WorldWideScience

Sample records for affect life span

  1. Paternal smoking habits affect the reproductive life span of daughters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukuda, Misao; Fukuda, Kiyomi; Shimizu, Takashi;

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed whether the smoking habits of fathers around the time of conception affected the period in which daughters experienced menstrual cycles (i.e., the reproductive life span). The study revealed that the smoking habits of the farther shortened the daughters' reproductive life...

  2. Facial affect recognition across the adult life span

    OpenAIRE

    MOOSAVIAN, Elham; BORRY, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The results of the researches have shown expression and recognition of emotion are two of the basic skills on which normal social interaction is based. As people grow older, they may become wiser and more experienced in interacting with other people, but they can also experience memory loss and cognitive slow-down, influencing the quality of relations in their daily routines. Experimental studies indicate that facial affect recognition, particularly negative emotions, decreases ...

  3. Older age may offset genetic influence on affect: The COMT polymorphism and affective well-being across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Bulent; Sims, Tamara; Best, Sasha E; Carstensen, Laura L

    2016-05-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT_Val158Met) genetic polymorphism has been linked to variation in affective well-being. Compared with Val carriers, Met carriers experience lower affective well-being. In parallel, research on aging and affective experience finds that younger adults experience poorer affective well-being than older adults. This study examined how COMT and age may interact to shape daily affective experience across the life span. Results suggest that Met (vs. Val) carriers experience lower levels of affective well-being in younger but not in older ages. These findings suggest that age-related improvements in emotional functioning may offset genetic vulnerabilities to negative affective experience. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27111524

  4. Life Span Developmental Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Eryılmaz, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of...

  5. Life Span Developmental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eryilmaz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of individuals with respect to developmental stages. This developmental approach suggests that scientific disciplines should not explain developmental facts only with age changes. Along with aging, cognitive, biological, and socioemotional development throughout life should also be considered to provide a reasonable and acceptable context, guideposts, and reasonable expectations for the person. There are three important subjects whom life span developmental approach deals with. These are nature vs nurture, continuity vs discontinuity, and change vs stability. Researchers using life span developmental approach gather and produce knowledge on these three most important domains of individual development with their unique scientific methodology.

  6. CALHM1 Deletion in Mice Affects Glossopharyngeal Taste Responses, Food Intake, Body Weight, and Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellekant, Göran; Schmolling, Jared; Marambaud, Philippe; Rose-Hellekant, Teresa A

    2015-07-01

    Stimulation of Type II taste receptor cells (TRCs) with T1R taste receptors causes sweet or umami taste, whereas T2Rs elicit bitter taste. Type II TRCs contain the calcium channel, calcium homeostasis modulator protein 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) transmitter to taste fibers. We have previously demonstrated with chorda tympani nerve recordings and two-bottle preference (TBP) tests that mice with genetically deleted Calhm1 (knockout [KO]) have severely impaired perception of sweet, bitter, and umami compounds, whereas their sour and salty tasting ability is unaltered. Here, we present data from KO mice of effects on glossopharyngeal (NG) nerve responses, TBP, food intake, body weight, and life span. KO mice have no NG response to sweet and a suppressed response to bitter compared with control (wild-type [WT]) mice. KO mice showed some NG response to umami, suggesting that umami taste involves both CALHM1- and non-CALHM1-modulated signals. NG responses to sour and salty were not significantly different between KO and WT mice. Behavioral data conformed in general with the NG data. Adult KO mice consumed less food, weighed significantly less, and lived almost a year longer than WT mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sweet taste majorly influences food intake, body weight, and life span. PMID:25855639

  7. Stability and Change in Affective Experience across the Adult Life-Span: Analyses with a National Sample from Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kunzmann, Ute; Richter, David; Schmukle, Stefan C.

    2013-01-01

    Using cross-sectional and longitudinal data from a national sample spanning the adult life span, age differences in anger and sadness were explored. The cross-sectional and longitudinal findings consistently suggest that the frequency of anger increases during young adulthood, but then shows a steady decrease until old age. By contrast, the frequency of sadness remains stable over most of adulthood and begins to increase in old age. In addition, the effects of age on happiness were investigat...

  8. Thermodynamics and life span estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the life span of people living in seven regions of Turkey is estimated by applying the first and second laws of thermodynamics to the human body. The people living in different regions of Turkey have different food habits. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are used to calculate the entropy generation rate per unit mass of a human due to the food habits. The lifetime entropy generation per unit mass of a human was previously found statistically. The two entropy generations, lifetime entropy generation and entropy generation rate, enable one to determine the life span of people living in seven regions of Turkey with different food habits. In order to estimate the life span, some statistics of Turkish Statistical Institute regarding the food habits of the people living in seven regions of Turkey are used. The life spans of people that live in Central Anatolia and Eastern Anatolia regions are the longest and shortest, respectively. Generally, the following inequality regarding the life span of people living in seven regions of Turkey is found: Eastern Anatolia < Southeast Anatolia < Black Sea < Mediterranean < Marmara < Aegean < Central Anatolia. - Highlights: • The first and second laws of thermodynamics are applied to the human body. • The entropy generation of a human due to his food habits is determined. • The life span of Turks is estimated by using the entropy generation method. • Food habits of a human have effect on his life span

  9. Loneliness Across the Life Span

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qualter, Pamela; Vanhalst, Janne; Harris, Rebecca; Van Roekel, Eeske; Lodder, Gerine; Bangee, Munirah; Maes, Marlies; Verhagen, Maaike

    2015-01-01

    Most people have experienced loneliness and have been able to overcome it to reconnect with other people. In the current review, we provide a life-span perspective on one component of the evolutionary theory of lonelinessa component we refer to as the reaffiliation motive (RAM). The RAM represents t

  10. nfi-1 affects behavior and life-span in C. elegans but is not essential for DNA replication or survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirono Keiko

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nuclear Factor I (one (NFI family of transcription/replication factors plays essential roles in mammalian gene expression and development and in adenovirus DNA replication. Because of its role in viral DNA replication NFI has long been suspected to function in host DNA synthesis. Determining the requirement for NFI proteins in mammalian DNA replication is complicated by the presence of 4 NFI genes in mice and humans. Loss of individual NFI genes in mice cause defects in brain, lung and tooth development, but the presence of 4 homologous NFI genes raises the issue of redundant roles for NFI genes in DNA replication. No NFI genes are present in bacteria, fungi or plants. However single NFI genes are present in several simple animals including Drosophila and C. elegans, making it possible to test for a requirement for NFI in multicellular eukaryotic DNA replication and development. Here we assess the functions of the single nfi-1 gene in C. elegans. Results C. elegans NFI protein (CeNFI binds specifically to the same NFI-binding site recognized by vertebrate NFIs. nfi-1 encodes alternatively-spliced, maternally-inherited transcripts that are expressed at the single cell stage, during embryogenesis, and in adult muscles, neurons and gut cells. Worms lacking nfi-1 survive but have defects in movement, pharyngeal pumping and egg-laying and have a reduced life-span. Expression of the muscle gene Ce titin is decreased in nfi-1 mutant worms. Conclusion NFI gene function is not needed for survival in C. elegans and thus NFI is likely not essential for DNA replication in multi-cellular eukaryotes. The multiple defects in motility, egg-laying, pharyngeal pumping, and reduced lifespan indicate that NFI is important for these processes. Reduction in Ce titin expression could affect muscle function in multiple tissues. The phenotype of nfi-1 null worms indicates that NFI functions in multiple developmental and behavioral systems in C

  11. Elevated histone expression promotes life span extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feser, Jason; Truong, David; Das, Chandrima; Carson, Joshua J; Kieft, Jeffrey; Harkness, Troy; Tyler, Jessica K

    2010-09-10

    Changes to the chromatin structure accompany aging, but the molecular mechanisms underlying aging and the accompanying changes to the chromatin are unclear. Here, we report a mechanism whereby altering chromatin structure regulates life span. We show that normal aging is accompanied by a profound loss of histone proteins from the genome. Indeed, yeast lacking the histone chaperone Asf1 or acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56 are short lived, and this appears to be at least partly due to their having decreased histone levels. Conversely, increasing the histone supply by inactivation of the histone information regulator (Hir) complex or overexpression of histones dramatically extends life span via a pathway that is distinct from previously known pathways of life span extension. This study indicates that maintenance of the fundamental chromatin structure is critical for slowing down the aging process and reveals that increasing the histone supply extends life span. PMID:20832724

  12. Life span of the biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, J. E.; Whitfield, M.

    1982-04-01

    Since main sequence stars appear to increase their burning rate as they age, the sun may be thought to have increased its output by 30% since the earth's origin 4.5 billion years ago. Due to the requirement for some means of planetary thermostasis in the maintenance of an equable climate since life began, possible links are considered between the biological, Gaia hypothesis of Lovelock and Margulis (1974) for climate control, and Walker et al's (in press) model of automatic thermostasis, in which the abundance of such atmospheric greenhouse gases as CO2 adjusts to resist the warming tendency of the increased solar flux. It is concluded that, since atmospheric CO2 is now close to its partial pressure lower limit, the biosphere will on a geological time-scale be soon exposed, without protection, to the predicted solar luminosity increases.

  13. The Cost of Uncertain Life Span

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Ryan D.

    2008-01-01

    A considerable amount of uncertainty surrounds life expectancy, the average length of life. The standard deviation in adult life span is about 15 years in the U.S., and theory and evidence suggest it is costly. I calibrate a utility-theoretic model of preferences over length of life and show that one less year in standard deviation is worth about half a mean life year. Differences in the standard deviation exacerbate cross-sectional differences in life expectancy between the U.S. and other in...

  14. Life span study report 9, part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of malignant tumors in the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) sample in Nagasaki as revealed by the Nagasaki Tumor Registry (Registry) has been investigated for the period 1959-78. No exposure status bias in data collection has been revealed. Neither method of diagnosis, reporting hospitals, nor the frequency of doubtful cases differ by exposure dose. Thus, the effect of a bias, if one exists, must be small and should not affect the interpretation of the results obtained in the present analysis. The risk of radiogenic cancer definitely increases with radiation dose for leukemia, cancer of the breast, lung, stomach, and thyroid, and suggestively so for cancer of the colon and urinary tract and multiple myeloma. However, there is no increase as yet for cancer of the esophagus, liver, gall bladder, uterus, ovary, and salivary gland, or for malignant lymphoma. For fatal cancers, these results strengthen those of the recent analysis of mortality based on death certificates on the same LSS cohort. In general, the relative risks based on incidence (that is, on Registry data) are either the same or slightly higher than those based on mortality for the same years; however, the absolute risk estimates (excess cancer per million person-year per rad) are far higher. (author)

  15. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study

    OpenAIRE

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support ...

  16. Life span study report, 11, part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABCC and its successor, RERF, have followed since 1959 and retrospectively to 1950 the mortality in a fixed cohort of survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the so-called Life Span Study sample. The present study, the 11th in a series that began in 1961, extends the surveillance period three more years and covers the period 1950-85. It is based on the recently revised dose system, called DS86, that has replaced previous estimates of individual exposures. The impact of the change from the old system of dosimetry, the T65DR, to the new on the dose-response relationships for cancer mortality was described in the first of this series of reports. Here, the focus is on cancer mortality among the 76,000 A-bomb survivors within the LSS sample for whom DS86 doses have been estimated, with the emphasis on biological issues associated with radiation carcinogenesis. (author)

  17. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support for LNTH. Even if the LNTH is used at low dose and dose rates, its estimation of excess cancer mortality should be communicated as 2.5% per Sv, i.e., an increase of cancer mortality from about 20% spontaneous mortality to about 22.5% per Sv, which is about half of the usually cited value. The impact of the “neutron discrepancy problem” – the apparent difference between the calculated and measured values of neutron flux in Hiroshima – was studied and found to be marginal. Major revision of the radiation risk assessment paradigm is required. PMID:26673526

  18. Data resources for life span study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Life Span Study sample consists originally of 82,000 A-bomb survivors who were enumerated from a nation-wide A-bomb survivors survey conducted in 1950 and 27,000 non-exposed individuals. Mortality ascertainment is essentially complete by periodic checks against Koseki, but its weakness is the inexactness of the cause of death stated on the death certificate. Some of the latter can be compensated for by collateral use of autopsy information and the data from Tissue and Tumor Registries. Updating of the Hiroshima Tumor Registry has been recently completed and no serious bias related to radiation dose was observed in the data collection for either Hiroshima or Nagasaki. Also the completeness of registration is the highest among registries in Japan. The Tumor and Tissue Registries should be very useful data resources to determine the radiation effects on non-fatal cancers i.e., thyroid and breast cancers as well as the fatal types. Lack of information on the out-migrated subjects from the two cities should be seriously considered, especially those who were of young age at the time of the bombing. Information on environmental factors other than radiation exposure, such as occupation, smoking and diet, has been collected by interviewers, mail questionnaires or record linkage with census data, since 1960. Such information is also currently obtained on a case-control basis for certain sites of cancer, such as breast, lung, colon and rectum, in this cohort. 11 references, 6 tables

  19. Life span study report, 9; 1950-78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RERF life span study report 9 consists of three parts and supplementary tables, each bound separately. Life span study report 9 supplementary tables, supplement to TR 12-80 and TR 5-81, are computer pritouts containing the life span study data from 1950-78. These tables are pertinent only to part 1 (Cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-78) and part 2 (Mortality from causes other than cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-78) of Life span study report 9. This study extends Life span study report 8 by four years from 1975-78. These tables are included following data: The life span study sample, Death certificate data by cause, Malignant neoplasms, Neoplasms generally, Diseases other than neoplasms, Injuries and accidents, Summary of death certificate data. (J.P.N.)

  20. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    OpenAIRE

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the action-phase model of developmental regulation with their original life-span theory of control to present a comprehensive theory of development. Third, they...

  1. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the…

  2. Boundaries of life: estimating the life span of the biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, S.; Bounama, C.; von Bloh, W.

    We present a minimal model for the global carbon cycle of the Earth containing the reservoirs mantle ocean floor continental crust continental biosphere and the Kerogen as well as the aggregated reservoir ocean and atmosphere and obtain reasonable values for the present distribution of carbon in the surface reservoirs of the Earth The Earth system model for the long-term carbon cycle is specified by introducing three different types of biosphere prokaryotes eucaryotes and complex multicellular life They are characterized by different global temperature tolerance windows prokaryotes 2oC 100oC eucaryotes 5oC 45oC complex multicellular life 0oC 30oC From the Archaean to the future there always exists a prokaryotic biosphere 2 Gyr ago eucaryotic life first appears because the global surface temperature reaches the tolerance window for eucaryotes The emergence of complex multicellular life is connected with an explosive increase in biomass and a strong decrease in Cambrian global surface temperature at about 0 54 Gyr ago In the long-term future the three types of biosphere will die out in reverse sequence of their appearance For realistic values of the biotic enhancement of weathering there is no bistability in the future solutions for complex life Therefore complex organisms will not extinct by an implosion in comparison to the Cambrian explosion Eucaryotes and complex life become extinct because of too high surface temperatures in the future The ultimate life span of the biosphere is defined by the extinction of procaryotes in about 1 6 Gyr

  3. Mating System Transitions Drive Life Span Evolution in Pristionchus Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weadick, Cameron J; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between the sexes influence evolution at many scales, but not all animal species conform to the familiar male-female (dioecious) mating system; such taxa are powerful tools for studying the evolutionary importance of sexual selection and conflict on all manner of life-history traits, including longevity. We tested for an effect of mating system on adult life span in Pristionchus nematodes, where self-fertile hermaphrodites have replaced females multiple times independently throughout the genus (androdioecy). By measuring adult life span for 11 species (6 dioecious, 5 androdioecious), we found that life span is considerably shorter in hermaphrodites relative to closely related females. This effect is not a cost of reproduction; brood size did not reliably trade off with life span in self-fertilizing hermaphrodites or in mated females. Furthermore, we found that sexual dimorphism in life span varied among dioecious species, with females generally outliving males. Finally, we documented intraspecific variation for life span and cuticular disease (blistering) prevalence in Pristionchus pacificus, a model system for evolutionary-developmental biology. This work demonstrates that mating system transitions and life span evolution are linked in Pristionchus nematodes and provides a foundation for future comparative and mechanistic studies of aging in this genus. PMID:27028079

  4. Brain Weight and Life-Span in Primate Species

    OpenAIRE

    Allman, J; McLaughlin, T.; A Hakeem

    1993-01-01

    In haplorhine primates (tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans), there is a significant correlation between brain weight and maximum life-span when the effect of body size is removed. There is also a significant correlation in haplorhine primates between brain weight and female age at first reproduction. For strepsirhine primates (lorises and lemurs), there are no significant correlations between brain weight and either life-span or female reproductive age when the effect of body size is removed...

  5. Life Span Exercise Among Elite Intercollegiate Student Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Sorenson, Shawn C.; Romano, Russell; Azen, Stanley P; Schroeder, E. Todd; Salem, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite prominent public attention, data on life span health and exercise outcomes among elite, competitive athletes are sparse and do not reflect the diversity of modern athletes. Hypothesis: Life span exercise behavior differs between National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) student athletes and a nonathlete control group. Sustained exercise is associated with improved cardiopulmonary health outcomes. Study Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive epidemiology study. Level of...

  6. Elders’ Attitudes toward Extending the Healthy Life Span

    OpenAIRE

    Cicirelli, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite continuing debate between anti-aging researchers seeking major life span extension and concerned gerontologists and bioethicists, elders’ views have received little research attention. Study aimed to relate elders’ attitudes toward strong life span extension to psychosocial and background factors. Participants were 109 American elders (65% women) aged 60-99 (M = 77.08, SD = 9.05). Measures included attitudes toward living long and living forever, Desired Age, Death Acceptance, Goal...

  7. IS LIFE-SPAN UNDER OUR CONTROL??

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parle Milind

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With each passing day, we age. Our body gets flooded with unwanted and deleterious elements, our cells lose their ability to divide, our nervous, endocrine and immune systems weaken with advancing age. Sagging skin, wrinkled face, graying hair, loss of muscle strength, reduced reflexes, low energy levels, increasing fat, faulty memory (dementia, weak immunity, impaired vision, defective hearing, decreased libido, cardiovascular problems and neurodegenerative disorders (like Parkinsonism and Alzheimer’s disease are the characteristic features of ageing. Leading a disease free, long life (longevity has been a dream of mankind since the arrival of human race on the planet Earth. We can not reverse the ageing process, but the features associated with ageing can be delayed in order to improve the quality of life. The present review article focuses on different theories of ageing and the anti-ageing effects of Green tea, Garlic, Turmeric, Ashwagandha, Tomato, Anwala, Ginger, Aloe and Tulsi.

  8. A life span model of successful aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, R; Heckhausen, J

    1996-07-01

    To lay the foundation for our model, we first describe existing conceptions of successful aging, underlying assumptions of development, and criteria for success. The model presented extends the discourse on this topic in three directions: (a) It frames the discussion of successful aging in the broader context of life course development; (b) it accounts for both normative and nonnormative (i.e., exceptional) success; and (c) it integrates motivational processes into a theory of successful aging. Successful aging is equated with the development and maintenance of primary control throughout the life course, which is achieved through control-related processes that optimize selection and failure compensation functions. Selection processes regulate the choice of action goals so that diversity is maintained and positive and negative trade-offs between performance domains and life stages are taken into account. Compensation mechanisms serve to maintain, enhance, and remediate competencies and motivational resources after failure experiences. Both compensation and selection processes are motivated by desires for primary control and can be characterized in terms of primary and secondary control processes. PMID:8694390

  9. Adaptive prolonged postreproductive life span in killer whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Emma A; Franks, Daniel W; Mazzi, Sonia; Darden, Safi K; Balcomb, Ken C; Ford, John K B; Croft, Darren P

    2012-09-14

    Prolonged life after reproduction is difficult to explain evolutionarily unless it arises as a physiological side effect of increased longevity or it benefits related individuals (i.e., increases inclusive fitness). There is little evidence that postreproductive life spans are adaptive in nonhuman animals. By using multigenerational records for two killer whale (Orcinus orca) populations in which females can live for decades after their final parturition, we show that postreproductive mothers increase the survival of offspring, particularly their older male offspring. This finding may explain why female killer whales have evolved the longest postreproductive life span of all nonhuman animals. PMID:22984064

  10. The Role of Culture in Social Development Over the Life Span : An Interpersonal Relations Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, Isabelle; Trommsdorff, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to illustrate the role of culture for individual development throughout the life span. First, theoretical approaches how culture affects the ontogenesis is presented, starting from early anthropological to recent eco-cultural and culture-informed approaches. Then, culture-specific conceptualizations of development over the life span are discussed, focusing on development in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age. Finally, we concentrate on selected areas of social de...

  11. Life-span development of self-esteem and its effects on important life outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Ulrich; Robins, Richard W; Widaman, Keith F

    2012-06-01

    We examined the life-span development of self-esteem and tested whether self-esteem influences the development of important life outcomes, including relationship satisfaction, job satisfaction, occupational status, salary, positive and negative affect, depression, and physical health. Data came from the Longitudinal Study of Generations. Analyses were based on 5 assessments across a 12-year period of a sample of 1,824 individuals ages 16 to 97 years. First, growth curve analyses indicated that self-esteem increases from adolescence to middle adulthood, reaches a peak at about age 50 years, and then decreases in old age. Second, cross-lagged regression analyses indicated that self-esteem is best modeled as a cause rather than a consequence of life outcomes. Third, growth curve analyses, with self-esteem as a time-varying covariate, suggested that self-esteem has medium-sized effects on life-span trajectories of affect and depression, small to medium-sized effects on trajectories of relationship and job satisfaction, a very small effect on the trajectory of health, and no effect on the trajectory of occupational status. These findings replicated across 4 generations of participants--children, parents, grandparents, and their great-grandparents. Together, the results suggest that self-esteem has a significant prospective impact on real-world life experiences and that high and low self-esteem are not mere epiphenomena of success and failure in important life domains. PMID:21942279

  12. Telomere length correlates with life span of dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Laura J; Fick, Gordon H; Li, Zichen; Cao, Eric; Bao, Bo; Heffelfinger, Doug; Parker, Heidi G; Ostrander, Elaine A; Riabowol, Karl

    2012-12-27

    Telomeric DNA repeats are lost as normal somatic cells replicate. When telomeres reach a critically short length, a DNA damage signal is initiated, inducing cell senescence. Some studies have indicated that telomere length correlates with mortality, suggesting that telomere length contributes to human life span; however, other studies report no correlation, and thus the issue remains controversial. Domestic dogs show parallels in telomere biology to humans, with similar telomere length, telomere attrition, and absence of somatic cell telomerase activity. Using this model, we find that peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) telomere length is a strong predictor of average life span among 15 different breeds (p Dogs lose telomeric DNA ~10-fold faster than humans, which is similar to the ratio of average life spans between these species. Breeds with shorter mean telomere lengths show an increased probability of death from cardiovascular disease, which was previously correlated with short telomere length in humans. PMID:23260664

  13. Life Span and Resiliency Theory: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Smith-Osborne

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Theories of life span development describe human growth and change over the life cycle (Robbins, Chatterjee, & Canda, 2006. Major types of developmental theories include biological, psychodynamic, behavioral, and social learning, cognitive, moral, and spiritual, and those influenced by systems, empowerment, and conflict theory. Life span development theories commonly focus on ontogenesis and sequential mastery of skills, tasks, and abilities. Social work scholars have pointed out that a limitation of life span and other developmental theory is lack of attention to resilience (Greene, 2007; Robbins et al., 1998. The concept of resilience was developed to “describe relative resistance to psychosocial risk experiences” (Rutter, 1999b, p. 119. Longitudinal studies focused on typical and atypical child development informed theory formulation in developmental psychopathology (Garmezy & Rutter, 1983; Luthar, Cichetti,& Becker, 2000 and in an evolving resilience model (Richardson, 2002; Werner & Smith, 1992. Research on resilience has found a positive relationship between a number of individual traits and contextual variables and resistance to a variety of risk factors among children and adolescents. More recently, resilience research has examined the operation of these same factors in the young adult, middle-age, and elder life stages. This article examines the historical and conceptual progression of the two developmental theories—life span and resiliency—and discusses their application to social work practice and education in human behavior in the social environment.

  14. The Writing Process: Effects of Life-Span Development on Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Diane Hahn

    A qualitative study focused on incubation and illumination within the act of writing to determine if life-span development affects image production during these creative, cognitive acts. Sixteen subjects of both sexes from four age groups represented major developmental stages in the life cycle. The research design provided two 90-minute sessions…

  15. Telomere Length Correlates with Life Span of Dog Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Fick

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Telomeric DNA repeats are lost as normal somatic cells replicate. When telomeres reach a critically short length, a DNA damage signal is initiated, inducing cell senescence. Some studies have indicated that telomere length correlates with mortality, suggesting that telomere length contributes to human life span; however, other studies report no correlation, and thus the issue remains controversial. Domestic dogs show parallels in telomere biology to humans, with similar telomere length, telomere attrition, and absence of somatic cell telomerase activity. Using this model, we find that peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC telomere length is a strong predictor of average life span among 15 different breeds (p < 0.0001, consistent with telomeres playing a role in life span determination. Dogs lose telomeric DNA ∼10-fold faster than humans, which is similar to the ratio of average life spans between these species. Breeds with shorter mean telomere lengths show an increased probability of death from cardiovascular disease, which was previously correlated with short telomere length in humans.

  16. Evaluating the life cycle environmental impact of short span bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Guangli; Pettersson, Lars; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-01-01

    impact of the construction sector. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a systematic method for assessing the environmental impact of products and systems, but its application in bridges is scarce. In Swede, most of the bridges are short spans and the type of concrete slab-frame bridge (CFB) accounts...

  17. Neuromodulation of Behavioral and Cognitive Development across the Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Among other mechanisms, behavioral and cognitive development entail, on the one hand, contextual scaffolding and, on the other hand, neuromodulation of adaptive neurocognitive representations across the life span. Key brain networks underlying cognition, emotion, and motivation are innervated by major transmitter systems (e.g., the catecholamines…

  18. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerger, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185) covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age) was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1) Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens) whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2) Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites. PMID:23667689

  19. [Microgravity, life span and biological age of animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serova, L V

    2002-01-01

    Summarized are author's and literary data about the microgravity effects on life span and biological age of animals obtained in experiments with laboratory rats flown in biosatellites Kosmos. Exposure of rats in the spaceflight microgravity as long as 3 wk. (up to 1/50th of the life period of this species) did not reduce the life span post flight. Alterations in biological age as judged by the reproductive function, general resistance and tissue regeneration rate were minor and in a number of parameters were significantly less as compared with the shifts resulting from simulation of the physiological effects of microgravity in laboratory (for a similar period). Prospects of investigations into this problem are considered. PMID:12442585

  20. Connecting Life Span Development with the Sociology of the Life Course: A New Direction

    OpenAIRE

    Gilleard, C.; Higgs, P.

    2015-01-01

    The life course has become a topic of growing interest within the social sciences. Attempts to link this sub-discipline with life span developmental psychology have been called for but with little sign of success. In this paper, we seek to address three interlinked issues concerning the potential for a more productive interchange between life course sociology and life span psychology. The first is to try to account for the failure of these two sub-disciplines to achieve any deepening engageme...

  1. Telomere Length Correlates with Life Span of Dog Breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Laura J. Fick; Gordon H. Fick; Zichen Li; Eric Cao; Bo Bao; Doug Heffelfinger; Heidi G. Parker; Elaine A. Ostrander; Karl Riabowol

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric DNA repeats are lost as normal somatic cells replicate. When telomeres reach a critically short length, a DNA damage signal is initiated, inducing cell senescence. Some studies have indicated that telomere length correlates with mortality, suggesting that telomere length contributes to human life span; however, other studies report no correlation, and thus the issue remains controversial. Domestic dogs show parallels in telomere biology to humans, with similar telomere length, telom...

  2. Minocycline Effect on Life and Health Span of Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Oxenkrug, Gregory; Navrotskaya, Valeriya; Vorobyova, Lyudmila; Summergrad, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Up-regulation of kynurenine (KYN) pathway of tryptophan (TRP) was suggested as one of the mechanisms of aging and aging-associated disorders. Genetic and pharmacological impairment of TRP – KYN metabolism resulted in prolongation of life span in Drosophila models. Minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective properties independent of its antibacterial activity, inhibited KYN formation from TRP. Since minocycline is the only FDA approved for human use medi...

  3. Exercise, brain, and cognition across the life span

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Michelle W.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Arthur F Kramer

    2011-01-01

    This is a brief review of current evidence for the relationships between physical activity and exercise and the brain and cognition throughout the life span in non-pathological populations. We focus on the effects of both aerobic and resistance training and provide a brief overview of potential neurobiological mechanisms derived from non-human animal models. Whereas research has focused primarily on the benefits of aerobic exercise in youth and young adult populations, there is growing eviden...

  4. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N=12 also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual’s passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations.

  5. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Wuerger

    Full Text Available It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185 covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1 Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2 Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites.

  6. Life Span Extension in Mice by Food Restriction Depends on an Energy Imbalance12

    OpenAIRE

    Sohal, Rajindar S.; Ferguson, Melissa; Sohal, Barbara H.; Forster, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, our main objective was to determine whether energy restriction (ER) affects the rate of oxygen consumption of mice transiently or lastingly and whether metabolic rate plays a role in the ER-related extension of life span. We compared rates of resting oxygen consumption between C57BL/6 mice, whose life span is prolonged by ER, and the DBA/2 mice where it is not, at 6 and 23 mo of age, following 40% ER for 2 and 19 mo, respectively. Mice of the 2 strains that consumed food ad lib...

  7. Emotional Egocentricity Bias across the life-span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eRiva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In our daily lives, we often have to quickly estimate the emotions of our conspecifics in order to have successful social interactions. While this estimation process seems quite easy when we are ourselves in a neutral or equivalent emotional state, it has recently been shown that in case of incongruent emotional states between ourselves and the others, our judgments can be biased. This phenomenon, introduced to the literature with the term Emotional Egocentricity Bias (EEB, has been found to occur in young adults and, to a greater extent, in children. However, how EEB changes across the life-span from adolescence to old age has been largely unexplored. In this study, we recruited 114 female participants subdivided in four cohorts (adolescents, young adults, middle-aged adults, older adults to examine EEB age-related changes. Participants were administered with a paradigm which, by making use of visuo-tactile stimulation that elicits conflicting feelings in paired participants, allows the valid and reliable exploration of EEB. Results highlighted a U-shaped relation between age and EEB, revealing higher emotional egocentricity in adolescents and older adults compared to young and middle-aged adults. These results are in line with the neuroscientific literature which has recently shown that overcoming EEB is associated with a greater activation of a portion of the parietal lobe, namely the right Supramarginal Gyrus (rSMG. This is an area that reaches full maturation only by the end of adolescence, and displays an early decay in older age. Thus, the age-related changes of the EEB could be possibly due to the life-span development of the rSMG. This study is the first one to show the quadratic relation between age and the EEB and set a milestone for further research exploring the neural correlates of the life-span development of the EEB. Future studies are needed in order to generalize these results to the male population and to explore gender

  8. Sex-specific Tradeoffs With Growth and Fitness Following Life-span Extension by Rapamycin in an Outcrossing Nematode, Caenorhabditis remanei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Martin I; Zwoinska, Martyna K; Meurling, Sara; Carlsson, Hanne; Maklakov, Alexei A

    2016-07-01

    Rapamycin inhibits the nutrient-sensing TOR pathway and extends life span in a wide range of organisms. Although life-span extension usually differs between the sexes, the reason for this is poorly understood. Because TOR influences growth, rapamycin likely affects life-history traits such as growth and reproduction. Sexes have different life-history strategies, and theory predicts that they will resolve the tradeoffs between growth, reproduction, and life span differently. Specifically, in taxa with female-biased sexual size dimorphism, reduced growth may have smaller effects on male fitness. We investigated the effects of juvenile, adult, or life-long rapamycin treatment on growth, reproduction, life span, and individual fitness in the outcrossing nematode Caenorhabditis remanei Life-long exposure to rapamycin always resulted in the strongest response, whereas postreproductive exposure did not affect life span. Although rapamycin resulted in longer life span and smaller size in males, male individual fitness was not affected. In contrast, size and fitness were negatively affected in females, whereas life span was only extended under high rapamycin concentrations. Our results support the hypothesis that rapamycin affects key life-history traits in a sex-specific manner. We argue that the fitness cost of life-span extension will be sex specific and propose that the smaller sex generally pay less while enjoying stronger life-span increase. PMID:26472877

  9. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells

  10. Quantifying yeast chronological life span by outgrowth of aged cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Christopher; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an important model organism in the field of aging research. The replicative and chronological life spans are two established paradigms used to study aging in yeast. Replicative aging is defined as the number of daughter cells a single yeast mother cell produces before senescence; chronological aging is defined by the length of time cells can survive in a non-dividing, quiescence-like state. We have developed a high-throughput method for quantitative measurement of chronological life span. This method involves aging the cells in a defined medium under agitation and at constant temperature. At each age-point, a sub-population of cells is removed from the aging culture and inoculated into rich growth medium. A high-resolution growth curve is then obtained for this sub-population of aged cells using a Bioscreen C MBR machine. An algorithm is then applied to determine the relative proportion of viable cells in each sub-population based on the growth kinetics at each age-point. This method requires substantially less time and resources compared to other chronological lifespan assays while maintaining reproducibility and precision. The high-throughput nature of this assay should allow for large-scale genetic and chemical screens to identify novel longevity modifiers for further testing in more complex organisms. PMID:19421136

  11. Explanations of a magic trick across the life span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Olson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying how children and adults explain magic tricks can reveal developmental differences in cognition. We showed 167 children (aged 4 to 13 years a video of a magician making a pen vanish and asked them to explain the trick. Although most claimed to know the secret, none of them correctly identified it. The younger children provided more supernatural interpretations and more often took the magician’s actions at face value. Combined with a similar study of adults (N=1008, we found that both young children and older adults were particularly overconfident in their explanations of the trick. Our methodology demonstrates the feasibility of using magic to study cognitive development across the life span.

  12. Adults' conceptions of intelligence across the adult life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, C A; Sternberg, R J

    1992-06-01

    To examine whether young, middle-aged, and older adults view the concept of intelligent person as similar or different during adulthood, 140 adults of various ages rated how likely it would be for individuals of average and exceptional intelligence at 30, 50, and 70 years of age to be engaged in behaviors previously identified by adults as characterizing adult intelligence. Adults perceived more similarity between exceptionally intelligent prototypes of closer ages (i.e., 30 and 50 and 50 and 70). Intelligence was perceived to consist of interest and ability to deal with novelty, everyday competence, and verbal competence--dimensions that were perceived to be differentially important for different-aged prototypes and by individuals of different ages. Participants' conceptions also included the idea that intelligence is malleable and that abilities differentially increase or decrease across the life span. PMID:1610512

  13. Transition: Life-Span and Life-Space Considerations for Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Edna Mora

    1994-01-01

    This article integrates literature from counseling, rehabilitation, multicultural education, and special education to explain the importance of life-span considerations, including the preschool and early school years, and the life-space factors of family, culture, and community. Principles for transition interventions which promote empowerment are…

  14. ETS-4 is a transcriptional regulator of life span in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bargavi Thyagarajan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a complex phenotype responsive to a plethora of environmental inputs; yet only a limited number of transcriptional regulators are known to influence life span. How the downstream expression programs mediated by these factors (or others are coordinated into common or distinct set of aging effectors is an addressable question in model organisms, such as C. elegans. Here, we establish the transcription factor ETS-4, an ortholog of vertebrate SPDEF, as a longevity determinant. Adult worms with ets-4 mutations had a significant extension of mean life span. Restoring ETS-4 activity in the intestine, but not neurons, of ets-4 mutant worms rescued life span to wild-type levels. Using RNAi, we demonstrated that ets-4 is required post-developmentally to regulate adult life span; thus uncoupling the role of ETS-4 in aging from potential functions in worm intestinal development. Seventy ETS-4-regulated genes, identified by gene expression profiling of two distinct ets-4 alleles and analyzed by bioinformatics, were enriched for known longevity effectors that function in lipid transport, lipid metabolism, and innate immunity. Putative target genes were enriched for ones that change expression during normal aging, the majority of which are controlled by the GATA factors. Also, some ETS-4-regulated genes function downstream of the FOXO factor, DAF-16 and the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. However, epistasis and phenotypic analyses indicate that ets-4 functioned in parallel to the insulin/IGF-1 receptor, daf-2 and akt-1/2 kinases. Furthermore, ets-4 required daf-16 to modulate aging, suggesting overlap in function at the level of common targets that affect life span. In conclusion, ETS-4 is a new transcriptional regulator of aging, which shares transcriptional targets with GATA and FOXO factors, suggesting that overlapping pathways direct common sets of lifespan-related genes.

  15. Resveratrol Fails to Extend Life Span in the Mosquito Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Adiv A; Riehle, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol present in grape skins, has been theorized to account for the "French Paradox" by explaining how red wine may decrease the health risks associated with unhealthy diets. Resveratrol has been reported to extend life span in several different species. Other studies, however, have failed to find a resveratrol-induced life span effect. A recent meta-study analyzing previously published survival data concluded that, although resveratrol reliably and reproducibly extends life span in some species, its life span effects show diminished reliability in other organisms. The data are mixed, and it remains unclear how evolutionarily conserved resveratrol's effects on life span are. To gain further insight into this controversy, we studied the effects of various concentrations (200 μM, 100 μM, 50 μM, or 0 μM) of orally fed resveratrol on the life span of the mosquito Anopheles stephensi, an important vector of human malaria, under two different feeding treatments--sugar-fed only or sugar-fed with intermittent blood meals. Each treatment was repeated three times and both survivorship and mortality rates were analyzed for each replicate. For the majority of experiments, resveratrol failed to mediate a statistically significant effect on life span. Although there was one instance where resveratrol significantly increased life span, there were five other instances where resveratrol significantly decreased life span. We conclude from these data that, under normal conditions, resveratrol does not extend life span in A. stephensi. PMID:25848933

  16. The affective life of semiotics

    OpenAIRE

    J. S. Hutta

    2015-01-01

    The paper challenges writings on affect that locate affective dynamism in autonomic bodily responses while positing discourse and language as "capturing" affect. To move beyond such "verticalism", the paper seeks to further an understanding of language, and semiotics more broadly, as itself affective. Drawing on participatory research conducted in Rio de Janeiro, it uses poetic expression as a paradigmatic case of the affective life of semiotics. Conceptually, it builds on Guat...

  17. Shorter Life Span of Microorganisms and Plants as a Consequence of Shielded Magnetic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, I. M.; Bathory, D.

    The geomagnetic field is an essential environmental factor for life and health on this planet. In order to survey how magnetic fields affect the life span and the nitrogenase (an iron-sulphur enzyme) activity of Azotobacter chroococcum as well as the life span, the main organic synthesis and the water balance of plants (22 species), the biological tests were incubated under shielded magnetic field and also in normal geo-magnetic environment. The shielding level was about 10-6 of the terrestrial magnetic field.Life cycles of all organisms require the co-ordinated control of a complex set of interlocked physiological processes and metabolic pathways. Such processes are likely to be regulated by a large number of genes. Our researches suggest that the main point in biological structures, which seems to be affected by the low magnetic environment, is the water molecule. Magnetic field induces a molecular alignment. Under shielded conditions, unstructured water molecules with fewer hydrogen bonds, which are producing a more reactive environment, are occurring. As compared to control, the life span of both microorganisms and plants was shorter in shielded environment. A higher nitrogenase affinity for the substrate was recorded in normal geo-magnetic field compared to low magnetic field. The synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes was modified under experimental conditions. The stomatal conductance was higher between 158 and 300% in shielded environment indicating an important water loss from the plant cells.Our results support the idea that the shielded magnetic environment induces different reactions depending on the time of exposure and on the main metabolic pathways of the cells.

  18. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  19. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms

  20. The Rate of Source Memory Decline across the Adult Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, Selene; Estrada-Manilla, Cinthya; Hernandez-Ramos, Evelia; Martinez-Galindo, Joyce Graciela; Torres-Trejo, Frine; Gomez-Fernandez, Tania; Ayala-Hernandez, Mariana; Osorio, David; Cedillo-Tinoco, Melisa; Garces-Flores, Lissete; Gomez-Melgarejo, Sandra; Beltran-Palacios, Karla; Guadalupe Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee; Garcia-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Cadena-Arenas, Yadira; Fernandez-Apan, Luisa; Bartschi, Andrea; Resendiz-Vera, Julieta; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Maria Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the ability to remember contextual information related to specific episodic experiences declines with advancing age; however, the exact moment in the adult life span when this deficit begins is still controversial. Source memory for spatial information was tested in a life span sample of 1,500 adults between…

  1. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the property during the practice life span. In the event of voluntary or involuntary loss of control... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  2. Sequential and Coordinative Processing Dynamics in Figural Transformations across the Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Ulrich; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the proposition that two distinct factors involved in life span cognitive development are mental speed and coordination efficiency. Results show dissociable speed of processing and working memory functioning over the life span and age-related differential effects of coordinative demands. (ET)

  3. The yeast forkhead HCM1 controls life span independent of calorie restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Noam; Gabay, Orshay; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Cohen, Haim Y

    2015-04-01

    Regulation of life span by members of the forkhead transcription factor family of proteins is one of the most highly investigated pathways in the field of aging. Nevertheless, despite the existence of forkhead family homologues in yeast, our knowledge of these proteins' role in yeast longevity is limited. Here, we show that yeast Hcm1p forkhead is the closest homologue of the worm PHA-4 forkhead, which regulates Caenorhabditis elegans life span. Overexpressing the yeast forkhead HCM1 or its deficiency resulted in a significant extension or reduction in yeast replicative life span, respectively. HCM1 regulates stress resistance, significantly increases the mRNA levels of several stress response genes including the catalase enzymes CTA1 and CTT1, and positively regulates life span independently of calorie restriction. Thus, HCM1 is a key regulator of life span, through a mechanism independent of calorie restriction. PMID:24835838

  4. Optimisation by Selection and Compensation: Balancing Primary and Secondary Control in Life Span Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Schulz, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Discusses individuals as producers of their life span developments, and examines individuals' selection of their life paths and their proneness to failure. Considers a model that explains individuals' optimization of their life course management in terms of selection of life paths and compensation for age-related losses such that potential for…

  5. [Effect of epitalon and melatonin on life span and spontaneous carcinogenesis in senescence accelerated mice (SAM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V N; Popovich, I G; Zabezhinskiĭ, M A; Rozenfel'd, S V; Khavinson, V Kh; Semenchenko, A V; Iashin, A I

    2005-01-01

    Female senescence accelerated mice SAMP-1. (prone) and SAMR-1 (resistant) were exposed 5 times a week monthly to melatonin (with drinking water 20mg/ml during the night hours) or to s.c. injections of epitalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly) at a single dose 1mkg/mouse. Control mice were intact or exposed to injection of 0.1 ml normal saline. The body weight and temperature, food consumption, estrous function were monitored regularly. The life span and tumor incidence were evaluated as well. As age advanced, the weight increased whereas food consumption and body temperature did not change. There was no significant substrain difference in these parameters. Exposure to melatonin or epitalon also failed to influence those indices. As age advanced, the incidence of irregular estrous cycles increased both in SAMP-1 and SAMR-1, whereas the treatment with both melatonin and epitalon prevented such disturbances. SAMP-1 revealed some features of accelerated aging as compared to SAMR-1. The mean life span of the 10% of the last survivors among treated SAMP-1 was shorter than that of SAMR-1, aging rate increased and mortality doubling time decreased. There was a direct correlation between body mass of the two substrains at the age of 3 and 12 months matched by body mass increase and longer life span. Melatonin or epitalon treatment was followed by longer mean and maximum survival in the 10% of the last survivors among SAMP-1. Melatonin involved decreased aging rate and increased mortality doubling time. Malignant lymphomas predominated in SAM without any significant difference in frequency between the substrains. While melatonin failed to influence tumor incidence or term of detection in SAMP-1, neither did epitalon affect frequency. However, it was followed by longer survival in tumor-free animals. No link between melatonin or epitalon treatment, on the one hand, and carcinogenesis, on the other, was reported in SAMR-1. PMID:15909815

  6. Mathematical Basis of Idea That Harmonious Marriage Can Lengthen Life-span

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    It is a very important issue for us to explore the effects of the marriage to life. In recent years, many scholars have proved that the marriage can lengthen life-span from different angles. With the development of theory of dependence random variables, we discuss the effects of the marriage to life and provide a mathematical basis of the idea that the harmonious marriage can lengthen life-span in this paper. Meanwhile, we analyze the impact of the marriage on life on the basis of the net single premium.

  7. LIFE SPAN OF A SMOOTH SOLUTION FOR THE SURFACE DIFFUSION FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祖汉

    2003-01-01

    Consider the motion of immersed hypersurfaces driven by surface diffusion flow and give anlower bound on the life span of a smooth immersed solution, which depends only on how muchthe curvature of the initial surface is concentrated in space.

  8. Berberine Prolongs Life Span and Stimulates Locomotor Activity of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Navrotskaya, V. V.; Oxenkrug, G.; Vorobyova, L. I.; Summergrad, P.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster mutants with deficient kynurenine (KYN) formation from tryptophan (TRP) have longer life span than wild type flies. Administration of alpha-methyl-TRP and 5-methyl-TRY, the inhibitors of TRP-KYN metabolism, prolonged life span in wild-type flies. Both inhibitors are not available for human use. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Berberis aristata, is known as the herb widely used in traditional Chinese and Indian medicine. Berberin is a strong inhibitor ...

  9. Comparative transcriptional profiling identifies takeout as a gene that regulates life span

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Johannes; Antosh, Michael; Chang, Chengyi; Schorl, Christoph; Kolli, Santharam; Neretti, Nicola; HELFAND, STEPHEN L.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in translating the positive effects of dietary restriction (DR) for the improvement of human health is the development of therapeutic mimics. One approach to finding DR mimics is based upon identification of the proximal effectors of DR life span extension. Whole genome profiling of DR in Drosophila shows a large number of changes in gene expression, making it difficult to establish which changes are involved in life span determination as opposed to other unrelated physiolog...

  10. Copper supplementation increases yeast life span under conditions requiring respiratory metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchman, Paul A.; Botta, Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    To further exploit yeast as a model for cellular aging we have modified the replicative life span assay to force respiration, by replacing glucose with the non-fermentable carbon source glycerol. The growth rates of several different strains varied greatly, with doubling times ranging from 2.7 to 7 hours. Life spans of all strains were lower on media containing glycerol than on media containing glucose. However, supplementation of glycerol-containing media with copper resulted in increases in...

  11. An Eco-Cultural and Interpersonal Relations Approach to Development Over the Life Span

    OpenAIRE

    Trommsdorff, Gisela

    2002-01-01

    This chapter aims to illustrate the role of culture for development over the life-span. First, theoretical approaches on development in culture are presented, starting from early anthropological to recent eco-cultural approaches. Then culture-specific conceptualisations of development over the life span are discussed, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age. Finally, recent studies on subjective theories, transmissions of values, and intergenerational relations are discussed ...

  12. Neuromodulation of associative and organizational plasticity across the life span: empirical evidence and neurocomputational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Chen; Brehmer, Yvonne; Shing, Yee Lee; Werkle-Bergner, Markus; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2006-01-01

    Developmental plasticity is the key mechanism that allows humans and other organisms to modify and adapt to contextual and experiential influences. Thus, reciprocal co-constructive interactions between behavioral and neuronal plasticity play important roles in regulating neurobehavioral development across the life span. This review focuses on behavioral and neuronal evidence of lifespan differences in associative memory plasticity and plasticity of the functional organization of cognitive and cortical processes, as well as the role of the dopaminergic system in modulating such plasticity. Special attention is given to neurocomputational models that help exploring lifespan differences in neuromodulation of neuronal and behavioral plasticity. Simulation results from these models suggest that lifespan changes in the efficacy of neuromodulatory mechanisms may shape associative memory plasticity and the functional organization of neurocognitive processes by affecting the fidelity of neuronal signal transmission, which has consequences for the distinctiveness of neurocognitive representations and the efficacy of distributed neural coding. PMID:16930705

  13. Increased Life Span due to Calorie Restriction in Respiratory-Deficient Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A model for replicative life span extension by calorie restriction (CR in yeast has been proposed whereby reduced glucose in the growth medium leads to activation of the NAD-dependent histone deacetylase Sir2. One mechanism proposed for this putative activation of Sir2 is that CR enhances the rate of respiration, in turn leading to altered levels of NAD or NADH, and ultimately resulting in enhanced Sir2 activity. An alternative mechanism has been proposed in which CR decreases levels of the Sir2 inhibitor nicotinamide through increased expression of the gene coding for nicotinamidase, PNC1. We have previously reported that life span extension by CR is not dependent on Sir2 in the long-lived BY4742 strain background. Here we have determined the requirement for respiration and the effect of nicotinamide levels on life span extension by CR. We find that CR confers robust life span extension in respiratory-deficient cells independent of strain background, and moreover, suppresses the premature mortality associated with loss of mitochondrial DNA in the short-lived PSY316 strain. Addition of nicotinamide to the medium dramatically shortens the life span of wild type cells, due to inhibition of Sir2. However, even in cells lacking both Sir2 and the replication fork block protein Fob1, nicotinamide partially prevents life span extension by CR. These findings (1 demonstrate that respiration is not required for the longevity benefits of CR in yeast, (2 show that nicotinamide inhibits life span extension by CR through a Sir2-independent mechanism, and (3 suggest that CR acts through a conserved, Sir2-independent mechanism in both PSY316 and BY4742.

  14. ω-6 Polyunsaturated fatty acids extend life span through the activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Eyleen J; Kuballa, Petric; Xavier, Ramnik; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-02-15

    Adaptation to nutrient scarcity depends on the activation of metabolic programs to efficiently use internal reserves of energy. Activation of these programs in abundant food regimens can extend life span. However, the common molecular and metabolic changes that promote adaptation to nutritional stress and extend life span are mostly unknown. Here we present a response to fasting, enrichment of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which promotes starvation resistance and extends Caenorhabditis elegans life span. Upon fasting, C. elegans induces the expression of a lipase, which in turn leads to an enrichment of ω-6 PUFAs. Supplementing C. elegans culture media with these ω-6 PUFAs increases their resistance to starvation and extends their life span in conditions of food abundance. Supplementation of C. elegans or human epithelial cells with these ω-6 PUFAs activates autophagy, a cell recycling mechanism that promotes starvation survival and slows aging. Inactivation of C. elegans autophagy components reverses the increase in life span conferred by supplementing the C. elegans diet with these fasting-enriched ω-6 PUFAs. We propose that the salubrious effects of dietary supplementation with ω-3/6 PUFAs (fish oils) that have emerged from epidemiological studies in humans may be due to a similar activation of autophagic programs. PMID:23392608

  15. Stability and change: Stress responses and the shaping of behavioral phenotypes over the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Michael B; Kaiser, Sylvia; Tiedtke, Tobias; Sachser, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, maternal signals conveyed via influences on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity may shape behavior of the young to be better adapted for prevailing environmental conditions. However, the mother's influence extends beyond classic stress response systems. In guinea pigs, several hours (h) of separation from the mother activates not only the HPA axis, but also the innate immune system, which effects immediate behavioral change, as well as modifies behavioral responsiveness in the future. Moreover, the presence of the mother potently suppresses the behavioral consequences of this innate immune activation. These findings raise the possibility that long-term adaptive behavioral change can be mediated by the mother's influence on immune-related activity of her pups. Furthermore, the impact of social partners on physiological stress responses and their behavioral outcomes are not limited to the infantile period. A particularly crucial period for social development in male guinea pigs is that surrounding the attainment of sexual maturation. At this time, social interactions with adults can dramatically affect circulating cortisol concentrations and social behavior in ways that appear to prepare the male to best cope in its likely future social environment. Despite such multiple social influences on the behavior of guinea pigs at different ages, inter-individual differences in the magnitude of the cortisol response remain surprisingly stable over most of the life span. Together, it appears that throughout the life span, physiological stress responses may be regulated by social stimuli. These influences are hypothesized to adjust behavior for predicted environmental conditions. In addition, stable individual differences might provide a means of facilitating adaptation to less predictable conditions. PMID:26816517

  16. High sexual signalling rates of young individuals predict extended life span in male Mediterranean fruit flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Nikos T; Katsoyannos, Byron I; Kouloussis, Nikos A; Carey, James R; Müller, Hans-Georg; Zhang, Ying

    2004-01-01

    In a laboratory study, we monitored the lifetime sexual signalling (advertisement) of wild male Mediterranean fruit flies, and we tested the hypothesis that high lifetime intensity of sexual signalling indicates high survival probabilities. Almost all males exhibited signalling and individual signalling rates were highly variable from the beginning of the adults' maturity and throughout their life span (average life span 62.3 days). Sexual signalling rates after day 10 (peak maturity) were consistently high until about 1 week before death. There was a positive relationship between daily signalling rates and life span, and an increase in signalling level by one unit over all times was associated with an approximately 50% decrease in mortality rate. Signalling rates early in adult life (day 6-20) were higher in the longest-lived than in the shortest-lived flies. These results support the hypothesis that intense sexual signalling indicates longer life span. We discuss the importance of age-specific behavioural studies for understanding the evolution of male life histories. PMID:14576929

  17. Childhood self-control and unemployment throughout the life span: evidence from two British cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Michael; Delaney, Liam; Egan, Mark; Baumeister, Roy F

    2015-06-01

    The capacity for self-control may underlie successful labor-force entry and job retention, particularly in times of economic uncertainty. Analyzing unemployment data from two nationally representative British cohorts (N = 16,780), we found that low self-control in childhood was associated with the emergence and persistence of unemployment across four decades. On average, a 1-SD increase in self-control was associated with a reduction in the probability of unemployment of 1.4 percentage points after adjustment for intelligence, social class, and gender. From labor-market entry to middle age, individuals with low self-control experienced 1.6 times as many months of unemployment as those with high self-control. Analysis of monthly unemployment data before and during the 1980s recession showed that individuals with low self-control experienced the greatest increases in unemployment during the recession. Our results underscore the critical role of self-control in shaping life-span trajectories of occupational success and in affecting how macroeconomic conditions affect unemployment levels in the population. PMID:25870404

  18. Explanatory style across the life span: evidence for stability over 52 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, M O; Seligman, M E

    1989-03-01

    Analyzed explanatory style across the life span. 30 Ss whose average age was 72 responded to questions about their current life and provided diaries or letters written in their youth, an average of 52 years earlier. A blind content analysis of explanatory style derived from these 2 sources revealed that explanatory style for negative events was stable throughout adult life (r = .54, p less than .002). In contrast, there appeared to be no stability of explanatory style for positive events between the same 2 time periods. These results suggest that explanatory style for negative events may persist across the life span and may constitute an enduring risk factor for depression, low achievement, and physical illness. PMID:2926642

  19. Like cognitive function, decision making across the life span shows profound age-related changes

    OpenAIRE

    Tymula, Agnieszka; Rosenberg Belmaker, Lior A.; Ruderman, Lital; Paul W Glimcher; Levy, Ifat

    2013-01-01

    Although largely unstudied, behavioral changes in decision making across the life span have implications for problems associated with poor decision making at different life stages, such as careless driving in adolescents and disadvantageous medical or financial decision making in older adults. We examine age-based differences in individual decision-making characteristics—choice consistency, rationality, and preferences for known and unknown risks—in 12- to 90-y-olds. We found that even the he...

  20. On personality stability and change: main results of Brno longitudinal study on life-span development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, Supplement (2007), s. 37-49. ISSN 0009-062X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA406/06/1408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : life-span development * personality stability and change Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.133, year: 2007

  1. Gains and Losses in Creative Personality as Perceived by Adults across the Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Anna N. N.; Yeung, Dannii Y.; Sue-Chan, Christina; Chan, Kara; Hui, Desmond C. K.; Cheng, Sheung-Tak

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used a life span model to study the subjective perception of creative personality (CP) in emerging, young, middle-aged, and older Hong Kong Chinese adults. We also asked participants to estimate the approximate age by which people develop and lose CP across adulthood. We expected an interesting interplay between internalized age…

  2. Body Image across the Life Span in Adult Women: The Role of Self-Objectification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Marika; Lynch, Jessica E.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated body image across life span in cross-section of women ages 20-84 years. Found that although body dissatisfaction remained stable, self-objectification, habitual body monitoring, appearance anxiety, and disordered eating all significantly decreased with age. Self- objectification mediated the relationship between age and disordered…

  3. Small lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid tissues of nude mice. Life-span and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Röpke, C

    1975-01-01

    far the most numerous in the lymph nodes seemed to be more sessile than para-cortical lymphocytes. The life-span of these latter cells are comparable to those of thoracic duct lymphocytes, and the scarcity of cells in the paracortex reflects the small number of recirculating lymphocytes in nude mice....

  4. Service Learning in Life-Span Developmental Psychology: Higher Exam Scores and Increased Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Brenda L.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes research conducted to evaluate the impact of service learning on exam scores and emotional empathy in a life-span development course. Service learning was 1 of 3 project options offered in the course; others included an interview project and a research paper. With the exception of the first exam, scores were significantly…

  5. Life-Span Development of Visual Working Memory: When Is Feature Binding Difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Nelson; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Kilb, Angela; Saults, J. Scott

    2006-01-01

    We asked whether the ability to keep in working memory the binding between a visual object and its spatial location changes with development across the life span more than memory for item information. Paired arrays of colored squares were identical or differed in the color of one square, and in the latter case, the changed color was unique on…

  6. Effects of kaolin particle films on the life span of an orb-weaver spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhadi-Marín, Jacinto; Pereira, José Alberto; Santos, Sónia A P

    2016-02-01

    Araniella cucurbitina (Araneae: Araneidae) is a widespread orb-weaver spider commonly found in agroecosystems. Mineral particle films such as kaolin, due to their protective or anti-feeding action, can represent an alternative to pesticides, especially in organic farming systems, but little is known about its effects on A. cucurbitina. Therefore, we tested the effect of kaolin sprays on the life span of A. cucurbitina under laboratory conditions. Four treatments were tested encompassing different exposure routes. Thus, kaolin sprays were applied on (i) the surface, (ii) the prey (fly), (iii) the spider and (iv) both spider & prey. A control group was tested with water in each treatment. Results showed that sprays of kaolin significantly affected the survival of A. curcubitina when applications were done on the surface and on both spider & prey registering a reduction of 48% and 56%, respectively. Spiders in control obtained higher probability of reaching alive at the end of the assay than those treated with kaolin. Differences observed can be explained by the feeding behavior of the species and may depend on the consumption of the web by the spider and the ratio spider/fly for body size. PMID:26432533

  7. Rapid growth and short life spans characterize pipefish populations in vulnerable seagrass beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, K L; Booth, D J

    2016-05-01

    The life-history traits of two species of pipefish (Syngnathidae) from seagrass meadows in New South Wales, Australia, were examined to understand whether they enhance resilience to habitat degradation. The spotted pipefish Stigmatopora argus and wide-bodied pipefish Stigmatopora nigra exhibit some of the shortest life spans known for vertebrates (longevity up to 150 days) and rapid maturity (male S. argus 35 days after hatching (DAH) and male S. nigra at 16-19 DAH), key characteristics of opportunistic species. Growth rates of both species were extremely rapid (up to 2 mm day(-1) ), with seasonal and sex differences in growth rate. It is argued that short life spans and high growth rates may be advantageous for these species, which inhabit one of the most threatened marine ecosystems on earth. PMID:27005315

  8. How does personality develop over the life-course: Results of the Brno Longitudinal Study on Life-Span Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek; Jelínek, Martin; Osecká, Terezie

    New York: Nova Science Publishers, 2009 - (Elling, L.), s. 213-245 ISBN 978-1-60741-612-8 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : life-span development * personality stability and change * longitudinal study Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  9. C. elegans VANG-1 modulates life span via insulin/IGF-1-like signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian J Honnen

    Full Text Available The planar cell polarity (PCP pathway is highly conserved from Drosophila to humans and a PCP-like pathway has recently been described in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The developmental function of this pathway is to coordinate the orientation of cells or structures within the plane of an epithelium or to organize cell-cell intercalation required for correct morphogenesis. Here, we describe a novel role of VANG-1, the only C. elegans ortholog of the conserved PCP component Strabismus/Van Gogh. We show that two alleles of vang-1 and depletion of the protein by RNAi cause an increase of mean life span up to 40%. Consistent with the longevity phenotype vang-1 animals also show enhanced resistance to thermal- and oxidative stress and decreased lipofuscin accumulation. In addition, vang-1 mutants show defects like reduced brood size, decreased ovulation rate and prolonged reproductive span, which are also related to gerontogenes. The germline, but not the intestine or neurons, seems to be the primary site of vang-1 function. Life span extension in vang-1 mutants depends on the insulin/IGF-1-like receptor DAF-2 and DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor. RNAi against the phase II detoxification transcription factor SKN-1/Nrf2 also reduced vang-1 life span that might be explained by gradual inhibition of insulin/IGF-1-like signaling in vang-1. This is the first time that a key player of the PCP pathway is shown to be involved in the insulin/IGF-1-like signaling dependent modulation of life span in C. elegans.

  10. [Life span and cercaria shedding of schistosome-infected snails in mountain region of Yunnan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, F; Yin, G; Wu, J; Duan, Y; Zhang, X; Yang, J; Qian, K; Tan, H; Zheng, J; Zhang, R

    1990-01-01

    The life span and cercaria shedding of infected Oncomelania snails in a mountain region of Shitoudi village, Weishan County, Yunnan Province were observed in simulated local ecological environments. 135 infected snails were isolated for observation 3 months after exposure to miracidia in August, 1987. The snail survival rate from the day of initial cercaria shedding to next June, July, August and September was 27.4, 16.3, 13.3 and 11.9% respectively, and the average number of cercariae shed was 139.9, 29.6, 39.2 and 75 per month respectively. The average life span of infected snails was 171.6 days. The average number of cercariae shed per snail in its whole life was 673.0. It was estimated that the average patent period of infected snails was over half a year. As this is the first report in our country in respect to the life span and cercariae shedding of infected snails in a mountain region, the result might be useful for quantitative analysis of epidemiological factors of schistosomiasis in this kind of endemic areas as well as for formulation of control strategy. PMID:2114229

  11. NAD⁺ repletion improves mitochondrial and stem cell function and enhances life span in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wu, Yibo; Gariani, Karim; Wang, Xu; Luan, Peiling; D'Amico, Davide; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Lutolf, Matthias P; Aebersold, Ruedi; Schoonjans, Kristina; Menzies, Keir J; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-17

    Adult stem cells (SCs) are essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration yet are susceptible to senescence during aging. We demonstrate the importance of the amount of the oxidized form of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its effect on mitochondrial activity as a pivotal switch to modulate muscle SC (MuSC) senescence. Treatment with the NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) induced the mitochondrial unfolded protein response and synthesis of prohibitin proteins, and this rejuvenated MuSCs in aged mice. NR also prevented MuSC senescence in the mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J) mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We furthermore demonstrate that NR delays senescence of neural SCs and melanocyte SCs and increases mouse life span. Strategies that conserve cellular NAD(+) may reprogram dysfunctional SCs and improve life span in mammals. PMID:27127236

  12. Basic traits predict the prevalence of personality disorder across the life span: the example of psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, David D; Lynam, Donald R; Widiger, Thomas A; Miller, Joshua D; McCrae, Robert R; Costa, Paul T

    2013-05-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) may be better understood in terms of dimensions of general personality functioning rather than as discrete categorical conditions. Personality-trait descriptions of PDs are robust across methods and settings, and PD assessments based on trait measures show good construct validity. The study reported here extends research showing that basic traits (e.g., impulsiveness, warmth, straightforwardness, modesty, and deliberation) can re-create the epidemiological characteristics associated with PDs. Specifically, we used normative changes in absolute trait levels to simulate age-related differences in the prevalence of psychopathy in a forensic setting. Results demonstrated that trait information predicts the rate of decline for psychopathy over the life span; discriminates the decline of psychopathy from that of a similar disorder, antisocial PD; and accurately predicts the differential decline of subfactors of psychopathy. These findings suggest that basic traits provide a parsimonious account of PD prevalence across the life span. PMID:23528790

  13. ETS-4 Is a Transcriptional Regulator of Life Span in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Thyagarajan, Bargavi; Blaszczak, Adam G.; Chandler, Katherine J.; Watts, Jennifer L; Johnson, W. Evan; Graves, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is a complex phenotype responsive to a plethora of environmental inputs; yet only a limited number of transcriptional regulators are known to influence life span. How the downstream expression programs mediated by these factors (or others) are coordinated into common or distinct set of aging effectors is an addressable question in model organisms, such as C. elegans. Here, we establish the transcription factor ETS-4, an ortholog of vertebrate SPDEF, as a longevity determinant. Adult wor...

  14. The Mother Enrichment Program: A Genetic System for Facile Replicative Life Span Analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lindstrom, Derek L.; Gottschling, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    The replicative life span (RLS) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been established as a model for the genetic regulation of longevity despite the inherent difficulty of the RLS assay, which requires separation of mother and daughter cells by micromanipulation after every division. Here we present the mother enrichment program (MEP), an inducible genetic system in which mother cells maintain a normal RLS—a median of 36 generations in the diploid MEP strain—while the proliferative potential of da...

  15. Estimates for the number of visible galaxy-spanning civilizations and the cosmological expansion of life

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, S. Jay

    2015-01-01

    If advanced civilizations appear in the universe with an ability and desire to expand, the entire universe can become saturated with life on a short timescale, even if such expanders appear rarely. Our presence in an apparently untouched Milky Way thus constrains the appearance rate of galaxy-spanning Kardashev type III (K3) civilizations, if it is assumed that some fraction of K3 civilizations will continue their expansion at intergalactic distances. We use this constraint to estimate the ap...

  16. Toxicity of cadmium and zinc mixtures to the decaudized cercarial life span of Diplostomum spathaceum

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, Neil; Crane, M.; Lewis, J W

    2005-01-01

    The effects of cadmium and zinc mixtures at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10,000mg l21 on the life-span of decaudized cercarial bodies (cercariae that have shed their tails) of Diplostomum spathaceum (Trematoda: Diplostomatidae) was investigated. Cercariae were exposed to metal mixtures of equal and unequal concentrations, and a low-dose pre-treatment followed by a high-dose exposure mixtures. Metal mixtures demonstrated variable effects on decaudized cercariae either by increasing or re...

  17. Diabetes mellitus as a cause of life span shortening in locally exposed rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the development of remote radiation pathology of pancreas in male rats after local irradiation of abdomen with doses of 5, 10 (two fractions of 5 Gy at a 30-day interval) and 15 Gy (three fractions of 5 Gy at a 30-day interval). The clinical and morphological estimates show the dose-dependent development of diabetes mellitus and 1.8-fold shortening of the life span, as compared to biological control

  18. Induced overexpression of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase extends the life span of adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jingtao; Folk, Donna; Bradley, Timothy J.; Tower, John

    2002-01-01

    A transgenic system ("FLP-out") based on yeast FLP recombinase allowed induced overexpression of MnSOD enzyme in adult Drosophila melanogaster. With FLP-out a brief heat pulse (HP) of young, adult flies triggered the rearrangement and subsequent expression of a MnSOD transgene throughout the adult life span. Control (no HP) and overexpressing (HP) flies had identical genetic backgrounds. The amount of MnSOD enzyme overexpression achieved varied among six independent transgenic lines, with inc...

  19. A method for describing disease patterns during the life span of dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Faye, Bernard; Boulme, R; Lescourret, Francoise; Coulon, Jean Baptiste

    1996-01-01

    This study presents some guidelines for describing the health status of dairy cows over their entire life span. It aims to define some types of health-paths (trajectories) described in terms of disease patterns (at the lactation level) and related to cow characteristics (breed, production potential) and farms. The data were collected over a 20-year period on three experimental farms. Eight diseases were analysed: clinical mastitis, lameness, placental retention, foot rot, digestive disorders,...

  20. Plasticity of Executive Control Induced by Process-Based Cognitive Training Across the Life-Span

    OpenAIRE

    Zinke, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Plasticity is a central concept within the life-span approach of development and is defined as the ability of an individual to change and reorganize in response to environmental challenges (e.g., Baltes & Singer, 20019. Such intraindividual changes can be induced by systematic cognitive training. Recent studies suggest that substantial amounts of plasticity can be induced in executive control functions with a process-based training approach. These newer studies show that repeated practice on ...

  1. Trade-off between cellular immunity and life span in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Indrikis KRAMS; Jan(i)na DAUK(S)TE; Inese KIVLENIECE; Ants KAASIK; Tatjana KRAMA; Todd M.FREEBERG; Markus J.RANTALA

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulation is a nonspecific,cellular response through which insects defend themselves against multicellular pathogens.During this immune reaction,haemocytes recognize an object as foreign and cause other haemocytes to aggregate and form a capsule around the object,often consisting of melanized cells.The process of melanisation is accompanied by the formation of potentially toxic reactive oxygen species,which can kill not only pathogens but also host cells.In this study we tested whether the encapsulation response is costly in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor.We found a negative relationship between the duration of implantation via a nylon monofilament and remaining life span.We also found a negative relationship between the strength of immune response and remaining life span,suggesting that cellular immunity is costly in T.molitor,and that there is a trade-off between immune response and remaining life span.However,this relationship disappeared at 31-32 hours of implantation at 25 ± 2℃.As the disappearance of a relationship between duration of implantation and lifespan coincided with the highest values of encapsulation response,we concluded that the beetles stopped investment in the production of melanotic cells,as the implant,a synthetic parasite,was fully isolated from the host's tissues.

  2. Trade-off between cellular immunity and life span in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrikis KRAMS, Janīna DAUKŠTE, Inese KIVLENIECE, Ants KAASIK, Tatjana KRAMA, Todd M. REEBERG, Markus J. RANTALA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Encapsulation is a nonspecific, cellular response through which insects defend themselves against multicellular pathogens. During this immune reaction, haemocytes recognize an object as foreign and cause other haemocytes to aggregate and form a capsule around the object, often consisting of melanized cells. The process of melanisation is accompanied by the formation of potentially toxic reactive oxygen species, which can kill not only pathogens but also host cells. In this study we tested whether the encapsulation response is costly in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor. We found a negative relationship between the duration of implantation via a nylon monofilament and remaining life span. We also found a negative relationship between the strength of immune response and remaining life span, suggesting that cellular immunity is costly in T. molitor, and that there is a trade-off between immune response and remaining life span. However, this relationship disappeared at 31-32 hours of implantation at 25 ± 2℃. As the disappearance of a relationship between duration of implantation and lifespan coincided with the highest values of encapsulation response, we concluded that the beetles stopped investment in the production of melanotic cells, as the implant, a synthetic parasite, was fully isolated from the host’s tissues [Current Zoology 59 (3: 340–346, 2013].

  3. Life span, reproductive output, and reproductive opportunity in captive Goeldi's monkeys (Callimico goeldii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Kara; Warneke, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of long-term field studies, demographic and reproductive records from animals housed in zoos and research laboratories are a valuable tool for the study of life history variables relating to reproduction. In this study, we analyzed studbook records of more than 2,000 individuals born over a 40-year period (1965-2004) to describe life history patterns of captive Goeldi's monkeys (Callimico goeldii) housed in North America and Europe. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis methods, we found the mean life span to be 5.5 years. The rate of infant mortality, defined as death before 30 days, was approximately 30%, with European animals being more likely to survive infancy than North American animals. When individuals surviving at least 1.5 years are considered, lifetime reproductive output averaged 3.5 offspring, yet more than one-third of individuals did not produce any offspring. Using a smaller dataset of individuals with known pairing histories, we developed a measure of opportunity for reproduction (OFR), which represented the total time an individual was known to be housed with a potential mate. For both sexes, we found that the correlation between OFR and number of offspring produced was much higher than the correlation between life span and number of offspring produced. This result highlights the importance of taking into account an individual's OFR. As a whole, our findings help characterize the life histories of captive Goeldi's monkeys and emphasize the impact management practices may have on reproductive success. PMID:20131357

  4. Life span of C57 mice as influenced by radiation dose, dose rate, and age at exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to measure the life shortening of C57BL/6J male mice as a result of exposure to five external doses from 60Co gamma radiation delivered at six different dose rates. Total doses ranged from 20 to 1620 rad at exposure rates ranging from 0.7 to 36,000 R/day. The ages of the mice at exposure were newborn, 2, 6, or 15 months. Two replications were completed. Although death was the primary endpoint, we did perform gross necropsies. The life span findings are variable, but we found no consistent shortening compared to control life spans. Therefore, we cannot logically extrapolate life shortening to lower doses, from the data we have obtained. In general, the younger the animals were at the beginning of exposure, the longer their life spans were compared to those of controls. This relationship weakened at the higher doses and dose rates, as mice in these categories tended not to have significantly different life spans from controls. Using life span as a criterion, we find this study suggests that some threshold dosage may exist beyond which effects of external irradiation may be manifested. Up to this threshold, there is no shortening effect on life span compared to that of control mice. Our results are in general agreement with the results of other researchers investigating human and other animal life span effects on irradiation

  5. Life span and tissue distribution of 111indium-labeled blood platelets in hypomagnesemic lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circulating platelets may be activated by exposed triple-helical collagen in atherosclerotic lesions in Mg-deficient ruminants. Autologous platelets, labeled in vitro with 111In and determined to be active, were injected into 5 hypomagnesemic and 3 control lambs fed semipurified diets with 100 or 2,000 mg of Mg/kg of feed for 3 months. During the first 68 hours, 111In concentrations were 11 times higher in packed cells than in plasma. Packed-cell 111In increased 60% during the first 2 hours, probably due to initial tissue sequestration and later release of labeled platelets. Thereafter, platelet half-life span averaged 60 and 63 hours for hypomagnesemic and control lambs. After 68 hours, lambs were injected with native vascular collagen fibrils at 500 micrograms/kg of body weight to initiate reversible platelet aggregation. Within 1 minute, 83% of packed-cell 111In disappeared from circulation. Thirty minutes later, the lambs were euthanatized and necropsied and in the lungs, liver, and spleen, 111In averaged 24%, 19%, and 9%, respectively, of 111In injected 68 hours earlier. Organ deposits were not affected by Mg intake, but 111In in the lungs was somewhat lower in 2 lambs injected with inactivated collagen. Pathologic changes induced by reversible platelet aggregation were compatible with right ventricular failure complicated by pulmonary edema, similar to changes in hypomagnesemic lambs that died spontaneously. Platelets in blood exposed to vascular lesions in hypomagnesemic ruminants could be a major mortality risk factor in grass tetany disease

  6. Dead or alive: deformed wing virus and Varroa destructor reduce the life span of winter honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainat, Benjamin; Evans, Jay D; Chen, Yan Ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Elevated winter losses of managed honeybee colonies are a major concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. Among the suspects are the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, and associated viruses. Here we hypothesize that pathogens reduce the life expectancy of winter bees, thereby constituting a proximate mechanism for colony losses. A monitoring of colonies was performed over 6 months in Switzerland from summer 2007 to winter 2007/2008. Individual dead workers were collected daily and quantitatively analyzed for deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), N. ceranae, and expression levels of the vitellogenin gene as a biomarker for honeybee longevity. Workers from colonies that failed to survive winter had a reduced life span beginning in late fall, were more likely to be infected with DWV, and had higher DWV loads. Colony levels of infection with the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and individual infections with DWV were also associated with reduced honeybee life expectancy. In sharp contrast, the level of N. ceranae infection was not correlated with longevity. In addition, vitellogenin gene expression was significantly positively correlated with ABPV and N. ceranae loads. The findings strongly suggest that V. destructor and DWV (but neither N. ceranae nor ABPV) reduce the life span of winter bees, thereby constituting a parsimonious possible mechanism for honeybee colony losses. PMID:22179240

  7. Partner preferences across the life span: online dating by older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, Sheyna Sears-Roberts; Mendelsohn, Gerald A

    2009-06-01

    Stereotypes of older adults as withdrawn or asexual fail to recognize that romantic relationships in later life are increasingly common. The authors analyzed 600 Internet personal ads from 4 age groups: 20-34, 40-54, 60-74, and 75+ years. Predictions from evolutionary theory held true in later life, when reproduction is no longer a concern. Across the life span, men sought physical attractiveness and offered status-related information more than women; women were more selective than men and sought status more than men. With age, men desired women increasingly younger than themselves, whereas women desired older men until ages 75 and over, when they sought men younger than themselves. PMID:19485668

  8. Causes of decreased life expectancy over the life span in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; McIntyre, Roger S; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2015-01-01

    expectancy due to natural causes (physical illnesses) and unnatural causes (suicide and accidents) in relation to age. RESULTS: A total of 22,635 patients with bipolar disorder were included in the study in addition to data from the entire Danish general population of 5.4 million people. At age 15 years......BACKGROUND: Accelerated aging has been proposed as a mechanism explaining the increased prevalence of comorbid general medical illnesses in bipolar disorder. AIMS: To test the hypothesis that lost life years due to natural causes starts in early and mid-adulthood, supporting the hypothesis of......, remaining life expectancy before age 90 years was decreased 12.7 and 8.9 life years, respectively, for men and women with bipolar disorder. For 15-year old boys with bipolar disorder, natural causes accounted for 58% of all lost life years and for 15-year old girls, natural causes accounted for 67...

  9. Hippocampal volume varies with educational attainment across the life-span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly G. Noble

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Socioeconomic disparities – and particularly differences in educational attainment – are associated with remarkable differences in cognition and behavior across the life-span. Decreased educational attainment has been linked to increased exposure to life stressors, which in turn have been associated with structural differences in the hippocampus and the amygdala. However, the degree to which educational attainment is directly associated with anatomical differences in these structures remains unclear. Recent studies in children have found socioeconomic differences in regional brain volume in the hippocampus and amygdala across childhood and adolescence. Here we expand on this work, by investigating whether disparities in hippocampal and amygdala volume persist across the life-span. In a sample of 275 individuals from the BRAINnet Foundation database ranging in age from 17 to 87, we found that socioeconomic status, as operationalized by years of educational attainment, moderates the effect of age on hippocampal volume. Specifically, hippocampal volume tended to markedly decrease with age among less educated individuals, whereas age-related reductions in hippocampal volume were less pronounced among more highly educated individuals. No such effects were found for amygdala volume. Possible mechanisms by which education may buffer age-related effects on hippocampal volume are discussed.

  10. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  11. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  12. Resilience, according to the paradigm of the development along the life (life-span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlete Portella Fontes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Resilience, in the approach of the development along the life, refers to the capacity of recovering and maintenance of the adaptive behavior when the person feels threatened by any distressing event (Staudinger, Marsiske and Baltes, 1995. Although the losses become more likely than the developed gains, the aged people can present considerable stability, self-esteem, competence, self-efficacy, subjective quality of life. The resilience is based on active protecting resources along the life: mechanisms of self-regulation, self-efficacy, emotional regulation, mechanisms of stress oping, selection strategies, optimization and compensation of the domains of human functioning. At the end of the article, interventions to increase the resilience of the aged are suggested.

  13. Super's Life-Span, Life-Space Approach and Its Outlook for Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Edwin L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the major elements of a lifespan, life-space approach to career development. Looks at the origins of these elements and briefly describes their evolution. Suggests five categories of possible future refinements in this approach so as to enhance theory building, testing, and synthesizing this model's applicability. (RJM)

  14. Materialism across the life span: An age-period-cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Esther D T; Pieters, Rik G M

    2016-09-01

    This research examined the development of materialism across the life span. Two initial studies revealed that (a) lay beliefs were that materialism declines with age and (b) previous research findings also implied a modest, negative relationship between age and materialism. Yet, previous research has considered age only as a linear control variable, thereby precluding the possibility of more intricate relationships between age and materialism. Moreover, prior studies have relied on cross-sectional data and thus confound age and cohort effects. To improve on this, the main study used longitudinal data from 8 waves spanning 9 years of over 4,200 individuals (16 to 90 years) to examine age effects on materialism while controlling for cohort and period effects. Using a multivariate multilevel latent growth model, it found that materialism followed a curvilinear trajectory across the life span, with the lowest levels at middle age and higher levels before and after that. Thus, in contrast to lay beliefs, materialism increased in older age. Moreover, age effects on materialism differed markedly between 3 core themes of materialism: acquisition centrality, possession-defined success, and acquisition as the pursuit of happiness. In particular, acquisition centrality and possession-defined success were higher at younger and older age. Independent of these age effects, older birth cohorts were oriented more toward possession-defined success, whereas younger birth cohorts were oriented more toward acquisition centrality. The economic downturn since 2008 led to a decrease in acquisition as the pursuit of happiness and in desires for personal growth, but to an increase in desires for achievement. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27560768

  15. Studies on the life span, reproduction, tissue biochemistry and diesel oil toxicity in the estuarine cladocera Diaphanosoma celebensis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhuKonkar, S.R.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    , neonate production, tissue biochemistry and toxicity of diesel oil have been described in the paper. Variations were observed in the life span and rate of neonate production between individuals of the 1 st and 2 nd generations. Both were found...

  16. DOE life-span radiation effects studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major life-span radiation effects studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory fall into three categories: (1) studies with beagle dogs exposed to plutonium compounds via a single inhalation; (2) studies with dogs and rats exposed chronically via inhalation to various combinations and concentrations of radon, radon daughters, and other components of uranium mine atmospheres; and (3) a study in which rats are exposed via single inhalation, in very large numbers, to very low concentrations of 239PuO2. Exposure of beagles currently on study was initiated in 1970 with 239PuO2, in 1973 with 238PuO2, and in 1976 with 239Pu(NO3)4. These experiments involve more than 500 animals, many of them still alive. Experiments seeking to explain the increased incidence of lung cancer in uranium miners have been in progress since 1966. Present emphasis is on studies with rats, in an attempt to define dose-effect relationships at the lowest feasible radon-daughter exposure levels. Our very-low-level experiment with inhaled 239PuO2 in rats, with exposures still under way, includes 1000 rats in the control group and 1000 rats in the lowest-exposure group, where life-span lung doses of <5 rads are anticipated

  17. Analysis of neoplasia in life-span radiation effects studies in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the occurrence of neoplastic disease in animals on life-span radiation effects experiments presents some unique problems. A simple analysis of tumor incidence or prevalence may overlook differences in the nature of specific types of neoplasms which can be extremely important in interpreting the results. Analyses should address not only whether or not an animal has a particular tumor type, but should also address the ultimate effect of that tumor on the fate of the animal. For life-span studies in dogs, where multiple neoplasms in individual animals are the rule rather than the exception this is particularly important. An easily computerized approach to performing such analyses has been adapted from a previous work. Neoplasms are classified as incidental (those found at necropsy in dogs which died of an unrelated cause), mortality-independent (those seen in live dogs and diagnosed after surgical removal), or fatal (those directly or indirectly responsible for death). In the authors' studies such categorization has allowed the evaluation of the overall impact of a tumor on an animal and enhanced the understanding of the meaning of experimental results. Adoption of a similar approach by various groups performing radiation effects studies in animals would facilitate the comparative evaluation of data from these studies

  18. CTT1 overexpression increases life span of calorie-restricted Saccharomyces cerevisiae deficient in Sod1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, Germana; Herdeiro, Ricardo; Mathias, Cristiane Juliano; Torres, Fernando Araripe; Pereira, Marcos Dias; Eleutherio, Elis

    2015-06-01

    Studies using different organisms revealed that reducing calorie intake, without malnutrition, known as calorie restriction (CR), increases life span, but its mechanism is still unkown. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as eukaryotic model, we observed that Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1p) is required to increase longevity, as well as to confer protection against lipid and protein oxidation under CR. Old cells of sod1 strain also presented a premature induction of apoptosis. However, when CTT1 (which codes for cytosolic catalase) was overexpressed, sod1 and WT strains showed similar survival rates. Furthermore, CTT1 overexpression decreased lipid peroxidation and delayed the induction of apoptotic process. Superoxide is rapidly converted to hydrogen peroxide by superoxide dismutase, but it also undergoes spontaneous dismutation albeit at a slower rate. However, the quantity of peroxide produced from superoxide in this way is two-fold higher. Peroxide degradation, catalyzed by catalase, is of vital importance, because in the presence of a reducer transition metal peroxide is reduced to the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, which reacts indiscriminately with most cellular constituents. These findings might explain why overexpression of catalase was able to overcome the deficiency of Sod1p, increasing life span in response to CR. PMID:25573485

  19. Life span and tumorigenesis in mice exposed to continuous low dose-rate γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation, we are conducting two experiments. Experiment 1 - Late effects of chronic low dose-rate γ-rays irradiation on SPF mice, using life-span and pathological changes as parameters. Continuous irradiation with γ-rays for 400 days was performed using 137Cs γ-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy/day, 1 mGy/day and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until they died a natural death. Statistical analyses show that the life spans of both sexes irradiated at 20mGy/day (p<0.0001) and of females irradiated at 1 mGy/day (p<0.05) were significantly shorter than that of the control group. Partial results show that the most common lethal neoplasms in the pooled data of non-irradiated control and irradiated make mice, in order of frequency, were neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, liver, and lung. In female mice, neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system and soft tissue were common. Experiment 2 - Effects on the progeny of chronic low dose-rate γ-ray irradiated SPF mice: pilot study, was started in 1999 and is currently in progress. (author)

  20. Neoplastic and life-span effects of chronic exposure to tritium. II. Rats exposed in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects on neoplasia incidence and life-span of exposure in utero to a major environmental radionuclide. Sprague-Dawley rats were continuously exposed to tritiated water (HTO) from conception through birth in doses of 0, 1, 10, 50, and 100 μCi HTO/ml body water. HTO administration was terminated at birth. Calculated cumulative doses during gestation were approximately 0, 6.6, 66, 330, and 660 rads of total body irradiation. Under these exposure conditions, the two highest doses resulted in sterile offspring. Animals surviving through 30 days postnatally were defined as the study population and observed until their deaths. Intrauterine exposures to doses up to 66 rads had no significant effects on either sex with respect to lifespan, overall neoplasia incidence, incidence rate, or onset of mammary fibroadenomas. Females exposed to 330 or 660 rads were sterile and had lower incidence rates of mammary fibroadenomas than did controls; at 660 rads females had a lower incidence of overall neoplasia and reduced mean lifespans. Sterile male offspring had reduced mean longevity after irradiation at 660 rads. Regardless of dose group, females had significantly higher incidences of neoplasia and longer life-spans than males

  1. Comparative transcriptional pathway bioinformatic analysis of dietary restriction, Sir2, p53 and resveratrol life span extension in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Antosh, Michael; Whitaker, Rachel; Kroll, Adam; Hosier, Suzanne; Chang, Chengyi; Bauer, Johannes; Cooper, Leon; Neretti, Nicola; HELFAND, STEPHEN L.

    2011-01-01

    A multiple comparison approach using whole genome transcriptional arrays was used to identify genes and pathways involved in calorie restriction/dietary restriction (DR) life span extension in Drosophila. Starting with a gene centric analysis comparing the changes in common between DR and two DR related molecular genetic life span extending manipulations, Sir2 and p53, lead to a molecular confirmation of Sir2 and p53's similarity with DR and the identification of a small set of commonly regul...

  2. Metabotypes with properly functioning mitochondria and anti-inflammation predict extended productive life span in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, K; Dänicke, S; Rehage, J; Sauerwein, H; Otto, W; Rolle-Kampczyk, U; von Bergen, M

    2016-01-01

    The failure to adapt metabolism to the homeorhetic demands of lactation is considered as a main factor in reducing the productive life span of dairy cows. The so far defined markers of production performance and metabolic health in dairy cows do not predict the length of productive life span satisfyingly. This study aimed to identify novel pathways and biomarkers related to productive life in dairy cows by means of (targeted) metabolomics. In a longitudinal study from 42 days before up to 100 days after parturition, we identified metabolites such as long-chain acylcarnitines and biogenic amines associated with extended productive life spans. These metabolites are mainly secreted by the liver and depend on the functionality of hepatic mitochondria. The concentrations of biogenic amines and some acylcarnitines differed already before the onset of lactation thus indicating their predictive potential for continuation or early ending of productive life. PMID:27089826

  3. Potentially Traumatic Events at Different Points in the Life Span and Mental Health: Findings From SHARE-Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Shrira, Amit; Shmotkin, Dov; Litwin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This study addressed the association between adversity cumulated at different points in the life span and present mental health. Data of 1,130 participants aged 50+ were drawn from the Israeli component of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Measures included an inventory of potentially traumatic events, mental distress (depressive symptoms), and well-being (quality of life, life satisfaction). Adversity reported to have occurred early in life was positively related...

  4. Biological impact of auditory expertise across the life span: musicians as a model of auditory learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Dana L; Kraus, Nina

    2014-02-01

    Experience-dependent characteristics of auditory function, especially with regard to speech-evoked auditory neurophysiology, have garnered increasing attention in recent years. This interest stems from both pragmatic and theoretical concerns as it bears implications for the prevention and remediation of language-based learning impairment in addition to providing insight into mechanisms engendering experience-dependent changes in human sensory function. Musicians provide an attractive model for studying the experience-dependency of auditory processing in humans due to their distinctive neural enhancements compared to nonmusicians. We have only recently begun to address whether these enhancements are observable early in life, during the initial years of music training when the auditory system is under rapid development, as well as later in life, after the onset of the aging process. Here we review neural enhancements in musically trained individuals across the life span in the context of cellular mechanisms that underlie learning, identified in animal models. Musicians' subcortical physiologic enhancements are interpreted according to a cognitive framework for auditory learning, providing a model in which to study mechanisms of experience-dependent changes in human auditory function. PMID:23988583

  5. Estimates for the number of visible galaxy-spanning civilizations and the cosmological expansion of life

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, S Jay

    2015-01-01

    If advanced civilizations appear in the universe with a desire to expand, the entire universe can become saturated with life on a short timescale, even if such expanders appear but rarely. Our presence in an untouched Milky Way thus constrains the appearance rate of galaxy-spanning Kardashev type III (K3) civilizations, if it is assumed that some fraction of K3 civilizations will continue their expansion at intergalactic distances. We use this constraint to estimate the appearance rate of K3 civilizations for 81 cosmological scenarios by specifying the extent to which humanity could be a statistical outlier. We find that in nearly all plausible scenarios, the distance to the nearest visible K3 is cosmological. In searches where the observable range is limited, we also find that the most likely detections tend to be expanding civilizations who have entered the observable range from farther away. An observation of K3 clusters is thus more likely than isolated K3 galaxies.

  6. Invited commentary: missing doses in the life span study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, K; Grant, E J; Cullings, H M; Shore, R E

    2013-03-15

    The Life Span Study is a long-term epidemiologic cohort study of survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. In this issue of the Journal, Richardson et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;177(6):562-568) suggest that those who died in the earliest years of follow-up were more likely to have a missing dose of radiation exposure assigned, leading to a bias in the radiation risk estimates. We show that nearly all members of the cohort had shielding information recorded before the beginning of follow-up and that much of the alleged bias that Richardson et al. describe simply reflects the geographic distribution of shielding conditions for which reliable dosimetry was impossible. PMID:23429724

  7. Life spans of a Bellman-Harris branching process with immigration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One considers two schemes of the Bellman-Harris process with immigration when a) the lifetime of the particles is an integral-valued random variable and the immigration is defined by a sequence of independent random variables; b) the distribution of the lifetime of the particles is nonlattice and the immigration is a process with continuous time. One investigates the properties of the life spans of such processes. The results obtained here are a generalization to the case of Bellman-Harris processes of the results of A.M. Zubkov, obtained for Markov branching processes. For the proof one makes use in an essential manner of the known inequalities of Goldstein, estimating the generating function of the Bellman-Harris process in terms of the generating functions of the imbedded Galton-Watson process

  8. Application of 51Cr-RBC life span study and surface counting in blood diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article summarized the RBC life span and liver, spleen surface counting in 274 cases of blood diseases. Whole blood labelling of 51Cr labelled auto or normal O type blood was used. The results showed that there was a shortening of the apparent survival time with different magnitude in various blood diseases, therefore it can be used for understanding the severity of hemolytic anemia, detection of latent hemolysis and also the investigation of the destruction and survival of RBC in other blood diseases. The surface counting of spleen, liver and precordium denoted that the S/P, S/L ratio was highest in hyperspleenism, consecutively various hemolytic anemia and cirrhosis of liver, hence this test can be used as an indication for splenectomy

  9. dSir2 in the Adult Fat Body, but Not in Muscles, Regulates Life Span in a Diet-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushal Kr. Banerjee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sir2, an evolutionarily conserved NAD+-dependent deacetylase, has been implicated as a key factor in mediating organismal life span. However, recent contradictory findings have brought into question the role of Sir2 and its orthologs in regulating organismal longevity. In this study, we report that Drosophila Sir2 (dSir2 in the adult fat body regulates longevity in a diet-dependent manner. We used inducible Gal4 drivers to knock down and overexpress dSir2 in a tissue-specific manner. A diet-dependent life span phenotype of dSir2 perturbations (both knockdown and overexpression in the fat body, but not muscles, negates the effects of background genetic mutations. In addition to providing clarity to the field, our study contrasts the ability of dSir2 in two metabolic tissues to affect longevity. We also show that dSir2 knockdown abrogates fat-body dFOXO-dependent life span extension. This report highlights the importance of the interplay between genetic factors and dietary inputs in determining organismal life spans.

  10. Virtual navigation strategies from childhood to senescence: evidence for changes across the life span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique D Bohbot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to investigate navigational strategies across the life span, by testing 8-year old children to 80-year old healthy older adults on the 4 on 8 virtual maze (4/8VM. The 4/8VM was previously developed to assess spontaneous navigational strategies, i.e. hippocampal-dependent spatial strategies (navigation by memorizing relationships between landmarks versus caudate nucleus-dependent response strategies (memorizing a series of left and right turns from a given starting position. With the 4/8VM, we previously demonstrated greater fMRI activity and grey matter in the hippocampus of spatial learners relative to response learners. A sample of 599 healthy participants was tested in the current study. Results showed that 84.4% of children, 46.3% of young adults, and 39.3% of older adults spontaneously used spatial strategies (p < 0.0001. Our results suggest that while children predominantly use spatial strategies, the proportion of participants using spatial strategies decreases across the life span, in favor of response strategies. Factors promoting response strategies include repetition, reward and stress. Since response strategies can result from successful repetition of a behavioral pattern, we propose that the increase in response strategies is a biological adaptive mechanism that allows for the automatization of behavior such as walking in order to free up hippocampal-dependent resources. However, the downside of this shift from spatial to response strategies occurs if people stop building novel relationships, which occurs with repetition and routine, and thereby stop stimulating their hippocampus. Reduced fMRI activity and grey matter in the hippocampus were shown to correlate with cognitive deficits in normal aging. Therefore, these results have important implications regarding factors involved in healthy and successful aging.

  11. Altered Lipid Synthesis by Lack of Yeast Pah1 Phosphatidate Phosphatase Reduces Chronological Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhee; Han, Gil-Soo; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Garrett, Teresa A; Carman, George M

    2015-10-16

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidate to yield diacylglycerol, plays a crucial role in the synthesis of the storage lipid triacylglycerol. This evolutionarily conserved enzyme also plays a negative regulatory role in controlling de novo membrane phospholipid synthesis through its consumption of phosphatidate. We found that the pah1Δ mutant was defective in the utilization of non-fermentable carbon sources but not in oxidative phosphorylation; the mutant did not exhibit major changes in oxygen consumption rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, F1F0-ATP synthase activity, or gross mitochondrial morphology. The pah1Δ mutant contained an almost normal complement of major mitochondrial phospholipids with some alterations in molecular species. Although oxidative phosphorylation was not compromised in the pah1Δ mutant, the cellular levels of ATP in quiescent cells were reduced by 2-fold, inversely correlating with a 4-fold increase in membrane phospholipids. In addition, the quiescent pah1Δ mutant cells had 3-fold higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide and cellular lipid hydroperoxides, had reduced activities of superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase, and were hypersensitive to hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, the pah1Δ mutant had a shortened chronological life span. In addition, the loss of Tsa1 thioredoxin peroxidase caused a synthetic growth defect with the pah1Δ mutation. The shortened chronological life span of the pah1Δ mutant along with its growth defect on non-fermentable carbon sources and hypersensitivity to hydrogen peroxide was suppressed by the loss of Dgk1 diacylglycerol kinase, indicating that the underpinning of pah1Δ mutant defects was the excess synthesis of membrane phospholipids. PMID:26338708

  12. Age- and calorie-independent life span extension from dietary restriction by bacterial deprivation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sager Jennifer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary restriction (DR increases life span and delays age-associated disease in many organisms. The mechanism by which DR enhances longevity is not well understood. Results Using bacterial food deprivation as a means of DR in C. elegans, we show that transient DR confers long-term benefits including stress resistance and increased longevity. Consistent with studies in the fruit fly and in mice, we demonstrate that DR also enhances survival when initiated late in life. DR by bacterial food deprivation significantly increases life span in worms when initiated as late as 24 days of adulthood, an age at which greater than 50% of the cohort have died. These survival benefits are, at least partially, independent of food consumption, as control fed animals are no longer consuming bacterial food at this advanced age. Animals separated from the bacterial lawn by a barrier of solid agar have a life span intermediate between control fed and food restricted animals. Thus, we find that life span extension from bacterial deprivation can be partially suppressed by a diffusible component of the bacterial food source, suggesting a calorie-independent mechanism for life span extension by dietary restriction. Conclusion Based on these findings, we propose that dietary restriction by bacterial deprivation increases longevity in C. elegans by a combination of reduced food consumption and decreased food sensing.

  13. Life-span studies on mice exposed to heavy charged particles or photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenic risk associated with heavy charged (HZE) particles is currently undefined. Precise relationships have been established for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) for the killing of cells in vitro and for other short-term (acute) biological responses to charged particles, but comparable information is lacking on carcinogenic response. Experiments are in progress to study induction/promotion of Harderian gland tumors, and the present life-span studies should provide complementary information because it is inferred that over the dose range explored in the present experiments, most of the life shortening is attributable to induction/promotion of neoplastic diseases. The information sought is important both for understanding fundamental mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and for assessing the risk of the space radiation environment and of radiation therapy or other medical applications of heavy charged particles in young patients whose life expectancy could permit expression of a tumor. The hypothesis tested in the core experiment, designated SKYHOOK, is that LET dependence for life shortening and excess mortality rates observed after mice are exposed to heavy charged particles (HZE) will conform to existing theory and observations based on other endpoints; namely, a peak RBE at a dose-averaged LET value of approximately 100 keV/μm, with RBE diminishing at lesser and greater values of LET. Because results on cell killing show different RBE values, at the same approximate LET, for different charged particles, the possibility exists that LET by itself is not a fully adequate descriptor for biological response, and physical characteristics such as mass, charge, or velocity may also be of great importance

  14. Sexual Dimorphism in the Effect of a Taurine Supplemented Diet on Life Span in Adult Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Milne, A; B. Talon; S. Shirkey; Habib, I.; Smith, L.A.; J. Nadolski

    2011-01-01

    As the amino acid taurine is being used more frequently in human and animal diets, the exact physiological role and benefit have not been fully elucidated. To determine if taurine can impact long term physiology, we investigated the effects of a chronic taurine supplemented diet using the model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We specifically studied how life span and development are affected. A pairwise comparison of survival curves found a significant difference between male and female fr...

  15. Affect, Meaning and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Research on quality of life in sociology is largely focused on a narrow range of dimensions including affect, happiness and satisfaction. It largely avoids a concern with the meanings that provide people with the purpose, significance, validity and coherence that are a basis of social relationships and social integration. Evidence is presented…

  16. Cancer risk among atomic bomb survivors. The RERF Life Span Study. Radiation Effects Research Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Schull, W J; Kato, H

    1990-08-01

    This article summarizes the risk of cancer among the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We focus primarily on the risk of death from cancer among individuals in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1950 through 1985 based on recently revised dosimetry procedures. We report the risk of cancer other than leukemia among the atomic bomb survivors. We note that the number of excess deaths of radiation-induced malignant tumors other than leukemia increases with age. Survivors who were exposed in the first or second decade of life have just entered the cancer-prone age and have so far exhibited a high relative risk in association with radiation dose. Whether the elevated risk will continue or will fall with time is not yet clear, although some evidence suggests that the risk may be declining. It is important to continue long-term follow-up of this cohort to document the changes with time since exposure and to provide direct rather than projected risks over the lifetime of an exposed individual. PMID:2366300

  17. Chips in black boxes? Convenience life span, parafood, brandwidth, families, and co-creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Any consumer who opens a bag of potato or corn chips (or crisps in the UK) knows there is no time to waste to enjoy or share them. The convenience life span of chips is limited: it is the shelf or storage life and a very limited time once outside the bag. Many technologies converge to generate the desired effect as a black box, not only of the packaging but also of the chips themselves. The concept of paratext can be applied to printed messages on the package, including the brand name and other texts like advertising (epitexts), which can be expanded into the concept of parafood. These concepts help to discuss technological developments and interpret why this has recently become a negotiation zone for co-creation (see the Do us a flavor campaigns). They are symptoms of changing relations between production, research and development, marketing, and consumption. This paper pays special attention to back stories, underdog brand biographies and narratives about origin. The concept of brandwidth is introduced to sensitize about the limits of combining different stories about chips. A recent brand biography, a family history and a cookery book are used to discuss the phenomenon of cooking with Fritos. Together with the concepts of parafood, brandwidth and black boxes, more reflection and dialogue about the role of history and heritage in marketing put new challenging perspectives on the agenda. PMID:25791963

  18. Radiation effects on cancer risks in the life span study cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine late health effects of radiation in atomic bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has been conducting studies on the Life Span Study (LSS) population, which consists of 93 000 atomic bomb survivors and 27.000 controls. A recent report on the incidence of solid cancers estimates that at the age of 70 y, after exposure at the age of 30 y, solid-cancer rates increase by about 35 % per Gy for men and 58 % per Gy for women. The age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. Furthermore, it seems that radiation-associated increases in cancer rates persist throughout life. In addition, radiation has similar effects upon first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. A recent report on leukemia mortality suggested that the effect of radiation on leukemia mortality persisted for more than five decades. In addition, a significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome is found in Nagasaki LSS members 40-60 y after radiation exposure. In view of the nature of the continuing increase in solid cancers, the LSS should continue to provide important new information on cancer risks, as most survivors still alive today were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation under the age of 20 y and are now entering their cancer-prone years. (authors)

  19. [Information theory of ageing: studying the effect of bone marrow transplantation on the life span of mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaukhov, A V; Karnaukhova, E V; Sergievich, L A; Karnaukhova, N A; Karnaukhova, N A; Bogdanenko, E V; Smirnov, A A; Manokhina, I A; Karnaukhov, V N

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the method of life span extension of multicellular organisms (human) using the reservation of stem cells followed by autotransplantation has been proposed. As the efficiency of this method results from the information theory of ageing, it is important to verify it experimentally testing the basic concepts of the theory. Taking it into consideration, the experiment on the bone marrow transplantation to old mice from young closely-related donors of the inbred line was carried out. It has been shown, that transplanted animals exhibited a survival advantage, a mean life span increased by 34% as compared to the control. This result not only demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed method for life span extension of multicellular organisms, but also confirms the basis of the information theory of ageing. PMID:25707248

  20. Mortality pattern and life span in case of combined effect of incorporated radioisotopes, smoking and ethanol in the experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is established that life span and mortality pattern of animals subjected to chronic intake of 90Sr, to the effect of ethanol, and smoking depend on the intensity of radiation and radiation doses, character of harmful factors, age and sex dependences. The mean life span of animals subjected to the combined effect of 90Sr(10-3 LD50/30) of ethanol and smoking was by 18-22 % lower in comparison with intact animals. Alongside with the mean life span decrease latent period of carcinogenesis is shortened. A high tendency to metastases formation was noted in case of combined action of these factors than in comparison with isolated effect of them. 3 refs.; 1 tab

  1. Investigating the life-span of cork products for household and personal use through a longitudinal approach with users

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ana Carina da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Doutoramento em Engenharia do Ambiente - Instituto Superior de Agronomia Products with a long life-span are important to reduce resources consumption and outflows to the environment. Cork has an interesting eco-profile since it is a natural non-wood forest product that can be produced without endangering the cork oak vitality. The aim of the work is to investigate the life-span of cork products. A total of 18 different cork products including household and personal use products were studie...

  2. Effects of x-irradiation of young female beagles on life span and tumor incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causes of death and the occurrence of neoplasia in female beagle dogs were evaluated retrospectively for 57 unexposed and 296 exposed dogs given single or fractionated whole-body x-irradiation exposures of 100 or 300 R. Some dogs subsequently were bred, and all were observed for the duration of their lives. The pathology for these dogs was derived from clinical records, gross-necropsy reports, tissue slides, and Formalin-fixed tissues. The results of this study indicated dose-related shortening of life span was clearly evident; causes of death due to either neoplasia (50%) or nonneoplastic disease (50%), with few exceptions, were similar in control and irradiated dogs; the incidences of neoplasms were not significantly greater for irradiated dogs than for controls, but the latency period decreased as dose increased; protraction increased survival in dogs given 300 R but not 100 R, which is attributable solely to amelioration of incidence rates of nonmammary neoplasia; and the cumulative rates of death due to mammary tumors were the same in dogs exposed to 100 R and 300 R. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  3. A Fasting-Responsive Signaling Pathway that Extends Life Span in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaharu Uno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent fasting is one of the most effective dietary restriction regimens that extend life span in C. elegans and mammals. Fasting-stimulus responses are key to the longevity response; however, the mechanisms that sense and transduce the fasting stimulus remain largely unknown. Through a comprehensive transcriptome analysis in C. elegans, we find that along with the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, AP-1 (JUN-1/FOS-1 plays a central role in fasting-induced transcriptional changes. KGB-1, one of the C. elegans JNKs, acts as an activator of AP-1 and is activated in response to fasting. KGB-1 and AP-1 are involved in intermittent fasting-induced longevity. Fasting-induced upregulation of the components of the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex via AP-1 and DAF-16 enhances protein ubiquitination and reduces protein carbonylation. Our results thus identify a fasting-responsive KGB-1/AP-1 signaling pathway, which, together with DAF-16, causes transcriptional changes that mediate longevity, partly through regulating proteostasis.

  4. Leukemia incidence in the atomic bomb survivor Life Span Study, 1950 - 87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) is currently preparing a series of reports on cancer incidence in the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort of atomic bomb survivors for the period from 1950 to 1987. One of these reports will present analyses of the data on the risk of hematopoietic cancers including leukemia, malignant lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. These analyses add an additional 11 years of follow-up to the previous comprehensive analysis of the LSS leukemia data. In this presentation, these data are presented and the methods being used modeling the leukemia risks are outlined. An analysis of the leukemia data pooled over subtypes will be used to illustrate these methods. It is shown that the data suggest a non-linear, concave upward dose response and that the temporal pattern of the radiation-induced excess absolute risks (EARs) depends on age-at-exposure and sex. There is no evidence of city differences in the EAR in this pooled analysis. The results suggest that the EARs for the youngest survivors were initially much higher and have declined more rapidly than those for older survivors. The same general pattern is seen both sexes, but the initial peak incidence is somewhat lower and the rate of decline less rapid for women than for men. (author)

  5. β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine Induces Neurological Deficits and Shortened Life Span in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Grace Zhai

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA, was first associated with the high incidence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC in Guam. Recently, BMAA has been implicated as a fierce environmental factor that contributes to the etiology of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, in addition to ALS. However, the toxicity of BMAA in vivo has not been clearly demonstrated. Here we report our investigation of the neurotoxicity of BMAA in Drosophila. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced life span, locomotor functions, and learning and memory abilities in flies. The severity of the alterations in phenotype is correlated with the concentration of BMAA detected in flies. Interestingly, developmental exposure to BMAA had limited impact on survival rate, but reduced fertility in females, and caused delayed neurological impairment in aged adults. Our studies indicate that BMAA exposure causes chronic neurotoxicity, and that Drosophila serves as a useful model in dissecting the pathogenesis of ALS/PDC.

  6. Childhood Adversity, Self-Esteem, and Diurnal Cortisol Profiles Across the Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilioli, Samuele; Slatcher, Richard B; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2016-09-01

    Childhood adversity is associated with poor health outcomes in adulthood; the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been proposed as a crucial biological intermediary of these long-term effects. Here, we tested whether childhood adversity was associated with diurnal cortisol parameters and whether this link was partially explained by self-esteem. In both adults and youths, childhood adversity was associated with lower levels of cortisol at awakening, and this association was partially driven by low self-esteem. Further, we found a significant indirect pathway through which greater adversity during childhood was linked to a flatter cortisol slope via self-esteem. Finally, youths who had a caregiver with high self-esteem experienced a steeper decline in cortisol throughout the day compared with youths whose caregiver reported low self-esteem. We conclude that self-esteem is a plausible psychological mechanism through which childhood adversity may get embedded in the activity of the HPA axis across the life span. PMID:27481911

  7. Human-figure drawing and memory functioning across the adult life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, K; Winblad, B; Nilsson, L -G.

    2001-03-01

    The main objective was to evaluate changes in the ability to draw the human figure (HFD) across adult life span and to relate these changes to those known to exist in memory function. Healthy adults (1000) from each of 10 five-year cohorts between 35 and 80 years were recruited randomly from a population in northern Sweden. Each participant was administered a health examination including cognitive testing and a drawing test, and an extensive examination of memory functions. For the drawing variables HFDarch and HFDtot, there is a steady decrease in episodic memory with poor drawers performing at a lower level. For semantic memory up to 65 years of age, there is no difference in performance, but thereafter a decrease. Good drawers show a better memory performance than poor drawers. For priming data for both HFDarch and HFDtot, there seems to be an interaction between age and drawing, such that poor drawers perform at a lower level for the two oldest groups but not for the youngest group. The HFDess is a valuable instrument and can support clinical evaluation as a screening for cognitive decline. The reduction of essential body details was strongly related to dementia progression, and thus as good a predictor of cognitive decline as episodic memory performance. The reduced capacity to perform a complex HFD declines with age and is most pronounced in the oldest age groups. PMID:11313105

  8. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study: Insufficient Statistical Power to Select Radiation Carcinogenesis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support for LNTH. Even if the LNTH is used at low dose and dose rates, its estimation of excess cancer mortality should be communicated as 2.5% per Sv, i.e., an increase of cancer mortality from about 20% spontaneous mortality to about 22.5% per Sv, which is about half of the usually cited value. The impact of the "neutron discrepancy problem" - the apparent difference between the calculated and measured values of neutron flux in Hiroshima - was studied and found to be marginal. Major revision of the radiation risk assessment paradigm is required. PMID:26673526

  9. [Intention for self-change across the life span: Focusing on concern about self-change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishima, Yuta

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine intention for self-change across the life span using measures of self-esteem, frequency of self-reflection, and concern about self-change. We hypothesized that: (a) Intention for self-change decreases with age because of increased self-esteem, decreased self-reflection and concern about self-change, and (b) Associations among self-esteem, frequency of self-reflection, and intention for self-change are mediated by concern about self-change. Participants (N = 997; age range, 15 to 69 yrs) completed an internet survey. ANOVA results suggested that intention for self-change, concern about self-change, and frequency of self-reflection decreased with age, and that self-esteem-scores increased with age. Simultaneous analysis of multiple age groups showed that for all groups of low self-esteem and frequent self-reflection promoted intention for self-change and that there were significant mediating effects for concern about self-change. Therefore, these findings supported out research hypotheses. PMID:27476265

  10. Entropy Stress and Scaling of Vital Organs over Life Span Based on Allometric Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Past theories on total lifetime energy expenditures and entropy generation in biological systems (BS dealt with whole systems, but the recent literature suggests that the total metabolic rate of a BS,q̇body (W is a sum of product of specific metabolic rate q̇k,m (W/kg of organ k of each vital life organ, k {k = brain, heart, kidney and liver, or abbreviated as BHKL, and rest of the organ mass (R} and mass of each organ k (mk. Using this hypothesis, Kleiber’s law on metabolic rate of BS (q̇body for animals of different sizes was validated. In this work, a similar procedure is adopted in estimating total entropy generation rate of whole human body (σ̇body, W/K as a sum of product of specific entropy generation rate for each organ, σ̇k,m (W/{K kg of organ k·} and the organ mass at any given age (t. Further integrating over life span for each organ (tlife, the lifetime specific entropy generated by organ k, σk,m,life (J of organ k/ {K kg organ k} is calculated. Then lifetime entropy generation of unit body mass, σbody,M,life (J/{K kg body mass·} is calculated as a sum of the corresponding values contributed by all vital organs to unit body mass and verified with previously published literature. The higher the σk,m,life , the higher the entropy stress level (which is a measure of energy released by unit organ mass of k as heat and the irreversibility within the organ, resulting in faster degradation of organ and the consequent health problems for the whole BS. In order to estimate σ̇k (W/K of organ k, data on energy release rate (q̇ is needed over lifetime for each organ. While the Adequate Macronutrients Distribution Range (AMDR/Adequate Intake (AI publication can be used in estimating the energy intake of whole body vs. age for the human body, the energy expenditure data is not available at organ level. Hence the σk,m,life was computed using existing allometric laws developed for the metabolism of the organs, the

  11. Estimating age-dependent costs and benefits of roots with contrasting life span: comparing apples and oranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.; Yanai, R.D.; Elkin, A.D.; Hartmond, U.; Flores-Alva, D.E.; Eissenstat, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    The relation between root age and root function is poorly understood, despite its importance to root longevity. The effect of root age on respiration rates and P-32-uptake kinetics was determined for roots excavated from mature apple and citrus trees (median root life spans of 30 vs 300 d). To evalu

  12. Use of linear model analysis techniques in the evaluation of radiation effects on the life span of the beagle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependency of the beagle-dog life span on level of and age at exposure to 60Co gamma radiation was analyzed by several techniques; one of these methods was linear model analysis. Beagles of both sexes were given single, bilateral exposures at 8, 28, or 55 days postcoitus (dpc) or at 2, 70, or 365 days postpartum (dpp). Dogs exposed at 8, 28, or 55 dpc or at 2 dpp received 0, 20, or 100 R, whereas those exposed at 70 or 365 dpp received 0 or 100 R. Beagles were designated initially either as sacrifice or as life-span animals. All deaths of life-span study animals were classified as spontaneous, hence for this group the mean age of death was a quantitative response that can be analyzed by linear model analysis techniques. Such analyses for each age group were performed, taking into account differences due to sex, linear and quadratic dependency on dose, and interaction between sex and dose. At this time most of the animals have reached 11 years of age. No significant effects of radiation on mean life span have been detected. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Osteopenia is present at an early age and worsens across the life span in girls and women with Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girls and women with Rett syndrome (RTT) are at increased risk for osteopenia and skeletal fractures. Our objective was to characterize the natural history of bone mineralization in RTT girls and women across their life span and to identify genetic, nutritional, physical, hormonal, or inflammatory ...

  14. Self-Esteem Development across the Life Span: A Longitudinal Study with a Large Sample from Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Ulrich; Maes, Jürgen; Schmitt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the development of self-esteem across the life span. Data came from a German longitudinal study with 3 assessments across 4 years of a sample of 2,509 individuals ages 14 to 89 years. The self-esteem measure used showed strong measurement invariance across assessments and birth cohorts. Latent growth curve analyses indicated…

  15. Missing doses in the life span study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, David B; Wing, Steve; Cole, Stephen R

    2013-03-15

    The Life Span Study of atomic bomb survivors is an important source of risk estimates used to inform radiation protection and compensation. Interviews with survivors in the 1950s and 1960s provided information needed to estimate radiation doses for survivors proximal to ground zero. Because of a lack of interview or the complexity of shielding, doses are missing for 7,058 of the 68,119 proximal survivors. Recent analyses excluded people with missing doses, and despite the protracted collection of interview information necessary to estimate some survivors' doses, defined start of follow-up as October 1, 1950, for everyone. We describe the prevalence of missing doses and its association with mortality, distance from hypocenter, city, age, and sex. Missing doses were more common among Nagasaki residents than among Hiroshima residents (prevalence ratio = 2.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.96, 2.14), among people who were closer to ground zero than among those who were far from it, among people who were younger at enrollment than among those who were older, and among males than among females (prevalence ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.28). Missing dose was associated with all-cancer and leukemia mortality, particularly during the first years of follow-up (all-cancer rate ratio = 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.51, 3.08; and leukemia rate ratio = 4.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.72, 10.67). Accounting for missing dose and late entry should reduce bias in estimated dose-mortality associations. PMID:23429722

  16. Atomic bomb dosimetry systems for life span study in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Life Span Study (LSS) of the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has provided invaluable qualitative data on the late effects of ionizing radiations to human beings. For the study, the best possible estimates of the atomic bomb radiations received by the organs or tissues of survivors were principally required. The first dose estimates for the survivors were designated as Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D). In 1965, a revised dosimetry system was constructed on the basis of experimental data from a field measurement with the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) at Nevada and from the thermoluminescence measurements of ceramic material and the radioactivity measurements of iron materials in Japan. These dose estimates were designated as Tentative 1965 (T65D). The T65D system was used with a great deal of confidence for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In 1980, however, two scientific groups in the United States challenged the validity of the T65D system. In the fall of 1981, a Working Group on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry Reassessment was organized both in the United States and in Japan. After four US-Japan Joint Workshops for Reassessment of Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry, the new dosimetry system which is designated as Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was constructed. Recently, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) has published the results of LSS which focussed on a comparison of the radiation-related risks of site-specific cancer mortality based on the DS86 and the T65D and deaths from cancer in the years 1950 to 1985. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued its basic recommendations as ICRP Publication 60 including the revised dose limits in occupational exposures. This paper reviews the dosimetry system of survivors for the LSS and discusses the physical basis for the DS86. (author)

  17. Life spanning murine gene expression profiles in relation to chronological and pathological aging in multiple organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Martijs J; Melis, Joost P M; Kuiper, Raoul V; van der Hoeven, Tessa V; Wackers, Paul F K; Robinson, Joke; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Dollé, Martijn E T; Vijg, Jan; Breit, Timo M; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van Steeg, Harry

    2013-10-01

    Aging and age-related pathology is a result of a still incompletely understood intricate web of molecular and cellular processes. We present a C57BL/6J female mice in vivo aging study of five organs (liver, kidney, spleen, lung, and brain), in which we compare genome-wide gene expression profiles during chronological aging with pathological changes throughout the entire murine life span (13, 26, 52, 78, 104, and 130 weeks). Relating gene expression changes to chronological aging revealed many differentially expressed genes (DEGs), and altered gene sets (AGSs) were found in most organs, indicative of intraorgan generic aging processes. However, only ≤ 1% of these DEGs are found in all organs. For each organ, at least one of 18 tested pathological parameters showed a good age-predictive value, albeit with much inter- and intraindividual (organ) variation. Relating gene expression changes to pathology-related aging revealed correlated genes and gene sets, which made it possible to characterize the difference between biological and chronological aging. In liver, kidney, and brain, a limited number of overlapping pathology-related AGSs were found. Immune responses appeared to be common, yet the changes were specific in most organs. Furthermore, changes were observed in energy homeostasis, reactive oxygen species, cell cycle, cell motility, and DNA damage. Comparison of chronological and pathology-related AGSs revealed substantial overlap and interesting differences. For example, the presence of immune processes in liver pathology-related AGSs that were not detected in chronological aging. The many cellular processes that are only found employing aging-related pathology could provide important new insights into the progress of aging. PMID:23795901

  18. Implicit Motor Sequence Learning and Working Memory Performance Changes Across the Adult Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Sarah Nadine; Keitel, Ariane; Südmeyer, Martin; Pollok, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Although implicit motor sequence learning is rather well understood in young adults, effects of aging on this kind of learning are controversial. There is first evidence that working memory (WM) might play a role in implicit motor sequence learning in young adults as well as in adults above the age of 65. However, the knowledge about the development of these processes across the adult life span is rather limited. As the average age of our population continues to rise, a better understanding of age-related changes in motor sequence learning and potentially mediating cognitive processes takes on increasing significance. Therefore, we investigated aging effects on implicit motor sequence learning and WM. Sixty adults (18-71 years) completed verbal and visuospatial n-back tasks and were trained on a serial reaction time task (SRTT). Randomly varying trials served as control condition. To further assess consolidation indicated by off-line improvement and reduced susceptibility to interference, reaction times (RTs) were determined 1 h after initial learning. Young and older but not middle-aged adults showed motor sequence learning. Nine out of 20 older adults (compared to one young/one middle-aged) exhibited some evidence of sequence awareness. After 1 h, young and middle-aged adults showed off-line improvement. However, RT facilitation was not specific to sequence trials. Importantly, susceptibility to interference was reduced in young and older adults indicating the occurrence of consolidation. Although WM performance declined in older participants when load was high, it was not significantly related to sequence learning. The data reveal a decline in motor sequence learning in middle-aged but not in older adults. The use of explicit learning strategies in older adults might account for the latter result. PMID:27199736

  19. Acacetin 7-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl (1-2) β-D-xylopyranoside Elicits Life-span Extension and Stress Resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, Jyotsna; Yadav, Deepti; Pant, Aakanksha; Yadav, A K; Gupta, M M; Pandey, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    The advancements in the field of gerontology have unraveled the signaling pathways that regulate life span, suggesting that it might be feasible to modulate aging. To this end, we isolated a novel phytomolecule Acacetin 7-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl (1-2) β-D-xylopyranoside (ARX) from Premna integrifolia and evaluated its antiaging effects in Caenorhabditis elegans The spectral data analysis revealed the occurrence of a new compound ARX. Out of the three tested pharmacological doses of ARX, viz. 5, 25, and 50 µM, the 25-µM dose was able to extend life span in C. elegans by more than 39%. The present study suggests that ARX affects bacterial metabolism, which in turn leads to dietary restriction (DR)-like effects in the worms. The effect of ARX on worms with mutations (mev-1, eat-2, sir-2.1, skn-1, daf-16, and hsf-1) indicates that ARX-mediated life-span extension involves mechanisms associated with DR and maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis. This study is the first time report on longevity-promoting activity of ARX in C. elegans mediated by stress and DR-regulating genes. This novel phytomolecule can contribute in designing therapeutics for managing aging and age-related diseases. PMID:26433219

  20. The effect of UV irradiation on proliferation and life span of human diploid fibroblast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of low dose UV irradiation on the reinitiation of proliferative activity and on the life span of human diploid fibroblast-like cells is described. Cells were exposed to UV at confluence or after maintenance in an arrested state. Cell division was stimulated immediately after UV irradiation or after an additional post-UV incubation period. Arrested populations of all in vitro ages exhibited a greater sensitivity to UV and the reinitiation of proliferation was enhanced by post-UV incubation before stimulation. Ultraviolet light had no effect on life span regardless of in vitro cell age, culture state at the time of exposure, or the presence of a postirradiation period of arrest

  1. Dietary supplementation with Lovaza and krill oil shortens the life span of long-lived F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Stephen R; Mote, Patricia L; Flegal, James M

    2014-06-01

    Marine oils rich in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been recommended as a preventive treatment for patients at risk for cardiovascular diseases. These oils also are the third most consumed dietary supplement in the USA. However, evidence for their health benefits is equivocal. We tested the daily, isocaloric administration of krill oil (1.17 g oil/kg diet) and Lovaza (Omacor; 4.40 g/kg diet), a pharmaceutical grade fish oil, beginning at 12 months of age, on the life span and mortality-related pathologies of long-lived, male, B6C3F1 mice. The oils were incorporated into the chemically defined American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93 M diet. An equivalent volume of soybean oil was removed. Krill oil was 3 % and Lovaza 11 % of the oil in the diets. When their effects were analyzed together, the marine oils significantly shortened life span by 6.6 % (P = 0.0321; log-rank test) relative to controls. Individually, Lovaza and krill oil non-significantly shortened median life span by 9.8 and 4.7 %, respectively. Lovaza increased the number of enlarged seminal vesicles (7.1-fold). Lovaza and krill oil significantly increased lung tumors (4.1- and 8.2-fold) and hemorrhagic diathesis (3.9- and 3.1-fold). Analysis of serum from treated mice found that Lovaza slightly increased blood urea nitrogen, while krill oil modestly increased bilirubin, triglycerides, and blood glucose levels. Taken together, the results do not support the idea that the consumption of isolated ω-3 fatty acid-rich oils will increase the life span or health of initially healthy individuals. PMID:24816553

  2. Life span of mice continuously exposed to low dose rate radiation in long term and their pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findings in experimental animals exposed to low dose rate radiation are essential for elucidation of its biological effect because its epidemiological human studies performed in such population as the radiation handling personnel involve many unavoidable confounding factors. For the elucidation, authors have conducted an experiment with unusually low dose rate radiation in the specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mouse to see its effect on the life span and pathogenesis, of which outline is given here. All through under the SPF condition, 8 weeks old, male and female SPF mice of B6C3F1 strain were exposed to 137Cs gamma ray at 0, 0.05, 1.1 and 21 mGy/day for 400 days (a half of the average life span of the mouse) in total doses of 0, 20, 400, 800 mGy, respectively, and then maintained until death. Five hundred mice of each sex were included in one rate group, general status and body weight were checked every day, and organ weight measurement and histopathological examination were done at death. Significant shortening of life span was seen in males and females exposed at 21 and at 1.1 and 21 mGy/day, respectively, where 1.1 mGy/day is 400 times as high as the natural radiation dose rate. Major cause of death was malignant lymphoma in both sexes among 10 or more tumors observed. Between exposed and non-exposed groups, the significant increase of tumor incidence was detected in angiosarcoma and myelogenic leukemia of males at 21 mGy/day and ovarian tumor of females at the same rate. It was considered that the life span shortening was not due to the increase of specific tumor incidence by radiation but by early death by many lethal tumors. It was therefore concluded that the long-term continuous low dose rate radiation could induce the early tumorigenesis, tumor growth promotion or both. (K.T.)

  3. Moral development and perceptual role-taking egocentrism: their development and interrelationship across the life-span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vento Bielby, D; Papalia, D E

    1975-01-01

    Moral judgments and perceptual role taking egocentrism were assessed in seventy-two middle-class people whose age range encompassed a significant portion of the life span. Findings support the anticipated curvilinear relationship between moral development and age, and egocentrism and age. However, the close conceptual development and age, and egocentrism and age. However, the close conceptual relationship between moral development and egocentrism throughout life received only slight statistical support, which attained significance only in the fifteen- to nineteen-year-old age group. The existence of "self-involving" egocentrism was postulated to be an important determinant or moral development during adulthood. PMID:1221055

  4. Delayed accumulation of intestinal coliform bacteria enhances life span and stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans fed respiratory deficient E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies with the nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans have identified conserved biochemical pathways that act to modulate life span. Life span can also be influenced by the composition of the intestinal microbiome, and C. elegans life span can be dramatically influenced by its diet of Escherichia coli. Although C. elegans is typically fed the standard OP50 strain of E. coli, nematodes fed E. coli strains rendered respiratory deficient, either due to a lack coenzyme Q or the absence of ATP synthase, show significant life span extension. Here we explore the mechanisms accounting for the enhanced nematode life span in response to these diets. Results The intestinal load of E. coli was monitored by determination of worm-associated colony forming units (cfu/worm or coliform counts as a function of age. The presence of GFP-expressing E. coli in the worm intestine was also monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Worms fed the standard OP50 E. coli strain have high cfu and GFP-labeled bacteria in their guts at the L4 larval stage, and show saturated coliform counts by day five of adulthood. In contrast, nematodes fed diets of respiratory deficient E. coli lacking coenzyme Q lived significantly longer and failed to accumulate bacteria within the lumen at early ages. Animals fed bacteria deficient in complex V showed intermediate coliform numbers and were not quite as long-lived. The results indicate that respiratory deficient Q-less E. coli are effectively degraded in the early adult worm, either at the pharynx or within the intestine, and do not accumulate in the intestinal tract until day ten of adulthood. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that the nematodes fed the respiratory deficient E. coli diet live longer because the delay in bacterial colonization of the gut subjects the worms to less stress compared to worms fed the OP50 E. coli diet. This work suggests that bacterial respiration can act as a virulence factor

  5. Evaluation of platelet thromboxane radioimmunoassay method to measure platelet life-span: Comparison with /sup 111/indium-platelet method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The platelet activation during radiolabeling in vitro with Cr-51 and In-111 may affect the platelet life-span (PLS) in vivo. A new RIA method to measure PLS is being evaluated. Aspirin inhibits platelet thromboxane (TxA/sub 2/) by acetylating cyclooxygenase. The time required for the TxA/sub 2/ levels to return towards control values depends on the rate of new platelets entering circulation and is a measure of PLS. A single dose of aspirin (150mg) was given to 5 normal human subjects. Blood samples were collected for 2 days before aspirin and daily for 10 days. TxA/sub 2/ production in response to endogenous thrombin was studied by allowing 1 ml blood sample to clot at 370C for 90 min. Serum TxB/sub 2/ (stable breakdown product of Tx-A/sub 2/) levels determined by RIA technique. The plot of TxB/sub 2/ levels (% control) against time showed a gradual increase. The PLS calculated by linear regression analysis assuming a 2-day lag period before cyclooxygenase recovery is 9.7 +- 2.37. In the same 5 subjects, platelets from a 50ml blood sample were labeled with /sup 111/In-tropolone in 2 ml autologous plasma. Starting at 1 hr after injection of labeled platelets, 10 blood samples were obtained over a 8 day period. The PLS calculated based on a linear regression analysis is 10.2 +. 1.4. The PLS measured from the rate of platelet disappearance from circulation and the rate of platelet regeneration into circulation are quite comparable in normal subjects. TxA/sub 2/ regeneration RIA may provide a method to measure PLS without administering radioactivity to patient

  6. Circuit life span in critically ill children on continuous renal replacement treatment: a prospective observational evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, Jimena; López-Herce, Jesús; Cidoncha, Elena; Urbano, Javier; Mencía, Santiago; Santiago, Maria J; Bellón, Jose M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction One of the greatest problems with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is early coagulation of the filters. Few studies have monitored circuit function prospectively. The purpose of this study was to determine the variables associated with circuit life in critically ill children with CRRT. Methods A prospective observational study was performed in 122 children treated with CRRT in a pediatric intensive care unit from 1996 to 2006. Patient and filter characteristics were analyzed to determine their influence on circuit life. Data were collected on 540 filters in 122 patients and an analysis was performed of the 365 filters (67.6%) that were changed due to circuit coagulation. Results The median circuit life was 31 hours (range 1 to 293 hours). A univariate and multivariate logistic regression study was performed to assess the influence of each one of the factors on circuit life span. No significant differences in filter life were found according to age, weight, diagnoses, pump, site of venous access, blood flow rate, ultrafiltration rate, inotropic drug support, or patient outcome. The mean circuit life span was longer when the heparin dose was greater than 20 U/kg per hour (39 versus 29.1 hours; P = 0.008), with hemodiafiltration compared with hemofiltration (34 versus 22.7 hours; P = 0.001), with filters with surface areas of 0.4 to 0.9 m2 (38.2 versus 26.1 hours; P = 0.01), and with a catheter size of 6.5 French or greater (33.0 versus 25.0 hours; P = 0.04). In the multivariate analysis, hemodiafiltration, heparin dose of greater than 20 U/kg per hour, filter surface area of 0.4 m2 or greater, and initial creatinine of less than 2 mg/dL were associated with a filter life of more than 24 and 48 hours. Total effluent rate of greater than 35 mL/kg per hour was associated only with a filter life of more than 24 hours. Conclusion Circuit life span in CRRT in children is short but may be increased by the use of hemodiafiltration, higher heparin

  7. Life-Cycle Monitoring of Long-Span PSC Box Girder Bridges through Distributed Sensor Network: Strategies, Methods, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheheng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM has attracted much attention in recent years, which enables early warnings of structural failure, condition assessments, and rational maintenance/repair strategies. In the context of bridges, many long-span steel bridges in China have been installed with the SHM systems; however, the applications of the SHM in prestressed concrete (PSC bridges are still rather limited. On the other hand, the PSC box girder bridges are extensively used in highway and railway systems and premature damage of these bridges is often reported, resulting in considerable maintenance and/or replacement costs. First, this paper presents a state-of-art review on the SHM of long-span PSC bridges. Monitoring strategies, methods, and previous applications for these bridges are summarized and discussed. In order to well capture the behavior of the bridge during its whole life and to maximize the use of sensors, a life-cycle monitoring strategy is proposed, in which the sensor layout is determined according to requirements for construction monitoring, completion test, and in-service monitoring. A case study is made on a three-span PSC box girder bridge in China. The system configuration, sensor layout, and data communications, and so forth, are presented. The up-to-date monitored structural responses are analyzed and compared with the design values.

  8. Effects of salinity on egg and fecal pellet production, development and survival, adult sex ratio and total life span in the calanoid copepod, Acartia tonsa: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayegan, Majid; Esmaeili Fereidouni, Abolghasem; Agh, Naser; Jani Khalili, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    The effects of salinity on the copepod, Acartia tonsa in terms of daily egg production rate (EPR), hatching success, fecal pellet production rate (FPR), naupliar development time and survival, sex ratio, and total life span were determined in laboratory conditions through three experiments. In experiment 1, EPR, hatching success, and FPR of individual females were monitored at salinities of 13, 20, 35 and 45 during short-periods (seven consecutive days). Results show EPR was affected by salinity with the highest outputs recorded at 20 and 35, respectively, which were considerably higher than those at 13 and 45. Mean FPR was also higher in 35 and 20. In experiment 2, the same parameters were evaluated over total life span of females (long-term study). The best EPR and FPR were observed in 35, which was statistically higher than at 13 and 20. In experiment 3, survival rates of early nauplii until adult stage were lowest at a salinity of 13. The development time increased with increasing of salinity. Female percentage clearly decreased with increasing salinity. Higher female percentages (56.7% and 52.2%, respectively) were significantly observed at two salinities of 13 and 20 compared to that at 35 (25%). Total longevity of females was not affected by salinity increment. Based on our results, for mass culture we recommend that a salinity of 35 be adopted due to higher reproductive performances, better feeding, and faster development of A. tonsa.

  9. Effects of salinity on egg and fecal pellet production, development and survival, adult sex ratio and total life span in the calanoid copepod, Acartia tonsa: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayegan, Majid; Esmaeili Fereidouni, Abolghasem; Agh, Naser; Jani Khalili, Khosrow

    2016-07-01

    The effects of salinity on the copepod, Acartia tonsa in terms of daily egg production rate (EPR), hatching success, fecal pellet production rate (FPR), naupliar development time and survival, sex ratio, and total life span were determined in laboratory conditions through three experiments. In experiment 1, EPR, hatching success, and FPR of individual females were monitored at salinities of 13, 20, 35 and 45 during short-periods (seven consecutive days). Results show EPR was affected by salinity with the highest outputs recorded at 20 and 35, respectively, which were considerably higher than those at 13 and 45. Mean FPR was also higher in 35 and 20. In experiment 2, the same parameters were evaluated over total life span of females (long-term study). The best EPR and FPR were observed in 35, which was statistically higher than at 13 and 20. In experiment 3, survival rates of early nauplii until adult stage were lowest at a salinity of 13. The development time increased with increasing of salinity. Female percentage clearly decreased with increasing salinity. Higher female percentages (56.7% and 52.2%, respectively) were significantly observed at two salinities of 13 and 20 compared to that at 35 (25%). Total longevity of females was not affected by salinity increment. Based on our results, for mass culture we recommend that a salinity of 35 be adopted due to higher reproductive performances, better feeding, and faster development of A. tonsa.

  10. Speaking, writing, and memory span in children: output modality affects cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Joachim

    2010-02-01

    Low-level processes of children's written language production are cognitively more costly than those involved in speaking. This has been shown by French authors who compared oral and written memory span performance. The observed difficulties of children's, but not of adults' low-level processes in writing may stem from graphomotoric as well as from orthographic inadequacies. We report on five experiments designed to replicate and expand the original results. First, the French results were successfully replicated for German third-graders, and for university students. Then, the developmental changes of the cognitive costs of writing were examined during primary school, comparing the performance of second- and fourth-graders. Next, we show that unpractised writing modes, which were experimentally induced, also lead to a decrease of memory performance in adults, which supports the assumption that a lack of graphomotoric automation is responsible for the observed effects in children. However, unpractised handwriting yields clearer results than unpractised typing. Lastly, we try to separate the influences of graphomotoric as opposed to orthographic difficulties by having the words composed through pointing on a "spelling board". This attempt, however, has not been successful, probably because the pointing to letters introduced other low-level costs. In sum, throughout the four years of primary school, German children show worse memory span performance in writing compared to oral recall, with an overall increase in both modalities. Thus, writing had not fully caught up with speaking regarding the implied cognitive costs by the end of primary school. Therefore, conclusions relate to the question of how to assess properly any kind of knowledge and abilities through language production. Los procesos de bajo nivel en la producción de lenguaje escrito en niños son más costosos a nivel cognitivo que los que están implicados en el habla. Esto ha sido demostrado por autores

  11. Bax-induced apoptosis shortens the life span of DNA repair defect Ku70-knockout mice by inducing emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shigemi; Palmer, James; Bates, Adam; Poventud-Fuentes, Izmarie; Wong, Kelvin; Ngo, Justine; Matsuyama, Mieko

    2016-06-01

    Cells with DNA damage undergo apoptosis or cellular senescence if the damage cannot be repaired. Recent studies highlight that cellular senescence plays a major role in aging. However, age-associated diseases, including emphysema and neurodegenerative disorders, are caused by apoptosis of lung alveolar epithelial cells and neurons, respectively. Therefore, enhanced apoptosis also promotes aging and shortens the life span depending on the cell type. Recently, we reported that ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(-) (/) (-) and ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(+/) (-) mice showed significantly extended life span in comparison with ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(+/+) mice. Ku70 is essential for non-homologous end joining pathway for DNA double strand break repair, and Bax plays an important role in apoptosis. Our study suggests that Bax-induced apoptosis has a significant impact on shortening the life span of ku70(-) (/) (-) mice, which are defective in one of DNA repair pathways. The lung alveolar space gradually enlarges during aging, both in mouse and human, and this age-dependent change results in the decrease of respiration capacity during aging that can lead to emphysema in more severe cases. We found that emphysema occurred in ku70(-) (/) (-) mice at the age of three-months old, and that Bax deficiency was able to suppress it. These results suggest that Bax-mediated apoptosis induces emphysema in ku70(-) (/) (-) mice. We also found that the number of cells, including bronchiolar epithelial cells and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, shows a higher DNA double strand break damage response in ku70 KO mouse lung than in wild type. Recent studies suggest that non-homologous end joining activity decreases with increased age in mouse and rat model. Together, we hypothesize that the decline of Ku70-dependent DNA repair activity in lung alveolar epithelial cells is one of the causes of age-dependent decline of lung function resulting from excess Bax-mediated apoptosis of lung alveolar epithelial cells (and their

  12. Dietary supplementation with Lovaza and krill oil shortens the life span of long-lived F1 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Spindler, Stephen R.; Mote, Patricia L.; Flegal, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Marine oils rich in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been recommended as a preventive treatment for patients at risk for cardiovascular diseases. These oils also are the third most consumed dietary supplement in the USA. However, evidence for their health benefits is equivocal. We tested the daily, isocaloric administration of krill oil (1.17 g oil/kg diet) and Lovaza (Omacor; 4.40 g/kg diet), a pharmaceutical grade fish oil, beginning at 12 months of age, on the life span and mortality-r...

  13. Life-span studies in 226Ra-injected animals: Effect of low doses, effect of a decorporative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A life-span radiation effects study was performed in mice injected with several doses of 226Ra. The study included 788 male C57Bl mice. For the removal of the 226Ra, half the mice were treated daily with a diet 5% of which was sodium-alginate. The experiment revealed that mice that received the lowest dose of 226Ra lived significantly longer than controls, and, despite appreciable skeletal removal of 226Ra as a result of decorporative treatment, no biological benefit was observed in treated animals. 19 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  14. The specificity of childhood adversities and negative life events across the life span to anxiety and depressive disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, Philip; Elzinga, Bernet M.; Hovens, Jacqueline G. F. M.; Roelofs, Karin; Zitman, Frans G.; van Oppen, Patricia; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although several studies have shown that life adversities play an important role in the etiology and maintenance of both depressive and anxiety disorders, little is known about the relative specificity of several types of life adversities to different forms of depressive and anxiety diso

  15. Nutrition through the life span. Part 3: adults aged 65 years and over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Alison

    The UK has an ageing population, but this is not being matched by a similar increase in healthy life expectancy. The greatest challenge in the 21st century will be to improve the quality of life as ageing occurs. Health is the most important prerequisite for people to enjoy life in their older years (Brundtland, 1988). Diet is one factor that is believed to play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases associated with ageing. The third and final part of this series addressing the concept of nutrition through the lifespan seeks to educate health-care professionals as to what constitutes a healthy diet for the elderly population, and gives practical guidance as to how to try and prevent the ever-growing problem of malnutrition within this age group. It is suggested that when the older adult is hospitalized their risk of malnutrition increases. Therefore, some guidance for the use of oral nutritional supplements in this population is given. Good nutrition and physical exercise are essential for healthy ageing from both a physical and psychological perspective (NICE, 2008). Therefore a multidisciplinary life course approach to ageing is vital to minimizing its complications for quality of life and subsequent public health (Denny, 2008). PMID:19273990

  16. Motives in American Men and Women across the Adult Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroff, Joseph; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigates stability and change in four social motives (achievement, affiliation, fear of weakness, hope of power) over the adult life cycle. Motives were assessed in 1957 and 1976 by coding thematic apperceptive content in stories told about six pictures. Some age differences and cohort stability were evident for both sexes. (Author/CB)

  17. Bmi-1 extends the life span of normal human oral keratinocytes by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Reuben H., E-mail: rkim@dentistry.ucla.edu [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lieberman, Mark B.; Lee, Rachel [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Shin, Ki-Hyuk [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mehrazarin, Shebli; Oh, Ju-Eun [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Park, No-Hee [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kang, Mo K., E-mail: mkang@dentistry.ucla.edu [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that Bmi-1 extended the in vitro life span of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We now report that the prolonged life span of NHOK by Bmi-1 is, in part, due to inhibition of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. Serial subculture of NHOK resulted in replicative senescence and terminal differentiation and activation of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. This was accompanied with enhanced intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 levels, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and increased expression of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. An ectopic expression of Bmi-1 in NHOK (HOK/Bmi-1) decreased the level of intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 induced dephosphorylation of Smad2/3, and diminished the level of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. Moreover, Bmi-1 expression led to the inhibition of TGF-{beta}-responsive promoter activity in a dose-specific manner. Knockdown of Bmi-1 in rapidly proliferating HOK/Bmi-1 and cancer cells increased the level of phosphorylated Smad2/3, p15{sup INK4B}, and p57{sup KIP2}. In addition, an exposure of senescent NHOK to TGF-{beta} receptor I kinase inhibitor or anti-TGF-{beta} antibody resulted in enhanced replicative potential of cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Bmi-1 suppresses senescence of cells by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in NHOK.

  18. Bmi-1 extends the life span of normal human oral keratinocytes by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously demonstrated that Bmi-1 extended the in vitro life span of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We now report that the prolonged life span of NHOK by Bmi-1 is, in part, due to inhibition of the TGF-β signaling pathway. Serial subculture of NHOK resulted in replicative senescence and terminal differentiation and activation of TGF-β signaling pathway. This was accompanied with enhanced intracellular and secreted TGF-β1 levels, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and increased expression of p15INK4B and p57KIP2. An ectopic expression of Bmi-1 in NHOK (HOK/Bmi-1) decreased the level of intracellular and secreted TGF-β1 induced dephosphorylation of Smad2/3, and diminished the level of p15INK4B and p57KIP2. Moreover, Bmi-1 expression led to the inhibition of TGF-β-responsive promoter activity in a dose-specific manner. Knockdown of Bmi-1 in rapidly proliferating HOK/Bmi-1 and cancer cells increased the level of phosphorylated Smad2/3, p15INK4B, and p57KIP2. In addition, an exposure of senescent NHOK to TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor or anti-TGF-β antibody resulted in enhanced replicative potential of cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Bmi-1 suppresses senescence of cells by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway in NHOK.

  19. Lifelong susceptibility to acoustic trauma: Changing patterns of chochlear damage over the life span of the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Age-related differences in susceptibility to noise-induced threshold shift (NITS) were examined over the entire life span of the CBA/J mouse. Mice of varying ages were given a single 5-min exposure to a 124-dB octave-band (12-24 kHz) noise. Susceptibility began at 15-16 days postpartum and increased rapidly until approximately 20 days of age. During this phase, NITS (as measured by increased action potential threshold) was greatest at 16 kHz. Overall susceptibility was consistently high from 20 to 90 days. During this phase, NITS became most severe at 32 kHz. From 120 days until beyond the end of its acturarial life span (527 days), NITS no longer occured at 2-16 kHz, but the 64-kHz response retained its susceptibility to acoustic trauma. Mice at 20 and 60 days of age showed the same pattern of decreasing susceptibility as the intensity of the noise exposure was reduced to 114 and 104 dB, indicating that the absence of a tightly restricted critical period is not peculiar to a particular sound pressure level.

  20. Trade-offs between seed output and life span - a quantitative comparison of traits between annual and perennial congeneric species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico, Giulia; Manzoni, Stefano; Nkurunziza, Libère; Murphy, Kevin; Weih, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Perennial plants allocate more resources belowground, thus sustaining important ecosystem services. Hence, shifting from annual to perennial crops has been advocated towards a more sustainable agriculture. Nevertheless, wild perennial species have lower seed production than selected annuals, raising the questions of whether there is a fundamental trade-off between reproductive effort and life span, and whether such trade-off can be overcome through selection. In order to address these questions and to isolate life span from phylogenetic and environmental factors, we conducted a meta-analysis encompassing c. 3000 congeneric annual/perennial pairs from 28 genera. This meta-analysis is complemented with a minimalist model of long-term productivity in perennial species. Perennials allocate more resources belowground and less to seeds than congeneric annuals, independently of selection history. However, existing perennial wheat and rice could achieve yields similar to annuals if they survived three years and each year doubled their biomass, as other perennial grasses do. Selected perennial crops maintain the large belowground allocation of wild perennials, and thus can provide desired regulatory ecosystem services. To match the seed yield of annuals, biomass production of perennial grains must be increased to amounts attained by some perennial grasses - if this goal can be met, perennial crops can provide a more sustainable alternative to annuals. PMID:26214792

  1. Analysis of Genomic Integrity and p53-Dependent G1 Checkpoint in Telomerase-Induced Extended-Life-Span Human Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Vaziri, Homayoun; Jeremy A Squire; Pandita, Tej K.; Bradley, Grace; Kuba, Robert M.; Zhang, Haihua; Gulyas, Sandor; Hill, Richard P.; Nolan, Garry P.; Benchimol, Samuel

    1999-01-01

    Life span determination in normal human cells may be regulated by nucleoprotein structures called telomeres, the physical ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres have been shown to be essential for chromosome stability and function and to shorten with each cell division in normal human cells in culture and with age in vivo. Reversal of telomere shortening by the forced expression of telomerase in normal cells has been shown to elongate telomeres and extend the replicative life span (H. Vazi...

  2. Sex differences in the effects of cocaine abuse across the life span

    OpenAIRE

    Dow-Edwards, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine alters brain function from the early days of development throughout the entire life of an individual. Since the first preclinical research on cocaine sensitization was published, sex differences in response to the drug in adult rats have been noted. With the appearance of reports on “crack babies” during the 1980’s, sex differences in response to prenatal (developmental) exposure have been identified in both clinical and preclinical reports. Cocaine administered during early developme...

  3. Dead or Alive: Deformed Wing Virus and Varroa destructor Reduce the Life Span of Winter Honeybees

    OpenAIRE

    Dainat, Benjamin; Jay D. Evans; Chen, Yan ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Elevated winter losses of managed honeybee colonies are a major concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. Among the suspects are the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, and associated viruses. Here we hypothesize that pathogens reduce the life expectancy of winter bees, thereby constituting a proximate mechanism for colony losses. A monitoring of colonies was performed over 6 months in Switzerland from summer 2007 to winter 2007/2008. Indivi...

  4. Early stress evokes dysregulation of histone modifiers in the medial prefrontal cortex across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusalkar, Madhavi; Suri, Deepika; Kelkar, Ashwin; Bhattacharya, Amrita; Galande, Sanjeev; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2016-03-01

    Early stress has been hypothesized to recruit epigenetic mechanisms to mediate persistent molecular, cellular, and behavioral changes. Here, we have examined the consequence of the early life stress of maternal separation (ES) on the gene expression of several histone modifiers that regulate histone acetylation and methylation within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a key limbic brain region that regulates stress responses and mood-related behavior. ES animals exhibit gene regulation of both writer (histone acetyltransferases and histone methyltransferases) and eraser (histone deacetylases and histone lysine demethylases) classes of histone modifiers. While specific histone modifiers (Kat2a, Smyd3, and Suv420h1) and the sirtuin, Sirt4 were downregulated across life within the mPFC of ES animals, namely at postnatal Day 21, 2 months, and 15 months of age, we also observed gene regulation restricted to these specific time points. Despite the decline noted in expression of several histone modifiers within the mPFC following ES, this was not accompanied by any change in global or residue-specific H3 acetylation and methylation. Our findings indicate that ES results in the regulation of several histone modifiers within the mPFC across life, and suggest that such perturbations may contribute to the altered prefrontal structural and functional plasticity observed following early adversity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 58: 198-210, 2016. PMID:26395029

  5. The control processes and subjective well-being of Chinese teachers: Evidence of convergence with and divergence from the key propositions of the motivational theory of life-span development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chi eWong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An analytical review of the motivational theory of life-span development reveals that this theory has undergone a series of elegant theoretical integrations. Its claim to universality nonetheless brings forth unresolved controversies. With the purpose of scrutinizing the key propositions of this theory, an empirical study was designed to examine the control processes and subjective well-being of Chinese teachers (N = 637. The OPS-Scales (Optimization in Primary and Secondary Control Scales for the Domain of Teaching were constructed to assess patterns of control processes. Three facets of subjective well-being were investigated with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Life Satisfaction Scale, and the Subjective Vitality Scale. The results revealed certain aspects of alignment with and certain divergences from the key propositions of the motivational theory of life-span development. Neither primacy of primary control nor primacy of secondary control was clearly supported. Notably, using different criteria for subjective well-being yielded different subtypes of primary and secondary control as predictors. The hypothesized life-span trajectories of primary and secondary control received limited support. To advance the theory in this area, we recommend incorporating Lakatos’ ideas about sophisticated falsification by specifying the hard core of the motivational theory of life-span development and articulating new auxiliary hypotheses.

  6. Climate Change Affects Deep Sea Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emma Marris; 秦春雨

    2004-01-01

    @@ The remote and lightless deep-sea floor has long been thought to be protected from events on the surface, such as global warming. But it now seems that climate change impinges on the rhythm of life on the seabed after all.

  7. Late effects of selected immunosuppressants on immunocompetence, disease incidence, and mean life-span. III. Disease incidence and life expectancy. [Mice, x radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, C.P.; Perkins, E.H.; Peterson, W.J.; Walburg, H.E.; Makinodan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of various immunosuppressive treatments on mean life-span and disease incidence have been studied. Significant life shortening was seen only in mice which received X-irradiation early in life and can be ascribed primarily to an increased incidence of certain malignancies. Marginal life shortening was seen in cyclophosphamide-treated animals, however, survival patterns between those and control animals did not differ until 30 months of age and the magnitude of life-shortening never approached that seen in X-irradiated animals. Thymectomy, splenectomy or cortisone treatment did not alter survival. All immunosuppressive treatments enhanced mortality due to non-neoplastic diseases, however, only a small percentage of animals die with these disease entities. With the exception of cortisone all immunosuppressive treatments increased the incidence of neoplastic disease. However, their effects on various neoplastic processes were variable and unpredictable. Four primary patterns in terms of relative immune competence, disease incidence and life expectancy were seen. Thus, immunodepression may or may not correlate with increased disease incidence, which in turn may or may not have a life-shortening effect. These findings are discussed in terms of the marked reduction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity normally seen in aged mice and the significance of postulated immune surveillance mechanisms to survival.

  8. Problem-based learning spanning real and virtual words: a case study in Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Good

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing use of immersive virtual environments for educational purposes. However, much of this activity is not yet documented in the public domain, or is descriptive rather than analytical. This paper presents a case study in which university students were tasked with building an interactive learning experience using Second Life as a platform. Both problem-based learning and constructionism acted as framing pedagogies for the task, with students working in teams to design and build a learning experience which could potentially meet the needs of a real client in innovative ways which might not be possible in real life. A process account of the experience is provided, which examines how the pedagogies and contexts (real and virtual influence and enhance each other. The use of a virtual environment, combined with problem-based learning and constructionism, subtly changed the nature of the instructor–student relationship, allowed students to explore ‘problematic problems' in a motivating and relevant manner, provided students with greater ownership over their work, and allowed problems to be set which were flexible, but at the same time allowed for ease of assessment.

  9. Differential Effects of Emotional Information on Interference Task Performance across the Life Span

    OpenAIRE

    LaMonica, Haley M.; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Harvey, Philip D.; Gold, James M.; Goldberg, Terry E.

    2010-01-01

    While functioning in multiple domains declines with age, emotional regulation appears to remain preserved in older adults. The Emotion Inhibition (Emotional Stroop) Test requires participants to name the ink color in which neutrally- and emotionally-valenced words are printed. It was employed in the current investigation as a measure of affective regulation in the context of an interference task in relation to age. Results demonstrated that while participants ranging from 20 to 50 years of ag...

  10. Differential Effects of Emotional Information on Interference Task Performance Across the Life Span

    OpenAIRE

    LaMonica, Haley M.; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Harvey, Philip D.; Gold, James M.; Goldberg, Terry E.

    2010-01-01

    While functioning in multiple domains declines with age, emotional regulation appears to remain preserved in older adults. The Emotion Inhibition (Emotional Stroop) Test requires participants to name the ink color in which neutrally and emotionally valenced words are printed. It was employed in the current investigation as a measure of affective regulation in the context of an interference task in relation to age. Results demonstrated that while participants ranging from 20 to 50 years of age...

  11. Differential Effects of Emotional Information on Interference Task Performance across the Life Span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley M LaMonica

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available While functioning in multiple domains declines with age, emotional regulation appears to remain preserved in older adults. The Emotion Inhibition (Emotional Stroop Test requires participants to name the ink color in which neutrally- and emotionally-valenced words are printed. It was employed in the current investigation as a measure of affective regulation in the context of an interference task in relation to age. Results demonstrated that while participants ranging from 20 to 50 years of age performed significantly worse on the emotion Stroop Inhibition relative to the neutral Stroop Inhibition condition, subjects over 60 years of age displayed the converse of this pattern, performing better on the emotion than the neutral condition, suggesting that they are less affected by the emotional impact of the positive and negative words used in the former condition. This pattern of age-related change in the ability to manage emotion may be related to blunting of affective signaling in limbic structures or, at the psychological level, focusing on emotional regulation.

  12. Life span studies on mice exposed to heavy charged particles or photons: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter summarizes the results currently available where dose-dependent mortality is compared among the single cohort that received fractionated doses of carbon ions and the first replicate that received single doses. At this time, 17% mortality has occurred in both groups and had enhanced life shortening been produced by fractionation of the carbon ion dose, somewhat higher mortality might be expected. Cautious interpretation of these preliminary results is necessary, but the mortality data available at this time provides no evidence for enhancement by dose fractionation with carbon ions. In sum, at this time, it appears the Q factor used for fission spectrum neutrons could be conservative if it were used for assessment of risk following exposure to 400 MeV carbon ions

  13. Life-span health effects of relatively soluble forms of internally deposited beta-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a large research effort to study the lifetime health risks of inhaled radionuclides, Beagle dogs inhaled 90SrCl2 or 144CeCl3 or were injected intravenously with 137CsCl. Because these three compounds were soluble in body fluids, the resulting widely differing patterns of radionuclide distribution and dose reflected tissue affinities of the elements involved. Long-term health effects, predominantly cancers, were seen in the organs receiving the highest doses. Investigations are continuing on the extent to which other less irradiated organs may have also been affected

  14. The relationship of cancer mortality to life span and food supply rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival curves for men and women dying from cardiovascular disease and similar curves for those dying from cancer in 47 countries were compared with the 1970-1974 per capita incomes of the inhabitants. The data were taken chiefly from 1964 life tables. The steepest survival curves were found in countries with the highest incomes. Comparison of the survival curves in different countries and comparison of cardiovascular survival with cancer survival curves indicate that both groups of diseases are probably diseases of senescence. The differences in survival slopes are interpreted as homeostatic responses in the population to rate of food intake. The response protects the population against long-term effects of changes in food supply by promoting differential reproduction of offspring best suited to the food supply rate fro the environment. The response to food supply rate complicates calculation of the effects of protracted exposure to low-level ionizing radiation because the radiation exposure appears to mimic the effec of extra food

  15. Language Development across the Life Span: A Neuropsychological/Neuroimaging Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Rosselli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Language development has been correlated with specific changes in brain development. The aim of this paper is to analyze the linguistic-brain associations that occur from birth through senescence. Findings from the neuropsychological and neuroimaging literature are reviewed, and the relationship of language changes observable in human development and the corresponding brain maturation processes across age groups are examined. Two major dimensions of language development are highlighted: naming (considered a major measure of lexical knowledge and verbal fluency (regarded as a major measure of language production ability. Developmental changes in the brain lateralization of language are discussed, emphasizing that in early life there is an increase in functional brain asymmetry for language, but that this asymmetry changes over time, and that changes in the volume of gray and white matter are age-sensitive. The effects of certain specific variables, such as gender, level of education, and bilingualism are also analyzed. General conclusions are presented and directions for future research are suggested.

  16. Cernunnos deficiency reduces thymocyte life span and alters the T cell repertoire in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Gabriella; Rivera-Munoz, Paola; Abramowski, Vincent; Malivert, Laurent; Lim, Annick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Martin, Christelle; Florkin, Benoit; Latour, Sylvain; Revy, Patrick; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Cernunnos is a DNA repair factor of the nonhomologous end-joining machinery. Its deficiency in humans causes radiosensitive severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) with microcephaly, characterized in part by a profound lymphopenia. In contrast to the human condition, the immune system of Cernunnos knockout (KO) mice is not overwhelmingly affected. In particular, Cernunnos is dispensable during V(D)J recombination in lymphoid cells. Nevertheless, the viability of thymocytes is reduced in Cernunnos KO mice, owing to the chronic activation of a P53-dependent DNA damage response. This translates into a qualitative alteration of the T cell repertoire to one in which the most distal Vα and Jα segments are missing. This results in the contraction of discrete T cell populations, such as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) and mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, in both humans and mice. PMID:23207905

  17. Tissue characteristics of high- and low-incidence plutonium-induced osteogenic sarcoma sites in life-span beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of information gathered from the 239Pu life-span study in beagles at the University of Utah, the tissue features were found to be characteristic of high-incidence bone-tumor sites compared to low-incidence sites included more hematopoietic tissues in the bone marrow; greater trabecular bone mass; greater bone remodeling rates; greater mineral apposition rates; greater density and activity of bone surface cells; greater density of putative bone-cell precursors; greater initial uptake of plutonium on bone surfaces; and greater marrow vascular volumes and a venous sinusoidal bed. Although most of these studies are not yet complete, the information being collected should contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of radiation-induced osteogenic sarcomas. This should aid in predicting the types and characteristics of osseous tissues where radiation-induced osteogenic sarcomas may arise in humans. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Curiosity and stimulation seeking across the adult life span: cross-sectional and 6- to 8-year longitudinal findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, L M; Camp, C J; Grodsky, A

    1992-03-01

    Giambra (1977-1978, 1979-1980) found that 2 scales of the Imaginal Processes Inventory measuring curiosity (i.e., information seeking) did not change across the adult life span, but 2 measuring stimulation seeking (i.e., boredom) for external stimulation need significantly decreased with age. In this study, these outcomes were replicated (1,356 men and 1,080 women 17 to 92 years old). In addition, a 6- to 8-year longitudinal repeat was obtained on 222 men and 124 women. Significant longitudinal declines were obtained for the stimulation-seeking measures. Furthermore, women showed an increase in impersonal-mechanical curiosity and a decline in interpersonal curiosity, though the amount of change was modest. Men were unchanged on both curiosity measures. Gender differences in longitudinal changes apparently reflected effects of socialization as well as tendencies toward displaying increased androgyny with advancing age. PMID:1558700

  19. Effect and Mechanism of Ginsenoside Rg3 on Postoperative Life Span of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ping; SU Wei; MIAO Zhan-hui; NIU Hong-rui; LIU Jing; HUA Qin-liang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect and mechanism of ginsenoside Rg3 (Shenyi Capsule,参一胶囊) on the postoperative life span of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The prospective, randomized, controlled method was adopted. One hundred and thirty- three patients with NSCLC were randomly assigned to 3 groups: Shenyi Capsule group (43 cases), combined therapy group (Shenyi Capsule plus chemotherapy, 46 cases), and chemotherapy group (44 cases). The survival rates, immune function and the correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and clinical effect were analyzed in the three groups. Results: (1) The 1-year survival rate in the Shenyi group, the combined group and the chemotherapy group was 76.7% (33/43), 82.6% (38/46), and 79.5% (35/44), respectively; the 2-year survival rate was 67.4% (29/43), 71.7% (33/46), and 70.5% (31/44), respectively; and the 3-year survival rate was 46.5% (20/43), 54.3% (25/46), and 47.7% (21/44), respectively. There was no significant difference among the 3 groups (P>0.05). (2) NK cells were increased to different degrees and the ratio of CD4/CD8 was normal in the Shenyi Capsule group and the combined group, while the ratio of CD4/CD8 was disproportional in the chemotherapy group. (3) In the chemotherapy group, the 3-year survival rate was lower in patients with positive expression of VEGF than in patients with negative expression (37.0% vs 64.7%, ~ 2=17.9, P0.05; 44.4% vs 50.0%, P>0.05). Conclusion: Shenyi Capsule, especially in combination with chemotherapy, can improve the life span of patients with NSCLC after operation. The mechanism might be correlated with improving the immune function and anti-tumor angiogenesis.

  20. Statistical modeling of biomedical corpora: mining the Caenorhabditis Genetic Center Bibliography for genes related to life span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan MI

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The statistical modeling of biomedical corpora could yield integrated, coarse-to-fine views of biological phenomena that complement discoveries made from analysis of molecular sequence and profiling data. Here, the potential of such modeling is demonstrated by examining the 5,225 free-text items in the Caenorhabditis Genetic Center (CGC Bibliography using techniques from statistical information retrieval. Items in the CGC biomedical text corpus were modeled using the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA model. LDA is a hierarchical Bayesian model which represents a document as a random mixture over latent topics; each topic is characterized by a distribution over words. Results An LDA model estimated from CGC items had better predictive performance than two standard models (unigram and mixture of unigrams trained using the same data. To illustrate the practical utility of LDA models of biomedical corpora, a trained CGC LDA model was used for a retrospective study of nematode genes known to be associated with life span modification. Corpus-, document-, and word-level LDA parameters were combined with terms from the Gene Ontology to enhance the explanatory value of the CGC LDA model, and to suggest additional candidates for age-related genes. A novel, pairwise document similarity measure based on the posterior distribution on the topic simplex was formulated and used to search the CGC database for "homologs" of a "query" document discussing the life span-modifying clk-2 gene. Inspection of these document homologs enabled and facilitated the production of hypotheses about the function and role of clk-2. Conclusion Like other graphical models for genetic, genomic and other types of biological data, LDA provides a method for extracting unanticipated insights and generating predictions amenable to subsequent experimental validation.

  1. Sex differences in the effects of cocaine abuse across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow-Edwards, Diana

    2010-06-01

    Cocaine alters brain function from the early days of development throughout the entire life of an individual. Since the first preclinical research on cocaine sensitization was published, sex differences in response to the drug in adult rats have been noted. With the appearance of reports on "crack babies" during the 1980s, sex differences in response to prenatal (developmental) exposure have been identified in both clinical and preclinical reports. Cocaine administered during early development in the rat produces wide-spread alterations in function which depend on the timing of drug administration as well as the sex of the animal. In males, the response patterns following postnatal days (PND) 11-20 cocaine administration (equivalent to the late prenatal period in humans) are quite similar to those seen following prenatal exposure (equivalent to the first half of pregnancy in humans). There is a general decrease in dopaminergic (DA) markers and reactivity perhaps due to the uncoupling of the D1 receptor from its second messenger system. While similar changes in D1 uncoupling are seen in females, behavioral and metabolic responses to drug challenges generally show increases in DA responsivity (except adolescents) perhaps due to the activational effects of estrogen and/or decreases in serotonin (5-HT) mediated regulation of DA function. We have found that a significant factor in the hyper-responsivity of the female is the role of the testing environment and the responses to stress which can obscure underlying neurochemical dysregulation. Whether parallel factors are operational in adult males and females is currently under investigation. PMID:20045010

  2. Preserving technical knowledge - when technology's lifetime exceeds the human life span

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industry is being challenged by the departure of experienced managers and workers. The loss of skills and the difficulty of finding qualified replacements can negatively affect operations, environment, safety and economics. There is a need to capture, preserve and pass along both documented and undocumented knowledge before aging workers depart the workplace. How to do it? Our ancestors faced the same problem, and they often solved it in a personal way through a Master-Journeyman-Apprentice system. Our modern education system is an extension of that system, augmented by extensive use of textbooks. This system now is stretched to its limits by two factors, (a) the need to update the teacher's knowledge, and (b) the need to update high quality textbooks. Modem Masters are so busy doing their work that they have no time to pass knowledge on in an effective manner. When they retire, their knowledge often is lost. The CANTEACH project was initiated to fill this gap. The essence of this knowledge capture process is acquisition of archival documents that are relevant to current practice in the field-in our case, CANDU power plant engineering. This project is made possible by voluntary contributions from Masters in the field; it can proceed only by avoiding the pitfalls of excessive security and intellectual property rules. This paper describes the mechanisms used to make this archival knowledge openly available for operators, designers, educators, and students of this technology. (author)

  3. When meaning matters more: Media preferences across the adult life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Marie-Louise; Bartsch, Anne; Bonus, James Alex

    2016-08-01

    Two studies considered age differences in the roles of emotion and meaningfulness in adults' media preferences. Socioemotional Selectivity Theory (SST) suggests that with increasing age, positive emotions become more meaningful, and emotional meaningfulness matters more for situation selection. Other developmental descriptions suggest that negative affect may be meaningful and interesting in youth. In Study 1, United States 18-86 year olds read descriptions of TV programs that varied in levels of warmth, funniness, sadness, and fright; in Study 2, United States and German 18-82 year olds watched film trailers that varied in levels of gore and meaningfulness. Participants rated their anticipated emotions, anticipated meaningfulness of the content, and their viewing interest. Consistent with SST, in both studies, anticipated meaningfulness was a stronger predictor of viewing interest for older adults relative to younger adults, and the indirect path (Emotion → Meaning → Interest) was stronger for older relative to younger adults. In Study 1, warmth (but not funniness) was more predictive of meaningfulness for older relative to younger adults; sadness and fear were not more predictive of meaningfulness for younger adults. In Study 2, there were age differences in the effects of fright on interest, in part via effects on anticipated fun and suspense (but not arousal). Overall, the results provide limited evidence that positive or negative emotions are more meaningful or interesting at different ages. However, they support the argument that emotional meaningfulness matters more to older than to younger adults. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27213487

  4. CALHM1 Deletion in Mice Affects Glossopharyngeal Taste Responses, Food Intake, Body Weight, and Life Span

    OpenAIRE

    Hellekant, Göran; Schmolling, Jared; Marambaud, Philippe; Rose-Hellekant, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of Type II taste receptor cells (TRCs) with T1R taste receptors causes sweet or umami taste, whereas T2Rs elicit bitter taste. Type II TRCs contain the calcium channel, calcium homeostasis modulator protein 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) transmitter to taste fibers. We have previously demonstrated with chorda tympani nerve recordings and two-bottle preference (TBP) tests that mice with genetically deleted Calhm1 (knockout [KO]) have severely impaired perce...

  5. Implications of extreme life span in clonal organisms: millenary clones in meadows of the threatened seagrass Posidonia oceanica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Arnaud-Haond

    Full Text Available The maximum size and age that clonal organisms can reach remains poorly known, although we do know that the largest natural clones can extend over hundreds or thousands of metres and potentially live for centuries. We made a review of findings to date, which reveal that the maximum clone age and size estimates reported in the literature are typically limited by the scale of sampling, and may grossly underestimate the maximum age and size of clonal organisms. A case study presented here shows the occurrence of clones of slow-growing marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica at spatial scales ranging from metres to hundreds of kilometres, using microsatellites on 1544 sampling units from a total of 40 locations across the Mediterranean Sea. This analysis revealed the presence, with a prevalence of 3.5 to 8.9%, of very large clones spreading over one to several (up to 15 kilometres at the different locations. Using estimates from field studies and models of the clonal growth of P. oceanica, we estimated these large clones to be hundreds to thousands of years old, suggesting the evolution of general purpose genotypes with large phenotypic plasticity in this species. These results, obtained combining genetics, demography and model-based calculations, question present knowledge and understanding of the spreading capacity and life span of plant clones. These findings call for further research on these life history traits associated with clonality, considering their possible ecological and evolutionary implications.

  6. Germ-cell loss extends C. elegans life span through regulation of DAF-16 by kri-1 and lipophilic-hormone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jennifer R; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2006-03-10

    In C. elegans, removing the germ cells extends life span by triggering the nuclear localization and activation of the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor in the intestine. In this study, we identify and analyze genes required for germline removal to extend life span. We find that the reproductive system communicates with the intestine through lipophilic-hormone signaling and that a gene called kri-1 is likely to act in the intestine to promote DAF-16 nuclear localization in response to this signal. This lipophilic-signaling pathway and kri-1 are not required for DAF-16's nuclear localization and life-span extension in animals with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Thus, this pathway specifically enables the integration of cues from the reproductive system with central DAF-16-activation pathways to influence the aging of the animal. PMID:16530050

  7. Life span study, 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the last report, covering the experience of the 82,000 A-bomb survivors for the period 1950-72, there have been 1,704 deaths (by 30 September 1974) and total deaths now stand at 20,230 since 1 October 1950. For cancer the increase was 390 and the new total 3,957. The entire 1950-74 mortality experience, supplemented by tumor registry information for Hiroshima (1957-70) and Nagasaki (1958-70), has been re-analyzed. The leukemogenic effect that dominated any consideration of late mortality effects until recently had now been exceeded by the effect of radiation on forms of cancer other than leukemia. At the end of 1974 excess deaths numbered about 85 for leukemia and 100 for other forms of cancer among the 82,000 A-bomb survivors under study. Sites of cancer that seemed especially involved in the continued increase in absolute risk estimates for all forms of cancer except leukemia were the respiratory organs, and the digestive organs. Under the linear hypothesis, which is far from proved for any form of cancer, except perhaps leukemia in Hiroshima, the estimated absolute risk for all forms of cancer, including leukemia, would suggest that the A-bomb survivor population of 285,000 registrants at the time of the 1950 census may have experienced 400 or 500 deaths from cancer induced by radiation in addition to perhaps 69,000 naturally occurring deaths in the interval 1950-74. (author)

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation attenuates taste progenitor cell proliferation and shortens the life span of taste bud cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian taste bud, a complex collection of taste sensory cells, supporting cells, and immature basal cells, is the structural unit for detecting taste stimuli in the oral cavity. Even though the cells of the taste bud undergo constant turnover, the structural homeostasis of the bud is maintained by balancing cell proliferation and cell death. Compared with nongustatory lingual epithelial cells, taste cells express higher levels of several inflammatory receptors and signalling proteins. Whether inflammation, an underlying condition in some diseases associated with taste disorders, interferes with taste cell renewal and turnover is unknown. Here we report the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammation on taste progenitor cell proliferation and taste bud cell turnover in mouse taste tissues. Results Intraperitoneal injection of LPS rapidly induced expression of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interferon (IFN-γ, and interleukin (IL-6, in mouse circumvallate and foliate papillae. TNF-α and IFN-γ immunoreactivities were preferentially localized to subsets of cells in taste buds. LPS-induced inflammation significantly reduced the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU-labeled newborn taste bud cells 1-3 days after LPS injection, suggesting an inhibition of taste bud cell renewal. BrdU pulse-chase experiments showed that BrdU-labeled taste cells had a shorter average life span in LPS-treated mice than in controls. To investigate whether LPS inhibits taste cell renewal by suppressing taste progenitor cell proliferation, we studied the expression of Ki67, a cell proliferation marker. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that LPS markedly reduced Ki67 mRNA levels in circumvallate and foliate epithelia. Immunofluorescent staining using anti-Ki67 antibodies showed that LPS decreased the number of Ki67-positive cells in the basal regions surrounding circumvallate taste buds

  9. [The role of clinical suicidology in the system of measures directed towards lowering early mortality and increasing population life span].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, T B; Polozhiĭ, B S

    2006-01-01

    The level of early mortality has increased substantially in Russia within the last fifteen years, having exceeded the same parameter in developed countries and in the entire post-Soviet area. The second frequent reason for early mortality is a group of factors that includes accidents, suicides, murders, and other external causes. The proportion of suicides in this group is 45 to 50%. As a result, in the recent years the suicide rate in Russia has filled the second place in the world. The authors of this article analyze the suicide rate in different Russian regions, distinguishing between regions with the highest and lowest rate, and characterizing population risk factors of suicidal danger, a special place among which is filled by socioeconomic condition of the regions and the ethnic composition of their population. Increase of the effectiveness of suicide prevention depends on creation of adequate scientific basis, which clinical suicidology can become. The authors substantiate the necessity to distinguish suicidology as a separate field of clinical medicine, and formulate its definition, goals and objectives. Basing on the obtained results, the authors come to a conclusion on the medico-social importance of the development of clinical suicidology in lowering early mortality and increasing the country's population life span. PMID:17002021

  10. Inventions in nanotechnological field provide increased strength and life span of the metal, composite and polymer, metallopolymer structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLASOV Vladimir Alexeevich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The invention «The method of dispersion of nanoparticles in epoxy resin (RU 2500706» refers to nanotechnological field and it can be applied in different areas of machine industry, transport, construction, power engineering to increase strength and life span of the structures made of metal, composite and polymer, metallopolymer materials, for glue and glue and mechanical joints in different structure elements as well as for compositions which strengthen the stress concentration zones (in the form of holes, cutouts, fillet, thickness differentials in structures, to reform defects, microcracks and other damages occurring in production and performance of structures, to eliminate and encapsulate the gaps in holes and meeting-points of bolted and riveted joints. The invention «The method to produce nanosuspension for manufacturing polymer nanocomposite (RU 2500695» refers to the area of production of polymer nanocomposites based on reactiveplastic binder for space, aircraft, construction and other types of structures (glass-fiber plastic, carbon reinforced plastic, organic plastic, etc.. The method includes preparation of nanosuspension by introducing carbon nanotubes into reactiveplastic binder under ultrasonic treatment with intensity cavity zone 15–25 kW/m². The method makes it possible to optimize the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes in binder and to shorten production time of nanocomposites possessing increased strength due to even distribution of nanoparticles in nanocomposite.

  11. Spermatozoid life-span of two brown seaweeds, Saccharina japonica and Undaria pinnatifida, as measured by fertilization efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; PANG Shaojun; LIU Feng; SHAN Tifeng; GAO Suqin

    2013-01-01

    During sexual reproduction of seaweeds,spermatozoid (sperm) discharge is triggered by chemical messengers (pheromones) released by the female gametes.The chemotactic ability of the sperm ensures fertilization success.Using unialgal male and female gametophyte material under designated standard gametogenesis testing (SGT) conditions,the potential life-span of the sperm of two seaweeds,Saccharinajaponica and Undaria pinnatifida,was assessed by their ability to fertilize eggs.Results show that within 20-30 min after being discharged,sperm of both species could complete fertilization without an apparent decline in fertilization rate.Although fertilization rate 60-120 min after sperm discharge dropped significantly in both species,some sperm were viable enough to fertilize the eggs.In S.japonica,at 12℃,some sperm were able to fertilize eggs up to 12 h after discharge.In both species,egg discharge rates (EDR) in the male and female mixed positive controls were significantly higher than those of all the sperm-testing groups.Doubling the seeded male gametophytes of S.japonica in the SGT tests significantly increased the EDR,further confirming the effect of the presence of the male on the female in terms of facilitating egg discharge from oogonia.

  12. Estimation of life-span of instrumentation and control cables used in nuclear power plants using the tensile testing methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) contain myriads of electrical cables of all sizes, voltage ratings and lengths delivering electrical power to much vital, as well as non-vital equipment. These cables are insulated with some form of polymeric insulation. These insulating materials will gradually age from exposure to heat, radiation, moisture and chemicals. Hence, on-site testing of the conditions of these cables is necessary to ensure their continued reliability in service and to predict their remaining life. In addition these cables must operate reliably in the harsh steam environments produced by postulated design-basis events (e.g. LOCA). Conservatively, this event is assumed to occur at the end of the planned service life of the NPPs. Evidence must be provided prior to their installation that the affected cables can meet the specified functional requirements. Usually this evidence is provided by the results of the qualification tests, simulating operational aging, the LOCA and the post accident phase. Research efforts are continuing, through out the world, for developing effective testing methods which can assess the present condition of a cable's electrical property and can also predict the remaining life and LOCA survivability with some assurance. It has been found that the insulation resistance of cables are not much affected by ageing. Experience has shown that the failure of nuclear cables is primarily due to the hardening and embrittlement of the insulation resulting in the formation of micro cracks, a loss of dielectric strength and high leakage currents. The elongation at break measurements carried on various cables subjected to accelerated thermal ageing were used to arrive at Arrhenius parameters based on an acceptable 65% elongation at break criteria. Life estimation have been carried at operating temperatures using these parameters. (author)

  13. Materialism, affective states, and life satisfaction: case of Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovčan, Ljiljana Kaliterna; Prizmić-Larsen, Zvjezdana; Brkljačić, Tihana

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have used Material Values Scale (MVS) to assess beliefs about importance to own material things. The aims of this study were to validate the MVS scale and to explore the relationships between materialistic values and well-being of Croatian citizens. The study was carried out on a representative sample of N = 1129 Croatian citizens. We used the short 9-item version of the MVS, life satisfaction rating, ratings of two positive (Positive affect) and four negative emotions (Negative affect) over the past month, and demographic variables (age, gender, income). The original dimensionality of the MVS was not confirmed; confirmatory factor analyses yielded two instead of three factors, Happiness and Centrality/Success. When controlled for income, gender and age, the Happiness dimension predicted Life satisfaction and both Positive and Negative affect, indicating that people who believed that the material goods in ones life leads to happiness reported to have lower life satisfaction, lower level of positive affect and higher level of negative affect over the past month. The Centrality/Success dimension was positively related to Positive affect, indicating that the belief that possessions play a central role in enjoyment leads to more frequent experiences of happiness and satisfaction over the past month. PMID:26587367

  14. Physical Attractiveness and Self-Esteem in Middle Childhood: Do Recent Life-Span Developmental Texts Perpetuate or Challenge Gender Stereotypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Beth H.

    This document reports on an investigation focusing on how the content of introductory college psychology texts' content related to physical attractiveness and self-esteem. The primary objective of this study was to review how recently published life-span developmental texts present physical development in middle childhood as related to traditional…

  15. Subjective quality of life in war-affected populations

    OpenAIRE

    Matanov, A.; Giacco, D.; Bogic, M.; Ajdukovic, D.; Franciskovic, T.; Galeazzi, G.M.; Kucukalic, A.; Lecic-Tosevski, D.; Morina, N.; Popovski, J.; Schützwohl, M.; Priebe, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposure to traumatic war events may lead to a reduction in quality of life for many years. Research suggests that these impairments may be associated with posttraumatic stress symptoms; however, wars also have a profound impact on social conditions. Systematic studies utilising subjective quality of life (SQOL) measures are particularly rare and research in post-conflict settings is scarce. Whether social factors independently affect SQOL after war in addition to symptoms has not...

  16. Life span study report 11. part 3. noncancer mortality, 1950-85, based on the revised doses (DS86)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaths in the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) sample have been determined for the years 1950-85 and previous reports have described analyses of cancer mortality using the revised Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) doses (LSS Report 11, Parts 1 and 2). In this report, we examine the relationship to dose of deaths from all diseases other than cancer. Although the evidence is still limited, there seems to be an excess risk for noncancer death at high doses (2 or 3 Gy and over). Statistically, a pure quadratic or a linear-threshold model (the estimated threshold dose is 1.4 Gy [0.6-2.8 Gy] is found to fit better than a simple linear or linear-quadratic model. This increase in noncancer mortality is statistically demonstrable, generally, after 1965 and among the younger survivors (< 40) at the time of the bombings, suggesting a sensitivity in this age group. For specific causes of death, an excess relative risk at the high dose level, that is, ≥ 2 Gy, is seen in circulatory and digestive diseases. The relative risk is, however, much smaller than that for cancer. These findings, based as they are on death certificates, have their limitations. Most significant, perhaps, is the possible erroneous attribution of radiation-related cancer deaths to other causes. At present, the contribution such errors may make to the apparent increase in noncancer deaths at the high doses cannot be estimated as rigorously as is obviously desirable. However, even now, this increase does not appear to be fully explicable in terms of classificatory errors. (J.P.N.)

  17. Low Six4 and Six5 gene dosage improves dystrophic phenotype and prolongs life span of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Muscle regeneration is an important process for skeletal muscle growth and recovery. Repair of muscle damage is exquisitely programmed by cellular mechanisms inherent in myogenic stem cells, also known as muscle satellite cells. We demonstrated previously the involvement of homeobox transcription factors, SIX1, SIX4 and SIX5, in the coordinated proliferation and differentiation of isolated satellite cells in vitro. However, their roles in adult muscle regeneration in vivo remain elusive. To investigate SIX4 and SIX5 functions during muscle regeneration, we introduced knockout alleles of Six4 and Six5 into an animal model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), mdx (Dmd(mdx) /Y) mice, characterized by frequent degeneration-regeneration cycles in muscles. A lower number of small myofibers, higher number of thick ones and lower serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were noted in 50-week-old Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y mice than Dmd(mdx) /Y mice, indicating improvement of dystrophic phenotypes of Dmd(mdx) /Y mice. Higher proportions of cells positive for MYOD1 and MYOG (markers of regenerating myonuclei) and SIX1 (a marker of regenerating myoblasts and newly regenerated myofibers) in 12-week-old Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y mice suggested enhanced regeneration, compared with Dmd(mdx) /Y mice. Although grip strength was comparable in Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y and Dmd(mdx) /Y mice, treadmill exercise did not induce muscle weakness in Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y mice, suggesting higher regeneration capacity. In addition, Six4(+/-) 5(+/-) Dmd(mdx) /Y mice showed 33.8% extension of life span. The results indicated that low Six4 and Six5 gene dosage improved dystrophic phenotypes of Dmd(mdx) /Y mice by enhancing muscle regeneration, and suggested that SIX4 and SIX5 are potentially useful de novo targets in therapeutic applications against muscle disorders, including DMD. PMID:27224259

  18. Radiation exposure and the risk of mortality from noncancer respiratory diseases in the life span study, 1950-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Truong-Minh; Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Shimizu, Yukiko; Furukawa, Kyoji; Takahashi, Ikuno; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Soda, Midori; Suyama, Akihiko; Shore, Roy E; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2013-11-01

    An apparent association between radiation exposure and noncancer respiratory diseases (NCRD) in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors has been reported, but the biological validity of that observation is uncertain. This study investigated the possibility of radiation causation of noncancer respiratory diseases in detail by examining subtypes of noncancer respiratory diseases, temporal associations, and the potential for misdiagnosis and other confounding factors. A total of 5,515 NCRD diagnoses listed as the underlying cause of death on the death certificate were observed among the 86,611 LSS subjects with estimated weighted absorbed lung doses. Radiation dose-response analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazard regression for pneumonia/influenza, other acute respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. The linear excess relative risks (ERR) per gray (Gy) were 0.17 (95% CI 0.08, 0.27) for all NCRD and 0.20 (CI 0.09, 0.34) for pneumonia/influenza, which accounted for 63% of noncancer respiratory disease deaths. Adjustments for lifestyle and sociodemographic variations had almost no impact on the risk estimates. However, adjustments for indications of cancer and/or cardiovascular disease decreased the risk estimates, with ERR for total noncancer respiratory diseases declined by 35% from 0.17 to 0.11. Although it was impossible to fully adjust for the misdiagnosis of other diseases as noncancer respiratory diseases deaths in this study because of limitations of available data, nevertheless, the associations were reduced or eliminated by the adjustment that could be made. This helps demonstrates that the association between noncancer respiratory diseases and radiation exposure in previous reports could be in part be attributed to coincident cancer and/or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24148011

  19. Effect of repetitive acute cold exposures during the last phase of broiler embryogenesis on cold resistance through the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinder, D; Rusal, M; Giloh, M; Yahav, S

    2009-03-01

    The time just before hatch is critical, because the embryo shifts toward internal and external pipping. This study aimed to determine the beneficial effect of repeated acute reductions of the incubation temperature during the last phase of broiler embryogenesis on posthatch cold tolerance and on the development of ascites syndrome. Fertile eggs were incubated at 37.8 degrees C and 56% RH. At 18 and 19 d of incubation, 3 treatments were conducted, comprising 2 or 3 exposures to 15 degrees C for 30 or 60 min each. During these cold exposures, egg temperature was measured by infrared thermography to determine sensible heat loss from the eggs. At hatch, BW and body temperature were measured. At 3 and 14 d of age, chicks were challenged by cold exposure to 10 degrees C for 3 h. From 14 d of age onward, three-quarters of the chicks were raised under ascites-inducing conditions (AIC) and the others were raised under regular conditions. The sensible heat loss from the eggs was 512 +/- 66 cal and 718 +/- 126 cal for 30 and 60 min of cold exposure, respectively. No effect of treatment on hatchability was observed, but body temperature and BW were greater to significantly greater in the treated chicks. Cold challenges at 3 and 14 d of age revealed a relative thermoregulatory advantage of embryos exposed to cold for 60 min. Under AIC, fewer treated chickens than controls developed ascites. At 38 d of age, BW and relative breast muscle weight were numerically to significantly greater in the treated chicks than in the control chicks when both were raised under regular conditions, whereas no differences were observed among the chicks raised under AIC. Repeated brief acute cold exposures during the last phase of embryogenesis appeared to improve the ability of growing broilers to withstand low ambient temperatures during their life span. Moreover, chickens treated during embryogenesis improved their performance under regular growth conditions. PMID:19211536

  20. Insights into radionuclide-induced lung cancer in people from life-span studies in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In life-span studies, beagle dogs were exposed one time by inhalation to an aerosol containing a beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclide in a relatively soluble or insoluble chemical form. After exposure dogs were observed for late-occurring biological effects. Lung cancer has been a predominant observation for radionuclides inhaled in a relatively insoluble form because most of the absorbed dose was delivered to the lung and contiguous tissues. Approximately 130 lung cancers were observed in dogs exposed to inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides; tumors occurred with absorbed doses to lung ranging from 1100 to 68,000 rads. With inhaled alpha emitters lung tumors occurred at doses between 530 and 8400 rads. Dose rate pattern was shown to be an important factor in the induction of lung cancer by inhaled beta emitters. Doses of low-LET irradiation delivered in a matter of days can be as much as 8 times more effective per unit of dose than radiation doses delivered over a more protracted period of time. Tumors also have occurred in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of dogs that inhaled relatively insoluble forms of beta emitters. From these studies, the risk of lung cancer from inhaled beta- or alpha-emitting radionuclides was compared to determine the importance of LET and other dose-effect modifying factors on resulting risks and on extrapolation to human inhalation exposure. Attention also was given to the risk of cancer in tracheobronchial lymph nodes, on the basis of the results of these studies and the current ICRP computational method in which lymph nodes are included with lung for purposes of dose and risk calculation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Quality of life in unaffected twins discordant for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Bech, Per; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm;

    2006-01-01

    -Risk twins) and without (the control group/Low-Risk twins) a co-twin history of affective disorder were identified through nationwide registers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that a genetic liability to affective disorder is associated with a lower perception of quality...... might be due to the genetic liability to affective disorder. These findings need to be replicated in future family studies.......BACKGROUND: The disability and hardship associated with affective disorder is shared by the family members of affective patients and might affect the family member's quality of life. METHOD: In a cross-sectional, high-risk, case-control study, monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins with (High...

  2. A study on the energy civilization in the 21st century and the analysis of the span of life or the energy recourses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study should have been mainly composed of the pre-estimate of the future views on the balancing of energy demand and supply in the 21st century related to global environmental matters and the analysis of the span of life of the usable energy resources in the 21st century. Due to the project interruption by the PBS input, this study carried out partly the investigation and the analysis of energy demand supply, which regarded to economic circumstances and environmental control regulations. Therefore, this intermediate report shall be an important reference to analyze the span of practical life of the usable energy resources in order to improve the usable capability of energy utilization for the future. 14 refs. (Author)

  3. Early Life Triclocarban Exposure During Lactation Affects Neonate Rat Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Rebekah C. M. Kennedy; Menn, Fu-Min; Healy, Laura; Kellie A. Fecteau; Hu, Pan; Bae, Jiyoung; Gee, Nancy A.; Lasley, Bill L; Zhao, Ling; Chen, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC), an antimicrobial used in bar soaps, affects endocrine function in vitro and in vivo. This study investigates whether TCC exposure during early life affects the trajectory of fetal and/or neonatal development. Sprague Dawley rats were provided control, 0.2% weight/weight (w/w), or 0.5% w/w TCC-supplemented chow through a series of 3 experiments that limited exposure to critical growth periods: gestation, gestation and lactation, or lactation onl...

  4. Parthenogenetic reproduction of Diaphanosoma celebensis (Crustacea: Cladocera). Effect of algae and algal density on survival, growth, life span and neonate production

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shrivastava, Y.; Mahambre, G.G.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Fernandes, Brenda; Goswami, S.C.; Madhupratap, M.

    been reported to occur suddenly after a series of parthenogenetic gener- ations (Zhong et al. 1989). In the present study also, three sexual males were encountered during the later part of the study while being mass reared. Studies have been initiated... the life span of females. However, long-term feeding experiments revealed that the percentage survival was high with I. galbana and low with C. cal- citrans. Introduction Diaphanosoma celebensis (Crustacea:Cladocera:Sididae) is a low to medium saline...

  5. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors in...... approach with pattern matching is a way to shed light on the tacit local knowledge that organizational actors cannot articulate and that an exclusively inductive research is not likely to unveil....

  6. Effects of radiation and lifestyle factors on risks of urothelial carcinoma in the Life Span Study of atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E J; Ozasa, K; Preston, D L; Suyama, A; Shimizu, Y; Sakata, R; Sugiyama, H; Pham, T-M; Cologne, J; Yamada, M; De Roos, A J; Kopecky, K J; Porter, M P; Seixas, N; Davis, S

    2012-07-01

    Among the Life Span Study (LSS) of Atomic-bomb survivors, recent estimates showed that unspecified bladder cancer had high radiation sensitivity with a notably high female-to-male excess relative risk (ERR) per radiation dose ratio and were the only sites for which the ERR did not decrease with attained age. These findings, however, did not consider lifestyle factors, which could potentially confound or modify the risk estimates. This study estimated the radiation risks of the most prevalent subtype of urinary tract cancer, urothelial carcinoma, while accounting for smoking, consumption of fruit, vegetables, alcohol and level of education (a surrogate for socioeconomic status). Eligible study subjects included 105,402 (males = 42,890) LSS members who were cancer-free in 1958 and had estimated radiation doses. Members were censored due to loss of follow-up, incident cancer of another type, death, or the end of calendar year 2001. Surveys (by mail or clinical interview) gathered lifestyle data periodically for 1963-1991. There were 63,827 participants in one or more survey. Five hundred seventy-three incident urothelial carcinoma cases occurred, of which 364 occurred after lifestyle information was available. Analyses were performed using Poisson regression methods. The excess relative risk per weighted gray unit (the gamma component plus 10 times the neutron component, Gy(w)) was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.43-1.78) but the risks were not dependent upon age at exposure or attained age. Lifestyle factors other than smoking were not associated with urothelial carcinoma risk. Neither the magnitude of the radiation ERR estimate (1.00 compared to 0.96), nor the female-to-male (F:M) ERR/Gy(w) ratio (3.2 compared to 3.4) were greatly changed after accounting for all lifestyle factors. A multiplicative model of gender-specific radiation and smoking effects was the most revealing though there was no evidence of significant departures from either the additive or multiplicative joint

  7. Life-Cycle Monitoring of Long-Span PSC Box Girder Bridges through Distributed Sensor Network: Strategies, Methods, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zheheng Chen; Tong Guo; Shengyou Yan

    2015-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has attracted much attention in recent years, which enables early warnings of structural failure, condition assessments, and rational maintenance/repair strategies. In the context of bridges, many long-span steel bridges in China have been installed with the SHM systems; however, the applications of the SHM in prestressed concrete (PSC) bridges are still rather limited. On the other hand, the PSC box girder bridges are extensively used in highway and railway...

  8. Materialism, affective states, and life satisfaction: case of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Lipovčan, Ljiljana Kaliterna; Prizmić-Larsen, Zvjezdana; Brkljačić, Tihana

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have used Material Values Scale (MVS) to assess beliefs about importance to own material things. The aims of this study were to validate the MVS scale and to explore the relationships between materialistic values and well-being of Croatian citizens. The study was carried out on a representative sample of N = 1129 Croatian citizens. We used the short 9-item version of the MVS, life satisfaction rating, ratings of two positive (Positive affect) and four nega...

  9. How life affects the geochemical cycle of carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Developing a quantitative understanding of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon as they have worked throughout Earth history on various time scales, how they have been affected by biological evolution, and how changes in the carbon content of ocean and atmosphere may have affected climate and the evolution of life are the goals of the research. Theoretical simulations were developed that can be tuned to reproduce such data as exist and, once tuned, can be used to predict properties that have not yet been observed. This is an ongoing process, in which models and results are refined as new data and interpretations become available and as understanding of the global system improves. Results of the research are described in several papers which were published or submitted for publication. These papers are summarized. Future research plans are presented.

  10. Antioxidant Capacity of “Mexican Arnica” Heterotheca inuloides Cass Natural Products and Some Derivatives: Their Anti-Inflammatory Evaluation and Effect on C. elegans Life Span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Rodríguez-Chávez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the accumulation of biomolecular damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS contributes to aging. The antioxidant activity is related to the ability of certain compounds to protect against the potentially harmful effect of processes or reactions involving ROS. This ability is associated with the termination of free radical propagation in biological systems. From Heterotheca inuloides various compounds which have shown to possess antioxidant capacity and scavenging ROS. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant capacity of additional natural components isolated from H. inuloides and some semisynthetic derivatives, their anti-inflammatory activity and the effect on Caenorhabditis elegans nematode life span. Compounds showed ability to inhibit various biological processes such as lipid peroxidation, scavenge nonbiological important oxidants such as 1O2, OH∙, H2O2, and HOCl and scavenge non biological stable free radicals (DPPH. Some cadinane type compounds showed possess antioxidant, ROS scavenging capacity, anti-inflammatory activity, and effect on the C. elegans life span. Flavonoid type compounds increased the life of the nematode and quercetin was identified as the compound with the greatest activity. The modification of chemical structure led to a change in the antioxidant capacity, the anti-inflammatory activity, and the survival of the worm.

  11. Early life triclocarban exposure during lactation affects neonate rat survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rebekah C M; Menn, Fu-Min; Healy, Laura; Fecteau, Kellie A; Hu, Pan; Bae, Jiyoung; Gee, Nancy A; Lasley, Bill L; Zhao, Ling; Chen, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC), an antimicrobial used in bar soaps, affects endocrine function in vitro and in vivo. This study investigates whether TCC exposure during early life affects the trajectory of fetal and/or neonatal development. Sprague Dawley rats were provided control, 0.2% weight/weight (w/w), or 0.5% w/w TCC-supplemented chow through a series of 3 experiments that limited exposure to critical growth periods: gestation, gestation and lactation, or lactation only (cross-fostering) to determine the susceptible windows of exposure for developmental consequences. Reduced offspring survival occurred when offspring were exposed to TCC at concentrations of 0.2% w/w and 0.5% w/w during lactation, in which only 13% of offspring raised by 0.2% w/w TCC dams survived beyond weaning and no offspring raised by 0.5% w/w TCC dams survived to this period. In utero exposure status had no effect on survival, as all pups nursed by control dams survived regardless of their in utero exposure status. Microscopic evaluation of dam mammary tissue revealed involution to be a secondary outcome of TCC exposure rather than a primary effect of compound administration. The average concentration of TCC in the milk was almost 4 times that of the corresponding maternal serum levels. The results demonstrate that gestational TCC exposure does not affect the ability of dams to carry offspring to term but TCC exposure during lactation has adverse consequences on the survival of offspring although the mechanism of reduced survival is currently unknown. This information highlights the importance of evaluating the safety of TCC application in personal care products and the impacts during early life exposure. PMID:24803507

  12. Application of a systematized nomenclature of veterinary medicine (SNOVET) to diagnostic coding and retrieval of clinical life-span data in beagle dogs exposed to plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A data-management system, utilizing the Systematized Nomenclature of Veterinary Medicine (SNOVET), was implemented to collect data generated by our life-span canine studies. Information is encoded and retrieved by specific categories. These data are analyzed statistically to look for significant effects related to exposure to radionuclides. Preliminary use for evaluation of the SNOVET system revealed statistically significant differences in survival between control and exposed animals. Also, there appears to be an increased risk of testicular and reproductive tract disorders with increasing dose. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. The Eyring-Stover theory of survival applied to life-span radiation effects studies in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Eyring-Stover theory of survival describes the observed biological phenomena of damage and repair as steady-state processes that can be expressed in the formalism of absolute reaction rate theory. The steady-state formulation, rather than that of dynamic equilibrium, is invoked since biological phenomena, in contrast with most chemical and physical phenemena, are time irreversible. The theory is appropriate for calculating life shortening that results from environmental factors such as irradiation since it does not require universality and intrinsicality as to some theories of aging. The theory gives not only midrange mortality rate values but also end-range values, which are difficult to predict empirically. The previously calculated life shortening of mice after external x-irradiation and of beagles after internal irradiation from 239Pu or 226Ra is reviewed; life shortening at low dose levels of 226Ra is presented. 21 refs., 1 tab

  14. Dead or alive: Deformed Wing Virus and Varroa destructor reduce the life span of winter honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated winter losses of managed honey bee colonies are a major concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. Among suspects are the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae and associated viruses. Here, we hypothesize that pathogens reduce the life expecta...

  15. Extracts of Cistanche deserticola Can Antagonize Immunosenescence and Extend Life Span in Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Prone 8 (SAM-P8 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 substrain (SAM-P8, widely accepted as an animal model for studying aging and antiaging drugs, was used to examine the effects of dietary supplementation with extracts of Cistanche deserticola (ECD which has been used extensively in traditional Chinese medicine because of its perceived ability to promote immune function in the elderly. Eight-month-old male SAM-P8 mice were treated with ECD by daily oral administrations for 4 weeks. The results showed that dietary supplementation of 150 mg/kg and 450 mg/kg of ECD could extend the life span measured by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in dose-dependent manner. Dietary supplementation of SAM-P8 mice for 4 weeks with 100, 500, and 2500 mg/kg of ECD was shown to result in significant increases in both naive T and natural killer cells in blood and spleen cell populations. In contrast, peripheral memory T cells and proinflammatory cytokine, IL-6 in serum, were substantially decreased in the mice that ingested 100 and 500 mg/kg of ECD daily. Additionally, Sca-1 positive cells, the recognized progenitors of peripheral naive T cells, were restored in parallel. Our results provide clear experimental support for long standing clinical observational studies showing that Cistanche deserticola possesses significant effects in extending life span and suggest this is achieved by antagonizing immunosenescence.

  16. The influence of superoxide dimutase and some other radical scavengers on X-ray resistance, life span and membrane integrity of Sacharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluations of various strains of yeast showed these to differ widely in the activities of superoxide dimutase and catalase, X-ray sensitivity, reproductive capacity and malondialdehyde concentration. Higher SOD activities in reponse to increases in oxygen production under extreme physiological conditions were observed for the cells of a haploid strain and just as well seen in those of a diploid strain. There were findings pointing to mutually 'compensatory' effects in respect of the contents of CAT and thiol. When intracellular radical scavengers were 'overstrained' by exposure to high X-ray doses, untoward effects on membrane integrity could be detected after irradiation. The use of the SOD-specific inhibitor DDC led to a reduction of both X-ray resistance and life span as a result of SOD-inhibition. Exogenous SOD was seen to reduce the mean life span. Cu2+ and Mn2+ were found to have a dual action in that they not only increased the resistance to X-rays through an augmentation of SOD activity but also had an immediate beneficial effect on radioresistance. Exogenous H202 led to an increase in the cellular CAT contents and an enhancement of X-ray resistance. (orig./MG)

  17. Phototoxic effect of UVR on wild type, ebony and yellow mutants of Drosophila melanogaster: Life Span, fertility, courtship and biochemical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhePeng; LIU RuiFang; WANG AnRu; DU LiLi; DENG XueMei

    2008-01-01

    Melanin plays an important role in protecting organisms from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Therefore, it is possible that differently colored strains can show different sensitivities to UVR. In the present work, life span, fertility and courtship behavior of wild type (w), ebony (e) and yellow (y) strains of Drosophila melanogaster were studied to evaluate their sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV). Because a range of photo-toxic effects of UVR are mediated through generation of free radicals, levels of free radicals, lipid per-oxide (malondialdehyde, MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of three strains were examined to indicate their antioxidant defending ability and oxidative status. It was shown that w always had the highest lifespan and fertility not only in the control but also in UV-exposed groups. Moreover, lifespan and fertility of e were significantly higher (P0.05). MDA levels were increased in the UV dose-dependent manner (P=0.0495). In con-clusion, our results suggested that UVB can decrease life span and fertility of flies and do harm to courtship, which may be due to oxidative damage to flies tissues (e.g. central nervous system) induced by free radicals, w had the highest tolerance to UVR, which may be ascribed to its advantage of survival under the natural condition and at high level of SOD activity. Then differences of pigment between e and y in absorbing UV, shielding against UV and scavenging free radicals produced by UVR should be responsible for their different sensitivity to UVR.

  18. Circuit life span in critically ill children on continuous renal replacement treatment: a prospective observational evaluation study

    OpenAIRE

    del Castillo, Jimena; López-Herce, Jesús; Cidoncha, Elena; Urbano, Javier; Mencía, Santiago; Santiago, Maria J; Bellón, Jose M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction One of the greatest problems with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is early coagulation of the filters. Few studies have monitored circuit function prospectively. The purpose of this study was to determine the variables associated with circuit life in critically ill children with CRRT. Methods A prospective observational study was performed in 122 children treated with CRRT in a pediatric intensive care unit from 1996 to 2006. Patient and filter characteristics were an...

  19. Circadian rhythms of body temperature and locomotor activity in aging BALB/c mice: early and late life span predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Andrea; Del Bello, Giovanna; Piacenza, Francesco; Giacconi, Robertina; Costarelli, Laura; Malavolta, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Impairment of one or more parameters of circadian rhythms (CR) of body temperature (BT) and locomotor activity (LMA) are considered among the hallmarks of mammalian aging. These alterations are frequently used as markers for imminent death in laboratory mice. However, there are still contradictory data for particular strains and it is also uncertain which changes might predict senescence changes later in life, including the force of mortality. In the present paper we use telemetry to study LMA and CR of BT during aging of BALB/c mice. At our knowledge this is the first time that CR of BT and LMA are investigated in this strain in a range of age covering the whole lifespan, from young adult up to very old age. CR of BT was analyzed with a cosine model using a cross sectional approach and follow-up measurements. The results show that BT, LMA, amplitude, goodness-of-fit (GoF) to circadian cycle of temperature decrease with different shapes during chronological age. Moreover, we found that the % change of amplitude and BT in early life (5-19 months) can predict the remaining lifespan of the mice. Later in life (22-32 months), best predictors are single measurements of LMA and GoF. The results of this study also offer potential measures to rapidly identifying freely unrestrained mice with the worst longitudinal outcome and against which existing or novel biomarkers and treatments may be assessed. PMID:26820297

  20. Effects of zinc on the life span and reproductive capacity and the hereditability influence of D.melanogaster%锌对果蝇寿命及生殖力的影响及其可遗传性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛雪; 郭欣欣; 张敏

    2012-01-01

    This paper is engaged in the study of zinc effects on the life span and reproduction capability and the hereditability influence of D. melanogaster. As is known, as a trace element, zinc has something to do with the enzyme structure and may act as an enzyme activator or regulator of the endocrine hormone participating in organism metabolism, such as that of protein, amino acid, nucleic acid, fat, carbohydrate, vitamin and other nutritious elements. Laboratory analysis shows that zinc can play an important role in skeletal development, reproduction, immune, biological membrane stability, and functions as a gene denominator, cell proliferator and differentiator. Therefore, zinc deficiency or excess in animal or human bodies may affect their growth, developmenl and reproduction. However, it is not clear how different concentration of zinc would affect the somatic longevity and reproduction capability under the experimental conditions, letting alone make sure if the effect can be hereditary. Therefore, we suggest using the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) to sludy the life span and it? reproduction capability after zinc being treated by survival tests and statistical methods. In doing so, we have added zinc to the culture medium of parental Drosophila at a concentration of 0.026 g/L, 0.052 g/L, 0.104 g/L and 0.260 g/L. Then, the life span and reproduction capability of parental Drosophila after being treated with the first filial Drosophila untreated analyzed separately. The results show that zinc treatment at low concentrations (added to the culture medium at a concentration of 0.026 g/L, 0.052 g/L, 0.104 g/L) tends to extend the average life-span, middle life-span, maximum life-span and 90% lethal time in parental and the first filial Drosophila, with treatment of 0.052 g/L zinc showing the best significant effects. On the contrary, high dosage zinc treatment (0.260 g/L) tends to shorten the life-span of Drosophila significantly, and suppress their reproduction

  1. Life-span shortening and disease incidence in male BALB/c and C57BL mice after single, fractionated d(50)-Be neutron or gamma exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life-span shortening and causes of death, ascertained by autopsy and histological examination at the time of spontaneous death, after single or fractionated x-ray, gamma, or d(50)-Be neutron irradiation, are being studied for two mouse strains (BALB/c and C57BL) with different disease characteristics. Fractionation schedules that have been implemented are x rays, four weekly exposures (C57BL); gamma rays, 10 daily exposures (BALB/c; and neutrons, eight exposures at 3-h intervals (C57BL). The data are incomplete but suggest that the dependency of life shortening on dose is related to the types of effects induced by radiation and results in different functions, linear or sigmoid, for the two mouse strains. Fractionated gamma irradiation causes more tumors than single exposure, but, generally, this is a result of multiple tumors occurring in animals. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for life shortening for d(50)-Be neutrons as compared to gamma rays is on the order of 1 to 2 and is slightly greater for the C57BL than for the BALB/c strain. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Differential effects of IGF-1 deficiency during the life span on structural and biomechanical properties in the tibia of aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpole, Nicole M; Herron, Jacquelyn C; Estep, Patrick N; Logan, Sreemathi; Hodges, Erik L; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Sonntag, William E

    2016-04-01

    Advanced aging is associated with the loss of structural and biomechanical properties in bones, which increases the risk for bone fracture. Aging is also associated with reductions in circulating levels of the anabolic signaling hormone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1. While the role of IGF-1 in bone development has been well characterized, the impact of the age-related loss of IGF-1 on bone aging remains controversial. Here, we describe the effects of reducing IGF-1 at multiple time points in the mouse life span--early in postnatal development, early adulthood, or late adulthood on tibia bone aging in both male and female igf (f/f) mice. Bone structure was analyzed at 27 months of age using microCT. We find that age-related reductions in cortical bone fraction, cortical thickness, and tissue mineral density were more pronounced when IGF-1 was reduced early in life and not in late adulthood. Three-point bone bending assays revealed that IGF-1 deficiency early in life resulted in reduced maximum force, maximum bending moment, and bone stiffness in aged males and females. The effects of IGF-1 on bone aging are microenvironment specific, as early-life loss of IGF-1 resulted in decreased cortical bone structure and strength along the diaphysis while significantly increasing trabecular bone fraction and trabecular number at the proximal metaphysis. The increases in trabecular bone were limited to males, as early-life loss of IGF-1 did not alter bone fraction or number in females. Together, our data suggest that the age-related loss of IGF-1 influences tibia bone aging in a sex-specific, microenvironment-specific, and time-dependent manner. PMID:26968399

  3. DNA methylation in the human cerebral cortex is dynamically regulated throughout the life span and involves differentiated neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D Siegmund

    Full Text Available The role of DNA cytosine methylation, an epigenetic regulator of chromatin structure and function, during normal and pathological brain development and aging remains unclear. Here, we examined by MethyLight PCR the DNA methylation status at 50 loci, encompassing primarily 5' CpG islands of genes related to CNS growth and development, in temporal neocortex of 125 subjects ranging in age from 17 weeks of gestation to 104 years old. Two psychiatric disease cohorts--defined by chronic neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's or lack thereof (schizophrenia--were included. A robust and progressive rise in DNA methylation levels across the lifespan was observed for 8/50 loci (GABRA2, GAD1, HOXA1, NEUROD1, NEUROD2, PGR, STK11, SYK typically in conjunction with declining levels of the corresponding mRNAs. Another 16 loci were defined by a sharp rise in DNA methylation levels within the first few months or years after birth. Disease-associated changes were limited to 2/50 loci in the Alzheimer's cohort, which appeared to reflect an acceleration of the age-related change in normal brain. Additionally, methylation studies on sorted nuclei provided evidence for bidirectional methylation events in cortical neurons during the transition from childhood to advanced age, as reflected by significant increases at 3, and a decrease at 1 of 10 loci. Furthermore, the DNMT3a de novo DNA methyl-transferase was expressed across all ages, including a subset of neurons residing in layers III and V of the mature cortex. Therefore, DNA methylation is dynamically regulated in the human cerebral cortex throughout the lifespan, involves differentiated neurons, and affects a substantial portion of genes predominantly by an age-related increase.

  4. Factors affecting quality of life in postmenopausal women, Isfahan, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Norozi, Ensiyeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Hasanzadeh, Akbar; Moodi, Mitra; Sharifirad, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    Context: Various studies have shown that quality of life in women after menopause undergoes radical changes. Several factors such as psycho-social factors are associated with the quality of life during menopausal period. Aims: The present study surveyed the factors associated with quality of life of postmenopausal women in Isfahan, based on Behavioral Analysis Phase of PRECEDE model. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was conducted through stratified random sampling among 200 hea...

  5. Late effects of selected immunosuppressants on immunocompetence, disease incidence, and mean life-span. II. Cell-mediated immune activity. [Mice, X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, W.J.; Perkins, E.H.; Goodman, S.A.; Hori, Y.; Halsall, M.K.; Makinodan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The late effects of various immunosuppressive insults on cell-mediated immunity in mice were studied in an attempt to assess the role of immune surveillance in the aging process. Results were obtained using susceptibility to allogeneic tumor cell challenge, graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR), blastogenic response to PHA, a thymus derived T cell-specific plant mitogen, and cytolytic activity against allogeneic tumor cells as measures of immunologic activity. In vivo studies late in life show that resistance to allogeneic tumor cells is significantly decreased in thymectomized mice, whereas those treated with cortisone, cyclophosphamide and sublethal x-ray remain unchanged. Spleen cells from only the thymectomized and the sublethally irradiated mice show reduced activity in the GVHR. No difference is seen in the activity of bone marrow cells. Results consistent with these findings were obtained in in vitro studies. Thus spleen cells from thymectomized or sublethally irradiated mice show decreased activity in response to PHA, whereas no change is seen in spleen cells from other treated groups. Hence, surgical and physical insults are more likely to induce long-lasting immunosuppression in those immunocompetent tissues whose activity normally diminishes with advancing age. Furthermore, the degree of immunosuppression seen in this study is not of the order of magnitude that one could reasonably predict a significant decrease in mean life-span.

  6. Deletion of the cardiolipin-specific phospholipase Cld1 rescues growth and life span defects in the tafazzin mutant: implications for Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cunqi; Lou, Wenjia; Li, Yiran; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A; Hüttemann, Maik; Lee, Icksoo; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Vaz, Frédéric M; Chen, Shuliang; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2014-02-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) that is synthesized de novo is deacylated to monolysocardiolipin (MLCL), which is reacylated by tafazzin. Remodeled CL contains mostly unsaturated fatty acids. In eukaryotes, loss of tafazzin leads to growth and respiration defects, and in humans, this results in the life-threatening disorder Barth syndrome. Tafazzin deficiency causes a decrease in the CL/MLCL ratio and decreased unsaturated CL species. Which of these biochemical outcomes contributes to the physiological defects is not known. Yeast cells have a single CL-specific phospholipase, Cld1, that can be exploited to distinguish between these outcomes. The cld1Δ mutant has decreased unsaturated CL, but the CL/MLCL ratio is similar to that of wild type cells. We show that cld1Δ rescues growth, life span, and respiratory defects of the taz1Δ mutant. This suggests that defective growth and respiration in tafazzin-deficient cells are caused by the decreased CL/MLCL ratio and not by a deficiency in unsaturated CL. CLD1 expression is increased during respiratory growth and regulated by the heme activator protein transcriptional activation complex. Overexpression of CLD1 leads to decreased mitochondrial respiration and growth and instability of mitochondrial DNA. However, ATP concentrations are maintained by increasing glycolysis. We conclude that transcriptional regulation of Cld1-mediated deacylation of CL influences energy metabolism by modulating the relative contribution of glycolysis and respiration. PMID:24318983

  7. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic reso...

  8. Malnutrition affects quality of life in gastroenterology patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristina Norman; Henriette Kirchner; Herbert Lochs; Matthias Pirlich

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between malnutrition and quality of life in patients with benign gastrointestinal disease.METHODS: Two hundred patients (104 wellnourished and 96 malnourished) were assessed according to the Subjective Global Assessment, anthropometric measurements and bioelectrical impedance analysis. Quality of life was determined with the validated Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form General Health Survey (SF 36). Muscle function was assessed by hand grip strength and peak flow.RESULTS: Body mass index, body cell mass, arm muscle area and hand grip strength were significantly lower in the malnourished patients. Quality of life was generally lower when compared to norm values. Seven out of eight quality of life scales (excluding bodily pain) were significantly reduced in the malnourished patients. Comparing patients with liver cirrhosis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), patients with IBD experienced significantly lower values in the perception of bodily pain, social functioning and mental health. Malnourished liver cirrhotics suffered reductions in more scales (six out of eight) than malnourished IBD patients did (four out of eight).CONCLUSION: Quality of life is generally low in benign gastrointestinal disease and is further reduced in patients who are classified as malnourished. It appears that liver cirrhosis patients experience a higher quality of life than IBD patients do, but the impact of malnutrition seems to be greater in liver cirrhosis than in IBD.

  9. Cardiovascular determinants of life span

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Y; Camici, G G; Lüscher, T. F.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases rises with aging and is one of the main causes of mortality in western countries. In view of the progressively aging population, there is an urge for a better understanding of age-associated cardiovascular diseases and its underlying molecular mechanisms. The risk factors for cardiovascular diseases include unhealthy diet, diabetes, obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and aging. Increased production of oxygen-derived free radic...

  10. Intelligence across the life span

    OpenAIRE

    Whitaker, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this paper is to present a theoretical explanation as to why young people score higher on IQ tests than their parents would have done at the same age. Background It is now well established that IQ tests score higher as they get older by about .3 of an IQ point per year for each year since they were standardized. So if the average 20 year old in 1972 was given an IQ test standardized in 2015 they would get a measured IQ of about 87, whereas the average 20 year o...

  11. Life span in online communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, A.; Kosiński, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Recently online communities have attracted great interest and have become an important medium of information exchange between users. The aim of this work is to introduce a simple model of the evolution of online communities. This model describes (a) the time evolution of users’ activity in a web service, e.g., the time evolution of the number of online friends or written posts, (b) the time evolution of the degree distribution of a social network, and (c) the time evolution of the number of active users of a web service. In the second part of the paper we investigate the influence of the users’ lifespan (i.e., the total time in which they are active in an online community) on the process of rumor propagation in evolving social networks. Viral marketing is an important application of such method of information propagation.

  12. Phototoxic effect of UVR on wild type, ebony and yellow mutants of Drosophila melanogaster: Life Span, fertility, courtship and biochemical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Melanin plays an important role in protecting organisms from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Therefore, it is possible that differently colored strains can show different sensitivities to UVR. In the present work, life span, fertility and courtship behavior of wild type (w), ebony (e) and yellow (y) strains of Drosophila melanogaster were studied to evaluate their sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV). Because a range of photo- toxic effects of UVR are mediated through generation of free radicals, levels of free radicals, lipid per- oxide (malondialdehyde, MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of three strains were examined to indicate their antioxidant defending ability and oxidative status. It was shown that w always had the highest lifespan and fertility not only in the control but also in UV-exposed groups. Moreover, lifespan and fertility of e were significantly higher (P<0.0001) than those of y in the UV-exposed groups, but not for the control. On the other hand, UV exposure had an adverse effect on courtship of flies. Stronger electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals could be detected in w, e and y exposed to 5 min UV. And there were more significant changes of EPR signals in y than in w and e. UVR had no significant (P=0.1782) effect on the SOD activities. After pooling data from the control and UV-exposed groups, we found that w had a significantly (P<0.05) higher level of SOD activity, but e and y were nearly at the same levels (P>0.05). MDA levels were increased in the UV dose-dependent manner (P=0.0495). In con- clusion, our results suggested that UVR can decrease life span and fertility of flies and do harm to courtship, which may be due to oxidative damage to flies tissues (e.g. central nervous system) induced by free radicals. w had the highest tolerance to UVR, which may be ascribed to its advantage of survival under the natural condition and at high level of SOD activity. Then differences of pigment between e and y in absorbing UV, shielding

  13. Mind Invasion: Situated Affectivity and the Corporate Life Hack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaby, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In view of the philosophical problems that vex the debate on situated affectivity, it can seem wise to focus on simple cases. Accordingly, theorists often single out scenarios in which an individual employs a device in order to enhance their emotional experience, or to achieve new kinds of experience altogether, such as playing an instrument, going to the movies, or sporting a fancy handbag. I argue that this narrow focus on cases that fit a “user/resource model” tends to channel attention away from more complex and also more problematic instances of situated affectivity. Among these are scenarios in which a social domain draws individuals into certain modes of affective interaction, often by way of attunement and habituation to affective styles and interaction patterns that are normative in the domain in question. This can lead to a phenomenon that is not so much “mind extension” than “mind invasion”: affectivity is dynamically framed and modulated from without, often contrary to the prior orientations of the individuals in question. As an example, I discuss affective patterns prevalent in today's corporate workplace. I claim that workplace affect sometimes contributes to what is effectively a “hack” of employees' subjectivity. PMID:26941705

  14. Mind Invasion: Situated Affectivity and the Corporate Life Hack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eSlaby

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In view of the philosophical problems that vex the debate on situated affectivity, it can seem wise to focus on simple cases. Accordingly, theorists often single out scenarios in which an individual employs a device in order to enhance their emotional experience, or to achieve new kinds of experience altogether, such as playing an instrument, going to the movies or sporting a fancy handbag. I argue that this narrow focus on cases that fit a ‘user/resource model’ tends to channel attention away from more complex and also more problematic instances of situated affectivity. Among these are scenarios in which a social domain draws individuals into certain modes of affective interaction, often by way of attunement and habituation to affective styles and interaction patterns that are normative in the domain in question. This can lead to a phenomenon that is not so much ‘mind extension’ than ‘mind invasion’: affectivity is dynamically framed and modulated from without, often contrary to the prior orientations of the individuals in question. As an example, I discuss affective patterns prevalent in today’s corporate workplace. I claim that workplace affect sometimes contributes to what is effectively a ‘hack’ of employees’ subjectivity.

  15. Mind Invasion: Situated Affectivity and the Corporate Life Hack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaby, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In view of the philosophical problems that vex the debate on situated affectivity, it can seem wise to focus on simple cases. Accordingly, theorists often single out scenarios in which an individual employs a device in order to enhance their emotional experience, or to achieve new kinds of experience altogether, such as playing an instrument, going to the movies, or sporting a fancy handbag. I argue that this narrow focus on cases that fit a "user/resource model" tends to channel attention away from more complex and also more problematic instances of situated affectivity. Among these are scenarios in which a social domain draws individuals into certain modes of affective interaction, often by way of attunement and habituation to affective styles and interaction patterns that are normative in the domain in question. This can lead to a phenomenon that is not so much "mind extension" than "mind invasion": affectivity is dynamically framed and modulated from without, often contrary to the prior orientations of the individuals in question. As an example, I discuss affective patterns prevalent in today's corporate workplace. I claim that workplace affect sometimes contributes to what is effectively a "hack" of employees' subjectivity. PMID:26941705

  16. Biomarkers of aging, life span and spontaneous carcinogenesis in the wild type and HER-2 transgenic FVB/N female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Andrey V; Popovich, Irina G; Trashkov, Alexandr P; Egormin, Peter A; Yurova, Maria N; Tyndyk, Margarita L; Gubareva, Ekaterina A; Artyukin, Ilia N; Vasiliev, Andrey G; Khaitsev, Nikolai V; Zabezhinski, Mark A; Anisimov, Vladimir N

    2016-04-01

    FVB/N wild type and transgenic HER-2/neu FVB/N female mice breed at N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology were under observation until natural death without any special treatment. Age-related dynamics of body weight, food consumption and parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, level of nitric oxide, malonic dialdehyde, catalase, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, vascular endothelial growth factor were studied in both mice strains. The parameters of life span and tumor pathology were studied as well. Cancer-prone transgenic HER-2/neu mice developed in 100 % multiple mammary adenocarcinomas and died before the age of 1 year. Forty tree percent of long-lived wild type mice survived the age of 2 years and 19 %-800 days. The total tumor incidence in wild type mice was 34 %. The age-associated changes in the level of serum IGF-1, glucose and insulin started much earlier in transgene HER-2/neu mice as compared with wild type FVB/N mice. It was suggested that transgenic HER-2/neu involves in initiation of malignization of mammary epithelial cells but also in acceleration of age-related hormonal and metabolic changes in turn promoting mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:26423570

  17. JNIH-ABCC life span study of children born to atomic bomb survivors. Report 1. Influence of concomitant variables upon mortality rate comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroo; Ueda, Shoichi

    1963-04-18

    The study of mortality rates among children born to atomic bomb survivors is being conducted according to the protocol, and at present, data for those whose parents are included in the Life Span Study sample are ready for analysis. Using this portion, the influence of various concomitant factors on the infant mortality rate was investigated. The distribution of year of birth, maternal age, and birth order differs between comparison groups. The differences introduce fairly large biases into mortality rate comparisons. For example, the infant mortality rate in children, both of whose parents were atomic bomb survivors would be overestimated by 10% or more. As far as such concomitant factors are observable, the bias can be reduced to negligible magnitude. Other factors are equally important but difficult to observe. For example, environmental factors influence mortality a great deal but adequate methods for treating such factors have not yet been found. If such bias is not eliminated, conclusions to be derived from this study suffer serious limitation, namely, unless drastic radiation effects exist, neither existence nor absence of radiation effects will be demonstrable. Investigation is continuing, especially concerning: how to measure environmental factors; regression analysis on radiation dose or distance from the hypocenter; and examination of specific causes of death. 7 references, 4 figures, 9 tables.

  18. Leaf life spans of some conifers of the temperate forests of South America Longevidad foliar de algunas coníferas de los bosques templados de Sudamérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOPHER H. LUSK

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Interspecific variation in leaf life span has wide-ranging implications for plant species sorting on resource availability gradients, and for ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling. Very little is known about leaf life spans of evergreen trees in the temperate forests of South America. Leaf life spans were estimated by static demographic methods, and associated leaf traits measured, for four conifers of this region. It was expected that leaf life span variation would correlate negatively with soil fertility of habitats normally occupied by each species. This prediction was upheld by the data. The mean leaf life span determined for Araucaria araucana (24 years is among the highest figures reported for any plant species. This extreme leaf longevity was associated with very robust construction (high leaf mass per unit area and very low nitrogen content. These aspects of the ecology of A. araucana may affect its fitness in two ways. Firstly, slow foliage turnover will reduce its annual nutrient requirements for crown maintenance, a trait that is thought to be crucial for survival on nutrient-poor sites. Secondly, the low decomposability of A. araucana leaf litter is likely to cause nutrient immobilisation, possibly favouring site retention by A. araucana in the face of competition from faster-growing but more nutrient-demanding species. Interspecific variation in leaf life span appeared to be systematically related to variation in leaf mass per unit area (LMA and leaf nitrogen, in agreement with a large body of evidence that leaf evolution is constrained by a trade-off between trait combinations which optimise carbon gain and growth in resource-rich habitats, and those which favour persistence in chronically adverse environmentsLas diferencias específicas en longevidad foliar tienen importantes implicancias para la distribución de las plantas en relación con gradientes de recursos, y en procesos ecosistémicos tales como el ciclaje de

  19. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  20. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  1. Giant lipoma of the back affecting quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Guler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipomas are benign tumours composed of adipose tissue. They may be localized in almost all body parts and may be in a giant form. Some of these giant lipomas may transform malignity and cause problems in daily living and detoriate quality of life. Mass localization also restrict body functions. In the present study, a 72-year-old man who presented with a mass enlarged in a time period of two years and because of this could not lie in the supine position, sit in an erect position and dress easily, go outside because of his physical appearance. With surgical treatment a 38 × 22 × 21 cm mass weighing 3575 g was successfully resected. Postoperative early phase complications did not occur. During 48 months of postoperative period, any recurrence was not detected and the patient was free of all his complaints. Cosmetic and functional results of the surgery and patient satisfaction were excellent. After surgery patient's quality of life was improved and restriction of body function was disappeared.

  2. Conditions Affecting Shelf-Life of Inoculated Legume Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Gemell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial inoculants are becoming more available as sustainable alternatives to fertilizers and other agrichemicals in broad-acre cropping. However, with the exception of legume inoculants little is understood about effective delivery and survival of the inoculum. Legume inoculants are applied to both seed and soil but seed inoculation is the most economical technique. Large quantities of pasture seed in Australia are inoculated by commercial seed coating companies, but the long-term survival of seed-applied inoculum is variable and monitoring of viability requires specialist microbiology skills and facilities. The aim of our research was to define optimum storage conditions for survival of rhizobia on legume seed and evaluate water activity as a means of monitoring shelf-life. The relationship between survival and water activity varied according to seed species, inoculum preparation, coating ingredients, initial water activity and time suggesting that storage conditions would need to be defined for each different combination. Although drying seeds after coating significantly reduced viable numbers of rhizobia, survival of rhizobia on dried commercially coated lucerne seed after 11 weeks was less variable than seeds that had not been dried. The highest numbers were maintained when seeds remained dry with water activities of between 0.47 and 0.38. The quality of inoculated seed could be improved by reducing the death rate of inoculum during preparation and providing optimum storage conditions for long-term survival.

  3. The affective profiles in the USA: happiness, depression, life satisfaction, and happiness-increasing strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Schütz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The affective profiles model categorizes individuals as self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect, high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect, low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect, and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect. The model has been used extensively among Swedes to discern differences between profiles regarding happiness, depression, and also life satisfaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate such differences in a sample of residents of the USA. The study also investigated differences between profiles with regard to happiness-increasing strategies. Methods. In Study I, 900 participants reported affect (Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule; PANAS and happiness (Happiness-Depression Scale. In Study II, 500 participants self-reported affect (PANAS, life satisfaction (Satisfaction With Life Scale, and how often they used specific strategies to increase their own happiness (Happiness-Increasing Strategies Scales. Results. The results showed that, compared to the other profiles, self-fulfilling individuals were less depressed, happier, and more satisfied with their lives. Nevertheless, self-destructive individuals were more depressed, unhappier, and less satisfied than all other profiles. The self-fulfilling individuals tended to use strategies related to agentic (e.g., instrumental goal-pursuit, communal (e.g., social affiliation, and spiritual (e.g., religion values when pursuing happiness. Conclusion. These differences suggest that promoting positive emotions can positively influence a depressive-to-happy state as well as increasing life satisfaction. Moreover, the present study shows that pursuing happiness through strategies guided by agency, communion, and spirituality is related to a self-fulfilling experience described as high positive affect and low negative affect.

  4. Charting the internal landscape: Affect associated with thoughts about major life domains explains life satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Miron-Shatz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of happiness have examined the impact of demographics, personality and emotions accompanying daily activities on life satisfaction. We suggest that how people feel while contemplating aspects of their lives, including their weight, children and future prospects, is a promising yet uncharted territory within the internal landscape of life satisfaction. In a sample of 811 American women, we assessed women's feelings when thinking about major life domains and frequency of thoughts about each domain. Regression and dominance analyses showed that emotional valence of thoughts about major life domains was an important predictor of current and prior life satisfaction, surpassing, in descending order, demographics, participants' feelings during recent activities, and their neuroticism and extraversion scores. Domains thought about more frequently were often associated with greater emotional valence. These results suggest that life satisfaction may be improved by modifying emotional valence and frequency of thoughts about life domains. Moreover, these thoughts appear to be an important and relatively stable component of well-being worthy of further study.

  5. Span of Control and Span of Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Oriana Bandiera; Andrea Prat; Raffaella Sadun; Julie Wulf

    2012-01-01

    For both practitioners and researchers, span of control plays an important role in defining and understanding the role of the CEO. In this paper, we combine organizational chart information for a sample of 65 companies with detailed data on how their CEOs allocate their work time, which we define as their span of activity. Span of activity provides a direct measure of the CEO's management style, including the attention devoted to specific subordinates and functions, the time devoted to indivi...

  6. Emotion and the affective turn: Towards an integration of cognition and affect in real life experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel W. du Toit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Emotion is caused by many factors, some of which are evolutionary, neurological, chemical, environmental, societal, personal and religious. Mostly, however, we are oblivious of the causal factors, many of which may function on a biological level or subconsciously, although the emotional effect is experienced physically and consciously. Emotions change as the trigger mechanisms in the cultural context change. This usually happens unnoticed over long periods. Internet databases have now made it possible to study the use of emotive words; this point is discussed. Of particular interest is the interaction between emotion and reason. Models that reduce emotion to the physical level are scrutinised critically. Reason is not emotionless and emotion is not always irrational. The close interrelationship of emotion and reason often makes it difficult to distinguish accurately between the two. The so-called affective turn takes cognisance of cultural, social, religious and other environmental factors; this broader approach clarifies the importance of affect’s role in rationality. One way of viewing emotion and affect is to look at the accompanying language; here the role of metaphor and narrative is pertinent. The traditional elevation of reason above emotion is examined critically as part of the affective turn that broadens the meaning and scope of emotions. I focus on the role of emotion in religion and factors that influence it, and explore the accent of affect in new spiritualities.

  7. Built environment, health and how old you are: A view across the life span - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Larry

    2011-01-01

    This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 4, “Preparing Aging Populations for Climate Change in British Columbia and Beyond” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Larry Frank "Built environment, health and how old you are: A view across the life span" - Talk focuses upon the relationships between the designs of the ...

  8. Uniform random spanning trees

    OpenAIRE

    Pemantle, Robin

    2004-01-01

    There are several good reasons you might want to read about uniform spanning trees, one being that spanning trees are useful combinatorial objects. Not only are they fundamental in algebraic graph theory and combinatorial geometry, but they predate both of these subjects, having been used by Kirchoff in the study of resistor networks. This article addresses the question about spanning trees most natural to anyone in probability theory, namely what does a typical spanning tree look like?

  9. Quality of Life in Cardiovascular Patients in Iran and Factors Affecting It: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Yaghoubi; Jafar-Sadegh Tabrizi; Mir-Mousa Mirinazhad; Saber Azami; Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad; Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are always one of the major causes of mortality in the world affecting all aspects of patients’ lives. Therefore, this study was conducted to summarize and provide a clear view of quality of life in these patients in Iran through a systematic review on the results of previously conducted studies. Methods: In a systematic review, required information was collected by searching keywords of Iran, quality of life, heart failure, cardiac, heart, and their Pers...

  10. Is Rural School-aged Children's Quality of Life Affected by Their Responses to Asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, Sharon D.; Brown, Sharon A.; Walker, Veronica García

    2011-01-01

    The unpredictable nature of asthma makes it stressful for children and can affect their quality of life. An exploratory analysis of 183 rural school-aged children's data was conducted to determine relationships among demographic factors, children's responses to asthma (coping, asthma self-management), and their quality of life (QOL). Coping frequency, asthma severity, and race/ethnicity significantly predicted children's asthma-related QOL. Children reported more frequent coping as asthma-rel...

  11. Towards understanding how surface life can affect interior geological processes: a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Dyke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Life has significantly altered the Earth's atmosphere, oceans and crust. To what extent has it also affected interior geological processes? To address this question, three models of geological processes are formulated: mantle convection, continental crust uplift and erosion and oceanic crust recycling. These processes are characterised as non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems. Their states of disequilibrium are maintained by the power generated from the dissipation of energy from the interior of the Earth. Altering the thickness of continental crust via weathering and erosion affects the upper mantle temperature which leads to changes in rates of oceanic crust recycling and consequently rates of outgassing of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Estimates for the power generated by various elements in the Earth system are shown. This includes, inter alia, surface life generation of 264 TW of power, much greater than those of geological processes such as mantle convection at 12 TW. This high power results from life's ability to harvest energy directly from the sun. Life need only utilise a small fraction of the generated free chemical energy for geochemical transformations at the surface, such as affecting rates of weathering and erosion of continental rocks, in order to affect interior, geological processes. Consequently when assessing the effects of life on Earth, and potentially any planet with a significant biosphere, dynamical models may be required that better capture the coupled nature of biologically-mediated surface and interior processes.

  12. Defoliation and bark harvesting affect life-history traits of a tropical tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaoue, Orou; Horvitz, Carol; Ticktin, Tamara; Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad

    2013-01-01

    Selectively harvesting whole individuals in managed populations (e.g. fisheries, hunting) has substantial effects on life expectancy and age at maturity. Although demographic rates of trees are impacted by recurrent harvest of plant organs (e.g. fruit, leaf, bark) known as non-timber forest...... life expectancy to perturbation of vital rates to the elasticities of population growth rate, emphasizing how the two kinds of elasticity address distinct biological issues and management goals. Life expectancy was shorter and reproduction delayed in the dry than in the moist region, indicating a cost...... of drought to life-history traits. Harvesting at constant rates only affects (increased) life expectancy in the moist region and (reduced) age at first reproduction in the dry region. Models in which harvest intensity varies stochastically over time show results similar to those with constant...

  13. The interplay between sleep behavior and affect in elementary school children's daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könen, Tanja; Dirk, Judith; Leonhardt, Anja; Schmiedek, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Recent reviews raised the idea of a bidirectional relation between sleep behavior and affect in adults, but little is known about this interplay in general and especially regarding children. In this micro-longitudinal study, the interplay of sleep and affect was captured directly in children's daily life context in and out of school through ambulatory assessment. For 31 consecutive days, 110 elementary school children (8-11 years old) provided information about their last night's sleep and reported their current affect at four daily occasions in school and at home on smartphones. A multilevel approach was used to analyze the relation between sleep and affect the next day (morning, noon, and afternoon) and the relation between evening affect and subsequent sleep. At the within-person level, sleep quality was related to all observed facets of affect the next day and the strongest effects were found in the morning. The effect of sleep quality on positive affect was particularly pronounced for children who on average went to bed early and slept long. There were, however, no direct within-person effects of sleep quantity on affect. Furthermore, evening affect was related to subsequent sleep. The findings support the idea of a bidirectional relation between affect and sleep in children's daily life (including school). They suggest that good sleep provides a basis and resource for children's affective well-being the next day and demonstrate the importance of analyzing within-person variations of children's sleep. Micro-longitudinal findings can contribute to explain how macro-longitudinal relations between sleep and affect develop over time. PMID:27236036

  14. Quality of Life in Cardiovascular Patients in Iran and Factors Affecting It: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Yaghoubi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are always one of the major causes of mortality in the world affecting all aspects of patients’ lives. Therefore, this study was conducted to summarize and provide a clear view of quality of life in these patients in Iran through a systematic review on the results of previously conducted studies. Methods: In a systematic review, required information was collected by searching keywords of Iran, quality of life, heart failure, cardiac, heart, and their Persian equivalents in databases of Science Direct, Pubmed, IRAN doc, SID, Medlib and Magiran. The selected time period for searching articles was since 2000 to 2012. Inclusion criteria were: releasing of article during 2000 to 2012, articles reporting patients’ quality of life in any domains of heart diseases, and articles published in Persian and English. Extracted results first were summarized in Extraction Table, and then analyzed manually. Results: Finally 18 of 1592 found articles were included in the study. A total of 3,797 cardiac patients' quality of life was measured using six different tools, the most important one of which was SF36 questionnaire. Among eight dimensions of SF36 questionnaire, the highest mean was for social role functioning with average score of 58.37 and the lowest for physical limitation (physical role functioning with score of 42.95. Overall, mean of eight dimensions was 53.19. Among 4 general domains of quality of life, physical activity had the lowest average of 43.63 and average of general dimensions of quality of life was 47.65. The most important factors affecting quality of life were sex, age, education, marital status, occupational status, suffering duration, number of hospitalizations etc. Conclusion: The results of the studies showed relatively low quality of life of cardiovascular patients in general. Therefore, according to the introduced effective factors in this study, it is necessary to consider regular programs

  15. The effect of anogenital warts on life quality of affected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanimirović Branko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anogenital warts represent a clinical manifestation of the infection of the lower female genital tract, human papilloma viruses types 6 and 11. They belong to the group of sexually transmitted diseases and then may be localized either on the female or male genitalia. The aim of the study was to show the effect of anogenital warts on life quality of the affected patients. Material and methods. The study was conducted on 200 female patients using the standardized questionnaire filled in by patients under the researcher's supervision immediately before laser wart removal. Each question out of 15 could be answered by one of the suggested answers: always, almost always, sometimes, rarely and never. The answer 'always' was worth one point, 'almost always' two points, 'sometimes' three points, 'rarely' four points and never 'five' points. Life quality was categorized as bad, tolerable, good, very good and excellent. The lower number of points in the questionnaire indicated the worse life quality and the higher number of points demonstrated a better life quality. Results. The study results showed that the highest number of subjects was in the third and fourth decade of life. The presence of anogenital warts had an effect on life quality in most patients. 5% of subjects assessed their life quality as bad, 16% as tolerable, 45% as good and 23% as very good. Only in 11% of patients the presence of anogenital warts did not have any effect on life quality (c2 = 121.680, p< 0.001. Conclusion. The presence of anogenital warts has a significant effect on life quality of affected patients, indicating the significance of their early detection and treatment.

  16. Investigating the Relationship among Internet Addiction, Positive and Negative Affects, and Life Satisfaction in Turkish Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telef, Bülent Baki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between Internet addiction and the areas of life satisfaction and positive or negative affects in Turkish adolescents. The research sample comprised 358 students studying in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades at four different middle schools in Canakkale city centre during the 2012-2013 academic year, of…

  17. EmoHeart: Conveying Emotions in Second Life Based on Affect Sensing from Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Neviarouskaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D virtual world of “Second Life” imitates a form of real life by providing a space for rich interactions and social events. Second Life encourages people to establish or strengthen interpersonal relations, to share ideas, to gain new experiences, and to feel genuine emotions accompanying all adventures of virtual reality. Undoubtedly, emotions play a powerful role in communication. However, to trigger visual display of user's affective state in a virtual world, user has to manually assign appropriate facial expression or gesture to own avatar. Affect sensing from text, which enables automatic expression of emotions in the virtual environment, is a method to avoid manual control by the user and to enrich remote communications effortlessly. In this paper, we describe a lexical rule-based approach to recognition of emotions from text and an application of the developed Affect Analysis Model in Second Life. Based on the result of the Affect Analysis Model, the developed EmoHeart (“object” in Second Life triggers animations of avatar facial expressions and visualizes emotion by heart-shaped textures.

  18. Deconstructing Positive Affect in Later Life: A Differential Functionalist Analysis of Joy and Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consedine, Nathan S.; Magai, Carol; King, Arlene R.

    2004-01-01

    Positive affect, an index of psychological well-being, is a known predictor of functionality and health in later life. Measures typically studied include joy, happiness, and subjective well-being, but less often interest--a positive emotion with functional properties that differ from joy or happiness. Following differential emotions theory, the…

  19. Social-Cognitive Factors Affecting Clients' Career and Life Satisfaction after Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Marijke; Sels, Luc

    2010-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting clients' career and life satisfaction in the first 6 months after having participated in career counseling. In particular, we tested a large subset of the recent social-cognitive model of work satisfaction of Lent and Brown using a longitudinal data set of 195 former counseling clients. Our results showed that…

  20. Does knowledge of cancer diagnosis affect quality of life? A methodological challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milroy Robert

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of an assessment of quality of life in lung cancer patients an investigation was carried out to examine whether the knowledge of their diagnosis affected their quality of life. Methods Every patient in a defined geographical area with a potential diagnosis of lung cancer was interviewed at first consultation and after a definitive treatment has been given. Quality of life was assessed using three standard measures: the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP, the EORTC quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-C30 and its lung cancer supplementary questionnaire (QLQ-LC13. Comparison was made in quality of life scores between patients who knew their cancer diagnosis and those who did not. Results In all, 129 lung cancer patients were interviewed. Of these, 30 patients (23% knew and 99 (78% did not know their cancer diagnosis at the time of baseline assessment. The patient groups were similar in their characteristics except for age (P = 0.04 and cell type (P Conclusion The findings suggest that the knowledge of cancer diagnosis does not affect the way in which patients respond to quality of life questionnaires.

  1. Unequally distributed psychological assets: are there social disparities in optimism, life satisfaction, and positive affect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K Boehm

    Full Text Available Socioeconomic status is associated with health disparities, but underlying psychosocial mechanisms have not been fully identified. Dispositional optimism may be a psychosocial process linking socioeconomic status with health. We hypothesized that lower optimism would be associated with greater social disadvantage and poorer social mobility. We also investigated whether life satisfaction and positive affect showed similar patterns. Participants from the Midlife in the United States study self-reported their optimism, satisfaction, positive affect, and socioeconomic status (gender, race/ethnicity, education, occupational class and prestige, income. Social disparities in optimism were evident. Optimistic individuals tended to be white and highly educated, had an educated parent, belonged to higher occupational classes with more prestige, and had higher incomes. Findings were generally similar for satisfaction, but not positive affect. Greater optimism and satisfaction were also associated with educational achievement across generations. Optimism and life satisfaction are consistently linked with socioeconomic advantage and may be one conduit by which social disparities influence health.

  2. Unequally Distributed Psychological Assets: Are There Social Disparities in Optimism, Life Satisfaction, and Positive Affect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Julia K.; Chen, Ying; Williams, David R.; Ryff, Carol; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is associated with health disparities, but underlying psychosocial mechanisms have not been fully identified. Dispositional optimism may be a psychosocial process linking socioeconomic status with health. We hypothesized that lower optimism would be associated with greater social disadvantage and poorer social mobility. We also investigated whether life satisfaction and positive affect showed similar patterns. Participants from the Midlife in the United States study self-reported their optimism, satisfaction, positive affect, and socioeconomic status (gender, race/ethnicity, education, occupational class and prestige, income). Social disparities in optimism were evident. Optimistic individuals tended to be white and highly educated, had an educated parent, belonged to higher occupational classes with more prestige, and had higher incomes. Findings were generally similar for satisfaction, but not positive affect. Greater optimism and satisfaction were also associated with educational achievement across generations. Optimism and life satisfaction are consistently linked with socioeconomic advantage and may be one conduit by which social disparities influence health. PMID:25671665

  3. Variations in 5-HTTLPR: relation to familiar risk of affective disorder, life events, neuroticism and cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mellerup, Erling; Andersen, Per Kragh;

    2009-01-01

    variations interact with life events in relation to depressive symptoms, neuroticism and salivary cortisol. METHOD: In a high-risk population study, healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twins with (high-risk twins) and without (low-risk twins) a co-twin history of affective disorder were identified through......BACKGROUND: Variations in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and stressful life events are associated with affective disorders. AIM: To investigate whether the distribution of the alleles of the 5-HTTLPR is associated with a genetic predisposition to affective disorder and whether these...... the experience of SLE was associated with a higher neuroticism score, but not with depressive symptoms nor awakening or evening salivary cortisol. CONCLUSION: A combination of variants in 5-HTTLPR and environmental stress seems to increase neuroticism in healthy individuals....

  4. Nuclear power plant life extension: How aging affects performance of containments & other structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert A Dameron; Sun Junling

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on how aging can affect performance of safety-related structures in nuclear power plant (NPP).Knowledge and assessment of impacts of aging on structures are essential to plant life extension analysis,especially performance to severe loadings such as loss-of-coolant-accidents or major seismic events.Plant life extension issues are of keen interest in countries (like the United States) which have a large,aging fleet of NPPs.This paper addresses the overlap and relationship of structure aging to severe loading performance,with particular emphasis on containment structures.

  5. Effects of intrauterine infusion of Trueperella pyogenes on endometrial mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and luteolytic cascade genes and their association with luteal life span in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F S; Greco, L F; Bisinotto, R S; Ribeiro, E S; Martinez, N M; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P; Reinhard, M K; Galvão, K N

    2015-11-01

    Objectives were to determine the effects of intrauterine infusion (IUI) of Trueperella pyogenes on endometrial expression of proinflammatory cytokines and luteal life span. Holstein cows (n = 32) were allocated randomly, in two replicates (15 then 17 cows), to receive one of three treatments on Day 5 of the estrous cycle: TP (n = 13), IUI containing 10(9) colony-forming units/mL of T. pyogenes; tumor necrosis factor (TNF; n = 9), IUI containing 1 μg of TNFα; and control (n = 10), IUI of saline solution. Five cows per treatment had uterine biopsies collected at 6, 12, and 24 hours after treatment to evaluate the endometrial messenger RNA expression of TNFα (TNF), interleukin-1β (IL1B), IL6, IL8, prostaglandin E synthase (PGES), prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS), and oxytocin receptor (OXR), and histologic evidence of inflammation. Messenger RNA expression was measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The remaining cows had ovaries scanned and blood collected for progesterone evaluation; however, only seven, four, and three cows in the TP, TNF, and control groups were used for comparison in replicate 2. The GLIMMIX procedure of SAS was used for statistical analysis. All TP and TNF cows had moderate to severe endometrial inflammation, whereas only one control had mild inflammation. Premature luteolysis occurred in three, one, and zero cows in the TP, TNF and control groups, respectively. Delayed luteolysis occurred in one TP and one TNF cow. Interleukin-1β expression was greater in the TP cows than in the TNF cows at 24 hours after IUI. Moreover, IL6 expression tended to be greater for the TP cows than for the control cows at 12 hours after IUI. Interleukin 8 expression was greater in the TP cows than in the control and TNF cows at 24 hours after IUI. Oxytocin receptor expression tended to be greater for the TP cows and was greater for the TNF cows than for the control cows at 12 hours. The messenger RNA expressions of TNF, PGES

  6. Communicating employability enchancement throughout the life-span: a national intervention program aimed at combating age-related stereotypes at the workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Selm; B.I.J.M. van der Heijden

    2013-01-01

    The stimulation of lifelong employability of employees is one of today's challenges in all sectors of the Dutch society. In this article, we will outline the historical context of the life-long employability issue in the Netherlands, and provide an overview of current business responses to the issue

  7. Communicating Employability Enhancement Throughout the Life-Span: A National Intervention Program Aimed at Combating Age-Related Stereotypes at the Workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selm, van Martine; Heijden, van der B.I.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The stimulation of lifelong employability of employees is one of today's challenges in all sectors of the Dutch society. In this article, we will outline the historical context of the life-long employability issue in the Netherlands, and provide an overview of current business responses to the issue

  8. Communicating Employability Enhancement throughout the Life-Span: A National Intervention Program Aimed at Combating Age-Related Stereotypes at the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Selm, Martine; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The stimulation of lifelong employability of employees is one of today's challenges in all sectors of the Dutch society. In this article, we will outline the historical context of the life-long employability issue in the Netherlands, and provide an overview of current business responses to the issue. We will discuss key obstacles for improving…

  9. Does dyselxia affect self-esteem, self-concept and satisfaction with life in university students?

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Sarah L

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Previous literature suggests that dyslexia affects self-esteem and self-concept in school children (Humphrey & Mullins, 2004). This study will extend the research into a sample of university students measuring self-esteem, self-concept and satisfaction with life between a dyslexic and non-dyslexic sample, taking gender (males and females) into account. Method: A questionnaire was utilised that included the Burnett Self-Scale, Reading Self-Concept Scale, and the Brief Multidimensio...

  10. Factors affecting the quality of life of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: A questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    Sema Üstündag; Ayten Demir Zencirci

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the factors affecting cancer patients′ quality of life. Methods: We collected data from 352 chemotherapy patients of an Outpatient Chemotherapy Unit in a state hospital. We included volunteered chemotherapy patients with a signed informed consent and at least 50 Karnofsky Performance Scale points. We gathered data by Personal Information Form and Nightingale Symptom Assessment Scale (N-SAS) and analyzed via basi...

  11. Demographic factors affecting quality of life of hemodialysis patients – Lahore, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Anees, Muhammad; Malik, Muzammil Riaz; Abbasi, Tanzeel; Nasir, Zeeshan; Hussain, Yasir; Ibrahim, Muhamamd

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the demographic factors affecting Quality Of Life (QOL) of hemodialysis (HD) patients. Methods: This observational study was conducted at Shalamar Hospital, Lahore. Patients of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and on maintenance HD for more than three months were included during the period March to June 2012. Patient of ESRD not on dialysis and Acute Renal Failure were excluded. One hundred and twenty five patients who fulfilled the criteri...

  12. Early Life in a Barren Environment Adversely Affects Spatial Cognition in Laying Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    OpenAIRE

    Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Nordgreen, Janicke; Nordquist, Rebecca E.; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial cognition in vertebrates is adversely affected by a lack of environmental complexity during early life. However, to our knowledge, no previous studies have tested the effect of early exposure to varying degrees of environmental complexity on specific components of spatial cognition in chickens. There are two main rearing systems for laying hens in the EU: aviaries and cages. These two systems differ from one another in environmental complexity. The aim of the present study was to test...

  13. COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION, DISSOCIATION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDERS IN REMISSION

    OpenAIRE

    Latalova, Klara; Prasko, Jan; Diveky, Tomas; Kamaradova, Dana; Velartova, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Background: Bipolar disorders are often associated with cognitive deficits, which have an influence on social functioning and the course of the illness. These deficits have an impact on occupational ability and social integration. Subjects and methods: To ascertain cognitive function, level of dissociation and quality of life and their interrelations in patients with bipolar affective disorder in remission. Data from D2 Attention Test, Verbal Fluency Test and Trial Making Test, Di...

  14. Factors affecting the quality of life of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: A questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Üstündag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the factors affecting cancer patients′ quality of life. Methods: We collected data from 352 chemotherapy patients of an Outpatient Chemotherapy Unit in a state hospital. We included volunteered chemotherapy patients with a signed informed consent and at least 50 Karnofsky Performance Scale points. We gathered data by Personal Information Form and Nightingale Symptom Assessment Scale (N-SAS and analyzed via basic descriptive statistics and linear regression analysis. Results: Patients were women (54.8%, married (83.5%, elementary school graduates (57.1%, housewives (44.6% and undergoing fluorouracil-based therapy (47.2%, and almost all patients had religious and cultural rituals for the disease. Women experienced worse physical and social well-being than men (P = 0.001, P = 0.0001. Singles had worse psychological and general well-being (P = 0.0001, P = 0.0001. Housewives had the worst physical and social well-being (P 0.05. Breast cancer and sarcoma patients had the worst social well-being than other cancer patients. The N-SAS points of patients were not affected by blessings/prays, vow/sacrifice, consulting local herbalists and visiting "ocaks (folk physicians" (P > 0.05. Patients with bad quality of life practiced lead pouring and amulets (P < 0.05. Gender was the first factor affecting the quality of life. Conclusion: Advanced studies on individual quality of life factors affecting cancer would empower nurses for better personal care techniques and patients for easily overcoming the disease.

  15. Leaf life span and nitrogen content in semideciduous forest tree species (Croton priscus and Hymenaea courbaril) Duração da vida da folha e conteúdo de nitrogênio em espécies arbóreas (Croton priscus e Hymenaea courbaril) de floresta semidecídua

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Regina Baptista Haddad; Damiani Pereira Lemos; Paulo Mazzafera

    2004-01-01

    In comparison to deciduous species, evergreen plants have lower leaf nutrient contents and higher leaf life span, important mechanisms for nutrient economy, allowing the colonization of low fertility soils. Strategies to conserve nitrogen in two semideciduous tropical forest tree species, with different leaf life spans were analyzed. The hypothesis was the fact that the two species would present different nitrogen conservation mechanisms in relation to chemical (total nitrogen, protein, chlor...

  16. Late effects of selected immunosuppressants on immunocompetence, disease incidence, and mean life-span. I. Humoral immune activity. [Mice, x radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, E.H.; Peterson, W.J.; Gottlier, C.F.; Halsall, M.K.; Caccheiro, L.H.; Makinodan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of different immunosuppressive treatments during young adulthood on humoral immune competence late in life was determined. It was found that the marked reduction in humoral immune competence in aged mice is further compromised when severe insults are administered early in life. Thus, thymectomy, splenectomy, and sublethal x-irradiation produced lasting immunodepression as measured in situ and by the hemolysin, direct and indirect plaque forming cells responses of adoptively transferred spleen cells. In contrast, treatment with cyclophosphamide and cortisone acetate were without effect, indicating that drug-damaged cells of the immune system were replaced by competent cells during the course of time. Decrease in immune competence of aged thymectomized animals could not be correlated with a decrease in numbers of theta-bearing T or immunoglobulin receptor-bearing B lymphocytes. The significance of the observed unequal effects of these immunosuppressants on immune competence, as they relate to disease incidence and life expectancy, are dealt with in the third paper in this series.

  17. Recruitment and Retention Strategies for Minority or Poor Clinical Research Participants: Lessons from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiogu, Ngozi; Norbeck, Jennifer H.; Mason, Marc A.; Cromwell, Bridget C.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Investigating health disparities requires studies designed to recruit and retain racially and socioeconomically diverse cohorts. It is critical to address the barriers that disproportionately affect participation in clinical research by minorities and the socioeconomically disadvantaged. This study sought to identify and…

  18. Factors Affecting Sustainable Performance of Construction Projects during Project Life Cycle Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Enshassi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development (SD is one of the main challenges faced by the construction industry, which has acquired global attention. Sustainable performance (SP of a construction project during its life cycle (LC is considered crucial to achieve the SD. The aim of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting sustainable performance of construction projects throughout project life cycle phases in the Gaza Strip. A total of 53 sustainable factors (economic, social, and environmental sustainable factors were identified through extensive literature review and confirmed by experts’ interviews and a pilot study. These factors are classified in relation to the project life cycle phases; inception phase, design phase, construction phase, operation phase, and demolition phase. A structured questionnaire survey is employed in this study for primary data collection. A total of 119 questionnaires were distributed randomly to engineers working in construction projects in the Gaza Strip to solicit their views regarding the factors affecting sustainable performance of construction projects throughout project life cycle phases. The results revealed that five factors among the top ten factors that impacting the sustainable performance of construction projects are classified under the construction phase, which confirmed that the construction process has the most effect on the projects SP. Three factors are classified under the inception phase, which assured that the inception of a potential project has a considerable effect projects. In addition, one factor was classified under operation phase and one factor was classified under demolition phase. The most common factors affecting the SP of construction project through the overall sustainability elements: reusable/recyclable element, provision of services, energy consumption, water cost, and water pollution assessment. Further studies are recommended to explore how to integrated sustainability concepts into

  19. Effects of nitrogen on development and growth of the leaves of vegetables. 2. Appearance, expansion growth and life span of leaves of leek plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Biemond, H.

    1995-01-01

    In greenhouse pot experiments and field trials, leek cv. Albana plants were supplied with different amounts of N fertilizer at various growth stages. Leaf emergence, expansion, size and senescence were monitored. The rate of leaf appearance was not affected by N treatments and almost constant across experiments at 0.15/day. The rate of leaf expansion and the mature leaf area increased with leaf number, reaching maximum values between leaf numbers 11 and 14 and decreasing with higher leaf numb...

  20. Effects of nitrogen on development and growth of the leaves of vegetables. 1. Appearance, expansion growth and life span of leaves of Brussels sprouts plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Biemond, H.; Vos, J.; Struik, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    In greenhouse pot experiments and field trials, leek cv. Albana plants were supplied with different amounts of N fertilizer at various growth stages. Leaf emergence, expansion, size and senescence were monitored. The rate of leaf appearance was not affected by N treatments and almost constant across experiments at 0.15/day. The rate of leaf expansion and the mature leaf area increased with leaf number, reaching maximum values between leaf numbers 11 and 14 and decreasing with higher leaf numb...

  1. Recruitment and Retention Strategies for Minority or Poor Clinical Research Participants: Lessons From the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity Across the Life Span Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ejiogu, Ngozi; Norbeck, Jennifer H.; Mason, Marc A.; Cromwell, Bridget C.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Investigating health disparities requires studies designed to recruit and retain racially and socioeconomically diverse cohorts. It is critical to address the barriers that disproportionately affect participation in clinical research by minorities and the socioeconomically disadvantaged. This study sought to identify and rectify these barriers to recruit and retain a biracial (African American and non-Hispanic White) and socioeconomically diverse cohort for a longitudina...

  2. 'The brain is the organ of longevity': Introduction to G. A. Sacher's free-energy hypothesis of life-span enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justesen, D.R.

    1981-10-01

    No experiment reported to date constitutes an adequate test in the sense of supplying comprehensive information on survival time, metabolic rate, food consumption and utilization, body mass, anatomical integrity (especially that of the skeletal and nervous systems), status of the immune and endocrine systems, and physiological and behavioral competence in the wake of chronic exposure to a moderately thermalizing radio field. Some reports do provide data on one or more of the important end points, usually in association with a single exposure or a limited number of brief exposures. One must distinguish between prolongation of life in senescence and enhancement of longevity based on actual retardation of the rate of aging. More, retardation of aging, if sorely taxed at the expense of quality of living, is no bargain. Some hibernators live relatively long lives, but the torpor of hibernation--a prolonged period of somnolence and greatly reduced metabolic activity--is hardly the stuff of a vibrant psychological existence.

  3. The life-span of experimental animals and their progeny under influence of the ecological conditions in the Chernobyl zone of alienation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory three-month old animals (white mongrel rats F0) were delivered to Chernobyl. The control animals were kept in a Kyiv vivarium. The indices of lifespan and dynamics of mortality of rats and their progeny have been determined using the life table methodology. The results have shown no essential difference in the indices of mortality and lifespan between control and experimental animals of the F0 generation. The expected lifespan of irradiated rats of the F1 - F2 generations increased in the age interval of 300 - 600 days. It's necessary to note that a decrease of this index in the Chernobyl groups of the F3 - F6 generations has been observed

  4. Healthy Life Style Beheviours of The Nurses and The Determination of Affecting Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Curcani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was carried out descriptively with the aim of determining the variables affecting healthy life style behaviors of the nurses. METHOD: The study was carried on between the date’s may-June 2007 at Ataturk University Yakutiye Research Hospital on Suleyman Demirel Training and Research Hospitals. The research was carried out with 205 nurses. In the collection of the data survey form including personal behaviors of the nurses, and the Health Promotion Life-Style Profile prepared by researchers were used in the direction of literature. RESULTS: Total score of Health Promotion Life-Style Profile of the nurses participating in the research was 121.20±18.30, and sub-group scale scores; health responsibility is 20.88±3.76 and physical activities is 14.04±4.22, and nutritional habit is 19.57±3.80, and mental development is 25.36±4.47, and relations between persons is 24.04±4.07, and stress management is 17.09±3.59. There was statistically significant distinction between total score average and the situation of hawing children, and working duration and education level of the nurses (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: At the end of the result, it was determined that average of Health Promotion Life-Style Profile of the nurses was middle level and that the most common and most noticeable health life style behaviors of the nurses was mental development, and that the least applied health life style behaviors of the nurses was physical activities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 487-492

  5. Factors Affecting the Quality of Life and the Illness Acceptance of Pregnant Women with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bień

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an analysis of the factors affecting the quality of life (QoL and the illness acceptance of diabetic pregnant women. The study was performed between January and April, 2013. It included 114 pregnant women with diabetes, hospitalized in the High Risk Pregnancy Wards of several hospitals in Lublin, Poland. The study used a diagnostic survey with questionnaires. The research instruments used were: The WHOQOL-Bref questionnaire and the Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS. The women’s general quality of life was slightly higher than their perceived general health. A higher quality of life was reported by women with a very good financial standing, very good perceived health, moderate self-reported knowledge of diabetes, and also by those only treated with diet and stating that the illness did not interfere with their lives (p < 0.05. Women with a very good financial standing (p < 0.009, high self-reported health (p < 0.002, and those treated with by means of a diet (p < 0.04 had a higher acceptance of illness. A higher acceptance of illness contributes to a higher general quality of life and a better perception of one’s health.

  6. The dynamic interplay between appraisal and core affect in daily life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PeterKuppens

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Appraisals and core affect are both considered central to the experience of emotion. In this study we examine the bidirectional relationships between these two components of emotional experience by examining how core affect changes following how people appraise events and how appraisals in turn change following how they feel in daily life. In an experience sampling study, participants recorded their core affect and appraisals of ongoing events; data were analyzed using cross-lagged multilevel modeling. Valence-appraisal relationships were found to be characterized by congruency: The same appraisals that were associated with a change in pleasure-displeasure (motivational congruency, other-agency, coping potential, and future expectancy, changed themselves as a function of pleasure-displeasure. In turn, mainly secondary appraisals of who is responsible and how one is able to cope with events were associated with changes in arousal, which itself is followed by changes in the future appraised relevance of events. These results integrate core affect and appraisal approaches to emotion by demonstrating the dynamic interplay of how appraisals are followed by changes in core affect which in turn change our basis for judging future events.

  7. 火麻仁油及甾醇对家蚕寿命影响的观察%Observation of Influence of Semen Cannabis Oil and Sterol on Bombyx Mori Linnaeus Life-span

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李寒冰; 孙静雅; 马永洁; 李根林; 任慧玲

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察火麻仁油及火麻仁甾醇对家蚕寿命的影响,探讨火麻仁油及甾醇的抗衰老作用.方法:取龄期相同、生长整齐的三眠蚕随机分为8组,即空白对照组,火麻仁油高、中、低剂量组,火麻仁甾醇高、中、低剂量组,维生素E对照组,每组110条.使用涂抹法将药液涂抹于新鲜桑叶上,4龄期内喂食3次,5龄期内喂食6次.结果:火麻仁油及甾醇高、中、低剂量组均对家蚕幼虫生存期较空白对照组明显延长(P<0.01或P<0.05),其中火麻仁甾醇能显著延长家蚕全生存期(P<0.01或P<0.05).与空白组相比,火麻仁油及甾醇均能显著延长5龄期家蚕耐饥饿时间(P<0.01).结论:火麻仁油及甾醇均能够延长家香各龄期生存期时间.%Objective:To observe the influence of Semen Cannabis oil and sterol on bombyx mori linnaeus life-span and discuss their anti-aging effect. Methods: Sanmian silkworm with the same age and growth were randomly divided into eight groups, namely blank control group, high, middle, low dose of Semen Cannabis oil group, high, meddle, low dose of Semen Cannabis oil and sterol group, positive control group. Physic liquor is daubed on the mulberry leaf ,3 times during 4 instars and 6 times during 5 instars. Results:The life-span of bombyx mori linnaeus larva was significantly longer in high, meddle, low dose of Semen Cannabis oil and sterol group compared with control group(P<0.01 or P<0.05). Semen Cannabis oil and sterol can significantly extend the all life span(P<0.01 or P<0.05). Compared with the blank control group, Semen Cannabis oil and sterol can significantly extend the hunger resistance time during 5 instars (P <0.01), Conclusion:both Semen Cannabis oil and sterol can extend the life span time of bombyx mori Linnaeus during any instars.

  8. Factors Affecting Quality of Life of the Homebound Elderly Hemiparetic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Takemasa, Seiichi; Nakagoshi, Ryoma; Murakami, Masahito; Uesugi, Masayuki; Inoue, Yuri; Gotou, Makoto; Koeda, Hideki; Naruse, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the quality of life (QOL) of homebound elderly hemiparetic stroke patients and factors that affect it. [Subjects] The subjects of the study were 21 homebound elderly hemiparetic stroke patients who were 65 years old or over and required care for daily living (12 males and 9 females, average age: 79.3 ± 8.4 years old). Their physical and psychological conditions, QOL, and other characteristics were researched. [Methods] The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) wa...

  9. Relation of happiness, hope and affection with quality of life in patients with heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Nave Leal, Elisabete; Pais-Ribeiro, José Luís; Oliveira, Mário; Silva, Nogueira da; Soares, Rui; Santos, Sofia; Ferreira, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Meeting the actual role of positive psychology, begins to be recognized the relation of positive variables with health. Objective: To know the relation of happiness, hope and affection with quality of life in individuals with heart failure. Population and Methodology: 128 individuals with heart failure, 98 men and 30 women, 61.9±12,1 years of age, 6,6±3,9 years in school and 74,2% retired because of this disease. 56,3% were in Class III of New York Heart Association, with poo...

  10. Compatible spanning trees

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Olaverri, Alfredo Martin; Huemer, Clemens; Hurtado Díaz, Fernando Alfredo; Tejel Altarriba, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Two plane geometric graphs are said to be compatible when their union is a plane geometric graph. Let S be a set of n points in the Euclidean plane in general position and let T be any given plane geometric spanning tree of S. In this work, we study the problem of finding a second plane geometric tree T' spanning S, such that is compatible with T and shares the minimum number of edges with T. We prove that there is always a compatible plane geometric tree T' having at most #n - 3#/4 edges in ...

  11. Early life trauma is associated with altered white matter integrity and affective control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Vincent; Amick, Melissa A; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H

    2016-08-01

    Early life trauma (ELT) has been shown to impair affective control and attention well into adulthood. Neuroimaging studies have further shown that ELT was associated with decreased white matter integrity in the prefrontal areas in children and adults. However, no study to date has looked at the relationship between white matter integrity and affective control in individuals with and without a history of ELT. To examine this, we tested 240 Veterans with (ELT N = 80) and without (NoELT N = 160) a history of childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse or family violence. Affective control was measured with the Affective Go/No-Go (AGN) and attention was indexed with the Test of Variable Attention (TOVA). White matter integrity was measured using fractional anisotropy (FA). Results showed greater number of errors on the AGN in ELT compared to NoELT. There was no difference on the TOVA. While there were no mean differences in FA, there was an interaction between FA and reaction time to positive stimuli on the AGN where the ELT group showed a positive relationship between FA and reaction time in right frontal and prefrontal areas, whereas the NoELT group showed a negative or no association between FA and reaction time. This suggests that ELT may be associated with a distinct brain-behavior relationship that could be related to other determinants of FA than those present in healthy adults. PMID:27214523

  12. The odor of a plant metabolite affects life history traits in dietary restricted adult olive flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerofotis, Christos D.; Ioannou, Charalampos S.; Nakas, Christos T.; Papadopoulos, Nikos T.

    2016-01-01

    Food quality shapes life history traits either directly or through response of individuals to additional environmental factors, such as chemical cues. Plant extracts used as food additives modulate key life history traits; however little is known regarding such effects for olfactory chemical cues. Exploiting an interesting experimental system that involves the olive fly (Bactrocera oleae) and the plant metabolite α-pinene we asked whether exposure of adults to this compound modulates adult longevity and female reproduction in similar manner in a stressful – dietary (protein) restricted (DR) and in a relaxed- full diet (FD) feeding environment. Accordingly, we exposed males and females to the aroma of α-pinene and measured lifespan and age-specific fecundity in the above two dietary contexts. Our results demonstrate that exposure to α-pinene increased longevity in males and fecundity in females only under dietary restricted conditions. In relaxed food conditions, females exposed to α-pinene shifted high egg-laying towards younger ages compared to non-exposed ones. This is the first report demonstrating that a plant compound affects key life history traits of adult olive flies through olfaction. These effects are sex-specific and more pronounced in dietary restricted adults. Possible underlying mechanisms and the ecological significance are discussed. PMID:27339862

  13. The odor of a plant metabolite affects life history traits in dietary restricted adult olive flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerofotis, Christos D; Ioannou, Charalampos S; Nakas, Christos T; Papadopoulos, Nikos T

    2016-01-01

    Food quality shapes life history traits either directly or through response of individuals to additional environmental factors, such as chemical cues. Plant extracts used as food additives modulate key life history traits; however little is known regarding such effects for olfactory chemical cues. Exploiting an interesting experimental system that involves the olive fly (Bactrocera oleae) and the plant metabolite α-pinene we asked whether exposure of adults to this compound modulates adult longevity and female reproduction in similar manner in a stressful - dietary (protein) restricted (DR) and in a relaxed- full diet (FD) feeding environment. Accordingly, we exposed males and females to the aroma of α-pinene and measured lifespan and age-specific fecundity in the above two dietary contexts. Our results demonstrate that exposure to α-pinene increased longevity in males and fecundity in females only under dietary restricted conditions. In relaxed food conditions, females exposed to α-pinene shifted high egg-laying towards younger ages compared to non-exposed ones. This is the first report demonstrating that a plant compound affects key life history traits of adult olive flies through olfaction. These effects are sex-specific and more pronounced in dietary restricted adults. Possible underlying mechanisms and the ecological significance are discussed. PMID:27339862

  14. A major QTL affects temperature sensitive adult lethality and inbreeding depression in life span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Background The study of inbreeding depression has major relevance for many disciplines, including conservation genetics and evolutionary biology. Still, the molecular genetic basis of this phenomenon remains poorly characterised, as knowledge on the mechanistic causes of inbreeding depression and...... the molecular properties of genes that give rise to or modulate its deleterious effects is lacking. These questions warrant the detailed study of genetic loci giving rise to inbreeding depression. However, the complex and polygenic nature of general inbreeding depression makes this a daunting task......-chromosome. Conclusion This demonstrates that analysis of large conditional lethal effects is a viable strategy for delineating genes which are sensitive to inbreeding depression....

  15. Life-span effects of ionizing radiation in the beagle dog: A summary account of four decades of research funded by the US Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly 40 years ago, the US Atomic Energy Commission made a far- reaching commitment to the support of life-span radiation-effects studies in a relatively long-lived animal, the beagle dog. Something in the range of 200 million dollars has already been spent on a group of closely related experiments, many of which are only now coming to fruition. Responsible fiscal management of these studies, directed toward securing an optimum return from past investments, and toward creative planning of future directions, requires a comprehensive view of this total effort. This report is designed to provide that comprehensive view. This is primarily intended as a research management document. Evaluation and interpretation are tasks for those directly involved in conducting these experiments. The limited objective of the present document is to describe what has been done, to give some of the background for why it was done, to describe results already realized and applications that have been made of these results -- all in a manner designed to display the total effort rather than piecemeal details. While proposing no specific answers to the questions ''Where do we go from here?''it is hoped that the document will provide a basis for approaching that question in an informed manner. The maintenance of a continuity of scientific understanding and direction in these experiments, which often continue beyond the initiating investigators' working life, is no small part of the problem involved in conducting these experiments

  16. Life-span effects of ionizing radiation in the beagle dog: A summary account of four decades of research funded by the US Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Nearly 40 years ago, the US Atomic Energy Commission made a far- reaching commitment to the support of life-span radiation-effects studies in a relatively long-lived animal, the beagle dog. Something in the range of 200 million dollars has already been spent on a group of closely related experiments, many of which are only now coming to fruition. Responsible fiscal management of these studies, directed toward securing an optimum return from past investments, and toward creative planning of future directions, requires a comprehensive view of this total effort. This report is designed to provide that comprehensive view. This is primarily intended as a research management document. Evaluation and interpretation are tasks for those directly involved in conducting these experiments. The limited objective of the present document is to describe what has been done, to give some of the background for why it was done, to describe results already realized and applications that have been made of these results -- all in a manner designed to display the total effort rather than piecemeal details. While proposing no specific answers to the questions ''Where do we go from here.''it is hoped that the document will provide a basis for approaching that question in an informed manner. The maintenance of a continuity of scientific understanding and direction in these experiments, which often continue beyond the initiating investigators' working life, is no small part of the problem involved in conducting these experiments.

  17. Working Environment Factors that Affect Quality of Work Life among Attendants in Petrol Stations in Kitale Town in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Aloys Nyagechi Kiriago; Henry M. Bwisa

    2013-01-01

    This research sought to establish working environment factors that affect Quality of Work Life among petrol station attendants in Kitale town. The objective of the study was to identify working environment aspects that affect Quality of Work Life among petrol station attendants. This study was an exploratory survey, carried out in 17 petrol stations that are located in Kitale Town, Kenya. The target population comprised 17 station managers and 170 attendants, out of which a sample of 102 resp...

  18. Dysautonomia Differentially Influences the Effect of Affective Pain Perception on Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, D.; Seco, J.; Tijero, B.; Abecia, L. C.; Gómez-Esteban, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to evaluate the real effect of dysautonomic symptoms on the influence of affective pain perception on quality of life in PD patients. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out using 105 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients of the Movement Disorders Unit, Hospital de Cruces (Bilbao, Spain) [men 59 (56.2%), women 46 (43.85%)]. Statistical analysis was made in order to evaluate the possible association of pain with life quality. Results. Quality of life measured by PDQ-39 (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire for quality of life) was statistically associated with affective dimension of pain (PRIA, affective pain rating index). However, the influence of this dimension on PDQ-39 was different in the specific case of PD patients that experimented a high score (>12) in SCOPA-AUT (Scale for Outcomes in PD-Autonomic scale). Conclusions. These results confirm the effect of affective perception of pain in life quality of PD patients, indicating the critical role of autonomic symptoms in the modulation of the influence of pain on quality of life and showing the possible utility of dysautonomia as clinical prognostic indicator of quality of life in PD patients affected by pain.

  19. Dysautonomia Differentially Influences the Effect of Affective Pain Perception on Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Our aim was to evaluate the real effect of dysautonomic symptoms on the influence of affective pain perception on quality of life in PD patients. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out using 105 Parkinson’s disease (PD patients of the Movement Disorders Unit, Hospital de Cruces (Bilbao, Spain [men 59 (56.2%, women 46 (43.85%]. Statistical analysis was made in order to evaluate the possible association of pain with life quality. Results. Quality of life measured by PDQ-39 (Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire for quality of life was statistically associated with affective dimension of pain (PRIA, affective pain rating index. However, the influence of this dimension on PDQ-39 was different in the specific case of PD patients that experimented a high score (>12 in SCOPA-AUT (Scale for Outcomes in PD-Autonomic scale. Conclusions. These results confirm the effect of affective perception of pain in life quality of PD patients, indicating the critical role of autonomic symptoms in the modulation of the influence of pain on quality of life and showing the possible utility of dysautonomia as clinical prognostic indicator of quality of life in PD patients affected by pain.

  20. Dysautonomia Differentially Influences the Effect of Affective Pain Perception on Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, D; Seco, J; Echevarría, E; Tijero, B; Abecia, L C; Gómez-Esteban, J C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to evaluate the real effect of dysautonomic symptoms on the influence of affective pain perception on quality of life in PD patients. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out using 105 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients of the Movement Disorders Unit, Hospital de Cruces (Bilbao, Spain) [men 59 (56.2%), women 46 (43.85%)]. Statistical analysis was made in order to evaluate the possible association of pain with life quality. Results. Quality of life measured by PDQ-39 (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire for quality of life) was statistically associated with affective dimension of pain (PRIA, affective pain rating index). However, the influence of this dimension on PDQ-39 was different in the specific case of PD patients that experimented a high score (>12) in SCOPA-AUT (Scale for Outcomes in PD-Autonomic scale). Conclusions. These results confirm the effect of affective perception of pain in life quality of PD patients, indicating the critical role of autonomic symptoms in the modulation of the influence of pain on quality of life and showing the possible utility of dysautonomia as clinical prognostic indicator of quality of life in PD patients affected by pain. PMID:27239367

  1. The Relation between Big Five Traits and Well-being across the Life Span%不同年龄群体大五人格与幸福感关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志霞; 李启明

    2014-01-01

    以毕生发展为研究视角,调查了3192位不同年龄群体被试,探讨不同年龄群体大五人格与幸福感的关系。结果发现:(1)各变量都存在显著的年龄效应,大五人格与主观幸福感相关显著;(2)在不同年龄群体里,神经质和开放性都能显著预测主观幸福感,且预测值随着年龄而增大,而外倾性、尽责性和宜人性对主观幸福感的预测存在年龄差异;(3)大五人格对主观幸福感的解释率随着年龄的增长而下降,到60岁之后其解释率上升;(4)年龄在大五人格与主观幸福感之间起了显著的调节作用。%In the current study, we examine the relationship between personality traits and subjective well-being and psy-chological well-being from a life span perspective.A total of 3192 Chinese residents took part in this study from 41 cities in the country 17 provinces and municipalities.And they completed the subjective well-being scale and big five-factor inventory.It took about 20 minutes to complete the questionnaires.The correlations among factors were calculated with SPSS 16.0 and Structural equation model was applied to deal with all data.In the analysis of struc-tural equation modeling, seven models were constructed.As predicted, personality traits were significantly associat-ed with subjective well-being with the different age groups of Chinese residents.And then Structural equation mod-els revealed that ages play a moderating role between personality traits and subjective well-being, and the total effect value was different.In conclusion, this research indicates that personality traits were associated with greater happiness across the life span, and personality traits were one of the best predictors.This study provides new in-sights into personal traits as predictors of well-being.Especially, this study addressed some limitations of previous studies.Importantly, this study also helps clarify questions about

  2. Life span study report 11, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 75,991 A-bomb survivors, shielded kerma and organ doses were calculated based on the new dosimetry system 1986 (DS86) and the previous tentative 1965 dose revised (T65DR) to compare risk coefficients for site-specific cancer mortality during the period 1950 - 1985. As for shielded kerma, the excess relative risk over the various sites and the excess numbers of cancer deaths per 104 person-year-gray were 1.35 - 1.51 and 1.38 - 1.61 times higher, respectively, under the DS86 than under the T65DR. The attributable risks did not differ in the two dosimetric systems. The risk coefficients based on the DS86 organ-absorbed doses were generally smaller than those based on the T65DR values. The difference in cancer mortality between Hiroshima and Nagasaki was smaller with the DS86 than with the T65DR; however, this was not statistically significant for either shielded kerma and organ-absorbed dose. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Life Span Personality Stability in Sibling Statuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, B. G.

    Personality stability and change in sibling status in the one- and two-child-family are examined in this Study. Q-sort data were analyzed for the same 33 male and 34 female subjects during four periods of their lives-- early and late adolescence and early and middle adulthood. Results indicate that stability of personality was greatest during…

  4. Life span study report 10 - 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study extends the previous report on cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors by adding data from four additional years of follow-up (1979 - 82) and by expanding the cohort (now designated LSS-E85) to include 11,393 Nagasaki survivors located between 2,500 - 9,999 m from the hypocenter at the time of the bombing (ATB). Significant dose responses were observed for leukemia, for cancers of the lung, female breast, stomach, colon, esophagus, and urinary bladder, and for multiple myeloma. Four new categories of cancer were also investigated: the results for cancers of the liver and intrahepatic bile ducts and of the ovary and other uterine adnexa were suggestive of significant radiation effects, but the positive dose responses for cancers of the gallbladder and prostate were not significant. Due to diagnostic difficulties and the lack of evidence for radiogenic effects at these sites, the results for liver and ovarian cancers do not provide convincing evidence for radiogenic effects. With the exception of multiple myeloma, the relative risk (RR) of radiation-induced cancer mortality was greater for women than for men, for each nonleukemic cancer with a significant overall dose response. These differences can be attributed in large measure to differences in the background cancer mortality rates, which are generally much higher for men than women. For leukemia there was no significant sex difference in the RR, while for multiple myeloma women had a slightly, though nonsignificantly, lower RR than males. A statistically significant interaction (p = .008) between the effects of age ATB and attained age on radiation-related mortality was also observed for cancers other than leukemia. In particular, the initially large RRs seen in those who were young ATB have decreased with time, while the smaller RRs for those who were older ATB tended to increase. (author)

  5. Enhancing cognitive function across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Donna L

    2002-04-01

    Glucose administration regulates many neural and behavioral processes in rodents, including learning and memory. Given the important role of glucose in brain function and the safety of glucose as a treatment, we have investigated the effects of glucose administration in humans of different ages. In previous work, we examined the effects of early-morning glucose consumption on cognitive functions in elderly individuals. In this population, glucose enhanced performance on specific measures, particularly on those tasks where mild age-related deficits appear (e.g., verbal declarative memory). Interestingly, glucose failed to enhance cognitive functions in young adults. Our recent work has examined three issues related to glucose enhancement of cognition: First, is glucose effective only in reversing impairments or can it also facilitate performance in highly functioning individuals? Second, are glucose effects dependent either on time of day or on interactions with other meals? Third, are typical breakfast foods as effective as glucose in enhancing cognitive performance? Our findings suggest that glucose can improve memory in highly functioning populations as it does in populations with deficits. However, enhancement by glucose may require sufficient levels of task difficulty and of blood glucose. In addition, like glucose, early morning consumption of cereal can improve performance on some cognitive tests. These results have important implications for the nature of glucose facilitation of memory and for the role of dietary factors in performance of many daily activities. PMID:11976194

  6. Temperament and Generativity during the life span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Rizzo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review aimed to collect and discuss a variety of studies that utilized the Temperament and Chatacter Inventory (TCI, an instrument developed by Cloninger in 1993, based on his psychobiological model of temperament and character. Searching on PubMed, 26 from 828 researches has been selected on the basis of four criteria: (a articles published in English between 1993 and 2013 and identified as empirical or longitudinal studies; (b reaserches conducted in non pathological sample; (c measuring temperamental traits or dimensions with the TCI; (d regarding relevant topics to generativity. Implication for Temperament and character of couples and about the transmission of temperament from parents to children are pointed out. In conlcusion it can be said that TCI is a valid instrument that can describe and predict couples relationship and child temperament and character, until the late adulthood.

  7. Understanding Aggressive Behavior Across the Life Span

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianghong; Lewis, Gary; Evans, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is the observable manifestation of aggression and is often associated with developmental transitions and a range of medical and psychiatric diagnoses across the lifespan. As healthcare professionals involved in the medical and psychosocial care of patients from birth through death, nurses frequently encounter—and may serve as—both victims and perpetrators of aggressive behavior in the workplace. While the nursing literature has continually reported research on prevention a...

  8. IS LIFE-SPAN UNDER OUR CONTROL??

    OpenAIRE

    Parle Milind; Bansal Nitin; Bansal Seema

    2011-01-01

    With each passing day, we age. Our body gets flooded with unwanted and deleterious elements, our cells lose their ability to divide, our nervous, endocrine and immune systems weaken with advancing age. Sagging skin, wrinkled face, graying hair, loss of muscle strength, reduced reflexes, low energy levels, increasing fat, faulty memory (dementia), weak immunity, impaired vision, defective hearing, decreased libido, cardiovascular problems and neurodegenerative disorders (like Parkinsonism and ...

  9. Life Spectacles: Media, Business Synergy, and Affective Work in Neoliberal China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Ren

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Chinese media communicates the meanings of everyday life has been significantly reconfigured since the late 1970s. ‘Folk television’ or ‘life television’ has been developed as a popular television genre that focuses on ordinary people and their lived experiences. This phenomenon reflects the neoliberal development of China’s cultural institutions in general and the privatization of television production and distribution in particular. Meanwhile, cultural enterprises also shape the way in which Chinese citizens conduct themselves. In such domains as leisure and consumption, operators of theme built environments such as theme parks, theme shopping malls, and even residential communities deploy spatial planning and engineering techniques to subtly train their users to behave in a particular way to become proper citizens. This type of business through real estate development, a dominant sector of the Chinese economy, contributes to the national project of managing social risks in China’s neoliberal process. To illustrate how media and leisure companies engage in cultural production appropriate to China’s neoliberal development, this paper examines both a television production of news about ‘ordinary people’ and a theme park operation of ethnic festival by focusing on the relationship between media convergence, business synergy, and affective work.

  10. Affect and Subsequent Physical Activity: An Ambulatory Assessment Study Examining the Affect-Activity Association in a Real-Life Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermann, Christina Y. N.; Herrmann, Christian; von Haaren, Birte; van Kann, Dave; Woll, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, cognitive, motivational, and volitional determinants have been used to explain and predict health behaviors such as physical activity. Recently, the role of affect in influencing and regulating health behaviors received more attention. Affects as internal cues may automatically activate unconscious processes of behavior regulation. The aim of our study was to examine the association between affect and physical activity in daily life. In addition, we studied the influence of the habit of being physically active on this relationship. An ambulatory assessment study in 89 persons (33.7% male, 25 to 65 years, M = 45.2, SD = 8.1) was conducted. Affect was assessed in the afternoon on 5 weekdays using smartphones. Physical activity was measured continuously objectively using accelerometers and subjectively using smartphones in the evening. Habit strength was assessed at the beginning of the diary period. The outcomes were objectively and subjectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) performed after work. Multilevel regression models were used to analyze the association between affect and after work MVPA. In addition, the cross-level interaction of habit strength and affect on after work MVPA was tested. Positive affect was positively related to objectively measured and self-reported after work MVPA: the greater the positive affect the more time persons subsequently spent on MVPA. An inverse relationship was found for negative affect: the greater the negative affect the less time persons spent on MVPA. The cross-level interaction effect was significant only for objectively measured MVPA. A strong habit seems to strengthen both the positive influence of positive affect and the negative influence of negative affect. The results of this study confirm previous results and indicate that affect plays an important role for the regulation of physical activity behavior in daily life. The results for positive affect were consistent. However, in

  11. Affect and subsequent physical activity: An ambulatory assessment study examining the affect-activity association in a real-life context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eNiermann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cognitive, motivational and volitional determinants have been used to explain and predict health behaviors such as physical activity. Recently, the role of affect in influencing and regulating health behaviors received more attention. Affects as internal cues may automatically activate unconscious processes of behavior regulation. The aim of our study was to examine the association between affect and physical activity in daily life. In addition, we studied the influence of the habit of being physically active on this relationship.An ambulatory assessment study in 89 persons (33.7% male, 25 to 65 years, M=45.2, SD=8.1 was conducted. Affect was assessed in the afternoon on 5 weekdays using smartphones. Physical activity was measured continuously objectively using accelerometers and subjectively using smartphones in the evening. Habit strength was assessed at the beginning of the diary period. The outcomes were objectively and subjectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA performed after work. Multilevel regression models were used to analyze the association between affect and after work MVPA. In addition, the cross-level interaction of habit strength and affect on after work MVPA was tested.Positive affect was positively related to objectively measured and self-reported after work MVPA: the greater the positive affect the more time persons subsequently spent on MVPA. An inverse relationship was found for negative affect: the greater the negative affect the less time persons spent on MVPA. The cross-level interaction effect was significant only for objectively measured MVPA. A strong habit seems to strengthen both the positive influence of positive affect and the negative influence of negative affect.The results of this study confirm previous results and indicate that affect plays an important role for the regulation of physical activity behavior in daily life. The results for positive affect were consistent

  12. Affect and Subsequent Physical Activity: An Ambulatory Assessment Study Examining the Affect-Activity Association in a Real-Life Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermann, Christina Y N; Herrmann, Christian; von Haaren, Birte; van Kann, Dave; Woll, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, cognitive, motivational, and volitional determinants have been used to explain and predict health behaviors such as physical activity. Recently, the role of affect in influencing and regulating health behaviors received more attention. Affects as internal cues may automatically activate unconscious processes of behavior regulation. The aim of our study was to examine the association between affect and physical activity in daily life. In addition, we studied the influence of the habit of being physically active on this relationship. An ambulatory assessment study in 89 persons (33.7% male, 25 to 65 years, M = 45.2, SD = 8.1) was conducted. Affect was assessed in the afternoon on 5 weekdays using smartphones. Physical activity was measured continuously objectively using accelerometers and subjectively using smartphones in the evening. Habit strength was assessed at the beginning of the diary period. The outcomes were objectively and subjectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) performed after work. Multilevel regression models were used to analyze the association between affect and after work MVPA. In addition, the cross-level interaction of habit strength and affect on after work MVPA was tested. Positive affect was positively related to objectively measured and self-reported after work MVPA: the greater the positive affect the more time persons subsequently spent on MVPA. An inverse relationship was found for negative affect: the greater the negative affect the less time persons spent on MVPA. The cross-level interaction effect was significant only for objectively measured MVPA. A strong habit seems to strengthen both the positive influence of positive affect and the negative influence of negative affect. The results of this study confirm previous results and indicate that affect plays an important role for the regulation of physical activity behavior in daily life. The results for positive affect were consistent. However, in

  13. Over-expression of the catalytic core of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase in the nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster reduces median life span by inducing mtDNA depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Azorín, Francisco; Calleja, Manuel; Hernández-Sierra, Rosana; Farr, Carol L.; Kaguni, Laurie S.; Garesse, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase γ (pol γ) is the sole DNA polymerase devoted to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We have characterized the molecular and physiological effects of over-expression of the catalytic subunit of pol γ, pol γ-α, in the nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster using the upstream activation sequence (UAS)/yeast transcriptional activator by binding to UAS (GAL4) system. Tissue-specific over-expression of pol γ-α was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, whereas the very low levels of endogenous protein are undetectable in UAS or GAL4 control lines. The transgenic flies over-expressing pol γ-α in the nervous system showed a moderate increase in pupal lethality, and a significant decrease in the median life span of adult flies. Moreover, these flies displayed a decrease in the rate of synthesis of mtDNA, which is accompanied by a significant mtDNA depletion, and a corresponding decrease in the levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA). Biochemical analysis showed an oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defect in transgenic flies, which were more susceptible to oxidative stress. Although we did not detect apoptosis in the nervous system of adult transgenic flies, brains of larvae over-expressing pol γ-α showed evidence of increased cell death that correlates with the observed phenotypes. Our data establish an animal model that mimics some of the features of human mtDNA depletion syndromes. PMID:17999718

  14. A report from the 2013 international symposium: the evaluation of the effects of low-dose radiation exposure in the life span study of atomic bomb survivors and other similar studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E J; Ozasa, K; Ban, N; de González, A Berrington; Cologne, J; Cullings, H M; Doi, K; Furukawa, K; Imaoka, T; Kodama, K; Nakamura, N; Niwa, O; Preston, D L; Rajaraman, P; Sadakane, A; Saigusa, S; Sakata, R; Sobue, T; Sugiyama, H; Ullrich, R; Wakeford, R; Yasumura, S; Milder, C M; Shore, R E

    2015-05-01

    The RERF International Low-Dose Symposium was held on 5-6 December 2013 at the RERF campus in Hiroshima, Japan, to discuss the issues facing the Life Span Study (LSS) and other low-dose studies. Topics included the current status of low-dose risk detection, strategies for low-dose epidemiological and statistical research, methods to improve communication between epidemiologists and biologists, and the current status of radiological studies and tools. Key points made by the participants included the necessity of pooling materials over multiple studies to gain greater insight where data from single studies are insufficient; generating models that reflect epidemiological, statistical, and biological principles simultaneously; understanding confounders and effect modifiers in the current data; and taking into consideration less studied factors such as the impact of dose rate. It is the hope of all participants that this symposium be used as a trigger for further studies, especially those using pooled data, in order to reach a greater understanding of the health effects of low-dose radiation. PMID:25811153

  15. Leptin affects life history decisions in a passerine bird: a field experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Lõhmus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organisms face trade-offs regarding their life-history strategies, such as decisions of single or multiple broods within a year. In passerines displaying facultative multiple breeding, the probability of laying a second clutch is influenced by several life-history factors. However, information about the mechanistic background of these trade-offs is largely lacking. Leptin is a protein hormone produced by white fat cells, and acts as a signal between peripheral energy depots and the central nervous system. In addition, leptin affects cells at all levels of the reproductive axis and plays a critical role in regulating the allocation of metabolic energy to reproduction. As such, it is possible that leptin levels influence the decision of whether or not to invest time and energy into a second clutch. Accordingly, we expect a treatment with exogenous leptin to result in an increased number of second broods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At a later stage during the first brood, female great tits were treated either with long-term leptin-filled cholesterol pellets (the experimental birds or with pellets containing only cholesterol (the control birds. We found that leptin-treated females were significantly more likely to have a second brood and that the earlier females were more likely to lay a second clutch than the late females. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As both timing of first brood and treatment with leptin were important in the decision of having multiple broods, the trade-offs involved in the breeding strategy most likely depend on multiple factors. Presumably leptin has evolved as a signal of energy supply status to regulate the release of reproductive hormones so that reproduction is coordinated with periods of sufficient nutrients. This study investigated the role of leptin as a mediator between energy resources and reproductive output, providing a fundamentally new insight into how trade-offs work on a functional basis.

  16. Maintaining Life Satisfaction in Adolescence: Affective Mediators of the Influence of Perceived Emotional Intelligence on Overall Life Satisfaction Judgments in a Two-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Álvarez, Nicolás; Extremera, Natalio; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the psychological processes underlying the improvement in mood states and human well-being, particularly during adolescence. Theoretical and empirical research suggests that emotional skills may play a role in enhancing perceived well-being; however, the mechanisms involved in during adolescence are unclear. The purpose of this study was to extend understanding by investigating the potential mediators of the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and life satisfaction in a 2-years study. Participants were 269 high school students (145 girls and 124 boys) who completed the self-report perceived emotional intelligence (PEI) Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale three times at 1-year intervals. The three-step longitudinal design corroborated earlier research indicating that positive and negative affect mediate the relationships between EI and life satisfaction. Students with high PEI tended to have more positive experiences and fewer negative experiences, which contributed to their greater life satisfaction. No sex differences were found in the multi-group analyses, suggesting that the causal relationships are similar in both sexes. These findings extend our understanding of the complex network of relationships involving PEI and life satisfaction in adolescence. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed. PMID:26834654

  17. Characteristics of the activity-affect association in inactive people: an ambulatory assessment study in daily life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BirteVon Haaren

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute and regular exercise as well as physical activity is related to wellbeing and positive affect. Recent studies have shown that even daily, unstructured physical activities increase positive affect. However, the attempt to achieve adherence to physical activity or exercise in inactive people through public health interventions has often been unsuccessful. Most studies analyzing the activity-affect association in daily life, did not report participants´ habitual activity behavior. Thus, samples included active and inactive people, but they did not necessarily exhibit the same affective reactions to physical activity in daily life. Therefore the present study investigated whether the association between physical activity and subsequent affective state in daily life can also be observed in inactive individuals. We conducted a pilot study with 29 inactive university students (mean age 21.3 yrs ± 1.7 using the method of ambulatory assessment. Affect was assessed via electronic diary and physical activity was measured with accelerometers. Participants had to rate affect every two hours on a six item bipolar scale reflecting the three basic mood dimensions energetic arousal, valence and calmness. We calculated activity intensity level (mean Metabolic Equivalent (MET value and the amount of time spent in light activity over the last 15 minutes before every diary prompt and conducted within-subject correlations. We did not find significant associations between activity intensity and the three mood dimensions. Due to the high variability in within-subject correlations we conclude that not all inactive people show the same affective reactions to physical activity in daily life. Analyzing the physical activity-affect association of inactive people was difficult due to little variance and distribution of the assessed variables. Interactive assessment and randomized controlled trials might help solving these problems. Future studies should examine

  18. Spanning paths in hypercubes

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořák, Tomáš; Gregor, Petr; Koubek, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Given a family \\u_i,v_i\\_i=1^k of pairwise distinct vertices of the n-dimensional hypercube Q_n such that the distance of u_i and v_i is odd and k≤n-1, there exists a family \\P_i\\_i=1^k of paths such that u_i and v_i are the endvertices of P_i and \\V(P_i)\\_i=1^k partitions V(Q_n). This holds for any n≥2 with one exception in the case when n=k+1=4. On the other hand, for any n≥3 there exist n pairs of vertices satisfying the above condition for which such a family of spanning paths does not ex...

  19. Relationship between sleep and health-related quality of life in patients affected with insomnia : a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Jun; 罗骏

    2013-01-01

    Background Insomnia is a common and increasing illness among general population all over the world. With insomnia, patients would more likely to have physical, social dysfunction and mood disorders, and even have increased risk of accidents. Therefore, identifying the harm of insomnia and improving the quality of life of patients are very important. Objectives The objective of this systematic review is to evaluate quality of life in patients affected with insomnia. Particularly foc...

  20. Demographic factors affecting quality of life of hemodialysis patients – Lahore, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anees, Muhammad; Malik, Muzammil Riaz; Abbasi, Tanzeel; Nasir, Zeeshan; Hussain, Yasir; Ibrahim, Muhamamd

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the demographic factors affecting Quality Of Life (QOL) of hemodialysis (HD) patients. Methods: This observational study was conducted at Shalamar Hospital, Lahore. Patients of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and on maintenance HD for more than three months were included during the period March to June 2012. Patient of ESRD not on dialysis and Acute Renal Failure were excluded. One hundred and twenty five patients who fulfilled the criteria were included. Demographic data containing age, sex, residence, socio economic status, education, mode of traveling for dialysis, total time consumed in dialysis were collected by the investigators. QOL index was measured using 26 items, WHO QOL BREF. Results: There were 89(71.2%) male and 36(28.8%) female patients. Environmental domain score was highest (p=0.000) than all other domains in HD Patients. In overall analysis age, marital status and total time consumed in getting HD effect QOL significantly (p=social relation in QOL (p=social relation domain. Monthly income and place of residence is positive predictor of QOL in environment domain. Conclusion: Gender, age, marital status, unemployment, residence of rural area, economical status, distance covered to reach hospital, mode of transport, total time consumed in getting HD, effect QOL in HD patient. Education level is a positive factor for improving QOL of HD patients. PMID:25225539

  1. Different immunological responses to early-life antibiotic exposure affecting autoimmune diabetes development in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Youjia; Jin, Ping; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-08-01

    Environmental factors clearly influence the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease. We have studied gut microbiota as important environmental agents that could affect the initiation or progression of type 1 diabetes especially in the prenatal period. We used neomycin, targeting mainly Gram negative or vancomycin, targeting mainly Gram positive bacteria, to treat pregnant NOD mothers and to study autoimmune diabetes development in their offspring. Neomycin-treated offspring were protected from diabetes, while vancomycin-treated offspring had accelerated diabetes development, and both antibiotics caused distinctly different shifts in gut microbiota composition compared with the offspring from untreated control mice. Our study demonstrated that neomycin treatment of pregnant mothers leads to generation of immune-tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the offspring and these APCs had reduced specific autoantigen-presenting function both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the protection from diabetes mediated by tolerogenic APCs was vertically transmissible to the second generation. In contrast, more diabetogenic inflammatory T cells were found in the lymphoid organs of the offspring from the vancomycin-treated pregnant mothers. This change however was not transmitted to the second generation. Our results suggested that prenatal exposure to antibiotic influenced gut bacterial composition at the earliest time point in life and is critical for consequent education of the immune system. As different bacteria can induce different immune responses, understanding these differences and how to generate self-tolerogenic APCs could be important for developing new therapy for type 1 diabetes. PMID:27178773

  2. Early life in a barren environment adversely affects spatial cognition in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Tahamtani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial cognition in vertebrates is adversely affected by a lack of environmental complexity during early life. However, to our knowledge no previous studies have tested the effect of early exposure to varying degrees of environmental complexity on specific components of spatial cognition in chickens. There are two main rearing systems for laying hens in the EU: aviaries and cages. These two systems differ from one another in environmental complexity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that rearing in a barren cage environment relative to a complex aviary environment causes long-lasting deficits in the ability to perform spatial tasks. For this purpose, 24 white Dekalb laying hens, half of which had been reared in an aviary system and the other half in a conventional cage system, were tested in a holeboard task. Birds from both treatment groups learnt the task, however the cage-reared hens required more time to locate rewards and had poorer levels of working memory. The latter finding supports the hypothesis that rearing in a barren environment causes long-term impairment of short-term memory in chickens.

  3. Dysautonomia Differentially Influences the Effect of Affective Pain Perception on Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rada, D.; Seco, J.; Echevarría, E.; B. Tijero; Abecia, L. C.; J. C. Gómez-Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to evaluate the real effect of dysautonomic symptoms on the influence of affective pain perception on quality of life in PD patients. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was carried out using 105 Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients of the Movement Disorders Unit, Hospital de Cruces (Bilbao, Spain) [men 59 (56.2%), women 46 (43.85%)]. Statistical analysis was made in order to evaluate the possible association of pain with life quality. Results. Quality of life...

  4. Factors affecting life cycle assessment of milk produced on 6 Mediterranean buffalo farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirlo, G; Carè, S; Fantin, V; Falconi, F; Buttol, P; Terzano, G M; Masoni, P; Pacelli, C

    2014-10-01

    This study quantifies the environmental impact of milk production of Italian Mediterranean buffaloes and points out the farm characteristics that mainly affect their environmental performance. Life cycle assessment was applied in a sample of 6 farms. The functional unit was 1 kg of normalized buffalo milk (LBN), with a reference milk fat and protein content of 8.3 and 4.73%, respectively. The system boundaries included the agricultural phase of the buffalo milk chain from cradle to farm gate. An economic criterion was adopted to allocate the impacts on milk production. Impact categories investigated were global warming (GW), abiotic depletion (AD), photochemical ozone formation (PO), acidification (AC), and eutrophication (EU). The contribution to the total results of the following farm activities were investigated: (1) on-farm energy consumption, (2) manure management, (3) manure application, (4) on-farm feed production (comprising production and application of chemical fertilizers and pesticides), (5) purchased feed production, (6) enteric fermentation, and (7) transport of purchased feeds, chemical fertilizers, and pesticides from producers to farms. Global warming associated with 1 kg of LBN resulted in 5.07 kg of CO₂ Eq [coefficient of variation (CV)=21.9%], AD was 3.5 × 10(-3) kg of Sb Eq (CV=51.7%), PO was 6.8 × 10(-4) kg of C₂H₄ Eq (CV=28.8%), AC was 6.5 × 10(-2) kg of SO₂ Eq (CV=30.3%), and EU was 3.3 × 10(-2) kg of PO₄(3-) Eq (CV=36.5%). The contribution of enteric fermentation and manure application to GW is 37 and 20%, respectively; on-farm consumption, on-farm feed production, and purchased feed production are the main contributors to AD; about 70% of PO is due to enteric fermentation; manure management and manure application are responsible for 55 and 25% of AC and 25 and 55% of EU, respectively. Methane and N₂O are responsible for 44 and 43% of GW, respectively. Crude oil consumption is responsible for about 72% of AD; contribution of

  5. Normative Life Events and PTSD in Children: How Easy Stress Can Affect Children’s Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Kousha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to traumatic events is common in children and adolescent. Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is an emotional reaction to traumatic events, which is increasingly recognized to be a prevalent and disabling disorder. The aim of this study is to determine the distribution of normative life events which predicts PTSD in youth who referred to an outpatient clinic in Rasht, Iran. This study is a cross-sectional descriptive study. The samples of children and adolescents ranging from 1-18 yr old who were diagnosed PTSD based on DSM-IV criteria in psychiatric interview and K-SADS (Kiddie-schedule for affective disorder and schizophrenia for school age children semi-structured diagnostic interview, from 2005 until 2008.The information consist of: age, sex, comorbidity with PTSD, events accompanying with PTSD, and time interval between events and visit. Eighty four youth who met the diagnosis of PTSD and their parents participated in the survey. Half of PTSD youth were 6-11 years old and admitted to clinic in the first 3 months after events. The most common events were witnessing violent or fearful scenes on TV followed by witnessing someone's death or funeral ceremony. The most comorbidity with PTSD included: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and anxiety. Our results indicate that youth exposure to violent or fearful scenes on TV could be very traumatic for them. Informing parents about the potential effect of low-magnitude stressors such as violent or fearful scenes on TV and funeral ceremony can decrease the prevalence of PTSD in youth.

  6. Differences in Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Depression between Successfully and Unsuccessfully Rehabilitated Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Martha H.; Holbert, Donald

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether persons with spinal cord injuries who were successfully rehabilitated differed from those who were not with regard to positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and depression. An ex post facto research design compared persons with spinal cord injuries who were previously employed with persons with spinal cord…

  7. Procrastination, Self-Regulation Failure, Academic Life Satisfaction, and Affective Well-Being: Underregulation or Misregulation Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkis, Murat; Duru, Erdinç

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of self-regulation failure in procrastination. In addition, it also aimed to investigate the effects of procrastination on affective well-being and academic life satisfaction. Three hundred and twenty-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The most obvious finding emerging from this…

  8. THE ANALYSIS OF AFFECT OF THE TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS ENDING DEATH TO THE LIFE EXPECTATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Derya KOC; Hakan TUZUN; Isil MARAL

    2006-01-01

    We make observations for year 1999, backward on the traffic accidents and deaths in the registrations and countries, based on the age and sex classifications by analyzing using life table techniques. In conclusion we observed that in tables that are prepared by excluded traffic accidents, effects seen in all ranges of sex and totally life losing from the age of zero. Life expectancy for year 1999 in Turkey, our observations pointed out the number 74.43 on the life table including all the deat...

  9. Role of Virtues and Perceived Life Stress in Affecting Psychological Symptoms among Chinese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wenjie; Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Siu, Bowie P. Y.; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the relationship among virtues, self-perceived life stress, and psychological symptoms. Participants: A total of 235 undergraduates participated in the study in March 2013. Methods: The participants were recruited to complete the Life Stress Rating Scale for College Students, the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire that…

  10. Affective Isolation as a Coping Strategy for Persons with Low and High Amounts of Life Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, John F.; Spridigliozzi, Gail A.

    1982-01-01

    Studied the effect of a laboratory-induced stress (failure feedback) on persons with differing levels of life stress. Proposed that differing levels of previous life stress cause people to make varying judgments about the degree of threat in a short-term stressful situation. (Author)

  11. Risk of affective disorders following prenatal exposure to severe life events: a Danish population-based cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, Ali S

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of prenatal exposure to severe life events on risk of affective disorders in the offspring. METHODS: In a cohort of 1.1 million Danish births from May 1978 until December 1997, mothers were considered exposed if one (or more) of their close relatives died or was diagnosed with serious illness up to 6 months before conception or during pregnancy. Offspring were followed up from their 10th birthday until their death, migration, onset of affective disorder or 31 December 2007; hospital admissions were identified by linkage to the Central Psychiatric Register. Log-linear Poisson regression was used for data analysis. RESULTS: The risk of affective disorders was increased in male offspring whose mothers were exposed to severe life events during the second trimester (adjusted RR 1.55 [95% CI 1.05-2.28]). There was an increased risk of male offspring affective disorders in relation to maternal exposure to death of a relative in the second trimester (adjusted RR 1.74 [95% CI 1.06-2.84]) or serious illness in a relative before pregnancy (adjusted RR 1.44 [95% CI 1.02-2.05]). There was no evidence for an association between prenatal exposure to severe life events and risk of female offspring affective disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Our population-based study suggests that prenatal maternal exposure to severe life events may increase the risk of affective disorders in male offspring. These findings are consistent with studies of populations exposed to famine and earthquake disasters which indicate that prenatal environment may influence the neurodevelopment of the unborn child.

  12. Factors Affecting Family Satisfaction with Inpatient End-of-Life Care

    OpenAIRE

    Sadler, Erin; Hales, Brigette; Henry, Blair; Xiong, Wei; Myers, Jeff; Wynnychuk, Lesia; Taggar, Ru; Heyland, Daren; Fowler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Little data exists addressing satisfaction with end-of-life care among hospitalized patients, as they and their family members are systematically excluded from routine satisfaction surveys. It is imperative that we closely examine patient and institution factors associated with quality end-of-life care and determine high-priority target areas for quality improvement. Methods Between September 1, 2010 and January 1, 2012 the Canadian Health care Evaluation Project (CANHELP) Bereavem...

  13. Does Chemotherapy Really Affect the Quality of Life of Women with Breast Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Sook Yeon; Chang, Sun Ju; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this cross-sectional study were to explore and evaluate the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on quality of life in breast cancer patients according to the survival time from surgery. Methods Completed questionnaires were collected from 534 women with breast cancer. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were reviewed and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast cancer instrument, global quality of life, Beck Depression Inventory, and unmet sexuality needs were ...

  14. Poor sleep quality and other symptoms affecting quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vitkova, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on poor sleep quality and other neuropsychiatric manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS). Emphasis is put on symptoms of MS, such as pain, depression, anxiety or fatigue, and how they are related to poor sleep quality in MS. Second, the thesis also focuses on bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction and their relation with sleep quality and health-related quality of life . We found that bladder dysfunction has a negative impact on quality of life in patients with MS irrespec...

  15. Factors affecting quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Durmaz, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases are currently the most common cause of death worldwide and associated with significant impairment of quality of life (QOL). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the QOL patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) in our country and the factors associated with QOL in these patients. Materials and Methods: The study population was composed of 85 patients diagnosed with stable CHD. The data were collected using Ferrans and Powers' Quality of Life Index Ca...

  16. Affective and sensory dimensions of pruritus severity: associations with psychological symptoms and quality of life in psoriasis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R.; Zachariae, C.O.; Lei, U.;

    2008-01-01

    The subjective dimensions of pruritus and their associations with psychological symptoms and quality of life were explored in a sample of 40 psoriasis patients. The patients completed a scale with descriptors from the Structured Itch Questionnaire together with measures of depression, distress...... severity, showed affective, but not sensory, pruritus severity to be a significant predictor of depressive symptoms, global distress, impairment of sleep, and pruritus-related quality of life. Mediation analyses indicated that impaired sleep quality partly mediated the association between pruritus severity...

  17. Affective and sensory dimensions of pruritus severity: Associations with psychological symptoms and quality of life in psoriasis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Zachariae, Claus; Lei, Ulrikke;

    2008-01-01

    The subjective dimensions of pruritus and their associations with psychological symptoms and quality of life were explored in a sample of 40 psoriasis patients. The patients completed a scale with descriptors from the Structured Itch Questionnaire together with measures of depression, distress...... severity, showed affective, but not sensory, pruritus severity to be a significant predictor of depressive symptoms, global distress, impairment of sleep, and pruritus-related quality of life. Mediation analyses indicated that impaired sleep quality partly mediated the association between pruritus severity...

  18. Assisting the Return to Normal Life in Chernobyl-Affected Regions: The International Chernobyl Research and Information Network (ICRIN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the International Chernobyl Research and Information Network (ICRIN) project, a programme designed to meet the priority information needs of communities in areas of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine which were affected by the 1986 nuclear accident. Its aim is to empower Chernobyl affected communities through targeted delivery of the most recent scientific information on the accident’s impacts, translated into practical advice, including recommendations on healthy lifestyles. Supported by a United Nations General Assembly resolution, the project is part of a broader effort by all United Nations agencies to help local communities return to normal life, under the United Nations Action Plan on Chernobyl to 2016. (author)

  19. Gene–environment interplay in Drosophila melanogaster: Chronic food deprivation in early life affects adult exploratory and fitness traits

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, James Geoffrey; Svetec, Nicolas; Rowe, Locke; Mery, Frederic; Dolan, Michael J.; Boyce, W. Thomas; Sokolowski, Marla B.

    2012-01-01

    Early life adversity has known impacts on adult health and behavior, yet little is known about the gene–environment interactions (GEIs) that underlie these consequences. We used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to show that chronic early nutritional adversity interacts with rover and sitter allelic variants of foraging (for) to affect adult exploratory behavior, a phenotype that is critical for foraging, and reproductive fitness. Chronic nutritional adversity during adulthood did not aff...

  20. Quality of Work Life on Employees Job Involvement and Affective Commitment between the Public and Private Sector in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    P. Yukthamarani Permarupan; Abdullah Al- Mamun; Roselina Ahmad Saufi

    2013-01-01

    This study is designed to examine the relationship between the quality of work life (QWL), employees’ job involvement and affective commitment among the employees of the public and private sector organizations in Malaysia. A total of 334 middle management level employees were selected to participate in this study. QWL was measured with five dimensions which are ‘fair and appropriate salary’, ‘working conditions’, ‘capacities at work’, ‘opportunities at work’ and ‘organization climate’. The in...

  1. A poor start in life negatively affects dominance status in adulthood independent of body size in green swordtails Xiphophorus helleri

    OpenAIRE

    Royle, Nick J.; Lindström, Jan; Metcalfe, Neil B

    2005-01-01

    Whilst there is an abundance of studies revealing how dominance interactions affect access to resources critical for survival and reproductive success, very little is known about how dominance status is influenced by early life experiences. However, there is increasing evidence that early developmental trajectories can shape the physiology and behaviour of the adult. In particular, compensatory growth following a period of poor nutrition can have long-term effects on the phenotype. Since catc...

  2. Does mode of administration affect health-related quality-of-life outcomes after stroke?

    OpenAIRE

    Caute, A.; Northcott, S.; Clarkson, L.; Pring, T.; Hilari, K.

    2012-01-01

    Telephone interviews and postal surveys may be a resource-efficient way of assessing health-related quality-of-life post-stroke, if they produce data equivalent to face-to-face interviews. This study explored whether telephone interviews and postal surveys of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL-39g) yielded similar results to face-to-face interviews. Participants included people with aphasia and comprised two groups: group one (n =22) were 3-6 months post-stroke; group two (n ...

  3. The Space Physics of Life: Searching for Biosignatures on Habitable Icy Worlds Affected by Space Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2006-01-01

    Accessible surfaces of the most likely astrobiological habitats (Mars, Europa, Titan) in the solar system beyond Earth are exposed to various chemical and hydrologic weathering processes directly or indirectly induced by interaction with the overlying space environment. These processes can be both beneficial, through provision of chemical compounds and energy, and destructive, through chemical dissociation or burial, to detectable presence of biosignatures. Orbital, suborbital, and surface platforms carrying astrobiological instrumentation must survive, and preferably exploit, space environment interactions to reach these habitats and search for evidence of life or its precursors. Experience from Mars suggests that any detection of biosignatures must be accompanied by characterization of the local chemical environment and energy sources including irradiation by solar ultraviolet photons and energetic particles from the space environment. Orbital and suborbital surveys of surface chemistry and astrobiological potential in the context of the space environment should precede targeted in-situ measurements to maximize probability of biosignature detection through site selection. The Space Physics of Life (SPOL) investigation has recently been proposed to the NASA Astrobiology Institute and is briefly described in this presentation. SPOL is the astrobiologically relevant study of the interactions and relationships of potentially? or previously inhabited, bodies of the solar system with the surrounding environments. This requires an interdisciplinary effort in space physics, planetary science, and radiation biology. The proposed investigation addresses the search for habitable environments, chemical resources to support life, and techniques for detection of organic and inorganic signs of life in the context of the space environment.

  4. Does Rurality Affect Quality of Life Following Treatment for Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Arndt, Stephanie A.; Cox, Cathy R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The present research examined the extent to which rural residence and social support seeking are associated with quality of life (QOL) among breast cancer patients following chemotherapy. Methods: Female breast cancer patients (n = 46) from communities of varying degrees of rurality in a Midwestern state completed psychological and QOL…

  5. Social environment affects the life history tactic of a phoretic mite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehring, Volker; Müller, Josef K

    2009-01-01

    Phoretic animals use their hosts for travelling to habitat patches suitable for reproduction. Some species, such as the mite Poecilochirus carabi, are phoretic as juveniles and cannot leave their habitat once they reach adulthood. Previous work has shown that mites exercise choice over the habitat...... influence of the social environment on a phoretic's habitat choice and life history....

  6. Ways by Which Comparable Income Affects Life Satisfaction in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chau-kiu; Leung, Kwan-kwok

    2008-01-01

    Proponents of social equality attribute low life satisfaction to income inequality in society, an inequality which occurs when most people have relatively low income and only a few have high income. In contrast, range-frequency theory and other social comparison theories predict that when most people have low income, they are satisfied because of…

  7. What Aspects of Society Affect the Quality of Life of a Minority?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggren, Niclas; Bjørnskov, Christian; Nilsson, Therese

    2015-01-01

    There is great variation in views on and treatment of minorities such as gay men across the world. We are the first to pinpoint what features of societies that are beneficial to gay men’s quality of life by making use of a unique new cross-country dataset covering 110 countries, the Gay Happiness...

  8. Does adversity early in life affect general population suicide rates? a cross-national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Bhandarkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adversity early in life has been suggested as a protective factor for elderly suicides. However, studies examining this relationship in general population suicide rates are scarce. METHODS: The relationship between general population suicide rates and four proxy measures of adversity earlier in life was examined using data from the World Health Organization and the United Nations data banks. RESULTS: General population suicide rates were negatively correlated with the percentage of children under the age of 5 years who were underweight, the percentage of children under the age of 5 years who were under height, the percentage of infants with low birth weight babies, and the percentage of the general population that was undernourished. The only independent predictor general population suicide rates in both sexes, on multiple regression analysis, was the Gini coefficient (a measure of income inequality. CONCLUSIONS: Income inequality may lead to low birth weight, undernourishment, underweight and under height because income inequality results in poor access to healthcare and nutrition. These adversities may increase child mortality rates and reduce life expectancy. Those surviving into adulthood in countries with greater adversity early in life may be at reduced risk of suicide because of selective survival of those at reduced risk of suicide due to constitutional or genetic factors and development of greater tolerance to hardship in adulthood.

  9. Does ICD indication affect quality of life and levels of distress?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Sears, Samuel F; Burg, Matthew M;

    2009-01-01

    The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the treatment of choice for life-threatening arrhythmias, with ICD indications having recently been extended to include primary prophylaxis. Despite the medical benefits of the ICD, there is an ongoing debate as to the impact of the ICD on...

  10. Maternal aging affects life performance of progeny in a Holstein dairy cow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astiz, S; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Sebastian, F; Fargas, O; Cano, I; Cuesta, P

    2014-10-01

    The development and life performance of 404 high-producing Holstein dairy cows was studied from birth onwards and during two lactations. The management, environment and parental genetics of the cows were known in detail. Cluster analysis identified four performance 'types': high-yielding (HY) cows and persistently high-yielding (PHY) cows, which accounted for 33% of the animals; medium-yielding (MY) cows, 41%; and low-yielding (LY) cows, 26%. Prenatal determinants of the life performance of the progeny were analyzed. Developmental and environmental factors were excluded as determinants of performance (including birth weight, level of passive immunity transfer, growth rate, age at first parturition and reproductive efficiency). Life performance did show minor seasonal effects, with more HY cows but less PHY being born during the cold season (90.1% in HY; 58.3% in PHY v. 81.5%). Instead, the single most important factor influencing life performance of daughters was maternal age. HY cows were born from the youngest mothers (1.89±1.14 parturitions, 3.12±1.42-year old), whereas LY cows were born from the oldest (2.72±1.80 parturitions, 3.97±2.01-year old; Pmilk yield: r=0.357; fat yield: r=0.211; protein yield: r=0.277; P<0.0001), suggesting the influence of the individual. These results suggest that under optimal health, nutritional and environmental conditions, maternal aging is an important determinant of the life performance of progeny and argue for the need to identify conditions that contribute to health and disease in progeny according to the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease or DOHaD concept. Our findings may help the development of novel management guidelines for dairy farms. PMID:25084160

  11. Counting spanning trees in graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Azarija, Jernej

    2012-01-01

    The history of counting the number of spanning trees dates back into the year 1842 in which the German mathematician Gustav Kirchhoff derived a relation between the number of spanning trees of a graph G (τ(G)) and the determinant of a specific submatrix associated with G. After this result many other related results followed. For example in 1889 the British mathematician A. Cayley showed that the complete graph on n nodes has nn−2 spanning trees.The function τ can nowadays be found in the fi...

  12. Spanning Tree Based Attribute Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Jorge, Cordero Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    inconsistent edges from a maximum spanning tree by starting appropriate initial modes, therefore generating stable clusters. It discovers sound clusters through simple graph operations and achieves significant computational savings. We compare the Star Discovery algorithm against earlier attribute clustering...

  13. Parental Whole Life Cycle Exposure to Dietary Methylmercury in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Affects the Behavior of Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Zamorano, Francisco X; Klingler, Rebekah; Murphy, Cheryl A; Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica; Carvan, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an established neurotoxicant of concern to fish-eating organisms. While most studies have focused on the fish consumers, much less is known about the effects of MeHg on the fish themselves, especially following exposures to chronic and environmentally relevant scenarios. Here we evaluated the behavioral effects of developmental MeHg insult by exposing parental generations of zebrafish to an environmentally realistic MeHg dietary concentration (1 ppm) and two higher concentrations (3 and 10 ppm) throughout their whole life span. Upon reaching adulthood, their offspring were analyzed through a series of behavioral tests, including the visual-motor response (VMR) assay, analysis of spontaneous swimming and evaluation of foraging efficiency. The VMR assay identified decreased locomotor output in the 6 day postfertilization (dpf) offspring of fish exposed to 3 and 10 ppm MeHg. However, in a second test 7 dpf fish revealed an increase in locomotor activity in all MeHg exposures tested. Increases in locomotion continued to be observed until 16 dpf, which coincided with increased foraging efficiency. These results suggest an association between MeHg and hyperactivity, and imply that fish chronically exposed to MeHg in the wild may be vulnerable to predation. PMID:27023211

  14. Resistance of canola cultivars affect life table parameters of Nysius cymoides (Spinola (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollashahi Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A life table can be used as an important and appropriate tool to evaluate the susceptibility or resistance level of different host plant cultivars to insect pests. In the current study, we determined the suitability or inferiority of five different canola cultivars (Hayula420, Hayula401, Hayula50, Hayula60, RGS to Nysius cymoides, under laboratory conditions. Data were analysed based on the age-stage, two-sex life table theory. Nysius cymoides which fed on Hayula420 had the longest nymphal period, while those which fed on Hayula50 had the shortest nymphal period. Developmental times (sum of incubation and nymphal periods was longest for those which fe d on Hayula420 and the shortest for those which fed on Hayula50. The adult pre-oviposition period (APOP, total pre-oviposition period (TPOP, mean fecundity, and adult longevity of adults reared on different canola cultivars showed significant differences. The highest and lowest net reproductive rates (R0 were obtained for those which fed on Hayula420 (11.40 offspring per individual and Hayula401 (5.47 offspring per individual, respectively. The highest value (0.0395 d-1 for the intrinsic rate of increase (r was obtained for those which fed on Hayula 60 cultivar and the lowest value (0.0261 d-1 for those which fed on Hayula401 cultivar. The shortest and longest mean generation times (T were obtained for those which fed on RGS and H401 cultivars, respectively. The lowest and highest values of life expectancy (exj were obtained for those which fed on RGS and Hayula420 cultivars, respectively. The results showed that Hayula401 and RGS were not susceptible cultivars to N. cymoides. These cultivars showed higher resistance to N. cymoides, while Hayula60, Hayula420, and Hayula50 were found to be suitable cultivars but with lower resistance to N. cymoides, respectively.

  15. Significant Others : A Literature Review on How Peers and Teachers Affect Adolescents in Their Academic Life

    OpenAIRE

    Valdner, Faith

    2014-01-01

    Students spend most of their waking hours with their teachers and peers, who are considered to be the significant others, that influence their learning motivation and school life. Whether a student likes to go to school or not, whether she can adjust in school and engage in all learning activities, whether she can get good grades or fail depend not only on herself, but on the significant others. In this study, the aim is to find out how and in what ways teachers and peers influence adolescent...

  16. Post harvest life and quality of cut roses as affected by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher doses of gamma irradiation (25 to 100 krad) inhibited full expansion of cut rose flowers but prolonged that vase life. On the other hand, at lower doses (2.5 to 10 krad), maximum opening of flower buds was observed with better longevity than in untreated flowers in cut rose cvs. Raktagandha. It was observed that irradiation at 50 krad dose was found to be superior than other treatments. Furthermore, this treatment resulted in greater amounts of total soluble sugars (TSS) and less amount of total free amino acids (TFAA) than untreated control. (author)

  17. Factors affecting teachers' attitudes and practice of family life education in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olukoya, A A; Oyedeji, S O; Johnson, T O

    1992-01-01

    Questionnaires completed by 700 secondary school teachers in Nigeria's Lagos, Kaduna, and Cross-River States revealed a generally positive attitude toward family life education. 53.56% of respondents were female and 31.5%% were or had been married. Their average age was 28.3 years. One third of the teachers were not parents, and only 15.5% had children as old as their students. The teachers expressed agreement with the importance of school-based sex education (71.6%), the potential for family planning to improve health (82.9%), concern with rapid population growth (68.7%), and awareness that teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases are major social problems in Nigeria (84.7% and 74.9%, respectively). Most identified ages 10-14 years as the ideal time to talk to children about sex. Half considered it the mother's responsibility to provide sex education, and most felt it is easier to talk to a female child. 45% of teachers agreed that contraceptive services should be available to adolescents. The factors associated with a positive attitude toward family life education were female sex, single marital status, Christian religion, and teaching in a coeducational school. PMID:12319296

  18. Breast screening technologists: Does real-life case volume affect performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hazel J.; Gale, Alastair G.; Wooding, David S.

    2004-05-01

    In the UK fewer radiologists are now specialising in breast cancer screening. Consequently, a number of technologists have been specially trained to read mammograms so as to double-read with existing radiologists. Each year the majority of these film-readers examine a set of difficult cases as a means of self-assessing their skills. We investigated whether the technologists performed as well as breast-screening radiologists on this difficult test set. We also investigated technologists" performance over a number of years to compare the performance of those technologists who have read a greater number of breast screening films and those who have had less experience. Finally, we investigated real-life experience and performance on the scheme by comparing; volume of cases read, experience, and technologists" performance over time versus radiologists" performance. Data for approximately 250 breast screening Radiologists and 80 specially trained technologists over three years for six sets of 60 difficult recent screening cases were examined. Overall, those technologists who have not read the same volume of cases as radiologists did not perform as well on this particular task. Although when the group was fractionated by volume of cases read in real-life and the number of years reading cases, then the technologists performed at a level similar to the radiologists.

  19. Money and happiness: rank of income, not income, affects life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Christopher J; Brown, Gordon D A; Moore, Simon C

    2010-04-01

    Does money buy happiness, or does happiness come indirectly from the higher rank in society that money brings? We tested a rank-income hypothesis, according to which people gain utility from the ranked position of their income within a comparison group. The rank hypothesis contrasts with traditional reference-income hypotheses, which suggest that utility from income depends on comparison to a social reference-group norm. We found that the ranked position of an individual's income predicts general life satisfaction, whereas absolute income and reference income have no effect. Furthermore, individuals weight upward comparisons more heavily than downward comparisons. According to the rank hypothesis, income and utility are not directly linked: Increasing an individual's income will increase his or her utility only if ranked position also increases and will necessarily reduce the utility of others who will lose rank. PMID:20424085

  20. Life history traits and exploitation affect the spatial mean-variance relationship in fish abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ting-chun; Mandal, Sandip; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Hsieh, Chih-hao

    2016-05-01

    Fishing is expected to alter the spatial heterogeneity of fishes. As an effective index to quantify spatial heterogeneity, the exponent b in Taylor's power law (V = aMb) measures how spatial variance (V) varies with changes in mean abundance (M) of a population, with larger b indicating higher spatial aggregation potential (i.e., more heterogeneity). Theory predicts b is related with life history traits, but empirical evidence is lacking. Using 50-yr spatiotemporal data from the California Current Ecosystem, we examined fishing and life history effects on Taylor's exponent by comparing spatial distributions of exploited and unexploited fishes living in the same environment. We found that unexploited species with smaller size and generation time exhibit larger b, supporting theoretical prediction. In contrast, this relationship in exploited species is much weaker, as the exponents of large exploited species were higher than unexploited species with similar traits. Our results suggest that fishing may increase spatial aggregation potential of a species, likely through degrading their size/age structure. Results of moving-window cross-correlation analyses on b vs. age structure indices (mean age and age evenness) for some exploited species corroborate our findings. Furthermore, through linking our findings to other fundamental ecological patterns (occupancy-abundance and size-abundance relationships), we provide theoretical arguments for the usefulness of monitoring the exponent b for management purposes. We propose that age/size-truncated species might have lower recovery rate in spatial occupancy, and the spatial variance-mass relationship of a species might be non-linear. Our findings provide theoretical basis explaining why fishery management strategy should be concerned with changes to the age and spatial structure of exploited fishes. PMID:27349101

  1. Diabetes-dependent quality of life (ADDQOL) and affecting factors in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia K.; Bakomitrou, Florentia; Trikallinou, Aikaterini; Ganotopoulou, Asimina; Verras, Chris; Christofilidis, George; Bousboulas, Stavros; Μelidonis, Αndreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2D) is a chronic metabolic disease with a great impact on health status and quality of life (QoL) in terms of physical, social, and psychological well-being. The aim of the present study was to measure diabetes-dependent QoL and affecting factors in patients with T2D. Methods Study population was consisted by 258 subjects with T2D attending diabetic outpatient clinics of General Hospitals of Piraeus “Tzaneio” and Nikaia “Ag.Panteleimon” during September–D...

  2. Aircraft noise in Berlin affects quality of life even outside the airport grounds

    OpenAIRE

    Eibich, Peter; Kholodilin, Konstantin; Krekel, Christian; Wagner, Gert G.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft noise is a particularly problematic source of noise as many airports are located in or near major cities and, as a result, densely populated areas are affected. Data from the Berlin Aging Study II (Berliner Altersstudie II, BASE-II), whose socio-economic module is based on the longitudinal Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study which has been conducted since 1984, allows us to examine the effect of different levels of aircraft noise on the subjective wellbeing and health of the older resi...

  3. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions affect the life-cycle analysis of algal biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers around the world are developing sustainable plant-based liquid transportation fuels (biofuels) to reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Algae are attractive because they promise large yields per acre compared to grasses, grains and trees, and because they produce oils that might be converted to diesel and gasoline equivalents. It takes considerable energy to produce algal biofuels with current technology; thus, the potential benefits of algal biofuels compared to petroleum fuels must be quantified. To this end, we identified key parameters for algal biofuel production using GREET, a tool for the life-cycle analysis of energy use and emissions in transportation systems. The baseline scenario produced 55 400 g CO2 equivalent per million BTU of biodiesel compared to 101 000 g for low-sulfur petroleum diesel. The analysis considered the potential for greenhouse gas emissions from anaerobic digestion processes commonly used in algal biofuel models. The work also studied alternative scenarios, e.g., catalytic hydrothermal gasification, that may reduce these emissions. The analysis of the nitrogen recovery step from lipid-extracted algae (residues) highlighted the importance of considering the fate of the unrecovered nitrogen fraction, especially that which produces N2O, a potent greenhouse gas with global warming potential 298 times that of CO2. (letter)

  4. Colony pace: a life-history trait affecting social insect epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechel, Séverine Denise; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2016-01-13

    Among colonies of social insects, the worker turnover rate (colony 'pace') typically shows considerable variation. This has epidemiological consequences for parasites, because in 'fast-paced' colonies, with short-lived workers, the time of parasite residence in a given host will be reduced, and further transmission may thus get less likely. Here, we test this idea and ask whether pace is a life-history strategy against infectious parasites. We infected bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) with the infectious gut parasite Crithidia bombi, and experimentally manipulated birth and death rates to mimic slow and fast pace. We found that fewer workers and, importantly, fewer last-generation workers that are responsible for rearing sexuals were infected in colonies with faster pace. This translates into increased fitness in fast-paced colonies, as daughter queens exposed to fewer infected workers in the nest are less likely to become infected themselves, and have a higher chance of founding their own colonies in the next year. High worker turnover rate can thus act as a strategy of defence against a spreading infection in social insect colonies. PMID:26763696

  5. Quality of life, vulnerability and resilience: a qualitative study of the tsunami impact on the affected population of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Josephine Fauci

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This qualitative study is aimed at analysing the impact of the 2004 tsunami on the Quality of Life of the Sri Lankan population. It focused on the factors that have contributed to an increase in the people's susceptibility to the impact of hazards - their vulnerability - as well as of the natural ability to cope of the populations affected - their resilience. METHODOLOGY: The study is based on the conduction of 10 Focus Group discussions and 18 In-depth Interviews, then analysed through a qualitative analysis software. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The analysis shows that each factor involved in the interplay among the different processes that produced the changes in the affected people's quality of life is at the same time a damaged asset, a vulnerability factor and a resource to draw upon for coping. The complexity of this situation opens further speculation as to how disasters and relief interventions influence relationships and dynamics in society. This should thus be further investigated, together with the effects of individual and group trauma on society.

  6. Spanning trees and the Eurozone crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João

    2013-12-01

    The sovereign debt crisis in the euro area has not yet been solved and recent developments in Spain and Italy have further deteriorated the situation. In this paper we develop a new approach to analyze the ongoing Eurozone crisis. Firstly, we use Maximum Spanning Trees to analyze the topological properties of government bond rates’ dynamics. Secondly, we combine the information given by both Maximum and Minimum Spanning Trees to obtain a measure of market dissimilarity or disintegration. Thirdly, we extend this measure to include a convenient distance not limited to the interval [0, 2]. Our empirical results show that Maximum Spanning Tree gives an adequate description of the separation of the euro area into two distinct groups: those countries strongly affected by the crisis and those that have remained resilient during this period. The measures of market dissimilarity also reveal a persistent separation of these two groups and, according to our second measure, this separation strongly increased during the period July 2009-March 2012.

  7. Impounding Experimental Research of Large Span Aqueduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafeng Deng

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have a research of the impounding experimental research of large span aqueduct. Caohe aqueduct is the mark building of the middle line of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project, of which the span is 30m. For this aqueduct, the structure is relatively complicated with great technical difficulties, what’s more there's no engineering experience or theoretical method to provide reference in domestic and abroad. It can be seen clear that whether the actual stressing state, deformation conditions and prestressed tension effect etc. meet the design requirements will directly affect the safe operation of aqueduct, so the impounding experiment of the aqueduct was carried out before formal operation. At the meanwhile, the deformation characteristics and stress characteristics of the aqueduct under various impounding conditions were analyzed in detail. The experiment results analysis shows that, the aqueduct structure is under a good elastic working condition with only 0.98mm maximum deflection deformation at mid-span, which meets the design and specification requirements. At the same time, all of the measure point’s stress is in the range of designed material, which means the structure form is safe and reliable and can meet the requirements of the later operation good.

  8. Leaf life span and nitrogen content in semideciduous forest tree species (Croton priscus and Hymenaea courbaril Duração da vida da folha e conteúdo de nitrogênio em espécies arbóreas (Croton priscus e Hymenaea courbaril de floresta semidecídua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Regina Baptista Haddad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In comparison to deciduous species, evergreen plants have lower leaf nutrient contents and higher leaf life span, important mechanisms for nutrient economy, allowing the colonization of low fertility soils. Strategies to conserve nitrogen in two semideciduous tropical forest tree species, with different leaf life spans were analyzed. The hypothesis was the fact that the two species would present different nitrogen conservation mechanisms in relation to chemical (total nitrogen, protein, chlorophyll, and proteolytic activity, functional (leaf life span, N-use efficiency, and N-resorption efficiency, morphological (specific leaf mass leaf characteristics, and total nitrogen in the soil. Hymenaea courbaril L. presented lower nitrogen compounds in leaves, longer leaf life span, higher N-use efficiency, and higher specific leaf mass, while absorbing proportionally less nitrogen from the soil than Croton priscus Croizat. These characteristics can contribute for a better nitrogen economy strategy of H. courbaril. No relationship was found between leaf life span and N resorption efficiency, nor between leaf life span, protease activity and nitrogen mobilization. The electrophoretic profiles of proteolytic enzymes in young leaves of the two species presented more bands with enzymatic activity than other kinds of leaves.Comparadas a espécies decíduas, as sempre-verdes têm menos nutrientes nas folhas, que também são mais longevas. Estes mecanismos são importantes para economia de nutrientes, e permitem a colonização de solos com baixa fertilidade. Foram analisadas estratégias de conservação de nitrogênio em duas espécies de floresta semidecídua, que aparentemente apresentavam longevidades foliares diferentes. Para isto foram comparados mecanismos químicos (concentrações de nitrogênio total, de proteína e clorofila e atividade proteolítica, funcionais (duração de vida das folhas, eficiência do uso de nitrogênio e eficiência de

  9. Wheat cultivars affecting life history and digestive amylolytic activity of Sitotroga cerealella Olivier (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzoui, E; Naseri, B

    2016-08-01

    The life history and digestive α-amylase activity of the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella Olivier (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) were studied on six wheat cultivars (Arg, Bam, Nai 60, Pishtaz, Sepahan and Shanghai) at 25 ± 1°C, relative humidity of 65 ± 5% and a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D) h. A delay in the developmental time of S. cerealella immature stages was detected when larvae were fed on cultivar Sepahan. The maximum survival rate of immature stages was seen on cultivar Bam (93.33 ± 2.10%), and the minimum rates were on cultivars Nai 60 (54.66 ± 2.49%) and Sepahan (49.33 ± 4.52%). The highest realized fecundity and fertility were recorded for females which came from larvae fed on cultivar Bam (93.30 ± 2.10 eggs/female and 91.90 ± 3.10%, respectively); and the lowest ones were observed for females which came from larvae fed on cultivar Sepahan (49.30 ± 4.50 eggs/female and 67.4 ± 11.1%, respectively). The heaviest male and female weights of S. cerealella were observed on cultivar Bam (2.97 ± 0.02 and 4.80 ± 0.01 mg, respectively). The highest amylolytic activity of the fourth instar was detected on cultivar Bam (0.89 ± 0.04 mg maltose min-1), which had the maximum mean hundred-wheat weight (5.92 ± 0.19 g). One α-amylase isozyme was detected in the midgut extracts from the fourth instar larvae fed on different wheat cultivars, and the highest intensity was found in larvae fed on cultivar Bam. Correlation analyses showed that very high correlations existed between the immature period, fecundity and fertility on one side and inhibition of α-amylase, soluble starch content and hundred-wheat weight on the other. According to the obtained results, cultivar Sepahan is an unfavorable host for the feeding and development of S. cerealella. PMID:27019124

  10. Diethylstilbestrol at environmental levels affects the development of early life stage and target gene expression in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bingli; Peng, Wei; Li, Wei; Yu, Yingxin; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yipei

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the biologic effects of DES on the early life and adult life stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were evaluated. At the early life stage, the fertilized eggs were exposed to 1-1000 ng/L diethylstilbestrol (DES) for 15 days and the hatched larvae were continually exposed to the same concentrations for an additional 25 days. Significant adverse effects on hatchability, time to hatching and mortality rate occurred at DES concentrations of 100 and 1000 ng/L, while the abnormality (scoliosis and abdominal swelling) rate was significantly increased at 10 ng/L and above. After exposure, the fish were maintained in charcoal-dechlorinated tap water for a further 30 days. Only the male gonadosomatic index (GSI) at 1000 ng/L was significantly increased. At concentrations greater than 1 ng/L, estrogen receptor α (ERα) mRNA in both sexes and vitellogenin-I (Vtg-I) mRNA in males were significantly down-regulated; while Vtg-I mRNA in females was significantly up-regulated. When sexually mature medaka were exposed to 10 and 1000 ng/L DES for 21 days, only the GSI in females was significantly decreased at 1000 ng/L. At 10 and 1000 ng/L, ERα mRNA in both sexes was significantly down-regulated, while Vtg-I mRNA in males was significantly up-regulated. These findings showed that DES at the environmental concentration of 10 ng/L can affect the early life stage development of medaka and alter liver ERα and Vtg-I gene expression. Therefore, if we only focused on these sensitive toxicity endpoints such as ERα and Vtg-I mRNA expression, DES has a strong estrogenic effect on Japanese medaka. PMID:26908245

  11. A distributed spanning tree algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karl Erik; Jørgensen, Ulla Lundin; Nielsen, Svend Hauge;

    1988-01-01

    We present a distributed algorithm for constructing a spanning tree for connected undirected graphs. Nodes correspond to processors and edges correspond to two way channels. Each processor has initially a distinct identity and all processors perform the same algorithm. Computation as well as...

  12. A Distributed Spanning Tree Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karl Erik; Jørgensen, Ulla Lundin; Nielsen, Sven Hauge; Nielsen, Søren Erik; Skyum, Sven

    We present a distributed algorithm for constructing a spanning tree for connected undirected graphs. Nodes correspond to processors and edges correspond to two-way channels. Each processor has initially a distinct identity and all processors perform the same algorithm. Computation as well as...

  13. Detailed free span assessment for Mexilhao flow lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Antonio; Franco, Luciano; Eigbe, Uwa; BomfimSilva, Carlos [INTECSEA, Houston, TX (United States); Escudero, Carlos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The subsea gas production system of Mexilhao Field SPS-35, Santos Basin, offshore Brazil, is composed basically of two rigid 12.75 inches production flow lines approximately 21 km long installed in a fairly rough seabed. During the basic design, the free span assessment was performed considering the maximum allowable free span length determined by the response model proposed by DNV-RP-F105. This approach resulted in a large number of predicted free span requiring corrections, leading to a higher capital cost for the project. In this sense, a detailed free span VIV fatigue assessment was proposed, considering multi-spans and multi-mode effects and also the post lay survey data. The assessment followed the DNV-RP-F105 recommendations for multi-spans and multi-mode effects, using Finite Element Analysis to determine the natural frequencies, mode shapes and corresponding stresses associated with the mode shapes. The assessment was performed in three stages, the first during the detailed design as part of the bottom roughness analysis using the expected residual pipelay tension. The second stage was performed after pipelay, considering the post-lay survey data, where the actual requirements for span correction were determined. Actual pipelay tension was used and seabed soil stiffness adjusted in the model to match the as-laid pipeline profile obtained from the survey data. The first and second stage assessments are seamlessly automated to speed up the evaluation process and allow for quick response in the field, which was important to keep the construction vessel time minimized. The third stage was performed once the corrections of the spans were made and the purpose was to confirm that the new pipeline configuration along the supported spans had sufficient fatigue life for the temporary and operational phases. For the assessment of all three stages, the probability of occurrence and directionality of the near bottom current was considered to improve prediction of the

  14. Identifying biologically meaningful hot-weather events using threshold temperatures that affect life-history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J Cunningham

    Full Text Available Increases in the frequency, duration and intensity of heat waves are frequently evoked in climate change predictions. However, there is no universal definition of a heat wave. Recent, intense hot weather events have caused mass mortalities of birds, bats and even humans, making the definition and prediction of heat wave events that have the potential to impact populations of different species an urgent priority. One possible technique for defining biologically meaningful heat waves is to use threshold temperatures (T(thresh above which known fitness costs are incurred by species of interest. We set out to test the utility of this technique using T(thresh values that, when exceeded, affect aspects of the fitness of two focal southern African bird species: the southern pied babbler Turdiodes bicolor (T(thresh = 35.5 °C and the common fiscal Lanius collaris (T(thresh = 33 °C. We used these T(thresh values to analyse trends in the frequency, duration and intensity of heat waves of magnitude relevant to the focal species, as well as the annual number of hot days (maximum air temperature > T(thresh, in north-western South Africa between 1961 and 2010. Using this technique, we were able to show that, while all heat wave indices increased during the study period, most rapid increases for both species were in the annual number of hot days and in the maximum intensity (and therefore intensity variance of biologically meaningful heat waves. Importantly, we also showed that warming trends were not uniform across the study area and that geographical patterns in warming allowed both areas of high risk and potential climate refugia to be identified. We discuss the implications of the trends we found for our focal species, and the utility of the T(thresh technique as a conservation tool.

  15. Affective Disposition, Thinking Styles, Neuroticism and Life Satisfaction / Disposición afectiva, estilos de pensamiento, neuroticismo y satisfacción vital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Zanon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The way in which positive and negative affects are perceived may be associated with a distinct pattern of behaviors and attitudes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between various combinations of affections and gender along with tendencies towards neuroticism, rumination, reflection, and life satisfaction. The participants were 348 students, who answered the questionnaire in groups. The euphoric group showed the highest scores of life satisfaction and emotional stability, while the dysphoric group presented the lowest scores. The emotional and apathetic groups showed no significant differences in relation to life satisfaction, depression, anxiety and vulnerability. From these results, it can be assumed that positive affect can lessen the impact that negative affect has on the development of vulnerability and other psychopathological symptoms. Interventions based on positive affect increase might be efficient to prevent vulnerability.

  16. Demography, disease and the devil: life-history changes in a disease-affected population of Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachish, Shelly; McCallum, Hamish; Jones, Menna

    2009-03-01

    1. Examining the demographic responses of populations to disease epidemics and the nature of compensatory responses to perturbation from epidemics is critical to our understanding of the processes affecting population dynamics and our ability to conserve threatened species. Such knowledge is currently available for few systems. 2. We examined changes to the demography and life-history traits of a population of Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) following the arrival of a debilitating infectious disease, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), and investigated the population's ability to compensate for the severe population perturbation caused by this epizootic. 3. There was a significant change to the age structure following the arrival of DFTD to the Freycinet Peninsula. This shift to a younger population was caused by the loss of older individuals from the population as a direct consequence of DFTD-driven declines in adult survival rates. 4. Offspring sex ratios of disease mothers were more female biased than those of healthy mothers, indicating that devils may facultatively adjust offspring sex ratios in response to disease-induced changes in maternal condition. 5. We detected evidence of reproductive compensation in response to disease impacts via a reduction in the age of sexual maturity of females (an increase in precocial breeding) over time. 6. The strength of this compensatory response appeared to be limited by factors that constrain the ability of individuals to reach a critical size for sexual maturity in their first year, because of the time limit dictated by the annual breeding season. 7. The ongoing devastating impacts of this disease for adult survival and the apparent reliance of precocial breeding on rapid early growth provide the opportunity for evolution to favour of this new life-history pattern, highlighting the potential for novel infectious diseases to be strong selective forces on life-history evolution. PMID:19021786

  17. SPANNING Between Structure and Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yongmei

    2005-01-01

    The design project, a new student union building for the Virginia Tech campus is a 420-foot-long structure spanning from earth to water. Along a steel-glass bridge, three simple volumes play together to achieve the functions of the student union. There is an order among Nature, Architecture, and People in this project. Simple geometric forms and the elegant structure interact with nature to achieve the order. People animate the serenity and become the core of the poetic environment. ...

  18. KeySpan Energy Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    Operating in Alberta, KeySpan is a gas processing company with 14 gas plant facilities and pipelines in the province. Since its employees are sometimes working at remote locations, it has been difficult to use conventional classroom and seminar learning techniques to meet training needs. Cost-effective and innovative learning delivery solutions are now available from sophisticated information and communication technologies such as the Internet. In 1998, the Capability Development System (CDS) was developed by KeySpan as an on-line training system. It comprised a software assessment tool, a number of skills profiles for different occupations, and a curriculum registry providing technical information on the gas processing industry. E-learning initiatives are focused on specific projects or business units in order to better manage the training outcomes. The e-learning experience of KeySpan has resulted in benefits such as: better support to its customers and clients' needs through focused training on company-critical processes, services, products, and functions; more efficient employees; and, employees that feel part of the team.

  19. 复杂悬跨条件下的管线涡激振动分析%VIV analysis of pipelines under complex span conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James WANG; F. Steven WANG; Gang DUAN; Paul JUKES

    2009-01-01

    Spans occur when a pipeline is laid on a rough undulating seabed or when upheaval buckling occurs due to constrained thermal expansion. This not only results in static and dynamic loads on the flowline at span sections, but also generates vortex induced vibration (VIV), which can lead to fatigue issues. The phenomenon, if not predicted and controlled properly, will negatively affect pipeline integrity, leading to expensive remediation and intervention work. Span analysis can be complicated by: long span lengths, a large number of spans caused by a rough seabed, and multi-span interactions. In addition, the complexity can be more onerous and challenging when soil uncertainty, concrete degradation and unknown residual lay tension are considered in the analysis. This paper describes the latest developments and a .state-of-the-art. finite element analysis program that has been developed to simulate the span response of a flowline under complex boundary and loading conditions. Both VIV and direct wave loading are captured in the analysis and the results are sequentially used for the ultimate limit state (ULS) check and fatigue life calculation.

  20. The affective profiles, psychological well-being, and harmony: environmental mastery and self-acceptance predict the sense of a harmonious life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Danilo; Al Nima, Ali; Kjell, Oscar N E

    2014-01-01

    Background. An important outcome from the debate on whether wellness equals happiness, is the need of research focusing on how psychological well-being might influence humans' ability to adapt to the changing environment and live in harmony. To get a detailed picture of the influence of positive and negative affect, the current study employed the affective profiles model in which individuals are categorised into groups based on either high positive and low negative affect (self-fulfilling); high positive and high negative affect (high affective); low positive and low negative affect (low affective); and high negative and low positive affect (self-destructive). The aims were to (1) investigate differences between affective profiles in psychological well-being and harmony and (2) how psychological well-being and its dimensions relate to harmony within the four affective profiles. Method. 500 participants (mean age = 34.14 years, SD. = ±12.75 years; 187 males and 313 females) were recruited online and required to answer three self-report measures: The Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule; The Scales of Psychological Well-Being (short version) and The Harmony in Life Scale. We conducted a Multivariate Analysis of Variance where the affective profiles and gender were the independent factors and psychological well-being composite score, its six dimensions as well as the harmony in life score were the dependent factors. In addition, we conducted four multi-group (i.e., the four affective profiles) moderation analyses with the psychological well-being dimensions as predictors and harmony in life as the dependent variables. Results. Individuals categorised as self-fulfilling, as compared to the other profiles, tended to score higher on the psychological well-being dimensions: positive relations, environmental mastery, self-acceptance, autonomy, personal growth, and purpose in life. In addition, 47% to 66% of the variance of the harmony in life was explained by the

  1. Ocean acidification affects redox-balance and ion-homeostasis in the life-cycle stages of Emiliania huxleyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian D Rokitta

    Full Text Available Ocean Acidification (OA has been shown to affect photosynthesis and calcification in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, a cosmopolitan calcifier that significantly contributes to the regulation of the biological carbon pumps. Its non-calcifying, haploid life-cycle stage was found to be relatively unaffected by OA with respect to biomass production. Deeper insights into physiological key processes and their dependence on environmental factors are lacking, but are required to understand and possibly estimate the dynamics of carbon cycling in present and future oceans. Therefore, calcifying diploid and non-calcifying haploid cells were acclimated to present and future CO(2 partial pressures (pCO(2; 38.5 Pa vs. 101.3 Pa CO(2 under low and high light (50 vs. 300 µmol photons m(-2 s(-1. Comparative microarray-based transcriptome profiling was used to screen for the underlying cellular processes and allowed to follow up interpretations derived from physiological data. In the diplont, the observed increases in biomass production under OA are likely caused by stimulated production of glycoconjugates and lipids. The observed lowered calcification under OA can be attributed to impaired signal-transduction and ion-transport. The haplont utilizes distinct genes and metabolic pathways, reflecting the stage-specific usage of certain portions of the genome. With respect to functionality and energy-dependence, however, the transcriptomic OA-responses resemble those of the diplont. In both life-cycle stages, OA affects the cellular redox-state as a master regulator and thereby causes a metabolic shift from oxidative towards reductive pathways, which involves a reconstellation of carbon flux networks within and across compartments. Whereas signal transduction and ion-homeostasis appear equally OA-sensitive under both light intensities, the effects on carbon metabolism and light physiology are clearly modulated by light availability. These interactive effects

  2. Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) adversely affects the life-cycle of the damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated whether life-time exposure to PFOS affects egg development, hatching, larval development, survival, metamorphosis and body mass of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata). Eggs and larvae were exposed to five concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 000 μg/L. Our results show reduced egg hatching success, slower larval development, greater larval mortality, and decreased metamorphosis success with increasing PFOS concentration. PFOS had no effect on egg developmental time and hatching or on mass of adults. Eggs were the least sensitive stage (NOEC = 10 000 μg/L). Larval NOEC values were 1000 times smaller (10 μg/L). Successful metamorphosis was the most sensitive response trait studied (NOEC < 10 μg/L). The NOEC value suggests that E. cyathigerum is amongst the most sensitive freshwater organisms tested. NOEC for metamorphosis is less than 10-times greater than the ordinary reported environmental concentrations in freshwater, but is more than 200-times smaller than the greatest concentrations measured after accidental releases. - Long-term laboratory exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid reduces survival and interferes with metamorphosis of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata).

  3. Mutations altering the gammaretrovirus endoproteolytic motif affect glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein and early events of the virus life cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A., E-mail: carolyn.wilson@fda.hhs.gov

    2015-01-15

    Previously, we found that mutation of glutamine to proline in the endoproteolytic cleavage signal of the PERV-C envelope (RQKK to RPKK) resulted in non-infectious vectors. Here, we show that RPKK results in a non-infectious vector when placed in not only a PERV envelope, but also the envelope of a related gammaretrovirus, FeLV-B. The amino acid substitutions do not prevent envelope precursor cleavage, viral core and genome assembly, or receptor binding. Rather, the mutations result in the formation of hyperglycosylated glycoprotein and a reduction in the reverse transcribed minus strand synthesis and undetectable 2-LTR circular DNA in cells exposed to vectors with these mutated envelopes. Our findings suggest novel functions associated with the cleavage signal sequence that may affect trafficking through the glycosylation machinery of the cell. Further, the glycosylation status of the envelope appears to impact post-binding events of the viral life cycle, either membrane fusion, internalization, or reverse transcription. - Highlights: • Env cleavage signal impacts infectivity of gammaretroviruses. • Non-infectious mutants have hyper-glycosylated envelope that bind target cells. • Non-infectious mutants have defects in the formation of the double-stranded DNA. • Env cleavage motif has functions beyond cleavage of the env precursor.

  4. Negative emotions affect postoperative scores for evaluating functional knee recovery and quality of life after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, A; Lin, C; Zhou, A; Du, J; Jia, X; Sun, L; Zhang, G; Zhang, L; Liu, M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether psychological factors affect health-related quality of life (HRQL) and recovery of knee function in total knee replacement (TKR) patients. A total of 119 TKR patients (male: 38; female: 81) completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-revised (EPQR-S), Knee Society Score (KSS), and HRQL (SF-36). At 1 and 6 months after surgery, anxiety, depression, and KSS scores in TKR patients were significantly better compared with those preoperatively (Pextraversion (E score) (B=-0.986 and -0.967, respectively, both Pneuroticism (N score; B=-0.137 and -0.991, respectively, both P<0.05). Postoperative MCS, SAI, Trait Anxiety Inventory (TAI), and BAI scores were also negatively associated with the N score (B=-0.367, -0.107, -0.281, and -0.851, respectively, all P<0.05). The KSS function score at the sixth month after surgery was negatively associated with TAI and N scores (B=-0.315 and -0.532, respectively, both P<0.05), but positively associated with the E score (B=0.215, P<0.05). The postoperative KSS joint score was positively associated with postoperative PCS (B=0.356, P<0.05). In conclusion, for TKR patients, the scores used for evaluating recovery of knee function and HRQL after 6 months are inversely associated with the presence of negative emotions. PMID:26577843

  5. Circadian clocks and life-history related traits: is pupation height affected by circadian organization in Drosophila melanogaster?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhanashree A. Paranjpe; D. Anitha; Vijay Kumar Sharma; Amitabh Joshi

    2004-04-01

    In D. melanogaster, the observation of greater pupation height under constant darkness than under constant light has been explained by the hypothesis that light has an inhibitory effect on larval wandering behaviour, preventing larvae from crawling higher up the walls of culture vials prior to pupation. If this is the only role of light in affecting pupation height, then various light : dark regimes would be predicted to yield pupation heights intermediate between those seen in constant light and constant darkness. We tested this hypothesis by measuring pupation height under various light : dark regimes in four laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Pupation height was the greatest in constant darkness, intermediate in constant light, and the least in a light / dark regime of LD 14:14 h. The results clearly suggest that there is more to light regime effects on pupation height than mere behavioural inhibition of wandering larvae, and that circadian organization may play some role in determining pupation height, although the details of this role are not yet clear. We briefly discuss these results in the context of the possible involvement of circadian clocks in life-history evolution.

  6. Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) adversely affects the life-cycle of the damselfly Enallagma cyathigerum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bots, Jessica, E-mail: Jessica.bots@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); De Bruyn, Luc, E-mail: luc.debruyn@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Kliniekstraat 25, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Snijkers, Tom, E-mail: tomsnijkers@gmail.co [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Van den Branden, Bert, E-mail: bvandenbranden@gmail.co [Department PIH Environment, University College West Flanders (HOWEST), Graaf K. 11 de Goedelaan 5, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium); Van Gossum, Hans, E-mail: hans.vangossum@ua.ac.b [Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2010-03-15

    We evaluated whether life-time exposure to PFOS affects egg development, hatching, larval development, survival, metamorphosis and body mass of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata). Eggs and larvae were exposed to five concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 000 mug/L. Our results show reduced egg hatching success, slower larval development, greater larval mortality, and decreased metamorphosis success with increasing PFOS concentration. PFOS had no effect on egg developmental time and hatching or on mass of adults. Eggs were the least sensitive stage (NOEC = 10 000 mug/L). Larval NOEC values were 1000 times smaller (10 mug/L). Successful metamorphosis was the most sensitive response trait studied (NOEC < 10 mug/L). The NOEC value suggests that E. cyathigerum is amongst the most sensitive freshwater organisms tested. NOEC for metamorphosis is less than 10-times greater than the ordinary reported environmental concentrations in freshwater, but is more than 200-times smaller than the greatest concentrations measured after accidental releases. - Long-term laboratory exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid reduces survival and interferes with metamorphosis of Enallagma cyathigerum (Insecta: Odonata).

  7. Changes in Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) throughout the Life Span: A Population-Based Study of 1027 Healthy Males from Birth (Cord Blood) to the Age of 69 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglæde, Lise; Sørensen, K; Boas, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Context: Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), which is secreted by immature Sertoli cells, triggers the involution of the fetal Mullerian ducts. AMH is a testis-specific marker used for diagnosis in infants with ambiguous genitalia or bilateral cryptorchidism. Aim: The aim of the study was to describe...... the ontogeny of AMH secretion through life in healthy males. Setting:This was a population-based study of healthy volunteers. Participants: Participants included 1027 healthy males from birth (cord blood) to 69 yr. A subgroup was followed up longitudinally through the infantile minipuberty [(in cord blood......, and at 3 and 12 months), n = 55] and another group through puberty [(biannual measurements), n = 83]. Main Outcome Measures: Serum AMH was determined by a sensitive immunoassay. Serum testosterone, LH, and FSH were measured, and pubertal staging was performed in boys aged 6 to 20 yr (n = 616). Results...

  8. Changes in Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) throughout the Life Span: A Population-Based Study of 1027 Healthy Males from Birth (Cord Blood) to the Age of 69 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglæde, Lise; Sørensen, K; Boas, Malene;

    2010-01-01

    Context: Anti-Mu¨ llerian hormone (AMH), which is secreted by immature Sertoli cells, triggers the involution of the fetalMu¨ llerian ducts.AMHis a testis-specific marker used for diagnosis in infants with ambiguous genitalia or bilateral cryptorchidism. Aim: The aim of the study was to describe...... the ontogeny of AMH secretion through life in healthy males. Setting:This was a population-based study of healthy volunteers. Participants: Participants included 1027 healthy males from birth (cord blood) to 69 yr. A subgroup was followed up longitudinally through the infantile minipuberty [(in cord blood......, and at 3 and 12 months), n 55] and another group through puberty [(biannual measurements), n 83]. Main Outcome Measures: Serum AMH was determined by a sensitive immunoassay. Serum testosterone, LH, and FSH were measured, and pubertal staging was performed in boys aged 6 to 20 yr (n 616). Results: Serum...

  9. Positive affect and negative affect correlate differently with distress and health-related quality of life in patients with cardiac conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Helle; Denollet, Johan; Kruse, Charlotte;

    2009-01-01

    The Global Mood Scale (GMS), assessing negative affect (NA) and positive affect (PA), is sensitive to tapping treatment-related changes in patients with cardiac conditions. We examined the psychometric properties of the Danish GMS and the influence of NA and PA on distress and health...

  10. Octave-spanning semiconductor laser

    CERN Document Server

    Rösch, Markus; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    We present here a semiconductor injection laser operating in continuous wave with an emission covering more than one octave in frequency, and displaying homogeneous power distribution among the lasing modes. The gain medium is based on a heterogeneous quantum cascade structure operating in the THz range. Laser emission in continuous wave takes place from 1.64 THz to 3.35 THz with optical powers in the mW range and more than 80 modes above threshold. Free-running beatnote investigations on narrow waveguides with linewidths of 980 Hz limited by jitter indicate frequency comb operation on a spectral bandwidth as wide as 624 GHz, making such devices ideal candidates for octave-spanning semiconductor-laser-based THz frequency combs.

  11. Spanning Trees in Random Satisfiability Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezanpour, A.; Moghimi-Araghi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Working with tree graphs is always easier than with loopy ones and spanning trees are the closest tree-like structures to a given graph. We find a correspondence between the solutions of random K-satisfiability problem and those of spanning trees in the associated factor graph. We introduce a modified survey propagation algorithm which returns null edges of the factor graph and helps us to find satisfiable spanning trees. This allows us to study organization of satisfiable spanning trees in t...

  12. Impaired sleep affects quality of life in children during maintenance treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspers Gertjan JL

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increase of pediatric cancer survival rates, late effects and quality of life (QoL have received more attention. Disturbed sleep in pediatric cancer is a common clinical observation, but research on this subject is sparse. In general, sleep problems can lead to significant morbidity and are associated with impaired QoL. Information on sleep is essential to develop interventions to improve QoL. Methods Children (2-18 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL were eligible for this multi-center study. The Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ, Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 3.0™ Acute Cancer Version (PedsQL were used to assess sleep and QoL halfway through maintenance therapy. Sleep and QoL were measured during and after dexamethasone treatment (on-dex and off-dex. Results Seventeen children participated (age 6.7 ± 3.3 years, 44% boys. Children with ALL had more sleep problems and a lower QoL compared to the norm. There were no differences on-dex and off-dex. Pain (r = -0.6; p = 0.029 and worry (r = -0.5; p = 0.034 showed a moderate negative association with sleep. Reduced overall QoL was moderately associated with impaired overall sleep (r = -0.6; p = 0.014 and more problems with sleep anxiety (r = -0.8; p = 0.003, sleep onset delay (r = -0.5; p = 0.037, daytime sleepiness (r = -0.5; p = 0.044 and night wakenings (r = -0.6; p = 0.017. Conclusion QoL is impaired in children during cancer treatment. The results of this study suggest that impaired sleep may be a contributing determinant. Consequently, enhanced counseling and treatment of sleep problems might improve QoL. It is important to conduct more extensive studies to confirm these findings and provide more detailed information on the relationship between sleep and QoL, and on factors affecting sleep in pediatric ALL and in children with cancer in general.

  13. The influence of childhood abuse, adult life events, and affective temperaments on the well-being of the general, nonclinical adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yoshiaki; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Nakai, Yukiei; Ichiki, Masahiko; Sato, Mitsuhiko; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Ishikawa, Jun; Ono, Yasuyuki; Murakoshi, Akiko; Tanabe, Hajime; Kusumi, Ichiro; Inoue, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the effects of childhood abuse, life events, and temperaments on well-being (positive affect) and ill-being (negative affect). We hypothesized that childhood abuse, affective temperaments, and adult life events interact with one another and influence positive and negative affects in the general adult population and tested this hypothesis using structural equation modeling. Methods A total of 415 participants from the general, nonclinical adult population were studied using the following self-administered questionnaires: the Subjective Well-Being Inventory (SUBI); Life Experiences Survey (LES); Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A); and the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS). The data were analyzed with single and multiple regression analyses and structural equation modeling (Mplus). Results Childhood abuse indirectly predicted the worsening of positive and negative affects through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments as measured by the TEMPS-A in the structural equation model. The cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments directly worsened the positive and negative affects and the negative appraisal of life events that occurred during the past year, while the hyperthymic temperament had the opposite effects. Limitations The subjects of this study were nonclinical volunteers. The findings might not be generalizable to psychiatric patients. Conclusion This study demonstrated that childhood abuse, particularly neglect, indirectly worsened the well-being of individuals through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable affective temperaments. An important “mediator” role of affective temperaments in the effect of childhood abuse on well-being was suggested. PMID:27110116

  14. Development of the NTF-117S Semi-Span Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Keith C.

    2010-01-01

    A new high-capacity semi-span force and moment balance has recently been developed for use at the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. This new semi-span balance provides the NTF a new measurement capability that will support testing of semi-span test models at transonic high-lift testing regimes. Future testing utilizing this new balance capability will include active circulation control and propulsion simulation testing of semi-span transonic wing models. The NTF has recently implemented a new highpressure air delivery station that will provide both high and low mass flow pressure lines that are routed out to the semi-span models via a set high/low pressure bellows that are indirectly linked to the metric end of the NTF-117S balance. A new check-load stand is currently being developed to provide the NTF with an in-house capability that will allow for performing check-loads on the NTF-117S balance in order to determine the pressure tare affects on the overall performance of the balance. An experimental design is being developed that will allow for experimentally assessing the static pressure tare affects on the balance performance.

  15. Negative emotions affect postoperative scores for evaluating functional knee recovery and quality of life after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine whether psychological factors affect health-related quality of life (HRQL and recovery of knee function in total knee replacement (TKR patients. A total of 119 TKR patients (male: 38; female: 81 completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-revised (EPQR-S, Knee Society Score (KSS, and HRQL (SF-36. At 1 and 6 months after surgery, anxiety, depression, and KSS scores in TKR patients were significantly better compared with those preoperatively (P<0.05. SF-36 scores at the sixth month after surgery were significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P<0.001. Preoperative Physical Component Summary Scale (PCS and Mental Component Summary Scale (MCS scores were negatively associated with extraversion (E score (B=-0.986 and -0.967, respectively, both P<0.05. Postoperative PCS and State Anxiety Inventory (SAI scores were negatively associated with neuroticism (N score; B=-0.137 and -0.991, respectively, both P<0.05. Postoperative MCS, SAI, Trait Anxiety Inventory (TAI, and BAI scores were also negatively associated with the N score (B=-0.367, -0.107, -0.281, and -0.851, respectively, all P<0.05. The KSS function score at the sixth month after surgery was negatively associated with TAI and N scores (B=-0.315 and -0.532, respectively, both P<0.05, but positively associated with the E score (B=0.215, P<0.05. The postoperative KSS joint score was positively associated with postoperative PCS (B=0.356, P<0.05. In conclusion, for TKR patients, the scores used for evaluating recovery of knee function and HRQL after 6 months are inversely associated with the presence of negative emotions.

  16. Solidifying agent and processing of blood used for the larval diet affect screwworm (Diptera: Calliphoridae) life-history parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, M F; Skoda, S R; Sagel, A

    2011-06-01

    Spray-dried whole bovine blood and a sodium polyacrylate polymer gel as a bulking and solidifying agent are among the constituents of the current larval diet for mass rearing screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Locally available, inexpensive dietary materials could reduce rearing cost and address an uncertain commercial supply of spray-dried blood. We compared efficacy of diet prepared from fresh bovine blood after decoagulation with sodium citrate or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or after mechanical defibrination, with the diet containing spray-dried blood using either gel or cellulose fiber as the bulking and solidifying agent. Several life-history parameters were compared among insects reared on each of the blood and bulking agent diets combination. Diets containing citrated blood yielded the lightest larval and pupal weights and fewest pupae. EDTA-treated blood with the gel also caused reductions. EDTA-treated blood with fiber yielded screwworms that were heavier and more numerous than those from the diet with citrated blood but lighter than those from the control diet using spray-dried blood. A reduction in percentage of adults emerging from pupae occurred from diets with both bulking agents using citrated blood and the diet using EDTA mixed with the gel bulking agent. As a group, the cellulose-fiber diets performed better than the gel diets. Larval diet did not affect adult longevity, weight of the eggs deposited by the females that emerged or subsequent egg hatch. Parameter measurements of insects from both defibrinated blood diets were similar to those from the spray-dried blood diets, indicating that fresh, defibrinated bovine blood can successfully replace the dry blood in the screwworm rearing medium. PMID:21735935

  17. Affective and Motivational Factors Mediate the Relation between Math Skills and Use of Math in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Brenda R. J.; Schmitz, Eva A.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the use of math in everyday life (the propensity to recognize and solve quantitative issues in real life situations). Data from a Dutch nation-wide research on math among adults (N = 521) were used to investigate the question whether math anxiety and perceived math competence mediated the relationship between math skills and use of math in everyday life, taken gender differences into account. Results showed that women reported higher math anxiety, lower perceived math competence, and lower use of math in everyday life, compared to men. Women's skills were estimated at a lower level than men's. For both women and men, higher skills were associated with higher perceived math competence, which in turn was associated with more use of math in everyday life. Only for women, math anxiety also mediated the relation between math skills and use of math in everyday life.

  18. Influence of self-esteem and negative affectivity on oral health related quality of life in patients with partial tooth loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzhayat, Esben Boeskov

    2013-01-01

    To meaningfully interpret oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) measures, the influence of personality traits must be investigated. Objectives:To investigate and quantify the influence of self-esteem and negative affectivity (NA) on OHRQoL. It was hypothesized that low self-esteem and high...

  19. The Mediator Roles of Life Satisfaction and Self-Esteem between the Affective Components of Psychological Well-Being and the Cognitive Symptoms of Problematic Internet Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senol-Durak, Emre; Durak, Mithat

    2011-01-01

    The factors associated with cognitions about problematic Internet use have been empirically tested in various studies. The aim of the present study was to examine the mediator roles of both life satisfaction and self-esteem between affective components of subjective well-being and cognitions about problematic Internet use. For this purpose, the…

  20. Subjective Well-Being and Adaptation to Life Events: A Meta-Analysis on Differences Between Cognitive and Affective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Maike; Hofmann, Wilhelm; Eid, Michael; Lucas, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that major life events can have short- and long-term effects on subjective well-being (SWB). The present meta-analysis examines (a) whether life events have different effects on cognitive and affective well-being and (b) how the rate of adaptation varies across different life events. Longitudinal data from 188 publications (313 samples, N = 65,911) were integrated to describe the reaction and adaptation to four family events (marriage, divorce, bereavement, child birth) and four work events (unemployment, reemployment, retirement, relocation/migration). The findings show that life events have very different effects on affective and cognitive well-being, and that for most events the effects of life events on cognitive well-being are stronger and more consistent across samples. Different life events differ in their effects on SWB, but these effects are not a function of the alleged desirability of events. The results are discussed with respect to their theoretical implications, and recommendations for future studies on adaptation are given. PMID:22059843

  1. Extended attention span training system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alan T.; Bogart, Edward H.

    1991-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a behavioral disorder characterized by the inability to sustain attention long enough to perform activities such as schoolwork or organized play. Treatments for this disorder include medication and brainwave biofeedback training. Brainwave biofeedback training systems feed back information to the trainee showing him how well he is producing the brainwave pattern that indicates attention. The Extended Attention Span Training (EAST) system takes the concept a step further by making a video game more difficult as the player's brainwaves indicate that attention is waning. The trainee can succeed at the game only by maintaining an adequate level of attention. The EAST system is a modification of a biocybernetic system that is currently being used to assess the extent to which automated flight management systems maintain pilot engagement. This biocybernetic system is a product of a program aimed at developing methods to evaluate automated flight deck designs for compatibility with human capabilities. The EAST technology can make a contribution in the fields of medical neuropsychology and neurology, where the emphasis is on cautious, conservative treatment of youngsters with attention disorders.

  2. The influence of childhood abuse, adult life events, and affective temperaments on the well-being of the general, nonclinical adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanai Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Kanai,1,2 Yoshikazu Takaesu,1 Yukiei Nakai,3 Masahiko Ichiki,1 Mitsuhiko Sato,1 Yasunori Matsumoto,1 Jun Ishikawa,1 Yasuyuki Ono,1 Akiko Murakoshi,1 Hajime Tanabe,4 Ichiro Kusumi,3 Takeshi Inoue1 1Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, 2Department of Palliative Medicine, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, 3Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, 4Department of Clinical Human Sciences, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan Background: Previous studies have shown the effects of childhood abuse, life events, and temperaments on well-being (positive affect and ill-being (negative affect. We hypothesized that childhood abuse, affective temperaments, and adult life events interact with one another and influence positive and negative affects in the general adult population and tested this hypothesis using structural equation modeling. Methods: A total of 415 participants from the general, nonclinical adult population were studied using the following self-administered questionnaires: the Subjective Well-Being Inventory (SUBI; Life Experiences Survey (LES; Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A; and the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS. The data were analyzed with single and multiple regression analyses and structural equation modeling (Mplus. Results: Childhood abuse indirectly predicted the worsening of positive and negative affects through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments as measured by the TEMPS-A in the structural equation model. The cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments directly worsened the positive and negative affects and the negative appraisal of life events that occurred during the past year, while the hyperthymic temperament had the opposite effects. Limitations: The subjects of this study were nonclinical volunteers. The findings might not

  3. Nitrogen availability, leaf life span and nitrogen conservation mechanisms in leaves of tropical trees Disponibilidade de nitrogênio, longevidade foliar e mecanismos de conservação de nitrogênio em folhas de espécies arbóreas tropicais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Nascimento Corte

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Evergreen species of temperate regions are dominant in low-nutrient soils. This feature is attributed to more efficient mechanisms of nutrient economy. Nevertheless, the cashew (Anacardium occidentale- Anacardiaceae, a deciduous species, is native to regions in Brazil with sandy soil, whilst the annatto (Bixa orellana- Bixaceae, classified as an evergreen species native to tropical America, grows spontaneously in regions with more humid soils. Evergreens contain robust leaves that can resist adverse conditions for longer. The physical aspects of the leaves and mechanisms of nutrient economy between the two species were compared, in order to verify whether the deciduous species had more efficient mechanisms that might explain its occurrence in regions of low soil fertility. The mechanisms of nitrogen economy were also compared for the two species at available concentrations of this nutrient. The following were analysed: (i leaf life span, (ii physical leaf characteristics (leaf mass per area, and rupture strain, (iii nitrogenous compounds (nitrogen, chlorophyll, and protein, (iv nitrogen conservation mechanisms (nitrogen resorption efficiency, resorption proficiency, and use efficiency, and (v nitrogen conservation mechanisms under different availability of this mineral. The higher values of leaf mass per area and leaf rupture strain found in A. occidentale were related to its longer leaf life span. A. occidentale showed lower concentrations of nitrogen and protein in the leaves than B. orellana. Under lower nitrogen availability, A. occidentale had higher nitrogen resorption proficiency, nitrogen use efficiency and leaf life span than B. orellana. These characteristics may contribute to the adaptation of this species to sandy soils with low nitrogen content.Perenifólias de clima temperado são dominantes em solos pouco férteis. Essa característica é atribuída a mecanismos mais eficientes de economia de nutrientes. O cajueiro (Anacardium

  4. Differentiation of Cognitive Abilities across the Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2009-01-01

    Existing representations of cognitive ability structure are exclusively based on linear patterns of interrelations. However, a number of developmental and cognitive theories predict that abilities are differentially related across ages (age differentiation-dedifferentiation) and across levels of functioning (ability differentiation). Nonlinear…

  5. Measuring Replicative Life Span in the Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Kristan K.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Aging is a degenerative process characterized by a progressive deterioration of cellular components and organelles resulting in mortality. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively to study the biology of aging, and several determinants of yeast longevity have been shown to be conserved in multicellular eukaryotes, including worms, flies, and mice 1. Due to the lack of easily quantified age-associated phenotypes, aging in yeast has been assayed almost exclusively by...

  6. Assessing Executive Functions: A Life-Span Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Cecil R.; Horton, Arthur MacNeill, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Despite many disagreements on the utility of neuropsychological applications in schools, executive function measures have been found to be useful across a variety of areas and ages. In addition, many disagreements are extant in discussions of the maturational course of the development of executive functioning abilities that are dependent on…

  7. Meditation improves self-regulation over the life span

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    The use of meditation to improve emotion and attention regulation has a long history in Asia and there are many practitioners in Western countries. Much of the evidence on the effectiveness of meditation is either anecdotal or a comparison of long-term meditators with controls matched in age and health. Recently, it has been possible to establish changes in self-regulation in undergraduate students after only 5 days of meditation practice, allowing randomized trials comparing effects of medit...

  8. Life spans of planktonic foraminifers: New sight through sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Mazumder, A.

    , northern Indian Ocean. Jour. Foram. Res. 27: 5-19. Hemleben, Ch., Spindler, M. and Anderson, O.R. 1989. Modern Planktonic Foraminifera. Springer-Verlag, New York Inc.. Houstan, R.M., Huber, B.T. and Spero, H.J. 1999. Size-related isotopic trends in some...

  9. Colour Constancy Across the Life Span: Evidence for Compensatory Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie Wuerger

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185) covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age) was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensa...

  10. Online dating across the life span: Users' relationship goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkin, Josephine A; Robles, Theodore F; Wiley, Joshua F; Gonzaga, Gian C

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing data from an eHarmony.com relationship questionnaire completed by new users (N = 5,434), this study identifies prioritized goals in new romantic relationships and whether importance of these goals differs by participants' age and gender. Overall, users valued interpersonal communication more than sex appeal. Older users rated sexual attraction as slightly less important than younger users did, but they still highly valued the goal. Women placed even greater emphasis on communication over sexual attraction compared to men. However, although men valued sexual attraction more than women at all ages, only the youngest women valued interpersonal communication more than young men. PMID:26479015

  11. Nature over nurture: temperament, personality, and life span development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, R R; Costa, P T; Ostendorf, F; Angleitner, A; Hrebícková, M; Avia, M D; Sanz, J; Sánchez-Bernardos, M L; Kusdil, M E; Woodfield, R; Saunders, P R; Smith, P B

    2000-01-01

    Temperaments are often regarded as biologically based psychological tendencies with intrinsic paths of development. It is argued that this definition applies to the personality traits of the five-factor model. Evidence for the endogenous nature of traits is summarized from studies of behavior genetics, parent-child relations, personality structure, animal personality, and the longitudinal stability of individual differences. New evidence for intrinsic maturation is offered from analyses of NEO Five-Factor Inventory scores for men and women age 14 and over in German, British, Spanish, Czech, and Turkish samples (N = 5,085). These data support strong conceptual links to child temperament despite modest empirical associations. The intrinsic maturation of personality is complemented by the culturally conditioned development of characteristic adaptations that express personality; interventions in human development are best addressed to these. PMID:10653513

  12. Nasal trigeminal chemosensitivity across the adult life span

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wysocki, C. J.; Cowart, B. J.; Radil, Tomáš

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2003), s. 115-122. ISSN 0031-5117 Grant ostatní: NI on Deafness (US) P50 DC00214; NI on Deafness (US) RO1 DC00298; Fogarty Center(US) F05 TW04839; Garfield Foundation(US) x Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : chemesthesis * trigeminal Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.856, year: 2003

  13. Can Quality of Work Life Affect Work Performance among Government Agriculture Extension Officers? A Case from Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jamilah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The importance of agriculture industry in enhancing the country economy cannot be denied. Recently, a total of USD 1.7 billion has been allocated by the government to boost this industry. Beside of this huge allocation, do the policy implementers which are the agriculture extension officers have adequate work performance to carry out the responsibility given to them? Approach: This study would like to discover whether quality of work life among the agriculture extension employee do have impact their work performance or not. It is necessary to estimate quality of work life function in enhancing work performance, analyze the most important factor and variables on this work performance. The instruments used for collecting data were: A scale on individual and family life, a scale on safety and security on the organization, a scale on interpersonal relationship in the organization, a scale on job satisfaction, a scale on organizational policies and management style, a scale on personnel health and well being, a scale on work environment, a scale on remuneration and a scale on organizational support. The data were analyzed PASW software. Results: Results depict that all of the nine qualities of work life studied have significant and positive relationship with work performance where the highest relationship occurred between individual and family life with work performance. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that five factors which are individual and family life, job satisfaction, organization policy and management style, work environment and remuneration are the main contributors to work performance among government agricultural extension employees. Conclusion/Recommendations: From the results gained, it can be concluded that aspect of individual and family life is the highest contributor to work performance among government agriculture extension officer. It can be noted that more courses on how to manage individual and family

  14. Do Panic Symptoms Affect the Quality of Life and Add to the Disability in Patients with Bronchial Asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Faye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anxiety and panic are known to be associated with bronchial asthma with variety of impact on clinical presentation, treatment outcome, comorbidities, quality of life, and functional disability in patients with asthma. This study aims to explore the pattern of panic symptoms, prevalence and severity of panic disorder (PD, quality of life, and disability in them. Methods. Sixty consecutive patients of bronchial asthma were interviewed using semistructured proforma, Panic and Agoraphobia scale, WHO Quality of life (QOL BREF scale, and WHO disability schedule II (WHODAS II. Results. Though 60% of the participants had panic symptoms, only 46.7% had diagnosable panic attacks according to DSM IV TR diagnostic criteria and 33.3% had PD. Most common symptoms were “sensations of shortness of breath or smothering,” “feeling of choking,” and “fear of dying” found in 83.3% of the participants. 73.3% of the participants had poor quality of life which was most impaired in physical and environmental domains. 55% of the participants had disability score more than a mean (18.1. Conclusion. One-third of the participants had panic disorder with significant effect on physical and environmental domains of quality of life. Patients with more severe PD and bronchial asthma had more disability.

  15. How Do You Feel? Self-esteem Predicts Affect, Stress, Social Interaction, and Symptom Severity during Daily Life in Patients with Chronic Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Juth, Vanessa; Smyth, Joshua M.; SANTUZZI, ALECIA M.

    2008-01-01

    Self-esteem has been demonstrated to predict health and well-being in a number of samples and domains using retrospective reports, but little is known about the effect of self-esteem in daily life. A community sample with asthma (n = 97) or rheumatoid arthritis (n = 31) completed a self-esteem measure and collected Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) data 5x/day for one week using a palmtop computer. Low self-esteem predicted more negative affect, less positive affect, greater stress severi...

  16. How Do You Feel? Self-esteem Predicts Affect, Stress, Social Interaction, and Symptom Severity during Daily Life in Patients with Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    JUTH, VANESSA; SMYTH, JOSHUA M.; SANTUZZI, ALECIA M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-esteem has been demonstrated to predict health and well-being in a number of samples and domains using retrospective reports, but little is known about the effect of self-esteem in daily life. A community sample with asthma (n = 97) or rheumatoid arthritis (n = 31) completed a self-esteem measure and collected Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) data 5x/day for one week using a palmtop computer. Low self-esteem predicted more negative affect, less positive affect, greater stress severity, and greater symptom severity in daily life. Naturalistic exploration of mechanisms relating self-esteem to physiological and/or psychological components in illness may clarify causal relationships and inform theoretical models of self-care, well-being, and disease management. PMID:18809639

  17. Life cycle assessment of lignocellulosic ethanol: a review of key factors and methods affecting calculated GHG emissions and energy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbrandt, Kelsey; Chu, Pei Lin; Simmonds, Allison; Mullins, Kimberley A; MacLean, Heather L; Griffin, W Michael; Saville, Bradley A

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic ethanol has potential for lower life cycle greenhouse gas emissions compared to gasoline and conventional grain-based ethanol. Ethanol production 'pathways' need to meet economic and environmental goals. Numerous life cycle assessments of lignocellulosic ethanol have been published over the last 15 years, but gaps remain in understanding life cycle performance due to insufficient data, and model and methodological issues. We highlight key aspects of these issues, drawing on literature and a case study of corn stover ethanol. Challenges include the complexity of feedstock/ecosystems and market-mediated aspects and the short history of commercial lignocellulosic ethanol facilities, which collectively have led to uncertainty in GHG emissions estimates, and to debates on LCA methods and the role of uncertainty in decision making. PMID:26807514

  18. Shelf life of fresh-cut spinach as affected by chemical treatment and type of packaging film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Piagentini

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Fresh-cut vegetables are an important and rapidly developing class of convenience foods. Their storage life may be greatly reduced due to their high rates of respiration and transpiration and the possibility of enzymatic and microbiological deterioration. Consequently, the objective of this work was to determine the shelf life and the failure attribute that conditioned the shelf life of fresh-cut spinach treated with chemical solutions and packaged in bags with different permeabilities. The shelf life of fresh-cut vegetables was defined as the time of refrigerated storage at which any one of the sensory attributes scored below 7 or when the microbiological counts exceeded 5.10(7 CFU/g. Fresh-cut spinach was treated with citric acid and ascorbic acid solutions and packaged in mono-oriented polypropylene (OPP bags or low-density polyethylene (LDPE bags. Sensory attributes and total microbial counts were evaluated throughout refrigerated storage. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to study the simultaneous effect of chemical treatment and refrigerated storage time on sensory and microbiological quality of fresh-cut spinach. A quadratic polynomial regression model was assumed for predicting off-odor, general appearance, wilting, browning, color, and mesophilic aerobic population. Type of packaging film only influenced development of off-odor (p£0.001 and had no effect on visual sensory attributes or microbiological counts (p>0.05. Development of off-odor was the attribute that limited shelf life of fresh-cut spinach packaged in OPP bags. On the other hand, shelf life of samples packaged in LDPE bags was dependent on a decrease in general appearance or an increase in microbiological counts, depending on the chemical treatment used.

  19. Spans in 2-Categories: A monoidal tricategory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffnung, Alexander E

    2011-01-01

    We present Trimble's definition of a tetracategory and prove that the spans in (strict) 2-categories with certain limits have the structure of a monoidal tricategory, defined as a one-object tetracategory. We recall some notions of limits in 2-categories for use in the construction of the monoidal tricategory of spans.

  20. Node degree distribution in spanning trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for computing the number of spanning trees involving one link or a specified group of links, and excluding another link or a specified group of links, in a network described by a simple graph in terms of derivatives of the spanning-tree generating function defined with respect to the eigenvalues of the Kirchhoff (weighted Laplacian) matrix. The method is applied to deduce the node degree distribution in a complete or randomized set of spanning trees of an arbitrary network. An important feature of the proposed method is that the explicit construction of spanning trees is not required. It is shown that the node degree distribution in the spanning trees of the complete network is described by the binomial distribution. Numerical results are presented for the node degree distribution in square, triangular, and honeycomb lattices. (paper)

  1. Performance, Career Dynamics, and Span of Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeets, Valerie Anne Rolande; Waldman, Michael; Warzynski, Frederic Michel Patrick

    higher ability managers should supervise more subordinates, or equivalently, have a larger span of control. And although some of this theory’s predictions have been empirically investigated, there has been little systematic investigation of the theory’s predictions concerning span of control. In this...... paper we first extend the theoretical literature on the scale-of-operations effect to allow firms’ beliefs concerning a manager’s ability to evolve over the manager’s career, where much of our focus is the determinants of span of control. We then empirically investigate testable predictions from this......’s predictions concerning span of control including predictions derived from the learning component of the model. Overall, our investigation supports the notion that the scale-of-operations effect and additionally learning are important determinants of the internal organization of firms including span of control....

  2. An Evaluation of Personality Traits and Negative Life Events in Explaining Negative Coping Strategies among Drug Dependent People: The Mediating Role of Negative Affects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A beigi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to examine the relationship of personality traits and negative life events with coping styles with the mediating role of negative affects in drug dependent people. Method: This was a correlational study wherein the number of 152 participants (drug users completed Cloninger temperament and character inventory, Paykel life events inventory, positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS, and Endler & Parker’s coping inventory for stressful situations. Results: Novelty seeking had an indirect effect on emotional coping styles. Although anger had a mediating role in this relationship, it did not play such a role in the relationship of low self-directedness and negative life events with emotional coping styles. Harm avoidance had a direct effect on avoidant coping styles. Fear and sadness played a mediating role in the structural relationship of harm avoidance and negative events with avoidant coping styles. Reward dependence had an indirect effect on avoidant coping styles. Sadness had a mediating role in the structural relationship between reward dependence and avoidant coping styles. Conclusion: People with traumatic personality traits show negative affects by experiencing stressful negative events which leads to traumatic coping style, including addiction.

  3. Impact of Multimorbidity on Disability and Quality of Life in the Spanish Older Population

    OpenAIRE

    Garin, Noe; Olaya, Beatriz; Moneta, Maria Victoria; Miret, Marta; Lobo, Antonio; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Haro, Josep Maria

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population aging is closely related to high prevalence of chronic conditions in developed countries. In this context, health care policies aim to increase life span cost-effectively while maintaining quality of life and functional ability. There is still, however, a need for further understanding of how chronic conditions affect these health aspects. The aim of this paper is to assess the individual and combined impact of chronic physical and mental conditions on quality of life a...

  4. "Electric Power for Rural Growth: How Electricity Affects Rural Life in Developing Countries," by Douglas F. Barnes. [Book Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodwick, Dora G.; McIntosh, William A., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews a book assessing the effects of central grid rural electrification on the social and economic development of 192 communities in India and Colombia. The study examines the impact on agricultural productivity (through increased irrigation), the quality of life of women and children, business activities, and regional inequities. (SV)

  5. Do Clinical and Demographic Features of Patients with Upper-Gastrointestinal Cancer Affect their Health-related Quality of Life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezan-Ali Esmaili-Hesari

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: SCC is predominant type of upper GI cancer in Khorasan provinces similar to the high risk area in Northern Iran. The specific health-related quality of life tool (EORTC QLQ-OG25 was able to distinguish most of the symptoms in patients with upper GI cancer .

  6. The Mediation Effect of School Satisfaction in the Relationship between Teacher Support, Positive Affect and Life Satisfaction in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telef, Bülent Baki; Arslan, Gökmen; Mert, Abdullah; Kalafat, Sezai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships among teacher support, positive emotions, school satisfaction and life satisfaction in adolescences. The study had the participation of 344 adolescents from different socio-economic levels studying in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades of three public middle schools in the province of…

  7. Maternal early-life trauma and affective parenting style: the mediating role of HPA-axis function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Sarah H; Hendrix, Cassandra; Robinson, Brittany; Stowe, Zachary N; Newport, D Jeffrey; Brennan, Patricia A; Johnson, Katrina C

    2016-02-01

    A history of childhood trauma is associated with increased risk for psychopathology and interpersonal difficulties in adulthood and, for those who have children, impairments in parenting and increased risk of negative outcomes in offspring. Physiological and behavioral mechanisms are poorly understood. In the current study, maternal history of childhood trauma was hypothesized to predict differences in maternal affect and HPA axis functioning. Mother-infant dyads (N = 255) were assessed at 6 months postpartum. Mothers were videotaped during a 3-min naturalistic interaction, and their behavior was coded for positive, neutral, and negative affect. Maternal salivary cortisol was measured six times across the study visit, which also included an infant stressor paradigm. Results showed that childhood trauma history predicted increased neutral affect and decreased mean cortisol in the mothers and that cortisol mediated the association between trauma history and maternal affect. Maternal depression was not associated with affective measures or cortisol. Results suggest that early childhood trauma may disrupt the development of the HPA axis, which in turn impairs affective expression during mother-infant interactions in postpartum women. Interventions aimed at treating psychiatric illness in postpartum women may benefit from specific components to assess and treat trauma-related symptoms and prevent secondary effects on parenting. PMID:25956587

  8. Female Genital Dialogues: Female Genital Self-Image, Sexual Dysfunction, and Quality of Life in Patients With Vitiligo With and Without Genital Affection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Deena; Mohammed, Ghada F A; Gomaa, Amal H A; Eyada, Moustafa M K

    2016-04-01

    Vitiligo has a major effect on sexual health because of the disfiguring skin lesions affecting self-image and self-esteem. However, this topic has not explored. This article aimed to assess the effect of vitiligo on genital self-image, sexual function, and quality of life in female patients. This cross-sectional study included 50 sexually active women with vitiligo and 25 women without vitiligo. All participants subjected to full history taking and examination. Extent of vitiligo was assessed with the Vitiligo Area Scoring Index score, sexual function with the Female Sexual Function Index, genital self-image with Female Genital Self-Image Score and quality of life with the Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaires. The main outcome measures were correlation between Vitiligo Area Scoring Index, Female Genital Self-Image Score, Female Sexual Function Index, and Dermatology Life Quality Index domains was determined using t test and Pearson correlation. This study revealed a negative correlation between the Vitiligo Area Scoring Index score and sexual satisfaction. Vitiligo Area Scoring Index and Dermatology Life Quality Index score was significantly correlated with Arabic Version of the Female Genital Self-Image Score alone and with Arabic Version of the Female Sexual Functioning Index alone and with both the Arabic Version of the Female Genital Self-Image Score and the Arabic Version of the Female Sexual Functioning Index (p <.05). Sexual and psychological assessment of patients with vitiligo is imperative to improve outcomes and increase patients' compliance with treatment. PMID:25650731

  9. Factors that affect the quality of life of patients with oral cancer who have had their defects reconstructed immediately after excision of the tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjie; Li, Feng; Li, Wenlu

    2016-05-01

    Physical, social, and psychological factors profoundly affect the quality of life (QoL) of patients with oral cancer. Here we have investigated these factors in patients who have had resection and reconstruction of their oral cancer. We have assessed patients who had reconstructions with a pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMM) flap or a free anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator flap using the University of Washington Quality of Life version 4 questionnaires (Chinese version). Data were analysed to investigate how age, sex, type of neck dissection, size of resection, dental condition, use of radiotherapy and need for mandibulotomy affected their QoL. Of the 72 patients who were sent a questionnaire, 61 (85%) returned them completed. Twenty-eight patients(46%) had had ALT perforator flaps and 33 patients (54%) PMM flaps. In the group who had ALT perforator flaps, age, sex, type of neck dissection, mandibulotomy, and the use of radiotherapy affected QoL. Among those who the PMM flaps, age, neck dissection, mandibulotomy, and use of radiotherapy affected QoL. The only factors that the two flaps had in common were age, neck dissection, use of radiotherapy, and mandibulotomy. PMID:26774899

  10. Developmental Regulation with Progressive Vision Loss: Use of Control Strategies and Affective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oliver K.; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Boerner, Kathrin; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Cimarolli, Verena R.; Brennan-Ing, Mark; Heckhausen, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The present study addresses older adults' developmental regulation when faced with progressive and irreversible vision loss. We used the motivational theory of life span development as a conceptual framework and examined changes in older adults' striving for control over everyday goal achievement, and their association with affective well-being,…

  11. Dynamic Approaches to Emotions and Stress in Everyday Life: Bolger and Zuckerman Reloaded with Positive as Well as Negative Affects

    OpenAIRE

    Zautra, Alex J.; Affleck, Glenn G.; Tennen, Howard; Reich, John W.; Davis, Mary C.

    2005-01-01

    A decade ago, Bolger and Zuckerman (1995) incorporated personality into the study of daily life events and psychological distress. Their approach put an entirely new cast on research and theorizing in this area. In their work, they focused on the predominantly negative personality trait of neuroticism. We extend their work to include theory and measurement of positive events and indicators of well-being in this paper. Integrating these research strands offers the possibility of a comprehensiv...

  12. Can Quality of Work Life Affect Work Performance among Government Agriculture Extension Officers? A Case from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    O. Jamilah; M. S.H. Azril; U. Jegak; M. Asiah; A. N. Azman; A. S.   Bahaman; Thomas, K

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The importance of agriculture industry in enhancing the country economy cannot be denied. Recently, a total of USD 1.7 billion has been allocated by the government to boost this industry. Beside of this huge allocation, do the policy implementers which are the agriculture extension officers have adequate work performance to carry out the responsibility given to them? Approach: This study would like to discover whether quality of work life among the agriculture extension emp...

  13. Biotic mortality factors affecting emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) are highly dependent on life stage and host tree crown condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D E; Duan, J J; Shrewsbury, P M

    2015-10-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is a serious invasive forest pest in North America responsible for killing tens to hundreds of millions of ash trees since it was accidentally introduced in the 1990 s. Although host-plant resistance and natural enemies are known to be important sources of mortality for EAB in Asia, less is known about the importance of different sources of mortality at recently colonized sites in the invaded range of EAB, and how these relate to host tree crown condition. To further our understanding of EAB population dynamics, we used a large-scale field experiment and life-table analyses to quantify the fates of EAB larvae and the relative importance of different biotic mortality factors at 12 recently colonized sites in Maryland. We found that the fates of larvae were highly dependent on EAB life stage and host tree crown condition. In relatively healthy trees (i.e., with a low EAB infestation) and for early instars, host tree resistance was the most important mortality factor. Conversely, in more unhealthy trees (i.e., with a moderate to high EAB infestation) and for later instars, parasitism and predation were the major sources of mortality. Life-table analyses also indicated how the lack of sufficient levels of host tree resistance and natural enemies contribute to rapid population growth of EAB at recently colonized sites. Our findings provide further evidence of the mechanisms by which EAB has been able to successfully establish and spread in North America. PMID:26072908

  14. Viscoelastic response of HTPB based solid fuel to horizontal and vertical storage slumping conditions and it's affect on service life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequent use of solid fuels as thrust generating energy source in modern day space vehicle systems has created a need to assess their serviceability for long term storage under various conditions. Solid fuel grain, the most important part of any solid fuel system, responds visco elastically to any loading condition. For the assessment of the service life of any solid fuel system, the solid fuel grain has to be structurally evaluated in applied storage conditions. Structural integrity of the grain is exceptionally significant to guarantee the successful operation of the solid fuel system. In this work, numerical simulations have been performed to assess the mechanical stresses and strains induced in an HTPB based solid fuel grain during service life employing ABAQUS standard FEA software using 4-node bilinear quadrilateral elements. For finite element analysis (FEA), typical 2-D and p/nth axisymmetric section of 5-point (n) star grain geometry is considered. Mechanical loads include the horizontal or vertical 1-g (solid fuel weight) storage condition. The simulation results are compared with the analytical results for the same grain geometry. Analytically measured slump deflections in grain segment at various storage times have been found in good relation with the FEA based simulation results. This proves the validity of the procedure adopted and is helpful in assessment of the service life of solid fuel systems. (author)

  15. Signal Enhancement with Variable Span Linear Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benesty, Jacob; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    This book introduces readers to the novel concept of variable span speech enhancement filters, and demonstrates how it can be used for effective noise reduction in various ways. Further, the book provides the accompanying Matlab code, allowing readers to easily implement the main ideas discussed....... Variable span filters combine the ideas of optimal linear filters with those of subspace methods, as they involve the joint diagonalization of the correlation matrices of the desired signal and the noise. The book shows how some well-known filter designs, e.g. the minimum distortion, maximum signal......-to-noise ratio, Wiener, and tradeoff filters (including their new generalizations) can be obtained using the variable span filter framework. It then illustrates how the variable span filters can be applied in various contexts, namely in single-channel STFT-based enhancement, in multichannel enhancement in both...

  16. Spanning and independence properties of frame partitions

    CERN Document Server

    Bodmann, Bernhard G; Paulsen, Vern I; Speegle, Darrin

    2010-01-01

    We answer a number of open problems in frame theory concerning the decomposition of frames into linearly independent and/or spanning sets. We prove that in finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, Parseval frames with norms bounded away from 1 can be decomposed into a number of sets whose complements are spanning, where the number of these sets only depends on the norm bound. We also prove, assuming the Kadison-Singer conjecture is true, that this holds for infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. Further, we prove a stronger result for Parseval frames whose norms are uniformly small, which shows that in addition to the spanning property, the sets can be chosen to be independent, and the complement of each set to contain a number of disjoint, spanning sets.

  17. Signal enhancement with variable span linear filters

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Jensen, Jesper R

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the novel concept of variable span speech enhancement filters, and demonstrates how it can be used for effective noise reduction in various ways. Further, the book provides the accompanying Matlab code, allowing readers to easily implement the main ideas discussed. Variable span filters combine the ideas of optimal linear filters with those of subspace methods, as they involve the joint diagonalization of the correlation matrices of the desired signal and the noise. The book shows how some well-known filter designs, e.g. the minimum distortion, maximum signal-to-noise ratio, Wiener, and tradeoff filters (including their new generalizations) can be obtained using the variable span filter framework. It then illustrates how the variable span filters can be applied in various contexts, namely in single-channel STFT-based enhancement, in multichannel enhancement in both the time and STFT domains, and, lastly, in time-domain binaural enhancement. In these contexts, the properties of ...

  18. Experimental study of single span railway bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Rigueiro, Constança; Rebelo, C.; Silva, L. Simões da

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to present some results concerning the investigation that has been done by the authors regarding the dynamic response of small to médium span railway bridges using response acceleration data colleted during the measurements carried out on single span bridges on the railway track Linz-Wels, in Austria. Using output-only methods in this experimental program, it was possible to have an estimation of the igenfrequencies, mode shapes and the corresponding viscous ...

  19. Reduced span spray – Part 1: Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Massinon, Mathieu; De Cock, Nicolas; Ouled Taleb Salah, Sofiene; Lebeau, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Maximising treatment efficiency for a given target lies mainly on depositing a maximum part of the spray volume within an optimal droplet size range, which has to be as narrow as possible to reduce retention variability and drift issues. The present work focuses on exploring the effect of span factor of the droplet size distribution on the final retention by a 3D target plant using a modelling approach with the final aim of guiding the development of a reduced span nozzle (Redu...

  20. Coexistence of spanning clusters in directed percolation

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Parongama; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    1998-01-01

    The probability distribution for the number of top to bottom spanning clusters in Directed percolation in two and three dimensions appears to be universal and is of the form $P(n) \\sim \\exp(-\\alpha n^2)$. We argue that $\\alpha$ is a new critical quantity vanishing at the upper critical dimension. The probability distribution of the individual masses of the spanning clusters is found to have a Pearson distribution with a lower cutoff. Various properties of the clusters are reported.

  1. Evaluating the efficiency of shortcut span protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Dittmann, Lars; Berger, Michael Stübert;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of various recovery methods in terms of capacity efficiency with the underlying aim of reducing control plane load. In particular, a method where recovery requests are bundled towards the destination (Shortcut Span Protection) is evaluated can compared against...... traditional recovery methods. The optimization model is presented and our simulation results show that Shortcut Span Protection uses more capacity than the unbundled related methods, but this is compensated by easier control and management of the recovery actions....

  2. Ranking and Ordering Problems of Spanning Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgart, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, we study bispanning graphs, i.e., graphs whose edge set consists of two disjoint spanning trees. In particular, we analyze this graph class with respect to a conjecture due to Mayr and Plaxton. In simple terms, this conjecture states that there exists a minimum number of spanning tree with distinct weights required that the weight function fulfills predefined properties. We are able to prove this claim for certain subclasses of all weighted bispanning graphs. Based on these fi...

  3. London SPAN version 4 parameter file format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing the French power exchange through an optional and anonymous organised trading system. Powernext SA collaborates with the clearing organization LCH.Clearnet SA to secure and facilitate the transactions. The French Standard Portfolio Analysis of Risk (SPAN) is a system used by LCH.Clearnet to calculate the initial margins from and for its clearing members. SPAN is a computerized system which calculates the impact of several possible variations of rates and volatility on by-product portfolios. The initial margin call is equal to the maximum probable loss calculated by the system. This document contains details of the format of the London SPAN version 4 parameter file. This file contains all the parameters and risk arrays required to calculate SPAN margins. London SPAN Version 4 is an upgrade from Version 3, which is also known as LME SPAN. This document contains the full revised file specification, highlighting the changes from Version 3 to Version 4

  4. Quality changes of pomegranate arils throughout shelf life affected by deficit irrigation and pre-processing storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Estévez, María E; Artés-Hernández, Francisco; Artés, Francisco; Aguayo, Encarna; Martínez-Hernández, Ginés Benito; Galindo, Alejandro; Gómez, Perla A

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the influence of sustained deficit irrigation (SDI, 78% less water supply than the reference evapotranspiration, ET0) compared to a control (100% ET0) on the physicochemical and sensory qualities and health-promoting compounds of pomegranate arils stored for 14days at 5°C. Prior to processing, the fruits were stored for 0, 30, 60 or 90days at 5°C. The effect of the pre-processing storage duration was also examined. Physicochemical and sensory qualities were kept during the storage period. Arils from SDI fruit had lower punicalagin-α and ellagic acid losses than the control (13% vs 50%). However, the anthocyanin content decreased during the shelf-life (72%) regardless of the treatment. The ascorbic acid slight decreased. Arils from SDI experienced glucose/fructose ratio loss (19%) lower than that of the control (35%). In general, arils from SDI showed better quality and health attributes during the shelf-life than did the control samples. PMID:27173567

  5. Hot summers, long life: egg laying strategies of Maniola butterflies are affected by geographic provenance rather than adult diet

    OpenAIRE

    Grill, A.; Cerny, A; Fiedler, K.

    2013-01-01

    Maniola butterflies undergo summer dormancy in dry and hot habitats and deposit their eggs only in early autumn when conditions become more favourable for their offspring. Female individuals of this genus are therefore relatively long-lived. For long-lived butterflies adult diet is of particular importance. We tested if added amino acids in nectar substitute fed to the butterflies affected timing of oviposition, fecundity and longevity. A hundred Maniola females were sampled from Mediterranea...

  6. Affect of Early-Life Oxygen Exposure on Proper Lung Development and Response to Respiratory Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Domm

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Children born preterm often exhibit reduced lung function and increased severity of response to respiratory viruses, suggesting that premature birth has compromised proper development of the respiratory epithelium and innate immune defenses. Increasing evidence suggests that premature birth promotes aberrant lung development likely due to the neonatal oxygen transition occurring before pulmonary development has matured. Given that preterm infants are born at a point of time where their immune system is also still developing, early-life oxygen exposure may also be disrupting proper development of innate immunity. Here we review current literature in hopes of stimulating research that enhances understanding of how the oxygen environment at birth influences lung development and host defense. This knowledge may help identify those children at risk for disease and ideally culminate in the development of novel therapies that improve their health.

  7. Happiness, hope and affection as predictors of quality of life and functionality of individuals with heart failure at 3 month follow up

    OpenAIRE

    Nave Leal, Elisabete; Pais-Ribeiro, José Luís; Oliveira, Mário; Silva, Nogueira da; Soares, Rui; Santos, Sofia; Ferreira, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Meeting the actual role of positive psychology, begins to be recognized the contribution of positive variables in health outcomes. Objective: To know the contribution of happiness, hope and affection individually and as a whole in the quality of life and functionality of individuals with heart failure. Population and Methodology: 128 individuals with heart failure, 98 men and 30 women, 61.9±12,1 years of age, 6,6±3,9 years of school and 74,2% retired because of this disea...

  8. Relationships between Categorical Perception of Phonemes, Phoneme Awareness, and Visual Attention Span in Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubrinetzky, Rachel; Collet, Gregory; Serniclaes, Willy; Nguyen-Morel, Marie-Ange; Valdois, Sylviane

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the categorical perception deficit of speech sounds in developmental dyslexia is related to phoneme awareness skills, whereas a visual attention (VA) span deficit constitutes an independent deficit. Phoneme awareness tasks, VA span tasks and categorical perception tasks of phoneme identification and discrimination using a d/t voicing continuum were administered to 63 dyslexic children and 63 control children matched on chronological age. Results showed significant differences in categorical perception between the dyslexic and control children. Significant correlations were found between categorical perception skills, phoneme awareness and reading. Although VA span correlated with reading, no significant correlations were found between either categorical perception or phoneme awareness and VA span. Mediation analyses performed on the whole dyslexic sample suggested that the effect of categorical perception on reading might be mediated by phoneme awareness. This relationship was independent of the participants’ VA span abilities. Two groups of dyslexic children with a single phoneme awareness or a single VA span deficit were then identified. The phonologically impaired group showed lower categorical perception skills than the control group but categorical perception was similar in the VA span impaired dyslexic and control children. The overall findings suggest that the link between categorical perception, phoneme awareness and reading is independent from VA span skills. These findings provide new insights on the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia. They suggest that phonological processes and VA span independently affect reading acquisition. PMID:26950210

  9. Relationships between Categorical Perception of Phonemes, Phoneme Awareness, and Visual Attention Span in Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubrinetzky, Rachel; Collet, Gregory; Serniclaes, Willy; Nguyen-Morel, Marie-Ange; Valdois, Sylviane

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the categorical perception deficit of speech sounds in developmental dyslexia is related to phoneme awareness skills, whereas a visual attention (VA) span deficit constitutes an independent deficit. Phoneme awareness tasks, VA span tasks and categorical perception tasks of phoneme identification and discrimination using a d/t voicing continuum were administered to 63 dyslexic children and 63 control children matched on chronological age. Results showed significant differences in categorical perception between the dyslexic and control children. Significant correlations were found between categorical perception skills, phoneme awareness and reading. Although VA span correlated with reading, no significant correlations were found between either categorical perception or phoneme awareness and VA span. Mediation analyses performed on the whole dyslexic sample suggested that the effect of categorical perception on reading might be mediated by phoneme awareness. This relationship was independent of the participants' VA span abilities. Two groups of dyslexic children with a single phoneme awareness or a single VA span deficit were then identified. The phonologically impaired group showed lower categorical perception skills than the control group but categorical perception was similar in the VA span impaired dyslexic and control children. The overall findings suggest that the link between categorical perception, phoneme awareness and reading is independent from VA span skills. These findings provide new insights on the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia. They suggest that phonological processes and VA span independently affect reading acquisition. PMID:26950210

  10. Health-related quality of life, depression, and self-esteem in adolescents with leprosy-affected parents: results of a cross-sectional study in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Nobuko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that has an impact on the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL of sufferers as well as their children. To date, no study has investigated the effects of parental leprosy on the well-being of adolescent children. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Lalitpur and Kathmandu districts of Nepal. Adolescents with leprosy-affected parents (n = 102; aged 11–17 years and those with parents unaffected by leprosy (n = 115; 11–17 years were investigated. Self-reported data from adolescents were collected using the Kinder Lebensqualität Fragebogen (KINDLR questionnaire to assess HRQOL, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D, and the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to compare scores between the two groups. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to explore the determinants of HRQOL for adolescents with leprosy-affected parents. Results ANCOVA revealed that the KINDLR and RSES scores were significantly lower among adolescents with leprosy-affected parents compared with unaffected parents. However, the scores of “Friends” and “School” subscales of KINDLR were similar between the two groups. The CES-D score was significantly higher among adolescents with leprosy-affected parents than for adolescents with unaffected parents. The KINDLR scores for adolescents with both parents affected (n = 41 were significantly lower than the scores for those with one parent affected (n = 61. Multiple regression analysis revealed that adolescents with leprosy-affected parents who had higher levels of depressive symptoms were more likely to have lower KINDLR scores. A similar result was seen for adolescents where both parents had leprosy. Conclusions Adolescents with leprosy-affected parents had higher levels of depressive symptoms, lower levels of self-esteem, and lower HRQOL compared with adolescents whose

  11. Behavior of three-span braced columns with equal and unequal spans

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yu-Wen

    1993-01-01

    Columns with three spans separated by elastic braces are analyzed. The influences of translational and rotational resistance at the braces, various end conditions, and the bracing locations for the perfect columns with equal and unequal spans subjected to uniform and nonuniform axial load are investigated. For imperfect columns with equal or unequal spans subjected to uniform compression, the effects of various end conditions at the top and various initial deflections are studied. "Ide...

  12. Stereotypes as stumbling-blocks: how coping with stereotype threat affects life outcomes for people with physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Arielle M; Cohen, Geoffrey L

    2014-10-01

    Stereotype threat, the concern about being judged in light of negative stereotypes, causes underperformance in evaluative situations. However, less is known about how coping with stereotypes can aggravate underperformance over time. We propose a model in which ongoing stereotype threat experiences threaten a person's sense of self-integrity, which in turn prompts defensive avoidance of stereotype-relevant situations, impeding growth, achievement, and well-being. We test this model in an important but understudied population: the physically disabled. In Study 1, blind adults reporting higher levels of stereotype threat reported lower self-integrity and well-being and were more likely to be unemployed and to report avoiding stereotype-threatening situations. In Study 2's field experiment, blind students in a compensatory skill-training program made more progress if they had completed a values-affirmation, an exercise that bolsters self-integrity. The findings suggest that stereotype threat poses a chronic threat to self-integrity and undermines life outcomes for people with disabilities. PMID:25015337

  13. A Study of Models of Life Quality Development of Isan Marginal Communities as Affected by Installation of the Solar Home System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsil Simvised

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: The electricity production system by using solar home cells is regarded as a substitute for energy which the state provides for the marginal communities because the area cannot be extended for putting up pylons with electric cables, all this for the marginal communities to have better life and being. The purposes of this thesis were to examine the history and development of the electricity production system by using solar home cells, and to examine models of life quality of Isan marginal communities as affected by the use of solar home system by using solar home cells. Approach: The sample consisted of 100 people in Isan marginal communities who lived in mountains, on highlands, on lowlands, and in national park areas with totally 4 areas. The instruments used for collecting data were an observation form, an interview form a group discourse note-taking form and workshop note-taking form. The 6 aspects of Minimum Needs (MN was included into every instrument. The data analysis results were subsequently presented by means of a descriptive analysis: Results: 1for the history and development of the solar home system, it was found that Thailand began using solar cells in 1977 by the Unit of Volunteer Doctors. At present, solar cells are used in various types: battery charging stations, communication systems, water pumping system, traffic light signals, blinkers and electric systems in marginal communities in general.2 for the models of life quality development of Isan marginal communities as affected by the use of the solar home system, the life quality was developed according to indicators of maximum needs in these 6 aspects: the model of developing good health, the model of developing progressive incomes, the models of This value cultivation and the model of developing cooperative development. It was found that the positive effects were at 98.67% and negative effects were at only 1.33%. Conclusion/Recommendation: There for, it can

  14. Boundary Spanning in Global Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderberg, Anne-Marie; Romani, Laurence

    How does a global company deal with inter-organizational boundary spanning activities? If the company is an Indian vendor, and the client a Western multinational company in need of major transformations, the answer to this question challenges prior research. This paper builds on a field study of...... Indian IT vendor managers who are responsible for developing client relations and coordinating complex global development projects. The authors revise a framework of boundary spanning leadership practices to adapt it to an offshore outsourcing context. The empirical investigation highlights how...

  15. Spanning Forests and the Golden Ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Chebotarev, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    For a graph G, let f_{ij} be the number of spanning rooted forests in which vertex j belongs to a tree rooted at i. In this paper, we show that for a path, the f_{ij}'s can be expressed as the products of Fibonacci numbers; for a cycle, they are products of Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. The {\\em doubly stochastic graph matrix} is the matrix F=(f_{ij})/f, where f is the total number of spanning rooted forests of G and n is the number of vertices in G. F provides a proximity measure for graph ve...

  16. Spanning organizational boundaries to manage creative processes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Kragh, Hanne; Lettl, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In order to continue to be innovative in the current fast-paced and competitive environment, organizations are increasingly dependent on creative inputs developed outside their boundaries. The paper addresses the boundary spanning activities that managers undertake to a) select and mobilize...... creative talent, b) create shared identity, and c) combine and integrate knowledge in innovation projects involving external actors. We study boundary spanning activities in two creative projects in the LEGO group. One involves identifying and integrating deep, specialized knowledge, the other focuses...... actors, and how knowledge is integrated across organizational boundaries. We discuss implications of our findings for managers and researchers in a business-to-business context...

  17. Boundary Spanning Leadership Practices for Population Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R; White-Williams, Connie

    2015-09-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. In this article, the authors discuss boundary spanning leadership practices for achieving the Triple Aim of simultaneously improving the health of populations, improving the patient experience, and reducing per-capita cost of health care. Drawing on experience with an existing population-focused heart failure clinic borne of an academic-practice partnership, the authors discuss boundary spanning leadership practices aimed at achieving the Triple Aim concept and its intended design. PMID:26301546

  18. Impounding Experimental Research of Large Span Aqueduct

    OpenAIRE

    Huafeng Deng; Min Zhu; Xianfan Yuan; Qian Luo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have a research of the impounding experimental research of large span aqueduct. Caohe aqueduct is the mark building of the middle line of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project, of which the span is 30m. For this aqueduct, the structure is relatively complicated with great technical difficulties, what’s more there's no engineering experience or theoretical method to provide reference in domestic and abroad. It can be seen clear that whether the actual stressing state, de...

  19. Signal Enhancement with Variable Span Linear Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benesty, Jacob; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    This book introduces readers to the novel concept of variable span speech enhancement filters, and demonstrates how it can be used for effective noise reduction in various ways. Further, the book provides the accompanying Matlab code, allowing readers to easily implement the main ideas discussed....... Variable span filters combine the ideas of optimal linear filters with those of subspace methods, as they involve the joint diagonalization of the correlation matrices of the desired signal and the noise. The book shows how some well-known filter designs, e.g. the minimum distortion, maximum signal...

  20. Biological and life-history factors affecting total mercury concentrations in Arctic charr from Heintzelman Lake, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velden, Shannon van der, E-mail: sdorn@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Reist, James D.; Babaluk, John A. [Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N6 (Canada); Power, Michael, E-mail: m3power@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    A snapshot sample of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) from Heintzelman Lake (81 Degree-Sign 42 Prime N, 66 Degree-Sign 56 Prime W), Ellesmere Island, Canada was used to elucidate the biological and life-history factors potentially influencing individual total mercury (THg) concentrations. Migratory history was significant, with anadromous fish having a lower mean THg concentration (64 {mu}g/kg ww) than the non-anadromous Arctic charr (117 {mu}g/kg ww). The increase in individual THg concentration with age was shown to be independent of length-at-age when large and small individuals within the same age groups were compared. Similarly, the diets of individual Arctic charr were comparable regardless of size, and there was no apparent ontogenetic shift in diet that could explain differences in length-at-age or THg concentration among fast- and slow-growing groups of fish (i.e., fish of the same age but differing sizes). Maturity state was also not related to THg concentration, but appears to be related to differences in length-at-age, with slow-growing fish allocating more energy to reproduction than fast-growing conspecifics. The differences in THg concentration among individual Arctic charr were best explained by fish age. We suggest that the increase in mercury concentration with age can be altered by a shift in diet (e.g., to piscivory) or habitat (e.g., anadromy), but is otherwise unaffected by changes in size or length-at-age. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total mercury concentrations ([THg]) were measured in Arctic charr from a single lake in the Canadian high Arctic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anadromous Arctic charr had a significantly lower mean [THg] (64 {mu}g/kg ww) than the non-anadromous fish (117 {mu}g/kg ww). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Length-at-age (i.e., average somatic growth rate) was not related to mean [THg] when same-age groups were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prey resource use, determined by {delta}{sup 13}C and

  1. Biological and life-history factors affecting total mercury concentrations in Arctic charr from Heintzelman Lake, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A snapshot sample of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) from Heintzelman Lake (81°42′N, 66°56′W), Ellesmere Island, Canada was used to elucidate the biological and life-history factors potentially influencing individual total mercury (THg) concentrations. Migratory history was significant, with anadromous fish having a lower mean THg concentration (64 μg/kg ww) than the non-anadromous Arctic charr (117 μg/kg ww). The increase in individual THg concentration with age was shown to be independent of length-at-age when large and small individuals within the same age groups were compared. Similarly, the diets of individual Arctic charr were comparable regardless of size, and there was no apparent ontogenetic shift in diet that could explain differences in length-at-age or THg concentration among fast- and slow-growing groups of fish (i.e., fish of the same age but differing sizes). Maturity state was also not related to THg concentration, but appears to be related to differences in length-at-age, with slow-growing fish allocating more energy to reproduction than fast-growing conspecifics. The differences in THg concentration among individual Arctic charr were best explained by fish age. We suggest that the increase in mercury concentration with age can be altered by a shift in diet (e.g., to piscivory) or habitat (e.g., anadromy), but is otherwise unaffected by changes in size or length-at-age. -- Highlights: ► Total mercury concentrations ([THg]) were measured in Arctic charr from a single lake in the Canadian high Arctic. ► Anadromous Arctic charr had a significantly lower mean [THg] (64 μg/kg ww) than the non-anadromous fish (117 μg/kg ww). ► Length-at-age (i.e., average somatic growth rate) was not related to mean [THg] when same-age groups were compared. ► Prey resource use, determined by δ13C and δ15N isotopes and gut contents, was similar among fast- and slow-growing fish. ► Maturity state was not related to [THg], but the slow-growing group

  2. Quality of life and affective well-being in middle-aged and older people with chronic medical illnesses: a cross-sectional population based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wikman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been considerable research into the impact of chronic illness on health-related quality of life. However, few studies have assessed the impact of different chronic conditions on general quality of life (QOL. The objective of this paper was to compare general (rather than health-related QOL and affective well-being in middle aged and older people across eight chronic illnesses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This population-based, cross-sectional study involved 11,523 individuals aged 50 years and older, taking part in wave 1 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. General QOL was assessed using the CASP-19, happiness was evaluated using two items drawn from the GHQ-12, and depression was measured with the CES-D. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender and wealth, were performed. General QOL was most impaired in people with stroke (mean 37.56, CI 36.73-38.39, and least in those reporting cancer (mean 41.78, CI 41.12-42.44, respectively, compared with no illness (mean 44.15, CI 43.92-44.39. Stroke (mean 3.65, CI 3.58-3.73 was also associated with the greatest reduction in positive well-being whereas diabetes (mean 3.81, CI 3.76-3.86 and cancer were least affected (3.85, CI 3.79-3.91, compared with no illness (mean 3.97, CI 3.95-4.00. Depression was significantly elevated in all conditions, but was most common in chronic lung disease (OR 3.04, CI 2.56-3.61, with more modest elevations in those with osteoarthritis (OR 2.08, CI 1.84-2.34 or cancer (OR 2.07, CI 1.69-2.54. Multiple co-morbidities were associated with greater decrements in QOL and affective well-being. CONCLUSION: The presence of chronic illness is associated with impairments in broader aspects of QOL and affective well-being, but different conditions vary in their impact. Further longitudinal work is needed to establish the temporal links between chronic illness and impairments in QOL and affective well-being.

  3. Affect and Mindfulness as Predictors of Change in Mood Disturbance, Stress Symptoms, and Quality of Life in a Community-Based Yoga Program for Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Mackenzie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been paid to the psychological determinants by which benefits are accrued via yoga practice in cancer-related clinical settings. Using a longitudinal multilevel modeling approach, associations between affect, mindfulness, and patient-reported mental health outcomes, including mood disturbance, stress symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQL, were examined in an existing seven-week yoga program for cancer survivors. Participants (N=66 were assessed before and after the yoga program and at three- and six-month follow-ups. Decreases in mood disturbance and stress symptoms and improvements in HRQL were observed upon program completion. Improvements in mood disturbance and stress symptoms were maintained at the three- and six-month follow-ups. HRQL exhibited further improvement at the three-month follow-up, which was maintained at the six-month follow-up. Improvements in measures of well-being were predicted by initial positive yoga beliefs and concurrently assessed affective and mindfulness predictor variables. Previous yoga experience, affect, mindfulness, and HRQL were related to yoga practice maintenance over the course of the study.

  4. Symbiodinium Community Composition in Scleractinian Corals Is Not Affected by Life-Long Exposure to Elevated Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Sam H. C.; Fabricius, Katharina E.; Humphrey, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is expected to negatively affect coral reefs, however little is known about how OA will change the coral-algal symbiosis on which reefs ultimately depend. This study investigated whether there would be differences in coral Symbiodinium types in response to OA, potentially improving coral performance. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of ribosomal DNA to investigate the dominant types of Symbiodinium associating with six species of scleractinian coral that were exposed to elevated partial pressures of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in situ from settlement and throughout their lives. The study was conducted at three naturally occurring volcanic CO2 seeps (pCO2 ∼500 to 900 ppm, pHTotal 7.8 – 7.9) and adjacent control areas (pCO2 ∼390 ppm, pHTotal ∼8.0 – 8.05) in Papua New Guinea. The Symbiodinium associated with corals living in an extreme seep site (pCO2 >1000 ppm) were also examined. Ten clade C types and three clade D types dominated the 443 coral samples. Symbiodinium types strongly contrasted between coral species, however, no differences were observed due to CO2 exposure. Within five species, 85 – 95% of samples exhibited the same Symbiodinium type across all sites, with remaining rare types having no patterns attributable to CO2 exposure. The sixth species of coral displayed site specific differences in Symbiodinium types, unrelated to CO2 exposure. Symbiodinium types from the coral inhabiting the extreme CO2 seep site were found commonly throughout the moderate seeps and control areas. Our finding that symbiotic associations did not change in response to CO2 exposure suggest that, within the six coral hosts, none of the investigated 13 clade C and D Symbiodinium types had a selective advantage at high pCO2. Acclimatisation through changing symbiotic association therefore does not seem to be an option for Indo-Pacific corals to deal with future OA. PMID:23717522

  5. Symbiodinium community composition in scleractinian corals is not affected by life-long exposure to elevated carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam H C Noonan

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is expected to negatively affect coral reefs, however little is known about how OA will change the coral-algal symbiosis on which reefs ultimately depend. This study investigated whether there would be differences in coral Symbiodinium types in response to OA, potentially improving coral performance. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 region of ribosomal DNA to investigate the dominant types of Symbiodinium associating with six species of scleractinian coral that were exposed to elevated partial pressures of carbon dioxide (pCO2 in situ from settlement and throughout their lives. The study was conducted at three naturally occurring volcanic CO2 seeps (pCO2 ∼500 to 900 ppm, pHTotal 7.8 - 7.9 and adjacent control areas (pCO2 ∼390 ppm, pHTotal ∼8.0 - 8.05 in Papua New Guinea. The Symbiodinium associated with corals living in an extreme seep site (pCO2 >1000 ppm were also examined. Ten clade C types and three clade D types dominated the 443 coral samples. Symbiodinium types strongly contrasted between coral species, however, no differences were observed due to CO2 exposure. Within five species, 85 - 95% of samples exhibited the same Symbiodinium type across all sites, with remaining rare types having no patterns attributable to CO2 exposure. The sixth species of coral displayed site specific differences in Symbiodinium types, unrelated to CO2 exposure. Symbiodinium types from the coral inhabiting the extreme CO2 seep site were found commonly throughout the moderate seeps and control areas. Our finding that symbiotic associations did not change in response to CO2 exposure suggest that, within the six coral hosts, none of the investigated 13 clade C and D Symbiodinium types had a selective advantage at high pCO2. Acclimatisation through changing symbiotic association therefore does not seem to be an option for Indo-Pacific corals to deal with future OA.

  6. SPAN C - Terminal sterilization process analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Computer program, SPAN-C, measures the dry heat thermal sterilization process applied to a planetary capsule and calculates the time required for heat application, steady state conditions, and cooling. The program is based on the logarithmic survival of micro-organisms. Temperature profiles must be input on cards.

  7. SPAN - Terminal sterilization process analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Computer program, SPAN, measures the dry heat thermal sterilization process applied to a planetary capsule and calculates the time required for heat application, steady state conditions, and cooling. The program is based on the logarithmic survival of micro-organisms. Temperature profiles must be input on tape.

  8. Construction Technology of Long Span Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    2000-01-01

    A large variety of construction methods are used during construction of major bridges, and in many cases the final structural system must be chosen with due respect to the construction process. Today the preferred construction methods are: the free-cantilever method, the launching method and the ...... full-span erection method....

  9. Computing Minimum Diameter Color-Spanning Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Rudolf; Xu, Xiaoming

    We study the minimum diameter color-spanning set problem which has recently drawn some attention in the database community. We show that the problem can be solved in polynomial time for L 1 and L ∞ metrics, while it is NP-hard for all other L p metrics even in two dimensions. However, we can efficiently compute a constant factor approximation.

  10. Dentulous Appliance for Upper Anterior Edentulous Span

    OpenAIRE

    Chalakkal, Paul; Devi, Ramisetty Sabitha; Srinivas, G Vijay; Venkataramana, Pammi

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses about a fixed dentulous appliance that was constructed to replace the primary upper anterior edentulous span in a four year old girl. It constituted a design, whereby the maxillary primary second molars were used to support the appliance through bands and a wire that contained an acrylic flange bearing trimmed acrylic teeth, anteriorly. The appliance was functionally and aesthetically compliant.

  11. Effect of high dose irradiation on the red cell span in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of studies on acute effects of high dose irradiation in vivo, the present report was carried out to evaluate the changes of the red cell life span in the white rabbits by a single whole body exposure to gamma rays from 60Co teletherapy unit. The exposure was done in dose levels of 100, 600 and 900 rads to each experimental group of 10 rabbits. The life span apparent half survival time of red cells, and that the red cell volume in the circulting blood were measured by ICSH Reference method using 51Cr. (Author)

  12. Holistic Approach to Human Health and Disease: Life Circumstances and Inner Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Tomljenović, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Human body is dinamic, energetic system under the influences of food intake, environment, interpersonal relationships, inheritance, culture and human activities. The environmental and psychosocioeconomic factors affect the individual’s health altering the performance of biological systems effecting disease risk and disease progression. The concerns in modern society are more and more devoted to stress and its influences on health. Life span is extended but the quality of life, well-being and ...

  13. Influence of negative affectivity and self-esteem on the oral health related quality of life in patients receiving oral rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzhayat, Esben Boeskov

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate if and how the personality traits Negative Affectivity (NA) and self-esteem influenced the Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in patients receiving oral rehabilitation. Methods: OHRQoL was measured by the Oral Health Impact Profile 49...... (OHIP-49), NA with a short form of the Eysenck Personality Inventory Questionnaire (EPI-Q), and self-esteem with Rosenbergs Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) in 66 patients treated with removable dental prosthesis (RDP). The minimally important difference (MID), effect size (ES), and standard error......L regardless of level of NA and self-esteem. High NA is associated with a large effect, but both high NA and low self-esteem is associated with poorer OHRQoL both before and after treatment....

  14. Improvement in Fatigue, Sleepiness, and Health-Related Quality of Life with Bright Light Treatment in Persons with Seasonal Affective Disorder and Subsyndromal SAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Rastad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of bright light treatment for secondary outcome measures and to explore and validate empirically derived subgroups and treatment effects in subgroups. Methods. A descriptive design. A sample of forty-nine persons (mean age of 45.8 with clinically assessed seasonal affective disorder (SAD or subsyndromal SAD (S-SAD participated in a two-group clinical trial evaluating the effects of treatment with bright light therapy. A person-oriented cluster analysis was applied to study treatment effects in subgroups. Results. For the merged group, sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, fatigue (fatigue questionnaire, and health-related quality of life (SF-36 were improved at posttreatment, and results were maintained at the one-month followup. Three distinct subgroups had a high level of fatigue in common, while the level of excessive daytime sleepiness and depressed mood differed between the subgroups. Over time, all subgroups improved following ten days treatment in a light room. Conclusion. Fatigue, excessive daytime sleepiness, and health-related quality of life improve in a similar way as depressed mood following treatment with bright light. The treatment was effective irrespective of the severity of the disorder, that is, for persons with SAD and subsyndromal SAD.

  15. Integration in the Vocational World: How Does It Affect Quality of Life and Subjective Well-Being of Young Adults with ASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eynat Gal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess whether the perception of quality of life (QOL and subjective well-being (SWB of young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD is affected by participation in a comprehensive program. Participants included 25 young adults with ASD who participated in the “Roim Rachok Program” (RRP, where they were trained to become aerial photography interpreters. Following the training period, they served in a designated army unit where they practiced their newly acquired profession. The participants filled out two questionnaires, (a Quality of Life (QOL-Q and (b Personal Well-being Index (PWI, at three points of the intervention: (a before the course, (b at the end of the course, and (c six months after integrating in the designated army unit. Wilcoxon signed ranks tests were used to assess the differences between the reported QOL and SWB at the three points of time. The results suggest that there were no significant differences at the end of the course, compared to its beginning. However, there were significantly improved perception of QOL and SWB during the period between the end of the course and six months after starting work. The results of this study highlight the importance of tailored vocational programs that are adapted to the unique needs and strengths of individuals with ASD.

  16. Integration in the Vocational World: How Does It Affect Quality of Life and Subjective Well-Being of Young Adults with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Eynat; Selanikyo, Efrat; Erez, Asnat Bar-Haim; Katz, Noomi

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to assess whether the perception of quality of life (QOL) and subjective well-being (SWB) of young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is affected by participation in a comprehensive program. Participants included 25 young adults with ASD who participated in the "Roim Rachok Program" (RRP), where they were trained to become aerial photography interpreters. Following the training period, they served in a designated army unit where they practiced their newly acquired profession. The participants filled out two questionnaires, (a) Quality of Life (QOL-Q) and (b) Personal Well-being Index (PWI), at three points of the intervention: (a) before the course, (b) at the end of the course, and (c) six months after integrating in the designated army unit. Wilcoxon signed ranks tests were used to assess the differences between the reported QOL and SWB at the three points of time. The results suggest that there were no significant differences at the end of the course, compared to its beginning. However, there were significantly improved perception of QOL and SWB during the period between the end of the course and six months after starting work. The results of this study highlight the importance of tailored vocational programs that are adapted to the unique needs and strengths of individuals with ASD. PMID:26404341

  17. FTO, Type 2 Diabetes, and Weight Gain Throughout Adult Life

    OpenAIRE

    Hertel, J. K.; Johansson, S; Sonestedt, E; Jonsson, A; Lie, R. T.; Platou, C. G. P.; Nilsson, P. M.; Rukh, G.; Midthjell, K.; Hveem, K; Melander, O; Groop, L.; Lyssenko, V.; Molven, A.; Orho-Melander, M

    2011-01-01

    This article contains Supplementary Data online at http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.2337/db10-1340/-/DC1. OBJECTIVE—FTO is the most important polygene identified for obesity. We aimed to investigate whether a variant in FTO affects type 2 diabetes risk entirely through its effect on BMI and how FTO influences BMI across adult life span.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Through regression models, we assessed the relationship between the FTO single nucleotide...

  18. Octave Spanning Frequency Comb on a Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Del'Haye, P; Gavartin, E; Holzwarth, R; Kippenberg, T J

    2009-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have revolutionized the field of frequency metrology within the last decade and have become enabling tools for atomic clocks, gas sensing and astrophysical spectrometer calibration. The rapidly increasing number of applications has heightened interest in more compact comb generators. Optical microresonator based comb generators bear promise in this regard. Critical to their future use as 'frequency markers', is however the absolute frequency stabilization of the optical comb spectrum. A powerful technique for this stabilization is self-referencing, which requires a spectrum that spans a full octave, i.e. a factor of two in frequency. In the case of mode locked lasers, overcoming the limited bandwidth has become possible only with the advent of photonic crystal fibres for supercontinuum generation. Here, we report for the first time the generation of an octave-spanning frequency comb directly from a toroidal microresonator on a silicon chip. The comb spectrum covers the wavelength range...

  19. Spanning forests on the Sierpinski gasket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chiuan Chang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the numbers of spanning forests on the Sierpinski gasket $SG_d(n$ at stage $n$ with dimension $d$ equal to two, three and four, and determine the asymptotic behaviors. The corresponding results on the generalized Sierpinski gasket $SG_{d,b}(n$ with $d=2$ and $b=3,4$ are obtained. We also derive the upper bounds of the asymptotic growth constants for both $SG_d$ and $SG_{2,b}$.

  20. Nutritional Factors Affecting Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, So Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Arang; Lee, Hee Jae; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals are important factors affecting mental health and the development of psychiatric disorders. Majority of scientific evidence relating to mental health focuses on depression, cognitive function, and dementia, and limited evidence is available about other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. As life span of human being is increasing, the more the prevalence of mental disorders is, the more attention rises. Lists of suggested nutritional components that may be beneficial for mental health are omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids, cholesterol, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Saturated fat and simple sugar are considered detrimental to cognitive function. Evidence on the effect of cholesterol is conflicting; however, in general, blood cholesterol levels are negatively associated with the risk of depression. Collectively, the aims of this review are to introduce known nutritional factors for mental health, and to discuss recent issues of the nutritional impact on cognitive function and healthy brain aging.