these cells could possibly serve as a therapeutic target. There appears to be a causal relationship between CSC and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in pancreatic tumors. The occurrence of EMT in pancreatic cancer cells is often accompanied by re-activation of developmental pathways, such as the Hedgehog, WNT, NOTCH, and Nodal/Activin pathways. Therapeutics based on CSC markers, EMT, developmental pathways, or tumor micro-environment could potentially be used to target pancreatic CSC. This may lead to a reduction of tumor growth, metastatic events, and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Cancer Stem Cells, EMT, and Developmental Pathway Activation in Pancreatic Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease with remarkably poor patient survival rates. The frequent presence of metastases and profound chemoresistance pose a severe problem for the treatment of these tumors. Moreover, cross-talk between the tumor and the local micro-environment contributes to tumorigenicity, metastasis and chemoresistance. Compared to bulk tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) have reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy. CSC are tumor cells with stem-like features that possess the ability to self-renew, but can also give rise to more differentiated progeny. CSC can be identified based on increased in vitro spheroid- or colony formation, enhanced in vivo tumor initiating potential, or expression of cell surface markers. Since CSC are thought to be required for the maintenance of a tumor cell population, these cells could possibly serve as a therapeutic target. There appears to be a causal relationship between CSC and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in pancreatic tumors. The occurrence of EMT in pancreatic cancer cells is often accompanied by re-activation of developmental pathways, such as the Hedgehog, WNT, NOTCH, and Nodal/Activin pathways. Therapeutics based on CSC markers, EMT, developmental pathways, or tumor micro-environment could potentially be used to target pancreatic CSC. This may lead to a reduction of tumor growth, metastatic events, and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

  18. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors : comparison of MR pancreatography(MRP) and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance pancreatography(MRP) is a non-invasive imaging technique for visualization of the pancreatic duct system, and is similar to those obtained by means of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP). To determine the role of MRP in the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, the diagnostic confidence and imaginal difference of MRP and ERP were compared. Twenty patients(13 male and 7 female, mean age 59 years) with pancreatic tumors underwent MRP and ERP. The former involved the use of a single shot fast spin-echo sequence on a 1.5T system. All images were retrospectively reviewed by a radiologist and a gastroenterologist, working together. Both MRP and ERP were compared for separate visualization of the head, body and tail portion of the pancreatic duct, and scored as excellent (4), good (3), fair (2), poor (1), or no visualization (0). In addition, the overall diagnostic confidence of both modalities was graded subjectively from non-diagnoses (0) to definite information (4). The final diagnoses derived from surgical findings (n=9) or imaging findings and clinical follow-up (n=7) were as follows : pancreatic cancer (n=12), mucin-producing pancreatic cancer (n=2), mucinous ductectatic tumor (n=4), serous cystadenoma (n=2). To assess the statistical significance of difference, the paired t-test was used. Mean scores of visualization of the pancreatic duct by MRP and ERP were 2.91 and 3.15 in the pancreatic head (p=NS), 3.11 and 2.18 in the pancreatic body (p=NS), and 3.07 and 1.09 in the pancreatic tail (p<0.01). The mean score of diagnostic confidence was 4.03 for MRP and 2.51 for ERP, a statistically significant difference (p<0.05). In 11 patients with obstruction of the pancreatic duct due to malignant lesions, MRP visualized the duct both proximally and distally to the site of obstruction, while ERP visualized only the distal duct to the site of obstruction. MRP was also better at defining the extent of tumor by visualization of surrounding pancreatic

  19. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors : comparison of MR pancreatography(MRP) and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Ki Suh; Seo, Jung Hoon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Bok; Chung, Jae Joon; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    Magnetic resonance pancreatography(MRP) is a non-invasive imaging technique for visualization of the pancreatic duct system, and is similar to those obtained by means of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP). To determine the role of MRP in the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, the diagnostic confidence and imaginal difference of MRP and ERP were compared. Twenty patients(13 male and 7 female, mean age 59 years) with pancreatic tumors underwent MRP and ERP. The former involved the use of a single shot fast spin-echo sequence on a 1.5T system. All images were retrospectively reviewed by a radiologist and a gastroenterologist, working together. Both MRP and ERP were compared for separate visualization of the head, body and tail portion of the pancreatic duct, and scored as excellent (4), good (3), fair (2), poor (1), or no visualization (0). In addition, the overall diagnostic confidence of both modalities was graded subjectively from non-diagnoses (0) to definite information (4). The final diagnoses derived from surgical findings (n=9) or imaging findings and clinical follow-up (n=7) were as follows : pancreatic cancer (n=12), mucin-producing pancreatic cancer (n=2), mucinous ductectatic tumor (n=4), serous cystadenoma (n=2). To assess the statistical significance of difference, the paired t-test was used. Mean scores of visualization of the pancreatic duct by MRP and ERP were 2.91 and 3.15 in the pancreatic head (p=NS), 3.11 and 2.18 in the pancreatic body (p=NS), and 3.07 and 1.09 in the pancreatic tail (p<0.01). The mean score of diagnostic confidence was 4.03 for MRP and 2.51 for ERP, a statistically significant difference (p<0.05). In 11 patients with obstruction of the pancreatic duct due to malignant lesions, MRP visualized the duct both proximally and distally to the site of obstruction, while ERP visualized only the distal duct to the site of obstruction. MRP was also better at defining the extent of tumor by visualization of surrounding pancreatic

  20. Novel therapeutic strategies targeting tumor-stromal interactions in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ShinHamada

    2013-01-01

    Therapy-resistance and postoperative recurrence are causes of the poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. Conventional therapies have a limited impact on the control of pancreatic cancer, resulting in the rapid re-growth of the tumor. The indispensable role of tumor-stromal interaction, which acts as a defender of cancer cells and enhances malignant potential, is being uncovered now. For example, specific signaling pathways for desmoplasia induction have been identified, such as sonic hedgehog (...

  1. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya’an; Zhang, Joy,; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography...

  2. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  3. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: Correlation between the contrast-enhanced computed tomography features and the pathological tumor grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Updated WHO classification divided pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors into G1, G2, and G3. • We investigate the relationship between CT findings and pathological tumor grades (G1 and G2). • A larger tumor size was associated with G2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs). • Non-hyperattenuation during the portal venous phase was associated with G2 PanNETs. - Abstract: Objective: To determine whether CT features can predict the pathological tumor grades of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) according to the recent WHO classification. Materials and methods: In all, 28 patients with histologically confirmed PanNETs underwent preoperative contrast CT examinations. Thirteen tumors were classified as G1 and 15 as G2. Two radiologists independently evaluated the CT features (tumor delineation, peripancreatic vascular involvement, upstream pancreatic duct dilatation, N (regional lymph node metastasis) and M (distant metastasis) grades, tumor homogeneity, cystic or necrotic change, and tumor conspicuity). The tumor sizes and Hounsfield unit values of all PanNETs during each phase on CT were measured by one radiologist. We compared the CT features between pathological tumor grades using Fisher's exact test for nominal scales and Mann–Whitney U test for ordinal scales or continuous variables. Additionally, we evaluated the performances of the CT findings and their combinations to diagnose G2 tumors. Results: G2 tumors showed significantly larger in tumor size than G1 tumors (p = 0.029). All 4 tumors with hepatic metastases were G2. Non-hyperattenuation compared with pancreatic parenchyma during portal venous phase (PVP) was significantly associated with G2 (p = 0.016). The accuracy for G2 diagnosis of tumor size (≥20 mm), M grade (M1), and tumor conspicuity (non-hyperattenuation during PVP) were 71%, 61%, and 71%, respectively, while the accuracy of their combination was 82%. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT features (tumor size, M

  4. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: Correlation between the contrast-enhanced computed tomography features and the pathological tumor grade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takumi, Koji, E-mail: takumi@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City, 890-8544 (Japan); Fukukura, Yoshihiko [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City, 890-8544 (Japan); Higashi, Michiyo [Department of Human Pathology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City, 890-8544 (Japan); Ideue, Junnichi; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Hakamada, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City, 890-8544 (Japan); Kanetsuki, Ichiro [Department of Radiology, Koseiren Hospital, 22-25 Tenpozancho, Kagoshima City, 890-0061 (Japan); Yoshiura, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City, 890-8544 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Updated WHO classification divided pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors into G1, G2, and G3. • We investigate the relationship between CT findings and pathological tumor grades (G1 and G2). • A larger tumor size was associated with G2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs). • Non-hyperattenuation during the portal venous phase was associated with G2 PanNETs. - Abstract: Objective: To determine whether CT features can predict the pathological tumor grades of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) according to the recent WHO classification. Materials and methods: In all, 28 patients with histologically confirmed PanNETs underwent preoperative contrast CT examinations. Thirteen tumors were classified as G1 and 15 as G2. Two radiologists independently evaluated the CT features (tumor delineation, peripancreatic vascular involvement, upstream pancreatic duct dilatation, N (regional lymph node metastasis) and M (distant metastasis) grades, tumor homogeneity, cystic or necrotic change, and tumor conspicuity). The tumor sizes and Hounsfield unit values of all PanNETs during each phase on CT were measured by one radiologist. We compared the CT features between pathological tumor grades using Fisher's exact test for nominal scales and Mann–Whitney U test for ordinal scales or continuous variables. Additionally, we evaluated the performances of the CT findings and their combinations to diagnose G2 tumors. Results: G2 tumors showed significantly larger in tumor size than G1 tumors (p = 0.029). All 4 tumors with hepatic metastases were G2. Non-hyperattenuation compared with pancreatic parenchyma during portal venous phase (PVP) was significantly associated with G2 (p = 0.016). The accuracy for G2 diagnosis of tumor size (≥20 mm), M grade (M1), and tumor conspicuity (non-hyperattenuation during PVP) were 71%, 61%, and 71%, respectively, while the accuracy of their combination was 82%. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced CT features (tumor size, M

  5. Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine inhibits growth of nude mouse subcutaneous transplantation tumor of human PC-3 pancreatic cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; JIN Jian-guang; QIN Zhao-yin

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To study the mechanisms of pancreatic cancer treatment with Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine by investigating the relationship between the apoptosis and the expression of bcl-2, Bax and VEGF in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods:Nude mouse subcutaneous transplantation tumor model of Human PC-3 pancreatic cancer was established; the expressions of bcl-2, Bax and VEGF of transplantation tumor cell were determined; the earlier apoptosis rate of pancreatic cancer cell and the gross tumor volume were determined. Results:Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine remarkably decreased the protein expression of bcl-2,raised the expression of Bax,increased the apoptosis rate of the pancreatic cancer and contract the gross tumor volume. Kanglaite greatly decreased the protein expression of VEGF of the tumor cell. Conclusion:Therapeutic efficacy of Kanglaite combined Gemcitabine is far better than separate use of the two medicines in the pancreatic cancer transplantation tumor treatment.

  6. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K.; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P.; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis. PMID:26831065

  7. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in pancreatic ductal carcinoma is associated with tumor metastasis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kemona

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study was to assess the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 in pancreatic ductal carcinoma and to examine its correlation with chosen clinico-anatomical parameters. The study group consisted of 36 patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma. Tumors were stained using immunohistochemical method (NCL -MMP-9, Novocastra. No correlation was found between tumor MMP-9 expression and age, gender or grade of histological malignancy. However, statistical analysis revealed a relationship between tumor MMP-9 expression and histological type (adenocarcinoma mucinosum of pancreatic carcinoma. The expression was strongly correlated with lymph node involvement and occurrence of distant metastases (p<0.00001. The results indicate a correlation between the expression of MMP-9 in pancreatic ductal carcinoma and worse prognosis (shown by lymph node involvement and distant metastases.

  8. Genetic deletion of the desmosomal component desmoplakin promotes tumor microinvasion in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G H Chun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We used the RIP1-Tag2 (RT2 mouse model of islet cell carcinogenesis to profile the transcriptome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET that were either non-invasive or highly invasive, seeking to identify pro- and anti-invasive molecules. Expression of multiple components of desmosomes, structures that help maintain cellular adhesion, was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas. Genetic deletion of one of these desmosomal components, desmoplakin, resulted in increased local tumor invasion without affecting tumor growth parameters in RT2 PNETs. Expression of cadherin 1, a component of the adherens junction adhesion complex, was maintained in these tumors despite the genetic deletion of desmoplakin. Our results demonstrate that loss of desmoplakin expression and resultant disruption of desmosomal adhesion can promote increased local tumor invasion independent of adherens junction status.

  9. Open pipelines for integrated tumor genome profiles reveal differences between pancreatic cancer tumors and cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe open, reproducible pipelines that create an integrated genomic profile of a cancer and use the profile to find mutations associated with disease and potentially useful drugs. These pipelines analyze high-throughput cancer exome and transcriptome sequence data together with public databases to find relevant mutations and drugs. The three pipelines that we have developed are: (1) an exome analysis pipeline, which uses whole or targeted tumor exome sequence data to produce a list of putative variants (no matched normal data are needed); (2) a transcriptome analysis pipeline that processes whole tumor transcriptome sequence (RNA-seq) data to compute gene expression and find potential gene fusions; and (3) an integrated variant analysis pipeline that uses the tumor variants from the exome pipeline and tumor gene expression from the transcriptome pipeline to identify deleterious and druggable mutations in all genes and in highly expressed genes. These pipelines are integrated into the popular Web platform Galaxy at #http://usegalaxy.org/cancer# to make them accessible and reproducible, thereby providing an approach for doing standardized, distributed analyses in clinical studies. We have used our pipeline to identify similarities and differences between pancreatic adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines and primary tumors

  10. Ascaris lumbricoides-Induced Acute Pancreatitis: Diagnosis during EUS for a Suspected Small Pancreatic Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Benedetto Mangiavillano; Silvia Carrara; Maria Chiara Petrone; Paolo Giorgio Arcidiacono; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2009-01-01

    Context Ascaris lumbricoides is the second most common intestinal parasite world-wide and, although the infection can be asymptomatic, in some cases it can present with complications, such as acute pancreatitis. Case report We describe the case of a 37- year-old man, with a history of travelling in Eastern countries who presented with Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis mimicking a small pancreatic cancer, diagnosed during an upper EUS. The endoscopy revealeda roundworm floating i...

  11. SU-E-J-07: A Functional MR Protocol for the Pancreatic Tumor Delineation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreychenko, A; Heerkens, H; Meijer, G; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den [UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer is one of the cancers with the poorest survival prognosis. At the time of diagnosis most of pancreatic cancers are unresectable and those patients can be treated by radiotherapy. Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer is limited due to uncertainties in CT-based delineations. MRI provides an excellent soft tissue contrast. Here, an MR protocol is developed to improve delineations for radiotherapy treatment of pancreatic cancer. In a later stage this protocol can also be used for on-line visualization of the pancreas during MRI guided treatments. Methods: Nine pancreatic cancer patients were included. The MR protocol included T2 weighted(T2w), T1 weighted(T1w), diffusion weighted(DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced(DCE) techniques. The tumor was delineated on T2w and T1w MRI by an experienced radiation oncologist. Healthy pancreas or pancreatitis (assigned by the oncologist based on T2w) areas were also delineated. Apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC), and area under the curve(AUC)/time to peak(TTP) maps were obtained from DWI and DCE scans, respectively. Results: A clear demarcation of tumor area was visible on b800 DWI images in 5 patients. ADC maps of those patients characterized tumor as an area with restricted water diffusion. Tumor delineations based on solely DCE were possible in 7 patients. In 6 of those patients AUC maps demonstrated tumor heterogeneity: a hypointense area with a hyperintense ring. TTP values clearly discriminated the tumor and the healthy pancreas but could not distinguish tumor and the pancreatitis accurately. Conclusion: MR imaging results in a more pronounced tumor contrast than contrast enhanced CT. The addition of quantitative, functional MRI provides valuable, additional information to the radiation oncologist on the spatial tumor extent by discriminating tumor from the healthy pancreas(TTP, DWI) and characterizing the tumor(ADC). Our findings indicate that tumor delineation in pancreatic cancer can greatly

  12. New tumor-associated antigen SC6 in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Min-Pei; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Xu, Jian-Hua; Wang, Di; Li, Hong-Yu; Cui, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Ren, Li-Nan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the concentration of a new antigen SC6 (SC6-Ag) recognized by monoclonal antibody (MAb) in patients with pancreatic cancer and other malignant or benign diseases and to understand whether SC6-Ag has any clinical significance in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from other gastrointestinal diseases.

  13. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José Celso Ardengh; César Vivian Lopes; Luiz Felipe Pereira de Lima; Juliano Rodrigues de Oliveira; Filadelfio Venco; Giulio Cesare Santo; Jose Luiz Pimenta Modena

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for pancreatic solid tumors larger or smaller than 3 cm, and cystic lesions.METHODS: From January/1997 to December/2006, 611 patients with pancreatic tumors were subjected to EUS-FNA. The final diagnosis was obtained either by surgery (356 cases) or after a mean clinical follow-up of 11.8 mo in the remaining patients.RESULTS: There were 405 solid tumors, 189 cystic lesions and 17 mixed. Pancreatic specimens for cytological assessment were successfully obtained by EUS-FNA in 595 (97.4%) cases. There were 352 (57.6%) malignancies and 259 (42.4%) benign tumors. Among the malignancies, pancreatic adenocarcinomas accounted for 67% of the lesions. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of EUS-FNA were, respectively, 78.4%, 99.2%, 99.3%, 77.2% and 87.2%. Specifically for solid tumors, the same parameters for neoplasms larger and smaller than 3 cm were, respectively, 78.8% vs 82.4%, 100% vs 98.4%, 100% vs 99%, 54.8% vs 74.1% and 83.1% vs 87.8%. For cystic lesions, the values were, respectively, 72.2%, 99.3%, 97.5%, 91% and 92.2%.CONCLUSION: EUS-FNA can be used to sample pancreatic tumors in most patients. Even though the negative predictive value is inadequate for large solid tumors, the results are rather good for small solid tumors, especially concerning the sensitivity, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy. Among all pancreatic lesions, EUS-FNA for cystic lesions can reveal the best negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy, both higher than 90%.

  14. Atorvastatin (Lipitor) attenuates the effects of aspirin on pancreatic cancerogenesis and the chemotherapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine on pancreatic cancer by promoting M2 polarized tumor associated macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qiaofei; Li, Yuan; Niu, Zheyu; Zong, Yi; Wang, Mengyi; Yao, Lutian; Lu, Zhaohui; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Background Interactions of inflammatory cells with pancreatic cancer cells play crucial roles in pancreatic cancer, however the dynamic changes of inflammatory cell populations in pancreatic cancerogensis and after chemotherapy have not been well eclucidated. The combinational use of aspirin and atrovastatin (Lipitor) have been widely prescribled for cardio-cerebral vascular diseases mainly by regulation of inflammations, and they have been also reported to have plausible anti-tumor effects, ...

  15. Sentinel lymph node mapping in tumors of the pancreatic body: preliminary report

    OpenAIRE

    Durczyński, Adam; Hogendorf, Piotr; Szymański, Dariusz; Grzelak, Piotr; Strzelczyk, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Actual lymphatic drainage of pancreatic body neoplasms and the proper extent of lymphadenectomy remain unknown. The aim of the study was to define the exact lymphatic draining pattern using the dye mapping method. Material and methods The study enrolled patients who were operated on for tumor of the pancreatic body in the Department of General and Transplant Surgery of the Medical University of Lodz during 2010, with injection of 1 ml of blue dye (Patent Blue, Guerbet) in the...

  16. Late Recurrence after Surgical Resection of a Pancreatic Tumor in von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Domenico Corleto

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Patients with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome, develop a variety of tumors in different organ systems which make the clinical management of these patients complex. Case report The long clinical history of a 45-year-old woman started at 22 years of age when she had surgery for a right adrenal pheochromocytoma. Two years later, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed to remove a pancreatic mass which turned out to be a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. After a long period of relative wellness, 21 years after the surgical resection of her primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, abdominal lymph node metastases of pancreatic neuroendocrine origin occurred. In fact, three abdominal nodules were removed by laparoscopic surgery, and the histological examination showed well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors with similar immunohistochemical characteristics and Ki67 below 1%. Considering the patient’s clinical history, an inherited cause was postulated and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 was first investigated, but the result was negative. Then, a missense mutation in exon 3 of the VHL gene (ACT>ATT; Thr157Ile was found. Conclusion Although no local and/or distant tumor recurrences are usually reported in radically operated on von Hippel-Lindau pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor patients after a median time of five years of follow-up, the present patient had a recurrence after a very long period of time, suggesting that a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome may behave more aggressively than that has previously been described, thus requiring a life-long follow-up.

  17. Accumulation of Extracellular Hyaluronan by Hyaluronan Synthase 3 Promotes Tumor Growth and Modulates the Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kultti; Chunmei Zhao; Netai C. Singha; Susan Zimmerman; Osgood, Ryan J.; Rebecca Symons; Ping Jiang; Xiaoming Li; Thompson, Curtis B.; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Jacobetz, Michael A.; Tuveson, David A.; Frost, Gregory I.; H. Michael Shepard; Zhongdong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Extensive accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan is found in pancreatic cancer. The role of hyaluronan synthases 2 and 3 (HAS2, 3) was investigated in pancreatic cancer growth and the tumor microenvironment. Overexpression of HAS3 increased hyaluronan synthesis in BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells. In vivo, overexpression of HAS3 led to faster growing xenograft tumors with abundant extracellular hyaluronan accumulation. Treatment with pegylated human recombinant hyaluronidase (PEGPH20)...

  18. Asymptomatic Pancreatic Perivascular Epithelial Cell Tumor (PEComa in a Male Patient: Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Zemet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Perivascular epithelial cell tumors (PEComas are a family of rare mesenchymal neoplasms which share cellular, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural characteristics but are found in different visceral and soft tissue sites. PEComas of the pancreas are extremely rare neoplasms. Case report We describe a 49-year-old male who was incidentally diagnosed with a pancreatic mass. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy suggested a PEComa. An uneventful pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was thus performed. The tumor was a solid well-circumscribed mass in the pancreatic head with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Histopathology revealed a well-circumscribed and vascularized neoplasm, measuring 32x27x30 mm, composed of epithelioid smooth muscle cells with clear cytoplasm rich in glycogen. The tumor exhibited immunoreactivity to alphasmooth muscle actin and to melanoma-associated antigen HMB-45. Conclusions Although rare, pancreatic PEComas should be included in the differential diagnosis of a pancreatic mass. Currently, the paucity of cases published makes it impossible to predict the behavior and prognosis of these tumors or to advocate an optimal therapy.

  19. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Eugene J; Baio, Flavio E; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R; Tamm, Eric P; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N; Rozner, Marc A; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L; Wolff, Robert A; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R; Fleming, Jason B

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  20. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  1. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-12-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  2. The estimation of metaloproteinases and their inhibitors blood levels in patients with pancreatic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Śmigielski, Jacek; Piskorz, Łukasz; -Wojnarowska, Renata Talar; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Jabłoński, Sławomir; Brocki, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration of proteolytic enzymes, MMP-2 and MMP-9, and their tissue inhibitors, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, in the blood of patients with benign and malignant pancreatic tumors. Methods MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were evaluated in the patients with benign and malignant pancreatic tumors before surgery and in the 30-day follow-up. The study covered 134 patients aged 54 to 76 years, who were divided into groups by TNM staging. Results Before ...

  3. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  4. Assessment of Hypoxia in the Stroma of Patient-Derived Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, Ines; Lourenco, Corey; Ibrahimov, Emin; Pintilie, Melania [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Tsao, Ming-Sound [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Pathology, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, ON M5G2C4 (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, 27 King’s College Circle, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S1A1 (Canada); Hedley, David W., E-mail: david.hedley@uhn.ca [Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Departments of Medical Biophysics University of Toronto, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Departments of Medicine, University of Toronto, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, 610 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G2M9 (Canada)

    2014-02-26

    The unusually dense stroma of pancreatic cancers is thought to play an important role in their biological aggression. The presence of hypoxia is also considered an adverse prognostic factor. Although it is usually assumed that this is the result of effects of hypoxia on the epithelial component, it is possible that hypoxia exerts indirect effects via the tumor stroma. We therefore measured hypoxia in the stroma of a series of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts. Nine patient-derived pancreatic xenografts representing a range of oxygenation levels were labeled by immunohistochemistry for EF5 and analyzed using semi-automated pattern recognition software. Hypoxia in the tumor and stroma was correlated with tumor growth and metastatic potential. The extent of hypoxia varied from 1%–39% between the different models. EF5 labeling in the stroma ranged from 0–20% between models, and was correlated with the level of hypoxia in the tumor cell area, but not microvessel density. Tumor hypoxia correlated with spontaneous metastasis formation with the exception of one hypoxic model that showed disproportionately low levels of hypoxia in the stroma and was non-metastatic. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia exists in the stroma of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts and suggest that stromal hypoxia impacts the metastatic potential.

  5. Assessment of Hypoxia in the Stroma of Patient-Derived Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unusually dense stroma of pancreatic cancers is thought to play an important role in their biological aggression. The presence of hypoxia is also considered an adverse prognostic factor. Although it is usually assumed that this is the result of effects of hypoxia on the epithelial component, it is possible that hypoxia exerts indirect effects via the tumor stroma. We therefore measured hypoxia in the stroma of a series of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts. Nine patient-derived pancreatic xenografts representing a range of oxygenation levels were labeled by immunohistochemistry for EF5 and analyzed using semi-automated pattern recognition software. Hypoxia in the tumor and stroma was correlated with tumor growth and metastatic potential. The extent of hypoxia varied from 1%–39% between the different models. EF5 labeling in the stroma ranged from 0–20% between models, and was correlated with the level of hypoxia in the tumor cell area, but not microvessel density. Tumor hypoxia correlated with spontaneous metastasis formation with the exception of one hypoxic model that showed disproportionately low levels of hypoxia in the stroma and was non-metastatic. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia exists in the stroma of primary pancreatic cancer xenografts and suggest that stromal hypoxia impacts the metastatic potential

  6. Identification of tumorigenic cells and therapeutic targets in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampitz, Geoffrey Wayne; George, Benson M; Willingham, Stephen B; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine; Newman, Aaron M; Sahoo, Debashis; Zemek, Allison J; Yanovsky, Rebecca L; Nguyen, Julia K; Schnorr, Peter J; Mazur, Pawel K; Sage, Julien; Longacre, Teri A; Visser, Brendan C; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-04-19

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are a type of pancreatic cancer with limited therapeutic options. Consequently, most patients with advanced disease die from tumor progression. Current evidence indicates that a subset of cancer cells is responsible for tumor development, metastasis, and recurrence, and targeting these tumor-initiating cells is necessary to eradicate tumors. However, tumor-initiating cells and the biological processes that promote pathogenesis remain largely uncharacterized in PanNETs. Here we profile primary and metastatic tumors from an index patient and demonstrate that MET proto-oncogene activation is important for tumor growth in PanNET xenograft models. We identify a highly tumorigenic cell population within several independent surgically acquired PanNETs characterized by increased cell-surface protein CD90 expression and aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDHA1) activity, and provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for their stem-like properties. We performed proteomic profiling of 332 antigens in two cell lines and four primary tumors, and showed that CD47, a cell-surface protein that acts as a "don't eat me" signal co-opted by cancers to evade innate immune surveillance, is ubiquitously expressed. Moreover, CD47 coexpresses with MET and is enriched in CD90(hi)cells. Furthermore, blocking CD47 signaling promotes engulfment of tumor cells by macrophages in vitro and inhibits xenograft tumor growth, prevents metastases, and prolongs survival in vivo. PMID:27035983

  7. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory. We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs. Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1–2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1–3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga–b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1. The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P current proposed TGM staging system was predictive for overall survival of p-NETs and could be more widely applied in clinical practice. PMID:27428224

  8. Prognostic Markers in Pancreatic Cancer: the tumor and its environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van der Zee (Jill)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIncidence Pancreatic cancer is not one of the most common types of cancer; however it is most certainly one of the most devastating types, ranking fourth in the list of cancer related deaths with a 5-year survival of only 6%. In 2010 there were an estimated 43.140 new cases whereas 36.80

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Pancreatic Tumor Growth by Inducing Alternative Polarization of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esha Mathew

    2016-03-01

    Significance: Targeting the stroma is emerging as a new paradigm in pancreatic cancer; however, efforts to that effect are hampered by our limited understanding of the nature and function of stromal components. Here, we uncover previously unappreciated heterogeneity within the stroma and identify interactions among stromal components that promote tumor growth and could be targeted therapeutically.

  10. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  11. miR-137 Modulates a Tumor Suppressor Network-Inducing Senescence in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Neault

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Activating K-Ras mutations occurs frequently in pancreatic cancers and is implicated in their development. Cancer-initiating events, such as oncogenic Ras activation, lead to the induction of cellular senescence, a tumor suppressor response. During senescence, the decreased levels of KDM4A lysine demethylase contribute to p53 activation, however, the mechanism by which KDM4A is downregulated is unknown. We show that miR-137 targets KDM4A mRNA during Ras-induced senescence and activates both p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb tumor suppressor pathways. Restoring the KDM4A expression contributed to bypass of miR-137-induced senescence and inhibition of endogenous miR-137 with an miRNA sponge-compromised Ras-induced senescence. miR-137 levels are significantly reduced in human pancreatic tumors, consistent with previous studies revealing a defective senescence response in this cancer type. Restoration of miR-137 expression inhibited proliferation and promoted senescence of pancreatic cancer cells. These results suggest that modulating levels of miR-137 may be important for triggering tumor suppressor networks in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Constitutively Active Akt1 Cooperates with KRasG12D to Accelerate In Vivo Pancreatic Tumor Onset and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toya M. Albury

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a deadly disease characterized by metastatic progression and resistance to conventional therapeutics. Mutation of KRAS is the most frequent early event in pancreatic tumor progression. AKT isoforms are frequently activated in pancreatic cancer, and reports have implicated hyperactivation of AKT1, as well as AKT2, in pancreatic tumor formation. The objective here is to delineate the role of AKT in facilitating in vivo pancreatic tumor progression in the context of KRAS mutation and predisposition to pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Mice with Akt1 and KRas mutant alleles expressed using the pancreas Pdx promoter were mated to characterize the incidence and frequency of histologic and genetic alterations known to occur commonly in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. RESULTS: Active Akt1 (Akt1Myr, containing a myristoylation sequence cooperated with active mutant KRasG12D to accelerate pancreatic carcinoma onset and progression and increase phosphorylation of downstream effectors in the Akt pathway. Mucin and smooth muscle actin expression was found in and around pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs, and accelerated time to metastasis was found in Akt1Myr/KRasG12D mice. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to prior reports of pancreatic KRas mutant mice mated with mice deficient for various tumor suppressor genes, which resulted in aggressive disease within a few months of age, Akt1Myr/KRasG12D mice enabled the study of PanINs and spontaneous pancreatic transformation more characteristic of human pancreatic progression in elderly individuals. The Akt1Myr/KRasG12D model holds promise for delineating the tumor biology and biomarkers critical for understanding their cooperation in cancer oncogenesis and future targeting in therapeutic strategies.

  13. Low Expression of ARHI Is Associated with Shorter Progression-Free Survival in Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Dalai; Edoardo Missiaglia; Stefano Barbi; Giovanni Butturini; Claudio Doglioni; Massimo Falconi; Aldo Scarpa

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular anomalies involved in the development and progression of malignancy of pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs). A recently identified member of the Ras family, Ras homologue member I (ARHI), has been shown to be involved in breast, ovary, and thyroid carcinogenesis. Unlike other members, it acts as a tumor suppressor gene that inhibits cell growth. Here we analyzed the mRNA expression of ARHI in 52 primary PETs and 16 normal pancreata using quantitative reverse ...

  14. Pancreatic Metastasis from a Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Osuga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Solitary fibrous tumor of the central nervous system is uncommon, with only around 200 reported cases. Further, extracranial metastasis is extremely rare, and only 5 cases of hematogenous metastases have been reported so far. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of solitary fibrous tumor of the central nervous system metastasizing to the pancreas. Case report A 62-year-old woman was referred for evaluation of a pancreatic mass, which was strongly suspected to be a neuroendocrine tumor. However, the histological findings and immunohistochemical profile indicated the presence of a solitary fibrous tumor. Because the medical history revealed previous transcranial resection for intracranial meningioma 16 years ago, we conducted a pathological review of the brain specimen obtained by the first operation and found that it had the same histology and immunohistochemical profile as the current endoscopic ultrasound-guided fineneedle aspiration specimen. Consequently, the final diagnosis, on the basis of the brain specimen, was changed from meningioma to solitary fibrous tumor of the central nervous system, and the pancreatic mass was diagnosed as metastasis from solitary fibrous tumor of the central nervous system. The patient underwent middle pancreatectomy; the pancreatic specimen also had the same histology and immunohistochemical profile as the brain specimen. Conclusion Histological findings and immunohistochemical profile obtained by EUS-FNA are invaluable for the correct diagnosis to avoid excessive surgical procedures.

  15. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  16. A mouse to human search for plasma proteome changes associated with pancreatic tumor development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor M Faca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complexity and heterogeneity of the human plasma proteome have presented significant challenges in the identification of protein changes associated with tumor development. Refined genetically engineered mouse (GEM models of human cancer have been shown to faithfully recapitulate the molecular, biological, and clinical features of human disease. Here, we sought to exploit the merits of a well-characterized GEM model of pancreatic cancer to determine whether proteomics technologies allow identification of protein changes associated with tumor development and whether such changes are relevant to human pancreatic cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Plasma was sampled from mice at early and advanced stages of tumor development and from matched controls. Using a proteomic approach based on extensive protein fractionation, we confidently identified 1,442 proteins that were distributed across seven orders of magnitude of abundance in plasma. Analysis of proteins chosen on the basis of increased levels in plasma from tumor-bearing mice and corroborating protein or RNA expression in tissue documented concordance in the blood from 30 newly diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer relative to 30 control specimens. A panel of five proteins selected on the basis of their increased level at an early stage of tumor development in the mouse was tested in a blinded study in 26 humans from the CARET (Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial cohort. The panel discriminated pancreatic cancer cases from matched controls in blood specimens obtained between 7 and 13 mo prior to the development of symptoms and clinical diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that GEM models of cancer, in combination with in-depth proteomic analysis, provide a useful strategy to identify candidate markers applicable to human cancer with potential utility for early detection.

  17. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 Production is Lost in Pancreatic Cancer and Overexpression of the Gene Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hennig

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer patients have an abysmal prognosis because of late diagnosis and lack of therapeutic options. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PaniNs, the precursor lesions, are a potential target for chemoprevention. Targeting eicosanoid pathways is an obvious choice because 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX has been suggested as a tumor promoter in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here we provide evidence that 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1 expression and activity may exert antitumorigenic effects in pancreatic cancer. Reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR and Western blot analysis showed absence or very weak expression of 15-LOX-1 in all pancreatic cancer cell lines tested. 15-LOX-1 was strongly stained in normal ductal cells, tubular complexes, and centroacinar cells, but no staining was seen in islets, cancer cells, PanlN lesions, or in tumor cells in lymph node metastases, indicating that 15-LOX-1 expression is lost during tumor development in human pancreas. Overexpression of 15-LOX-1 in pancreatic tumor cells or treatment with its arachidonic acid-derived metabolite resulted in decreased cell growth. These findings provide evidence that loss of 15-LOX-1 may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, possibly as a tumor suppressor gene. Thus, induction of 15-LOX-1 expression may be an attractive option for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  18. A Novel Ras Inhibitor (MDC-1016 Reduces Human Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo G Mackenzie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers partly because of its persistent resistance to chemotherapy. The currently limited treatment options for pancreatic cancer underscore the need for more efficient agents. Because activating Kras mutations initiate and maintain pancreatic cancer, inhibition of this pathway should have a major therapeutic impact. We synthesized phospho-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (PFTS; MDC-1016 and evaluated its efficacy, safety, and metabolism in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. PFTS inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in culture in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In an MIA PaCa-2 xenograft mouse model, PFTS at a dose of 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced tumor growth by 62% and 65% (P < .05 vs vehicle control. Furthermore, PFTS prevented pancreatitis-accelerated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in mice with activated Kras. PFTS appeared to be safe, with the animals showing no signs of toxicity during treatment. Following oral administration, PFTS was rapidly absorbed, metabolized to FTS and FTS glucuronide, and distributed through the blood to body organs. Mechanistically, PFTS inhibited Ras-GTP, the active form of Ras, both in vitro and in vivo, leading to the inhibition of downstream effector pathways c-RAF/mitogen-activated protein-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK/ERK1/2 kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT. In addition, PFTS proved to be a strong combination partner with phospho-valproic acid, a novel signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 inhibitor, displaying synergy in the inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth. In conclusion, PFTS, a direct Ras inhibitor, is an efficacious agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models, deserving further evaluation.

  19. Mutational Analysis of p27 (CDKN1 B and p18 (CDKN2C in Sporadic Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors Argues against Tumor-Suppressor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lindberg

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs arise sporadically or are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MENi syndrome or von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. About 90% of patients with familial MENi display detectable MEN1 gene (menin mutations. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 (CDKN1 B is a downstream target of menin and has been recently shown to be responsible for the multiple endocrine neoplasia-like syndrome in rats, where affected animals develop multiple tumors and hyperplasia in endocrine tissues, including the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. A germline nonsense truncation mutation of p27 has been recently described in a suspected MENi family without MENi mutation, raising the possibility that p27 mutation could be responsible for MENi phenotype. Somatic MENi mutations occur at low frequency in sporadic PETs; here, we subjected p27 to mutational analysis in 27 sporadic PETs. As an additional menin target, analysis of the p18(CDKN2C gene was included. In the p27 gene, one common polymorphism (V1 09G and one novel polymorphism (g/a in the noncoding part of exon 2 were identified. Three known polymorphisms were found in the p18 gene. These data suggest that p27 and p18 are unlikely to present classic tumor-suppressor genes in sporadic PETs.

  20. SU-D-201-04: Study On the Impact of Tumor Shape and Size On Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, M [ohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, and KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazmara, H [KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sefidgar, M [IKI University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Subramaniam, R; Rahmim, A [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Drug delivery to solid tumors can be expressed physically using transport phenomena such as convection and diffusion for the drug of interest within extracellular matrices. We aimed to carefully model these phenomena, and to investigate the effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors in the pancreas. Methods: In this study, multiple tumor geometries as obtained from clinical PET/CT images were considered. An advanced numerical method was used to simultaneously solve fluid flow and solute transport equations. Data from n=45 pancreatic cancer patients with non-resectable locoregional disease were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. To investigate effect of tumor shape, tumors with similar size but different shapes were selected and analyzed. Moreover, to investigate effect of tumor size, tumors with similar shapes but different sizes, ranging from 1 to 77 cm{sup 3}, were selected and analyzed. A hypothetical tumor similar to one of the analyzed tumors, but scaled to reduce its size below 0.2 cm{sup 3}, was also analyzed. Results: The results showed relatively similar average drug concentration profiles in tumors with different sizes. Generally, smaller tumors had higher absolute drug concentration. In the hypothetical tumor, with volume less than 0.2 cm{sup 3}, the average drug concentration was 20% higher in comparison to its counterparts. For the various real tumor geometries, however, the maximum difference between average drug concentrations was 10% for the smallest and largest tumors. Moreover, the results demonstrated that for pancreatic tumors the shape is not significant. The negligible difference of drug concentration in different tumor shapes was due to the minimum effect of convection in pancreatic tumors. Conclusion: In tumors with different sizes, smaller tumors have higher drug delivery; however, the impact of tumor shape in the case of pancreatic

  1. SU-D-201-04: Study On the Impact of Tumor Shape and Size On Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Drug delivery to solid tumors can be expressed physically using transport phenomena such as convection and diffusion for the drug of interest within extracellular matrices. We aimed to carefully model these phenomena, and to investigate the effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors in the pancreas. Methods: In this study, multiple tumor geometries as obtained from clinical PET/CT images were considered. An advanced numerical method was used to simultaneously solve fluid flow and solute transport equations. Data from n=45 pancreatic cancer patients with non-resectable locoregional disease were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. To investigate effect of tumor shape, tumors with similar size but different shapes were selected and analyzed. Moreover, to investigate effect of tumor size, tumors with similar shapes but different sizes, ranging from 1 to 77 cm3, were selected and analyzed. A hypothetical tumor similar to one of the analyzed tumors, but scaled to reduce its size below 0.2 cm3, was also analyzed. Results: The results showed relatively similar average drug concentration profiles in tumors with different sizes. Generally, smaller tumors had higher absolute drug concentration. In the hypothetical tumor, with volume less than 0.2 cm3, the average drug concentration was 20% higher in comparison to its counterparts. For the various real tumor geometries, however, the maximum difference between average drug concentrations was 10% for the smallest and largest tumors. Moreover, the results demonstrated that for pancreatic tumors the shape is not significant. The negligible difference of drug concentration in different tumor shapes was due to the minimum effect of convection in pancreatic tumors. Conclusion: In tumors with different sizes, smaller tumors have higher drug delivery; however, the impact of tumor shape in the case of pancreatic tumors is not

  2. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes towards immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tinder, Teresa L; Subramani, Durai B.; Basu, Gargi D; Bradley, Judy M.; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2008-01-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune competent host. Significant enhancement in...

  3. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) mice lacking Mucin 1 have a profound defect in tumor growth and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Besmer, Dahlia M; CURRY, JENNIFER M.; Roy, Lopamudra D.; Tinder, Teresa L; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Schettini, Jorge; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Yong Y.; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is over expressed and aberrantly glycosolated in >60% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The functional role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has yet to be fully elucidated due to a dearth of appropriate models. In the present study, we have generated mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (KC), which are either Muc1-null (KCKO) or express human MUC1 (KCM). We show that KCKO mice have significantly slower tumor progression and rates of secondary metastasi...

  4. Lobular panniculitis: A manifestation of pancreatic tumor with fatal outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović Marina; Golušin Zoran; Petrović Aleksandra; Vučković Nada; Brkić Silvija; Sotirović-Seničar Slavica; Petrović Kosta

    2005-01-01

    Lobular panniculitis is a skin condition that may be the first sign of underlying pancreatic disease. Though rare, the condition has been sufficiently well defined and pathognomonic, thus making differentiation from idiopathic lobular panniculitis quite possible. A 77-year-old woman was in apparently good general health condition when developed skin lesions in a form of erythematous painful fluctuant nodules localized predominantly on the breast, but also present on the arms, thighs, and trun...

  5. GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guimarães, Marta; Rodrigues, Pedro; Pereira, Sofia S;

    2015-01-01

    the treatment of severe obesity, a 54-year-old female with previous type 2 diabetes, developed post-prandial sweating, fainting and hypoglycemic episodes, which eventually led to the finding by ultrasound of a 1.8-cm solid mass in the pancreatic head. The 72-h fast test and the plasma chromogranin A......Post-prandial hypoglycemia is frequently found after bariatric surgery. Although rare, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), which occasionally are mixed hormone secreting, can lead to atypical clinical manifestations, including reactive hypoglycemia. Two years after gastric bypass surgery for...

  6. [Von Hippel-Lindau disease type 2-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and adrenal myelolipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzhansky, O V; Morozova, M M; Korostelev, S A; Kanivets, I V; Chardarov, N K; Shatveryan, G A; Pal'tseva, E M; Fedorov, D N

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a case of von Hippel--Lindau-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and adrenal myelolipoma in a 44-year-old woman. The pancreatic tumor and a left retroperitoneal mass were removed in the women in July 2014 and May 2015. Histological examination of the pancreatic tumor revealed that the latter consisted of clear cells forming tubular and tubercular structures showing the expression of chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and cytokeratins 18 and 19 and a negative response to CD10 and RCC. The adrenal medullary mass presented as clear-cell alveolar structures with inclusions of adipose tissue mixed with erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cells. The clear-cell component of the adrenal gland expressed neuroendocrine markers with a negative response to cytokeratins, CD10, and RCC. Molecular genetic examination yielded a signal corresponding to two copies of the VHL gene. No deletions or amplifications of the gene were detected. Cases of von Hippel--Lindau disease concurrent with adrenal pheochromocytoma and myelolipoma and simultaneous pancreatic involvement were not found in the literature. PMID:26978235

  7. Alteration of somatostatin receptor subtype 2 gene expression in pancreatic tumor angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-Yi Qin; Ru-Liang Fang; Manoj Kumar Gupta; Zheng-Ren Liu; Da-Yu Wang; Qing Chang; Yi-Bei Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the difference of somatostatin receptorsubtype 2 (SST2R) gene expression in pancreatic canceroustissue and its adjacent tissue, and the relationship betweenthe change of SST2R gene expression and pancreatic tumorangiogenesis related genes.METHODS: The expressions of SST2R, DPC4, p53 and ras genes in cancer tissues of 40 patients with primary pancreatic cancer, and the expression of SST2R gene in its adjacent tissue were determined by immunohistochemiscal LSAB method and EnVisionTM method. Chi-square test was used to analyze the difference in expression of SST2R in pancreatic cancer tissue and its adjacent tissue, and the correlation of SST2R gene expression with the expression of p53, ras and DPC4 genes.RESULTS: Of the tissue specimens from 40 patients with primary pancreatic cancer, 35 (87.5%) cancer tissues showed a negative expression of SST2R gene, whereas 34 (85%) a positive expression of SST2R gene in its adjacent tissues.Five (12.5%) cancer tissues and its adjacent tissues simultaneously expressed SST2R. The expression of SST2R gene was markedly higher in pancreatic tissues adjacent to cancer than in pancreatic cancer tissues (P<0.05). The expression rates of p53, ras and DPC4 genes were 50%,60% and 72.5%, respectively. There was a significant negative correlation of SST2R with p53 and ras genes (X12=9.33,X22=15.43, P<0.01), but no significant correlation with DPC4 gene (X2=2.08, P >0.05).CONCLUSION: There was a significant difference of SST2R gene expression in pancreatic cancer tissues and its adjacent tissues, which might be one cause for the different therapeutic effects of somatostatin and its analogs on pancreatic cancer patients. There were abnormal expressions of SST2R, DPC4, p53 and ras genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis, and moreover, the loss or decrease of SST2R gene expression was significantly negatively correlated with the overexpression of tumor angiogenesis correlated p53 and ras genes, suggesting that SST2R gene

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Tumor Size on CT Scan Versus Pathologic Specimen: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer primary tumor size measurements are often discordant between computed tomography (CT) and pathologic specimen after resection. Dimensions of the primary tumor are increasingly relevant in an era of highly conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 97 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic cancer at two Boston hospitals. All patients had CT scans before surgical resection. Primary endpoints were maximum dimension (in millimeters) of the primary tumor in any direction as reported by the radiologist on CT and by the pathologist for the resected gross fresh specimen. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings were analyzed if available. Results: Of the patients, 87 (90%) had preoperative CT scans available for review and 46 (47%) had EUS. Among proximal tumors (n = 69), 40 (58%) had pathologic duodenal invasion, which was seen on CT in only 3 cases. The pathologic tumor size was a median of 7 mm larger compared with CT size for the same patient (range, -15 to 43 mm; p < 0.0001), with 73 patients (84%) having a primary tumor larger on pathology than CT. Endoscopic ultrasound was somewhat more accurate, with pathologic tumor size being a median of only 5 mm larger compared with EUS size (range, -15 to 35 mm; p = 0.0003). Conclusions: Computed tomography scans significantly under-represent pancreatic cancer tumor size compared with pathologic specimens in resectable cases. We propose a clinical target volume expansion formula for the primary tumor based on our data. The high rate of pathologic duodenal invasion suggests a risk of duodenal undercoverage with highly conformal radiotherapy.

  9. Solid Pancreatic Tumors with Unilocular Cyst-Like Appearance on CT: Differentiation from Unilocular Cystic Tumors Using CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Hee [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) with unilocular cyst-like appearance, and to compare them with those of unilocular cystic tumors of the pancreas. This retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was waived. We included 112 pancreatic tumors with unilocular cyst-like appearance on CT (16 solid tumors [nine NETs and seven SPTs] and 96 cystic tumors [45 serous cystadenomas, 30 mucinous cystic neoplasms, and 21 branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms]). Two radiologists reviewed the CT images in consensus to determine tumor location, long diameter, morphological features, wall thicknesses, ratio of wall thickness to tumor size, wall enhancement patterns, intratumoral contents, and accompanying findings. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the results. All 16 solid tumors had perceptible walls (mean thickness, 2.7 mm; mean ratio of wall thickness to tumor size, 7.7%) with variable enhancement. Four NETs and seven SPTs had hemorrhage, calcifications, and/or mural nodules. Six CT findings were specific for solid tumors with unilocular cyst-like appearance: a thick (> 2 mm) wall, uneven thickness of the wall, high ratio of wall thickness to tumor size, hyper- or hypo-attenuation of the wall in the arterial and portal phase, and heterogeneous internal contents. When three or more of the above criteria were used, 100% specificity and 87.5-92% accuracy were obtained for solid tumors with unilocular cyst-like appearance. A combination of CT features was useful for distinguishing solid tumors with unilocular cyst-like appearance from unilocular cystic tumors of the pancreas.

  10. Von Hippel Lindau disease with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Kepicoglu, Hasan; Rusen, Elif; Kabasakal, Levent; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2013-01-01

    We present a 39-year-old woman who was previously diagnosed with Von Hippel Lindau Disease (VHLD). She had surgery and radiotherapy for cranial hemangioblastoma (HA) 11 years ago and had unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma in another hospital 6 month prior to her admission to our center. Moon face, buffalo hump, central obesity, progressive weight gain and menstrual irregularities persisted after adrenalectomy. Her laboratory results were consistent with ectopic Cushing's syndrome (ECS). A pancreatic solid mass with a nodule on the left lung were revealed upon computed tomography. In addition, Gallium-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET confirmed the pancreatic involvement and demonstrated additional lesions on the left lung and in the aortocaval lymphatic system on the right side, suggesting metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with [177Lutetium-DOTA0,Tyr3] octreotate was performed on the patient, with no side effects observed. She was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the first cycle. PMID:23524618

  11. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010355 Oxymatrine enhances the expression of collagen I and α-SMA in rat chronic pancreatitis. WANG Yuliang(王昱良),et al. Dept Gastroenterol ,Huanghe Hosp,Sanmenxia 472000. World Chin J Digestol 2010;18(13):1331-36. Objective To investigate the treatment effects of oxymatrine (OM) against chronic pancreatitis in rats and to explore the potential

  12. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  13. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  14. Expression of dynamin immunoreactivity in experimental pancreatic tumors induced in rat by mancozeb-nitrosomethylurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentich, M A; Cook, T; Urrutia, R

    1996-04-19

    Dynamins are GTPases which support receptor-mediated endocytosis and bind to several tyrosine kinase receptor-associated proteins known to mediate cell proliferation and differentiation. We have recently established that dynamin expression correlates with normal neuronal (Torre et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269 (1994) 32411-32417) and acinar pancreatic cell differentiation (Cook et al., Mol. Biol. Cell, 6 (1995) 405a). To begin to understand the role of dynamin in neoplastic pancreatic cell differentiation, we have followed the expression of this protein by immunohistochemistry during the development of pancreatic tumors in a mancozeb-nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-based carcinogenesis model recently developed in our laboratory (Monis and Valentich, Carcinogenesis, 14 (1993) 929-933). After a single intraperitoneal injection (50 mg/g body wt) of this carcinogen, rats fed with mancozeb develop pancreatic focal acinar hyperplasia (FACH), dysplastic foci (DYF) displaying acinar-like and ductular-like structures, and ductular-like carcinoma in situ (CIS). After histochemical staining using a monoclonal anti-dynamin antibody, high levels of this protein are consistently observed in well-differentiated acinar tumors (FACH). In contrast, dynamin immunoreactivity is almost undetectable in more advanced lesions showing a ductular-like phenotype (ductular-like DYF and CIS). This change in the expression pattern of dynamin during the progression of acinar into ductular-like DYF and CIS lesions correlates with recent findings from our laboratory showing a differential expression pattern for dynamin in pancreatic cells during embryonic development, with ductular-like precursor cells expressing low levels of this protein. Based upon these results, we conclude that more advanced ductular-like neoplastic cells induced by the carcinogen NMU in rat pancreas behave phenotypically like pancreatic precursor cells in their pattern of expression for dynamin. PMID:8603375

  15. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes towards immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinder, Teresa L.; Subramani, Durai B.; Basu, Gargi D.; Bradley, Judy M.; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd

    2008-01-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial pre-neoplastic lesions (PanINs) and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and indoleamine 2,3, dioxygenase compared to PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased pro-inflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally-suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer. PMID:18713982

  16. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes toward immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinder, Teresa L; Subramani, Durai B; Basu, Gargi D; Bradley, Judy M; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2008-09-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune-competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial preneoplastic lesions and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IDO compared with PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased proinflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease, which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer. PMID:18713982

  17. Prognostication and response assessment in liver and pancreatic tumors: The new imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Puntel, Gino; Ortolani, Silvia; Cingarlini, Sara; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo; D'Onofrio, Mirko

    2015-06-14

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) are technical improvements of morphologic imaging that can evaluate functional properties of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors during conventional MRI or CT examinations. Nevertheless, the term "functional imaging" is commonly used to describe molecular imaging techniques, as positron emission tomography (PET) CT/MRI, which still represent the most widely used methods for the evaluation of functional properties of solid neoplasms; unlike PET or single photon emission computed tomography, functional imaging techniques applied to conventional MRI/CT examinations do not require the administration of radiolabeled drugs or specific equipments. Moreover, DWI and DCE-MRI can be performed during the same session, thus providing a comprehensive "one-step" morphological and functional evaluation of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors. Literature data reveal that functional imaging techniques could be proposed for the evaluation of these tumors before treatment, given that they may improve staging and predict prognosis or clinical outcome. Microscopic changes within neoplastic tissues induced by treatments can be detected and quantified with functional imaging, therefore these techniques could be used also for post-treatment assessment, even at an early stage. The aim of this editorial is to describe possible applications of new functional imaging techniques apart from molecular imaging to hepatic and pancreatic tumors through a review of up-to-date literature data, with a particular emphasis on pathological correlations, prognostic stratification and post-treatment monitoring. PMID:26078555

  18. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer. PMID:23529644

  19. Selective tumor irradiation by infusional brachytherapy in nonresectable pancreatic cancer: a phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Selective high-dose radiation of solid tumors has been a goal of radiation oncology. The physiological barriers of solid tumors (high interstitial tumor pressure, reduced tumor vascularity, and poor perfusion) have been major barriers in achieving significant tumor dose of systemically infused radioconjugates. Direct tumor infusional brachytherapy overcomes these barriers and leads to selective high tumor doses. Methods and Materials: The development of interstitial tumor infusion of macroaggregated albumin (MAA) followed by colloidal chromic phosphate 32P has overcome solid tumor obstacles in 47 patients with nonresectable pancreatic cancer in a Phase I dose escalation study. The colloidal 32P infusion was followed by external radiation and five fluorouracil. Results: Of the 28 patients with cancer limited to the pancreas, 15 of 16 patients retained 86-100% (mean 96%) of the infused colloidal 32P isotope. While the other 12 patients had partial shunting to the liver, shunting to the liver was due to high interstitial resistance with tumor dose deposition of 17-88% (mean 52%). Of the 19 patients with metastatic pancreas cancer, colloidal 32P tumor deposition ranged from 22 to 100% of the infused dose (mean 79%). The less than optimal tumor deposition led to our increasing the MAA from 600,000 to 1.5-2.5 million particles. Interstitial dexamethasone 2 mg and later 4 mg was infused first and prevented liver shunting by somehow reducing tumor resistance. The median survival in 28 Phase I patients with nonresectable pancreas cancer without metastasis, was 12 months. No significant toxicity occurred when treatment was limited to two infusions with as much as 30 mCi each. The maximum tumor dose was 17,000 Gy (1.700,000 cGy). In 19 non-resectable pancreatic cancer patients with metastasis, a 6.9 months median survival was observed. Conclusions: Infusional brachytherapy is an outpatient procedure that delivers high-dose radiation selectively to pancreatic cancer

  20. Pancreatic endocrine tumors or apudomas Tumores endocrinos o apudomas pancreáticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto Varas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET are difficult to diagnose. Their accurate localization using imaging techniques is intended to provide a definite cure. The goal of this retrospective study was to review a PET series from a private institution. Patients and methods: the medical records of 19 patients with PETs were reviewed, including 4 cases of MEN-1, for a period of 17 years (1994-2010. A database was set up with ten parameters: age, sex, symptoms, imaging techniques, size and location in the pancreas, metastasis, surgery, complications, adjuvant therapies, definite diagnosis, and survival or death. Results: a total of 19 cases were analyzed. Mean age at presentation was 51 years (range: 26-67 y (14 males, 5 females, and tumor size was 5 to 80 mm (X: 20 mm. Metastatic disease was present in 37% (7/19. Most underwent the following imaging techniques: ultrasounds, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Fine needle aspiration punction (FNA was performed for the primary tumor in 4 cases. Non-functioning: 7 cases (37%, insulinoma: 2 cases [1 with possible multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN], Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES from gastrinoma: 5 (3 with MEN-1, glucagonoma: 2 cases, 2 somatostatinomas; carcinoid: 1 case with carcinoide-like syndrome. Most patients were operated upon: 14/19 (73%. Four (4/14: 28% has postoperative complications following pancreatectomy: pancreatitis, pseudocyst, and abdominal collections. Some patients received chemotherapy (4, somatostatin (3 and interferon (2 before or after surgery. Median follow-up was 48 months. Actuarial survival during the study was 73.6% (14/19. Conclusions: age was similar to that described in the literature. Males were predominant. Most cases were non-functioning (37%. Most patients underwent surgery (73% with little morbidity (28% and an actuarial survival of 73.6% at the time of the study.Introducción y objetivo: los tumores endocrinos pancre

  1. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Treatment of Panc1, L3.6pL and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cells with metformin downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes including bcl-2, survivin, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, and fatty acid synthase. Metformin induced proteasome-dependent degradation of Sps in L3.6pL and Panc28 cells, whereas in Panc1 cells metformin decreased microRNA-27a and induced the Sp repressor, ZBTB10, and disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 by metformin was phosphatase dependent. Metformin also inhibited pancreatic tumor growth and downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in tumors in an orthotopic model where L3.6pL cells were injected directly into the pancreas. The results demonstrate for the first time that the anticancer activities of metformin are also due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes. PMID:23803693

  2. Gene expression profiles in primary pancreatic tumors and metastatic lesions of Ela-c-myc transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Dezhong J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic carcinoma usually is a fatal disease with no cure, mainly due to its invasion and metastasis prior to diagnosis. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of paired primary pancreatic tumors and metastatic lesions from Ela-c-myc transgenic mice in order to identify genes that may be involved in the pancreatic cancer progression. Differentially expressed selected genes were verified by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR. To further evaluate the relevance of some of the selected differentially expressed genes, we investigated their expression pattern in human pancreatic cancer cell lines with high and low metastatic potentials. Results Data indicate that genes involved in posttranscriptional regulation were a major functional category of upregulated genes in both primary pancreatic tumors (PT and liver metastatic lesions (LM compared to normal pancreas (NP. In particular, differential expression for splicing factors, RNA binding/pre-mRNA processing factors and spliceosome related genes were observed, indicating that RNA processing and editing related events may play critical roles in pancreatic tumor development and progression. High expression of insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (Igfbp1 and Serine proteinase inhibitor A1 (Serpina1, and low levels or absence of Wt1 gene expression were exclusive to liver metastatic lesion samples. Conclusion We identified Igfbp1, Serpina1 and Wt1 genes that are likely to be clinically useful biomarkers for prognostic or therapeutic purposes in metastatic pancreatic cancer, particularly in pancreatic cancer where c-Myc is overexpressed.

  3. Recruitment and activation of pancreatic stellate cells from the bone marrow in pancreatic cancer: a model of tumor-host interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Scarlett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are characterised by extensive stellate cell mediated fibrosis, and current therapeutic development includes targeting pancreatic cancer stroma and tumor-host interactions. Recent evidence has suggested that circulating bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDC contribute to solid organs. We aimed to define the role of circulating haematopoietic cells in the normal and diseased pancreas. METHODS: Whole bone marrow was harvested from male β-actin-EGFP donor mice and transplanted into irradiated female recipient C57/BL6 mice. Chronic pancreatitis was induced with repeat injections of caerulein, while carcinogenesis was induced with an intrapancreatic injection of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA. Phenotype of engrafted donor-derived cells within the pancreas was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. RESULTS: GFP positive cells were visible in the exocrine pancreatic epithelia from 3 months post transplantation. These exhibited acinar morphology and were positive for amylase and peanut agglutinin. Mice administered caerulein developed chronic pancreatitis while DMBA mice exhibited precursor lesions and pancreatic cancer. No acinar cells were identified to be donor-derived upon cessation of cerulein treatment, however rare occurrences of bone marrow-derived acinar cells were observed during pancreatic regeneration. Increased recruitment of BMDC was observed within the desmoplastic stroma, contributing to the activated pancreatic stellate cell (PaSC population in both diseases. Expression of stellate cell markers CELSR3, PBX1 and GFAP was observed in BMD cancer-associated PaSCs, however cancer-associated, but not pancreatitis-associated BMD PaSCs, expressed the cancer PaSC specific marker CELSR3. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that BMDC can incorporate into the pancreas and adopt the differentiated state of the exocrine compartment. BMDC that

  4. Pancreatic Head Mass: How Can We Treat It? Tumor: Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihanyi TF

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma is a devastating disease. Untreated 5-year survival is 0%. The only possibility of being cured is given by surgical removal of the tumor. Pancreatoduodenectomy previously involved high morbidity and mortality rates until it was postulated that palliation gave better results. Today, morbidity and mortality rates have been decreased to an acceptable level, mortality rates in specialized centers being under 5%. Prognostic factors determining survival were found to be the size of the tumor, grade, lymph node involvement and stage. In order to be able to compare results of the different centers, standardization of the surgical technique is mandatory. It is unanimously accepted that in order to improve survival in pancreatic carcinoma, the radicality of the surgical procedure should be increased to include lymphadenectomy. Postoperative adjuvant therapy could also be a determinant factor. Prospective randomized clinical trials will give an answer to these still unanswered questions.

  5. Procathepsin E is highly abundant but minimally active in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Ivry, Sam L; Chaudhury, Chaity; Hostetter, Daniel R; Hanahan, Douglas; Craik, Charles S

    2016-09-01

    The cathepsin family of lysosomal proteases is increasingly being recognized for their altered expression in cancer and role in facilitating tumor progression. The aspartyl protease cathepsin E is overexpressed in several cancers and has been investigated as a biomarker for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here we show that cathepsin E expression in mouse PDAC tumors is increased by more than 400-fold when compared to healthy pancreatic tissue. Cathepsin E accumulates over the course of disease progression and accounts for more than 3% of the tumor protein in mice with end-stage disease. Through immunoblot analysis we determined that only procathepsin E exists in mouse PDAC tumors and cell lines derived from these tumors. By decreasing the pH, this procathepsion E is converted to the mature form, resulting in an increase in proteolytic activity. Although active site inhibitors can bind procathepsin E, treatment of PDAC mice with the aspartyl protease inhibitor ritonavir did not decrease tumor burden. Lastly, we used multiplex substrate profiling by mass spectrometry to identify two synthetic peptides that are hydrolyzed by procathepsin E near neutral pH. This work represents a comprehensive analysis of procathepsin E in PDAC and could facilitate the development of improved biomarkers for disease detection. PMID:27149201

  6. MUC1-specific CTLs are non-functional within a pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P; Ginardi, A R; Madsen, C S; Tinder, T L; Jacobs, F; Parker, J; Agrawal, B; Longenecker, B M; Gendler, S J

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive, treatment refractory disease and is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. In humans, 90% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas over-express altered forms of a tumor-associated antigen, MUC1 (an epithelial mucin glycoprotein), which is a target for immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant mouse model of pancreas cancer that demonstrates peripheral and central tolerance to human MUC1 and develops spontaneous tumors of the pancreas, we have previously reported the presence of functionally active, low affinity, MUC1-specific precursor cytotoxic T cells (pCTLs). Hypothesis for this study is that MUC1-based immunization may enhance the low level MUC1-specific immunity that may lead to an effective anti-tumor response. Data demonstrate that MUC1 peptide-based immunization elicits mature MUC1-specific CTLs in the peripheral lymphoid organs. The mature CTLs secrete IFN-gamma and are cytolytic against MUC1-expressing tumor cells in vitro. However, active CTLs that infiltrate the pancreas tumor microenvironment become cytolytically anergic and are tolerized to MUC1 antigen, allowing the tumor to grow. We demonstrate that the CTL tolerance could be reversed at least in vitro with the use of anti-CD40 co-stimulation. The pancreas tumor cells secrete immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 and TGF-beta that are partly responsible for the down-regulation of CTL activity. In addition, they down-regulate their MHC class I molecules to avoid immune recognition. CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells, which secrete IL-10, were also found in the tumor environment. Together these data indicate the use of several immune evasion mechanisms by tumor cells to evade CTL killing. Thus altering the tumor microenvironment to make it more conducive to CTL killing may be key in developing a successful anti-cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12820727

  7. Is There a Role for Liver Transplantation in Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNET)?

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Paul Gulati; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2012-01-01

    Dear Sir, recently, we published an important report on the role of radiotherapy in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) consisting of our experience and the data presented at the 2012 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA [1, 2]. We received multiple calls, emails as well as questions by the patients about the role of liver transplant in this popula...

  8. Evaluation and treatment decision of pancreatic tumors by use of MRI with MRCP imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most malignant tumors. Symptoms are usually nonspecific and insidious such that the cancer is advanced by the time of diagnosis.The aim of our work was to investigate the use of MRI and MRCP in diagnosis of the patients suspected of pancreatic carcinoma and to determine the role of these methods in the evaluation of resectability of pancreatic cancer in comparison to surgical findings. Forty-nine patients (33 men and 16 women) aged 44 - 82 had undergone to MRI and MRCP imagination of the upper abdomen on 1.5 T system with use of a standard flexible surface coil. The results of those radiological diagnostic tests were compare to the surgical findings and histopathological examination. The capacity of MR and MRCP to detect pathological mass, assess disease process nature and accuracy of assessment of the resectability of the malignant lesion were evaluated. In the statistical analysis test X2 and Fisher's precise test were performed. A statistical analysis determined 88% sensitivity, 95% specificity and 94% exactness of MRI and MRCP in the evaluation of nature of tumors within the pancreas and 100% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 95% accuracy in determining the resectability of the lesion. The positive predictive value came to 83%, while the negative predictive value to 100%. The Kappa compatibility index in comparison with a surgical findings came to 0.85714. Conclusions: MR and MRCP appears an important stage in diagnosis and in assessment of pancreatic tumors. By the estimation of tumor respectability it aids clinical management

  9. Advances in the Treatment of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (pNETs)

    OpenAIRE

    Strosberg, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have led to significant advancements in treatment options for metastatic neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas. Sunitinib and everolimus have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of progressive pancreatic NETs based on phase III trial data demonstrating improvements in progression-free survival. Cytotoxic drugs such as temozolomide and capecitabine have been associated with high radiographic response rates; however data derives primarily from ...

  10. Quality of life and performance status in patients with pancreatic and periampullary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The background of this study was to determine if pretreatment quality of life is associated with performance status in patients with pancreatic and periampullary tumors. Eighty consecutive patients evaluated for surgical treatment of pancreatic or periampullary tumors completed the social functioning SF-36, a generic quality of life instrument. This instrument measures 8 domains of quality of life: physical functioning (PF), role-physical (RP), role-emotional, bodily pain, vitality, mental health, social functioning, and general health (GH). The best possible score is 100 and the worst possible score is 0. Each patient was then assigned a Karnofsky performance score (KPS), with the best possible score of 100 (normal, no complaints, no evidence of disease) and worst score of 0 (dead). Data recorded included age, gender, pathology, stage, resection, use of chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Statistical analysis was done using single and multiple linear regression analysis, correlation coefficients (r) and coefficient of determination (r2). KPS was significantly associated with all domains of the SF-36 by single linear regression. By multiple linear regression, KPS was significantly associated with the PF domain (p2 values) suggest that there are additional factors determining both quality of life and performance status in patients with pancreatic and periampullary tumors. (author)

  11. SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESS OF SOME NONHORMONAL ANTIGENS IN PANCREATIC ENDOCRINE TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jiyao

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To study the express of some nonhormonal antigens in pancreatic endocrine tumors. Methods: The nonhormonal antigens including Alpha-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (α-HCG), progesterone receptors (PR), 7B2, HISL-19, in normal pancreatic islets and in 52cases of pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: It was found that HCG can be detected in PET but not in normal islet cells. HCG immunoreactivity was expressed by 3 of 28 (10.7%) benign PET and by 14 of 24 (58.3%)malignant PET. PR was found by 20 of 28 (71.4%) benign PET and by 7 of 24 (29%) malignant PET. 7B2 was detected by 23 of 28 (82.1%) benign PET and by 13 of 24(54.2%) malignant PET. HISL-19 was appeared by 23 of 28 benign PET and by 11 of 24 (46%) malignant PET.Golgitype persisted in 87.5% malignant tumors.Conclusion: The assay of nonhormonal antigens may be well defined the clinico-pathological characteristics of PET.

  12. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemkens, Bjorn, E-mail: b.stemkens@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Tijssen, Rob H.N. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Senneville, Baudouin D. de [Imaging Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); L' Institut de Mathématiques de Bordeaux, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5251, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Heerkens, Hanne D.; Vulpen, Marco van; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.; Berg, Cornelis A.T. van den [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  13. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients

  14. Characterization of a pancreatic islet cell tumor in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jessica S; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report a 25-year-old male polar bear suffering from a pancreatic islet cell tumor. The aim of this report is to present a case of this rare tumor in a captive polar bear. The implication of potential risk factors such as high carbohydrate diet or the presence of amyloid fibril deposits was assessed. Necropsy examination revealed several other changes, including nodules observed in the liver, spleen, pancreas, intestine, and thyroid glands that were submitted for histopathologic analysis. Interestingly, the multiple neoplastic nodules were unrelated and included a pancreatic islet cell tumor. Immunohistochemistry of the pancreas confirmed the presence of insulin and islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) within the pancreatic islet cells. The IAPP gene was extracted from the paraffin-embedded liver tissue and sequenced. IAPP cDNA from the polar bear exhibits some differences as compared to the sequence published for several other species. Different factors responsible for neoplasms in bears such as diet, infectious agents, and industrial chemical exposure are reviewed. This case report raised several issues that further studies may address by evaluating the prevalence of cancers in captive or wild animals. PMID:25273481

  15. Refractory hypercalcemia and ectopic calcitonin secretion in a malignant pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor: hypocalcemic effects on cinacalcet

    OpenAIRE

    Valdes Socin, Hernan Gonzalo; Rubio Almanza, Matilde; LOLY, Jean-Philippe; Polus, Marc; Beckers, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Paraneoplastic hypercalcemia is a sign of poor prognosis, as it is particularly resistant to the usual hypocalcemic treatments. Observation: In 2009, a well differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (Ki-67= 2%) is diagnosed in a 52-year-old diabetic man. The tumor is revealed with a splenic and hepatic carcinomatosis. Plasmatic calcium was: 3.54 mmol/L (2.15 - 2.6). Biology showed hypophosphatemia, PTH < 4 ng/ml, high 1-25 OH VitD, calcitonin: 1016 ng/ml (< 12 ng/ml). H...

  16. A case of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with neurofibromatosis-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishi Takeshi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1 sometime develop neuroendocrine tumors (NET. Although these NETs usually occur in the duodenum or peri-ampullary region, they occasionally grow in the pancreas (PNET. A 62-year-old man with NF-1 had mild liver dysfunction and was admitted to our hospital for further examination. An abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan demonstrated a 30-mm tumor in the head of the pancreas. The scan showed an invasion of the tumor into the duodenum, and biopsy under an endoscopic ultrasonography indicated that the tumor was a NET. A subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Macroscopically, the pancreatic tumor was white and elastic hard. Microscopically, tumor cells were composed of ribbons, cords, and solid nests with an acinus-like structure. The tumor was diagnosed as NET G2 according to the WHO classification (2010. The product of theNF-1 gene, i.e., neurofibromin, was weakly positive in the tumor cells, suggesting that the tumor was induced by a mutation in the NF-1 gene. This is the seventh case of PNET arising in NF-1 patients worldwide.

  17. Pancreatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor: A case report with clinicopathological features and a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Ta, Na; Huang, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Xu, Jing-Jing; Zheng, Kai-Lian; Jin, Gang; Zheng, Jian-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) of the pancreas is an unusual tumor deriving from mesenchyma. This paper described a case of pancreatic PEComa, which was initially suspected as neuroendocrine carcinoma by biopsy, and therefore surgical treatment was recommended due to undetermined diagnosis. Examination of the surgical specimen under a microscope showed that the tumor cell's morphology was epithelioid or spindle-shaped, and ranged in a nested pattern. Additionally, these cells had a large extent of acidophilic cytoplasm, no mitotic figures, and expressed HMB-45, melan-p, and smooth muscle actin immunohistochemically. Pathological examination indicated that PEComa originated from the pancreas, but symptoms related to tuberous sclerosis were absent. Since PEComa is extremely rare in the pancreas, it is likely to be ignored in differential diagnosis. In conclusion, our article highlighted the clinicopathological features of PEComa, and we conducted a literature review focusing on PEComa so as to deepen the understanding of this tumor type. PMID:27053862

  18. CT compared to angiography for staging of tumors of the pancreatic head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspestrand, F.; Kolmannskog, F. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, National Hospital, Oslo Univ. (Norway))

    1992-11-01

    A retrospective study of 32 patients with malignant tumor of the pancreatic head and ampullary region is presented. The aim of the study was to compare the ability of CT and angiography to evaluate the peripancreatic vessels, and to correlate the results of tumor staging based upon CT criteria to angiographic and surgical findings. In 5 patients (16%) CT disclosed contiguous tumor growth around vessels not discernible at angiography and, in contradiction to previous reports, angiography added no valuable information regarding main vessel involvement. In terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value CT was more accurate in predicting unresectable than resectable tumors, the former with a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity and positive predictive value of 100%. (orig.).

  19. CT compared to angiography for staging of tumors of the pancreatic head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 32 patients with malignant tumor of the pancreatic head and ampullary region is presented. The aim of the study was to compare the ability of CT and angiography to evaluate the peripancreatic vessels, and to correlate the results of tumor staging based upon CT criteria to angiographic and surgical findings. In 5 patients (16%) CT disclosed contiguous tumor growth around vessels not discernible at angiography and, in contradiction to previous reports, angiography added no valuable information regarding main vessel involvement. In terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value CT was more accurate in predicting unresectable than resectable tumors, the former with a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity and positive predictive value of 100%. (orig.)

  20. Low expression of ARHI is associated with shorter progression-free survival in pancreatic endocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalai, Irene; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Barbi, Stefano; Butturini, Giovanni; Doglioni, Claudio; Falconi, Massimo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2007-03-01

    Little is known about the molecular anomalies involved in the development and progression of malignancy of pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs). A recently identified member of the Ras family, Ras homologue member I (ARHI), has been shown to be involved in breast, ovary, and thyroid carcinogenesis. Unlike other members, it acts as a tumor suppressor gene that inhibits cell growth. Here we analyzed the mRNA expression of ARHI in 52 primary PETs and 16 normal pancreata using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. ARHI expression showed a statistically significant difference between either normal pancreas or well-differentiated endocrine tumors (WDET) and poorly differentiated endocrine carcinomas (PDECs) (P PET progression. Its mRNA expression seemed to be a prognostic factor for disease outcome and, in association with the proliferative index Ki67, a predictor for a rapid tumor relapse. PMID:17401457

  1. Virtual microdissection identifies distinct tumor- and stroma-specific subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Marayati, Raoud; Flate, Elizabeth L.; Volmar, Keith E.; Loeza, S. Gabriela Herrera; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Rashid, Naim U.; Williams, Lindsay A.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Chung, Alexander H.; Smyla, Jadwiga K.; Anderson, Judy M.; Kim, Hong Jin; Bentrem, David J.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a lethal disease with a 5-year survival of 4%. A key hallmark of PDAC is extensive stromal involvement, which makes capturing precise tumor-specific molecular information difficult. Here, we have overcome this problem by applying blind source separation to a diverse collection of PDAC gene expression microarray data, which includes primary, metastatic, and normal samples. By digitally separating tumor, stroma, and normal gene expression, we have identified and validated two tumor-specific subtypes including a “basal-like” subtype which has worse outcome, and is molecularly similar to basal tumors in bladder and breast cancer. Furthermore, we define “normal” and “activated” stromal subtypes which are independently prognostic. Our results provide new insight into the molecular composition of PDAC which may be used to tailor therapies or provide decision support in a clinical setting where the choice and timing of therapies is critical. PMID:26343385

  2. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mice lacking mucin 1 have a profound defect in tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Dahlia M; Curry, Jennifer M; Roy, Lopamudra D; Tinder, Teresa L; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Schettini, Jorge; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Yong Y; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-07-01

    MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in more than 60% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The functional role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has yet to be fully elucidated due to a dearth of appropriate models. In this study, we have generated mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (KC), which are either Muc1-null (KCKO) or express human MUC1 (KCM). We show that KCKO mice have significantly slower tumor progression and rates of secondary metastasis, compared with both KC and KCM. Cell lines derived from KCKO tumors have significantly less tumorigenic capacity compared with cells from KCM tumors. Therefore, mice with KCKO tumors had a significant survival benefit compared with mice with KCM tumors. In vitro, KCKO cells have reduced proliferation and invasion and failed to respond to epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or matrix metalloproteinase 9. Further, significantly less KCKO cells entered the G(2)-M phase of the cell cycle compared with the KCM cells. Proteomics and Western blotting analysis revealed a complete loss of cdc-25c expression, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as well as a significant decrease in nestin and tubulin-α2 chain expression in KCKO cells. Treatment with a MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, abrogated the enhanced proliferation of the KCM cells but had minimal effect on KCKO cells, suggesting that MUC1 is necessary for MAPK activity and oncogenic signaling. This is the first study to utilize a Muc1-null PDA mouse to fully elucidate the oncogenic role of MUC1, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:21558393

  3. Two Avirulent, Lentogenic Strains of Newcastle Disease Virus Are Cytotoxic for Some Human Pancreatic Tumor Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Walter

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Highly infectious Newcastle disease virus (NDV strains are known to be very cytotoxic for an array of human tumor cell types in vitro and in vivo but the effects of these and avirulent NDV strains on pancreatic neoplasms are little known. Objective Here, the direct cytolytic effects of the avirulent Hitchner-B1 (B1 and Ulster (U NDV strains on 7 human pancreatic tumor cell lines and 4 normal human cell lines were studied. Methods Cytotoxicity assays used serially diluted NDV to determine minimum cytotoxic plaque forming unit (PFU doses. Results For NDV-B1, normal human cells were killed only by relatively high doses (range: 471-3,724 PFU whereas NDV-U killed these cells at low PFU (range: 0.32-1.60 PFU. Most pancreatic cancer cell types were killed by much lower NDV-B1 doses (range: 0.40- 2.60 PFU while NDV-U killed Capan-1 and SU.86.86 cultures at very low doses (0.00041 PFU and 0.0034 PFU, respectively. Conclusions On average, 1,555 times more NDV-B1 was needed to kill normal cells than most pancreatic tumor cells and 558 times more NDV-U to kill the two most sensitive pancreatic cancer lines. These innately-targeted lentogenic viruses may have meaningful potential in treating pancreatic cancer.

  4. The analysis of respiration-induced pancreatic tumor motion based on reference measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate pancreatic tumor motion and its dynamics during respiration. This retrospective study includes 20 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer who were treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. An online respiratory tumor tracking system was used. Periodical maximum and minimum tumor positions with respiration in superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were collected for tumor motion evaluation. The predictability of tumor motion in each axis, based on reference measurement, was analyzed. The use of a 20-mm and 5-mm constant margins for SI and LL/AP directions, avoids target underdosage, without the need for reference measurement. Pearson’s correlation coefficient indicated only a modest correlation between reference and subsequent measurements in the SI direction (r = 0.50) and no correlation in LL (r = 0.17) and AP (r = 0.35) directions. When margins based on the reference measurement of respiratory tumor motion are used, then 30% of patients have a risk zone of underdosage >3 mm (in average). ITV (internal target volume) optimization based on the reference measurement is possible, but allows only modest margin reduction (approximately from 20 mm to 16-17 mm) in SI direction and no reduction in AP and LL directions. Our results support the use of 20-mm margin in the SI direction and 5-mm margins in the LL and AP directions to account for respiratory motion without reference measurement. Single measurement of tumor motion allows only modest margin reduction. Further margin reduction is only possible when there is on-line tumor motion control according to internal markers

  5. Fentanyl inhibits cell viability in human pancreatic cancer cell line and tumor growth in pancreatic cancer cell-transplanted mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Jianxia; Wang, Liangrong; Chen, Lei; Yang, Tao; Jin, Lida; Lin, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a kind of devastating disease with a high mortality rate. Fentanyl has been widely applied to anesthesia and analgesia in pancreatic cancer therapy, and is also demonstrated to inhibit the growth of some kinds of cancer cells in existed studies. To investigate the functions of fentanyl in pancreatic cancer, we conducted a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments using human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990 and fentanyl treatment. The cells were transplanted to BALB/c nude...

  6. A Rationally Optimized Nanoparticle System for the Delivery of RNA Interference Therapeutics into Pancreatic Tumors in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Joann; McCarroll, Joshua A; Boyer, Cyrille; Youkhana, Janet; Sagnella, Sharon M; Duong, Hien T T; Liu, Jie; Sharbeen, George; Goldstein, David; Davis, Thomas P; Kavallaris, Maria; Phillips, Phoebe A

    2016-07-11

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with a dismal prognosis. Short-interfering RNA (siRNA)-based therapeutics hold promise for the treatment of cancer. However, development of efficient and safe delivery vehicles for siRNA remains a challenge. Here, we describe the synthesis and physicochemical characterization of star polymers (star 1, star 2, star 3) using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) for the delivery of siRNA to pancreatic cancer cells. These star polymers were designed to contain different lengths of cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) side-arms and varied amounts of poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] (POEGMA). We showed that star-POEGMA polymers could readily self-assemble with siRNA to form nanoparticles. The star-POEGMA polymers were nontoxic to normal cells and delivered siRNA with high efficiency to pancreatic cancer cells to silence a gene (TUBB3/βIII-tubulin) which is currently undruggable using chemical agents, and is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastases. Notably, systemic administration of star-POEGMA-siRNA resulted in high accumulation of siRNA to orthotopic pancreatic tumors in mice and silenced βIII-tubulin expression by 80% at the gene and protein levels in pancreatic tumors. Together, these novel findings provide strong rationale for the use of star-POEGMA polymers as delivery vehicles for siRNA to pancreatic tumors. PMID:27305597

  7. Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic metastases in childhood cancer have been rarely reported in the radiology literature although ample evidence exists in pathology reports for its occurrence in patients with alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS). Assess the occurrence of pancreatic metastases in alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, increase awareness of this association and reassess current staging protocols. Three major oncology centers reviewed their records and imaging examinations. Patients' history and demographics, primary tumor site and histology, presence of tumor recurrence, and presence and location of other metastases were reviewed. Pancreatic metastases occurred in eight patients with alveolar RMS. Four of these presented at diagnosis and four with disease recurrence. In recurrent disease, the duration between the diagnosis of the primary tumor and pancreatic metastases varied from 8 months to 6 years (mean ± SD: 2.38 ± 2.49 years). In all patients who received PET scans, pancreatic metastases showed a marked FDG-uptake, but had variable detectability with CT. Pancreatic metastases were not associated with certain primary tumor locations or presence of other metastases, mandating an evaluation of the pancreas in all cases of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas. Radiologists should be sensitized and actively evaluate the pancreas in patients with alveolar RMS. Optimizing CT and PET-CT protocols may increase the diagnostic yield. (orig.)

  8. Definition of Microscopic Tumor Clearance (R0) in Pancreatic Cancer Resections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, curative resection is the only chance for cure for patients suffering from pancreatic ductal adenoacarcinoma (PDAC). Despite low reported rates of microscopic tumor infiltration (R1) in most studies, tumor recurrence is a common finding in patients with PDAC and contributes to extremely low long-term survival rates. Lack of international definition of resection margins and of standardized protocols for pathological examination lead to high variation in reported R1 rates. Here we review recent studies supporting the hypothesis that R1 rates are highly underestimated in certain studies and that a microscopic tumor clearance of at least 1 mm is required to confirm radicality and to serve as a reliable prognostic and predictive factor

  9. Definition of Microscopic Tumor Clearance (R0) in Pancreatic Cancer Resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlitter, Anna Melissa [Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität München, Ismaningerstr. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Esposito, Irene, E-mail: Esposito@lrz.tum.de [Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität München, Ismaningerstr. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Institute of Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2010-11-25

    To date, curative resection is the only chance for cure for patients suffering from pancreatic ductal adenoacarcinoma (PDAC). Despite low reported rates of microscopic tumor infiltration (R1) in most studies, tumor recurrence is a common finding in patients with PDAC and contributes to extremely low long-term survival rates. Lack of international definition of resection margins and of standardized protocols for pathological examination lead to high variation in reported R1 rates. Here we review recent studies supporting the hypothesis that R1 rates are highly underestimated in certain studies and that a microscopic tumor clearance of at least 1 mm is required to confirm radicality and to serve as a reliable prognostic and predictive factor.

  10. Identification of a novel subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells from gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Shimizu

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is highly resistant to systemic chemotherapy. Although there are many reports using pancreatic cancer cells derived from patients who did not receive chemotherapy, characteristics of pancreatic cancer cells from chemotherapy-resistant patients remain unclear. In this study, we set out to establish a cancer cell line in disseminated cancer cells derived from gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. By use of in vitro co-culture system with stromal cells, we established a novel pancreatic tumor-initiating cell line. The cell line required its direct interaction with stromal cells for its in vitro clonogenic growth and passaging. Their direct interaction induced basal lamina-like extracellular matrix formation that maintained colony formation. The cell line expressed CD133 protein, which expression level changed autonomously and by culture conditions. These results demonstrated that there were novel pancreatic tumor-initiating cells that required direct interactions with stromal cells for their in vitro cultivation in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This cell line would help to develop novel therapies that enhance effects of gemcitabine or novel anti-cancer drugs.

  11. Monoclonal Antibody 16D10 to the C-Terminal Domain of the Feto-Acinar Pancreatic Protein Binds to Membrane of Human Pancreatic Tumoral SOJ-6 Cells and Inhibits the Growth of Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Panicot-Dubois

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Feto-acinar pancreatic protein (FAPP characterized by mAbJ28 reactivity is a specific component associated with ontogenesis and behaves as an oncodevelopment-associated antigen. We attempted to determine whether pancreatic tumoral SOJ-6 cells are expressed at their surface FAPP antigens and to examine if specific antibodies directed against these FAPP epitopes could decrease the growth of pancreatic tumors in a mice model. For this purpose, we used specific antibodies against either the whole FAPP, the O-glycosylated C-terminal domain, or the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our results indicate that SOJ-6 cells expressed at their surface a 32-kDa peptide corresponding to the C-terminal domain of the FAPP. Furthermore, we show, by using endoproteinase Lys-C or geldanamycin, a drug able to impair the FAPP secretion, that this 32-kDa peptide expressed on the SOJ-6 cell surface comes from the degradation of the FAPP. Finally, an in vivo prospective study using a preventative tumor model in nude mice indicates that targeting this peptide by the use of mAb16D10 inhibits the growth of SOJ-6 xenografts. The specificity of mAb16D10 for pancreatic tumors and the possibility to obtain recombinant structures of mucin-like peptides recognized by mAb16D10 and mAbJ28 are promising tools in immunologic approaches to cure pancreatic cancers.

  12. Genotype tunes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissue tension to induce matricellular fibrosis and tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laklai, Hanane; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A; Pickup, Michael W; Collisson, Eric A; Kim, Grace E; Barrett, Alex S; Hill, Ryan C; Lakins, Johnathon N; Schlaepfer, David D; Mouw, Janna K; LeBleu, Valerie S; Roy, Nilotpal; Novitskiy, Sergey V; Johansen, Julia S; Poli, Valeria; Kalluri, Raghu; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wood, Laura D; Hebrok, Matthias; Hansen, Kirk; Moses, Harold L; Weaver, Valerie M

    2016-05-01

    Fibrosis compromises pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) treatment and contributes to patient mortality, yet antistromal therapies are controversial. We found that human PDACs with impaired epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling have high epithelial STAT3 activity and develop stiff, matricellular-enriched fibrosis associated with high epithelial tension and shorter patient survival. In several KRAS-driven mouse models, both the loss of TGF-β signaling and elevated β1-integrin mechanosignaling engaged a positive feedback loop whereby STAT3 signaling promotes tumor progression by increasing matricellular fibrosis and tissue tension. In contrast, epithelial STAT3 ablation attenuated tumor progression by reducing the stromal stiffening and epithelial contractility induced by loss of TGF-β signaling. In PDAC patient biopsies, higher matricellular protein and activated STAT3 were associated with SMAD4 mutation and shorter survival. The findings implicate epithelial tension and matricellular fibrosis in the aggressiveness of SMAD4 mutant pancreatic tumors and highlight STAT3 and mechanics as key drivers of this phenotype. PMID:27089513

  13. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor Presenting as a Pancreatic Mass: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondo M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a distinctive lesion of unknown etiology. It has generally been considered a rare benign pseudosarcomatous lesion of admixed inflammatory infiltrates with myofibroblastic spindle cells. Although original case descriptions focused on the pulmonary system, it is now recognized that virtually any anatomic location can be involved. However, an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor located in the pancreas is rare. CASE REPORT: We report a case of an asymptomatic 70-year-old Caucasian man with a 3.8 cm inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor located in the tail of the pancreas which was discovered incidentally on a computed tomography scan of the abdomen. Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle aspiration was negative for malignancy. However, because of worrisome radiographic features, a distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was performed. The pathology revealed an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with focal extension into the peripancreatic soft tissues, but with negative surgical margins. The patient has been followed for 10 months without evidence of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: To date, there have been only 25 cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor located in the pancreas reported in the English language scientific literature. Even with multimodal pre-surgical investigation, it can be extremely difficult to differentiate inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor from pancreatic malignancies. Most cases require surgical exploration and complete resection to obtain an accurate diagnosis. A review of published case reports is also presented.

  14. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNETs): A Clinic-Based Case-Control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Bamlet, William R.; McWilliams, Robert R; Hobday, Timothy J.; Burch, Patrick A.; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are uncommon, and little is known about their risk factors and association with other cancers. We evaluated whether risk factors known to be associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma are also associated with PNETs: smoking, alcohol use, family history of PNET and other cancers, and personal history of diabetes as potential risk factors. Methods Patients with PNETs seen at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2000 and 2011 were compared to controls seen for a general medical evaluation. Patients and controls completed the same questionnaires. After excluding insulinoma and high-grade PNETs, 355 cases were evaluated, and 309 were matched to 602 controls (2:1) on age, sex, and region of residence. Results Personal smoking history was not associated with PNETs. Alcohol use was less common among cases (54% vs. 67%, p<0.001). Cases were more likely to report a family member with sarcoma (p=0.02), PNET (p=0.02), gall bladder cancer (p=0.02), ovarian cancer (p=0.04) and gastric cancer (p=0.01). There was no association with other cancers in family members. Diabetes was more commonly reported by cases than controls (19% vs. 11%, p<0.001). Conclusions With the exception of diabetes, risk factors that are associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma are not risk factors for PNETs. PMID:25291526

  15. Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

  16. Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); White, Rebekah R. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tyler, Douglas S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Papavassiliou, Paulie [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Papalezova, Katia T. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Guy, Cynthia D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Czito, Brian G., E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

  17. En masse resection of pancreas, spleen, celiac axis, stomach, kidney, adrenal, and colon for invasive pancreatic corpus and tail tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluturk, Koray; Alam, Abdul Hamid; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin

    2013-01-01

    Providing a more comfortable life and a longer survival for pancreatic corpus/tail tumors without metastasis depends on the complete resection. Recently, distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection was reported as a feasible and favorable method in selected pancreatic corpus/tail tumors which had invaded the celiac axis. Additional organ resections to the celiac axis were rarely required, and when necessary it was included only a single extra organ resection such as adrenal or intestine. Here, we described a distal pancreatic tumor invading most of the neighboring organs-stomach, celiac axis, left renal vein, left adrenal gland, and splenic flexure were treated by en bloc resection of all these organs. The patient was a 60-year-old man without any severe medical comorbidities. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day eight without any complication. Histopathology and stage of the tumor were adenocarcinoma and T4 N1 M0, respectively. Preoperative back pain of the patient was completely relieved in the postoperative period. As a result, celiac axis resection for pancreatic cancer is an extensive surgery, and a combined en masse resection of the invaded neighboring organs is a more extensive surgery than the celiac axis resection alone. This more extensive surgery is safe and feasible for selected patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24159408

  18. En Masse Resection of Pancreas, Spleen, Celiac Axis, Stomach, Kidney, Adrenal, and Colon for Invasive Pancreatic Corpus and Tail Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Kutluturk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing a more comfortable life and a longer survival for pancreatic corpus/tail tumors without metastasis depends on the complete resection. Recently, distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection was reported as a feasible and favorable method in selected pancreatic corpus/tail tumors which had invaded the celiac axis. Additional organ resections to the celiac axis were rarely required, and when necessary it was included only a single extra organ resection such as adrenal or intestine. Here, we described a distal pancreatic tumor invading most of the neighboring organs—stomach, celiac axis, left renal vein, left adrenal gland, and splenic flexure were treated by en bloc resection of all these organs. The patient was a 60-year-old man without any severe medical comorbidities. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day eight without any complication. Histopathology and stage of the tumor were adenocarcinoma and T4 N1 M0, respectively. Preoperative back pain of the patient was completely relieved in the postoperative period. As a result, celiac axis resection for pancreatic cancer is an extensive surgery, and a combined en masse resection of the invaded neighboring organs is a more extensive surgery than the celiac axis resection alone. This more extensive surgery is safe and feasible for selected patients with pancreatic cancer.

  19. C-KI-RAS mutations in peripheral blood of pancreatic cancer patients: a marker for early tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of circulating minimal malignant clone (CMMC) (harboring c-Ki-ras-2 mutation) in peripheral blood (PB) samples of untreated pancreatic cancer using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of c-Ki-ras-2 oncogene. Methods and Materials: Experiments were carried out in fresh tumor, peritoneal washings (PW), and PB samples of untreated pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients (both resectable and unresectable). Samples were taken from 16 patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma for the PCR analysis of mutated c-Ki-ras oncogene. Five tumor samples, 15 PB samples, and 3 PW samples were analyzed for point mutation of the c-Ki-ras gene at codon 12. Results: Out of five tumor samples analyzed for c-Ki-ras mutation, four were positive at the 12th codon. Out of total 15 PB samples, nine were positive for the c-Ki-ras point mutation at the 12th codon. All the positive PB samples showed a base substitution from GGT to GAT in the second position of the 12th codon. Out of three PW samples, two showed mutation at the second position from GGT to GAT similar to their PB and tumor samples. Conclusion: Our study indicated the presence of the tumor cells (CMMC) in PB of pancreatic adenocarcinoma that can be identified by PCR analysis of c-Ki-ras oncogene. Patients with presence of CMMC in PB and mutation in PW had aggressive tumors that responded poorly to treatment

  20. Radiolabeling of substance P with Lutetium-177 and biodistribution study in AR42J pancreatic tumor xenografted Nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic tumor (PT) is a neuroendocrine neoplasm that usually origin metastases in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, new developments in targeted therapies have emerged and the presence of peptide receptors at the cell membrane of PT constitutes the basis of the clinical use of specific radiolabeled ligands. Substance P, an 11-amino acid peptide which has an important role in modulating pain transmission trough neurokinin 1 and 2 receptors (NKr), may play a role in the pathogenesis of PT, because approximately 10% of these tumors over express NKr. The aim of the present work was to produce a pure and stable SP analog (DOTA-SP) radiolabeled with Lutetium-177 (177Lu), and to evaluate its in vivo target to AR42J pancreatic tumor cells in Nude mice in other to verify if SP can be used in this pancreatic tumor detection and treatment. 177Lu (half-life 6.7 days) has both β and γ-emissions suitable for radiotherapy and imaging respectively. Substance P was successfully labeled with high yield (>99%) at optimized conditions and kept stable for more than 72 hours at 4 deg C and 24 hours in human plasma. Biodistribution studies showed that SP excretion was mainly performed by renal pathway. In addition, 177Lu-DOTA-SP showed higher uptake by tumor than normal pancreas, indicating the presence of NK receptors in AR42J pancreatic tumor. (author)

  1. Pancreatic extragastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sami; Akbulut; R?dvan; Yavuz; Emrah; Otan; Sinan; Hatipoglu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To provide an overview of the literature on pan-creatic extragastrointestinal stromal tumors(EGISTs).METHODS: We report a case of pancreatic EGIST and review published studies on pancreatic EGIST ac-cessed via the PubMed, MEDlInE, Google Scholar, and Google databases. The keywords used were “pancreas and GIST”, “pancreas and extra GIST”, “pancreas and gastrointestinal stromal tumor”, and “pancreas and ex-tragastrointestinal stromal tumor”. literature reviews and/or duplicate studies were excluded. The search included articles published in the English language be-tween January 1, 2000 and May 15, 2014.RESULTS: From our literature survey, 30 manuscripts on pancreatic EGISTs were considered, of which 27met the search criteria and three were excluded. The studies involved 30 patients(15 men, 15 women) with a mean age of 55.3 ± 14.3 years(range 30-84 years). The mean age of the male patients was 50.8 ± 13.7 years(range 30-84 years); that of the female patients was 59.9 ± 13.3 years(range 38-81 years). Tumor dimensions were obtained for 28 cases(mean 114.4 ± 78.6 mm; range 20-350 mm). Tumors were diagnosed incidentally in 23.3% of patients; abdominal discomfort and weight loss were the major complaints in symp-tomatic patients. Risk of aggressive behavior according to Fletcher criteria was determined in 25 of 30 patients(68%: high risk, 28%: intermediate risk, 4%: low risk). Histopathological examination revealed the presence of spindle cells in 96.1% of cases; CD117 and CD34 were present immunohistochemically in 96.6% and 84% of patients, respectively. The most common surgical pro-cedures were distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy(n = 9) and pancreaticoduodenectomy(n = 7). The to-tal follow-up period for the 28 patients ranged from 3-66 mo, during which locoregional or distant metastases were diagnosed in six patients and two patients died.CONCLUSION: Studies on EGISTs have only been published in the last decade. The lack of studies with large

  2. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, Florence [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Est, Hôpital Tenon, University Paris VI, Paris (France); Yorke, Ellen D.; Davidson, Margaret [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig S. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: GoodmanK@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion.

  3. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion

  4. Low Expression of ARHI Is Associated with Shorter Progression-Free Survival in Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Dalai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the molecular anomalies involved in the development and progression of malignancy of pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs. A recently identified member of the Ras family, Ras homologue member I (ARHI, has been shown to be involved in breast, ovary, and thyroid carcinogenesis. Unlike other members, it acts as a tumor suppressor gene that inhibits cell growth. Here we analyzed the mRNA expression of ARHI in 52 primary PETs and 16 normal pancreata using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. ARHI expression showed a statistically significant difference between either normal pancreas or well-differentiated endocrine tumors (WDET and poorly differentiated endocrine carcinomas (PDECs (P < .001 and P < .001, respectively. Moreover, ARHI expression among WDEC samples was more heterogeneous than in WDET, with several tumors showing level of expression analogous to that observed in PDECs. A significant correlation between lower ARHI expression and shorter survival (P = .020 was identified, and a low ARHI expression was associated to a shorter time to progression (P < .001, even considering the proliferation index Ki67 in the multivariate analysis. ARHI is involved in PET progression. Its mRNA expression seemed to be a prognostic factor for disease outcome and, in association with the proliferative index Ki67, a predictor for a rapid tumor relapse.

  5. Prognosis and Long-Term Survival after Operation in Patients with Pancreatic and Peripancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors of a Single Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika S Janot

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are very rare. The aim of this study was to assess the survival rate in patients with functioning or non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Methods The data for 49 patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors who were treated at a single institution from January 2004 to December 2010 were analyzed retrospectively with regard to short-term and long-term outcomes, as well as predictive factors for survival and prognosis. Overall survival was evaluated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with the prognosis in a multivariate analysis. Results Patients’ median age at diagnosis was 59 years (range 17–83 years. Nine lesions (19% were functioning tumors and 40 (81% were non-functional. The 5-year survival rate was 85.5%. Among patients who underwent potentially curative resection, tumor stage (P=0.001, pathological classification (P=0.03 and presence of liver metastases (P=0.003, as well as the resection margin, were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions Surgical resection should be attempted and should play a central role in the therapeutic approach to patients with neuroendocrine tumors. The important aspect is early diagnosis, which makes it possible to carry out radical surgery before the tumor has metastasized.

  6. Physiological modeling of tumor-affected renal circulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bézy-Wendling, Johanne; Kretowski, Marek

    2008-01-01

    International audience One way of gaining insight into what can be observed in medical images is through physiological modeling. For instance, anatomical and functional modifications occur in the organ during the appearance and the growth of a tumor. Some of these changes concern the vascularization. We propose a computational model of tumor-affected renal circulation that represents the local heterogeneity of different parts of the kidney (cortex, medulla). We present a simulation of vasc...

  7. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 is elevated serologically in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and widely expressed on circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfeng Qu

    Full Text Available Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1 is a putative pancreatic stem cell marker and is upregulated in pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer, and many other solid tumors. It marks tumor stem cells in mouse models of intestinal neoplasia. Here we sought to determine whether DCLK1 protein can be detected in the bloodstream and if its levels in archived serum samples could be quantitatively assessed in pancreatic cancer patients. DCLK1 specific ELISA, western blotting, and immunohistochemical analyses were used to determine expression levels in the serum and staining intensity in archived tumor tissues of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC patients and in pancreatic cancer mouse models. DCLK1 levels in the serum were elevated in early stages of PDAC (stages I and II compared to healthy volunteers (normal controls. No differences were observed between stages III/IV and normal controls. In resected surgical tissues, DCLK1 expression intensity in the stromal cells was significantly higher than that observed in tumor epithelial cells. Circulating tumor cells were isolated from KPCY mice and approximately 52% of these cells were positive for Dclk1 staining. Dclk1 levels in the serum of KPC mice were also elevated. We have previously demonstrated that DCLK1 plays a potential role in regulating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. Given the increasingly recognized role of EMT derived stem cells in cancer progression and metastasis, we hypothesize that DCLK1 may contribute to the metastatic process. Taken together, our results suggest that DCLK1 serum levels and DCLK1 positive circulating tumor cells should be further assessed for their potential diagnostic and prognostic significance.

  8. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Lin; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yu-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

  9. Broncho-biliary fistula secondary to biliary obstruction and lung abscess in a patient with pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Panda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report of broncho-biliary fistula that developed due to the blockage of biliary stent placed during the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET; diagnosed on high clinical suspicion, percutaneous cholangiogram and contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT; and successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD.

  10. Broncho-biliary fistula secondary to biliary obstruction and lung abscess in a patient with pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Dipanjan Panda; Mayank Aggarwal; Vikas Yadav; Sachin Kumar; Amar Mukund; Saphalta Baghmar

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of broncho-biliary fistula that developed due to the blockage of biliary stent placed during the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET); diagnosed on high clinical suspicion, percutaneous cholangiogram and contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT); and successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD).

  11. Broncho-biliary fistula secondary to biliary obstruction and lung abscess in a patient with pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Dipanjan; Aggarwal, Mayank; Yadav, Vikas; Kumar, Sachin; Mukund, Amar; Baghmar, Saphalta

    2016-06-01

    We present a case report of broncho-biliary fistula that developed due to the blockage of biliary stent placed during the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET); diagnosed on high clinical suspicion, percutaneous cholangiogram and contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT); and successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). PMID:26994644

  12. Low Expression of ARHI Is Associated with Shorter Progression-Free Survival in Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors1*

    OpenAIRE

    Irene, Dalai; Edoardo, Missiaglia; Stefano, Barbi; Giovanni, Butturini; Claudio, Doglioni; Massimo, Falconi; Aldo, Scarpa

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular anomalies involved in the development and progression of malignancy of pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs). A recently identified member of the Ras family, Ras homologue member I (ARHI), has been shown to be involved in breast, ovary, and thyroid carcinogenesis. Unlike other members, it acts as a tumor suppressor gene that inhibits cell growth. Here we analyzed the mRNA expression of ARHI in 52 primary PETs and 16 normal pancreata using quantitative reverse ...

  13. Diagnostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with reference to the World Health Organization classification

    OpenAIRE

    Masui, Toshihiko; Doi, Ryuichiro; Ito, Tatsuo; KAMI, KAZUHIRO; Ogawa, Kohei; Harada, Daisuke; Uemoto, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    The 2004 classification of the World Health Organization (WHO) has demonstrated an efficacy for prediction of the prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. This study aimed to assess the predictive value of preoperative 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in relation to the 2004 WHO criteria. The histology of 21 pancreatic endocrine tumors resected at our hospital was reviewed and the tumors were classified according to the 2004 WHO criteria. FDG-PET findings we...

  14. Regression of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in mice after a single systemic injection of recombinant vaccinia virus GLV-1h68

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yong A; Galanis, Charles; Woo, Yanghee; Chen, Nanhai; Qian ZHANG; Fong, Yuman; Szalay, Aladar A

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy of tumors has shown promising results in both preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of a replication-competent vaccinia virus, GLV-1h68, against human pancreatic carcinomas in cell cultures and in nude mice. We found that GLV-1h68 was able to infect, replicate in, and lyse tumor cells in vitro. Virus-mediated marker gene expressions were readily detected. Moreover, s.c. PANC-1 pancreatic tumor xenografts were effectively treated...

  15. Src kinases play a novel dual role in acute pancreatitis affecting severity but no role in stimulated enzyme secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Jensen, R T

    2016-06-01

    In pancreatic acinar cells, the Src family of kinases (SFK) is involved in the activation of several signaling cascades that are implicated in mediating cellular processes (growth, cytoskeletal changes, apoptosis). However, the role of SFKs in various physiological responses such as enzyme secretion or in pathophysiological processes such as acute pancreatitis is either controversial, unknown, or incompletely understood. To address this, in this study, we investigated the role/mechanisms of SFKs in acute pancreatitis and enzyme release. Enzyme secretion was studied in rat dispersed pancreatic acini, in vitro acute-pancreatitis-like changes induced by supramaximal COOH-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK). SFK involvement assessed using the chemical SFK inhibitor (PP2) with its inactive control, 4-amino-7-phenylpyrazol[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP3), under experimental conditions, markedly inhibiting SFK activation. In CCK-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells, activation occurred of trypsinogen, various MAP kinases (p42/44, JNK), transcription factors (signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, nuclear factor-κB, activator protein-1), caspases (3, 8, and 9) inducing apoptosis, LDH release reflective of necrosis, and various chemokines secreted (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted). All were inhibited by PP2, not by PP3, except caspase activation leading to apoptosis, which was increased, and trypsin activation, which was unaffected, as was CCK-induced amylase release. These results demonstrate SFK activation is playing a dual role in acute pancreatitis, inhibiting apoptosis and promoting necrosis as well as chemokine/cytokine release inducing inflammation, leading to more severe disease, as well as not affecting secretion. Thus, our studies indicate that SFK is a key mediator of inflammation and pancreatic acinar cell death in acute pancreatitis, suggesting it

  16. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31+ vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models

  17. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); New Drug Development Center, Osong Medical Innovation Foundation, Cheongwon, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Suhwan [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa [BK21-plus, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok, E-mail: sskoh@dau.ac.kr [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  18. Hormone profiling, WHO 2010 grading, and AJCC/UICC staging in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are the second most common pancreatic neoplasms, exhibiting a complex spectrum of clinical behaviors. To examine the clinico-pathological characteristics associated with long-term prognosis we reviewed 119 patients with pNETs treated in a tertiary referral center using the WHO 2010 grading and the American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer (AJCC/UICC) staging systems, with a median follow-up of 38 months. Tumor size, immunohistochemistry (IHC) profiling and patient characteristics-determining stage were analyzed. Primary clinical outcomes were disease progression or death. The mean age at presentation was 52 years; 55% were female patients, 11% were associated with MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) or VHL (Von Hippel–Lindau); mean tumor diameter was 3.3 cm (standard deviation, SD) (2.92). The clinical presentation was incidental in 39% with endocrine hypersecretion syndromes in only 24% of cases. Nevertheless, endocrine hormone tissue immunoreactivity was identified in 67 (56.3%) cases. According to WHO 2010 grading, 50 (42%), 38 (31.9%), and 3 (2.5%) of tumors were low grade (G1), intermediate grade (G2), and high grade (G3), respectively. Disease progression occurred more frequently in higher WHO grades (G1: 6%, G2: 10.5%, G3: 67%, P = 0.026) and in more advanced AJCC stages (I: 2%, IV: 63%, P = 0.033). Shorter progression free survival (PFS) was noted in higher grades (G3 vs. G2; 21 vs. 144 months; P = 0.015) and in more advanced AJCC stages (stage I: 218 months, IV: 24 months, P < 0.001). Liver involvement (20 vs. 173 months, P < 0.001) or histologically positive lymph nodes (33 vs. 208 months, P < 0.001) were independently associated with shorter PFS. Conversely, tissue endocrine hormone immunoreactivity, independent of circulating levels was significantly associated with less aggressive disease. Age, gender, number of primary tumors, and heredity were not significantly associated with

  19. Increase in Annual Number of Pancreatic Head Resections Does not Affect Mortality of Pancreatic Cancer in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthymios Ypsilantis

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, Lee and Saif urged for new effective methods for early diagnosis of pancreatic head adenocarcinoma, emphasizing that at the time of initial presentation, the majority of patients have non-resectable tumours [1]. Also, Li and Saif, in their thorough overview of current advancements in the management of the disease, summarized that pancreatic cancer requires a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach that should aim to increase the chances of surgical resection [2].

  20. Is There a Role for Liver Transplantation in Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNET?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Paul Gulati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, recently, we published an important report on the role of radiotherapy in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET consisting of our experience and the data presented at the 2012 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA [1, 2]. We received multiple calls, emails as well as questions by the patients about the role of liver transplant in this population of patients with PNET. This question probably received a lot of attention in the media with the unfortunate passing of Steve Jobs in 2011. In 2009, Mr. Jobs was the recipient of a liver transplant, an unusual treatment for this disease.

  1. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). Recent insights and advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. (author)

  2. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  4. Transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic tumor into malignant insulinoma after 3 years: an uncommon clinical course of insulinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Ozbek, Mustafa; Karakose, Melia; Tutal, Esra; Ucan, Bekir; Yilmazer, Demet; Dilli, Alper; Gultekin, Salih Sinan; Cakal, Erman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2015-06-01

    A 62-year-old man admitted to our outpatient clinic with two months of recurrent life threatening hypoglycemia episodes. He was diagnosed as malignant insulinoma with multiple metastases of liver and peripancreatic lymph nodes. Liver biopsy specimen was demonstrated grade 2 neuroendocrine tumor compatible with clinical and radiological results. He was followed under the treatment of continuous intravenous glucose infusion during the diagnostic procedures. He had a pancreatic lesion history measured 20 x 12 mm in diameter via the abdominal tomography examination approximately two years before the diagnosis. Unusual course of this case suggests the transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor into functional insulin secreting tumor with metastases. The patient was found inoperable and started on chemotherapy. PMID:26154097

  5. Aberrantly Over-Expressed TRPM8 Channels in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Correlation with Tumor Size/Stage and Requirement for Cancer Cells Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 8 (TRPM8 channels control Ca2+ homeostasis. Recent studies indicate that TRPM8 channels are aberrantly expressed and required for cellular proliferation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the functional significance of TRPM8 in pancreatic tissues is mostly unknown. The objectives of this study are to examine the expression of TRPM8 in various histopathological types of pancreatic tissues, determine its clinical significance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and investigate its functional role in cancer cells invasion. We present evidence that, in normal pancreatic tissues, anti-TRPM8 immunoreactivity is detected in the centroacinar cells and the islet endocrine cells. In pre-malignant pancreatic tissues and malignant neoplasms, TRPM8 is aberrantly expressed to variable extents. In the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, TRPM8 is expressed at moderate or high levels, and anti-TRPM8 immunoreactivity positively correlates with the primary tumor size and stage. In the pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines that express relatively high levels of TRPM8, short hairpin RNA-mediated interference of TRPM8 expression impaired their ability of invasion. These data suggest that aberrantly expressed TRPM8 channels play contributory roles in pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis, and support exploration of TRPM8 as a biomarker and target of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  6. Epithelial mesenchymal transition and pancreatic tumor initiating CD44+/EpCAM+ cells are inhibited by γ-secretase inhibitor IX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindhya Palagani

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is an aggressive disease with a high rate of metastasis. Recent studies have indicated that the Notch signalling pathway is important in PDAC initiation and maintenance, although the specific cell biological roles of the pathway remain to be established. Here we sought to examine this question in established pancreatic cancer cell lines using the γ-secretase inhibitor IX (GSI IX to inactivate Notch. Based on the known roles of Notch in development and stem cell biology, we focused on effects on epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT and on pancreatic tumor initiating CD44+/EpCAM+ cells. We analyzed the effect of the GSI IX on growth and epithelial plasticity of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, and on the tumorigenicity of pancreatic tumor initiating CD44+/EpCAM+ cells. Notably, apoptosis was induced after GSI IX treatment and EMT markers were selectively targeted. Furthermore, under GSI IX treatment, decline in the growth of pancreatic tumor initiating CD44+/EpCAM+ cells was observed in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. This study demonstrates a central role of Notch signalling pathway in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and identifies an effective approach to inhibit selectively EMT and suppress tumorigenesis by eliminating pancreatic tumor initiating CD44+/EpCAM+ cells.

  7. Alteration of pancreatic cancer cell functions by tumor-stromal cell interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shin eHamada; Atsushi eMasamune; Tooru eShimosegawa

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a characteristic tissue structure called desmoplasia, which consists of dense fibrotic stroma surrounding cancer cells. Interactions between pancreatic cancer cells and stromal cells promote invasive growth of cancer cells and establish a specific microenvironment such as hypoxia which further aggravates the malignant behavior of cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play pivotal role in the development of fibrosis within the pancreatic cancer tissue, and also...

  8. Alteration of pancreatic cancer cell functions by tumor-stromal cell interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a characteristic tissue structure called desmoplasia, which consists of dense fibrotic stroma surrounding cancer cells. Interactions between pancreatic cancer cells and stromal cells promote invasive growth of cancer cells and establish a specific microenvironment such as hypoxia which further aggravates the malignant behavior of cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in the development of fibrosis within the pancreatic cancer tissue, and al...

  9. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m2/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m2) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p 2/wk vs. 296 ± 15 mg/m2/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP

  10. Islet Cells Serve as Cells of Origin of Pancreatic Gastrin-Positive Endocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Jaafar, Rami;

    2015-01-01

    The cells of origin of pancreatic gastrinomas remain an enigma, since no gastrin-expressing cells are found in the normal adult pancreas. It was proposed that the cellular origin of pancreatic gastrinomas may come from either the pancreatic cells themselves or gastrin-expressing cells which have...

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B) expression in tumor tissue and serum of pancreatic cancer: Role of uric acid accumulation in gemcitabine-induced MICA/B expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) are two stress-inducible ligands that bind the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating the cyotoxicity of NK and T cells. In this study, we sought to study MICA/B expression in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether and how genotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine can affect MICA/B expression and natural killer cytotoxity. Seven pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for MICA/B expression by flow cytometry and for their sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing by a 51Cr release assay. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera of pancreatic cancer was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and ELISA, respectively. Two MICA/B-positive cell lines were sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of NK-92 cells. Other two MICA/B-positive cell lines and three MICA/B-negative cell lines were resistant to NK-92 cell killing. MICA/B expression was positive in 17 of 25 (68%) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Serum MICA/B levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas but did not correlate with the stage of pancreatic cancer and patient survival. Gemcitabine therapy led to increased serum MICA levels in 6 of 10 patients with detectable serum MICA. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase that converts xanthine to uric acid, blocked uric acid production, MICA/B expression, and sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing toward a PANC-1 cancer cell line exposed to radiation and two genotoxic drugs, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. The levels of MICA/B expression in serum and tissue of pancreatic cancer are elevated. DNA damage-induced MICA/B expression is mediated through increased uric acid production

  12. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslav Zavoral; Petra Minarikova; Filip Zavada; Cyril Salek; Marek Minarik

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  13. Analysis of potential response predictors to capecitabine/temozolomide in metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cives, M; Ghayouri, M; Morse, B; Brelsford, M; Black, M; Rizzo, A; Meeker, A; Strosberg, J

    2016-09-01

    The capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM) regimen is active in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs), with response rates ranging from 30 to 70%. Small retrospective studies suggest that O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) deficiency predicts response to temozolomide. High tumor proliferative activity is also commonly perceived as a significant predictor of response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. It is unclear whether chromosomal instability (CIN), which correlates with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), is a predictive factor. In this study, we evaluated 143 patients with advanced pNET who underwent treatment with CAPTEM for radiographic and biochemical response. MGMT expression (n=52), grade (n=128) and ALT activation (n=46) were investigated as potential predictive biomarkers. Treatment with CAPTEM was associated with an overall response rate (ORR) of 54% by RECIST 1.1. Response to CAPTEM was not influenced by MGMT expression, proliferative activity or ALT pathway activation. Based on these results, no biomarker-driven selection criteria for use of the CAPTEM regimen can be recommended at this time. PMID:27552969

  14. A novel role of the tumor size in pancreatic cancer as an ancillary factor for predicting resectability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Chun Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Results: The tumor size in unresectable groups is significantly larger than that in the resectable group. The area under the ROC curve was 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.665-0.789, which represented a good correlation between the tumor size and pancreatic cancer resectability. The PCA patients with a tumor diameter of > 4.8 cm had a 5.043-fold higher chance of unresectability than did those with a tumor diameter 4.8 cm is a potential ancillary parameter for determining the resectability of PCA in addition to traditional image studies. Diagnosis laparoscopy may be indicated for radiologically resectable PCA patients with tumor size > 4.8 cm to prevent unnecessary laparotomy.

  15. ”Vascular Lock” Causing Splenic Perfusion Defects During Irreversible Electroporation of a Locally Advanced Pancreatic Tumor

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    Anna Maria Ierardi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Context There is little reported experience of irreversible electroporation (IRE of locally advanced pancreatic tumors (LAP. In literature, few data reported complications. In particular vascular vasoconstriction miming splenic infarcts in humans has never been found. Case report This report describes the onset of asymptomatic multiple little splenic perfusion defects after the treatment of a LAP localized in the boby tail portion of the pancreas with the application of five percutaneous probes for IRE, in a 79 year-old man. Splenic artery was regularly patent but entirely trapped in the tumor. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, until now, no experience concerning percutaneous IRE of pancreatic cancer described that phenomenon. The cause could not be established with certainty and “vascular lock" may be a valid hypothesis. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate its frequency and its exact pathophysiological cause in humans.

  16. The c-myc and PyMT oncogenes induce different tumor types in a somatic mouse model for pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Brian C.; Klimstra, David S.; Varmus, Harold E

    2003-01-01

    We have generated a mouse model for pancreatic cancer through the somatic delivery of oncogene-bearing avian retroviruses to mice that express TVA, the receptor for avian leukosis sarcoma virus subgroup A (ALSV-A), under the control of the elastase promoter. Delivery of ALSV-A-based RCAS vectors encoding either mouse polyoma virus middle T antigen (PyMT) or c-Myc to elastase-tv-a transgenic, Ink4a/Arf null mice induced the formation of pancreatic tumors. RCAS-PyMT induced pancreatic tumors wi...

  17. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  18. Usefulness of contrast-enhanced transabdominal ultrasound for tumor classification and tumor staging in the pancreatic head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossjohann, Hanne Sønder; Rappeport, Eli David; Jensen, Claus Verner;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and compare it to ultrasound (US) and 64-slice-CT (64-CT) for diagnosing, staging and evaluation of resectability of pancreatic cancer.......To evaluate contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and compare it to ultrasound (US) and 64-slice-CT (64-CT) for diagnosing, staging and evaluation of resectability of pancreatic cancer....

  19. SEL1L Affects Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Cycle and Invasiveness through Modulation of PTEN and Genes Related to Cell-Matrix Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Cattaneo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Previously, it was reported that SEL1L is able to decrease the aggressive behavior of human pancreatic tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. To gain insights into the involvement of SEL1L in tumor invasion, we performed gene expression analysis on the pancreatic cancer cell line Suit-2 subjected to two complementary strategies: upregulation and downregulation of SEL1L expression by stable transfection of the entire cDNA under an inducible promoter and by RNA-mediated interference. SuperArray and real-time analysis revealed that SEL1L modulates the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors TIMP1 (P < .04–.03 and TIMP2 (P < .03–.05, and the PTEN gene (P < .03―.05. Gene expression modulations correlate with the decrease in invasive ability (P < .05 and in accumulation of SEL1L-expressing cells in G1. Taken together, our data indicate that SEL1L alters the expression of mediators involved in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix by creating a microenvironment that is unfavorable to invasive growth and by affecting cell cycle progression through promotion of G1 accumulation.

  20. Triphala inhibits both in vitro and in vivo xenograft growth of pancreatic tumor cells by inducing apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triphala is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat variety of diseases; however its mechanism of action remains unexplored. This study elucidates the molecular mechanism of Triphala against human pancreatic cancer in the cellular and in vivo model. Growth-inhibitory effects of Triphala were evaluated in Capan-2, BxPC-3 and HPDE-6 cells by Sulphoradamine-B assay. Apoptosis was determined by cell death assay and western blotting. Triphala was administered orally to nude mice implanted with Capan-2 xenograft. Tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Exposure of Capan-2 cells to the aqueous extract of Triphala for 24 h resulted in the significant decrease in the survival of cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of about 50 μg/ml. Triphala-mediated reduced cell survival correlated with induction of apoptosis, which was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Triphala-induced apoptosis was linked with phosphorylation of p53 at Ser-15 and ERK at Thr-202/Tyr-204 in Capan-2 cells. Above mentioned effects were significantly blocked when the cells were pretreated with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), suggesting the involvement of ROS generation. Pretreatment of cells with pifithrin-α or U0126, specific inhibitors of p53 or MEK-1/2, significantly attenuated Triphala-induced apoptosis. Moreover, NAC or U0126 pretreatment significantly attenuated Triphala-induced p53 transcriptional activity. Similarly, Triphala induced apoptosis in another pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 by activating ERK. On the other hand, Triphala failed to induce apoptosis or activate ERK or p53 in normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE-6) cells. Further, oral administration of 50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg Triphala in PBS, 5 days/week significantly suppressed the growth of Capan-2 pancreatic tumor-xenograft. Reduced tumor-growth in Triphala fed mice was due to increased apoptosis in the tumors cells, which was associated with increased

  1. STAT5b as Molecular Target in Pancreatic Cancer—Inhibition of Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, and Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Moser

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of patients suffering from pancreatic cancer is still poor and novel therapeutic options are urgently needed. Recently, the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b was associated with tumor progression in human solid cancer. Hence, we assessed whether STAT5b might serve as an anticancer target in ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (DPAC. We found that nuclear expression of STAT5b can be detected in approximately 50% of DPAC. Blockade of STAT5b by stable shRNA-mediated knockdown showed no effects on tumor cell growth in vitro. However, inhibition of tumor cell motility was found even in response to stimulation with epidermal growth factor or interleukin-6. These findings were paralleled by a reduction of prometastatic and proangiogenic factors in vitro. Subsequent in vivo experiments revealed a strong growth inhibition on STAT5b blockade in subcutaneous and orthotopic models. These findings were paralleled by impaired tumor angiogenesis in vivo. In contrast to the subcutaneous model, the orthotopic model revealed a strong reduction of tumor cell proliferation that emphasizes the meaning of assessing targets in an appropriate microenvironment. Taken together, our results suggest that STAT5b might be a potential novel target for human DPAC.

  2. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%–77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21–11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01–1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further

  3. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Deshpande, Vikram [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Warshaw, Andrew L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: Tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further

  4. Primary cystic pancreatic neoplasms and tumor-like conditions. MR cholangiopancreatographic evaluation of lesions and Wirsung's duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the contribution of single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) in the diagnosis of cystic lesions in the pancreas, and their relation to Wirsung's duct. Material and methods: In 66 patients (33 women and 33 men; mean age: 66 years) cystic pancreatic lesions were retrospectively analyzed. The SSFSE technique was used, including an evaluation of Wirsung's duct. Conventional pancreatic sequences were added. The following lesion features were assessed: location, number, size, relation to Wirsung's duct, nature of the cystic image and signal intensity of the neoplasm or tumor-like condition. Surgical and anatomopathological correlation was obtained in 31/66 cases (47%). Results: The cystic lesions were divided in 2 groups: A) cystic lesions related to Wirsung's duct, 30 patients: all lesions measured less than 30 mm in size. Seven patients underwent surgical treatment; in 22 cases surgery was not indicated. One patient refused surgery. A mucinous papilliferous intraductal tumor was diagnosed in 3 cases, ampullar carcinoma in 1 case, pancreatic carcinoma, 1 case, autoimmune pancreatitis, 1 case, and cystic duct dilatation due to benign fibrous stenosis, 1 case. B) Cystic lesions not related to Wirsung's duct (36 patients): 7 serous cystadenomas, 7 adenocarcinomas with a cystic component, 1 mucinous cystadenoma, 1 duodenal diverticulum, 7 pseudocysts and 1 neuroendocrine tumor. In 12 patients surgery was not carried out due to clinical contraindication or patient's refusal. Conclusion: SSFSE allowed a clear differentiation between cystic lesions related (Group A) and non-related (Group B) to Wirsung's duct. The diagnosis could not be achieved by usual MRI sequences. However, benign and malignant lesions were observed in both groups. In all cases SSFSE afforded useful data either for surgical treatment or clinical follow-up. (author)

  5. Aberrant over-expression of TRPM7 ion channels in pancreatic cancer: required for cancer cell invasion and implicated in tumor growth and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies in zebrafish development have led to identification of the novel roles of the transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7 ion channels in human pancreatic cancer. However, the biological significance of TRPM7 channels in pancreatic neoplasms was mostly unexplored. In this study, we determined the expression levels of TRPM7 in pancreatic tissue microarrays and correlated these measurements in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with the clinicopathological features. We also investigated the role of TRPM7 channels in pancreatic cancer cell invasion using the MatrigelTM-coated transwell assay. In normal pancreas, TRPM7 is expressed at a discernable level in the ductal cells and centroacinar cells and at a relatively high level in the islet endocrine cells. In chronic pancreatitis, pre-malignant tissues, and malignant neoplasms, there is variable expression of TRPM7. In the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens examined, TRPM7 is expressed at either moderate-level or high-level. Anti-TRPM7 immunoreactivity in pancreatic adenocarcinoma significantly correlates with the size and stages of tumors. In human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in which TRPM7 is highly expressed, short hairpin RNA-mediated suppression of TRPM7 impairs cell invasion. The results demonstrate that TRPM7 channels are over-expressed in a proportion of the pre-malignant lesions and malignant tumors of the pancreas, and they are necessary for invasion by pancreatic cancer cells. We propose that TRPM7 channels play important roles in development and progression of pancreatic neoplasm, and they may be explored as clinical biomarkers and targets for its prevention and treatment.

  6. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) mice lacking Mucin 1 have a profound defect in tumor growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Dahlia M.; Curry, Jennifer M.; Roy, Lopamudra D.; Tinder, Teresa L.; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Schettini, Jorge; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Yong Y.; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is over expressed and aberrantly glycosolated in >60% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The functional role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has yet to be fully elucidated due to a dearth of appropriate models. In the present study, we have generated mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (KC), which are either Muc1-null (KCKO) or express human MUC1 (KCM). We show that KCKO mice have significantly slower tumor progression and rates of secondary metastasis, compared to both KC and KCM. Cell lines derived from KCKO tumors have significantly lower tumorigenic capacity compared to cells from KCM tumors. Therefore, mice with KCKO tumors had a significant survival benefit compared to mice with KCM tumors. In vitro, KCKO cells have reduced proliferation and invasion and failed to respond to epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), or matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9). Further, significantly fewer KCKO cells entered the G2M phase of the cell cycle compared to the KCM cells. Proteomics and western blotting analysis revealed a complete loss of cdc-25c expression, phosphorylation of MAPK, as well as a significant decrease in Nestin and Tubulin α-2 chain expression in KCKO cells. Treatment with a MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, abrogated the enhanced proliferation of the KCM cells but had minimal effect on KCKO cells, suggesting that MUC1 is necessary for MAPK activity and oncogenic signaling. This is the first study to utilize a Muc1-null PDA mouse in order to fully elucidate the oncogenic role of MUC1, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:21558393

  7. An alarming prognosis: how people affected by pancreatic cancer use (and avoid) Internet information

    OpenAIRE

    Chapple, A; Evans, JV; Ziebland, S; McPherson, A.; Hugh Grant

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at how patients with pancreatic cancer use the Internet, and considers its potential negative effects for people with a life threatening illness. We designed a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews collected by maximum variation sampling. Respondents were recruited from all over the UK in 2009/10. We interviewed 32 people with pancreatic cancer and eight relatives/carers of people who had recently died of pancreatic cancer. In contrast to a similar study we und...

  8. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  9. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  10. Tumor Budding Cells, Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition-type Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EvaKaramitopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the most lethal cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Moreover, PDAC escapes early detection and resists treatment. Multiple combinations of genetic alterations are known to occur in PDAC including mutational activation of KRAS, inactivation of p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4 (DPC4 and dysregulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling. Through their interaction with WNT pathway, the downstream molecules of these pathways have been implicated in the promotion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs, small populations of which have been identified in PDAC, and EMT-type cells play critical roles in drug resistance, invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. EMT may be histologically represented by the presence of tumor budding which is described as the occurrence of single tumor cells or small clusters (<5 of dedifferentiated cells at the invasive front of gastrointestinal (including colorectal, oesophageal, gastric and ampullary carcinomas and is linked to poor prognosis. Tumor budding has recently been shown to occur frequently in PDAC and to be associated with adverse clinicopathological features and decreased disease-free and overall survival. The aim of this review is to present a short overview on the morphological and molecular aspects that underline the relationship between tumor budding cells, CSCs and EMT-type cells in PDAC.

  11. VIP and Calcitonin-Producing Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor with Watery Diarrhea: Clinicopathological Features and the Effect of Somatostatin Analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Kon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET secretes various peptide hormones; however, calcitonin hypersecretion is rare. Its clinicopathological significance and treatment is still controversial. Case report A 43 year-old Japanese man presented severe watery diarrhea and a large mass in the pancreatic tail. Blood concentration of VIP was elevated to 649 pg/mL (reference range: 0- 100 pg/mL, and calcitonin to 66,700 pg/mL (reference range: 15-86 pg/mL. There was no tumor in other endocrine organs. The resected tumor was composed of 80% calcitonin-positive cells and 10% VIP-positive cells. After the operation, the levels of VIP and calcitonin were decreased to 44 and 553 pg/mL, respectively, and diarrhea was improved. The mRNA of somatostatin receptor (SSTR subtypes 2, 3 and 5 in the tumor tissue were increased 22.8, 25.1, and 37.0-fold of those of normal pancreas, respectively. At 19 months after the operation, blood calcitonin was again raised to 3,980 pg/mL, and metastatic tumors were found in the liver. With the treatment of long-acting somatostatin analogue, calcitonin was reduced to 803 pg/mL. The patient does not present endocrine symptom, and the size of the metastatic tumors appears stable. Conclusion From the world literature to date, co-secretion of VIP and calcitonin was documented in only 10 cases of pNET including the current case. Although VIP is a primary cause of diarrhea in these cases, high level of calcitonin may also influence on the clinical symptoms. Somatostatin analogue suppresses the levels of VIP and calcitonin, and the control proliferation is also expected when tumor cells express SSTRs.

  12. A High Circulating Tumor Cell Count in Portal Vein Predicts Liver Metastasis From Periampullary or Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Yu Wen; Kuo, Hsun-Chuan; Ho, Be-Ing; Chang, Ming-Chu; Chang, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Chen, Huai-Lu; Liang, Ting-Yung; Wang, Chien-Fang; Huang, Chia-Yi; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Chang, Ying Chih; Lee, Eva YHP; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) released from a periampullary or pancreatic cancer can be more frequently detected in the portal than the systemic circulation and potentially can be used to identify patients with liver micrometastases. Aims of this study is to determine if CTCs count in portal venous blood of patients with nonmetastatic periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be used as a predictor for subsequent liver metastases. CTCs were quantified in portal and peripheral venous blood samples collected simultaneously during pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients with presumed periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma without image-discernible metastasis. Postoperatively patients were monitored for liver metastasis by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography every 3 months for 1 year. Sixty patients with a pathological diagnosis of periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma were included in the study. Multivariate analysis indicated that portal CTC count was a significant predictor for liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. Eleven of 13 patients with a high portal CTCs count (defined as >112 CMx Platform estimated CTCs in 2 mL blood) developed liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. In contrast, only 6 of 47 patients with a low portal CTC count developed liver metastases (P < 0.0001). A value of 112 CMx Platform estimated CTCs had 64.7% sensitivity and 95.4% specificity to predict liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. We concluded that a high CTC count in portal venous blood collected during pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients with periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma without metastases detected by currently available imaging tools is a significant predictor for liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. PMID:27100430

  13. Multislice spiral CT for the diagnostics of pancreatic tumors; Mehrzeilen-Spiral-CT in der Diagnostik von Pankreastumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, U.; Lell, M.; Noemayr, A.; Greess, H.; Bautz, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Wolf, H. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik; Brunner, T. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    1999-11-01

    Purpose. Investigation of the capabilities of MSCT and its value for the staging of pancreatic carcinomas. Methods. 50 Patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma were examined with a biphasic multislice-spiral-CT protocol: Slice collimation 4x1 mm, Pitch 3.5-4 mm. After administration of 120 ml contrast medium and 50 ml NaCl with a flow rate of 3.0 ml/s the examination was started with a delay of 40 s (pancreatic phase) and 80 s (portalvenous phase). Results: Multislice spiral CT allows the examination of the whole upper abdomen with nearly isotropic data sets. This is the premise for the optimal assessment of the tumor extent in all planes, excellent demarcation of the tumor against the adjacent vessels and organs and the demarcation of small peripancreatic lymph nodes. Conclusions. Multislice spiral CT and the use of interactive multiplanar reconstructions improve the staging of pancreatic cancer. (orig.) [German] Ziel unserer Untersuchungen war es, die Moeglichkeiten der Mehrzeilen-Detektor-Spiral-CT und ihre Bedeutung fuer das Staging von Pankreastumoren zu evaluieren. Bei insgesamt 50 Patienten, bei denen der Verdacht auf ein Pankreaskarzinom bestand, wurde im Rahmen der Tumorstagings ein biphasisches hochaufgeloestes Mehrzeilen-Spiral-CT mit einer Schichtkollimation von 4x1 mm, einem Pitch von 3,5-4, 120 ml Kontrastmittel, 50 ml 0,9%NaCl-Bolus, 3,0 ml/s Fluss und einem Startdelay von durchschnittlich 40 s (Pankreasparenchymphase) und 80 s (portalvenoese Phase) durchgefuehrt. Die Mehrzeilen-Spiral-CT ist in der Lage die gesamte Pankreasloge und auch die angrenzenden Organe mit hoher Ortsaufloesung in allen Raumebenen abzubilden. Die nahezu isotrope multiplanare Bildgebung erlaubt die vollstaendige Erfassung der Tumorausdehnung in allen Raumebenen und eine bessere Abgrenzung der Tumoren gegenueber dem angrenzenden Fettgewebe, den benachbarten Organen (Gefaesse, Duodenum, Magen) und einen sichereren Nachweis von peripankreatischen Lymphknoten. Die Mehrzeilen

  14. Long-Term Disease Control of a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor with Lanreotide Autogel®: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybaert, Willem; Van Hul, Erik; Woestenborghs, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The CLARINET study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496) showed that somatostatin analogs are able to stabilize tumor growth in patients with intestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Here, we present a case of NET originating from the pancreatic tail that was treated with lanreotide Autogel®. A 60-year-old patient underwent resection of a pancreatic NET with splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. Four months after surgery, there was an increase in chromogranin A levels, along with a hypercaptating lesion of approximately 3.5 cm at the residual part of the pancreatic corpus. Treatment with 30 mg monthly-administered octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was initiated. After 3 months of treatment, a control CT scan revealed diffuse metastases in the liver, although the patient presented no symptoms and liver tests were normal. Due to difficulties with the administration of octreotide LAR, treatment was switched to lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg, administered as monthly deep-subcutaneous injections. Progression-free survival, as shown by 3-monthly CT scans, was obtained for 2 years without the need to increase the lanreotide Autogel® dose, and the patient reported no side effects. After these 2 years, deterioration of the patient's clinical status and weight loss were observed, along with increased size of the liver lesions and appearance of peritoneal metastases. Chemotherapy treatment with cisplatinum-etoposide was initiated, while the lanreotide Autogel® injections were continued. After three chemotherapy cycles, a rapid decline in the patient's quality of life was noted, and she requested discontinuation of the chemotherapy and lanreotide injections. One month later, the patient died due to clinical progressive disease. PMID:25408662

  15. Long-term disease control of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with lanreotide autogel(®): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybaert, Willem; Van Hul, Erik; Woestenborghs, Heidi

    2014-09-01

    The CLARINET study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496) showed that somatostatin analogs are able to stabilize tumor growth in patients with intestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Here, we present a case of NET originating from the pancreatic tail that was treated with lanreotide Autogel(®). A 60-year-old patient underwent resection of a pancreatic NET with splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. Four months after surgery, there was an increase in chromogranin A levels, along with a hypercaptating lesion of approximately 3.5 cm at the residual part of the pancreatic corpus. Treatment with 30 mg monthly-administered octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was initiated. After 3 months of treatment, a control CT scan revealed diffuse metastases in the liver, although the patient presented no symptoms and liver tests were normal. Due to difficulties with the administration of octreotide LAR, treatment was switched to lanreotide Autogel(®) 120 mg, administered as monthly deep-subcutaneous injections. Progression-free survival, as shown by 3-monthly CT scans, was obtained for 2 years without the need to increase the lanreotide Autogel(®) dose, and the patient reported no side effects. After these 2 years, deterioration of the patient's clinical status and weight loss were observed, along with increased size of the liver lesions and appearance of peritoneal metastases. Chemotherapy treatment with cisplatinum-etoposide was initiated, while the lanreotide Autogel(®) injections were continued. After three chemotherapy cycles, a rapid decline in the patient's quality of life was noted, and she requested discontinuation of the chemotherapy and lanreotide injections. One month later, the patient died due to clinical progressive disease. PMID:25408662

  16. The relationship between tumor necrosis factor-α gene polymorphisms and acute severe pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张佃良; 黎介寿; 江志伟; 于宝军; 唐星明; 李维勤

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the presence of the TNF2 allele and plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and soluble TNF receptor (Stnf-R) with the development of acute severe pancreatitis (ASP) and severe sepsis.Methods Genomic DNA was prepared from peripheral blood leukocytes. The TNF1 and TNF2 biallelic polymorphisms were identified by analyzing Ncol-digested DNA fragments obtained from PCR products. Plasma levels of TNFα and sTNF-R were measured by EASIA.Results The overall TNF2 allele frequency in ASP patients was comparable to that found in healthy volunteers (29. 2% vs. 29. 3%, P>0. 05). Severe sepsis occurred in 26 of 72 patients. Patients with severe sepsis showed a significantly higher prevalence of TNF2 than those without (46. 2% vs.19.6%, P<0.05). Plasma TNFα, sTNF-RI, and sTNF-RII levels were (36 ±31 ) pg/ml, (5.4 ±3.5) ng/ml, and (11.2 ±7. 8) ng/ml, respectively, in patients with severe sepsis, and (31 ±25)pg/ml, (4. 6 ± 3. 8) ng/ml, and (8. 8 ± 6.6) ng/ml in non-severe sepsis subjects. Differences in TNF levels were not statistically significant between patients with ASP and control group (P >0. 05).Moreover, there was no correlation between TNF2 allele frequency and TNFα levels [(37 ±31) pg/mlvs. (31 ±25) pg/ml in TNF2 group and TNF1 group, respectively, P>0. 05].Conclusions Our results suggest that there is no relationship between ASP and the TNF2 allele, but that the TNF2 allele is associated with a susceptibility to severe sepsis as a result of ASP.

  17. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and se- lective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepres- sant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancre- atic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. METHODS: A subcutaneous xenograft model of hu- man pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was estab- lished in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were ran- domly divided into mirtazapine group [10 mg/(kg'd)], (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). RESULTS: Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 ± 2.1 vs 7.1 ± 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no significant difference in tumor vol- ume and tumor weight of the three groups. CONCLUSION: Mirtazapine and fluoxetine have no effect on the growth of pancreatic tumor. However, mirtazapine can significantly increase food intake and improve nutrition compared with fluoxetine in a pan- creatic cancer mouse model.

  18. Role of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC: is tumor budding the missing link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EvaKaramitopoulou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC ranks as the fourth commonest cause of cancer death while its incidence is increasing worldwide. For all stages, survival at 5 years is <5%. The lethal nature of pancreatic cancer is attributed to its high metastatic potential to the lymphatic system and distant organs. Lack of effective therapeutic options contributes to the high mortality rates of PDAC. Recent evidence suggests that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT plays an important role to the disease progression and development of drug resistance in PDAC. Tumor budding is thought to reflect the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which allows neoplastic epithelial cells to acquire a mesenchymal phenotype thus increasing their capacity for migration and invasion and help them become resistant to apoptotic signals. In a recent study by our own group the presence and prognostic significance of tumor budding in PDAC were investigated and an association between high-grade budding and aggressive clinicopathological features of the tumors as well as worse outcome of the patients was found. The identification of EMT phenotypic targets may help identifying new molecules so that future therapeutic strategies directed specifically against them could potentially have an impact on drug resistance and invasiveness and hence improve the prognosis of PDAC patients. The aim of this short review is to present an insight on the morphological and molecular aspects of EMT and on the factors that are involved in the induction of EMT in PDAC.

  19. Modulation of cell cycle and gene expression in pancreatic tumor cell lines by methionine deprivation (methionine stress): implications to the therapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinakis, Demetrius M; Liu, Xiaoyan; Neuner, Russell D

    2005-09-01

    The effect of methionine deprivation (methionine stress) on the proliferation, survival, resistance to chemotherapy, and regulation of gene and protein expression in pancreatic tumor lines is examined. Methionine stress prevents successful mitosis and promotes cell cycle arrest and accumulation of cells with multiple micronuclei with decondensed chromatin. Inhibition of mitosis correlates with CDK1 down-regulation and/or inhibition of its function by Tyr(15) phosphorylation or Thr(161) dephosphorylation. Inhibition of cell cycle progression correlates with loss of hyperphosphorylated Rb and up-regulation of p21 via p53 and/or transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activation depending on p53 status. Although methionine stress-induced toxicity is not solely dependent on p53, the gain in p21 and loss in CDK1 transcription are more enhanced in wild-type p53 tumors. Up-regulation of SMAD7, a TGF-beta signaling inhibitor, suggests that SMAD7 does not restrict the TGF-beta-mediated induction of p21, although it may prevent up-regulation of p27. cDNA oligoarray analysis indicated a pleiotropic response to methionine stress. Cell cycle and mitotic arrest is in agreement with up-regulation of NF2, ETS2, CLU, GADD45alpha, GADD45beta, and GADD45gamma and down-regulation of AURKB, TOP2A, CCNA, CCNB, PRC1, BUB1, NuSAP, IFI16, and BRCA1. Down-regulation of AREG, AGTR1, M-CSF, and EGF, IGF, and VEGF receptors and up-regulation of GNA11 and IGFBP4 signify loss of growth factor support. PIN1, FEN1, and cABL up-regulation and LMNB1, AREG, RhoB, CCNG, TYMS, F3, and MGMT down-regulation suggest that methionine stress sensitizes the tumor cells to DNA-alkylating drugs, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation. Increased sensitivity of pancreatic tumor cell lines to temozolomide is shown under methionine stress conditions and is attributed in part to diminished O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and possibly to inhibition of the cell cycle progression. PMID:16170025

  20. PTCH 1 staining of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) samples from patients with and without multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-1) syndrome reveals a potential therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    Gurung, Buddha; Hua, Xianxin; Runske, Melissa; Bennett, Bonita; LiVolsi, Virginia; Roses, Robert; Fraker, Douglas A; Metz, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare, indolent tumors that may occur sporadically or develop in association with well-recognized hereditary syndromes, particularly multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). We previously demonstrated that the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway was aberrantly up-regulated in a mouse model that phenocopies the human MEN-1 syndrome, Men1l/l;RipCre, and that inhibition of this pathway suppresses MEN-1 tumor cell proliferation. We hypothesized that the...

  1. Well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with solitary hepatic metastasis presenting as a benign cystic mass: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Su Joa; Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kim, Jeong Ho; Choi, Hye Young [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and their hepatic metastases have an inconsistent appearance with only a small percentage of lesions appearing as cystic masses in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, they can be mistaken as benign or infectious lesions, which can lead to a false diagnosis with delayed or inadequate treatment. We reported a patient with upper abdominal pain that lasted for several months, caused by a huge cystic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the liver. This was mistakenly interpreted as a complicated or hydatid cyst, and the findings in the CT and MRI was presented.

  2. Well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with solitary hepatic metastasis presenting as a benign cystic mass: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and their hepatic metastases have an inconsistent appearance with only a small percentage of lesions appearing as cystic masses in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, they can be mistaken as benign or infectious lesions, which can lead to a false diagnosis with delayed or inadequate treatment. We reported a patient with upper abdominal pain that lasted for several months, caused by a huge cystic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the liver. This was mistakenly interpreted as a complicated or hydatid cyst, and the findings in the CT and MRI was presented.

  3. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation o...

  4. Malignant Pancreatic Extra-Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Diagnosed by Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology. A Case Report with a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Nawal Rao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors are extremely uncommon neoplasm. To the best of our knowledge, only eleven cases have been reported in the literature. All the case reports published mostly involve diagnoses made on surgical pathology. Case report A 40-year-old male patient presented with asthenia, mild abdominal pain, severe anemia and weight loss. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a heterogeneously enhancing mass (6.5x6.0 cm in the body and head of the pancreas. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA was performed on the mass of the pancreas before a pancreaticoduodenectomy. A cytological diagnosis of pancreatic malignant mesenchymal neoplasm was made. The final diagnosis of primary pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor was confirmed by histopathological examination and immunohistochemical findings (CD117 positivity. This case was diagnosed by percutaneous transabdominal ultrasound, rather than endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA which had been used in three previous cases. Conclusion We report a very unusual case of pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor which was diagnosed by US-FNA cytology. Although this is uncommon in the pancreas, extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of solid and cystic pancreatic masses on cytology.

  5. Sorafenib Inhibits Tumor Growth and Improves Survival in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Volker Fendrich; Katja Maschuw; Johannes Rehm; Malte Buchholz; Julia P. Holler; Slater, Emily P; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Jens Waldmann

    2012-01-01

    Background. The purpose of the study was to evaluate Sorafenib (BAY 43-9006) derived receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition on tumor progression in murine islet cell tumors. Sorafenib is considered to be a potent inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis and neovascularization in various solid tumors. Rip1Tag2 mice were treated in two different groups according to the model of tumor progression: the early treatment group received vehicle or Sorafenib from 10 to 14 weeks of age and the late treatment group...

  6. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n = 3) or without (n = 3) pancreatic...

  7. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong-Kook [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Henry, Jon C. [Department of Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Jiang, Jinmai [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Esau, Christine [Regulus Therapeutics, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Gusev, Yuriy [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Lerner, Megan R. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Postier, Russell G. [Department of Surgery, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Brackett, Daniel J. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Schmittgen, Thomas D., E-mail: Schmittgen.2@osu.edu [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  8. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. → miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. → miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a β2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G2/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the β2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The β2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  9. Assessment and optimization of electroporation-assisted tumoral nanoparticle uptake in a nude mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West DL

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Derek Lamont West,1,2 Sarah B White,3 Zhouli Zhang,4 Andrew C Larson,4 Reed A Omary5 1Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering and Nanomedicine, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston, Houston, TX, 3Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; 4Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; 5Department of Radiology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is a particularly lethal form of cancer. In 2012, the incidence of PDAC was 43,920. Five-year survival for patients with PDAC is around 6%, regardless of staging, making PDAC one of the deadliest forms of cancer. One reason for this dismal prognosis is chemoresistance to the current first-line therapy, gemcitabine. There are multiple factors that contribute to the chemoresistance observed in pancreatic cancer. Among them, desmoplasia has been increasingly seen as a significant contributor to chemoresistance. To overcome desmoplastic chemoresistance, several novel methods of treatment have been developed. Electroporation is one such novel treatment. High electrical fields are applied to cells to create pores that increase cell permeability. It has been previously demonstrated that electroporation enhances the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs in pancreatic tumor models. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems constitute a second novel method to overcome desmoplastic chemoresistance. Due to their intrinsic design advantages, nanoparticles have been shown to increase the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents, while further reducing or even eliminating side effects. To date, there have been no studies evaluating the cumulative effect of combining both nanoparticle and electroporation strategies to overcome chemoresistance in PDAC. Our preliminary studies assessed the in vitro and in vivo uptake of doxorubicin-loaded iron oxide

  10. Do variants associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and type 2 diabetes reciprocally affect risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Wu

    Full Text Available Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the existence of shared genetic susceptibility is largely unknown. We evaluated whether any reported genetic risk variants of either disease found by genome-wide association studies reciprocally confer susceptibility.Data that were generated in previous genome-wide association studies (GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes; PanScan were obtained through the National Institutes of Health database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP. Using the PanScan datasets, we tested for association of 38 variants within 37 genomic regions known to be susceptibility factors for type 2 diabetes. We further examined whether type 2 diabetes variants predispose to pancreatic cancer risk stratified by diabetes status. Correspondingly, we examined the association of fourteen pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants within eight genomic regions in the GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes dataset.Four plausible associations of diabetes variants and pancreatic cancer risk were detected at a significance threshold of p = 0.05, and one pancreatic cancer susceptibility variant was associated with diabetes risk at threshold of p = 0.05, but none remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons.Currently identified GWAS susceptibility variants are unlikely to explain the potential shared genetic etiology between Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer.

  11. The Adnectin CT-322 is a novel VEGF receptor 2 inhibitor that decreases tumor burden in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Andrew F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer continues to have a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Therefore, more effective therapies are necessary to improve prognosis in this disease. Angiogenesis is required for tumor growth, and subsequently, mediators of angiogenesis are attractive targets for therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a well-characterized mediator of tumor angiogenesis that functions primarily by binding and activating VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2. In this study, we evaluate the use of CT-322, a novel biologic (Adnectin. This small protein is based on a human fibronectin domain and has beneficial properties in that it is fully human, stable, and is produced in bacteria. CT-322 binds to and inhibits activation of VEGFR2. Methods The efficacy of CT-322 was evaluated in vivo using two orthotopic pancreatic tumor models. The first model was a human tumor xenograft where MiaPaCa-2 cells were injected into the tail of the pancreas of nude mice. The second model was a syngeneic tumor using Pan02 cells injected into pancreas of C57BL/6J mice. In both models, therapy was initiated once primary tumors were established. Mice bearing MiaPaCa-2 tumors were treated with vehicle or CT-322 alone. Gemcitabine alone or in combination with CT-322 was added to the treatment regimen of mice bearing Pan02 tumors. Therapy was given twice a week for six weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed and evaluated (grossly and histologically for primary and metastatic tumor burden. Primary tumors were also evaluated by immunohistochemistry for the level of apoptosis (TUNEL, microvessel density (MECA-32, and VEGF-activated blood vessels (Gv39M. Results Treatment with CT-322 was effective at preventing pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis in orthotopic xenograft and syngeneic models of pancreatic cancer. Additionally, CT-322 treatment increased apoptosis, reduced microvessel density and reduced the number of VEGF-activated blood vessels in tumors

  12. Factors affecting the local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors affecting local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors. Between June 2006 and June 2009, 159 lung tumors in 144 patients (primary lung cancer, 128; metastatic lung tumor, 31) were treated with SBRT with 48-60 Gy (mean 50.1 Gy) in 4-5 fractions. Higher doses were given to larger tumors and metastatic tumors in principle. Assessed factors were age, gender, tumor origin (primary vs. metastatic), histological subtype, tumor size, tumor appearance (solid vs. ground glass opacity), maximum standardized uptake value of positron emission tomography using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and SBRT doses. Follow-up time was 1-60 months (median 18 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local failure-free rates of all lesions were 90, 80, and 77%, respectively. On univariate analysis, metastatic tumors (p<0.0001), solid tumors (p=0.0246), and higher SBRT doses (p=0.0334) were the statistically significant unfavorable factors for local control. On multivariate analysis, only tumor origin was statistically significant (p=0.0027). The 2-year local failure-free rates of primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors were 87 and 50%, respectively. A metastatic tumor was the only independently significant unfavorable factor for local control after SBRT. (author)

  13. Activation of nuclear TR3 (NR4A1) by a diindolylmethane analog induces apoptosis and proapoptotic genes in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Kyungsil; Lee, Syng-Ook; Cho, Sung-Dae; Kim, Kyounghyun; Khan, Shaheen; Safe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    NR4A1 (Nur77, TR3) is overexpressed in pancreatic tumors and activation of TR3 by 1,1-bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-methoxyphenyl)methane (DIM-C-pPhOCH3) inhibits cell and tumor growth and induces apoptosis. Microarray analysis demonstrates that in L3.6pL pancreatic cancer cells DIM-C-pPhOCH3 induces genes associated with metabolism, homeostasis, signal transduction, transcription, stress, transport, immune responses, growth inhibition and apoptosis. Among the most highly induced growth inhibitory and...

  14. 1-MT Enhances Potency of Tumor Cell Lysate-pulsed Dendritic Cells against Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma by Downregulating the Percentage of Tregs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元栋; 徐钧; 邹浩军; 王春友

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether 1-methyl-tryptophan [1-MT,an indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase(IDO) inhibitor] could reduce CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells(Tregs) proliferation and improve the anti-tumor efficacy of dendritic cells(DCs) pulsed with tumor cell lysate in the mice bearing pancreatic adenocarcinoma.The models of pancreatic adenocarcinoma were established in C57BL/6 mice by subcutaneous injection of Pan02 cells.Eight mice which were subcutaneously injected with PBS served as control.The expression of IDO was...

  15. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the pancreatic head – a case report of a 6 months old child and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are rare in the pediatric population. Most common localizations were reported in the lungs. A localization in the pancreas needs differentiation from other tumors and chronic pancreatitis. Treatment is surgical resection, although there are reports of treatment with oral steroids and radiation therapy. A 6-month-old child was treated due to a tumor in the head of the pancreas. On admission he was jaundiced with pruritus. US and MRI confirmed pancreatic tumor. Preoperative biopsy wasn’t conclusive regarding the nature of the tumor. Duodenopancreatectomy was performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. Histologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. On follow up, he remained with no evidence of recurrence. A literature review revealed 10 cases of pancreatic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in the pediatric age group. Our patient is the youngest reported. Despite major resection, there were no complications. However, management of this child might be possible with steroids, but conservative treatment might be insufficient, especially in aggressive forms of tumors

  16. Rasfonin, a novel 2-pyrone derivative, induces ras-mutated Panc-1 pancreatic tumor cell death in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z; Li, L; Li, Y; Zhou, W; Cheng, J; Liu, F; Zheng, P; Zhang, Y; Che, Y

    2014-01-01

    Rasfonin is a novel 2-pyrone derivative reported to induce apoptosis in ras-dependent cells. In this study, its effects on ras-mutated pancreatic cancer cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Two human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 (mutated K-ras) and BxPC-3 (wild-type K-ras) were selected to test the effects of rasfonin on cell proliferation, clone formation, migration and invasion in vitro. Immunoblotting was used to detect the expressions of EGFR-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway proteins. Ras activity was measured using a pull-down ELISA kit and guanine exchange factor (GEF)/GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) activity was measured by [(3)H]-GDP radiometric ligand binding. For an in vivo study, CD1 nude mice bearing Panc-1 cells were treated with rasfonin or Salirasib (FTS). We found that rasfonin suppressed proliferation more strongly in Panc-1 cells (IC50=5.5 μM) than BxPC-3 cells (IC50=10 μM) in vitro. Clone formation, migration and invasion by Panc-1 cells were also reduced by rasfonin. Rasfonin had little effect on the farnesylation of Ras, but it strongly downregulated Ras activity and consequently phosphorylation of c-Raf/MEK/ERK. Further experiments indicated that rasfonin reduced Son of sevenless (Sos1) expression but did not alter GEF and GAP activities. The in vivo experiments also revealed that rasfonin (30 mg/kg) delayed the growth of xenograft tumors originating from Panc-1 cells. Tumor weight was ultimately decreased after 20 days of treatment of rasfonin. Rasfonin is a robust inhibitor of pancreatic cancers with the K-ras mutation. The reduction of Sos1 expression and the consequently depressed Ras-MAPK activity could be important in its anticancer activity. PMID:24853419

  17. Tumor Size on Abdominal MRI Versus Pathologic Specimen in Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We assessed the accuracy of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for determining tumor size by comparing the preoperative contrast-enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo (3-dimensional [3D] volumetric interpolated breath-hold [VIBE]) MRI tumor size with pathologic specimen size. Methods and Materials: The records of 92 patients who had both preoperative contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI images and detailed pathologic specimen measurements were available for review. Primary tumor size from the MRI was independently measured by a single diagnostic radiologist (P.M.) who was blinded to the pathology reports. Pathologic tumor measurements from gross specimens were obtained from the pathology reports. The maximum dimensions of tumor measured in any plane on the MRI and the gross specimen were compared. The median difference between the pathology sample and the MRI measurements was calculated. A paired t test was conducted to test for differences between the MRI and pathology measurements. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure the association of disparity between the MRI and pathology sizes with the pathology size. Disparities relative to pathology size were also examined and tested for significance using a 1-sample t test. Results: The median patient age was 64.5 years. The primary site was pancreatic head in 81 patients, body in 4, and tail in 7. Three patients were American Joint Commission on Cancer stage IA, 7 stage IB, 21 stage IIA, 58 stage IIB, and 3 stage III. The 3D VIBE MRI underestimated tumor size by a median difference of 4 mm (range, −34-22 mm). The median largest tumor dimensions on MRI and pathology specimen were 2.65 cm (range, 1.5-9.5 cm) and 3.2 cm (range, 1.3-10 cm), respectively. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI underestimates tumor size by 4 mm when compared with pathologic specimen. Advanced abdominal MRI sequences warrant further investigation for radiation therapy planning in pancreatic adenocarcinoma before

  18. Evaluation of radiological prognostic factors of hepatic metastases in patients with non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denecke, Timm [Klinik für Radiologie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Baur, Alexander D.J., E-mail: alexander.baur@charite.de [Klinik für Radiologie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Ihm, Claudia; Steffen, Ingo G. [Klinik für Radiologie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Tischer, Elisabeth [Medizinische Klinik m.S. Hepatologie Gastroenterologie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Arsenic, Ruza [Institut für Pathologie, Campus Charité Mitte, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Pascher, Andreas [Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Wiedenmann, Bertram; Pavel, Marianne [Medizinische Klinik m.S. Hepatologie Gastroenterologie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: There are different therapeutic options in non-functional well to moderately differentiated (G1 and G2) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) with unresectable hepatic metastases including systemic chemotherapy and novel molecular targeted therapies. Treatment with somatostatin analogs (SSA) as antiproliferative agents is optional. At initial diagnosis watchful waiting until tumor progression is a well-established approach. Goal of this study was to evaluate imaging features as potential prognostic factors predicting early tumor progression in order to select patients that might benefit from an earlier initiation of medical treatment. Patients and methods: In 44 patients we correlated tumor grade, chromogranin A (CgA) levels, treatment with SSA and imaging features of hepatic metastases on contrast-enhanced multiphase CT and MR imaging with time to tumor progression (TTP) according to RECIST 1.0. Results: In the total patient cohort none of the tested imaging features was found to be a statistically significant prognostic factor for TTP. Since treatment with SSA was associated with an increased TTP we also analyzed a subgroup of 30 patients not treated with SSA. In this subgroup of patients hypoenhancement of hepatic metastases during early contrast phases was found to be a negative prognostic factor for early tumor progression within 12 months (p = 0.039). The other evaluated parameters including hepatic tumor load, number of metastases, and presence of regressive morphological changes did not reveal significant results. Conclusion: Hypovascularization of liver metastases from G1 and G2 pNET reflected by hypoenhancement during the early contrast phases seems to be associated with early tumor progression. In patients with hypoenhancing metastases repeated biopsy for reassessment of grading of these metastases, and early initiation of therapy should be considered.

  19. Evaluation of radiological prognostic factors of hepatic metastases in patients with non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There are different therapeutic options in non-functional well to moderately differentiated (G1 and G2) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) with unresectable hepatic metastases including systemic chemotherapy and novel molecular targeted therapies. Treatment with somatostatin analogs (SSA) as antiproliferative agents is optional. At initial diagnosis watchful waiting until tumor progression is a well-established approach. Goal of this study was to evaluate imaging features as potential prognostic factors predicting early tumor progression in order to select patients that might benefit from an earlier initiation of medical treatment. Patients and methods: In 44 patients we correlated tumor grade, chromogranin A (CgA) levels, treatment with SSA and imaging features of hepatic metastases on contrast-enhanced multiphase CT and MR imaging with time to tumor progression (TTP) according to RECIST 1.0. Results: In the total patient cohort none of the tested imaging features was found to be a statistically significant prognostic factor for TTP. Since treatment with SSA was associated with an increased TTP we also analyzed a subgroup of 30 patients not treated with SSA. In this subgroup of patients hypoenhancement of hepatic metastases during early contrast phases was found to be a negative prognostic factor for early tumor progression within 12 months (p = 0.039). The other evaluated parameters including hepatic tumor load, number of metastases, and presence of regressive morphological changes did not reveal significant results. Conclusion: Hypovascularization of liver metastases from G1 and G2 pNET reflected by hypoenhancement during the early contrast phases seems to be associated with early tumor progression. In patients with hypoenhancing metastases repeated biopsy for reassessment of grading of these metastases, and early initiation of therapy should be considered

  20. Tumores quísticos pancreáticos y lesiones pseudotumorales Cystic pancreatic tumours and pseudo-tumoural lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Jiménez Mendióroz

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Las lesiones quísticas de páncreas son infrecuentes, estimándose en sólo un 1% de todos los tumores pancreáticos y en un 10% de todos los quistes pancreáticos. El diagnóstico preoperatorio es importante para un adecuado tratamiento, existiendo en la actualidad valiosas técnicas radiológicas como son los ultrasonidos, la tomografía computarizada y la resonancia magnética. A pesar de todo tenemos que aceptar que nos encontramos ante un grupo de tumores de difícil diagnóstico, debido a la gran variedad de tipos celulares que existen en los mismos.Cystic lesions of the pancreas are infrequent, estimated at only some 1% of all pancreatic tumours and at some 10% of all pancreatic cysts. The pre-operational diagnosis is important for a suitable treatment, with valuable radiological techniques available today such as ultrasound, computerised tomography and magnetic resonance. In spite of this we have to accept that we are facing a group of tumours whose diagnosis is difficult, due to the great variety of cellular types existing within them.

  1. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  2. Continuous and low-energy 125I seed irradiation changes DNA methyltransferases expression patterns and inhibits pancreatic cancer tumor growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Yan-fang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iodine 125 (125I seed irradiation is an effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers. However, the radiobiological mechanisms underlying brachytherapy remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the influence of continuous and low-energy 125I irradiation on apoptosis, expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs and cell growth in pancreatic cancers. Materials and methods For in vitro 125I seed irradiation, SW-1990 cells were divided into three groups: control (0 Gy, 2 Gy, and 4 Gy. To create an animal model of pancreatic cancer, the SW 1990 cells were surgically implanted into the mouse pancreas. At 10 d post-implantation, the 30 mice with pancreatic cancer underwent 125I seed implantation and were separated into three groups: 0 Gy, 2 Gy, and 4 Gy group. At 48 or 72 h after irradiation, apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry; changes in DNMTs mRNA and protein expression were assessed by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis, respectively. At 28 d after 125I seed implantation, in vivo apoptosis was evaluated with TUNEL staining, while DNMTs protein expression was detected with immunohistochemical staining. The tumor volume was measured 0 and 28 d after 125I seed implantation. Results 125I seed irradiation induced significant apoptosis, especially at 4 Gy. DNMT1 and DNMT3b mRNA and protein expression were substantially higher in the 2 Gy group than in the control group. Conversely, the 4 Gy cell group exhibited significantly decreased DNMT3b mRNA and protein expression relative to the control group. There were substantially more TUNEL positive in the 125I seed implantation treatment group than in the control group, especially at 4 Gy. The 4 Gy seed implantation group showed weaker staining for DNMT1 and DNMT3b protein relative to the control group. Consequently, 125I seed implantation inhibited cancer growth and reduced cancer volume. Conclusion 125I seed implantation kills pancreatic cancer cells, especially

  3. Mechanoregulatory tumor-stroma crosstalk in pancreatic cancer: Measurements of the effects of extracellular matrix mechanics on tumor growth behavior, and vice-versa, to inform therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Jonathan; Jones, Dustin; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Cramer, Gwendolyn; Hanna, William; Caide, Andrew; Jafari, Seyedehrojin

    The rheological properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to play key roles in regulating tumor growth behavior through mechanotranduction pathways. The role of the mechanical microenvironment may be particularly important tumors of the pancreas, noted for an abundance of rigid fibrotic stroma, implicated in therapeutic resistance. At the same time, cancer cells and their stromal partners (e.g. tumor associated fibroblasts) continually alter the mechanical microenvironment in response to extracellular physical and biochemical cues as part of a two-way mechanoregulatory dialog. Here, we describe experimental studies using 3D pancreatic cell cultures with customized mechanical properties, combined with optical microrheology to provide insight into tumor-driven matrix remodeling. Quantitative microscopy provides measurements of phenotypic changes accompanying systematic variation of ECM composition in collagen and laminin-rich basement membrane admixtures, while analysis of the trajectories of passive tracer particles embedded in ECM report dynamic changes in heterogeneity, microstructure and local shear modulus accompanying both ECM stiffening (fibrosis) processes, and ECM degradation near invading cells. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Cancer Institute, R00CA155045 (PI: Celli).

  4. Sub-lethal radiation enhances anti-tumor immunotherapy in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not uncommon to observe circulating tumor antigen-specific T lymphocytes in cancer patients despite a lack of significant infiltration and destruction of their tumors. Thus, an important goal for tumor immunotherapy is to identify ways to modulate in vivo anti-tumor immunity to achieve clinical efficacy. We investigate this proposition in a spontaneous mouse tumor model, Rip1-Tag2. Experimental therapies were carried out in two distinctive trial designs, intended to either intervene in the explosive growth of small tumors, or regress bulky end-stage tumors. Rip1-Tag2 mice received a single transfer of splenocytes from Tag-specific, CD4+ T cell receptor transgenic mice, a single sub-lethal radiation, or a combination therapy in which the lymphocyte transfer was preceded by the sub-lethal radiation. Tumor burden, the extent of lymphocyte infiltration into solid tumors and host survival were used to assess the efficacy of these therapeutic approaches. In either intervention or regression, the transfer of Tag-specific T cells alone did not result in significant lymphocyte infiltration into solid tumors, not did it affect tumor growth or host survival. In contrast, the combination therapy resulted in significant reduction in tumor burden, increase in lymphocyte infiltration into solid tumors, and extension of survival. The results indicate that certain types of solid tumors may be intrinsically resistant to infiltration and destruction by tumor-specific T lymphocytes. Our data suggest that such resistance can be disrupted by sub-lethal radiation. The combinatorial approach presented here merits consideration in the design of clinical trials aimed to achieve T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

  5. Identification and characterization of a tumor infiltrating CD56(+)/CD16 (-) NK cell subset with specificity for pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Timothy L; Burns, William; Riley, John; Morgan, Richard A; Davis, Jeremy L; Hanada, Kenichi; Quezado, Martha; Rosenberg, Steven A; Royal, Richard E

    2010-12-01

    In a recent clinical trial, a patient exhibited regression of several pancreatic cancer metastases following the administration of the immune modulator Ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody). We sought to characterize the immune cells responsible for this regression. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL-2742) and an autologous tumor line (TC-2742) were expanded from a regressing metastatic lesion excised from this patient. Natural killer (NK) cells predominated in the TIL (92% CD56(+)) with few T cells (12% CD3(+)). A majority (88%) of the NK cells were CD56(bright)CD16(-). TIL-2742 secreted IFN-γ and GM-CSF following co-culture with TC-2742 and major histocompatibility complex mismatched pancreatic tumor lines. After sorting TIL-2742, the purified CD56(+)CD16(-)CD3(-) subset showed reactivity similar to TIL-2742 while the CD56(-)CD16(-)CD3(+) cells exhibited no tumor recognition. In co-culture assays, TIL-2742 and the NK subset expressed high reactivity to several pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines and could lyse the autologous tumor as well as pancreas and prostate cancer lines. Reactivity was partially abrogated by blockade of TRAIL. We thus identified a unique subset of NK cells (CD56(bright)CD16(dim)) isolated from a regressing metastatic pancreatic cancer in a patient responding to Ipilimumab. This represents the first report of CD56(+)CD16(-) NK cells with apparent specificity for pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines and associated with tumor regression following the treatment with an immune modulating agent. PMID:20734041

  6. Amblyomin-X induces ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and caspase activation in human melanoma and pancreatic tumor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Katia L P; Pacheco, Mario Thiego Fernandes; Berra, Carolina Maria; Bosch, Rosemary V; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Chammas, Roger; de Freitas Saito, Renata; Iqbal, Asif; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, new insights into proteasome function and its role in several human diseases made it a potential therapeutic target. In this context, Amblyomin-X is a Kunitz-type FXa inhibitor similar to endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and is a novel proteasome inhibitor. Herein, we have demonstrated Amblyomin-X cytotoxicity to different tumor cells lines such as pancreatic (Panc1, AsPC1BxPC3) and melanoma (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). Of note, Amblyomin-X was not cytotoxic to normal human fibroblast cells. In addition, Amblyomin-X promoted accumulation of ER stress markers (GRP78 and GADD153) in sensitive (SK-MEL-28) and bortezomib-resistant (Mia-PaCa-2) tumor cells. The intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)] i was slightly modulated in human tumor cells (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) after 24 h of Amblyomin-X treatment. Furthermore, Amblyomin-X induced mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome-c release, PARP cleavage, and activation of caspase cascade in both human tumor (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) cells. These investigations might help in further understanding of the antitumor properties of Amblyomin-X. PMID:27015684

  7. Diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma based on combined measurement of multiple serum tumor markers using artificial neural network analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yingchi; Chen Hui; Wang Dong; Luo Wei; Zhu Biyun; Zhang Zhongtao

    2014-01-01

    Background Artificial neural network (ANN) has demonstrated the ability to assimilate information from multiple sources to enable the detection of subtle and complex patterns.In this reseamh,we evaluated an ANN model in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer using multiple serum markers.Methods In this retrospective analysis,913 serum specimens collected at the Department of General Surgery of Beijing Friendship Hospital were analyzed for carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9),carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125),and caminoembryonic antigen (CEA).The three tumor marker values were used as inputs into an ANN and randomized into a training set of 658 (70.31% were malignant) and a test set of the remaining 255 samples (70.69% were malignant).The samples were also evaluated using a Logistic regression (LR) model.Results The ANN-derived composite index was superior to each of the serum tumor markers alone and the Logistic regression model.The areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) was 0.905 (95% confidence Interval (CI) 0.868-0.942) for ANN,0.812 (95% CI 0.762-0.863) for the Logistic regression model,0.845 (95% CI 0.798-0.893)for CA19-9,0.795 (95% CI 0.738-0.851) for CA125,and 0.800 (95% Cl 0.746-0.854) for CEA.ANN analysis of multiple markers yielded a high level of diagnostic accuracy (83.53%) compared to LR (74.90%).Conclusion The performance of ANN model in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is better than the single tumor marker and LR model.

  8. Recapitulation of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Human Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I (MEN1) Syndrome via Pdx1-directed Inactivation of Men1

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, H.-C. Jennifer; He, Mei; Powell, Anathea; Adem, Asha; Lorang, Dominique; Heller, Charles; Grover, Amelia C; Ylaya, Kris; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Marx, Stephen J.; Spiegel, Allen M.; Libutti, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal syndrome caused by mutations in the MEN1 tumor suppressor gene. While the protein product of MEN1, menin, is ubiquitously expressed, somatic loss of the remaining wildtype MEN1 allele results in tumors primarily in parathyroid, pituitary, and endocrine pancreas. To understand the endocrine specificity of the MEN1 syndrome, we evaluated biallelic loss of Men1 by inactivating Men1 in pancreatic progenitor cells utilizing the Cre-lox sys...

  9. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevey, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dobos, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Vago, A. [Central Lab., National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Head and Neck Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Doeme, B. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tovari, J. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); 1. Inst. of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPO{alpha} on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPO{alpha} at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPO{alpha} on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1{alpha} expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPO{alpha} and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPO{alpha} treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPO{alpha} administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPO{alpha} treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 {+-} 4.7 mg and 34.9 {+-} 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPO{alpha} treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  10. Pancreatic necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic necrosis is a possible complication of acute pancreatitis. It is characterized by diffuse inflammation associated with exudation or leakage of pancreatic juice with its proteolytic enzymes into the peripancreatic tissues. Colonic complications of acute pancreatitis are uncommon events. Tha main purpose of our study was to correlate radiological findings of pancreatic necrosis as observed during barium enema to CT patterns. A retrospective study was therefore carried out on 40 patients affected with acute pancreatitis with local and systemic complication. The analysis of the results allowed different patterns to be observed, with the two techniques, in the acute and in the chronich phases. In the acute phase, barium enema of the colon showed inflammatory extrinsic processes involving the wall, with a typical localization related to the spread of pancreatic enzymes along mesenteric pathways, as described by Meyers. CT allowed a thorough evaluation of both the pathologic process and its spatial balance. In the chronic phase, barium enema showed fibrotic trictures and fistulas. CT demonstrated pseudoeystic masses and irregular focal areas of decreased attenuation or irregular pancreatic margins. This correlation shows how an extrinsic inflammatory involvement of the colon with a characteristic tomography may help make a diagnosis and plan therapy

  11. Differences and Similarities in the Clinicopathological Features of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in China and the United States: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Ming; Tang, Laura; Qiao, Xin-Wei; Wolin, Edward; Nissen, Nicholas N; Dhall, Deepti; Chen, Jie; Shen, Lin; Chi, Yihebali; Yuan, Yao-Zong; Ben, Qi-Wen; Lv, Bin; Zhou, Ya-Ru; Bai, Chun-Mei; Chen, Jie; Song, Yu-Li; Song, Tian-Tian; Lu, Chong-Mei; Yu, Run; Chen, Yuan-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The presentation, pathology, and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) in Asian patients have not been studied in large cohorts. We hypothesized that the clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese patients might be different from those of US patients. The objectives of this study were to address whether PNETs in Chinese patients exhibit unique clinicopathological features and natural history, and can be graded and staged using the WHO/ENETS criteria. This is a retrospective review of medical records of patients with PNETs in multiple academic medical centers in China (7) and the United States (2). Tumor grading and staging were based on WHO/ENETS criteria. The clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese and US patients were compared. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to find associations between survival and patient demographics, tumor grade and stage, and other clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 977 (527 Chinese and 450 US) patients with PNETs were studied. In general, Chinese patients were younger than US patients (median age 46 vs 56 years). In Chinese patients, insulinomas were the most common (52.2%), followed by nonfunctional tumors (39.7%), whereas the order was reversed in US patients. Tumor grade distribution was similar in the 2 countries (G1: 57.5% vs 55.0%; G2: 38.5% vs 41.3%; and G3: 4.0% vs 3.7%). However, age, primary tumor size, primary tumor location, grade, and stage of subtypes of PNETs were significantly different between the 2 countries. The Chinese nonfunctional tumors were significantly larger than US ones (median size 4 vs 3 cm) and more frequently located in the head/neck region (54.9% vs 34.8%). The Chinese and US insulinomas were similar in size (median 1.5 cm) but the Chinese insulinomas relatively more frequently located in the head/neck region (48.3% vs 26.1%). Higher grade, advanced stage, metastasis, and larger primary tumor size were significantly associated with

  12. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  13. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  14. Expression analysis of MAC30 in human pancreatic cancer and tumors of the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Kayed, Hany; Kleeff, Jörg; Ding, J.; Hammer, J.; Giese, T; Zentgraf, H; Büchler, M W; Friess, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    Meningioma-associated protein, MAC30, is a protein with unknown function and cellular localization that is differentially expressed in certain malignancies. In the present study, the expression of MAC30 in a variety of normal and cancerous human gastrointestinal tissues, with special emphasis on pancreatic tissues was analyzed. Quantitative RT-PCR was utilized to compare MAC30 expression levels. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were carried ou...

  15. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase induced by EGFR/ERK activation promotes tumor growth in pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Yong, E-mail: drbiany@126.com [Department of Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 210023 (China); Yu, Yun [College of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 210023 (China); Wang, Shanshan; Li, Lin [Department of Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 210023 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Lipid metabolism is dysregulated in many human diseases including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme involved in de novo lipid biosynthesis, is significantly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and associates with tumor progression. However, limited data is available to understand underlying biological functions and clinical significance of overexpressed FASN in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, upregulated FASN was more frequently observed in PDAC tissues compared with normal pancreas in a tissue microarray. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression level of FASN resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Knockdown or inhibition of endogenous FASN decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in HPAC and AsPC-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that EGFR/ERK signaling accounts for elevated FASN expression in PDAC as ascertained by performing siRNA assays and using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Collectively, our results indicate that FASN exhibits important roles in tumor growth and EGFR/ERK pathway is responsible for upregulated expression of FASN in PDAC. - Highlights: • Increased expression of FASN indicates a poor prognosis in PDAC. • Elevated FASN favors tumor growth in PDAC in vitro. • Activation of EGFR signaling contributes to elevated FASN expression.

  16. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase induced by EGFR/ERK activation promotes tumor growth in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipid metabolism is dysregulated in many human diseases including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme involved in de novo lipid biosynthesis, is significantly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and associates with tumor progression. However, limited data is available to understand underlying biological functions and clinical significance of overexpressed FASN in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, upregulated FASN was more frequently observed in PDAC tissues compared with normal pancreas in a tissue microarray. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression level of FASN resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Knockdown or inhibition of endogenous FASN decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in HPAC and AsPC-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that EGFR/ERK signaling accounts for elevated FASN expression in PDAC as ascertained by performing siRNA assays and using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Collectively, our results indicate that FASN exhibits important roles in tumor growth and EGFR/ERK pathway is responsible for upregulated expression of FASN in PDAC. - Highlights: • Increased expression of FASN indicates a poor prognosis in PDAC. • Elevated FASN favors tumor growth in PDAC in vitro. • Activation of EGFR signaling contributes to elevated FASN expression

  17. Primary Pancreatic Tuberculosis Masquerading as a Pancreatic Tumor Leading to Whipple’s Pancreaticoduodenectomy. A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar Singh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old female presented with upper abdominal pain. Ultrasound and CECT both showed a mass in the pancreatic head and uncinate process suggestive of carcinoma of the head of the pancreas. A Whipple’s pancreaticoduodenectomy was carried out. Microscopic examination showed numerous epithelioid cell granulomas in the pancreas infiltrating the duodenal mucosa. No evidence of malignancy was seen. Acid fast bacilli were positive. The patient was started on anti-tubercular therapy. Cases of isolated pancreatic tuberculosis are very rare and can mimic pancreatic carcinoma clinically and radiologically. A differential diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis must be made in a patient presenting with a pancreatic mass and the patient must be thoroughly investigated to confirm or rule out malignancy or tuberculosis. We herein present a case of primary pancreatic tuberculosis and discuss the clinicopathological features of this condition. We have also proposed an algorithm for the management of patients presenting with a pancreatic mass and a clinical suspicion of pancreatic tuberculosis.

  18. GFRα2 prompts cell growth and chemoresistance through down-regulating tumor suppressor gene PTEN via Mir-17-5p in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiangning; Wang, Di; Zhang, Jiaqiang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Ying; Chen, Hao; Shi, Minmin; Wang, Xuelong; Shen, Baiyong; Deng, Xiaxing; Zhan, Qian; Wei, Gang; Peng, Chenghong

    2016-10-01

    Nerve growth factors and their receptors have received an increasing attention in certain cancers since they play an important role in regulating tumorigenesis, biological process and metastasis. Here we aimed at characterizing a new function of one of the subtypes of growth factor receptors (GFR), GFRα2, in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we showed that GFRα2 was up-regulated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and was positively correlated with tumor size and perineural invasion, which indicated that it may be associated with cell growth and apoptosis. Mechanically, we discovered that high GFRα2 expression level leads to PTEN inactivation via enhancing Mir-17-5p level. PMID:27400681

  19. Do Variants Associated with Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer and Type 2 Diabetes Reciprocally Affect Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lang; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the existence of shared genetic susceptibility is largely unknown. We evaluated whether any reported genetic risk variants of either disease found by genome-wide association studies reciprocally confer susceptibility. Methods Data that were generated in previous genome-wide association studies (GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes; PanScan) were obtained through the National Institutes of Health database of Genotypes...

  20. FACTORS AFFECTING REMOVAL AND PROGNOSIS OF THYMIC TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志庸; 戈烽; 李单青; 李泽坚; 孙成孚; 徐乐天; 张世农

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and ten cases of thymic tumors were intervened surgically, including 92 thymoma, 8 thymie earcinoid, and 10 thymic carcinoma. In this series, 50. 9 % of the cases were complicated with various syndromes, 44. 5 % with myasthenia gravis (MG). Resection rate was correlated with the size and invasion of the tumor. There was significant difference in resection rate among thymoma, thymic carcinoid and thymic carcinoma. The degree of invasiorl undoubtely influenced on resection. The 3-, 5- and 10- year suvival rate of the thymoma were 82. 7 %, 68. 1 % and 40. 0 %, respectively. The prognosis depended on the pathoioglcal classification and the severity of the neighbouring invasion, but MG had no sianificant effect on prognosis. Recurrence and metastasis of the tumor were the main cause of late death.

  1. Assessment of different 3D culture systems to study tumor phenotype and chemosensitivity in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeberg, Katrine; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Greco, Maria Raffaella; Saccomano, Mara; Nøhr-Nielsen, Asbjørn; Alves, Frauke; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly malignant disease with a very poor prognosis, due to the influence of the tumor stroma, which promotes tumor growth, early invasion and chemoradiation resistance. Efforts to develop models for identifying novel anticancer therapeutic compounds have been hampered by the limited ability of in vitro models to mimic these in vivo tumor-stroma interactions. This has led to the development of various three-dimensional (3D) culture platforms recapitulating the in vivo tumor-stroma crosstalk and designed to better understand basic cancer processes and screen drug action. However, a consensus for different experimental 3D platforms is still missing in PDAC. We compared four PDAC cell lines of different malignancy grown in 2D monolayers to three of the more commonly used 3D techniques (ultralow adhesion concave microwells, Matrigel inclusion and organotypic systems) and to tumors derived from their orthotopic implantation in mice. In these 3D platforms, we observed that cells grow with very different tumor morphologies and the organotypic setting most closely resembles the tumor cytoarchitecture obtained by orthotopically implanting the four cell lines in mice. We then analyzed the molecular and cellular responses of one of these cell lines to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) stimulation with EGF and inhibition with erlotinib and found that only in the 3D platforms, and especially the organotypic, cells: i) responded to EGF by changing the expression of signalling components underlying cell-stroma crosstalk and tissue architecture, growth, invasion and drug resistance (E-cadherin, EGFR, ezrin, β1 integrin, NHERF1 and HIF-1α) similar to those reported in vivo; ii) had stimulated growth and increased erlotinib sensitivity in response to EGF, more faithfully mimicking their known in vivo behaviour. Altogether, these results, indicate the organotypic as the most relevant physiological 3D system to study the

  2. The effectiveness of 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy for transplantation tumor of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice: an experiment in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the effectiveness and therapeutic mechanism of 125I interstitial brachytherapy for transplantation tumor of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice. Methods: The human pancreatic cell line Sw1990 was subcutaneously injected into the right lower limb partially dorsal area next to the groin of the immunodeficient BABL /c nude mice. The tumor was removed and cut into small pieces after it was formed,then the tumor pieces were inoculated in nude mice. The tumor developed to 8-10 mm in size after six weeks. A total of 16 nude mice with the suitable tumor size were used in this study. The 16 experimental mice were randomly and equally divided into two groups. The mice in study group (n = 8) were implanted with 125I seeds, while the mice in control group (n = 8) were implanted with ghost seeds. After the implantation both the long and short diameter of the tumors as well as the mouse body weight were measured every 4 days. The tumor weight was measured when the mouse was sacrificed. The paraffin-embedded samples were sent for histopathological examination. Apoptotic cells were checked with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was detected with immuno-histochemical staining. Results: The tumor grew slowly in the study group, but rapidly in the control group. The tumor weight in the study group and the control group was (2.68 ± 0.70)g and (4.68 ± 1.45)g, respectively, the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.021). The tumor inhibition rate was about 42.66%. No significant difference in body weight of nude mice existed between two groups both before and after the treatment (P > 0.05). Marked tumor necrosis was seen in study group, but no obvious, or only a little, tumor necrosis could be observed in the control group. The apoptotic index checked with the TUENL method in the study group and control group was (23.2 ± 1.9)% and

  3. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors can affect a person’s chance of getting cancer of the pancreas. Most of these are risk factors for exocrine ... Chronic pancreatitis, a long-term inflammation of the pancreas, is linked with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (especially in smokers), but most people with pancreatitis ...

  5. Formation of the tetraploid intermediate is associated with the development of cells with more than four centrioles in the elastase-simian virus 40 tumor antigen transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The development of pancreatic cancer in transgenic mice expressing the simian virus 40 tumor antigen placed under controlling regions of the elastase I gene is characterized by the sequential appearance of tetraploid and then multiple aneuploid cell populations. Pancreatic tissues from such transgenic mice were studied between 8 and 32 days of age. Virtually 100% of acinar cell nuclei had immunohistochemically detectable tumor antigen by 18 days. Tetraploid cells were demonstrated by DNA cont...

  6. Piperlongumine Suppresses Growth and Sensitizes Pancreatic Tumors to Gemcitabine in a Xenograft Mouse Model by Modulating the NF-kappa B Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongwei; Wu, Xiangsong; Zhou, Yinan; Jiang, Hongchi; Pan, Shangha; Sun, Bei

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy, which generally respond poorly to chemotherapy. Hence, novel agents that are safe and effective are highly needed. The aim of this study was to investigate whether piperlongumine, a natural product isolated from the fruit of the pepper Piper longum, has any efficacy against human pancreatic cancer when used either alone or in combination with gemcitabine in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In vitro, piperlongumine inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines, potentiated the apoptotic effects of gemcitabine, inhibited the constitutive and inducible activation of NF-κB, and suppressed the NF-κB-regulated expression of c-Myc, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Survivin, XIAP, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Furthermore, in an in vivo xenograft model, we found piperlongumine alone significantly suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the antitumor properties of gemcitabine. These results were consistent with the downregulation of NF-κB activity and its target genes, decreased proliferation (PCNA and Ki-67), decreased microvessel density (CD31), and increased apoptosis (TUNEL) in tumor remnants. Collectively, our results suggest that piperlongumine alone exhibits significant antitumor effects against human pancreatic cancer and it further enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine, possibly through the modulation of NF-κB- and NF-κB-regulated gene products. PMID:26667450

  7. Fusion of cell-penetrating peptides to thermally responsive biopolymer improves tumor accumulation of p21 peptide in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker LR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Leslie R Walker,1 Jung Su Ryu,1 Eddie Perkins,2 Lacey R McNally,3 Drazen Raucher1 1Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USAAbstract: Current therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are limited. The limitations of this type of treatment are abundant. The majority of chemotherapeutic agents used in clinics are highly toxic to both tumor cells and normal tissues due to the lack of specificity. Resistance can develop due to overexposure of these agents. To address these issues, these agents must be made more exclusive toward the tumor site. We have developed a macromolecular carrier based on the sequence of the biopolymer elastin-like polypeptide (ELP that is able to aggregate upon reaching the externally heated tumor environment. This carrier is specific to the tumor as it only aggregates at the heated tumor site. ELP is soluble below its transition temperature but will aggregate when the temperature is raised above its transition temperature. ELP was modified by p21, a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, and the addition of Bac, a cell-penetrating peptide with nuclear localization capabilities. In this study, p21-ELP-Bac and its control, ELP-p21, were used in cell proliferation studies using the pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, MiaPaca-2, and S2013. ELP-p21 had little effect on proliferation, while the half maximal inhibitory concentration of p21-ELP-Bac was ~30 µM. As translocation across the plasma membrane is a limiting step for delivery of macromolecules, these polypeptides were utilized in a pancreatic xenograft model to study the plasma clearance, biodistribution, tumor accumulation, and tumor reduction capabilities of the polypeptide with and without a cell-penetrating peptide.Keywords: elastin-like polypeptide, peptide, targeted drug delivery, macromolecule

  8. Interfractional Position Variation of Pancreatic Tumors Quantified Using Intratumoral Fiducial Markers and Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, Astrid van der, E-mail: a.vanderhorst@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wognum, Silvia; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Jong, Rianne de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Fockens, Paul [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional pancreatic position variation using fiducial markers visible on daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In addition, we analyzed possible migration of the markers to investigate their suitability for tumor localization. Methods and Materials: For 13 pancreatic cancer patients with implanted Visicoil markers, CBCT scans were obtained before 17 to 25 fractions (300 CBCTs in total). Image registration with the reference CT was used to determine the displacement of the 2 to 3 markers relative to bony anatomy and to each other. We analyzed the distance between marker pairs as a function of time to identify marker registration error (SD of linear fit residuals) and possible marker migration. For each patient, we determined the mean displacement of markers relative to the reference CT (systematic position error) and the spread in displacements (random position error). From this, we calculated the group systematic error, Σ, and group random error, σ. Results: Marker pair distances showed slight trends with time (range, −0.14 to 0.14 mm/day), possibly due to tissue deformation, but no shifts that would indicate marker migration. The mean SD of the fit residuals was 0.8 mm. We found large interfractional position variations, with for 116 of 300 (39%) fractions a 3-dimensional vector displacement of >10 mm. The spread in displacement varied significantly (P<.01) between patients, from a vector range of 9.1 mm to one of 24.6 mm. For the patient group, Σ was 3.8, 6.6, and 3.5 mm; and σ was 3.6, 4.7 and 2.5 mm, in left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior directions, respectively. Conclusions: We found large systematic displacements of the fiducial markers relative to bony anatomy, in addition to wide distributions of displacement. These results for interfractional position variation confirm the potential benefit of using fiducial markers rather than bony anatomy for daily online

  9. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Orange, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.

  10. Interfractional Position Variation of Pancreatic Tumors Quantified Using Intratumoral Fiducial Markers and Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional pancreatic position variation using fiducial markers visible on daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In addition, we analyzed possible migration of the markers to investigate their suitability for tumor localization. Methods and Materials: For 13 pancreatic cancer patients with implanted Visicoil markers, CBCT scans were obtained before 17 to 25 fractions (300 CBCTs in total). Image registration with the reference CT was used to determine the displacement of the 2 to 3 markers relative to bony anatomy and to each other. We analyzed the distance between marker pairs as a function of time to identify marker registration error (SD of linear fit residuals) and possible marker migration. For each patient, we determined the mean displacement of markers relative to the reference CT (systematic position error) and the spread in displacements (random position error). From this, we calculated the group systematic error, Σ, and group random error, σ. Results: Marker pair distances showed slight trends with time (range, −0.14 to 0.14 mm/day), possibly due to tissue deformation, but no shifts that would indicate marker migration. The mean SD of the fit residuals was 0.8 mm. We found large interfractional position variations, with for 116 of 300 (39%) fractions a 3-dimensional vector displacement of >10 mm. The spread in displacement varied significantly (P<.01) between patients, from a vector range of 9.1 mm to one of 24.6 mm. For the patient group, Σ was 3.8, 6.6, and 3.5 mm; and σ was 3.6, 4.7 and 2.5 mm, in left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior directions, respectively. Conclusions: We found large systematic displacements of the fiducial markers relative to bony anatomy, in addition to wide distributions of displacement. These results for interfractional position variation confirm the potential benefit of using fiducial markers rather than bony anatomy for daily online

  11. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments

  12. [Somatostatin-producing endocrine pancreatic tumor in Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis. Case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurenmann, P; Binswanger, R; Maurer, R; Stamm, B; Hegglin, J

    1987-07-25

    Somatostatin-producing tumors of the pancreas were first described in 1977. In 1983 a syndrome involving multiple endocrine neoplasias (MEN) was named type III A. This syndrome consists of carcinoid of the duodenum, often producing somatostatin, and von Recklinghausen's disease (neurofibromatosis) or pheochromocytoma. The case is reported of a 62-year-old man with familial neurofibromatosis and a tumor of the head of the pancreas spreading into pars II of the duodenum. After Whipple's duodenopancreatectomy the patient exhibited no further symptoms. Immunohistochemistry served to prove the production of somatostatin and small amounts of calcitonin in the tumor. PMID:2890200

  13. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistanc...

  14. Favorable outcome of patients affected by rhabdoid tumors due to rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome (RTPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordes, Uwe; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Modena, Piergiorgio; Massimino, Maura; Biassoni, Veronica; Reinhard, Harald; Hasselblatt, Martin; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Frühwald, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome is usually associated with shorter survival in patients with malignant rhabdoid tumors regardless of anatomical origin. Here we present four children harboring truncating heterozygous SMARCB1/INI1 germline mutations with favorable outcome. All four patients received multi-modality treatment, three according to therapeutic recommendations by the EU-RHAB registry, two without radiotherapy, and mean event-free survival accounts for 7 years. In conclusion, intensive treatment with curative intent is justified for children with rhabdoid tumors even if an underlying rhabdoid predisposition syndrome is demonstrated. PMID:24123847

  15. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Max Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis.

  16. Multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumor affecting amygdala and hippocampus: A quasi-tumor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Maki; Komori, Takashi; Nakata, Yasuhiro; Yagishita, Akira; Morino, Michiharu; Isozaki, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumors (MVNT) have been referred to as distinctive neuronal tumors whose characteristic features include multiple nodules localized in the subcortical white matter. MVNT are composed of vacuolating dysplastic neurons reactive to HuC/HuD. A significant overexpression of alpha-internexin (INA) limited to the stroma of nodules was reported in one tumor. Since genetic analyses have failed to demonstrate any consistent alterations, the nosological position as well as the nature of MVNT, namely, neoplastic or dysplastic, remains unclear. We herein present another example of MVNT involving the amygdala and anterior hippocampus in a 41-year-old man. In addition to the nodular lesions described earlier, we found INA-positive ribbon-like lesions that replaced neuropil and extended along the hippocampal gray matter. We also identified dysplastic neurons infiltrating into the CA4 hilus of the hippocampus. Intense INA expression was present in the stroma as well as the cytoplasmic membrane of dysplastic neurons and their processes. While the invasiveness suggested a neoplasm, a relatively restrictive, either nodular or ribbon-like growth pattern with INA-positive abnormal neuropil suggested a hamartoma. Such quasi-tumors should be accommodated in the World Health Organization classification of tumors of the central nervous system, as are dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor and Lhermitte-Duclos disease. PMID:26644357

  17. Magnetic resonance-guided regional gene delivery strategy using a tumor stroma-permeable nanocarrier for pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Qingbing Wang,1,2 Jianfeng Li,3 Sai An,3 Yi Chen,1 Chen Jiang,3 Xiaolin Wang1,2 1Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, 3Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Gene therapy is a very promising technology for treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. However, its application has been limited by the abundant stromal response in the tumor microenvironment. The aim of this study was to prepare a dendrimer-based gene-free loading vector with high permeability in the tumor stroma and explore an imaging-guided local gene delivery strategy for PDAC to promote the efficiency of targeted gene delivery.Methods: The experimental protocol was approved by the animal ethics committee of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University. Third-generation dendrigraft poly-L-lysines was selected as the nanocarrier scaffold, which was modified by cell-penetrating peptides and gadolinium (Gd chelates. DNA plasmids were loaded with these nanocarriers via electrostatic interaction. The cellular uptake and loaded gene expression were examined in MIA PaCa-2 cell lines in vitro. Permeability of the nanoparticles in the tumor stroma and transfected gene distribution in vivo were studied using a magnetic resonance imaging-guided delivery strategy in an orthotopic nude mouse model of PDAC.Results: The nanocarriers were synthesized with a dendrigraft poly-L-lysine to polyethylene glycol to DTPA ratio of 1:3.4:8.3 and a mean diameter of 110.9±7.7 nm. The luciferases were strictly expressed in the tumor, and the luminescence intensity in mice treated by Gd-DPT/plasmid luciferase (1.04×104±9.75×102 p/s/cm2/sr was significantly (P<0.05 higher than in those treated with Gd-DTPA (9.56×102±6.15×10 p/s/cm2/sr and Gd-DP (5.75×103± 7.45×102 p/s/cm2/sr

  18. Near infra-red photoimmunotherapy with anti-CEA-IR700 results in extensive tumor lysis and a significant decrease in tumor burden in orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A Maawy

    Full Text Available Photoimmunotherapy (PIT of cancer utilizes tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies conjugated to a photosensitizer phthalocyanine dye IR700 which becomes cytotoxic upon irradiation with near infrared light. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PIT on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo in an orthotopic nude mouse model. The binding capacity of anti-CEA antibody to BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cells was determined by FACS analysis. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay was used to determine cell death following treatment with PIT. For in vivo determination of PIT efficacy, nude mice were orthotopically implanted with BxPC-3 pancreatic tumors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. After tumor engraftment, the mice were divided into two groups: (1 treatment with anti-CEA-IR700 + 690 nm laser and (2 treatment with 690 nm laser only. Anti-CEA-IR700 (100 μg was administered to group (1 via tail vein injection 24 hours prior to therapy. Tumors were then surgically exposed and treated with phototherapy at an intensity of 150 mW/cm2 for 30 minutes. Whole body imaging was done subsequently for 5 weeks using an OV-100 small animal imaging system. Anti-CEA-IR700 antibody bound to the BxPC3 cells to a high degree as shown by FACS analysis. Anti-CEA-IR700 caused extensive cancer cell killing after light activation compared to control cells in cytotoxicity assays. In the orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer, the anti-CEA-IR700 group had significantly smaller tumors than the control after 5 weeks (p<0.001. There was no significant difference in the body weights of mice in the anti-CEA-IR700 and control groups indicating that PIT was well tolerated by the mice.

  19. Unusual case of pancreatic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor associated with spontaneous splenic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Fadi K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous splenic rupture considered a relatively rare but life threatening. The three commonest causes of spontaneous splenic rupture are malignant hematological diseases, viral infections and local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders. We describe a unique and unusual case of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the tail of pancreas presented with massively enlarged spleen and spontaneous splenic rupture. Case presentation A 19 years old male patient with no significant past medical history presented to emergency room with abdominal pain and fatigue. Massively enlarged spleen was detected. Hypotension and rapid reduction of hemoglobin level necessitated urgent laparatomy. About 1.75 liters of blood were found in abdominal cavity. A large tumor arising from the tail of pancreas and local rupture of an enlarged spleen adjacent to the tumor were detected. Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. To our knowledge, we report the first case of massively enlarged spleen that was complicated with spontaneous splenic rupture as a result of splenic congestion due to mechanical obstruction caused by an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the tail of pancreas. A review of the literature is also presented. Conclusion Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the tail of pancreas should be included in the differential diagnosis of the etiological causes of massively enlarged spleen and spontaneous splenic rupture.

  20. Vasohibin-1 Expression Is Regulated by Transforming Growth Factor-β/Bone Morphogenic Protein Signaling Pathway Between Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppänen, Hanna; Kauttu, Tuuli; Vainionpää, Sanna; Ye, Yingjiang; Mustonen, Harri

    2013-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 has been detected in endothelial cells as an intrinsic angiogenesis inhibitor. Both tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling have been reported to promote angiogenesis in cancer. However, whether vasohibin-1 expression is regulated by TGF-β/BMP signaling between TAMs and cancer cells remains unclear. The expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, BMP-4, and BMP-7 in TAMs and the expression of vasohibin-1, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and VEGF-C in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (a nonmetastatic cell line Panc-1 and a distant metastatic cell line HPAF-II) were measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The TGF-β receptor 1 and BMP receptor 1 were inhibited by the inhibitor SB-431542 and LDN193189, respectively. Thereafter, vasohibin-1, VEGF-A, and VEGF-C expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR. We found that the expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, BMP-4, and BMP-7 was upregulated in TAMs cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells. Vasohibin-1, VEGF-A, and VEGF-C mRNA expression in pancreatic cancer cells was upregulated by TAMs. Vasohibin-1 expression in pancreatic cancer cells cocultured with TAMs was upregulated significantly when TGF-β receptors or BMP receptors were inhibited, but VEGF-C expression was downregulated. Therefore, Vasohibin-1 expression is regulated by the TGF-β/BMP signaling between TAMs and pancreatic cancer cells. These results might shed a new light on the antiangiogenesis therapy in the pancreatic cancer. PMID:23651239

  1. K-Ras mutation detection in liquid biopsy and tumor tissue as prognostic biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Yuanting; Sun, Hong; Zhuang, Rongyuan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Tianshu; Cai, Weimin

    2016-07-01

    K-Ras gene mutations have been found in most pancreatic cancers; however, conflicting data on the prognostic value of K-Ras mutations in pancreatic cancer have been published. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess its prognostic significance. Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Google Scholar were performed through December 2015 to identify publications exploring the association of K-Ras mutation with overall survival. Forty eligible studies involving 3427 patients with pancreatic cancer were included in the present meta-analysis. Our analysis showed a hazard ratio (HR) of negative association with survival of 1.61 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.90; p < 0.01] in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer patients. In subgroup analyses, K-Ras mutations detected in tumor tissues and in liquid biopsies had HRs of 1.37 (95 % CI 1.20-1.57; p < 0.01) and 3.16 (95 % CI 2.1-4.71; p < 0.01), respectively. In addition, the HR was higher when K-Ras mutations were detected in fresh frozen samples (HR = 2.01, 95 % CI 1.28-3.16, p = 0.002) than in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (HR = 1.29, 95 % CI 1.12-1.49, p < 0.01). Though K-Ras alterations are more frequent among non-East Asian individuals than East Asian individuals, there were no significant differences in HRs of survival between the two ethnic subgroups. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that K-Ras mutations are associated with a worse overall survival in pancreatic cancer patients, especially when mutations are detected in liquid biopsies or fresh frozen tumor tissue samples. PMID:27225938

  2. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Is a Critical Step in Tumorgenesis of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transcription factors Snail, Slug and Twist repress E-cadherin and induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process exploited by invasive cancer cells. In this study, we evaluated the role of EMT in the tumorgenesis of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PNETs) in vitro, in vivo and human tumor specimen. Expression of EMT markers was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. For in vitro studies, BON-1 cells were analyzed regarding expression of EMT markers before and after transfection with siRNA against Slug or Snail, and cell aggregation assays were performed. To asses in vivo effects, Rip1Tag2 mice were treated with vehicle or the snail-inhibitor polythlylenglykol from week 5-10 of age. The resected pancreata were evaluated by weight, tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Snail and Twist was expressed in 61 % and 64% of PNETs. This was associated with loss of E-cadherin. RT-PCR revealed conservation of the EMT markers Slug and Snail in BON-1 cells. Transfection with siRNA against Slug was associated with upregulation of E-cadherin, enhanced cell-cell adhesion and inhibition of cell proliferation. Snail-inhibition in vivo by PEG was associated with increased apoptosis, decreased tumor cell proliferation and dramatic reduced tumor volume in Rip1Tag2 mice. The presented data show that EMT plays a key role in tumorgenesis of PNETs. The activation of Snail in a considerable subset of human PNETs and the successful effect of Snail inhibition by PEG in islet cell tumors of transgenic mice provides first evidence of Snail as a drug target in PNETs

  3. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Is a Critical Step in Tumorgenesis of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendrich, Volker, E-mail: fendrich@med.uni-marburg.de; Maschuw, Katja; Waldmann, Jens [Department of Surgery, Philipps University Marburg, Baldingerstraße, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Buchholz, Malte [Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, Philipps-University Marburg, Baldingerstraße, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Rehm, Johannes [Department of Surgery, Philipps University Marburg, Baldingerstraße, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Gress, Thomas M. [Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, Philipps-University Marburg, Baldingerstraße, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Bartsch, Detlef K. [Department of Surgery, Philipps University Marburg, Baldingerstraße, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); König, Alexander [Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, Philipps-University Marburg, Baldingerstraße, Marburg D-35043 (Germany)

    2012-03-08

    The transcription factors Snail, Slug and Twist repress E-cadherin and induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process exploited by invasive cancer cells. In this study, we evaluated the role of EMT in the tumorgenesis of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PNETs) in vitro, in vivo and human tumor specimen. Expression of EMT markers was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. For in vitro studies, BON-1 cells were analyzed regarding expression of EMT markers before and after transfection with siRNA against Slug or Snail, and cell aggregation assays were performed. To asses in vivo effects, Rip1Tag2 mice were treated with vehicle or the snail-inhibitor polythlylenglykol from week 5-10 of age. The resected pancreata were evaluated by weight, tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Snail and Twist was expressed in 61 % and 64% of PNETs. This was associated with loss of E-cadherin. RT-PCR revealed conservation of the EMT markers Slug and Snail in BON-1 cells. Transfection with siRNA against Slug was associated with upregulation of E-cadherin, enhanced cell-cell adhesion and inhibition of cell proliferation. Snail-inhibition in vivo by PEG was associated with increased apoptosis, decreased tumor cell proliferation and dramatic reduced tumor volume in Rip1Tag2 mice. The presented data show that EMT plays a key role in tumorgenesis of PNETs. The activation of Snail in a considerable subset of human PNETs and the successful effect of Snail inhibition by PEG in islet cell tumors of transgenic mice provides first evidence of Snail as a drug target in PNETs.

  4. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Is a Critical Step in Tumorgenesis of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander König

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factors Snail, Slug and Twist repress E-cadherin and induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process exploited by invasive cancer cells. In this study, we evaluated the role of EMT in the tumorgenesis of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PNETs in vitro, in vivo and human tumor specimen. Expression of EMT markers was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. For in vitro studies, BON-1 cells were analyzed regarding expression of EMT markers before and after transfection with siRNA against Slug or Snail, and cell aggregation assays were performed. To asses in vivo effects, Rip1Tag2 mice were treated with vehicle or the snail-inhibitor polythlylenglykol from week 5-10 of age. The resected pancreata were evaluated by weight, tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Snail and Twist was expressed in 61 % and 64% of PNETs. This was associated with loss of E-cadherin. RT-PCR revealed conservation of the EMT markers Slug and Snail in BON-1 cells. Transfection with siRNA against Slug was associated with upregulation of E-cadherin, enhanced cell-cell adhesion and inhibition of cell proliferation. Snail-inhibition in vivo by PEG was associated with increased apoptosis, decreased tumor cell proliferation and dramatic reduced tumor volume in Rip1Tag2 mice. The presented data show that EMT plays a key role in tumorgenesis of PNETs. The activation of Snail in a considerable subset of human PNETs and the successful effect of Snail inhibition by PEG in islet cell tumors of transgenic mice provides first evidence of Snail as a drug target in PNETs.

  5. Why the Incidence of Post-ERCP Pancreatitis Varies Considerably? Factors Affecting the Diagnosis and the Incidence of This Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testoni PA

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The reported incidence of post-ERCP/sphincterotomy pancreatitis ranges between 1.3 and 24.4% in non-selected series. This varying incidence likely reflects on the one hand difference in patient populations, indications and endoscopic expertise and, on the other hand, different definitions of pancreatitis and methods of data collection. Among a number of patient-related factors recognized at risk for post-ERCP pancreatitis in four recent large prospective studies, the combination of female gender, normal serum bilirubin levels and recurrent abdominal pain suggesting sphincter of Oddi dysfunction and previous post-ERCP pancreatitis placed patients at an increasingly higher risk of pancreatitis. Among the technique-related risk factors for post-ERCP pancreatitis, biliary sphincter balloon dilation, difficult cannulation, sphincter of Oddi manometry and pancreatic sphincterotomy have also been recognized as significant risk factors. However, since the case mix in non-selected series does not significantly differ in the different studies, it is logical to assume that the different criteria adopted for defining the post-ERCP pancreatitis play a key role in the reported wide variation of incidence reported for this complication. The occurrence and duration of pain and the amplitude of serum amylase after ERCP are critical points in the definition of post-ERCP pancreatitis. Although a consensus conference identified 24-hour persisting pain associated with hyperamylasemia greater than 3 times the upper reference limit as an indicator of pancreatitis, these two parameters are however considered in a different manner in the studies available up to now. In a prospective study where we calculated the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis by using the most widely used criteria, for both occurrence and duration of pancreatic pain and serum amylase amplitude, the incidence of post-procedure pancreatitis ranged from 1.9 to 11.7% depending on the criteria adopted.

  6. Does Tumor Depth Affect Nodal Upstaging in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkureishi, Lee; Ross, Gary; Shoaib, Taimur;

    2007-01-01

    stage according to TNM classification (P < .001). Tumor depth greater than 4 mm appears to be the most appropriate cutoff for risk stratification, although tumors in the oropharynx may require a lower value. CONCLUSION:: Tumor depth is an important prognostic factor for patients with SCC of the oral......PURPOSE:: The aim of this study was to determine whether tumor depth affects upstaging of the clinically node-negative neck, as determined by sentinel lymph node biopsy with full pathologic evaluation of harvested nodes including step-serial sectioning (SSS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). PATIENTS......-eosin staining, SSS, and IHC. Patients upstaged by SSS/IHC were denoted pN1mi. RESULTS:: One hundred one of 172 patients were staged pN0, with 71 (41%) patients upstaged. Increasing tumor depth was associated with higher likelihood of upstaging (P < .001). Tumor depth showed a positive correlation with nodal...

  7. Factors affecting radiation injury after interstitial brachytherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of brachytherapy on normal brain tissue are not easily delineated in the clinical setting because of the presence of concurrent radiation-induced changes in the coexistent brain tumor. Sequential morphologic studies performed after the implantation of radioactive sources into the brains of experimental animals have provided a better understanding of the character and magnitude of the structural changes produced by interstitial irradiation on normal brain tissue. Furthermore, the clinical experience accumulated thus far provides not only relevant information, but also some guidelines for future treatment policies. In this paper, the authors summarize the experimental findings and review the pathologic and clinical features of brain injury caused by interstitial brachytherapy. A number of studies in the older literature examined the effects of radioisotopes such as radium-226 (38--43), radon-22 (44--46), gold-198 (29,47--50), tantalum-182 (29,51,52) yttrium-9- (50,53,54), and cobalt-60 (29,50,55). This review is restricted to low- and high-activity encapsulated iodine-125 (125I) and iridium-192 (192Ir), the isotopes that are most commonly used in current clinical practice

  8. Loss of stromal JUNB does not affect tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jennifer; Strittmatter, Karin; Nübel, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Sator-Schmitt, Melanie; Bäuerle, Tobias; Angel, Peter; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina

    2014-03-15

    The transcription factor AP-1 subunit JUNB has been shown to play a pivotal role in angiogenesis. It positively controls angiogenesis by regulating Vegfa as well as the transcriptional regulator Cbfb and its target Mmp13. In line with these findings, it has been demonstrated that tumor cell-derived JUNB promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis. In contrast to JUNB's function in tumor cells, the role of host-derived stromal JUNB has not been elucidated so far. Here, we show that ablation of Junb in stromal cells including endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts does not affect tumor growth in two different syngeneic mouse models, the B16-F1 melanoma and the Lewis lung carcinoma model. In-depth analyses of the tumors revealed that tumor angiogenesis remains unaffected as assessed by measurements of the microvascular density and relative blood volume in the tumor. Furthermore, we could show that the maturation status of the tumor vasculature, analyzed by the SMC marker expression, α-smooth muscle actin and Desmin, as well as the attachment of pericytes to the endothelium, is not changed upon ablation of Junb. Taken together, these results indicate that the pro-angiogenic functions of stromal JUNB are well compensated with regard to tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:24027048

  9. β2-AR-HIF-1α: A Novel Regulatory Axis for Stress-Induced Pancreatic Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, T.; J. MA; Ma, Q; Guo, K.; Guo, J.; Li, X; Li, W; Liu, J; Huang, C; Wang, F.; Wu, E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic stress in a negative social and psychological state plays a critical role in pancreatic cancer development and progression. In this study, we created a new stress model system to determine the effects of chronic stress on pancreatic cancer progression. Here, we show that chronic stress not only causes depression in mice, most likely attributed to an elevated level of epinephrine, but also induces pancreatic cancer progression. ...

  10. Molecular mechanism of pancreatic tumor metastasis inhibition by Gd@C82(OH)22 and its implication for de novo design of nanomedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. -g.; Zhou, G.; Yang, P.; Liu, Y.; Sun, B.; Huynh, T.; Meng, H.; Zhao, L.; Xing, G.; Chen, C.; Zhao, Y.; Zhou, R.

    2012-09-18

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most lethal of the solid tumors and the fourth-leading cause of cancer-related death in North America. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have long been targeted as a potential anticancer therapy because of their seminal role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation of tumor survival and invasion. However, the inhibition specificity to MMPs and the molecular-level understanding of the inhibition mechanism remain largely unresolved. Here, we found that endohedral metallofullerenol Gd@C82(OH)22 can successfully inhibit the neoplastic activity with experiments at animal, tissue, and cellular levels. Gd@C82(OH)22 effectively blocks tumor growth in human pancreatic cancer xenografts in a nude mouse model. Enzyme activity assays also show Gd@C82(OH)22 not only suppresses the expression of MMPs but also significantly reduces their activities. We then applied large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations to illustrate the molecular mechanism by studying the Gd@C82(OH)22–MMP-9 interactions in atomic detail. Our data demonstrated that Gd@C82(OH)22 inhibits MMP-9 mainly via an exocite interaction, whereas the well-known zinc catalytic site only plays a minimal role. Steered by nonspecific electrostatic, hydrophobic, and specific hydrogen-bonding interactions, Gd@C82(OH)22 exhibits specific binding modes near the ligand-specificity loop S1', thereby inhibiting MMP-9 activity. Both the suppression of MMP expression and specific binding mode make Gd@C82(OH)22 a potentially more effective nanomedicine for pancreatic cancer than traditional medicines, which usually target the proteolytic sites directly but fail in selective inhibition. Finally, our findings provide insights for de novo design of nanomedicines for fatal diseases such as pancreatic cancer.

  11. More Accurate Prediction of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Patients' Survival with Prognostic Model Using Both Host Immunity and Tumor Metabolic Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younak Choi

    Full Text Available Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR and standard uptake value (SUV by 18F-FDG PET represent host immunity and tumor metabolic activity, respectively. We investigated NLR and maximum SUV (SUVmax as prognostic markers in metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC patients who receive palliative chemotherapy.We reviewed 396 MPC patients receiving palliative chemotherapy. NLR was obtained before and after the first cycle of chemotherapy. In 118 patients with PET prior to chemotherapy, SUVmax was collected. Cut-off values were determined by ROC curve.In multivariate analysis of all patients, NLR and change in NLR after the first cycle of chemotherapy (ΔNLR were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS. We scored the risk considering NLR and ΔNLR and identified 4 risk groups with different prognosis (risk score 0 vs 1 vs 2 vs 3: OS 9.7 vs 7.9 vs 5.7 vs 2.6 months, HR 1 vs 1.329 vs 2.137 vs 7.915, respectively; P<0.001. In PET cohort, NLR and SUVmax were independently prognostic for OS. Prognostication model using both NLR and SUVmax could define 4 risk groups with different OS (risk score 0 vs 1 vs 2 vs 3: OS 11.8 vs 9.8 vs 7.2 vs 4.6 months, HR 1 vs 1.536 vs 2.958 vs 5.336, respectively; P<0.001.NLR and SUVmax as simple parameters of host immunity and metabolic activity of tumor cell, respectively, are independent prognostic factors for OS in MPC patients undergoing palliative chemotherapy.

  12. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  13. A Novel Chimeric Antigen Receptor Against Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Mediates Tumor Destruction in a Humanized Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagisetty, Kiran H.; Tran, Eric; Zheng, Zhili; Gattinoni, Luca; Yu, Zhiya; Burns, William R.; Miermont, Anne M.; Teper, Yaroslav; Rudloff, Udo; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Feldman, Steven A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Despite advances in the understanding of its molecular pathophysiology, pancreatic cancer remains largely incurable, highlighting the need for novel therapies. We developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a glycoprotein that is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer starting at early stages of malignant transformation. To optimize the CAR design, we used antigen-recognition domains derived from mouse or human antibodies, and intracellular signaling domains containing one or two T cell costimulatory elements, in addition to CD3zeta. Comparing multiple constructs established that the CAR based on human monoclonal antibody Ha1-4.117 had the greatest reactivity in vitro. To further analyze this CAR, we developed a human pancreatic cancer xenograft model and adoptively transferred CAR-engineered T cells into animals with established tumors. CAR-engineered human lymphocytes induced significant antitumor activity, and unlike what has been described for other CARs, a second-generation CAR (containing CD28 cosignaling domain) induced a more potent antitumor effect than a third-generation CAR (containing CD28 and 41BB cosignaling domains). While our results provide evidence to support PSCA as a target antigen for CAR-based immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer, the expression of PSCA on selected normal tissues could be a source of limiting toxicity. PMID:24694017

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; ARAKURA, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into o...

  15. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) affects gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, LuGuang; Yano, Naohiro

    2005-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), originally identified as a hypothalamic hormone, is expressed in the pancreas. The peptide has been shown to control glycemia, although the role of TRH in the pancreas has not yet been clarified. In quiescent INS-1 cells (rat immortalized beta-cell line), 200 nM of TRH for 24 hours significantly increased insulin levels in the culture medium and in cell extracts. In studies with gene array technology where about 60% to 75% of the 1081 genes were detected, TRH significantly stimulated multiple groups of gene expressions, including G-protein-coupled receptor and related signaling, such as insulin secretion, endoplasmic reticulum traffic mechanisms, cell-cycle regulators, protein turnover factors, DNA recombination, and growth factors. Noticeably, TRH suppressed the genes of proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated protein X, Bcl-xL/ Bcl-2-associated death promoter, and Fas. The multiple gene expressions in response to TRH in pancreatic cells suggest that the changed microenvironment brought about by TRH may influence beta-cellfunction. PMID:16392621

  16. JNK pathway inhibition selectively primes pancreatic cancer stem cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis without affecting the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, P. Robyn; Kettlun, Claudia; Heinemann, Mitja L.; Ruetering, Jennifer; Vykoukal, Jody; Alt, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Successful treatment of solid cancers mandates targeting cancer stem cells (CSC) without impact on the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling has been shown to be of importance in cancer. We test whether JNK inhibition would sensitize pancreatic CSCs to induction of apoptosis via low-dose TNFα-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Design Effects of JNK inhibition (JNKi) were evaluated in vitro in functional assays, through mRNA and protein expression analysis, and in in vivo mouse studies. CSCs were enriched in anoikis-resistant spheroid culture and analyzed accordingly. Results We confirmed that the JNK pathway is an important regulatory pathway in pancreatic cancer stem cells and further found that JNK inhibition downregulates the decoy receptor DcR1 through IL-8 signaling while upregulating pro-apoptotic death receptors DR4/5, thereby sensitizing cells - even with acquired TRAIL-resistance - to apoptosis induction. Treatment of orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts with either gemcitabine, JNKi or TRAIL alone for 4 weeks showed only modest effects compared to control, while the combination of JNKi and TRAIL resulted in significantly lower tumor burden (69%; p animals. Conclusions The combination of JNKi and TRAIL significantly impacts on CSCs, but leaves regular tissue-resident stem cells unaffected – even under hypoxic stress conditions. This concept of selective treatment of pancreatic CSCs warrants further evaluation. PMID:26840266

  17. Pancreatic cancer-Pathology%胰腺癌:病理学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank Bergmann; Irene Esposito; Esther Herpel; Peter Schirmacher

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introductions Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (frequently simply being referred to as "pancreatic cancer") represents the most frequent neoplasm of the pancreas, accounting for 85% to 90% of all pancreatic tumors [1, 2].

  18. MR imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Katsuyoshi E-mail: itokatsu@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Koike, Shinji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2001-05-01

    This article presents current MR imaging techniques for the pancreas, and review a spectrum of MR imaging features of various pancreatic diseases. These include: 1) congenital anomalies such as anomalous union of pancreatobiliary ducts, divisum, and annular pancreas, 2) inflammatory diseases, including acute or chronic pancreatitis with complications, groove pancreatitis, and autoimmune pancreatitis, tumor-forming pancreatitis, 3) pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinoma, islet cell tumors, and cystic neoplasms (microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and intraductal mucin-producing pancreatic tumor). Particular attention is paid to technical advances in MR imaging of the pancreas such as fat-suppression, MR pancreatography (single- or multi-slice HASTE), and thin-section 3D multiphasic contrast-enhanced dynamic sequences. Imaging characteristics that may lead to a specific diagnosis or narrow the differential diagnosis are also discussed.

  19. 18F-FDG PET/MRI fusion in characterizing pancreatic tumors. Comparison to PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fusion was feasible in characterizing pancreatic tumors (PTs), comparing MRI and computed tomography (CT) as mapping images for fusion with PET as well as fused PET/MRI and PET/CT. We retrospectively reviewed 47 sets of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT and MRI examinations to evaluate suspected or known pancreatic cancer. To assess the ability of mapping images for fusion with PET, CT (of PET/CT), T1- and T2-weighted (w) MR images (all non-contrast) were graded regarding the visibility of PT (5-point confidence scale). Fused PET/CT, PET/T1-w or T2-w MR images of the upper abdomen were evaluated to determine whether mapping images provided additional diagnostic information to PET alone (3-point scale). The overall quality of PET/CT or PET/MRI sets in diagnosis was also assessed (3-point scale). These PET/MRI-related scores were compared to PET/CT-related scores and the accuracy in characterizing PTs was compared. Forty-three PTs were visualized on CT or MRI, including 30 with abnormal FDG uptake and 13 without. The confidence score for the visibility of PT was significantly higher on T1-w MRI than CT. The scores for additional diagnostic information to PET and overall quality of each image set in diagnosis were significantly higher on the PET/T1-w MRI set than the PET/CT set. The diagnostic accuracy was higher on PET/T1-w or PET/T2-w MRI (93.0 and 90.7%, respectively) than PET/CT (88.4%), but statistical significance was not obtained. PET/MRI fusion, especially PET with T1-w MRI, was demonstrated to be superior to PET/CT in characterizing PTs, offering better mapping and fusion image quality. (author)

  20. Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Kornmann; Doris Henne-Bruns; Jan Scheele; Christian Rainer Wirtz; Thomas Kapapa; Johannes Lemke

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreat...

  1. Tumores de cólon - primeiro achado do adenocarcinoma de pâncreas: relato de caso Colon tumors - first find of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pedroso de Moraes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar um caso raro de adenocarcinoma de pâncreas que se apresentou como tumores colorretais sincrônicos. Paciente masculino, 76 anos, apresentava dor abdominal difusa de forte intensidade, diarréia e vômitos há sete dias. Tratava de gastrite há dois anos e nos últimos quatro meses apresentava hiporexia e perda de peso. Estava emagrecido, desidratado e desnutrido, com distensão abdominal importante, ruídos hidroaéreos ausentes e dor difusa à palpação abdominal. Exames evidenciaram hiperglicemia, distensão importante do intestino delgado ao raio x, ultra-som de abdome com colecistolitíase e endoscopia digestiva alta com pangastrite, bulboduodenite e papila normal. Tomografia abdominal confirmou colecistolitíase. A colonoscopia mostrou três lesões, em reto médio, cólon transverso e na válvula íleocecal. As biópsias revelaram apenas reação inflamatória. Persistiram os sintomas e decidiu-se submetê-lo a colecistectomia onde foram vistas lesões planas em diafragma cujas biópsias evidenciaram adenocarcinoma. No quinto dia de pós-operatório o paciente apresentava quadro obstrutivo e foi submetido à nova laparotomia com colectomia direita, ileostomia terminal dupla e biópsia pancreática. Esta mostrou adenocarcinoma e o estudo imunoistoquímico positivo para tumor primário do pâncreas. O paciente evoluiu para óbito um mês após. CONCLUSÃO: o exame de imagem normal não descarta a hipótese diagnóstica e quando a origem do tumor primário não está definida é essencial o exame imunoistoquímico para firmar o diagnóstico.OBJECTIVE: Report a case of a rare pancreatic adenocarcinoma presented as synchronic colorectal tumor. CASE REPORT: Seventy six year old man with high intensity and diffuse abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting during seven days. At that moment he had been in treatment for gastritis for 2 years and in the last four months he presented hyporexia and weight loss. He was dehydrated and

  2. Pretreatment Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Level Indicates Tumor Response, Early Distant Metastasis, Overall Survival, and Therapeutic Selection in Localized and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer has been disputed because of high probability of distant metastasis. Thus, we analyzed the effect of clinical parameters on tumor response, early distant metastasis within 3 months (DM3m), and overall survival to identify an indicator for selecting patients who would benefit from CRT. Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively analyzed the data from 84 patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent CRT between August 2002 and October 2009. Sex, age, tumor size, histological differentiation, N classification, pre- and post-treatment carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, and CA 19-9 percent decrease were analyzed to identify risk factors associated with tumor response, DM3m, and overall survival. Results: For all 84 patients, the median survival time was 12.5 months (range, 2–31.9 months), objective response (complete response or partial response) to CRT was observed in 28 patients (33.3%), and DM3m occurred in 24 patients (28.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment CA 19-9 level (≤400 vs. >400 U/ml) was significantly associated with tumor response (45.1% vs. 15.2%), DM3m (19.6% vs. 42.4%), and median overall survival time (15.1 vs. 9.7 months) (p 3m, and overall survival and identifying patients who will benefit from CRT.

  3. Association between genetic subgroups of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma defined by high density 500 K SNP-arrays and tumor histopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available The specific genes and genetic pathways associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are still largely unknown partially due to the low resolution of the techniques applied so far to their study. Here we used high-density 500 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-arrays to define those chromosomal regions which most commonly harbour copy number (CN alterations and loss of heterozygozity (LOH in a series of 20 PDAC tumors and we correlated the corresponding genetic profiles with the most relevant clinical and histopathological features of the disease. Overall our results showed that primary PDAC frequently display (>70% extensive gains of chromosomes 1q, 7q, 8q and 20q, together with losses of chromosomes 1p, 9p, 12q, 17p and 18q, such chromosomal regions harboring multiple cancer- and PDAC-associated genes. Interestingly, these alterations clustered into two distinct genetic profiles characterized by gains of the 2q14.2, 3q22.1, 5q32, 10q26.13, 10q26.3, 11q13.1, 11q13.3, 11q13.4, 16q24.1, 16q24.3, 22q13.1, 22q13.31 and 22q13.32 chromosomal regions (group 1; n = 9 versus gains at 1q21.1 and losses of the 1p36.11, 6q25.2, 9p22.1, 9p24.3, 17p13.3 and Xp22.33 chromosomal regions (group 2; n = 11. From the clinical and histopathological point of view, group 1 cases were associated with smaller and well/moderately-differentiated grade I/II PDAC tumors, whereas and group 2 PDAC displayed a larger size and they mainly consisted of poorly-differentiated grade III carcinomas. These findings confirm the cytogenetic complexity and heterozygozity of PDAC and provide evidence for the association between tumor cytogenetics and its histopathological features. In addition, we also show that the altered regions identified harbor multiple cancer associate genes that deserve further investigation to determine their relevance in the pathogenesis of PDAC.

  4. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor of the Pancreas with Concomitant Pancreas Divisum. A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Daisuke Watanabe; Kouichi Miura; Takashi Goto; Hirohide Ohnishi; Hiroshi Nanjo; Yuzo Yamamoto

    2010-01-01

    Context Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas is a rare neoplasm which affects young women. On the other hand, pancreas divisum is an anomaly which develops at 7 weeks of gestation. Here, we report a case of a solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas with concomitant pancreas divisum. Case report A 26-year-old woman was diagnosed as having a pancreatic tumor with solid and cystic components in the pancreatic head. Pancreatograms obtained by ERCP and MRCP showed no communication betwe...

  5. A High Circulating Tumor Cell Count in Portal Vein Predicts Liver Metastasis From Periampullary or Pancreatic Cancer: A High Portal Venous CTC Count Predicts Liver Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Yu Wen; Kuo, Hsun-Chuan; Ho, Be-Ing; Chang, Ming-Chu; Chang, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Chen, Huai-Lu; Liang, Ting-Yung; Wang, Chien-Fang; Huang, Chia-Yi; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Chang, Ying Chih; Lee, Eva Yhp; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) released from a periampullary or pancreatic cancer can be more frequently detected in the portal than the systemic circulation and potentially can be used to identify patients with liver micrometastases. Aims of this study is to determine if CTCs count in portal venous blood of patients with nonmetastatic periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be used as a predictor for subsequent liver metastases. CTCs were quantified in portal and peripheral venous blood samples collected simultaneously during pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients with presumed periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma without image-discernible metastasis. Postoperatively patients were monitored for liver metastasis by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography every 3 months for 1 year. Sixty patients with a pathological diagnosis of periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma were included in the study. Multivariate analysis indicated that portal CTC count was a significant predictor for liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. Eleven of 13 patients with a high portal CTCs count (defined as >112 CMx Platform estimated CTCs in 2 mL blood) developed liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. In contrast, only 6 of 47 patients with a low portal CTC count developed liver metastases (P CTCs had 64.7% sensitivity and 95.4% specificity to predict liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. We concluded that a high CTC count in portal venous blood collected during pancreaticoduodenectomy in patients with periampullary or pancreatic adenocarcinoma without metastases detected by currently available imaging tools is a significant predictor for liver metastases within 6 months after surgery. PMID:27100430

  6. Computed tomography and the dilated pancreatic duct: An ominous sign

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    Palmer Gold, R.; Seaman, W.B.

    1981-01-15

    The main pancreatic duct has been visualized with both ultrasound and computed tomography. A normal pancreatic duct has been reported using CT, and controversy persists over whether a normal duct can be routinely imaged with ultrasound. The dilated pancreatic duct has always been associated with disease - usually pancreatitis or a proximal obstructing pancreatic carcinoma. In the patient with no clinical history or laboratory data suggesting pancreatitis, a dilated pancreatic duct implies a proximal tumor.

  7. Primary Pancreatic Choriocarcinoma Presenting as Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biggs Saravanan Ramachandran

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic cancers can present with pancreatitis or its complications. Pancreatic choriocarcinoma is an extremely rare disease to involve pancreas. Case report A 27-year-old married woman presented to our facility with abdominal pain and fullness of 20-day duration. She was clinically diagnosed as acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst as a complication. Serum amylase was elevated with CT scan of abdomen showing a cystic lesion involving the pancreas. We approached the cyst with endoscopic ultrasonography and cyst fluid was aspirated and analyzed. Cyst fluid amylase was elevated and cytology revealed germ cell tumor. Serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin was elevated. She had a swelling over the jaw which also revealed choriocarcinoma in histopathological examination. Patient was started with chemotherapy. Conclusion We report this case of pancreatic choriocarcinoma due to its extreme rarity and the diagnostic dilemma it posed.

  8. CA19-9-related tumor kinetics after first-line chemotherapy of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a monoinstitutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloca, Giuseppe; Venturino, Antonella; Guarneri, Domenico

    2016-09-01

    The absolute value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) pretreatment and its reduction after chemotherapy are established prognostic variables for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The present study is a retrospective monoinstitutional evaluation of the prognostic role of the CA19-9 reduction and some CA19-9-related tumor kinetics parameters, such as tumor growth rate constant (G), kinetic tumor response and log ratio. Forty-one cases met the selection criteria. After 8 weeks only G reported an inverse relationship with OS (r = -0.494) that was confirmed by regression analysis (R (2) = 0.192). G after 8 weeks of chemotherapy appears as a possible surrogate end point of overall survival. PMID:27522503

  9. Interventional chemotherapy for pain caused by pancreatic, retro-peritoneal and paravertabral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To probe an interventional method in treatment of cancerous pain in late-stage cancers of pancreas, retroperitoneal and paravertabral space by micro-injury technique. Methods: 86 cases of late-stage cancer (primary or metastatic)with severe pain caused by the invasion to the retroperitonium, paravertabral space and spine; were performed by microinvasive selective parent vascular catheterization perfusion chemotherapy through lumbar and intercortal arterial approach. Follow up of the relief of symptoms and pain were carried out. Results: The inhibition of tumor growth and the symptoms relief were obtained obviously. The effeciency rates for pain-relief were 90.7% and 88.37%, evaluated by number-grading and complain-grading respectively. Conclusion: The arterial perfusion chemotherapy can effectively relieve the cancerous pain caused by retro-peritoneum, mediastinal, spinal and paravertabral troubles, providing a method of choice clinically. (authors)

  10. Gemcitabine as Salvage Treatment in Patients with Poorly Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare and aggressive tumor. The combination of etoposide and cisplatin is considered as the first-line treatment, but no recommendations exist for further treatment after progression. Case series We report here case series of three patients who received gemcitabine as salvage chemotherapy in patients with poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. All the three patients achieved clinical benefit with manageable toxicities. The survival was 5.5, 8, and 9 months respectively after the beginning of gemcitabine in these three patients. Conclusions This case series of patients with poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas who received gemcitabine as salvage chemotherapy suggests that gemcitabine could be an effective salvage treatment. Future studies to investigate gemcitabine in this setting are warranted.

  11. [Autoimmune pancreatitis as an element of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-05-26

    Autoimmune pancreatitis constantly belongs to diseases which often causes significant diagnostic problem and often runs out with surgical intervention as considered to be a pancreatic cancer. Important although usually underestimated problems are polyglandular syndromes, which may consist of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) problem as well. This case report is an example of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS), which was connected with the surgical treatment with biliary bypass anastomosis because of the unresectable lesion in the head of pancreas. The definite remission of the pancreatic lesion finally came after a steroid therapy. Differentiation between neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic tumors very often remains a serious clinical problem. On grounds of imaging and cytopathology exams it is often difficult to decide about the nature of a lesion. The negative result of cytopathological biopsy examination does not finally settle straightforward diagnosis. Diagnostic problems affect also autoimmune pancreatitis. It is worth to undertake attempts to differentiate pancreatic lesions especially in cases of concomitance with other autoimmune polyglandular syndromes. That is because it is connected with completely different treatment and outcome. We should remember about diagnostic criteria of autoimmune pancreatitis. Appropriate diagnosis for patients with AIP gives them a chance to avoid serious surgical resection and possible complications. PMID:27234865

  12. Identification of pancreatic tumors in vivo with ligand-targeted, pH responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles by multispectral optoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Marie K; Pender, Dillon; Chuong, Phillip; Fouts, Benjamin L; Sobelov, Alexander; McNally, Molly W; Mezera, Megan; Woo, Shiao Y; McNally, Lacey R

    2016-06-10

    Despite significant efforts to translate nanotechnology for cancer application, lack of identification of biodistribution/accumulation of these nanovehicles in vivo remains a substantial barrier for successful implementation of theranostic nanoparticles in the clinic. The purpose of the study was to develop a tumor-targeted theranostic nanovehicle for pancreatic cancer detectable by multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT). To improve the tumor specificity of our mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN), we utilized a dual targeting strategy: 1) an elevated tumor receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (UPAR), and 2) the acidic tumor microenvironment. The tumor specificity of the MSN particle was improved with the addition of both chitosan, targeting acidic pH, and urokinase plasminogen activator (UPA), targeting UPAR. Drug release assays confirmed pH responsive release of gemcitabine in vitro. The UPAR specific binding of MSN-UPA nanoparticles was confirmed by reduction in fluorescence signal following MSN-UPA nanoparticle treatment in UPAR positive cells blocked with a UPAR-blocking antibody. Based upon Indocyanine Green encapsulation within the nanoparticles, UPA ligand targeted MSNs demonstrated increased intensity compared to untargeted MSNs at both pH7.4 (7×) and 6.5 (20×); however the signal was much more pronounced at a pH of 6.5 using tissue phantoms (pmultispectral optoacoustic tomography (p<0.05) and confirmed by ex vivo analysis. By tracking in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution with MSOT, it was shown that pH responsive, ligand targeted MSNs preferentially bind to pancreatic tumors for payload delivery. PMID:26763377

  13. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  14. Inhibition of Human Pancreatic Tumor Growth by Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells in Nude Mouse Xenograft Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji Sung; Park, Yun Soo; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Yong Guk; Kim, Yeon Jin; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Hyung Sook; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth commonest cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. However, no adequate therapy for pancreatic cancer has yet been found. In this study, the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells against the human pancreatic cancer was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured with IL-2-containing medium in anti-CD3 for 14 days. The resulting populations of CIK cells comprised 94% CD3+, 4% CD3-CD56+, 41% CD3+C...

  15. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer

  16. Nuclear expression of Y-box binding protein-1 is associated with poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer and its knockdown inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in mice tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Kentaro; Nakano, Kenji; Cui, Lin; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Onishi, Hideya; Oda, Yoshinao; Obika, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masao; Katano, Mitsuo

    2016-07-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the implication of Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) for the aggressive phenotypes, prognosis and therapeutic target in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). YB-1 expression in PDAC, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and normal pancreas specimens was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and its correlation with clinicopathological features was assessed in patients with PDAC. The effects of YB-1 on proliferation, invasion and expressions of cell cycle-related proteins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were analyzed by WST-8, cell cycle and Matrigel invasion assays, Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR in PDAC cells transfected with YB-1-siRNAs. To verify the significance of YB-1 for tumor progression in vivo, the growth and metastasis were monitored after intrasplenic implantation of ex vivo YB-1 siRNA-transfected PDAC cells, and YB-1-targeting antisense oligonucleotides were intravenously administered in nude mice harboring subcutaneous tumor. The intensity of YB-1 expression and positivity of nuclear YB-1 expression were higher in PDAC than PanIN and normal pancreatic tissues. Nuclear YB-1 expression was significantly associated with dedifferentiation, lymphatic/venous invasion and unfavorable prognosis. YB-1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation via cell cycle arrest by S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 downregulation and consequent p27 accumulation, and decreased the invasion due to downregulated membranous-type 2 MMP expression in PDAC cells. Tumor growth and liver metastasis formation were significantly suppressed in nude mice after implantation of YB-1-silenced PDAC cells, and the YB-1 targeting antisense oligonucleotide significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous tumors. In conclusion, YB-1 may be involved in aggressive natures of PDAC and a promising therapeutic target. PMID:26939718

  17. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy: Presentation of a case affecting the maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Pooja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy is a rare, distinctive neoplasm of early infancy with rapid expansile growth and a high rate of recurrence. Most commonly, the lesion affects the maxilla of infants during the first year of life. One such case was diagnosed in the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology in Subharti Dental College, Meerut.

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Assessment of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the usefulness of the computed tomography (CT) finding of main pancreatic duct (MPD) wall enhancement, termed the “enhanced duct sign”, for diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in comparison with diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Two radiologists independently evaluated the presence or absence of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced CT in patients with AIP (n = 55), pancreatic carcinoma (n = 50), and chronic pancreatitis (n = 50). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of AIP were calculated. In patients demonstrating the enhanced duct sign, additional findings were evaluated by consensus. Results: The enhanced duct sign was more frequently observed in patients with AIP (37/55, 67%) than in patients with pancreatic carcinoma (5/50, 10%) or chronic pancreatitis (0/50, 0%) (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the finding were 0.67, 0.95, 0.85, 0.88, and 0.84, respectively. In AIP, the lumen within the enhanced duct was completely or partially invisible in 29 of 37 (78%) patients, and the enhanced duct was observed within the affected pancreatic parenchyma in 35 of 37 (95%) patients. In pancreatic carcinoma, the lumen within the enhanced duct was visible in all patients (5/5, 100%), and the enhanced duct was observed downstream of the tumor (5/5, 100%). Conclusion: The enhanced duct sign is highly specific of AIP.

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Assessment of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Yuichi, E-mail: kawai.yuichi@a.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Suzuki, Kojiro, E-mail: kojiro@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Itoh, Shigeki, E-mail: shigeito@nagoya-1st.jrc.or.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Japan Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital, 3-35 Michishita-cho, Nakamura-ku, Nagoya 453-8511 (Japan); Takada, Akira, E-mail: takadaa@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mori, Yoshine, E-mail: yoshine@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naganawa, Shinji, E-mail: naganawa@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the usefulness of the computed tomography (CT) finding of main pancreatic duct (MPD) wall enhancement, termed the 'enhanced duct sign', for diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in comparison with diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Two radiologists independently evaluated the presence or absence of the enhanced duct sign on multiphase contrast-enhanced CT in patients with AIP (n = 55), pancreatic carcinoma (n = 50), and chronic pancreatitis (n = 50). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of AIP were calculated. In patients demonstrating the enhanced duct sign, additional findings were evaluated by consensus. Results: The enhanced duct sign was more frequently observed in patients with AIP (37/55, 67%) than in patients with pancreatic carcinoma (5/50, 10%) or chronic pancreatitis (0/50, 0%) (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the finding were 0.67, 0.95, 0.85, 0.88, and 0.84, respectively. In AIP, the lumen within the enhanced duct was completely or partially invisible in 29 of 37 (78%) patients, and the enhanced duct was observed within the affected pancreatic parenchyma in 35 of 37 (95%) patients. In pancreatic carcinoma, the lumen within the enhanced duct was visible in all patients (5/5, 100%), and the enhanced duct was observed downstream of the tumor (5/5, 100%). Conclusion: The enhanced duct sign is highly specific of AIP.

  20. [Aspartame--the sweet-tasting dipeptide--does not affect the pancreatic insulin-secreting function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikova, N V; Fedotov, V P; Aleshina, L V; Shvachkin, Iu P; Girin, S K

    1984-01-01

    The action of a synthetic dipeptide aspartam (150 to 180 times as sweet as glucose) on pancreatic insulin-secretory function of rats was studied in vivo and in vitro. The drug was given orally while drinking (300 mg/kg body weight) or was added to the incubation medium of cultivated pancreatic cells (20 mM). It was shown that insulin content in the rat blood serum remained unchanged 10 and 35 minutes after aspartam administration. The drug did not exert any stimulating effect upon insulin secretion following the addition to the pancreatic cell culture medium. It is concluded that aspartam exhibits no direct or mediated action on pancreatic insulin-secretory function. PMID:6382247

  1. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271

  2. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  3. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesha Salahuddin; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 relate...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  5. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  6. Calorie restriction decreases murine and human pancreatic tumor cell growth, nuclear factor-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression in an insulin-like growth factor-1-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Harvey

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR prevents obesity and has potent anticancer effects that may be mediated through its ability to reduce serum growth and inflammatory factors, particularly insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and protumorigenic cytokines. IGF-1 is a nutrient-responsive growth factor that activates the inflammatory regulator nuclear factor (NF-κB, which is linked to many types of cancers, including pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that CR would inhibit pancreatic tumor growth through modulation of IGF-1-stimulated NF-κB activation and protumorigenic gene expression. To test this, 30 male C57BL/6 mice were randomized to either a control diet consumed ad libitum or a 30% CR diet administered in daily aliquots for 21 weeks, then were subcutaneously injected with syngeneic mouse pancreatic cancer cells (Panc02 and tumor growth was monitored for 5 weeks. Relative to controls, CR mice weighed less and had decreased serum IGF-1 levels and smaller tumors. Also, CR tumors demonstrated a 70% decrease in the expression of genes encoding the pro-inflammatory factors S100a9 and F4/80, and a 56% decrease in the macrophage chemoattractant, Ccl2. Similar CR effects on tumor growth and NF-κB-related gene expression were observed in a separate study of transplanted MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic tumor cell growth in nude mice. In vitro analyses in Panc02 cells showed that IGF-1 treatment promoted NF-κB nuclear localization, increased DNA-binding of p65 and transcriptional activation, and increased expression of NF-κB downstream genes. Finally, the IGF-1-induced increase in expression of genes downstream of NF-κB (Ccdn1, Vegf, Birc5, and Ptgs2 was decreased significantly in the context of silenced p65. These findings suggest that the inhibitory effects of CR on Panc02 pancreatic tumor growth are associated with reduced IGF-1-dependent NF-κB activation.

  7. Colonic involvement in non-necrotizing acute pancreatitis: correlation of CT findings with the clinical course of affected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, W.; Studler, U.; Buitrago-Tellez, C.H.; Steinbrich, W. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Kocher, T. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Degen, L. [Institute of Gastroenterology, University of Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe CT findings of colonic involvement in acute non-necrotizing pancreatitis and to analyze the correlation between colonic wall thickening at CT and the clinical course of these patients. The CT examinations of 19 consecutive patients with acute non-necrotizing pancreatitis who were not treated with antibiotics initially were analyzed retrospectively. The severity of acute pancreatitis was categorized according to the CT severity index (CTSI) and the presence of colonic wall thickening at the initial CT was compared with the clinical course of all patients. Seven of 11 patients with a CTSI of 4 showed a colonic wall thickening, whereas the remaining patients with a CTSI of 4 (n=4), CTSI of 3 (n=5), and CTSI of 2 (n=3) showed no colonic abnormalities at CT. Patients with colonic wall thickening presented more often with fever, showed higher levels of infectious parameters, needed more often antibiotic therapy, and had more requests for additional CT examinations and CT-guided fluid aspirations as well as a longer duration of hospital stay as compared with patients without colonic wall involvement, even if the latter presented with the same CTSI initially. It is well known that translocation of the colonic flora may significantly influence the clinical course of patients with acute pancreatitis, and our results indicate that patients with acute pancreatitis who present with colonic wall thickening at CT have an increased risk for a complicated clinical course regarding systemic infection. (orig.)

  8. Colonic involvement in non-necrotizing acute pancreatitis: correlation of CT findings with the clinical course of affected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to describe CT findings of colonic involvement in acute non-necrotizing pancreatitis and to analyze the correlation between colonic wall thickening at CT and the clinical course of these patients. The CT examinations of 19 consecutive patients with acute non-necrotizing pancreatitis who were not treated with antibiotics initially were analyzed retrospectively. The severity of acute pancreatitis was categorized according to the CT severity index (CTSI) and the presence of colonic wall thickening at the initial CT was compared with the clinical course of all patients. Seven of 11 patients with a CTSI of 4 showed a colonic wall thickening, whereas the remaining patients with a CTSI of 4 (n=4), CTSI of 3 (n=5), and CTSI of 2 (n=3) showed no colonic abnormalities at CT. Patients with colonic wall thickening presented more often with fever, showed higher levels of infectious parameters, needed more often antibiotic therapy, and had more requests for additional CT examinations and CT-guided fluid aspirations as well as a longer duration of hospital stay as compared with patients without colonic wall involvement, even if the latter presented with the same CTSI initially. It is well known that translocation of the colonic flora may significantly influence the clinical course of patients with acute pancreatitis, and our results indicate that patients with acute pancreatitis who present with colonic wall thickening at CT have an increased risk for a complicated clinical course regarding systemic infection. (orig.)

  9. Tumor markers CA19-9, CA242 and CEA in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yimin; Yang, Jun; Li, Hongjuan; WU, YIHUA; Zhang, Honghe; Chen, Wenhu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis and early detection is crucial for improving patient prognosis. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate and compare the sensitivity and specificity of single test of CA19-9, CA242, and CEA, as well as combination test in pancreatic cancer detection. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, Medline, and Wanfang databases for studies that evaluated the diagnostic validity of CA19-9, CA242, and CEA between January 1990 and September 2...

  10. RISK FACTORS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL TARGETS

    OpenAIRE

    EdwinCharlesThrower

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review:Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer.Recent Findings:Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcri...

  11. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer: underlying mechanisms and potential targets

    OpenAIRE

    KOLODECIK, THOMAS; Shugrue, Christine; Ashat, Munish; Thrower, Edwin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review: Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer. Recent findings: Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the tr...

  12. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer: underlying mechanisms and potential targets

    OpenAIRE

    KOLODECIK, THOMAS; Shugrue, Christine; Ashat, Munish; Thrower, Edwin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review: Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer. Recent findings: Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the trans...

  13. Pancreatic mass as an initial presentation of severe Wegener's granulomatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Valerieva, Yana; Golemanov, Branimir; Tzolova, Nadezhda; Mitova, Rumiana

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis or a pancreatic mass is a very rare initial presentation of Wegener's granu-lomatosis. A 62-year-old woman presented with tumor-like pancreatitis and otitis media Abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance suggested the presence of pancreatic tumor. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration was negative. Distal pancreatic resection and splenectomy were performed and histopathology proved Wegener's vasculitis of the pancreas and spleen. Azathioprine and steroids were subsequ...

  14. Analysis of Genetic Alterations in Patients Affected with Neurofibromatosis Type 2 and its Associated Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, Caisa Marie

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder with the clinical hallmark of bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS). Patients affected by a severe NF2 phenotype also presents with peripheral schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas. The closely related disorder schwannomatosis also displays multiple schwannomas, but never VS. Mutation screening of the NF2 gene in the above mentioned tumors did not identify mutations in numerous of cases. We analyzed the DNA sequence covering ...

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor and not cyclooxygenase 2 promotes endothelial cell viability in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Desmond P

    2010-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), often coexpressed in cancer, are associated with poor prognosis. However, results from pancreatic cancer trials of their inhibitors were disappointing. This study delineated the role of COX-2 and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in angiogenesis and VEGF regulation.

  16. A case report: Cavitary infarction caused by pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy in a patient with pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyoung Kyg; Kwon, Woon Jung; Choi, Seong Hoon; Lee, Jong Hwa; Cha, Hee Jeong [Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan School of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary tumor embolism is commonly discovered at autopsy, but is rarely suspected ante-mortem. Microangiopathy is an uncommon and distinct form of simple tumor pulmonary embolism. Here, we present a 52-year-old male with tumor thrombotic microangiopathy and pulmonary infarction, which might have originated from intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Multiple wedge-shaped consolidations were found initially and aggravated with cavitation. These CT features of pulmonary infarction were pathologically confirmed to result from pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy.

  17. A case report: Cavitary infarction caused by pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy in a patient with pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary tumor embolism is commonly discovered at autopsy, but is rarely suspected ante-mortem. Microangiopathy is an uncommon and distinct form of simple tumor pulmonary embolism. Here, we present a 52-year-old male with tumor thrombotic microangiopathy and pulmonary infarction, which might have originated from intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Multiple wedge-shaped consolidations were found initially and aggravated with cavitation. These CT features of pulmonary infarction were pathologically confirmed to result from pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy

  18. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Associated with the Use of Sandostatin® LAR® Depot in a Patient with Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor. An Association or a Coincidence? The First Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Sandostatin® LAR® depot is a synthetic analogue of the naturally occurring hormone somatostatin and is indicated for certain patients with acromegaly and severe diarrhea and flushing episodes associated with metastatic carcinoid tumors and for the long-term treatment of the profuse watery diarrhea associated with VIP-secreting tumors in patients in whom initial treatment with immediate release Sandostatin® injection has been shown to be effective and tolerated. The most common toxicities include biliary disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, injection-site pain, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Rheumatoid arthritis or similar toxicities have not been associated with Sandostatin® LAR® depot. Case report We present a 53-year-old female with a history of neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas with metastasis to the liver, lung developed joint pains in the hands as well as feet accompanied with intermittent swelling in the morning and pain in the bilateral joints in the hands as well as feet following 45th cycle of Sandostatin® LAR® depot at a dose of 30 mg. All the work-up including rheumatoid factor, anti nuclear antibody, cryoglobulins were within normal limits except her erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated. No radiological abnormalities were revealed. Her symptoms improved after we reduced the dose to 20 mg. Discussion Her Naranjo scale was 7, suggesting a probable relation. The patient had four signs and symptoms as required by the American College of Rheumatology for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The association of the rheumatoid arthritis with Sandostatin® LAR® depot may be a rare complication but with the extended use beyond acromegaly and carcinoid to acute esophageal variceal bleeding, pancreatic pseudocysts, gastrointestinal, and pancreatic external fistulae, short bowel syndrome, a dumping syndrome and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related refractory hypersecretory diarrhea, physicians should be made

  20. Loss of ATRX or DAXX expression and concomitant acquisition of the alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype are late events in a small subset of MEN-1 syndrome pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    OpenAIRE

    de Wilde, Roeland F.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Maitra, Anirban; Meeker, Alan K.; Barish H Edil; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Ellison, Trevor A.; Schulick, Richard D; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Valk, Gerlof D.; Vriens, Menno R.; Rinkes, Inne HM Borel; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Ralph H. Hruban; Matsukuma, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 45% of sporadic well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors harbor mutations in either ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked) or DAXX (death domain-associated protein). These novel tumor suppressor genes encode nuclear proteins that interact with one another and function in chromatin remodeling at telomeric and peri-centromeric regions. Mutations in these genes are associated with loss of their protein expression and correlate with the alternative lengthen...

  1. Acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  2. Acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  3. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma exerts systemic effects on the peripheral blood myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: an indicator of disease severity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) isolated from tumor bearing animals or from individuals with solid tumors display functional abnormalities and the DC impairment has emerged as one mechanism for tumor evasion from the control of the immune system. Ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic cancer, is recognized as a very aggressive cancer type with a mortality that almost matches the rate of incidence. We examined the systemic influence ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exerted on levels of peripheral blood DCs and inflammatory mediators in comparison to the effects exerted by other pancreatic tumors, chronic pancreatitis, and age-matched controls. All groups examined, including PDAC, had decreased levels of myeloid DCs (MDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (PDC) and enhanced apoptosis in these cells as compared to controls. We found elevated levels of PGE2 and CXCL8 in subjects with PDAC, and chronic pancreatitis. Levels of these inflammatory factors were in part restored in PDAC after tumor resection, whereas the levels of DCs were impaired in the majority of these patients ~12 weeks after tumor removal. Our results prove that solid pancreatic tumors, including PDAC, systemically affect blood DCs. The impairments do not seem to be tumor-specific, since similar results were obtained in subjects with chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, we found that PDAC patients with a survival over 2 years had significant higher levels of blood DCs compared to patients with less than one year survival. Our findings points to the involvement of inflammation in the destruction of the blood MDCs and PDCs. Furthermore, the preservation of the blood DCs compartment in PDAC patients seems to benefit their ability to control the disease and survival

  4. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited g...

  5. A Retrospective Study of Capecitabine/Temozolomide (CAPTEM Regimen in the Treatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (pNETs after Failing Previous Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs are notoriously resistant to currently available chemotherapy agents.Preclinical data has suggested synergy between temozolomide and capecitabine. Objective To report a retrospective data on the efficacy and safety of capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM regimen in patients with metastatic pancreaticneuroendocrine tumors (pNETs who have failed prior therapies. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 7 patientswith metastatic pNETs who had had progressive cancer prior to treatment despite therapy, including long-acting releaseoctreotide (60 mg/month, chemotherapy and hepatic chemoembolization. Capecitabine was administered at a flat dose of1,000 mg orally twice daily on days 1-14 and temozolomide 200 mg/m2 was given in two divided doses daily on days 10-14of a 28-day cycle. Tumor assessments were repeated every two cycles and serum tumor markers were measured every cycle. Response to treatment was assessed using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST parameters, and toxicity was graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 3.0. Results Among 7 patients treated, three patients achieved a partial response, and two patients had stable disease. Totalresponse rate was 43%, and clinical benefit (responders and stable disease was 71%. Median duration of response was 8months (range: 4-12 months. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities included grade 3 thrombocytopenia in one patient and grade 3 fatigue in one patient. The most common toxicities were grade 1 and 2 neutropenia, grade 1 fatigue, grade 1 and 2 hand-foot syndrome. Conclusions Our retrospective study showed that modified CAPTEM regimen was well-tolerated and produced comparable response to historical data in neuroendocrine tumors, including pNETs. Our study is unique as it only included patients with pNETs. Further prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the combination of

  6. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  7. Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

  8. Research Progress in Correlation with Tumor Makers and Pancreatic Cancer%肿瘤标志物与胰腺癌相关性的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张泉东; 金政锡; 郝迪斯

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a type of tumors of digestive system with high malignancy.Symptoms often do not appear until the cancer has advanced to the late stage.Delayed diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is also related with that.There are no specific and sensitive markers for this disease.Therefor,it is important to look for early tumer markers.Studies have found that the potential diagnostic value of the molecules,such as glypican-1,chemokines and chemokine receptors.%胰腺癌(PC)是一种恶性程度极高的消化系统肿瘤,由于其生长的无痛性与隐匿性,且没有真正有效的常规检查与特异且敏感的肿瘤标志物,使得胰腺癌病人常在晚期才被诊断,而这时他们已失去了手术的最佳时机,因此寻找肿瘤早期标志物具有重要意义.由于胰腺癌标志物如趋化因子及受体、磷脂酰肌醇蛋白聚糖-1等的联合检测可能对胰腺癌早期诊断与预后评估具有很大价值,因而有待进一步研究.

  9. Assessment and optimization of electroporation-assisted tumoral nanoparticle uptake in a nude mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    West DL; White SB; Zhang Z; Larson AC; Omary RA

    2014-01-01

    Derek Lamont West,1,2 Sarah B White,3 Zhouli Zhang,4 Andrew C Larson,4 Reed A Omary5 1Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering and Nanomedicine, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston, Houston, TX, 3Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; 4Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; 5Department of Radiology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenoca...

  10. Advances of MRCP in diagnosis of pancreatic duct dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic duct dilatation is a common sign of pancreaticobiliary diseases and may be seen in pancreatic carcinoma, carcinoma of duodenal papilla, distal common bile duct carcinoma, ampullary carcinoma, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor, pancreatitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, sphincter of oddi dysfunction, pancreatic trauma, pancreas divisum, annular pancreas, pancreatic tuberculosis, abdominal aorta aneurysm, etc. It is possible to make a correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis by analyzing features of shape, extent, and location of dilated pancreatic duct. This article reviews the advances of MRCP in etiological diagnosis of dilatation of the pancreatic duct. (authors)

  11. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis*

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fábio Payão; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation -, and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly...

  12. Overcoming therapeutic resistance in pancreatic cancer is not a simple mix of PDT and chemotherapy: Evaluation of PDT-chemotherapy combinations in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Petrovic, Ljubica; Massdodi, Iqbal; Rizvi, Imran; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    The dismal survival statistics for pancreatic cancer are due in large part to the notoriously poor response of these tumors to conventional therapies. Here we examine the ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT), using the photosensitizer verteporfin to enhance of the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy agents and/or eradicate populations that are nonresponsive to these agents. Using an in vitro 3D tumor model of pancreatic cancer combined with an imaging-based methodology for quantifying therapeutic response, we specifically examine PDT combination treatments with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin. We show that our 3D cell culture model recapitulates a more clinically-relevant dose response to gemcitabine, with minimal cytotoxic response even at high doses. The same cultures exhibit modest response to PDT treatments, but are also less responsive to this modality relative to our previous reports of monolayer dose response in the same cells. In combination we found no evidence of any enhancement in efficacy of either PDT or gemcitabine treatment regardless of dose or sequence (PDT before gemcitabine, or gemcitabine before PDT). However, when oxaliplatin chemotherapy was administered immediately after treatment with 2.5J/cm2 verteporfin PDT, there was an observable enhancement in response that appears to exceed the additive combination of either treatment alone and suggesting there may be a synergistic interaction. This observation is consistent with previous reports of enhanced efficacy in combinations of PDT with platinum-based chemotherapy. The contrast in results between the combinations examined here underscores the need for rational design of mechanism-based PDT combinations.

  13. Metformin may function as anti-cancer agent via targeting cancer stem cells: the potential biological significance of tumor-associated miRNAs in breast and pancreatic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bin; Azmi, Asfar S; Ali, Shadan; Zaiem, Feras; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2014-06-01

    Metformin is one of the most used diabetic drugs for the management of type II diabetes mellitus (DM) in the world. Increased numbers of epidemiological and clinical studies have provided convincing evidence supporting the role of metformin in the development and progression of a variety of human tumors including breast and pancreatic cancer. Substantial pre-clinical evidence from in vitro and in vivo experimental studies strongly suggests that metformin has an anti-cancer activity mediated through the regulation of several cell signaling pathways including activation of AMP kinase (AMPK), and other direct and indirect mechanisms; however, the detailed mechanism(s) has not yet been fully understood. The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has gained significant attention in recent years due its identification and defining its clinical implications in many different tumors including breast cancer and pancreatic cancer. In this review, we will discuss the protective role of metformin in the development of breast and pancreatic cancers. We will further discuss the role of metformin as an anti-cancer agent, which is in part mediated through targeting CSCs. Finally, we will discuss the potential role of metformin in the modulation of tumor-associated or CSC-associated microRNAs (miRNAs) as part of the novel mechanism of action of metformin in the development and progression of breast and pancreatic cancers. PMID:25333034

  14. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karl-Walter Jauch; Hendrik Seeliger; Hanno Niess; Qi Bao; Andrea Renner; Yue Zhao; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC t...

  15. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D. PMID:26845357

  16. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVpeak) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Livermean + [2 × Liversd]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm3 or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in tailoring therapy

  17. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dholakia, Avani S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Raman, Siva P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hacker-Prietz, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wahl, Richard L. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pawlik, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Laheru, Daniel A. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  18. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  20. Transarterial chemoperfusion with gemcitabine and mitomycin C in pancreatic carcinoma: Results in locally recurrent tumors and advanced tumor stages; Transarterielle Chemoperfusion mit Gemcitabine und Mitomycin C bei Pankreaskarzinom: Ergebnisse bei Rezidivtumoren und fortgeschrittenen Tumorstadien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S.; Heller, M.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Bauer, R.W. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, J. W. Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Boecher, E. [Klinik Paradise, Medizinische Klinik, Soest (Germany); Jacob, U. [Leonardisklinik, Onkologische Fachklinik, Bad Heilbrunn (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate local transarterial chemoperfusion (TACP) in locally recurrent pancreatic carcinoma and advanced tumor stages which did not respond to prior systemic chemotherapy. The tumor response, survival, and pain response were retrospectively analyzed. Materials and method: Forty outpatients (median age 62 years, range 36 - 79) were treated with a minimum of 3 (mean 6, range 3 - 12) applications per patient in four-week intervals. Twenty-eight patients were in advanced tumor stages, and 12 patients had locally recurrent tumors. Gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) and mitomycin C (8.5 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered within 1 hour through a celiac trunk catheter. The tumor response (diameter, volume) was measured using MRI or CT and classified according to RECIST. The pain response was defined as a reduction of pain intensity of more than 50% on a visual analog scale, or a reduction of more than 50% in analgesics consumption, or a switch to a less potent analgesic agent. Results: The treatment was tolerated well by all patients. No clinically relevant problems or grade III or IV toxicity according to CTC (Common Toxicity Criteria) were observed. Tumor-related pain was relieved in 20/32 (62.5%) cases. Radiologically, 'complete response' was found in 3/40 (7.5%), 'partial response' in 9/40 (22.5%), 'stable disease' in 16/40 (40%), and 'progressive disease' in 12/40 (30%) of the patients. The median survival period since initial diagnosis and first TACP was 16.4 months and 8.1 months, respectively. Locally recurrent tumors showed better, but still not significant results regarding tumor response (41.7% vs. 25%) as well as survival (14.4 vs. 7 months) compared to advanced tumor stages. Responders (CR + PR) showed a significant survival advantage compared to patients with tumor progression (13.0 vs. 6.0 months; p = 0.013). (orig.)

  1. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ferri Iglesias, María José; Sáez Zafra, Marc; Figueras, Joan; Fort Martorell, Esther; Sàbat Mir, Míriam; López-Ben, Santiago; Llorens Duran, Rafael de; Aleixandre i Cerarols, Rosa Núria; Peracaula Miró, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA 19–9) is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whethe...

  2. Improved Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Diagnosis in Jaundiced and Non-Jaundiced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients through the Combination of Routine Clinical Markers Associated to Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ferri, María José; Saez, Marc; Figueras, Joan; Fort, Esther; Sabat, Miriam; López-Ben, Santiago; Llorens, Rafael de; Aleixandre, Rosa Núria; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background There is still no reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA 19–9) is a tumor marker only recommended for pancreatic adenocarcinoma follow-up. One of the clinical problems lies in distinguishing between this cancer and other benign pancreatic diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In this study we will assess the value of panels of serum molecules related to pancreatic cancer physiopathology to determine whether alone or in comb...

  3. Inhibition of DACH1 activity by short hairpin RNA represses cell proliferation and tumor invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiao-Na; Qiu, Chan; Wang, Chuan; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-08-01

    Cancer of the pancreas is one of the most lethal diseases worldwide. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis is of great consequence to elevate the survival rate. Human Dachshund homologue 1 (DACH1) plays a controversial role in human malignancy progression with its expression being altered in a variety of cancers. Nevertheless, its functional roles and molecular mechanisms in pancreatic cancer remain unknown. The expression of DACH1 in pancreatic cancer cell lines and the ductal epithelial cells were evaluated both at mRNA and protein levels. Three pairs of siRNA targeting the DACH1 gene were designed and synthesized, double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were annealed and inserted into pGenesil-1 vector, which was confirmed by enzymatic digestion and sequencing analyses. The successfully constructed recombinant plasmids were transfected into Capan-1 cells and our data indicated that knockdown of DACH1 gene expression showed strong correlation with repressing tumorigenesis. The proliferation of Capan-1 cells was significantly repressed as evaluated by CCK-8 and colony formation assays. Flow cymetry revealed that cell apoptosis was promoted in interference plasmid group compared with control groups (P0.05). Transwell assay validated the abilities of migration and invasion as being significantly reduced in pshRNA-DACH1 group. Furthermore, our study suggested that DACH1 expression regulates the pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis through interacting with Bcl-2 signaling axis, whereas it controls cell migration and invasion via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. PMID:27278537

  4. Factors affecting 18 F FDOPA standardized uptake value in patients with primary brain tumors after treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To investigate the factors affecting 18 F FDOPA uptake in patients with primary brain tumors (PBT) after treatment. Materials and methods: 97 patients with PBT (6 were grade I, 40 were grade II, 29 were grade III and 22 were grade IV) underwent 18 F FDOPA positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) after treatment. Intervals from surgery, chemotherapy (CHT) and radiotherapy (RT) were 41.48 (± 42.27), 16.04 (± 29.08) and 28.62 (± 34.49) months respectively. Results: 18 F FDOPA uptake in the site of recurrence was not related to the interval from surgery and CHT while a significant relationship has been found with the interval from RT and tumor grade. Conclusions: The results of our study show that the interval from RT and the grade of PBT should be considered carefully when evaluating brain PET/CT scans since these factors could directly affect 18 F FDOPA uptake

  5. PTCH 1 staining of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) samples from patients with and without multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-1) syndrome reveals a potential therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Buddha; Hua, Xianxin; Runske, Melissa; Bennett, Bonita; LiVolsi, Virginia; Roses, Robert; Fraker, Douglas A; Metz, David C

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare, indolent tumors that may occur sporadically or develop in association with well-recognized hereditary syndromes, particularly multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). We previously demonstrated that the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway was aberrantly up-regulated in a mouse model that phenocopies the human MEN-1 syndrome, Men1l/l;RipCre, and that inhibition of this pathway suppresses MEN-1 tumor cell proliferation. We hypothesized that the HH signaling pathway is similarly upregulated in human PNETs. We performed immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PTCH1 in human fresh and archival PNET specimens to examine whether human sporadic and MEN-1-associated PNETs revealed similar abnormalities as in our mouse model and correlated the results with clinical and demographic factors of the study cohort. PTCH1 staining was positive in 12 of 22 PNET patients (55%). Four of 5 MEN-1 patients stained for PTCH1 (p = 0.32 as compared with sporadic disease patients). Nine of 16 patients with metastatic disease stained for PTCH1 as compared with zero of 3 with localized disease only (p = 0.21). No demographic or clinical features appeared to be predictive of PTCH 1 positivity and PTCH 1 positivity per se was not predictive of clinical outcome. PTCH1, a marker of HH pathway up regulation, is detectable in both primary and metastatic tumors in more than 50% of PNET patients. Although no clinical or demographic factors predict PTCH1 positivity and PTCH1 positivity does not predict clinical outcome, the frequency of expression alone indicates that perturbation of this pathway with agents such as Vismodegib, an inhibitor of Smoothened (SMO), should be examined in future clinical trials. PMID:25482929

  6. Tumor budding cells, cancer stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-type cells in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karamitopoulou, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Moreover, PDAC escapes early detection and resists treatment. Multiple combinations of genetic alterations are known to occur in PDAC including mutational activation of KRAS, inactivation of p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4 (DPC4) and dysregulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling. Through their interaction with Wingless-INT pathway, the downstream molecules of these pathways have been implica...

  7. Tumor Budding Cells, Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition-type Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    EvaKaramitopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Moreover, PDAC escapes early detection and resists treatment. Multiple combinations of genetic alterations are known to occur in PDAC including mutational activation of KRAS, inactivation of p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4 (DPC4) and dysregulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling. Through their interaction with WNT pathway, the downstream molecules of these pathways have been implicated in th...

  8. Tumor budding cells, cancer stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-type cells in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karamitopoulou, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Moreover, PDAC escapes early detection and resists treatment. Multiple combinations of genetic alterations are known to occur in PDAC including mutational activation of KRAS, inactivation of p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4 (DPC4) and dysregulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling. Through their interaction with Wingless-INT pathway, the downstream molecules of these pathways have been implica...

  9. [Surgical management of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Song Cheol

    2008-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major problematic concern among all forms of gastrointestinal malignancies because of its poor prognosis. Although significant progress has been made in the surgical treatment in terms of increased resection rate and decreased treatment-related morbidity and mortality, the true survival rate still remains below 5% today. Surgical options for pancreatic cancer are based on the its unique anatomy and physiology, catastrophic tumor biology, experience of surgeon, and status of patients. Four main options exist for the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. These include standard "Whipple" pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), pylorus preserving PD (PPPD), distal pancreatectomy (left-side pancreatectomy), and total pancreatectomy according to the location of tumor. Portal vein involvement by tumor is regarded as an anatomical extension of disease, and en bloc resection of portal vein with tumor is recommended if technically feasible, which is stated in 2002 AJCC tumor staging for pancreatic cancer. In comparison of the survival rates between standard and extended resection of pancreatic head cancer, no significant survival benefit was demonstrated from the prospective reports. PPPD may be superior to standard PD in respect to nutrition and quality of life without any deleterious effect upon long term survival or tumor recurrence. New surgical treatment modalities including modified extended pancreatectomy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and radical antegrade modular distal pancreatectomy have been tried to improve the patients' survival. However, early diagnosis and treatment remain as key factors for the cure of pancreatic cancer irrespective of various surgical trials. PMID:18349571

  10. Genetic abnormalities in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamboni Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence and mortality of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are nearly coincident having a five-year survival of less than 5%. Enormous advances have been made in our knowledge of the molecular alterations commonly present in ductal cancer and other pancreatic malignancies. One significant outcome of these studies is the recognition that common ductal cancers have a distinct molecular fingerprint compared to other nonductal or endocrine tumors. Ductal carcinomas typically show alteration of K-ras, p53, p16INK4, DPC4 and FHIT, while other pancreatic tumor types show different aberrations. Among those tumors arising from the exocrine pancreas, only ampullary cancers have a molecular fingerprint that may involve some of the same genes most frequently altered in common ductal cancers. Significant molecular heterogeneity also exists among pancreatic endocrine tumors. Nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumors have frequent mutations in MEN-1 and may be further subdivided into two clinically relevant subgroups based on the amount of chromosomal alterations. The present review will provide a brief overview of the genetic alterations that have been identified in the various subgroups of pancreatic tumors. These results have important implications for the development of genetic screening tests, early diagnosis, and prognostic genetic markers.

  11. The Differential Broadens. EUS FNA Appearance and Cytological Findings of Pancreatic Angiomyolipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferga C Gleeson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Angiomyolipoma is a rare tumor characterized histologically by a mixture of spindle cells, adipose tissue, epithelioid cells, and vascular tissue. It usually involves the kidney followed by the liver whereby the majority of affected patients are female, and many cases arise in the setting of tuberous sclerosis.Case report We report a case of a 33-yearold female with an asymptomatic incidental right renal mass suggestive of an angiomyolipoma in conjunction with numerous pancreatic masses. Conclusions The utility of EUS in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors is well established. This is the first known reported EUS detection and FNA confirmation of angiomyolipoma metastatic to the pancreas and should now be added to the already broad differential of metastatic pancreatic tumors

  12. A Case of a Solid Renal Mass Together with a Cystic Pancreatic Lesion in a 50-Year-Old Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satorres Rosas J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic cysts may be incidentally detected in asymptomatic patients evaluated for other clinical manifestations. Microcystic adenomas are particularly rare among pancreatic cyst neoplasms. They are benign lesions and can present as solitary pancreatic tumors or as a radiological manifestation combined with other cystic and tumoral lesions affecting different organs. CASE REPORT: A 50-year-old man presented with hematuria. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed a 9-centimeter renal mass in the left kidney consistent with a renal-cell carcinoma as well as a cystic lesion the head of the pancreas. The histopathological study of the cystic mass, following a computed tomography guided biopsy, showed a microcystic adenoma. Therefore, further studies were performed so as to assess the relationship between both lesions and determine the final diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Microcystic adenomas are exceedingly rare tumors among pancreatic cysts. The combination of a solid renal mass and a pancreatic cystic lesion should lead to a broad differential diagnosis. Pancreatic magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to be particularly useful in evaluating cystic masses. The presence of walls and internal septations in the pancreatic mass with gadolinium enhancement should raise the possibility of an underlying Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

  13. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  14. Design and optimization of the production process of radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA-Nal3-Octreotide for the treatment of gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolabel peptides are molecules of interest in nuclear medicine for their therapeutic and diagnostic application in cancer. Among an impressing group of relevant peptides, those similar of the somatostatin, as the Nal3-Octreotide (NOC), have established as potential radiopharmaceuticals when presenting significant affinity for the receptors of this peptide hormone that are over expressed and broadly distributed in tumors of neuroendocrine origin, as the gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors. On the other hand, the Lutetium-177 (177Lu) is an ideal candidate for the peptides radiolabel and has favorable characteristics to be used in radionuclide therapy. The objective of this work was designing, optimizing and to document the production process of the radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA-Nal3-Octreotide (177Lu-DOTANOC) for the solicitude of its sanitary registration before the Comision Federal contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). For the optimization of the production process a factorial design of three variables was evaluated with mixed levels (18 combinations), where the dependent variable is the radiochemical purity and the analytic method used to determine this parameter (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) was validated. Later on, by means of the production of 3 lots of the optimized formula of the radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTANOC the production process was validated and the stability long term study to determine the period of useful life was carried out. The following pharmaceutical formulation was adopted as good: 1.85 GBq (0.5μg) of 177Lu, 250 μg of DOTANOC and 150 μL of acetates Buffer 1 M ph 5 in 5 m L of the medium. The analytic method used to determine the radiochemical purity of the formulation satisfied the requirements for the wished analytic application. We can conclude that the 3 validation lots prepared under protocols of Good Production Practices, in the Plant of Radiopharmaceuticals Production of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones

  15. Clinicopathologic Review of 31 Cases of Solid Pseudopapillary Pancreatic Tumors: Can We Use the Scoring System of Microscopic Features for Suggesting Clinically Malignant Potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang-Hee; Lee, Jae-Myeong

    2016-04-01

    A solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT) is a pancreatic neoplasm of low malignant potential. The potentially malignant pathologic features of SPTs were regarded as angioinvasion, perineural invasion, deep invasion of the surrounding acinar tissue, and nuclear pleomorphism. We retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of SPTs (25 female and 6 male patients, with an average age of 35 ± 14 years). The mean follow-up period was 132.0 ± 55.9 months. To evaluate the clinical impact of above pathological parameters, we analyzed their correlation with actually observed clinical malignancy. In three cases, the SPTs were clearly clinically malignant: one patient had recurrences three times, one showed lymph node metastases, and one deep soft tissue invasion around the gastroduodenal artery. Tumor infiltration to the peripancreatic soft tissue was observed in 17 cases (54.8%). The pathologic features considered suggestive of malignant potential were angioinvasion (25.8%), perineural invasion (6.5%), presence of mitosis in 10 high-power fields (16.1%), and moderate nuclear pleomorphism (19.4%). The presence of at least three of these features was not correlated with clinically confirmed malignant behavior (P = 0.570). Microscopic pathologic features of SPTs cannot be reliably associated with aggressive clinical behavior. Moreover, the absence of these microscopic features cannot exclude clinical malignancy. PMID:27097622

  16. An esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a patient with MEN1-related pancreatic gastrinoma: An unusual association and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Massironi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1-related gastrinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare neoplasms, and their association has been rarely reported. We describe an unusual association between a GIST and a MEN1-related gastrinoma. A 44-year-old man had undergone surgical removal of a pancreatic gastrinoma in 2004 and was then administered long-term somatostatin analogs, and diagnosed as having MEN1 syndrome. Following an uneventful follow-up, in April 2009, an upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy showed esophageal narrowing, with evidence of a 2-cm solid mass on endoscopic ultrasonography. Histology revealed a tumor composed of elongated cells with plump cytoplasm arranged in a storiform pattern. The immunophenotype of the lesion was CD117 and Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF positive, whereas alpha-1 muscle actin and S-100 protein were negative. Due to morphological and immunohistochemical results, a final diagnosis of esophageal GIST was made. The association between GISTs and MEN1 could be casual, although a single case of the coexistence of a GIST and a MEN1-related gastrinoma has already been reported. A role of the MEN1 gene in the pathogenesis of GISTs could be hypothesized.

  17. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  18. Role of RHOT1 on migration and proliferation of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qingqing; Yao, Lei; Wei, Youzhen; Geng, Shasha; He, Chengzhi; Jiang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most malignant tumors. Rho GTPases can affect several types of human cancers, including PC. In this study, we investigated the role of Ras homolog family member T1 (RHOT1), a new member of Rho GTPases in PC. IHC results showed that RHOT1 was expressed significantly higher in PC tissues than paracancerous tissues (P

  19. Phase 1 Study of PLX7486 as Single Agent and With Gemcitabine Plus Nab-Paclitaxel in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Solid Tumors; Untreated Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Cancer Non-resectable; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Tumors of Any Histology With Activating Trk (NTRK) Point or NTRK Fusion Mutations; Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor

  20. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Canlas, Karen R; Malcolm S. Branch

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a useful tool in the evaluation and management of acute pancreatitis. This review will focus on the role of ERCP in specific causes of acute pancreatitis, including microlithiasis and gallstone disease, pancreas divisum, Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, tumors of the pancreaticobiliary tract, pancreatic pseudocysts, and pancreatic duct injury. Indications for endoscopic techniques such as biliary and pancreatic sphincterotomy, stenting, s...

  1. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by disrupting nuclear β-catenin/TCF-1 complex: critical role of STAT-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Kartick C; Fofaria, Neel M; Gupta, Parul; Ranjan, Alok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2015-05-10

    Aberrant activation of β-catenin/TCF signaling is related to the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of capsaicin on β-catenin/TCF signaling. In a concentration and time-dependent study, we observed that capsaicin treatment inhibits the activation of dishevelled (Dsh) protein DvI-1 in L3.6PL, PanC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells. Capsaicin treatment induced GSK-3β by inhibiting its phosphorylation and further activated APC and Axin multicomplex, leading to the proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. Expression of TCF-1 and β-catenin-responsive proteins, c-Myc and cyclin D1 also decreased in response to capsaicin treatment. Pre-treatment of cells with MG-132 blocked capsaicin-mediated proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. To establish the involvement of β-catenin in capsaicin-induced apoptosis, cells were treated with LiCl or SB415286, inhibitors of GSK-3β. Our results reveal that capsaicin treatment suppressed LiCl or SB415286-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling. Our results further showed that capsaicin blocked nuclear translocation of β-catenin, TCF-1 and p-STAT-3 (Tyr705). The immunoprecipitation results indicated that capsaicin treatment reduced the interaction of β-catenin and TCF-1 in the nucleus. Moreover, capsaicin treatment significantly decreased the phosphorylation of STAT-3 at Tyr705. Interestingly, STAT-3 over expression or STAT-3 activation by IL-6, significantly increased the levels of β-catenin and attenuated the effects of capsaicin in inhibiting β-catenin signaling. Finally, capsaicin mediated inhibition of orthotopic tumor growth was associated with inhibition of β-catenin/TCF-1 signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells was associated with inhibition of β-catenin signaling due to the dissociation of β-catenin/TCF-1 complex and the process was orchestrated by STAT-3. PMID:25869100

  2. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas K; Herrmann, Ken; Eckel, Florian; Beer, Ambros J

    2011-01-01

    Morphology-based imaging modalities have replaced classical conventional nuclear medicine modalities for detection of liver or pancreatic lesions. With positron emission tomography and the glucose analog F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a sensitive and specific modality for the detection of hepatic metastases and extrahepatic tumor deposits from hepatocellular or pancreatic cancer is available. F-18 FDG PET can increase the accuracy of staging primary tumors of the liver or the pancreas, and can be used for response monitoring. Radiopharmaceuticals such as Ga-68 DOTATOC and F-18 DOPA allow the specific detection of neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and their metastatic deposits. Hybrid scanners such as PET-CT integrate morphologic and metabolic information, and allow to increase the sensitivity and specificity of noninvasive imaging in many tumor entities. The development of specific radiopharmaceuticals and technical innovations such as SPECT-CT has increased the reliability of conventional scintigraphic imaging. This chapter focuses on the use of PET-CT in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers. PMID:21331938

  3. Primary pancreatic neoplasms in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic tumors are infrequent in children. We are reporting the imaging diagnostic findings observed in a 9 patient series managed during the 1989-2000 with different types of pancreatic neoplasms (insulinoma n=2, pancreatoblastoma n=1, solid papillary-cystic carcinoma n=4, and adenocarcinoma n=2). Imaging exams included: ultrasonography, computed tomography, angiography and magnetic resonance. Imaging studies were useful to demonstrate the tumoral mass in 8/9 cases (89%), with only one false negative case (insulinoma). In this patient (6 years old), US, CT and angiography were negative for pancreatic tumor; final diagnosis was achieved by venous insulin dosimetry and intraoperative US. Pancreatic localization was determined in 7/9 cases (77%), excluding an undetected insulinoma and a huge pancreatoblastoma (14 x 10 cm). However, the imaging diagnosis was useful for staging and planning an adequate surgical approach. (author)

  4. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bharivi Jani; Fadi Rzouq; Shreyas Saligram; Atta Nawabi; Marian Nicola; Katie Dennis; Carly Ernst; Ali Abbaszadeh; John Bonino; Mojtaba Olyaee

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the "groove" of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance chol...

  5. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Neoadjuvant therapy affects tumor growth markers in early stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chorostowska-Wynimko J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction While adjuvant therapy of early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is widely accepted, literature data concerning neoadjuvant treatment provide contradictory results with both improved and unaffected survival rates. Also, data concerning potential effects of neo-adjuvant therapy on cellular level are scarce. Objective The aim of present study was to analyze the effect of chemotherapy followed by surgical resection on several key biological markers of tumor growth (TGF-β, VEGF, apoptosis (sAPO-1/Fas/CD95 and invasiveness (TIMP-1 assessed in the sera of NSCLC early-stage patients (IB-IIIA. Materials and methods Measurements were performed by ELISA method in blood serum from 24 NSCLC patients (I-IIIA collected prior therapy, one day before surgery and 3 days after. Results TGF-β serum concentrations were significantly lower after both chemotherapy (P Conclusion Neoadjuvant treatment of early-stage NSCLC affects mostly mechanisms responsible for tumor growth and vascularization. Its effect on cancer cells apoptotic activity needs further evaluation.

  7. MUC1 Regulates PDGFA Expression During Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Sahraei, Mahnaz; Roy, Lopamudra Das; CURRY, JENNIFER M.; Teresa, Tinder L; Nath, Sritama; Besmer, Dahlia; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Dalia, Ritu; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) has one of the worst prognoses of all cancers. Mucin 1 (MUC1), a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is a key modulator of several signaling pathways that affect oncogenesis, motility, and metastasis. Its expression is known to be associated with poor prognosis in patients. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive. We report a novel association of MUC1 with Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-A (PDGFA). PDGFA is one of the many drivers of tumor growth, an...

  8. Whipple Made Simple For Surgical Pathologists: Orientation, Dissection, and Sampling of Pancreaticoduodenectomy Specimens For a More Practical and Accurate Evaluation of Pancreatic, Distal Common Bile Duct, and Ampullary Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Adsay, N. Volkan; Basturk, Olca; Saka, Burcu; Bagci, Pelin; Ozdemir, Denizhan; Balci, Serdar; Sarmiento, Juan M; Kooby, David A; Staley, Charles; Maithel, Shishir K; Everett, Rhonda; Cheng, Jeanette D.; Thirabanjasak, Duangpeng; Weaver, Donald W.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) specimens present a challenge for surgical pathologists because of the relative rarity of these specimens, combined with the anatomic complexity. Here, we describe our experience on the orientation, dissection, and sampling of PD specimens for a more practical and accurate evaluation of pancreatic, distal common bile duct (CBD), and ampullary tumors. For orientation of PDs, identification of the “trapezoid,” created by the vascular bed at the center, the pancreati...

  9. {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC: biodistribution and dosimetry in patients affected by neuroendocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettinato, C.; Sarnelli, A.; Di Donna, M.; Civollani, S.; Marengo, M.; Bergamini, C. [A.O. S. Orsola-Malpighi, Health Physics, Bologna (Italy); Nanni, C.; Montini, G.; Di Pierro, D. [A.O. S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, M. [European Institute of Oncology, Health Physics, Milano (Italy)

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC in patients affected by neuroendocrine tumors. We enrolled nine patients (six male and three female) affected by different types of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Each patient underwent four whole body positron emission tomography (PET) scans, respectively, at 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after the intravenous injection of about 185 MBq of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC. Blood and urine samples were taken at different time points post injection: respectively, at about 5, 18, 40, 60, and 120 min for blood and every 40-50 min from injection time up to 4 h for urine. The organs involved in the dosimetric evaluations were liver, heart, spleen, kidneys, lungs, pituitary gland, and urinary bladder. Dosimetric evaluations were done using the OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software. A physiological uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC was seen in all patients in the pituitary gland, the spleen, the liver, and the urinary tract (kidneys and urinary bladder). Organs with the highest absorbed doses were kidneys (9.0 E-02{+-}3.2 E-02 mSv/Mq). The mean effective dose equivalent (EDE) was 2.5 E-02{+-}4.6 E-03 mSv/MBq. The excretion of the compound was principally via urine, giving dose to the kidney and the urinary bladder wall. As SSTR2 is the most frequently expressed somatostatin receptor and {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC has high affinity to it, this compound might play an important role in PET oncology in the future. The dosimetric evaluation carried out by our team demonstrated that {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC delivers a dose to organs comparable to, and even lower than, analogous diagnostic compounds. (orig.)

  10. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  11. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  12. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... method of medical management. Patients may be prescribed pancreatic enzyme supplements to treat maldigestion, insulin to treat diabetes, ... in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes such as Creon, Pancrease, and Violiase are helpful ...

  13. Ascorbate availability affects tumor implantation-take rate and increases tumor rejection in Gulo–/– mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell EJ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth J Campbell,1 Margreet CM Vissers,2 Gabi U Dachs1 1Mackenzie Cancer Research Group, 2Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Pathology, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand Abstract: In solid tumors, HIF1 upregulates the expression of hundreds of genes involved in cell survival, tumor growth, and adaptation to the hypoxic microenvironment. HIF1 stabilization and activity are suppressed by prolyl and asparagine hydroxylases, which require oxygen as a substrate and ascorbate as a cofactor. This has led us to hypothesize that intracellular ascorbate availability could modify the hypoxic HIF1 response and influence tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of variable intracellular ascorbate levels on HIF1 induction in cancer cells in vitro, and on tumor-take rate and growth in the Gulo–/– mouse. These mice depend on dietary ascorbate, and were supplemented with 3,300 mg/L, 330 mg/L, or 33 mg/L ascorbate in their drinking water, resulting in saturating, medium, or low plasma and tissue ascorbate levels, respectively. In Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LL/2 in culture, optimal ascorbate supplementation reduced HIF1 accumulation under physiological but not pathological hypoxia. LL/2, B16-F10 melanoma, or CMT-93 colorectal cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into Gulo–/– mice at a range of cell inocula. Establishment of B16-F10 tumors in mice supplemented with 3,300 mg/L ascorbate required an increased number of cancer cells to initiate tumor growth compared with the number of cells required in mice on suboptimal ascorbate intake. Elevated ascorbate intake was also associated with decreased tumor ascorbate levels and a reduction in HIF1α expression and transcriptional activity. Following initial growth, all CMT-93 tumors regressed spontaneously, but mice supplemented with 33 mg/L ascorbate had lower plasma ascorbate levels and grew larger tumors than optimally supplemented mice. The data from this

  14. Complicated Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma? ; What is the impact of organ failure on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis? ; Based on individual patient data from randomized trials, does early enteral tube feedin...

  15. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias;

    2004-01-01

    chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 170 unique proteins were identified including known pancreatic cancer tumor markers (e.g., CEA, MUC1) and proteins overexpressed in pancreatic cancers (e.g., hepatocarcinoma-intestine-pancreas/pancreatitis-associated protein (HIP/PAP) and lipocalin 2......Proteomic technologies provide an excellent means for analysis of body fluids for cataloging protein constituents and identifying biomarkers for early detection of cancers. The biomarkers currently available for pancreatic cancer, such as CA19-9, lack adequate sensitivity and specificity...... in this study could be directly assessed for their potential as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer by quantitative proteomics methods or immunoassays....

  16. Assessment of confounding factors affecting the tumor markers SMRP, CA125, and CYFRA21-1 in serum

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Gilbert Weber; Georg Johnen; Dirk Taeger; Anne Weber; Isabelle Mercedes Gross; Beate Pesch; Thomas Kraus; Thomas Brüning; Monika Gube

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate if serum levels of potential tumor markers for the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer are affected by confounding factors in a surveillance cohort of workers formerly exposed to asbestos. SMRP, CA125, and CYFRA21-1 concentrations were determined in about 1,700 serum samples from 627 workers formerly exposed to asbestos. The impact of factors that could modify the concentrations of the tumor markers was examined with linear mixed mo...

  17. Perineural Invasion in Pancreatic Cancer: Advanced Research in the Neuro-cancer Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hong SHEN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic Cancer (PCa is characterized by prominently local nerve alterations and perineural invasion (PNI, which frequently affects the extrapancreatic nerve plexus, causing severe pain and retropancreatic tumor extension. It precludes curative resection, promotes local recurrence, and at the last negatively influences the prognosis of patients. Recent research on PNI in PCa has revealed the critical involvement of numerous nerve- or cancer cell-derived molecules in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanisms contributing to alteration and invasion of intrapancreatic nerves and the spread of cancer cells along extrapancreatic nerves in pancreatic cancer patients are still poorly understood. This review focuses on perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer and provides an outline of the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

  18. Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathy Sushmita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

  19. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization

  20. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Li, Ying-Yi [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Furukawa, Kaoru; Tanabe, Yamato [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Matsugo, Seiichi [School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sasaki, Soichiro [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Mukaida, Naofumi, E-mail: mukaida@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2015-03-06

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization.

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  4. Metformin-Cefixime Co-administration affects Glucose Regulation and Reno-Pancreatic Histology in Alloxan-induced Hyperglycemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olurishe CO,

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, is often associated with renal infections and complications, requiring antimicrobials. Metformin (Met being the first line therapy in T2DM is co-administered with antimicrobial agents when infections coexist. Cefixime (Cef, an oral cephalosporin is effective in treatment of several bacterial infections. The current study investigated the effect of concurrent metformin-cefixime (Met-Cef administration on glucose regulation, renal function and haematological indices in alloxan induced hyperglycaemic rats. Four groups of five wistar rats were used in the study. Groups I and II were normoglycemic receiving daily oral normal saline (10 ml/kg and cefixime (400 mg/kg from day 14 respectively. Diabetes was induced with a single i.p. administration of 140 mg/kg alloxan monohydrate in groups III and IV which received 200 mg/kg metformin for 28 days, while group IV received cefixime in addition from day 15. Random blood glucose (RBG was evaluated on days 8, 14 and 28, while fasting blood glucose (FBG was evaluated on days 1, 14, 21 and 28. At the end of the study animals were humanely sacrificed and blood obtained was used for the determination of renal and haematological parameters. Relative weights of kidneys andpancreas were determined and histopathological evaluation of the organs also conducted. There was a statistically significant reduction(p<0.05 in RBG and a decrease in FBG between metformin treated and Met-Cef treated groups at the end of two weeks co-administration.There was no significant difference in electrolytes, urea, creatinine and haematological parameters. Pancreatic histology showed amelioration of necrosis of pancreatic acini in the Met-Cef treated rats compared to Met only treated rats. Concurrent Met-Cef treatment did not result in any differences in renal histology in comparison with metformin treated group. Data from the study revealed a possible augmentation of the hypoglycaemic effect of metformin

  5. Carbonyl stress-induced 5-hydroxytriptamine secretion from RIN-14B, rat pancreatic islet tumor cells, via the activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzawa, Sayaka; Takahashi, Kenji; Shimada, Takahisa; Ohta, Toshio

    2016-07-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG), a highly reactive dicarbonyl substance, is known as an endogenous carbonyl stress-inducing substance related to various disease states. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequently encountered gastrointestinal disorders and MG is considered to be its causal substance. An increased serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) level is related to IBS symptoms and the majority of 5-HT originates from enterochromaffin (EC) cells in the intestine. Here we examine the mechanisms of MG-induced 5-HT secretion using RIN-14B cells derived from a rat pancreatic islet tumor since these cells are used as a model for EC cells. MG increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and 5-HT secretion, both of which were inhibited by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and specific transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonists. MG elicited an inward current under voltage-clamped conditions. Prior application of MG evoked reciprocal suppression of subsequent [Ca(2+)]i responses to allylisothiocyanate, a TRPA1 agonist, and vice versa. Glyoxal, an analog of MG, also evoked [Ca(2+)]i and secretory responses but its potency was much lower than that of MG. The present results suggest that MG promotes 5-HT secretion through the activation of TRPA1 in RIN-14B cells. These results may indicate that TRPA1 is a promising target for the treatment of IBS and that the RIN-14B cell line is a useful model for investigation of IBS. PMID:27423812

  6. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr(3)-octreotide for staging and follow-up of patients with endocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the use of 99mTc-EDDA-hydrazinonicotinyl-Tyr3-octreotide (Tc-TOC) for staging and follow-up of neuroendocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumors with special focus on the acquisition protocol including single photon emission computed tomography (SPECf). Methods: Eighty-eight patients (37 female, 51 male; age range: 16 to 81 years; mean age: 56.3 years) were studied: 42 patients for staging after initial histological confirmation and 46 patients during post-therapy follow-up. An average activity of 400 MBq of the radiopharmaceutical was injected. All tumors originated from neuroendocrine tissue of the gastroenteropancreatic tract. Whole body seintigrams at 4 h postinjection and SPECT of the abdomen were obtained in alI patients. Additional planar images of the abdomen were acquired at 2 h after injection in 68 patients. Results: The Tc-TOC scan result was true-positive in 56 patients, true-negative in 17, false-negative in 14, and false-positive in 1 patient. The false-positive finding was caused by a colonie adenoma. Overall, a scan sensitivity of 80% (56/70 patients), specificity of 94.4% (17/18 patients) and accuracy of 82.9% (73/88 patients) were calculated on patient basis. In total, Tc-TOC detected 357 foci in 69 patients. In 7 patients equivocaI findings were observed in the bowel at 4 h postinjection without corresponding tracer uptake in the scan 2 h earlier, meaning that these abnormal findings were correctly classified as non-malignant. In addition to planar views, SPECT revealed further 62 lesions

  7. Effect of vitamin E deficiency on pancreatic tumors induced by N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) in the syrian golden hamster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, M.A.; Martin, W.G.; Hinton, D.E.

    1986-03-05

    Male hamsters (N=100) were injected i.p. with 40 mg/kg BOP at 8 wk, then assigned to a vitamin E deficient (< 1 I.U./100g, D) or sufficient (150 I.U./100g, C) semi-purified diet and pair-fed. To prevent interaction with Se, diets were torula yeast based (< 0.05 ppm Se). After 120 d on diet (dod), the hamsters were fed the C diet for the remainder of the trial. A previous study indicated that this dietary regimine prevented mortality due to vitamin E depletion to at least 420 dod. At 90 dod two pairs of hamsters were sacrificed to confirm E deficiency. RBC hemolysis increased in D (D=87.1 +/- 6.5%, C=43.9 +/- 4.4%, p < 0.05) and plasma ..cap alpha..-tocopherol decreased (D=22.5 +/- 3.8, C=43.9 +/- 4.7 ..mu..g/ml, p < 0.05). D hamsters lost weight relative to C from 60-185 dod only. Moribund hamsters were sacrificed. Gross examination revealed nodules in liver and pancreas of animals dying at greater than or equal to 33 wk post-injection. At 52 wk, 50% of D had died and the remaining D hamsters were sacrificed. Mortality (50%) was delayed by 8 wk in C. From 33-52 wk, D:C mortality was 1.6. This suggests that dietary vitamin E deficiency decreased the latency period for onset of tumors. Histological examination showed pancreatic tumors and associated lesions, including cystic foci, cystadenomas and adenocarcinomas.

  8. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  9. Factors and variables affecting tumor response to combined heat and radiation in head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate, retrospectively, the value of the combined modality over radiation alone with respect to CR rate and its correlation with some variables, such as tumor temperature and tumor volume, in a patient population homogeneous with respect to tumor site and histology and treated under the same conditions according to a treatment protocol. (orig./MG)

  10. Acute pancreatitis - severity classification, complications and outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis, with an annual incidence of approximately 35 per 100 000 inhabitants in Sweden, is in most cases mild and self-limiting. Severe acute pancreatitis, affecting 10-15% of the cases is, however, associated with severe complications and even death. The optimal management of acute pancreatitis includes accurate early prediction of the disease severity. The aims of this thesis were to investigate early severity classification, complications and outcome in acute pancreatitis patie...

  11. The long non-coding RNA HOTAIR affects the radiosensitivity of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma by regulating the expression of Wnt inhibitory factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanhui; Li, Zhihua; Zheng, Shangyou; Chen, Huimou; Zhao, Xiaohui; Gao, Wenchao; Bi, Zhuofei; You, Kaiyun; Wang, Yingxue; Li, Wenzhu; Li, Liting; Liu, Yimin; Chen, Rufu

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is seriously resistant to radiotherapy and the mechanism is largely unknown. HOX transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) is overexpressed in PDAC. However, the function of HOTAIR has never been related to the radiosensitivity of PDAC. In this present study, the expression of HOTAIR in the PDAC cell lines and tissues was measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and the association between HOTAIR expression levels and X-ray treatment in PDAC cell lines was investigated. Additionally, the influence of HOTAIR knockdown on radiosensitivity, proliferation, and apoptosis of PDAC cells after radiation was evaluated by colony formation assays, Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays, and flow cytometry, respectively. Furthermore, the correlation between HOTAIR and Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1) expression in PDAC cell lines and tissues was studied to assess the role of HOTAIR and WIF-1 in the radiosensitivity of PDAC. The results confirmed that HOTAIR expression was significantly increased in the PDAC cell lines and tissues (n = 90) compared with human normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line (HPDE) and matched adjacent normal tissues (n = 90). Functionally, HOTAIR knockdown enhanced the radiosensitivity of PDAC cells, reduced the proliferation, and increased the apoptosis of cells after radiation. And HOTAIR silencing increased the expression of WIF-1. Furthermore, the overexpression of WIF-1 revealed that HOTAIR modulated the radiosensitivity of PDAC cells by regulating the expression of WIF-1. These data reveals that HOTAIR can affect the radiosensitivity of PDAC cells partly via regulating the expression of WIF-1, and HOTAIR-WIF-1 axis is a potential target for PDAC radiotherapy. PMID:26482614

  12. Pancreatitis-induced Inflammation Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer by Inhibiting Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Carmen; Collado, Manuel; Navas, Carolina; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Cañamero, Marta; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Barbacid, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells of adult mice (≥P60) are resistant to transformation by some of the most robust oncogenic insults including expression of K-Ras oncogenes and loss of p16Ink4a/p19Arf or Trp53 tumor suppressors. Yet, these acinar cells yield pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (mPanIN) and ductal adenocarcinomas (mPDAC) if exposed to limited bouts of non-acute pancreatitis, providing they harbor K-Ras oncogenes. Pancreatitis contributes to tumor progression by abrogating the senescence barrier characteristic of low-grade mPanINs. Attenuation of pancreatitis-induced inflammation also accelerates tissue repair and thwarts mPanIN expansion. Patients with chronic pancreatitis display senescent PanINs, if they have received anti-inflammatory drugs. These results put forward the concept that anti-inflammatory treatment of people diagnosed with pancreatitis may reduce their risk of developing PDAC. PMID:21665147

  13. Does tumor type affect local control by radiofrequency ablation in the lungs?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the effect of tumor type on local control by radiofrequency ablation in the lungs. Materials and methods: : This study included 252 lung tumors (mean size, 13.5 mm) in 105 patients (73 men and 32 women; mean age, 66.6 years) who underwent radiofrequency ablation with a multitined expandable electrode. Those tumors comprised five tumor types: primary lung cancer (n = 35) and pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (n = 117), lung cancer (n = 23), renal cell carcinoma (n = 49), and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 28). Local control was evaluated with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. The overall local control rates were estimated as well as those for each tumor type using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Local control rates for a given tumor type were compared with those for the four other types. Then, multivariate multilevel analysis was performed using the variables of tumor type, tumor size, contact with a vessel or bronchus, and procedure period. Results: The overall local control rates were 97%, 86%, 81%, and 76% at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, respectively. Local control rates varied among the tumor types, and metastatic colorectal cancer showed significantly (P = .023) higher local control rates than those of the four other types. However, multivariate analysis indicated that the relative risk of local progression for a given tumor type was comparable to the risks for the four other types. Conclusion: Tumor type per se did not significantly influence local control.

  14. Does tumor type affect local control by radiofrequency ablation in the lungs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Takao [Department of Radiology, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)], E-mail: takaoh@tc4.so-net.ne.jp; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi [Department of Radiology, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Sano, Yoshifumi [Department of Cancer and Thoracic Surgery, Okayama University Medical School, Okayama (Japan); Tsuda, Toshihide [Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Graduate School of Environmental Science, Okayama University Graduate School, Okayama (Japan); Iguchi, Toshihiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Kishi, Ryotaro; Matsui, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Susumu [Department of Radiology, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the effect of tumor type on local control by radiofrequency ablation in the lungs. Materials and methods: : This study included 252 lung tumors (mean size, 13.5 mm) in 105 patients (73 men and 32 women; mean age, 66.6 years) who underwent radiofrequency ablation with a multitined expandable electrode. Those tumors comprised five tumor types: primary lung cancer (n = 35) and pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (n = 117), lung cancer (n = 23), renal cell carcinoma (n = 49), and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 28). Local control was evaluated with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. The overall local control rates were estimated as well as those for each tumor type using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Local control rates for a given tumor type were compared with those for the four other types. Then, multivariate multilevel analysis was performed using the variables of tumor type, tumor size, contact with a vessel or bronchus, and procedure period. Results: The overall local control rates were 97%, 86%, 81%, and 76% at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, respectively. Local control rates varied among the tumor types, and metastatic colorectal cancer showed significantly (P = .023) higher local control rates than those of the four other types. However, multivariate analysis indicated that the relative risk of local progression for a given tumor type was comparable to the risks for the four other types. Conclusion: Tumor type per se did not significantly influence local control.

  15. Membrane Drug Transporters and Chemoresistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer ranks among the tumors most resistant to chemotherapy. Such chemoresistance of tumors can be mediated by various cellular mechanisms including dysregulated apoptosis or ineffective drug concentration at the intracellular target sites. In this review, we highlight recent advances in experimental chemotherapy underlining the role of cellular transporters in drug resistance. Such contribution to the chemoresistant phenotype of tumor cells or tissues can be conferred both by uptake and export transporters, as demonstrated by in vivo and in vitro data. Our studies used human pancreatic carcinoma cells, cells stably transfected with human transporter cDNAs, or cells in which a specific transporter was knocked down by RNA interference. We have previously shown that 5-fluorouracil treatment affects the expression profile of relevant cellular transporters including multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and that MRP5 (ABCC5) influences chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Similarly, cell treatment with the nucleoside drug gemcitabine or a combination of chemotherapeutic drugs can variably influence the expression pattern and relative amount of uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells or select for pre-existing subpopulations. In addition, cytotoxicity studies with MRP5-overexpressing or MRP5-silenced cells demonstrate a contribution of MRP5 also to gemcitabine resistance. These data may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine and/or 5-fluorouracil

  16. Aberrant expression of Wnt antagonist SFRP1 in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Xian-min; ZHAO Cheng-hai; DAI Xian-wei

    2008-01-01

    @@ Pancreatic cancer is one of the malignant tumor with a very poor prognosis. Both genetic and epigenetic alterations are involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer. Hypermethylation and subsequent loss of expression of some tumor suppressor genes and tumor-related genes occur frequently in pancreatic cancer, such as loss of expression of pl6,1 RASSF1A,2 SOCS-1,3 and hMLH14 genes were repoted.

  17. Pancreatic cancer control: is vitamin D the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sarah; Naseem, Imrana

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by late detection, resistance to therapy, poor prognosis, and an exceptionally high mortality rate. Epidemiology ascribes a chemopreventive role to vitamin D in several cancers including pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D therapy has been ascribed a role previously in tumor inhibition and differentiation in addition to reduction of inflammation and angiogenesis. However, the role of vitamin D in pancreatic cancer prevention or therapy remains elusive to date. Studies have shown a negative correlation between the risk of pancreatic cancer and serum vitamin D levels. It is believed that vitamin D binding to certain conserved sequences called vitamin D response elements in the DNA can alter the expression of genes involved in tumorigenesis. Recent research has elucidated the role of zinc in carcinogenesis, which in turn is found to be affected by vitamin D supplementation. In the light of numerous new-found roles for vitamin D, we review and evaluate the potential actions of the sunshine vitamin with respect to pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:25946657

  18. Are preoperative sex-related differences of affective symptoms in primary brain tumor patients associated with postoperative histopathological grading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Andre; Jenewein, J; Krayenbühl, N; Woernle, C; Bellut, D

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to explore the impact of the histopathological tumor type on affective symptoms before surgery among male and female patients with supratentorial primary brain tumors. A total of 44 adult patients were included in the study. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Additionally, clinical interviews, including the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), were conducted. The general function of patients was measured with the Karnofsky Performance Status scale (KPS). All measures were obtained before surgery and therefore before the final histopathological diagnosis. All self-rating questionnaires but not the HDRS, showed significantly higher scores in female patients. The functional status assessed with the KPS was lower in female patients and correlated to the somatic part of the BDI. We further found a tendency for higher HDRS scores in male patients with a WHO grade 4 tumor stage compared to female patients. This finding was supported by positive correlations between HDRS scores and WHO grade in male and negative correlations between HDRS scores and WHO grade in female patients. In conclusion the preoperative evaluation of affective symptoms with self-rating questionnaires in patients with brain tumors may be invalidated by the patient’s functional status. Depression should be explored with clinical interviews in these patients. Sex differences of affective symptoms in this patient group may also be related to the malignancy of the tumor, but further studies are needed to disentangle this relationship. PMID:26468140

  19. Genetic abnormalities in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zamboni Giuseppe; Beghelli Stefania; Moore Patrick S; Scarpa Aldo

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The incidence and mortality of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are nearly coincident having a five-year survival of less than 5%. Enormous advances have been made in our knowledge of the molecular alterations commonly present in ductal cancer and other pancreatic malignancies. One significant outcome of these studies is the recognition that common ductal cancers have a distinct molecular fingerprint compared to other nonductal or endocrine tumors. Ductal carcinomas typically show alteratio...

  20. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and ppancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (p<0.001 for the 650 dyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  1. 保守性切除术在胰腺近段良性肿瘤治疗中的应用%Conservative resection for pancreatic benign tumor: a report of 28 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄海; 董鑫; 李晔; 吴育连

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨保守性切除术在胰腺近段良性肿瘤治疗中的应用及其预后.方法 回顾性分析28例胰腺保守性切除术患者,其中胰腺中段切除术15例,肿瘤剜出术13例.胰肠吻合方式采用套入式环形连续缝合,胰瘘患者采用改良持续闭式腹腔灌洗治疗.观察其疗效及预后.结果 围手术期无死亡发生.术后并发症发生率为21.4%,胰瘘发生率为21.4%.平均随访 43.2个月,所有患者均存活且无复发,无新发糖尿病及外分泌功能障碍.结论 对于胰腺近段良性肿瘤患者,保守性切除术是安全有效的.套入式环形连续缝合的胰肠吻合方式可以减少术后胰瘘的发生,改良持续闭式腹腔灌洗是治疗术后胰瘘的有效方法.%Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of conservative resection (CR) for patients with proximal pancreatic benign tumor. Methods Twenty eight patients with proximal pancreatic benign tumor underwent conservative resection, including 15 cases with central pancreatectomy and 13 cases with enucleation. For pancreaticojejunostomy, a modified invagina-tion method, continuous circular invaginated pancreaticojejunostomy (CCI-PJ) was applied. Modified continuous closed lavage (MCCL) was performed for patients with pancreatic fistula. Results The indications of operation included serous cystadenomas in 11 cases, insulinomas in 7, non-functional islet cell tumors in 5, solid pseudopapillary tumors in 4 and neuroendocrine tumor in 1 case. There was no perioperative mortality; the postoperative complication rate was 21.4% and 21.4% patients had pancreatic fistula. At a mean follow up of 43.2 months, all patients were alive with no recurrence and no new-onset diabetes melli-tus or exocrine dysfunction. Conclusion Conservative resection is a safe and effective procedure for patients with benign or borderline tumors in the proximal portion of the pancreas, with careful CCI-PJ and postoperative MCCL.

  2. The role of proton therapy in the treatment of large irradiation volumes: a comparative planning study of pancreatic and biliary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the potential benefit of proton therapy for abdominal tumors. Extensive comparative planning was conducted investigating the most up-to-date photon and proton irradiation technologies. Methods and Materials: A number of rival plans were generated for four patients: two inoperable pancreatic tumors, one inoperable and one postoperative biliary duct tumor. The dose prescription goal for these large targets was 50 Gy, followed by a boost dose up to 20 Gy to a smaller planning target volume (PTV). Photon plans were developed using 'forward' planning of coplanar and noncoplanar conformal fields and 'inverse' planning of intensity-modulated (IM) fields. Proton planning was simulated as administered using the so called spot-scanning technique. Plans were evaluated on the basis of normal tissues' dose-volume constraints (Emami B, Lyman J, Brown A, et al. Tolerance of normal tissue to therapeutic irradiation. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1990;21:109-122) and coverage of treatment volumes with prescribed doses. Results: For all cases, none of the forward calculated photon plans was able to deliver 50 Gy to large PTVs at the same time respecting the dose-volume constraints on all critical organs. Nine evenly spaced IM fields achieved or nearly achieved all maximum dose constraints to critical structures for two out of three inoperable patients. IM plans also obtained good results for the postoperative patient, even though the dose to the liver was very close to the maximum allowed. In all cases, photon irradiation of large PTV1s to 50 Gy followed by a 20 Gy boost entailed a risk very close to or higher than 5% for serious complications to the kidneys, liver, or bowel. Simple arrangements of 2, 3, and 4 proton fields obtained better dose conformation to the target, allowing the delivery of planned doses including the boost to all patients, without excessive risk of morbidity. Dose homogeneity inside the targets was also

  3. Telomere profiles and tumor-associated macrophages with different immune signatures affect prognosis in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Noelyn A; Eiholzer, Ramona A; Kirs, Stenar; Zhou, Jean; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten; Wiles, Anna K; Frampton, Chris M; Taha, Ahmad; Royds, Janice A; Slatter, Tania L

    2016-03-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer and likely to be targeted in future treatments. In glioblastoma established methods of identifying telomerase and alternative lengthening of telomeres leave a significant proportion of tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism. This study investigated the composition of these tumors using RNA-Seq. Glioblastomas with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had an increased immune signature compared with alternative lengthening of telomeres and telomerase-positive tumors. Immunohistochemistry for CD163 confirmed that the majority (80%) of tumors with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The RNA-Seq and immunostaining data separated tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism into three subgroups: alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages and telomerase like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The third subgroup had no increase in tumor-associated macrophages and may represent a distinct category. The presence of tumor-associated macrophages conferred a worse prognosis with reduced patient survival times (alternative lengthening of telomeres with and without macrophages P=0.0004, and telomerase with and without macrophages P=0.013). The immune signatures obtained from RNA-Seq were significantly different between telomere maintenance mechanisms. Alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with macrophages had increased expression of interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1-3). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages had increased expression of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), CXCL12 and sushi-repeat containing protein x-linked 2 (SRPX2). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages were also associated with a reduced frequency of total/near total resections (44% vs >76% for all other subtypes

  4. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Eunice Y; Hodge, Sassan; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-01-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed...

  5. Intake of Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee, or Tea Does Not Affect Risk for Pancreatic Cancer : Results From the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Dik, Vincent K.; Jeurnink, Suzanne M.; Bech, Bodil H.; Overvad, Kim; Halkjaer, Jytte; Tjonneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Racine, Antoine; Katzke, Verena A.; Li, Kuanrong; Boeing, Heiner; Floegel, Anna; Androulidaki, Anna; Bamia, Christina; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Masala, Giovanna; Panico, Salvatore; Crosignani, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Gavrilyuk, Oxana; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Duell, Eric J.; Arguelles, Marcial; Molina-Montes, Esther; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Dorronsoro, Miren; Lindkvist, Bjorn; Wallstrom, Peter; Sund, Malin; Ye, Weimin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Timothy J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Duarte-Salles, Talita; Freisling, Heinz; Licaj, Idlir; Gallo, Valentina; Michaud, Dominique S.; Riboli, Elio; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Few modifiable risk factors have been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic cancer. There is little evidence for the effects of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or tea intake on risk of pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association of total coffee, caffeinated cof

  6. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Hodge, Sasson; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-02-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to induce hyperthermia. Magnetic NPHT can improve therapeutic effectiveness by two modes of action: 1) direct killing of hypoxic tumor cells; and 2) increase in tumor oxygenation, which has the potential to make the tumor more susceptible to adjuvant therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Prior studies in breast cancer cells demonstrated that a hypoxic microenvironment diminished NP uptake in vitro; however, mNPHT with intratumoral NP injection in hypoxic tumors increased tumor oxygenation and delayed tumor growth. In this study, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were incubated in normoxic, hypoxic, and hyperoxic conditions with iron oxide NP for 4-72 hours. After incubation, the cells were analyzed for iron uptake by mass spectrometry, Prussian blue staining, and electron microscopy. In contrast to breast cancer cells, uptake of NPs was increased in hypoxic microenvironments as compared to normoxic conditions in HNSCC cells. In future studies, we will confirm the effect of the oxygen microenvironment on NP uptake and efficacy of mNPHT both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...... AIP responds to steroid treatment, also a trial with steroids, can help to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer. OUTLOOK AND DISCUSSION: This review presents the pathological, radiologic and laboratory findings of AIP. Moreover, the treatment and pathogenesis are discussed.......BACKGROUND: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a relatively newly recognized type of pancreatitis that is characterized by diffuse or focal swelling of the pancreas due to lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A PubMed literature search was...

  8. Diffuse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Characteristic imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate imaging findings of diffuse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: We included 14 patients (4 men and 10 women; mean age, 64.5 years) with diffuse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma on the basis of retrospective radiological review. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed 14 CT scans in consensus with respect to the following: tumor site, peripheral capsule-like structure, dilatation of intratumoral pancreatic duct, parenchymal atrophy, and ancillary findings. Eight magnetic resonance (MR) examinations with MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and seven endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were also reviewed, focusing on peripheral capsule-like structure and dilatation of intratumoral pancreatic duct. Results: CT revealed tumor localization to the body and tail in 11 (79%) patients and peripheral capsule-like structure in 13 (93%). The intratumoral pancreatic duct was not visible in 13 (93%). Pancreatic parenchymal atrophy was not present in all 14 patients. Tumor invasion of vessels was observed in all 14 patients and of neighbor organs in 8 (57%). On contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images, peripheral capsule-like structure showed higher signal intensity in five patients (71%). In all 11 patients with MRCP and/or ERCP, the intratumoral pancreatic duct was not dilated. Conclusion: Diffuse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has characteristic imaging findings, including peripheral capsule-like structure, local invasiveness, and absence of both dilatation of intratumoral pancreatic duct and parenchymal atrophy

  9. Inhibition of polyamine oxidase activity affects tumor development during the maize-Ustilago maydis interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasso-Robles, Francisco Ignacio; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Becerra-Flora, Alicia; Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Gonzalez, María Elisa; Pieckenstain, Fernando Luis; García de la Cruz, Ramón Fernando; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita

    2016-05-01

    Ustilago maydis is a biotrophic plant pathogenic fungus that leads to tumor development in the aerial tissues of its host, Zea mays. These tumors are the result of cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and are accompanied by the reprograming of primary and secondary metabolism of infected plants. Up to now, little is known regarding key plant actors and their role in tumor development during the interaction with U. maydis. Polyamines are small aliphatic amines that regulate plant growth, development and stress responses. In a previous study, we found substantial increases of polyamine levels in tumors. In the present work, we describe the maize polyamine oxidase (PAO) gene family, its contribution to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and its possible role in tumor development induced by U. maydis. Histochemical analysis revealed that chlorotic lesions and maize tumors induced by U. maydis accumulate H2O2 to significant levels. Maize plants inoculated with U. maydis and treated with the PAO inhibitor 1,8-diaminooctane exhibit a notable reduction of H2O2 accumulation in infected tissues and a significant drop in PAO activity. This treatment also reduced disease symptoms in infected plants. Finally, among six maize PAO genes only the ZmPAO1, which encodes an extracellular enzyme, is up-regulated in tumors. Our data suggest that H2O2 produced through PA catabolism by ZmPAO1 plays an important role in tumor development during the maize-U. maydis interaction. PMID:26926794

  10. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Estrup Olesen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Mark; A; Wells; Katrina; J; Schneider; Shailender; Singh

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellatecells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is "THE" effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, J D; Morton, D. G.; Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is very important as the management and prognosis of these two diseases is different. In most patients with pancreatic disease, the diagnosis can be established but there is a subgroup of patients in whom it is difficult to differentiate between these conditions because the clinical presentation is often similar and currently available diagnostic tests may be unable to distinguish between an inflammatory or neoplast...

  13. Methylation-associated down-regulation of RASSF1A and up-regulation of RASSF1C in pancreatic endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RASSF1A gene silencing by DNA methylation has been suggested as a major event in pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET) but RASSF1A expression has never been studied. The RASSF1 locus contains two CpG islands (A and C) and generates seven transcripts (RASSF1A-RASSF1G) by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing. We studied 20 primary PETs, their matched normal pancreas and three PET cell lines for the (i) methylation status of the RASSF1 CpG islands using methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing and (ii) expression of RASSF1 isoforms by quantitative RT-PCR in 13 cases. CpG island A methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP); pyrosequencing was applied to quantify the methylation of 51 CpGs also encompassing those explored by MSP and qMSP approaches. MSP detected methylation in 16/20 (80%) PETs and 13/20 (65%) normal pancreas. At qMSP, 11/20 PETs (55%) and 9/20 (45%) normals were methylated in at least 20% of RASSF1A alleles. Pyrosequencing showed variable distribution and levels of methylation within and among samples, with PETs having average methylation higher than normals in 15/20 (75%) cases (P = 0.01). The evaluation of mRNA expression of RASSF1 variants showed that: i) RASSF1A was always expressed in PET and normal tissues, but it was, on average, expressed 6.8 times less in PET (P = 0.003); ii) RASSF1A methylation inversely correlated with its expression; iii) RASSF1 isoforms were rarely found, except for RASSF1B that was always expressed and RASSF1C whose expression was 11.4 times higher in PET than in normal tissue (P = 0.001). A correlation between RASSF1A expression and gene methylation was found in two of the three PET cell lines, which also showed a significant increase in RASSF1A expression upon demethylating treatment. RASSF1A gene methylation in PET is higher than normal pancreas in no more than 75% of cases and as such it cannot be considered a marker for this neoplasm

  14. The retafion of lactic dehydrogenase and tumor makers with pancreatic cancer%乳酸脱氢酶及肿瘤标记物对胰腺癌的预后影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海霞; 戴月娣; 张德祥; 袁苏徐; 陶莉

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To stady the relation of lactic dehydrogenase ( LDH) and tumor makers with pancreatic cancer patients' survival. Methods: All pancreatic cancer patients were diagnosed by pathology and got survival by phone. LDH and tumor markers of CEA, GA19 -9, CA125, CA15 -3, CA72 -4, CA50 and CA242 were detected and analysed. Results:The median survival time of 297 pancreatic cancer patients was 5.0 months and one - year, two - year, three - year survival rates were 27.3% , 10. 1% and 2.0% , respectively. Patients with large tumor diameter and advanced stage had less 3 - year survival rate( P < 0.05 ). Patients with tumor located body, tail and total pancreas had less survival time than that of tumor located head and neck. Patients with advanced stage, high LDH, CEA, CA19 -9 and CA125 had less survival lime(P<0.05). Patients with LDH more than 300U/L had leas survival time than those with mile increasing (P <0. 05). Patients with CA125 and CA15 -3 more than 100U/ml had less suryival time than those with mild increasing (P < 0. 05). Cox mullivariate proportional hazards model showed that, tumor stage and CA19 -9 were independent prognostic factors(P < 0.01). Conclusion;Tumor location, stage, LDH, CEA, CA125, CA19-9, CA72-4, CA15 -3 might have prognostic value in pancreatic cancer and tumor location, stage, LDH, CEA, CA19 -9 and CA125 were independent prognostic factors to pancreatic cancer.%目的:观察胰腺癌患者乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)及肿瘤标记物对预后影响.方法:收集LDH及肿瘤标记物,对病理诊断明确且回访到生存期的胰腺癌患者分析预后.结果:297例胰腺癌患者中位生存期5.0月,1年、2年、3年生存率分别为27.3%,10.1%,2.0%.肿瘤最大径大及分期晚的患者1年、2年、3年生存率降低(P<0.05).胰体尾癌及全胰腺癌较胰头癌生存期短,分期晚、LDH、CEA、CA19-9、CA125升高的患者生存期短(P<0.05);LDH高于300U/L患者较轻度升高者生存期短(P <0.05):CA125、CA15

  15. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches,chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments.Here,we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments.

  16. Formal Modeling and Analysis of Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qinsi; Miskov-Zivanov, Natasa; Liu, Bing; Faeder, James R.; Lotze, Michael; Clarke, Edmund M

    2016-01-01

    The focus of pancreatic cancer research has been shifted from pancreatic cancer cells towards their microenvironment, involving pancreatic stellate cells that interact with cancer cells and influence tumor progression. To quantitatively understand the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, we construct a computational model for intracellular signaling networks of cancer cells and stellate cells as well as their intercellular communication. We extend the rule-based BioNetGen language to depict in...

  17. Endoscopic ultrasonography for evaluating patients with recurrent pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo G.; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) is still a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in clinical practice. In up to 30% of cases of ARP, it is not possible to establish the etiology of the disease. In the other 70%, many factors play an etiological role in ARP: microlithiasis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD), pancreas divisum, hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, a choledochocele, annular pancreas, an anomalous pancreatobiliary junction, pancreatic tumors or chronic pancreatiti...

  18. Environmental effects on molecular biomarkers expression in pancreatic and brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, Lawrence; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Massodi, Iqbal; Anbil, Sriram; Mai, Zhiming; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    A complete understanding of the biological mechanisms regulating devastating disease such as cancer remains elusive. Pancreatic and brain cancers are primary among the cancer types with poor prognosis. Molecular biomarkers have emerged as group of proteins that are preferentially overexpressed in cancers and with a key role in driving disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell proliferative biomarker is particularly highly expressed in most cancers including brain and pancreatic cancers. The ability of EGFR to sustain prolong cell proliferation is augmented by biomarkers such as Bax, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, proteins regulating the apoptotic process. To better understand the role and effect of the microenvironment on these biomarkers in pancreatic cancer (PaCa); we analysed two pancreatic tumor lines (AsPc-1 and MiaPaCa-2) in 2D, 3D in-vitro cultures and in orthotopic tumors at different growth stages. We also investigated in patient derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cultures, the ability to utilize the EGFR expression to specifically deliver photosensitizer to the cells for photodynamic therapy. Overall, our results suggest that (1) microenvironment changes affect biomarker expression; thereby it is critical to understand these effects prior to designing combination therapies and (2) EGFR expression in tumor cells indeed could serve as a reliable and a robust biomarker that could be used to design targeted and image-guided photodynamic therapy.

  19. Pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Alrawashdeh, Wasfi

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in higher-income countries, with 5-year survival only 10% (range 7%–25%), even in people presenting with early-stage cancer. Risk factors include age, smoking, chronic pancreatitis, a family history, and dietary factors. Diabetes mellitus may also increase the risk.

  20. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  1. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  2. Breast tumor specific mutation in GATA3 affects physiological mechanisms regulating transcription factor turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Adomas, Aleksandra B; Grimm, Sara A.; Malone, Christine; Takaku, Motoki; Sims, Jennifer K.; Wade, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The transcription factor GATA3 is a favorable prognostic indicator in estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast tumors in which it participates with ERα and FOXA1 in a complex transcriptional regulatory program driving tumor growth. GATA3 mutations are frequent in breast cancer and have been classified as driver mutations. To elucidate the contribution(s) of GATA3 alterations to cancer, we studied two breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, which carries a heterozygous frameshift mutation ...

  3. SU-E-J-175: Comparison of the Treatment Reproducibility of Tumors Affected by Breathing Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of the dose distribution simulations was to form a global idea of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) realization, by its comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) delivery for tumors affected by respiratory motion. Methods: In the group of 10patients both 3DCRT and IMRT plans were prepared.For each field the motion kernel was generated with the largest movement amplitude of 4;6 and 8mm.Additionally,the sets of reference measurements were made in no motion conditions(0 mm).The evaluation of plan delivery,using a diode array placed on moving platform,was based on the Gamma Index analysis with distance to agreement of 3mm and dose difference of 3%. Results: IMRT plans tended to spare doses delivered to lungs compared to 3DCRT.Nonetheless,analyzed volumes showed no significant difference between the static and dynamic techniques,except for the volumes of both lungs receiving 10 and 15Gy.After adding the components associated with the respiratory movement,all IMRT lung parameters evaluated for the ipsilateral,contralateral and both lungs together,revealed considerable differences between the 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes.Similar results were obtained for the 3DCRT lung measurements,but without significance between the 0vs.6-mm amplitude.Taking into account the CTV score parameter in 3DCRT and IMRT plans,there was no statistically significant difference between the motion patterns with the smallest amplitudes.The differences were found for the 8-mm amplitude when it was compared both with static conditions and 4-mm amplitude (for 3DCRT) and between 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes (for IMRT).All accepted and measured 3DCRT and IMRT doses to spinal cord,esophagus and heart were always below the QUANTEC limits. Conclusion: The application of IMRT technique in lung radiotherapy affords possibilities for reducing the lung doses.For maximal amplitudes of breathing trajectory below 4mm,the disagreement between CTV

  4. SU-E-J-175: Comparison of the Treatment Reproducibility of Tumors Affected by Breathing Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, M; Piotrowski, T; Adamczyk, S [Medical Physics Department, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan (Poland)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the dose distribution simulations was to form a global idea of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) realization, by its comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) delivery for tumors affected by respiratory motion. Methods: In the group of 10patients both 3DCRT and IMRT plans were prepared.For each field the motion kernel was generated with the largest movement amplitude of 4;6 and 8mm.Additionally,the sets of reference measurements were made in no motion conditions(0 mm).The evaluation of plan delivery,using a diode array placed on moving platform,was based on the Gamma Index analysis with distance to agreement of 3mm and dose difference of 3%. Results: IMRT plans tended to spare doses delivered to lungs compared to 3DCRT.Nonetheless,analyzed volumes showed no significant difference between the static and dynamic techniques,except for the volumes of both lungs receiving 10 and 15Gy.After adding the components associated with the respiratory movement,all IMRT lung parameters evaluated for the ipsilateral,contralateral and both lungs together,revealed considerable differences between the 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes.Similar results were obtained for the 3DCRT lung measurements,but without significance between the 0vs.6-mm amplitude.Taking into account the CTV score parameter in 3DCRT and IMRT plans,there was no statistically significant difference between the motion patterns with the smallest amplitudes.The differences were found for the 8-mm amplitude when it was compared both with static conditions and 4-mm amplitude (for 3DCRT) and between 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes (for IMRT).All accepted and measured 3DCRT and IMRT doses to spinal cord,esophagus and heart were always below the QUANTEC limits. Conclusion: The application of IMRT technique in lung radiotherapy affords possibilities for reducing the lung doses.For maximal amplitudes of breathing trajectory below 4mm,the disagreement between CTV

  5. UPR in palmitate-treated pancreatic beta-cells is not affected by altering oxidation of the fatty acid

    OpenAIRE

    Sol E-ri; Sargsyan Ernest; Bergsten Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Elevated levels of lipids are detrimental for beta-cell function and mass. One of the mechanisms of how fatty acids induce apoptosis is development of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is still far from understood how fatty acids activate the UPR, however. Methods We examined how palmitate-induced activation of the UPR was affected by altering the metabolism of the fatty acid in insulin-secreting INS-1E and MIN6 cell lines and intact human islets. To increase oxidati...

  6. Stress Proteins and Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Carla E.; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is challenged by its resistance to microenvironmental stress infringed during escape from the primary tumor and the colonization of a foreign secondary tissue. Because of its great metastatic potential and its strong resistance to anticancer drugs, pancreatic cancer is regarded as a paradigm of the adaptation of cancer cells to microenvironmental stress. Thus, to understand how pancreatic cancer cells adapt to the different endogenous and therapy-related stresses is crucial f...

  7. Tumor Protein p53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 (TP53INP1 in Spontaneous Chronic Pancreatitis in the WBN/Kob Rat: Drug Effects on Its Expression in the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawabu N

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1 gene was found using DNA microarray technology as an overexpressed gene in acute pancreatitis. However, expression of TP53INP1 in chronic pancreatitis has not been previously reported. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated TP53INP1 gene expression and its relationship with p53 and apoptosis in spontaneous chronic pancreatitis in the Wistar-Bonn/Kobori rat. METHODS: Ninety four-week-old male Wistar-Bonn/Kobori rats were fed a special breeding diet until sacrifice. Camostat mesilate (n=30 or a herbal medicine (Saiko-keishi-to; n=30 were mixed with the diet, while the other 30 rats were untreated. The rats were sacrificed every 4 weeks for 20 weeks, and the pancreas was examined. In addition, 6 four-week-old male Wistar-Bonn/Kobori rats were sacrificed and studied as starting reference. Finally, Wistar rats (n=36 were studied as controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: TP53INP1 mRNA expression was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using semi-quantitative analysis, direct sequencing and in situ hybridization. RESULTS: TP53INP1 mRNA was strongly expressed at 12 weeks when chronic pancreatitis developed, with a second peak at 20 weeks. The expression kinetics of TP53INP1 mRNA paralleled acinar cell apoptosis assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. The p53 mRNA expression showed a single peak at 12 weeks. In situ hybridization revealed that TP53INP1 mRNA was expressed mainly in acinar cells. Therapeutic drugs such as camostat mesilate and a herbal medicine Saiko-keishi-to suppressed the TP53INP1 mRNA expression. TP53INP1 mRNA induction in acinar cells was confirmed with in vitro experiments using an arginine-induced rat pancreatic acinar AR4-2J cell injury model. CONCLUSIONS: TP53INP1 expression may reflect the acute-phase response and apoptosis of acinar cells in the course of chronic pancreatitis.

  8. PANCREATIC CARCINOMA: REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Kumari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, even when treated with radical surgery. The overall 5 year survival rate following surgical intervention is around 10%.With the increasing use of CT scans for other reasons not related to pancreas, a variety of neoplastic and non - neoplastic lesions are increasingly encountered in clinical practice. The distinction of these lesions has significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. Regarding ductal carcinoma, key distinguishing features from chronic pancreatitis and a discussion of the concept of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia ( PanIN are included. Precursors, mo lecular carcinogenesis, risk factors and different morphological patterns of tumors arising from exocrine pancreas are discussed. Research on early detection is ongoing. Screening of people with a family history of hereditary pancreatitis plays an importan t role in the early detection of ductal carcinoma of pancreas.

  9. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  10. Spontaneous regression of pancreatic cancer: Real or a misdiagnosis?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous tumor regression has been subject of numerous studies and speculations for many years. This phenomenon is exceptional, but well reported, in some types of tumors, but not in pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer has the worst five-year survival rate of any cancer. Despite numerous molecular studies and clinical approaches, using several mouse models, this cancer responds poorly to the existing chemotherapeutic agents and progress on treatment remains elusive. Although pancreatic ca...

  11. Contrast-Enhanced Harmonic Endoscopic Ultrasonography in Pancreatic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Wallace; Zhaoshen Li; Can Xu

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. However, it still has limits in the differentiation between pancreatic cancers and inflammatory tumor-like masses. A novel technology, contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS), has been developed recently. It can visualize both parenchymal perfusion and microvasculature in pancreas without Doppler-related artifacts. Therefore, it is superior to EUS and CT in detecting small pancreatic mass...

  12. Radiofrequency ablation of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma:An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirko; D’Onofrio; Emilio; Barbi; Roberto; Girelli; Enrico; Martone; Anna; Gallotti; Roberto; Salvia; Paolo; Tinazzi; Martini; Claudio; Bassi; Paolo; Pederzoli; Roberto; Pozzi; Mucelli

    2010-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation(RFA)of pancreatic neoplasms is restricted to locally advanced,non-resectable but nonmetastatic tumors.RFA of pancreatic tumors is nowadays an ultrasound-guided procedure performed during laparotomy in open surgery.Intraoperative ultrasound covers the mandatory role of staging,evaluation of feasibility,guidance and monitoring of the procedure.Different types of needle can be used.The first aim in the evaluation of RFA as a treatment for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinom...

  13. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-κB pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-κB, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer

  14. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

  15. NUT midline carcinoma in a newborn with multiorgan disseminated tumor and a 2-year-old with a pancreatic/hepatic primary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Bahig M; Steelman, Charlotte K; Abramowsky, Carlos R; Olson, Thomas A; French, Christopher A; Saxe, Debra F; Ricketts, Richard R; Katzenstein, Howard M

    2010-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare and aggressive malignant epithelial tumor defined by rearrangement of the NUT gene on chromosome 15. In two thirds of cases, NUT is involved in a balanced translocation with BDR4 on chromosome 19, while in the remaining cases, NUT is rearranged with variant fusion partners such as BRD3. These undifferentiated tumors primarily affect midline structures, usually in the upper aerodigestive tract and mediastinum. Most reported cases have followed a rapidly lethal clinical course. We report the clinical and pathological findings of NMC in the youngest patients identified so far. The 1st case involves a newborn who presented with a supraorbital mass and extensive multiorgan involvement, including the spine, lungs, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, and subcutaneous tissue. The 2nd patient was a 2-year-old male with an abdominal mass involving the liver and pancreas with pulmonary metastasis. Histopathological analysis of both tumors showed undifferentiated malignant neoplasms, and immunohistochemistry showed positivity for epithelial markers. Both tumors demonstrated t(15;19), and immunohistochemistry with NUT monoclonal antibodies and fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed NUT rearrangement. The patients died from disease at 1 and 2 months postpresentation. Thus far, 25 cases have been reported, including our 2 current cases. Presentation ages range from 0 to 78 years (mean, 23 years). Herein, we report the 2 youngest reported cases of NMC, including the 1st congenital case and the 1st case arising within the liver/pancreas. Increased awareness and further molecular studies are required for a better understanding of NMC pathobiology and improved therapeutic outcomes. PMID:20017639

  16. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Harald J., E-mail: harald.maier@uni-ulm.de; Wirth, Thomas [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University of Ulm, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Beug, Hartmut [Institute of Molecular Pathology, 1030 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-12-09

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death and is characterized by early invasion and metastasis. The developmental program of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is of potential importance for this rapid tumor progression. During EMT, tumor cells lose their epithelial characteristics and gain properties of mesenchymal cells, such as enhanced motility and invasive features. This review will discuss recent findings pertinent to EMT in pancreatic carcinoma. Evidence for and molecular characteristics of EMT in pancreatic carcinoma will be outlined, as well as the connection of EMT to related topics, e.g., cancer stem cells and drug resistance.

  17. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death and is characterized by early invasion and metastasis. The developmental program of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is of potential importance for this rapid tumor progression. During EMT, tumor cells lose their epithelial characteristics and gain properties of mesenchymal cells, such as enhanced motility and invasive features. This review will discuss recent findings pertinent to EMT in pancreatic carcinoma. Evidence for and molecular characteristics of EMT in pancreatic carcinoma will be outlined, as well as the connection of EMT to related topics, e.g., cancer stem cells and drug resistance

  18. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wirth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death and is characterized by early invasion and metastasis. The developmental program of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is of potential importance for this rapid tumor progression. During EMT, tumor cells lose their epithelial characteristics and gain properties of mesenchymal cells, such as enhanced motility and invasive features. This review will discuss recent findings pertinent to EMT in pancreatic carcinoma. Evidence for and molecular characteristics of EMT in pancreatic carcinoma will be outlined, as well as the connection of EMT to related topics, e.g., cancer stem cells and drug resistance.

  19. Groove pancreatitis: A rare form of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharivi Jani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the "groove" of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple′s procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction

  20. Human pancreatic cancer-associated stellate cells remain activated after in vivo chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Carla Cabrera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by an extensive fibrotic reaction or desmoplasia and complex involvement of the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic stellate cells are a key mediator of the pancreatic matrix and they promote progression and invasion of pancreatic cancer by increasing cell proliferation and offering protection against therapeutic interventions. Our study utilizes human tumor-derived pancreatic stellate cells (HTPSCs isolated from fine needle aspirates of pancreatic cancer tissue from patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma before and after treatment with full dose gemcitabine plus concurrent hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery. We show that HTPSCs survive in vivo chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment and display a more activated phenotype post therapy. These data support the idea that stellate cells play an essential role in supporting and promoting pancreatic cancer and further research is needed to develop novel treatments targeting the pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

  1. Hedgehog signaling and therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, Fergal C

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the role that the hedgehog signaling pathway has in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis. METHOD: PubMed search (2000-2010) and literature based references. RESULTS: Firstly, in 2009 a genetic analysis of pancreatic cancers found that a core set of 12 cellular signaling pathways including hedgehog were genetically altered in 67-100% of cases. Secondly, in vitro and in vivo studies of treatment with cyclopamine (a naturally occurring antagonist of the hedgehog signaling pathway component; Smoothened) has shown that inhibition of hedgehog can abrogate pancreatic cancer metastasis. Thirdly, experimental evidence has demonstrated that sonic hedgehog (Shh) is correlated with desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer. This is important because targeting the Shh pathway potentially may facilitate chemotherapeutic drug delivery as pancreatic cancers tend to have a dense fibrotic stroma that extrinsically compresses the tumor vasculature leading to a hypoperfusing intratumoral circulation. It is probable that patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer will derive the greatest benefit from treatment with Smoothened antagonists. Fourthly, it has been found that ligand dependent activation by hedgehog occurs in the tumor stromal microenvironment in pancreatic cancer, a paracrine effect on tumorigenesis. Finally, in pancreatic cancer, cells with the CD44+CD24+ESA+ immunophenotype select a population enriched for cancer initiating stem cells. Shh is increased 46-fold in CD44+CD24+ESA+ cells compared with normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Medications that destruct pancreatic cancer initiating stem cells are a potentially novel strategy in cancer treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Aberrant hedgehog signaling occurs in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and therapeutics that target the transmembrane receptor Smoothened abrogate hedgehog signaling and may improve the outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pancreatic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofer Kaplan

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS is a powerful technique that enables continuous monitoring of biochemical processes in tissues and organs in a non-invasive manner. A model of isolated perfused rat pancreas, suitable for NMRS studies, was developed. Acute pancreatitis was induced by injections of either 0.5 ml 5% sodium taurocholate (TC into the bile duets, or 1.0 ml 10% TC injections into the pancreatic parenchyma. Phosphorous (31P NMRS of experimental pancreatitis were characterized by a transient signal at -0.18±0.04 ppm which was assigned as solubilized lecithin, and can be used as an indicator of the early phases of the discase. Depletion of the high energy phosphorous compounds, phosphocreatine and ATP, were also found during acute pancreatitis, and paralleled the extension of the pathological damage. The role of NMRS in pancreatic cancer diagnosis and its treatment were assessed in three models of pancreatic neoplasms. Perfused MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells, subcutancously implanted pancreatic tumors in hamsters, and pancreatic tumors induced in-situ in rats by direct appiication of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethyl benzanthracene, were studied by phosphorous (31P, sodium (23Na and proton (¹H NMRS. 31P spectra of pancreatic cancer were qualitatively similar to those of intact organs. However, 31P NMRS was found to be useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Total (infra- and extracellular sodium concentrations, measured in the solid tumors, were similar in both the normal pancreas and the pancreatic tumors (39-40 mmol/g wet weight. Proton spectra of perchloric acid extracts revealed several differences between tumors and control pancreases. The principal findings were elevated levels of the amino acid taurine, from I.17±O.39 mmol/g wet weight in healthy pancreases, to 2.79±0.71 mmol/g wet weight in pancreatic carcinoma in rats, and lactate levels which increased from 0.92±0.2 to 6.19±1.93 mmol/g wet weight

  3. Proteomics in Pancreatic Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ruihui; Li, Zhaoshen; Li, Shude; Gao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis and deeply affects the life of people. Therefore, the earlier diagnosis and better treatments are urgently needed. In recent years, the proteomic technologies are well established and growing rapidly and have been widely applied in clinical applications, especially in pancreatic cancer research. In this paper, we attempt to discuss the development of current proteomic technologies and the application of proteomics to the field of pancreatic cancer research. This will explore the potential perspective in revealing pathogenesis, making the diagnosis earlier and treatment. PMID:22084685

  4. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2008-01-01

    Sun exposure has been associated with lower death rates for pancreatic cancer in ecological studies. Skin exposure to solar ultra-violet B radiation induces cutaneous production of precursors to 25-hydroxy (OH) vitamin D (D) and is considered the primary contributor to vitamin D status in most populations. Pancreatic islet and duct cells express 25-(OH) D3-1α-hydroxylase that generates the biologically active 1,25-dihydroxy(OH)2 D form. Thus, 25(OH)D concentrations could affect pancreatic fun...

  5. Imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihashi, H.; Hirose, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Kamikita, Y.; Asano, A. (Asahikawa Medical College, Hokkaido (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Diagnosing pancreatic diseases using non invasive methods such as ultrasound and computed tomography was reviewed. Images characteristic to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer were explained. Pancreatic cancer accompanied with