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Sample records for affect intracellular transport

  1. Traffic jam: a compendium of human diseases that affect intracellular transport processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridor, M; Hannan, L A

    2000-11-01

    As sequencing of the human genome nears completion, the genes that cause many human diseases are being identified and functionally described. This has revealed that many human diseases are due to defects of intracellular trafficking. This 'Toolbox' catalogs and briefly describes these diseases.

  2. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C; Dalzell, Danielle R; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (2  nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2  kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  3. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  4. Traffic jams II: an update of diseases of intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridor, Meir; Hannan, Lisa A

    2002-11-01

    As more details emerge on the mechanisms that mediate and control intracellular transport, the molecular basis for variety of human diseases has been revealed. In turn, disease pathology and physiology shed light on the intricate controls that regulate intracellular transport to assure proper cellular and tissue function and homeostasis. We previously listed a number of diseases that are the result of defects in intracellular transport, or cause defects in intracellular transport. (Aridor M, Hannan LA. Traffic Jam: A compendium of human diseases that affect intracellular transport processes. Traffic 2000; 1: 836-851). This Toolbox updates the previous list to include additional disorders that were recently identified to be related to intracellular trafficking. In the time since we have published our first list there have been significant advances in understanding of the molecular basis of these defects. Such advances will pave the way to future effective therapeutics.

  5. Intracellular structure and nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S

    1995-01-01

    Intracellular movement of any solute or particle accords with one of two general schemes: either it takes place predominantly in the solution phase or it occurs by dynamic interactions with solid-state structures. If nucleocytoplasmic exchanges of macromolecules and complexes are predominantly solution-phase processes, i.e., if the former ("diffusionist") perspective applies, then the only significant structures in nucleocytoplasmic transport are the pore complexes. However, if such exchanges accord with the latter ("solid-state") perspective, then the roles of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton in nucleocytoplasmic transport are potentially, at least, as important as that of the pore complexes. The role of the nucleoskeleton in mRNA transport is more difficult to evaluate than that of the cytoskeleton because it is less well characterized, and current evidence does not exclude either perspective. However, the balance of evidence favors a solid-state scheme. It is argued that ribosomal subunits are also more likely to migrate by a solid-state rather than a diffusionist mechanism, though the opposite is true of proteins and tRNAs. Moreover, recent data on the effects of viral proteins on intranuclear RNA processing and migration accord with the solid-state perspective. In view of this balance of evidence, three possible solid-state mechanisms for nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport are described and evaluated. The explanatory advantage of solid-state models is contrasted with the heuristic advantage of diffusion theory, but it is argued that diffusion theory itself, even aided by modern computational techniques and numerical and graphical approaches, cannot account for data describing the movements of materials within the cell. Therefore, the mechanisms envisaged in a diffusionist perspective cannot be confined to diffusion alone, but must include other processes such as bulk fluid flow.

  6. Loss-of-function mutations in Rab escort protein 1 (REP-1 affect intracellular transport in fibroblasts and monocytes of choroideremia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V Strunnikova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Choroideremia (CHM is a progressive X-linked retinopathy caused by mutations in the CHM gene, which encodes Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1, an escort protein involved in the prenylation of Rabs. Under-prenylation of certain Rabs, as a result of loss of function mutations in REP-1, could affect vesicular trafficking, exocytosis and secretion in peripheral cells of CHM patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate this hypothesis, intracellular vesicle transport, lysosomal acidification and rates of proteolytic degradation were studied in monocytes (CD14+ fraction and primary skin fibroblasts from the nine age-matched controls and thirteen CHM patients carrying 10 different loss-of-function mutations. With the use of pHrodo BioParticles conjugated with E. coli, collagen I coated FluoSpheres beads and fluorescent DQ ovalbumin with BODYPY FL dye, we demonstrated for the first time that lysosomal pH was increased in monocytes of CHM patients and, as a consequence, the rates of proteolytic degradation were slowed. Microarray analysis of gene expression revealed that some genes involved in the immune response, small GTPase regulation, transcription, cell adhesion and the regulation of exocytosis were significantly up and down regulated in cells from CHM patients compared to controls. Finally, CHM fibroblasts secreted significantly lower levels of cytokine/growth factors such as macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, pigment epithelial derived factor (PEDF, tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha, fibroblast growth factor (FGF beta and interleukin (lL-8. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated for the first time that peripheral cells of CHM patients had increased pH levels in lysosomes, reduced rates of proteolytic degradation and altered secretion of cytokines. Peripheral cells from CHM patients expose characteristics that were not previously recognized and could used as an alternative models to study the effects of different

  7. Cytoskeletal network morphology regulates intracellular transport dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, David; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable time scales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that r...

  8. A replacement of the active-site aspartic acid residue 293 in mouse cathepsin D affects its intracellular stability, processing and transport in HEK-293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Sanna; Storch, Stephan; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Hasilik, Andrej; Tyynelä, Jaana; Braulke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The substitution of an active-site aspartic acid residue by asparagine in the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CTSD) results in a loss of enzyme activity and severe cerebrocortical atrophy in a novel form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in sheep [Tyynelä, Sohar, Sleat, Gin, Donnelly, Baumann, Haltia and Lobel (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2786-2792]. In the present study we have introduced the corresponding mutation by replacing aspartic acid residue 293 with asparagine (D293N) into the mouse CTSD cDNA to analyse its effect on synthesis, transport and stability in transfected HEK-293 cells. The complete inactivation of mutant D293N mouse CTSD was confirmed by a newly developed fluorimetric quantification system. Moreover, in the heterologous overexpression systems used, mutant D293N mouse CTSD was apparently unstable and proteolytically modified during early steps of the secretory pathway, resulting in a loss of mass by about 1 kDa. In the affected sheep, the endogenous mutant enzyme was stable but also showed the shift in its molecular mass. In HEK-293 cells, the transport of the mutant D293N mouse CTSD to the lysosome was delayed and associated with a low secretion rate compared with wild-type CTSD. These data suggest that the mutation may result in a conformational change which affects stability, processing and transport of the enzyme. PMID:12350228

  9. Coupling of Active Motion and Advection Shapes Intracellular Cargo Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Trong, P Khuc; Goldstein, R E; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.028104

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular cargo transport can arise from passive diffusion, active motor-driven transport along cytoskeletal filament networks, and passive advection by fluid flows entrained by such motor/cargo motion. Active and advective transport are thus intrinsically coupled as related, yet different representations of the same underlying network structure. A reaction-advection-diffusion system is used here to show that this coupling affects the transport and localization of a passive tracer in a confined geometry. For sufficiently low diffusion, cargo localization to a target zone is optimized either by low reaction kinetics and decoupling of bound and unbound states, or by a mostly disordered cytoskeletal network with only weak directional bias. These generic results may help to rationalize subtle features of cytoskeletal networks, for example as observed for microtubules in fly oocytes.

  10. Intracellular transport of cholesterol in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasaemle, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The erythrocyte was selected as a simple cell for the study of transbilayer movement of cholesterol. Cholesterol oxidase was used to measure the distribution of ({sup 3}H)cholesterol across the erythrocyte membrane. Cholesterol oxidase was also used to estimate the rate of transport of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to the plasma membrane of cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts; the half-time of this process was 42 minutes. The rate of transport of LDL cholesterol to the plasma membrane was confirmed by a second procedure using amphotericin B. Amphotericin B was also used to estimate the rate of transport of endogenously synthesized cholesterol to the plasma membrane of CHO cells. New methodology was developed including improvements of the previously published cholesterol oxidase assay for plasma membrane cholesterol. A new method for detecting transport of cholesterol to the plasma membrane in cultured cells was developed using amphotericin B. Preliminary studies investigated the use of fluorescent polyenes, pimaricin and etruscomycin, as probes for plasma membrane cholesterol in transport studies. Finally, a modification of a previously published cell staining protocol yielded a simple, quantitative assay for cell growth.

  11. Intracellular transport of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    For genome multiplication hepadnaviruses use the transcriptional machinery of the cell that is found within the nucleus. Thus the viral genome has to be transported through the cytoplasm and nuclear pore. The intracytosolic translocation is facilitated by the viral capsid that surrounds the genome and that interacts with cellular microtubules. The subsequent passage through the nuclear pore complexes (NPC) is mediated by the nuclear transport receptors importin α and β. Importin α binds to the C-terminus of the capsid protein that comprises a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The exposure of the NLS is regulated and depends upon genome maturation and/or phosphorylation of the capsid protein. As for other karyophilic cargos using this pathway importin α interacts with importin β that facilitates docking of the import complex to the NPC and the passage through the pore.Being a unique strategy, the import of the viral capsid is incomplete in that it becomes arrested inside the nuclear basket, which is a cage-like structure on the karyoplasmic face of the NPC. Presumably only this compartment provides the factors that are required for capsid disassembly and genome release that is restricted to those capsids comprising a mature viral DNA genome.

  12. Intracellular transport proteins: classification, structure and function of kinesins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Chudy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Correct cell functioning, division and morphogenesis rely on efficient intracellular transport. Apart from dyneins and myosins, kinesins are the main proteins responsible for intracellular movement. Kinesins are a large, diverse group of motor proteins, which based on phylogenetic similarity were classified into fourteen families. Among these families, due to the location of their motor domains, three groups have been characterized: N-, C- and M-kinesin. As molecular motors, kinesins transport various molecules and vesicles mainly towards the microtubule plus end (from the cell body participating in anterograde transport, although there are also kinesins involved in retrograde transport (C-kinesins. Kinesins are also involved in spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and spermatogenesis. Because of their great importance for the correct functioning of cells, mutations in kinesin coding genes may lead to such neurodegenerative diseases as dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  13. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    CERN Document Server

    Appert-Rolland, Cecile; Santen, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Cells are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems driven by continuous energy supply. They carry out many vital functions requiring active transport of various ingredients and organelles, some being small, others being large. The cytoskeleton, composed of three types of filaments, determines the shape of the cell and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for the so-called cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated, in particular because its breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. We first review some biological facts obtained from experiments, and present some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We start with background knowledge on the origi...

  14. [Carboxyl nanodiamond as intracellular transporters of anticancer drug--podophyllotoxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao-Li; Wang, Bin; Peng, Yan; Ni, Jing-Man

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the intracellular transporters effect and the cytotoxicity of carboxyl nanodiamond (CND) - podophyllotoxin (PPT). Nanodiamond (ND) was treated with mixed carboxylic acid and finally got 64 nm CND by centrifugation, and then it was reacted with PPT to form CND-PPT. UV spectrophotometry was used to calculate the content of PPT in CND-PPT, the particle size distribution and zeta potential were measured by Dynamic laser scattering instrument. CND, PPT, CND-PPT and CND + PPT (physical mixture of CND and PPT) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, at the same time, thermal analysis and element analysis were used to estimate the content of the PPT in CND-PPT. The affect of CND, PPT, CND-PPT on HeLa cell was measured with MTT assay. The results showed that content of PPT combined with CND accounted for about 10%. MTT assay showed that CND has low cytotoxicity and CND-PPT can increase the water soluble of PPT. As a conclusion, CND as a hydrophilic pharmaceutical carrier combined with PPT is able to increase the water solubility of PPT, at low concentration, CND-PPT can enhance the antitumor activity in comparison with PPT, so CND can be used as a potential anticancer drug carrier.

  15. Imaging and controlling intracellular reactions: Lysosome transport as a function of diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are the ultimate complex environment with intracellular chemical reactions regulated by the local cellular environment. For example, reactants are sequestered into specific organelles to control local concentration and pH, motor proteins transport reactants within the cell, and intracellular vesicles undergo fusion to bring reactants together. Current research in the Payne Lab in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech is aimed at understanding and utilizing this complex environment to control intracellular chemical reactions. This will be illustrated using two examples, intracellular transport as a function of organelle diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers. Using single particle tracking fluorescence microscopy, we measured the intracellular transport of lysosomes, membrane-bound organelles, as a function of diameter as they underwent transport in living cells. Both ATP-dependent active transport and diffusion were examined. As expected, diffusion scales with the diameter of the lysosome. However, active transport is unaffected suggesting that motor proteins are insensitive to cytosolic drag. In a second example, we utilize intracellular complexity, specifically the distinct micro-environments of different organelles, to carry out chemical reactions. We show that catalase, found in the peroxisomes of cells, can be used to catalyze the polymerization of the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. More importantly, we have found that a range of iron-containing biomolecules are suitable catalysts with different iron-containing biomolecules leading to different polymer properties. These experiments illustrate the advantage of intracellular complexity for the synthesis of novel materials.

  16. Copper transporter 2 regulates intracellular copper and sensitivity to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Carlos P; Fofana, Mariama; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, Christopher J; Howell, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian cells express two copper (Cu) influx transporters, CTR1 and CTR2. CTR1 serves as an influx transporter for both Cu and cisplatin (cDDP). In mouse embryo fibroblasts, reduction of CTR1 expression renders cells resistant to cDDP whereas reduction of CTR2 makes them hypersensitive both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the role of CTR2 on intracellular Cu and cDDP sensitivity its expression was molecularly altered in the human epithelial 2008 cancer cell model. Intracellular exchangeable Cu(+) was measured with the fluorescent probe Coppersensor-3 (CS3). The ability of CS3 to report on changes in intracellular Cu(+) was validated by showing that Cu chelators reduced its signal, and that changes in signal accompanied alterations in expression of the major Cu influx transporter CTR1 and the two Cu efflux transporters, ATP7A and ATP7B. Constitutive knock down of CTR2 mRNA by ∼50% reduced steady-state exchangeable Cu by 22-23% and increased the sensitivity of 2008 cells by a factor of 2.6-2.9 in two separate clones. Over-expression of CTR2 increased exchangeable Cu(+) by 150% and rendered the 2008 cells 2.5-fold resistant to cDDP. The results provide evidence that CS3 can quantitatively assess changes in exchangeable Cu(+), and that CTR2 regulates both the level of exchangeable Cu(+) and sensitivity to cDDP in a model of human epithelial cancer. This study introduces CS3 and related sensors as novel tools for probing and assaying Cu-dependent sensitivity to anticancer therapeutics.

  17. Crystallographic study of FABP5 as an intracellular endocannabinoid transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, Benoît; Wang, Tao [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sun, Jing; Wang, Liqun; Kaczocha, Martin [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Ojima, Iwao [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 1794-3400 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Deutsch, Dale, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Li, Huilin, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    FABP5 was recently found to intracellularly transport endocannabinoid signaling lipids. The structures of FABP5 complexed with two endocannabinoids and an inhibitor were solved. Human FABP5 was found to dimerize via a domain-swapping mechanism. This work will help in the development of inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels. In addition to binding intracellular fatty acids, fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) have recently been reported to also transport the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid derivatives that function as neurotransmitters and mediate a diverse set of physiological and psychological processes. To understand how the endocannabinoids bind to FABPs, the crystal structures of FABP5 in complex with AEA, 2-AG and the inhibitor BMS-309403 were determined. These ligands are shown to interact primarily with the substrate-binding pocket via hydrophobic interactions as well as a common hydrogen bond to the Tyr131 residue. This work advances our understanding of FABP5–endocannabinoid interactions and may be useful for future efforts in the development of small-molecule inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels.

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum-resident Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) Isoform Glucose-regulated Protein 94 (GRP94) Regulates Cell Polarity and Cancer Cell Migration by Affecting Intracellular Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Suman; Shinogle, Heather E; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Blagg, Brian S J

    2016-04-15

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that is up-regulated in cancer and is required for the folding of numerous signaling proteins. Consequently, HSP90 represents an ideal target for the development of new anti-cancer agents. The human HSP90 isoform, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and regulates secretory pathways, integrins, and Toll-like receptors, which contribute to regulating immunity and metastasis. However, the cellular function of GRP94 remains underinvestigated. We report that GRP94 knockdown cells are defective in intracellular transport and, consequently, negatively impact the trafficking of F-actin toward the cellular cortex, integrin α2 and integrin αL toward the cell membrane and filopodia, and secretory vesicles containing the HSP90α-AHA1-survivin complex toward the leading edge. As a result, GRP94 knockdown cells form a multipolar spindle instead of bipolar morphology and consequently manifest a defect in cell migration and adhesion.

  19. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    applications. Further development could potentially enable selective capture of intracellular antigens, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, or disruption of the transport systems and consequently the infection and pathogenesis cycle of biothreat agents.

  20. Intracellular transport mechanisms: a critique of diffusion theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Malone, P C; Wheatley, D N

    1995-09-21

    It is argued that Brownian motion makes a less significant contribution to the movements of molecules and particles inside cells than is commonly believed, and that the numbers of similar molecules and particles within any near-homogeneous subcompartment of the cell internum are insufficient to justify the statistical assumptions implicit in the derivation of the diffusion equation. For these reasons, it is contended that, contrary to accepted opinion, diffusion theory cannot provide an explanation for intracellular transport at the molecular level. Although attempts have been made to adapt diffusion theory to complex media, the conclusion is that none satisfactorily overcomes the problem of applying the theory to cell biology. However, the heuristic influence of the theory on cellular biophysics and physiology is noted, and possible alternative frameworks for interpreting the valuable experimental data obtained from such studies are outlined.

  1. How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Solanko, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in membranes and explain how such models are related to sterol flux between organelles. An overview of various sterol-transfer proteins is given, and the physico-chemical principles of their function in non-vesicular sterol transport are explained. We also discuss selected experimental approaches for characterization of sterol-protein interactions and for monitoring intracellular sterol transport. Finally, we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol import into mammalian cells and describe the process of cellular cholesterol efflux. Overall, we emphasize how specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  2. Intracellular loop 5 is important for the transport mechanism and molecular pharmacology of the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Saida; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup

    2015-01-01

    are important drug targets in treating i.e. affective disorders such as depression and anxiety, and for drugs of abuse such as ecstasy and cocaine. The normal function of the SERT relies on large conformational changes and its inhibition by antidepressants represents a conformational lock. Understanding...... the molecular mechanism of inhibition and which structural elements are involved in inhibitor binding and conformational changes of the transporter will provide clues for the development of improved drugs for the treatment of depression. Guided by our previous studies, we combined different biochemical methods......-HT transport. We also find that the potency of antidepressants is improved by in SERT with a lengthened IL5. These findings support the notion that intracellular loops are important substructures with a role in both the transport mechanism and molecular pharmacology of SERT....

  3. Rab proteins: the key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuin, Tanmay; Roy, Jagat Kumar

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes.

  4. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuin, Tanmay [Cell and Developmental Biology Unit, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag 713104 (India); Roy, Jagat Kumar, E-mail: jkroy@bhu.ac.in [Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  5. How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Solanko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions....... Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways...... as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics...

  6. SLC30A9 mutation affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis causes a novel cerebro-renal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Yonatan; Shorer, Zamir; Liani-Leibson, Keren; Chabosseau, Pauline; Kadir, Rotem; Volodarsky, Michael; Halperin, Daniel; Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Shalev, Hanna; Schreiber, Ruth; Gradstein, Libe; Gurevich, Evgenia; Zarivach, Raz; Rutter, Guy A; Landau, Daniel; Birk, Ohad S

    2017-02-09

    A novel autosomal recessive cerebro-renal syndrome was identified in consanguineous Bedouin kindred: neurological deterioration was evident as of early age, progressing into severe intellectual disability, profound ataxia, camptocormia and oculomotor apraxia. Brain MRI was normal. Four of the six affected individuals also had early-onset nephropathy with features of tubulo-interstitial nephritis, hypertension and tendency for hyperkalemia, though none had rapid deterioration of renal function. Genome wide linkage analysis identified an ∼18 Mb disease-associated locus on chromosome 4 (maximal logarithm of odds score 4.4 at D4S2971; θ = 0). Whole exome sequencing identified a single mutation in SLC30A9 within this locus, segregating as expected within the kindred and not found in a homozygous state in 300 Bedouin controls. We showed that SLC30A9 (solute carrier family 30 member 9; also known as ZnT-9) is ubiquitously expressed with high levels in cerebellum, skeletal muscle, thymus and kidney. Confocal analysis of SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing SLC30A9 fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein demonstrated vesicular cytosolic localization associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, not co-localizing with endosomal or Golgi markers. SLC30A9 encodes a putative zinc transporter (by similarity) previously associated with Wnt signalling. However, using dual-luciferase reporter assay in SH-SY5Y cells we showed that Wnt signalling was not affected by the mutation. Based on protein modelling, the identified mutation is expected to affect SLC30A9's highly conserved cation efflux domain, putatively disrupting its transmembrane helix structure. Cytosolic Zn2+ measurements in HEK293 cells overexpressing wild-type and mutant SLC30A9 showed lower zinc concentration within mutant rather than wild-type SLC30A9 cells. This suggests that SLC30A9 has zinc transport properties affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis, and that the molecular mechanism of the disease is through

  7. Conformational changes in dopamine transporter intracellular regions upon cocaine binding and dopamine translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehnes, Yvette; Shan, Jufang; Beuming, Thijs; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2014-07-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, mediates the reuptake of dopamine at the synaptic cleft. DAT is the primary target for psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. We previously demonstrated that cocaine binding and dopamine transport alter the accessibility of Cys342 in the third intracellular loop (IL3). To study the conformational changes associated with the functional mechanism of the transporter, we made cysteine substitution mutants, one at a time, from Phe332 to Ser351 in IL3 of the background DAT construct, X7C, in which 7 endogenous cysteines were mutated. The accessibility of the 20 engineered cysteines to polar charged sulfhydryl reagents was studied in the absence and presence of cocaine or dopamine. Of the 11 positions that reacted with methanethiosulfonate ethyl ammonium, as evidenced by inhibition of ligand binding, 5 were protected against this inhibition by cocaine and dopamine (S333C, S334C, N336C, M342C and T349C), indicating that reagent accessibility is affected by conformational changes associated with inhibitor and substrate binding. In some of the cysteine mutants, transport activity is disrupted, but can be rescued by the presence of zinc, most likely because the distribution between inward- and outward-facing conformations is restored by zinc binding. The experimental data were interpreted in the context of molecular models of DAT in both the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Differences in the solvent accessible surface area for individual IL3 residues calculated for these states correlate well with the experimental accessibility data, and suggest that protection by ligand binding results from the stabilization of the outward-facing configuration. Changes in the residue interaction networks observed from the molecular dynamics simulations also revealed the critical roles of several positions during the conformational transitions. We conclude that the IL3 region of DAT

  8. Regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking by intracellular amphetamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlig, Kristopher M; Lute, Brandon J; Wei, Yuqiang

    2006-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) mediates the removal of released DA. DAT is the major molecular target responsible for the rewarding properties and abuse potential of the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH). AMPH has been shown to reduce the number of DATs at the cell surface, and this AMPH...

  9. Intracellular Acetyl Unit Transport in Fungal Carbon Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbis, K.; Distel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a central metabolite in carbon and energy metabolism. Because of its amphiphilic nature and bulkiness, acetyl-CoA cannot readily traverse biological membranes. In fungi, two systems for acetyl unit transport have been identified: a shuttle dependent on the carrier c

  10. Transepithelial Na+ transport and the intracellular fluids: a computer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, M M; Bookman, R J

    1982-01-01

    Computer simulations of tight epithelia under three experimental conditions have been carried out, using the rheogenic nonlinear model of Lew, Ferreira and Moura (Proc. Roy. Soc. London. B 206:53-83, 1979) based largely on the formulation of Koefoed-Johnsen and Ussing (Acta Physiol. Scand. 42: 298-308. 1958). First, analysis of the transition between the short-circuited and open-circuited states has indicated that (i) apical Cl- permeability is a critical parameter requiring experimental definition in order to analyze cell volume regulation, and (ii) contrary to certain experimental reports, intracellular Na+ concentration (ccNa) is expected to be a strong function of transepithelial clamping voltage. Second, analysis of the effects of lowering serosal K+ concentration (csK) indicates that the basic model cannot simulate several well-documented observations; these defects can be overcome, at least qualitatively, by modifying the model to take account of the negative feedback interaction likely to exist between the apical Na+ permeability and ccNa. Third, analysis of the strongly supports the concept that osmotically induced permeability changes in the apical intercellular junctions play a physiological role in conserving the body's stores of NaCl. The analyses also demonstrate that the importance of Na+ entry across the basolateral membrane is strongly dependent upon transepithelial potential, cmNa and csK; under certain conditions, net Na+ entry could be appreciably greater across the basolateral than across the apical membrane.

  11. Active intracellular transport in metastatic cells studied by spatial light interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Majeed, Hassaan; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular transport are very difficult to quantify and, consequently, continue to be insufficiently understood. While it is well documented that mass trafficking inside living cells consists of both random and deterministic motions, quantitative data over broad spatiotemporal scales are lacking. We studied the intracellular transport in live cells using spatial light interference microscopy, a high spatiotemporal resolution quantitative phase imaging tool. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (directed, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). Furthermore, we studied the behavior of the two-dimensional mass density over 30 h in HeLa cells and focused on the active component. We determined the standard deviation of the velocity distribution at the point of cell division for each cell and compared the standard deviation velocity inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found that the velocity distribution in the cytoplasm is consistently broader than in the nucleus, suggesting mechanisms for faster transport in the cytosol versus the nucleus. Future studies will focus on improving phase measurements by applying a fluorescent tag to understand how particular proteins are transported inside the cell.

  12. Navigating the plant cell: intracellular transport logistics in the green kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geitmann, Anja; Nebenführ, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular transport in plant cells occurs on microtubular and actin arrays. Cytoplasmic streaming, the rapid motion of plant cell organelles, is mostly driven by an actin-myosin mechanism, whereas specialized functions, such as the transport of large cargo or the assembly of a new cell wall during cell division, are performed by the microtubules. Different modes of transport are used, fast and slow, to either haul cargo over long distances or ascertain high-precision targeting, respectively. Various forms of the actin-specific motor protein myosin XI exist in plant cells and might be involved in different cellular functions.

  13. Monensin and FCCP inhibit the intracellular transport of alphavirus membrane glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Kaariainen, L; Hashimoto, K.; Saraste, J; Virtanen, I; Penttinen, K

    1980-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of semliki forest virus (SFV) and sindbis virus (SIN) were used to study the intracellular transport of virus membrane glycoproteins in infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. When antisera against purified glycoproteins and (125)I- labeled protein A from staphylococcus aureus were used only small amounts of virus glycoproteins were detected at the surface of SFV ts-1 and SIN Ts-10 infected cells incubated at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C). When the muta...

  14. The efficient intracellular sequestration of the insulin-regulatable glucose transporter (GLUT-4) is conferred by the NH2 terminus

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    GLUT-4 is the major facilitative glucose transporter isoform in tissues that exhibit insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Insulin regulates glucose transport by the rapid translocation of GLUT-4 from an intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane. A critical feature of this process is the efficient exclusion of GLUT-4 from the plasma membrane in the absence of insulin. To identify the amino acid domains of GLUT-4 which confer intracellular sequestration, we analyzed the subcellular dist...

  15. The intracellular domain of Dumbfounded affects myoblast fusion efficiency and interacts with Rolling pebbles and Loner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarada Bulchand

    Full Text Available Drosophila body wall muscles are multinucleated syncytia formed by successive fusions between a founder myoblast and several fusion competent myoblasts. Initial fusion gives rise to a bi/trinucleate precursor followed by more fusion cycles forming a mature muscle. This process requires the functions of various molecules including the transmembrane myoblast attractants Dumbfounded (Duf and its paralogue Roughest (Rst, a scaffold protein Rolling pebbles (Rols and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor Loner. Fusion completely fails in a duf, rst mutant, and is blocked at the bi/trinucleate stage in rols and loner single mutants. We analysed the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Duf, by mutating conserved putative signaling sites and serially deleting the intracellular domain. These were tested for their ability to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner and to rescue the fusion defect in duf, rst mutant embryos. Studying combinations of double mutants, further tested the function of Rols, Loner and other fusion molecules. Here we show that serial truncations of the Duf intracellular domain successively compromise its function to translocate and interact with Rols and Loner in addition to affecting myoblast fusion efficiency in embryos. Putative phosphorylation sites function additively while the extreme C terminus including a PDZ binding domain is dispensable for its function. We also show that fusion is completely blocked in a rols, loner double mutant and is compromised in other double mutants. These results suggest an additive function of the intracellular domain of Duf and an early function of Rols and Loner which is independent of Duf.

  16. Intracellular Transport of Plant Viruses: Finding the Door out of the Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James E. Schoelz; Phillip A. Harries; Richard S. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Plant viruses are a class of plant pathogens that specialize in movement from cell to cell.As part of their arsenal for infection of plants,every virus encodes a movement protein (MP),a protein dedicated to enlarging the pore size of plasmodesmata (PD) and actively transporting the viral nucleic acid into the adjacent cell.As our knowledge of intercellular transport has increased,it has become apparent that viruses must also use an active mechanism to target the virus from their site of replication within the cell to the PD.Just as viruses are too large to fit through an unmodified plasmodesma,they are also too large to be freely diffused through the cytoplasm of the cell.Evidence has accumulated now for the involvement of other categories of viral proteins in intracellular movement in addition to the MP,including viral proteins originally associated with replication or gene expression.In this review,we will discuss the strategies that viruses use for intracellular movement from the replication site to the PD,in particular focusing on the role of host membranes for intracellular transport and the coordinated interactions between virus proteins within cells that are necessary for successful virus spread.

  17. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of host rocks, secondary minerals, and fluids would affect the transport of radionuclides from a previously proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Minerals in the Yucca Mountain tuffs that are important for retarding radionuclides include clinoptilolite and mordenite (zeolites), clay minerals, and iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides. Water compositions along flow paths beneath Yucca Mountain are controlled by dissolution reactions, silica and calcite precipitation, and ion-exchange reactions. Radionuclide concentrations along flow paths from a repository could be limited by (1) low waste-form dissolution rates, (2) low radionuclide solubility, and (3) radionuclide sorption onto geological media.

  18. Allyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Actin-Dependent Intracellular Transport in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørnar Sporsheim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile allyl isothiocyanate (AITC derives from the biodegradation of the glucosinolate sinigrin and has been associated with growth inhibition in several plants, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this feature remain scarcely investigated in plants. In this study, we present evidence of an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport in A. thaliana. A transgenic line of A. thaliana expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-tagged actin filaments was used to show attenuation of actin filament movement by AITC. This appeared gradually in a time- and dose-dependent manner and resulted in actin filaments appearing close to static. Further, we employed four transgenic lines with YFP-fusion proteins labeling the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, vacuoles and peroxisomes to demonstrate an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport of or, in these structures, consistent with the decline in actin filament movement. Furthermore, the morphologies of actin filaments, ER and vacuoles appeared aberrant following AITC-exposure. However, AITC-treated seedlings of all transgenic lines tested displayed morphologies and intracellular movements similar to that of the corresponding untreated and control-treated plants, following overnight incubation in an AITC-absent environment, indicating that AITC-induced decline in actin-related movements is a reversible process. These findings provide novel insights into the cellular events in plant cells following exposure to AITC, which may further expose clues to the physiological significance of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system.

  19. Monensin and FCCP inhibit the intracellular transport of alphavirus membrane glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, L; Hashimoto, K; Saraste, J; Virtanen, I; Penttinen, K

    1980-12-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of semliki forest virus (SFV) and sindbis virus (SIN) were used to study the intracellular transport of virus membrane glycoproteins in infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. When antisera against purified glycoproteins and (125)I- labeled protein A from staphylococcus aureus were used only small amounts of virus glycoproteins were detected at the surface of SFV ts-1 and SIN Ts-10 infected cells incubated at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C). When the mutant-infected cells were shifted to the permissive temperature (28 degrees C), in the presence of cycloheximide, increasing amounts of virus glycoproteins appeared at the cell surface from 20 to 80 min after the shift. Both monensin (10muM) and carbonylcyanide-p- trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP; 10-20 muM) inhibited the appearance of virus membrane glycoproteins at the cell surface. Vinblastine sulfate (10 mug/ml) inhibited the transport by approximately 50 percent, whereas cytochalasin B (1 mug/ml) had only a marginal effect. Intracellular distribution of virus glycoproteins in the mutant-infected cells was visualized in double-fluorescence studies using lectins as markers for endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. At 39 degrees C, the virus membrane glycoproteins were located at the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas after shift to 28 degrees C, a bright juxtanuclear reticular fluorescence was seen in the location of the Golgi apparatus. In the presence of monensin, the virus glycoproteins could migrate to the Golgi apparatus, although transport to the cell surface did not take place. When the shift was carried out in the presence of FCCP, negligible fluorescence was seen in the Golgi apparatus and the glycoproteins apparently remained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. A rapid inhibition in the accumulation of virus glycoproteins at the cell surface was obtained when FCCP was added during the active transport period, whereas with monensin there was a delay of

  20. The effect of solution nonideality on modeling transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited intracellular ice formation during cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; He, Xiaoming

    2014-04-14

    A new model was developed to predict transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited ice formation in cells during freezing without the ideal-solution assumption that has been used in previous models. The model was applied to predict cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) during cryopreservation of mouse oocytes and bovine carotid artery endothelial cells in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with glycerol as the cryoprotectant or cryoprotective agent. A comparison of the predictions between the present model and the previously reported models indicated that the ideal-solution assumption results in under-prediction of the amount of intracellular ice at slow cooling rates (<50 K/min). In addition, the lower critical cooling rates for IIF that is lethal to cells predicted by the present model were much lower than those estimated with the ideal-solution assumption. This study represents the first investigation on how accounting for solution nonideality in modeling water transport across the cell membrane could affect the prediction of diffusion-limited ice formation in biological cells during freezing. Future studies are warranted to look at other assumptions alongside nonideality to further develop the model as a useful tool for optimizing the protocol of cell cryopreservation for practical applications.

  1. An intracellular traffic jam: Fc receptor-mediated transport of immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Devin B; Björkman, Pamela J

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques along with more powerful in vitro and in vivo models of receptor-mediated ligand transport are facilitating advances in our understanding of how cells efficiently direct receptors and their cargo to target destinations within the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. Specifically, light and 3D electron microscopy studies examining the trafficking behavior of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), a transport receptor for immunoglobulin G (IgG), have given us new insights into the dynamic interplay between the structural components of the cytosolic trafficking machinery, its protein regulators, and the receptors it directs to various locations within the cell. These studies build upon previous biochemical characterizations of FcRn transport and are allowing us to begin formulation of a more complete model for the intracellular trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes.

  2. Characterization of intracellular regions in the human serotonin transporter for phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lena; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    /dephosphorylation during transporter regulation by multiple pathways. In particular, activation and/or inhibition of kinases including PKC, PKG, p38MAPK, and CaMKII modulate SERT function and trafficking. The molecular mechanisms by which kinase activity is linked to SERT regulation are poorly understood, including...... the identity of specific phosphorylated residues. To elucidate SERT phosphorylation sites, we have generated peptides corresponding to the entire intracellular region of human SERT and performed in vitro phosphorylation assays with a panel of kinases suggested to be involved in SERT regulation or for which...

  3. Intracellular sucrose communicates metabolic demand to sucrose transporters in developing pea cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuchan; Chan, Katie; Wang, Trevor L; Hedley, Cliff L; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2009-01-01

    Mechanistic inter-relationships in sinks between sucrose compartmentation/metabolism and phloem unloading/translocation are poorly understood. Developing grain legume seeds provide tractable experimental systems to explore this question. Metabolic demand by cotyledons is communicated to phloem unloading and ultimately import by sucrose withdrawal from the seed apoplasmic space via a turgor-homeostat mechanism. What is unknown is how metabolic demand is communicated to cotyledon sucrose transporters responsible for withdrawing sucrose from the apoplasmic space. This question was explored here using a pea rugosus mutant (rrRbRb) compromised in starch biosynthesis compared with its wild-type counterpart (RRRbRb). Sucrose influx into cotyledons was found to account for 90% of developmental variations in their absolute growth and hence starch biosynthetic rates. Furthermore, rr and RR cotyledons shared identical response surfaces, indicating that control of transporter activity was likely to be similar for both lines. In this context, sucrose influx was correlated positively with expression of a sucrose/H(+) symporter (PsSUT1) and negatively with two sucrose facilitators (PsSUF1 and PsSUF4). Sucrose influx exhibited a negative curvilinear relationship with cotyledon concentrations of sucrose and hexoses. In contrast, the impact of intracellular sugars on transporter expression was transporter dependent, with expression of PsSUT1 inhibited, PsSUF1 unaffected, and PsSUF4 enhanced by sugars. Sugar supply to, and sugar concentrations of, RR cotyledons were manipulated using in vitro pod and cotyledon culture. Collectively the results obtained showed that intracellular sucrose was the physiologically active sugar signal that communicated metabolic demand to sucrose influx and this transport function was primarily determined by PsSUT1 regulated at the transcriptional level.

  4. INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT. Phosphatidylserine transport by ORP/Osh proteins is driven by phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser von Filseck, Joachim; Čopič, Alenka; Delfosse, Vanessa; Vanni, Stefano; Jackson, Catherine L; Bourguet, William; Drin, Guillaume

    2015-07-24

    In eukaryotic cells, phosphatidylserine (PS) is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but is highly enriched in the plasma membrane (PM), where it contributes negative charge and to specific recruitment of signaling proteins. This distribution relies on transport mechanisms whose nature remains elusive. Here, we found that the PS transporter Osh6p extracted phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) and exchanged PS for PI4P between two membranes. We solved the crystal structure of Osh6p:PI4P complex and demonstrated that the transport of PS by Osh6p depends on PI4P recognition in vivo. Finally, we showed that the PI4P-phosphatase Sac1p, by maintaining a PI4P gradient at the ER/PM interface, drove PS transport. Thus, PS transport by oxysterol-binding protein-related protein (ORP)/oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) proteins is fueled by PI4P metabolism through PS/PI4P exchange cycles.

  5. Effects of glial glutamate transporter inhibitors on intracellular Na+ in mouse astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, J Y; Shimamoto, K; Magistretti, P J

    2001-03-02

    The effects of inhibitors of the glial Na+/glutamate co-transporter on the intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+](i)) were investigated in mouse cortical astrocytes. [Na+](i) was monitored by fluorescence microscopy on single astrocytes using the Na+-sensitive probe sodium-binding benzofuran isophtalate. Application of the competitive inhibitors threo-beta-hydroxyaspartate (THA) and trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (t-PDC) resulted in robust and reversible increases in [Na+](i) that were comparable in shape to the response to glutamate but about twice lower in amplitude. As previously observed with glutamate, the amplitude of the [Na+](i) response to these compounds was concentration-dependent with EC(50) values of 11.1 microM (THA) and 7.6 microM (t-PDC), as was the initial rate of [Na+](i) rise (EC(50) values of 14.8 microM for THA and 11.5 microM for t-PDC). Both compounds diminished the response to subsequent glutamate applications, possibly because of an inhibitory effect of the intracellularly-accumulated compounds. In comparison, the newly-developed compound threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) alone did not cause any significant alteration of [Na+](i) up to a concentration of 500 microM . TBOA inhibited the [Na+](i) response evoked by 200 microM glutamate in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 114 and 63 microM, as measured on the amplitude and the initial rate, respectively. The maximum inhibition of glutamate-evoked [Na+](i) increase by TBOA was approximately 70%. The residual response persisted in the presence of a non-NMDA receptor antagonist or the inhibitor of the GLT-1 glutamate transporters, dihydrokainate (DHK). In view of the complete reversibility of its effects, TBOA represents a very useful pharmacological tool for studies of glutamate transporters.

  6. Cytoplasmic electric fields and electroosmosis: possible solution for the paradoxes of the intracellular transport of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor P Andreev

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to show that electroosmotic flow might play an important role in the intracellular transport of biomolecules. The paper presents two mathematical models describing the role of electroosmosis in the transport of the negatively charged messenger proteins to the negatively charged nucleus and in the recovery of the fluorescence after photobleaching. The parameters of the models were derived from the extensive review of the literature data. Computer simulations were performed within the COMSOL 4.2a software environment. The first model demonstrated that the presence of electroosmosis might intensify the flux of messenger proteins to the nucleus and allow the efficient transport of the negatively charged phosphorylated messenger proteins against the electrostatic repulsion of the negatively charged nucleus. The second model revealed that the presence of the electroosmotic flow made the time of fluorescence recovery dependent on the position of the bleaching spot relative to cellular membrane. The magnitude of the electroosmotic flow effect was shown to be quite substantial, i.e. increasing the flux of the messengers onto the nucleus up to 4-fold relative to pure diffusion and resulting in the up to 3-fold change in the values of fluorescence recovery time, and therefore the apparent diffusion coefficient determined from the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Based on the results of the modeling and on the universal nature of the electroosmotic flow, the potential wider implications of electroosmotic flow in the intracellular and extracellular biological processes are discussed. Both models are available for download at ModelDB.

  7. Intracellular pH regulation by acid/base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon A. Ruffin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pH (pHi regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: [1] The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. [2] pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL and extrusion (JE. The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g. metabolic acidosis. [3] The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3 and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3 and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3- transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2. [4] The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions.

  8. A cycling state that can lead to glassy dynamics in intracellular transport

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, Monika; Weirich, Kimberly L; Scholz, Bjorn J; Tabei, S M Ali; Gardel, Margaret L; Dinner, Aaron R

    2016-01-01

    Power-law dwell times have been observed for molecular motors in living cells, but the origins of these trapped states are not known. We introduce a minimal model of motors moving on a two-dimensional network of filaments, and simulations of its dynamics exhibit statistics comparable to those observed experimentally. Analysis of the model trajectories, as well as experimental particle tracking data, reveals a state in which motors cycle unproductively at junctions of three or more filaments. We formulate a master equation for these junction dynamics and show that the time required to escape from this vortex-like state can account for the power-law dwell times. We identify trends in the dynamics with the motor valency for further experimental validation. We demonstrate that these trends exist in individual trajectories of myosin II on an actin network. We discuss how cells could regulate intracellular transport and, in turn, biological function, by controlling their cytoskeletal network structures locally.

  9. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E. (SBU)

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  10. Selected legal and regulatory concerns affecting domestic energy transportation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, C.R.

    1979-07-01

    This report provides assessments of eight legal and regulatory concerns that may affect energy material transportation in the US during the rest of the century: state authority to regulate nuclear materials transport, divestiture of petroleum pipelines from major integrated oil companies, problems affecting the natural gas transportation system, capabilities of energy transportation systems during emergencies, Federal coal pipeline legislation, ability of Federal agencies to anticipate railroad difficulties, abandonment of uneconomic railroad lines, and impact of the Panama Canal treaty upon US energy transportation. (DLC)

  11. Leishmania panamensis infection and antimonial drugs modulate expression of macrophage drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes: impact on intracellular parasite survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Maria Adelaida; Navas, Adriana; Márquez, Ricardo; Rojas, Laura Jimena; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Blanco, Victor Manuel; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment failure is multifactorial. Despite the importance of host cell drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of drugs targeting intracellular pathogens, their impact on the efficacy of antileishmanials is unknown. We examined the contribution of pharmacologically relevant determinants in human macrophages in the antimony-mediated killing of intracellular Leishmania panamensis and its relationship with the outcome of treatment with meglumine antimoniate. Methods Patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis who failed (n = 8) or responded (n = 8) to treatment were recruited. Gene expression profiling of pharmacological determinants in primary macrophages was evaluated by quantitative RT–PCR and correlated to the drug-mediated intracellular parasite killing. Functional validation was conducted through short hairpin RNA gene knockdown. Results Survival of L. panamensis after exposure to antimonials was significantly higher in macrophages from patients who failed treatment. Sixteen macrophage drug-response genes were modulated by infection and exposure to meglumine antimoniate. Correlation analyses of gene expression and intracellular parasite survival revealed the involvement of host cell metallothionein-2A and ABCB6 in the survival of Leishmania during exposure to antimonials. ABCB6 was functionally validated as a transporter of antimonial compounds localized in both the cell and phagolysosomal membranes of macrophages, revealing a novel mechanism of host cell-mediated regulation of intracellular drug exposure and parasite survival within phagocytes. Conclusions These results provide insight into host cell mechanisms regulating the intracellular exposure of Leishmania to antimonials and variations among individuals that impact parasite survival. Understanding of host cell determinants of intracellular pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics opens new avenues to improved drug efficacy for intracellular

  12. Multiple transport pathways for mediating intracellular pH homeostasis: the contribution of H+/ion exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon ePittman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pH homeostasis is an essential process in all plant cells. The transport of H+ into intracellular compartments is critical for providing pH regulation. The maintenance of correct luminal pH in the vacuole and in compartments of the secretory/endocytic pathway is important for a variety of cellular functions including protein modification, sorting and trafficking. It is becoming increasingly evident that coordination between primary H+ pumps, most notably the V-ATPase, and secondary ion/H+ exchangers allows this endomembrane pH maintenance to occur. This article describes some of the recent insights from the studies of plant cation/H+ exchangers and anion/H+ exchangers that demonstrate the fundamental roles of these transporters in pH homeostasis within intracellular compartments.

  13. Variables Affecting Two Electron Transport System Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, G. Allen; Lanza, Guy R.

    1986-01-01

    Several methodological variables were critical in two commonly used electron transport activity assays. The dehydrogenase assay based on triphenyl formazan production exhibited a nonlinear relationship between formazan production (dehydrogenase activity) and sediment dilution, and linear formazan production occurred for 1 h in sediment slurries. Activity decreased with increased time of sediment storage at 4°C. Extraction efficiencies of formazan from sediment varied with alcohol type; methan...

  14. Biosynthesis of the D2-cell adhesion molecule: post-translational modifications, intracellular transport, and developmental changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, J M; Linnemann, D; Bock, E

    1984-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications and intracellular transport of the D2-cell adhesion molecule (D2-CAM) were examined in cultured fetal rat neuronal cells. Developmental changes in biosynthesis were studied in rat forebrain explant cultures. Two D2-CAM polypeptides with Mr of 187,000-210,000 (A...

  15. Intracellular transport routes for MHC class I and their relevance for antigen cross-presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cézaire Aimé Adiko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-presentation, in which exogenous antigens are presented via MHC I complexes, is involved both in the generation of anti-infectious and anti-tumoral cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. While cross-presentation was described almost four decades ago and while it is now established that some dendritic cell subsets are better than others in processing and cross-presenting internalized antigens, the involved molecular mechanisms remain only partially understood. Some of the least explored molecular mechanisms in cross-presentation concern the origin of cross-presenting MHC I molecules and the cellular compartments where antigenic peptide loading occurs. This review focuses on MHC I molecules and their intracellular trafficking. We discuss the source of cross-presenting MHC I in dendritic cells as well as the role of the endocytic pathway in their recycling from the cell surface. Next, we describe the importance of the TAP peptide transporter for delivering peptides to MHC I during cross-presentation. Finally, we highlight the impact of innate immunity mechanisms on specific antigen cross-presentation mechanisms in which TLR activation modulates MHC I trafficking and TAP localization.

  16. Mango Fruit Extracts Differentially Affect Proliferation and Intracellular Calcium Signalling in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Meng-Wong Taing; Jean-Thomas Pierson; Shaw, Paul N.; Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Gidley, Michael J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of human cancer cell proliferation is a common approach in identifying plant extracts that have potential bioactive effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that methanolic extracts of peel and flesh from three archetypal mango cultivars, Irwin (IW), Nam Doc Mai (NDM), and Kensington Pride (KP), differentially affect proliferation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity, and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]I) signalling in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Man...

  17. BiP Negatively Affects Ricin Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Sandvig

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The AB plant toxin ricin binds both glycoproteins and glycolipids at the cell surface via its B subunit. After binding, ricin is endocytosed and then transported retrogradely through the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the ER, the A subunit is retrotranslocated to the cytosol in a chaperone-dependent process, which is not fully explored. Recently two separate siRNA screens have demonstrated that ER chaperones have implications for ricin toxicity. ER associated degradation (ERAD involves translocation of misfolded proteins from ER to cytosol and it is conceivable that protein toxins exploit this pathway. The ER chaperone BiP is an important ER regulator and has been implicated in toxicity mediated by cholera and Shiga toxin. In this study, we have investigated the role of BiP in ricin translocation to the cytosol. We first show that overexpression of BiP inhibited ricin translocation and protected cells against the toxin. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of BiP enhanced toxin translocation resulting in increased cytotoxicity. BiP-dependent inhibition of ricin toxicity was independent of ER stress. Our findings suggest that in contrast to what was shown with the Shiga toxin, the presence of BiP does not facilitate, but rather inhibits the entry of ricin into the cytosol.

  18. Iron transport through ferroportin is induced by intracellular ascorbate and involves IRP2 and HIF2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheers, Nathalie; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2014-01-03

    A few tightly regulated transport proteins mediate iron absorption across the intestinal epithelium. At the basolateral border of intestinal cells there is one identified transporter, ferroportin, for the transfer of intracellular iron to the vascular system. Here, we investigate the effects of ascorbate (vitamin C) on the regulation of ferroportin in human intestinal Caco-2 cells using ELISA and Western Blot analyses. The results indicate that ferroportin protein levels peak at 100 μM of added ascorbate with an increase of 274% (p=0.02). At 150 μM of ascorbate, the increase was only 28% (p=0.04), and at 200 μM there was no significant change from the baseline control. In addition, the ascorbate-induced, (at 150 μM) up-regulated ferroportin levels were associated with increased 55Fe transport across the basolateral border (19%, p=0.03). Ascorbate-induced up-regulation of cellular ferroportin levels (no added iron) was associated with increased levels of the iron regulatory protein IRP2 (230%, p=0.0009), and the hypoxia-inducible factor HIF2α (69%, p=0.03). Thus, iron transport across the basal border via ferroportin is influenced by the intracellular status of ascorbate and IRP2 and HIF2α are involved. We discuss possible reasons for the ascorbate-effects and the dependence of cellular growth conditions for iron transport-related protein expression.

  19. Iron Transport through Ferroportin Is Induced by Intracellular Ascorbate and Involves IRP2 and HIF2α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Scheers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A few tightly regulated transport proteins mediate iron absorption across the intestinal epithelium. At the basolateral border of intestinal cells there is one identified transporter, ferroportin, for the transfer of intracellular iron to the vascular system. Here, we investigate the effects of ascorbate (vitamin C on the regulation of ferroportin in human intestinal Caco-2 cells using ELISA and Western Blot analyses. The results indicate that ferroportin protein levels peak at 100 μM of added ascorbate with an increase of 274% (p = 0.02. At 150 μM of ascorbate, the increase was only 28% (p = 0.04, and at 200 μM there was no significant change from the baseline control. In addition, the ascorbate-induced, (at 150 μM up-regulated ferroportin levels were associated with increased 55Fe transport across the basolateral border (19%, p = 0.03. Ascorbate-induced up-regulation of cellular ferroportin levels (no added iron was associated with increased levels of the iron regulatory protein IRP2 (230%, p = 0.0009, and the hypoxia-inducible factor HIF2α (69%, p = 0.03. Thus, iron transport across the basal border via ferroportin is influenced by the intracellular status of ascorbate and IRP2 and HIF2α are involved. We discuss possible reasons for the ascorbate-effects and the dependence of cellular growth conditions for iron transport-related protein expression.

  20. A glutathione peroxidase, intracellular peptidases and the TOR complexes regulate peptide transporter PEPT-1 in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Benner

    Full Text Available The intestinal peptide transporter PEPT-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans is a rheogenic H(+-dependent carrier responsible for the absorption of di- and tripeptides. Transporter-deficient pept-1(lg601 worms are characterized by impairments in growth, development and reproduction and develop a severe obesity like phenotype. The transport function of PEPT-1 as well as the influx of free fatty acids was shown to be dependent on the membrane potential and on the intracellular pH homeostasis, both of which are regulated by the sodium-proton exchanger NHX-2. Since many membrane proteins commonly function as complexes, there could be proteins that possibly modulate PEPT-1 expression and function. A systematic RNAi screening of 162 genes that are exclusively expressed in the intestine combined with a functional transport assay revealed four genes with homologues existing in mammals as predicted PEPT-1 modulators. While silencing of a glutathione peroxidase surprisingly caused an increase in PEPT-1 transport function, silencing of the ER to Golgi cargo transport protein and of two cytosolic peptidases reduced PEPT-1 transport activity and this even corresponded with lower PEPT-1 protein levels. These modifications of PEPT-1 function by gene silencing of homologous genes were also found to be conserved in the human epithelial cell line Caco-2/TC7 cells. Peptidase inhibition, amino acid supplementation and RNAi silencing of targets of rapamycin (TOR components in C. elegans supports evidence that intracellular peptide hydrolysis and amino acid concentration are a part of a sensing system that controls PEPT-1 expression and function and that involves the TOR complexes TORC1 and TORC2.

  1. Intracellular transport of low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol is defective in Niemann-Pick type C fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liscum, L.; Ruggiero, R.M.; Faust, J.R.

    1989-05-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is characterized by substantial intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol. The accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in NPC fibroblasts cultured with low density lipoprotein (LDL) appears to result from the inability of LDL to stimulate cholesterol esterification in addition to impaired LDL-mediated downregulation of LDL receptor activity and cellular cholesterol synthesis. Although a defect in cholesterol transport in NPC cells has been inferred from previous studies, no experiments have been reported that measure the intracellular movement of LDL-cholesterol specifically. We have used four approaches to assess intracellular cholesterol transport in normal and NPC cells and have determined the following: (a) mevinolin-inhibited NPC cells are defective in using LDL-cholesterol for growth. However, exogenously added mevalonate restores cell growth equally in normal and NPC cells; (b) the transport of LDL-derived (3H)cholesterol to the plasma membrane is slower in NPC cells, while the rate of appearance of (3H)acetate-derived, endogenously synthesized (3H)cholesterol at the plasma membrane is the same for normal and NPC cells; (c) in NPC cells, LDL-derived (3H)cholesterol accumulates in lysosomes to higher levels than normal, resulting in defective movement to other cell membranes; and (d) incubation of cells with LDL causes an increase in cholesterol content of NPC lysosomes that is threefold greater than that observed in normal lysosomes. Our results indicate that a cholesterol transport defect exists in NPC that is specific for LDL-derived cholesterol.

  2. Effect of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on ion transport and intracellular calcium in kidney distal epithelial cells (A6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, H F; Staermose, S; Vang, J

    2001-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) is found in near-shore environments receiving wastewater from urban treatment plants in a concentration reported to have physiological and toxic effect on aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect LAS on ion transport and homeostasis in epithelia cells. A6 cells form a polarised epithelium when grown on permeable supports, actively absorb sodium and secrete chloride. Only the addition of LAS (100 microM) to the apical solution of A6 epithelia resulted in an increase in the active ion transport measured as short circuit current (SCC) and transepithelial conductance (G(t)). This increase could not be affected by the sodium channel inhibitor amiloride (100 microM), indicating that LAS stimulated the chloride secretion. Change in the intracellular calcium concentration (Ca(2+))(i) was measured in fura-2 loaded A6 cells, since it known that increase in (Ca(2+))(i) stimulate chloride secretion. LAS induced a concentration-dependent increase in (Ca(2+))(i) from 5 to 200 microM, where the half-maximal stimulating concentration on 100 mM resulted in an increase in (Ca(2+))(i) from 108+/-15 to 570+/-26 nM (n=4; P<0.01). The increase in (Ca(2+))(i) could be blocked by the calcium chelator ethylenebis(5-oxyethylenenitrilo)tetraacetic acid (EGTA), showing that the effect of LAS was due to influx of extracellular calcium. Furthermore, it was shown that the calcium channel inhibitor verapamil (0.2 mM) abolished the LAS induced increase in (Ca(2+))(i) and Gt when applied to the apical solution. However, verapamil has no inhibitory effect on these parameters when the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (100 microM) was added to A6 cells. These results indicate that LAS induced a specific activation of calcium channels in the apical membrane of A6 epithelia, leading to increase in (Ca(2+))(i) and thereby increased chloride secretion as a result of stimulation of calcium-dependent chloride channels in the apical membrane

  3. Immunomicroscopic localization of aminopeptidase N in the pig enterocyte. Implications for the route of intracellular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Sjöström, H; Norén, Ove

    1987-01-01

    . Labelling was demonstrated in the Golgi apparatus and in a minor fraction of the intracellular smooth vesicles positioned between the Golgi apparatus and the microvillar membrane. These observations are compatible with the view that newly synthesized aminopeptidase N is delivered directly to the microvillar...

  4. Increase of Intracellular Cyclic AMP by PDE4 Inhibitors Affects HepG2 Cell Cycle Progression and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Mara; Cardarelli, Silvia; Galli, Francesca; Giardi, Maria Federica; Ragusa, Federica; Panera, Nadia; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Biagioni, Stefano; Giorgi, Mauro

    2017-06-01

    Type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4) are major members of a superfamily of enzymes (PDE) involved in modulation of intracellular signaling mediated by cAMP. Broadly expressed in most human tissues and present in large amounts in the liver, PDEs have in the last decade been key therapeutic targets for several inflammatory diseases. Recently, a significant body of work has underscored their involvement in different kinds of cancer, but with no attention paid to liver cancer. The present study investigated the effects of two PDE4 inhibitors, rolipram and DC-TA-46, on the growth of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with these inhibitors caused a marked increase of intracellular cAMP level and a dose- and time-dependent effect on cell growth. The concentrations of inhibitors that halved cell proliferation to about 50% were used for cell cycle experiments. Rolipram (10 μM) and DC-TA-46 (0.5 μM) produced a decrease of cyclin expression, in particular of cyclin A, as well as an increase in p21, p27 and p53, as evaluated by Western blot analysis. Changes in the intracellular localization of cyclin D1 were also observed after treatments. In addition, both inhibitors caused apoptosis, as demonstrated by an Annexin-V cytofluorimetric assay and analysis of caspase-3/7 activity. Results demonstrated that treatment with PDE4 inhibitors affected HepG2 cell cycle and survival, suggesting that they might be useful as potential adjuvant, chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1401-1411, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Aphid amino acid transporter regulates glutamine supply to intracellular bacterial symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel R G; Feng, Honglin; Baker, James D; Bavan, Selvan; Luetje, Charles W; Wilson, Alex C C

    2014-01-01

    Endosymbiotic associations have played a major role in evolution. However, the molecular basis for the biochemical interdependence of these associations remains poorly understood. The aphid-Buchnera endosymbiosis provides a powerful system to elucidate how these symbioses are regulated. In aphids, the supply of essential amino acids depends on an ancient nutritional symbiotic association with the gamma-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola. Buchnera cells are densely packed in specialized aphid bacteriocyte cells. Here we confirm that five putative amino acid transporters are highly expressed and/or highly enriched in Acyrthosiphon pisum bacteriocyte tissues. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, two bacteriocyte amino acid transporters displayed significant levels of glutamine uptake, with transporter ACYPI001018, LOC100159667 (named here as Acyrthosiphon pisum glutamine transporter 1, ApGLNT1) functioning as the most active glutamine transporter. Transporter ApGLNT1 has narrow substrate selectivity, with high glutamine and low arginine transport capacity. Notably, ApGLNT1 has high binding affinity for arginine, and arginine acts as a competitive inhibitor for glutamine transport. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that ApGLNT1 is localized predominantly to the bacteriocyte plasma membrane, a location consistent with the transport of glutamine from A. pisum hemolymph to the bacteriocyte cytoplasm. On the basis of functional transport data and localization, we propose a substrate feedback inhibition model in which the accumulation of the essential amino acid arginine in A. pisum hemolymph reduces the transport of the precursor glutamine into bacteriocytes, thereby regulating amino acid biosynthesis in the bacteriocyte. Structural similarities in the arrangement of hosts and symbionts across endosymbiotic systems suggest that substrate feedback inhibition may be mechanistically important in other endosymbioses.

  6. Recombinant modular transporters on the basis of epidermal growth factor for targeted intracellular delivery of photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilyazova, Dinara G.; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Gulak, Pavel V.; Lunin, Vladimir G.; Sergienko, Olga V.; Grin, Mikhail A.; Mironov, Andrey F.; Rubin, Andrey B.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2005-08-01

    The search for new pharmaceuticals has raised interest in locally-acting drugs which act over short distances within the cell, and for which different cell compartments have different sensitivities. Thus, photosensitizers used in anti-cancer therapy should be transported to the most sensitive subcellular compartments where their action is most pronounced. Earlier, we described the effects of bacterially expressed modular recombinant transporters for photosensitizers comprising a-melanocyte-stimulating hormone as an internalizable, cell-specific ligand, an optimized nuclear localization sequence, an Escherichia coli hemoglobin-like protein as a carrier, and an endosomolytic amphipathic polypeptide. These transporters delivered photosensitizers into the murine melanoma cells nuclei to result in cytotoxic effects 2 orders of magnitude greater than those of nonmodified photosensitizers. Here we describe new transporters possessing the same modules except for a ligand that is replaced with epidermal growth factor specific for other cancer cell types. The new transporter modules retained their functional activities within the chimera, this transporter delivered photosensitizers into the human carcinoma cells nuclei to result in photocytotoxic effects almost 3 orders of magnitude greater than those of nonmodified photosensitizers. The obtained results show that ligand modules of such transporters are interchangeable, meaning that they can be tailored for particular applications.

  7. Copper does not alter the intracellular distribution of ATP7B, a copper-transporting ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, M; Sakisaka, S; Kawaguchi, T; Kimura, R; Taniguchi, E; Koga, H; Hanada, S; Baba, S; Furuta, K; Kumashiro, R; Sugiyama, T; Sata, M

    2000-09-01

    Wilson's disease is a genetic disorder characterized by the accumulation of copper in the body due to a defect of biliary copper excretion. However, the mechanism of biliary copper excretion has not been fully clarified. We examined the effect of copper on the intracellular localization of the Wilson disease gene product (ATP7B) and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged ATP7B in a human hepatoma cell line (Huh7). The intracellular organelles were visualized by fluorescence microscopy. GFP-ATP7B colocalized with late endosome markers, but not with endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or lysosome markers in both the steady and copper-loaded states. ATP7B mainly localized at the perinuclear regions in both states. These results suggest that the main localization of ATP7B is in the late endosomes in both the steady and copper-loaded states. ATP7B seems to translocate copper from the cytosol to the late endosomal lumen, thus participating in biliary copper excretion via lysosomes.

  8. Low Resolution Structure of a Bacterial SLC26 Transporter Reveals Dimeric Stoichiometry and Mobile Intracellular Domains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Emma L. R.; Karinou, Eleni; Naismith, James H.; Gabel, Frank; Javelle, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    The SLC26/SulP (solute carrier/sulfate transporter) proteins are a superfamily of anion transporters conserved from bacteria to man, of which four have been identified in human diseases. Proteins within the SLC26/SulP family exhibit a wide variety of functions, transporting anions from halides to carboxylic acids. The proteins comprise a transmembrane domain containing between 10–12 transmembrane helices followed a by C-terminal cytoplasmic sulfate transporter and anti-sigma factor antagonist (STAS) domain. These proteins are expected to undergo conformational changes during the transport cycle; however, structural information for this family remains sparse, particularly for the full-length proteins. To address this issue, we conducted an expression and detergent screen on bacterial Slc26 proteins. The screen identified a Yersinia enterocolitica Slc26A protein as the ideal candidate for further structural studies as it can be purified to homogeneity. Partial proteolysis, co-purification, and analytical size exclusion chromatography demonstrate that the protein purifies as stable oligomers. Using small angle neutron scattering combined with contrast variation, we have determined the first low resolution structure of a bacterial Slc26 protein without spectral contribution from the detergent. The structure confirms that the protein forms a dimer stabilized via its transmembrane core; the cytoplasmic STAS domain projects away from the transmembrane domain and is not involved in dimerization. Supported by additional biochemical data, the structure suggests that large movements of the STAS domain underlie the conformational changes that occur during transport. PMID:21659513

  9. DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine inhibits intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi multiplication by affecting cell division but not trypomastigote-amastigote transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, M A; Basso, B; Kierszenbaum, F

    1992-06-01

    DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific, irreversible inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), decreases the capacity of Trypanosoma cruzi to invade and multiply within different types of mammalian host cells in vitro. In this work we found that inhibition of intracellular growth results from selective impairment of amastigote division without appreciable alteration of the capacity of the invading trypomastigotes to transform into the replicative amastigote form. Addition of agmatine, the product of arginine decarboxylation, reversed the inhibitory effect of DFMA. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity by DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine present in the medium prior to and during infection did not affect trypomastigote transformation or amastigote replication and did not change the magnitude of the inhibitory effect of DFMA on parasite multiplication. Hence, neither polyamine synthesis via the ornithine decarboxylase pathway nor salvage of host cell polyamines by T. cruzi appeared to be a likely explanation for the normal rate of parasite transformation that was seen in the presence of DFMA. Two clones of T. cruzi, TMSU-1 and TMSU-2, were tested for their degrees of sensitivity to the inhibitory effects of DFMA. Both trypomastigote association with (i.e., binding to and penetration of) myoblasts, and intracellular amastigote multiplication by either clone were found to be significantly (P less than 0.05) but not completely inhibited by DFMA. Therefore, the partial inhibition of T. cruzi infectivity and replication caused by DFMA is unlikely to represent a composite of effects of the drug on DFMA-sensitive and insensitive clones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Mathematical modeling of the intracellular protein dynamics: the importance of active transport along microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Zuzanna; Parisot, Martin; Lachowicz, Mirosław

    2014-12-21

    In this paper we propose a mathematical model of protein and mRNA transport inside a cell. The spatio-temporal model takes into account the active transport along microtubules in the cytoplasm as well as diffusion and is able to reproduce the oscillatory changes in protein concentration observed in many experimental data. In the model the protein and the mRNA interact with each other that allows us to classify the model as a simple gene regulatory network. The proposed model is generic and may be adapted to specific signaling pathways. On the basis of numerical simulations, we formulate a new hypothesis that the oscillatory dynamics is allowed by the mRNA active transport along microtubules from the nucleus to distant locations.

  11. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  12. Mango Fruit Extracts Differentially Affect Proliferation and Intracellular Calcium Signalling in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Wong Taing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of human cancer cell proliferation is a common approach in identifying plant extracts that have potential bioactive effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that methanolic extracts of peel and flesh from three archetypal mango cultivars, Irwin (IW, Nam Doc Mai (NDM, and Kensington Pride (KP, differentially affect proliferation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK activity, and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]I signalling in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Mango flesh extracts from all three cultivars did not inhibit cell growth, and of the peel extracts only NDM reduced MCF-7 cell proliferation. Mango cultivar peel and flesh extracts did not significantly change ERK phosphorylation compared to controls; however, some reduced relative maximal peak [Ca2+]I after adenosine triphosphate stimulation, with NDM peel extract having the greatest effect among the treatments. Our results identify mango interfruit and intrafruit (peel and flesh extract variability in antiproliferative effects and [Ca2+]I signalling in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and highlight that parts of the fruit (such as peel and flesh and cultivar differences are important factors to consider when assessing potential chemopreventive bioactive compounds in plants extracts.

  13. Following Intracellular Cholesterol Transport by Linear and Non-Linear Optical Microscopy of Intrinsically Fluorescent Sterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wustner, D.

    2012-01-01

    analysis like pixel-wise bleach rate fitting and multiphoton image correlation spectroscopy are introduced. Several applications of the new technology including observation of vectorial sterol trafficking in polarized human hepatoma cells for investigation of reverse cholesterol transport are presented....... the cellular movement of this essential lipid molecule. In this article, a survey of the various methods being used for analysis of sterol trafficking is given. Various classical biochemical methods are presented and their suitability for analysis of sterol trafficking is assessed. Special emphasis...

  14. Intracellular transport and processing of a tobacco vacuolar β-1,3-glucanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticher, L; Hinz, U; Meyer, A D; Meins, F

    1992-11-01

    The class I β-1,3-glucanases are basic, vacuolar enzymes implicated in the defense of plants against pathogen infection. The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) enzyme is synthesized as a preproprotein with an N-terminal signal peptide for targeting to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and an N-glycosylated C-terminal extension which is lost during protein maturation. The transport and processing of β-1,3-glucanase in cellsuspension cultures of the tobacco cultivar Havana 425 was investigated by pulse-chase labelling and cell fractionation. We verified that mature β-1,3-glucanase is localized in the vacuole of the suspension-cultured cells. Comparison of the time course of processing in homogenates, the soluble fraction, and membrane fractions indicates that proglucanase is transported from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi compartment to the vacuole. Processing to the mature form occurs in the vacuole. Treatment of cells with tunicamycin, which inhibits N-glycosylation, and digestion of the (35)S-labelled processing intermediates with endoglycosidase H indicate that β-1,3-glucanase has a single N-glycan attached to the C-terminal extension. Glycosylation is not required for proteolytic processing or correct targeting to the vacuole.

  15. Analysis of persistence during intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallavicini, C; Levi, V; Bruno, L [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Desposito, M A, E-mail: lbruno@df.uba.a

    2010-09-01

    The displacement of particles or probes in the cell cytoplasm as a function of time is characterized by different anomalous diffusion regimes. The transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles or large proteins, involves the action of ATP-consuming molecular motors. We investigate the motion of pigment organelles driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the turning angles ({phi}) of the obtained 2D trajectories as a function of the time lag, we determine the critical time of the transition between anticorrelated and directed motion as the time when the turning angles begin to concentrate around {phi} = 0. We relate this transition with the crossover from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior observed in a previous work [5]. We also assayed the properties of the trajectories in cells with inhibited myosin activity, and we can compare the results in the presence and absence of active motors.

  16. Optimization of Intracellular Transportation of Gene Therapeutic DNA in Small Cell Lung Cancer (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease characterized as being very aggressive and metastasizing at a rapid pace. The malevolent pace of SCLC cell migration results in almost three out of four SCLC patients having disseminated SCLC at the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately...... and thereby improving the efficacy of the treatment. By implementing what is known as a DNA nuclear targeting sequence (DTS) strategy, we found that we could utilize the SCLC cells own transportation system thereby manipulating the cancer cells to bring our therapeutic plasmids from the cytoplasm......, there are currently no satisfactory treatments for SCLC and the prognosis is poor. New treatments are therefore in high demand and one such could potentially be gene therapy. However, curing a metastasizing disease such as SCLC by gene therapy requires a systemically applied delivery system. Such a delivery system...

  17. Acetylation of TUG protein promotes the accumulation of GLUT4 glucose transporters in an insulin-responsive intracellular compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belman, Jonathan P; Bian, Rachel R; Habtemichael, Estifanos N; Li, Don T; Jurczak, Michael J; Alcázar-Román, Abel; McNally, Leah J; Shulman, Gerald I; Bogan, Jonathan S

    2015-02-13

    Insulin causes the exocytic translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters to stimulate glucose uptake in fat and muscle. Previous results support a model in which TUG traps GLUT4 in intracellular, insulin-responsive vesicles termed GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Insulin triggers TUG cleavage to release the GSVs; GLUT4 then recycles through endosomes during ongoing insulin exposure. The TUG C terminus binds a GSV anchoring site comprising Golgin-160 and possibly other proteins. Here, we report that the TUG C terminus is acetylated. The TUG C-terminal peptide bound the Golgin-160-associated protein, ACBD3 (acyl-CoA-binding domain-containing 3), and acetylation reduced binding of TUG to ACBD3 but not to Golgin-160. Mutation of the acetylated residues impaired insulin-responsive GLUT4 trafficking in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ACBD3 overexpression enhanced the translocation of GSV cargos, GLUT4 and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), and ACBD3 was required for intracellular retention of these cargos in unstimulated cells. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, bound TUG and deacetylated the TUG peptide. SIRT2 overexpression reduced TUG acetylation and redistributed GLUT4 and IRAP to the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Mutation of the acetylated residues in TUG abrogated these effects. In mice, SIRT2 deletion increased TUG acetylation and proteolytic processing. During glucose tolerance tests, glucose disposal was enhanced in SIRT2 knock-out mice, compared with wild type controls, without any effect on insulin concentrations. Together, these data support a model in which TUG acetylation modulates its interaction with Golgi matrix proteins and is regulated by SIRT2. Moreover, acetylation of TUG enhances its function to trap GSVs within unstimulated cells and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake.

  18. Identification of intracellular residues in the dopamine transporter critical for regulation of transporter conformation and cocaine binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, Claus Juul; Grånäs, Charlotta; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2004-01-01

    , Asp-345, and Asp-436, the mutation of which to alanine produces a phenotype similar to that of Y335A. Like Y335A, the mutants (K264A, D345A, and D436A) were characterized by low uptake capacity that was potentiated by Zn(2+). Moreover, the mutants displayed lower affinity for cocaine and other...... treatment with MTSET in the presence of dopamine, cocaine, or Zn(2+). Without Zn(2+), E2C I159C/K264A, E2C I159C/Y335A, and E2C I159C/D345A were also not inactivated by MTSET. In the presence of Zn(2+) (10 microm), however, MTSET (0.5 mm) caused up to approximately 60% inactivation. As in NET I155C......, this inactivation was protected by dopamine and enhanced by cocaine. These data are consistent with a Zn(2+)-dependent partial reversal of a constitutively altered conformational equilibrium in the mutant transporters. They also suggest that the conformational equilibrium produced by the mutations resembles...

  19. Preparation and characterization of folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted-trimethylchitosan for intracellular transport of protein through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Song, Xiangrong; Darby, Michael; Liang, Yufeng; He, Ling; Cai, Zheng; Chen, Qiuhong; Bi, Yueqi; Yang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jiapeng; Li, Yuanbo; Sun, Yiyi; Lee, Robert J; Hou, Shixiang

    2010-01-01

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins to specific tumor cells, folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted-trimethylchitosan (folate-PEG-g-TMC) was synthesized. Nano-scaled spherical polyelectrolyte complexes between the folate-PEG-g-TMC and fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) were prepared under suitable weight ratio of copolymer to FITC-BSA by ionic interaction between the positively charged copolymers and the negatively charged FITC-BSA. Intracellular uptake of FITC-BSA was specifically enhanced in SKOV3 cells (folate receptor over-expressing cell line) through folate receptor-mediated endocytosis compared with A549 cells (folate receptor deficient cell line). Folate-PEG-g-TMC shows promise for intracellular transport of negatively charged therapeutic proteins into folate receptor over-expressing tumor cells.

  20. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  1. Proteins involved in uptake, intracellular transport and basolateral secretion of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids by mammalian enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Borel, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for fat-soluble vitamin uptake and transport at the intestinal level has advanced considerably over the past decade. On one hand, it has long been considered that vitamin D and E as well as β-carotene (the main provitamin A carotenoid in human diet) were absorbed by a passive diffusion process, although this could not explain the broad inter-individual variability in the absorption efficiency of these molecules. On the other hand, it was assumed that preformed vitamin A (retinol) and vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) absorption occurred via energy-dependent processes, but the transporters involved have not yet been identified. The recent discovery of intestinal proteins able to facilitate vitamin E and carotenoid uptake and secretion by the enterocyte has spurred renewed interest in studying the fundamental mechanisms involved in the absorption of these micronutrients. The proteins identified so far are cholesterol transporters such as SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type I), CD36 (cluster determinant 36), NPC1L1 (Niemann-Pick C1-like 1) or ABCA1 (ATP-Binding Cassette A1) displaying a broad substrate specificity, but it is likely that other membrane proteins are also involved. After overviewing the metabolism of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids in the human upper gastrointestinal lumen, we will focus on the putative or identified proteins participating in the intestinal uptake, intracellular transport and basolateral secretion of these fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids, and outline the uncertainties that need to be explored in the future. Identifying the proteins involved in intestinal uptake and transport of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids across the enterocyte is of great importance, especially as some of them are already targets for the development of drugs able to slow cholesterol absorption. Indeed, these drugs may also interfere with lipid vitamin uptake. A better understanding of the molecular

  2. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Meier, E

    1990-01-01

    preparations. This indicates that the low-affinity receptors were not located in the plasma membrane. This is in good agreement with the corresponding morphological findings, that monensin treatment led to an intense vacuolization of the Golgi apparatus, thereby preventing intracellular transport of the newly...

  3. Reduction of intracellular pH by tenidap. Involvement of cellular anion transporters in the pH change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiff, P; Robinson, R P; Gabel, C A

    1995-10-26

    Tenidap [5-chloro-2,3-dihydro-3-(hydroxy-2-thienylmethylene)-2-oxo-1H- indole-1-carboxamide], a novel antirheumatic agent, produces a rapid and sustained intracellular acidification when applied to cells in culture. To investigate the mechanism by which this change in ionic homeostasis is achieved, the acidification activities of structural analogs of tenidap were determined, and the movements of [14C]tenidap into and out of cells were explored. The acidification activity of tenidap was enhanced by lowering extracellular pH, suggesting that the free acid species was required for this process. Consistent with this requirement, a non-acidic analog of tenidap did not produce a change in intracellular pH (pHi). In contrast, multihalogenated derivatives of tenidap produced greater changes in pHi than did tenidap, and one analog produced a transient acidification from which the cell recovered; this recovery, however, was blocked by an inhibitor of the Na+/H+ antiporter. Fibroblasts incubated with [14C]tenidap achieved within 5 min a level of cell-associated drug that remained constant during longer incubations. Simultaneous addition of the electrogenic ionophore valinomycin or the P-glycoprotein inhibitor 4-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2(1H)-isoquinolinyl)-N-[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphe nyl) ethyl]-6,7-dimethoxy-2-quinazolinamine (CP-100,356) caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the level of cell-associated [14C]tenidap; other agents tested did not promote this enhanced cellular accumulation. [14C]Tenidap accumulated by fibroblasts in the presence of CP-100,356 subsequently was released when these cells were placed in a tenidap- and CP-100,356-free medium. Importantly, several agents that are known to inhibit anion transport processes, including alpha-cyano-beta-(1-phenylindol-3-yl) acrylate, 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, and meclofenamic acid, inhibited efflux of [14C]tenidap. In contrast, ethacrynic acid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2

  4. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-07-02

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects.

  5. Bifunctional effects of O-methylated flavones from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi on melanocytes: Inhibition of melanin production and intracellular melanosome transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest in skin lightening has recently renewed attention on the esthetic applications of Chinese herbal medicine. Although Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi is used for antipyretic and antiinflammatory purposes, its whitening effect remains unclear. This study reports three major findings: (1) S. baicalensis has a potent inhibitory effect on melanogenesis; (2) wogonin and its glycoside are the active components of S. baicalensis; and (3) O-methylated flavones from S. baicalensis, such as wogonin, inhibit intracellular melanosome transport. Using a melanin quantification assay, we showed that S. baicalensis potently inhibits melanogenesis in B16F10 cells. Componential analyses revealed that the main components of S. baicalensis are baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, wogonin, and oroxylin A. Among these five flavones, wogonin and wogonoside consistently inhibited melanogenesis in both B16F10 melanoma cells and primary melanocytes. Wogonin exhibited the strongest inhibition of melanin production and markedly lightened the color of skin equivalents. We identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase-related proteins as potential targets of wogonin- and wogonoside-induced melanogenesis suppression. In culture, we found that the melanosomes in wogonin-treated B16F10 cells were localized to the perinuclear region. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that wogonin significantly reduced in melanophilin protein, which is required for actin-based melanosome transport. Other actin-based melanosome transport-related molecules, i.e., Rab27A and myosin Va, were not affected by wogonin. Cotreatment with MG132 blocked the wogonin-induced decrease in melanophilin, suggesting that wogonin promotes the proteolytic degradation of melanophilin via the calpain/proteasomal pathway. We determined that the structural specificities of the mono-O-methyl group in the flavone A-ring and the aglycone form were responsible for reducing melanosome transport

  6. Effects of liposomal phospholipids and lipid transport-related protein on the intracellular fate of encapsulated doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, Keita; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawanishi, Toru; Okuda, Haruhiro; Goda, Yukihiro

    2014-02-03

    We have previously reported the intracellular trafficking mechanism of liposomal phospholipids. In the present study, we investigated the effects of liposomal phospholipids on the intracellular trafficking of doxorubicin (DXR). In DXR-encapsulated liposomes, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified phospholipids have been widely used as one of the liposomal lipids. First, we investigated the intracellular trafficking mechanism of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and (1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy-PEG2000] (PEG2000-DSPE), and demonstrated that the intracellular trafficking pathways of phospholipids changed by PEG modification. Then, we evaluated the effects of liposomal DXR on the intracellular trafficking of liposomal phospholipids. Under the phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP)-suppressing condition by siRNA treatment, the intracellular amounts of DSPC derived from DXR-encapsulated liposomes were larger than that from nonencapsulated liposomes. Moreover, following the effects of liposomal phospholipids on the intracellular amounts of DXR, the intracellular amounts of DXR were increased under the PITP-suppressing condition in DXR-encapsulated liposomes. We showed that intracellular DXR was associated with the complex of PITP and DSPC, and the extracellular efflux of DXR was enhanced by complex formation with PITP and DSPC.

  7. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Jackson, Matthew I; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Combs, Gerald F

    2011-11-01

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability at nutritional doses. In this study, we found that two sources of L-selenomethionine (SeMet) and Se-enriched yeast each increased intracellular Se content more effectively than selenite or methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. Interestingly, SeMSC, SeMet, and digested Se-enriched yeast were transported at comparable efficacy from the apical to basolateral sides, each being about 3-fold that of selenite. In addition, these forms of Se, whether before or after traversing from apical side to basolateral side, did not change the potential to support glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Although selenoprotein P has been postulated to be a key Se transport protein, its intracellular expression did not differ when selenite, SeMSC, SeMet, or digested Se-enriched yeast was added to serum-contained media. Taken together, our data show, for the first time, that the chemical form of Se at nutritional doses can affect the absorptive (apical to basolateral side) efficacy and retention of Se by intestinal cells; but that, these effects are not directly correlated to the potential to support GPx activity.

  8. Seismic Reflection Characteristics of Naturally-Induced Subsidence Affecting Transportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard D Miller; Jianghai Xia; Don W Steeples

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipeliues can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure.

  9. Seismic reflection characteristics of naturally-induced subsidence affecting transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipelines can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  10. Pair correlation microscopy reveals the role of nanoparticle shape in intracellular transport and site of drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Thammasiraphop, Kitiphume; Duong, Hien T. T.; Yeow, Jonathan; Karagoz, Bunyamin; Boyer, Cyrille; Gooding, J. Justin; Gaus, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticle size, surface charge and material composition are known to affect the uptake of nanoparticles by cells. However, whether nanoparticle shape affects transport across various barriers inside the cell remains unclear. Here we used pair correlation microscopy to show that polymeric nanoparticles with different shapes but identical surface chemistries moved across the various cellular barriers at different rates, ultimately defining the site of drug release. We measured how micelles, vesicles, rods and worms entered the cell and whether they escaped from the endosomal system and had access to the nucleus via the nuclear pore complex. Rods and worms, but not micelles and vesicles, entered the nucleus by passive diffusion. Improving nuclear access, for example with a nuclear localization signal, resulted in more doxorubicin release inside the nucleus and correlated with greater cytotoxicity. Our results therefore demonstrate that drug delivery across the major cellular barrier, the nuclear envelope, is important for doxorubicin efficiency and can be achieved with appropriately shaped nanoparticles.

  11. A salt bridge linking the first intracellular loop with the C terminus facilitates the folding of the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koban, Florian; El-Kasaby, Ali; Häusler, Cornelia; Stockner, Thomas; Simbrunner, Benedikt M; Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael; Sucic, Sonja

    2015-05-22

    The folding trajectory of solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family members is of interest because point mutations result in misfolding and thus cause clinically relevant phenotypes in people. Here we examined the contribution of the C terminus in supporting folding of the serotonin transporter (SERT; SLC6A4). Our working hypothesis posited that the amphipathic nature of the C-terminal α-helix (Thr(603)-Thr(613)) was important for folding of SERT. Accordingly, we disrupted the hydrophobic moment of the α-helix by replacing Phe(604), Ile(608), or Ile(612) by Gln. The bulk of the resulting mutants SERT-F604Q, SERT-I608Q, and SERT-I612Q were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, but their residual delivery to the cell surface still depended on SEC24C. This indicates that the amphipathic nature of the C-terminal α-helix was dispensable to endoplasmic reticulum export. The folding trajectory of SERT is thought to proceed through the inward facing conformation. Consistent with this conjecture, cell surface expression of the misfolded mutants was restored by (i) introducing second site suppressor mutations, which trap SERT in the inward facing state, or (ii) by the pharmacochaperone noribogaine, which binds to the inward facing conformation. Finally, mutation of Glu(615) at the end of the C-terminal α-helix to Lys reduced surface expression of SERT-E615K. A charge reversal mutation in intracellular loop 1 restored surface expression of SERT-R152E/E615K to wild type levels. These observations support a mechanistic model where the C-terminal amphipathic helix is stabilized by an intramolecular salt bridge between residues Glu(615) and Arg(152). This interaction acts as a pivot in the conformational search associated with folding of SERT.

  12. A Salt Bridge Linking the First Intracellular Loop with the C Terminus Facilitates the Folding of the Serotonin Transporter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koban, Florian; El-Kasaby, Ali; Häusler, Cornelia; Stockner, Thomas; Simbrunner, Benedikt M.; Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sucic, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    The folding trajectory of solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family members is of interest because point mutations result in misfolding and thus cause clinically relevant phenotypes in people. Here we examined the contribution of the C terminus in supporting folding of the serotonin transporter (SERT; SLC6A4). Our working hypothesis posited that the amphipathic nature of the C-terminal α-helix (Thr603–Thr613) was important for folding of SERT. Accordingly, we disrupted the hydrophobic moment of the α-helix by replacing Phe604, Ile608, or Ile612 by Gln. The bulk of the resulting mutants SERT-F604Q, SERT-I608Q, and SERT-I612Q were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, but their residual delivery to the cell surface still depended on SEC24C. This indicates that the amphipathic nature of the C-terminal α-helix was dispensable to endoplasmic reticulum export. The folding trajectory of SERT is thought to proceed through the inward facing conformation. Consistent with this conjecture, cell surface expression of the misfolded mutants was restored by (i) introducing second site suppressor mutations, which trap SERT in the inward facing state, or (ii) by the pharmacochaperone noribogaine, which binds to the inward facing conformation. Finally, mutation of Glu615 at the end of the C-terminal α-helix to Lys reduced surface expression of SERT-E615K. A charge reversal mutation in intracellular loop 1 restored surface expression of SERT-R152E/E615K to wild type levels. These observations support a mechanistic model where the C-terminal amphipathic helix is stabilized by an intramolecular salt bridge between residues Glu615 and Arg152. This interaction acts as a pivot in the conformational search associated with folding of SERT. PMID:25869136

  13. Stress-induced inhibition of nonsense-mediated RNA decay regulates intracellular cystine transport and intracellular glutathione through regulation of the cystine/glutamate exchanger SLC7A11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Gardner, L B

    2015-08-06

    SLC7A11 encodes a subunit of the xCT cystine/glutamate amino-acid transport system and has a critical role in the generation of glutathione and the protection of cells from oxidative stress. Expression of SLC7A11 promotes tumorigenesis and chemotherapy resistance, but while SLC7A11 has been previously noted to be upregulated in hypoxic cells, its regulation has not been fully delineated. We have recently shown that nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) is inhibited by cellular stresses generated by the tumor microenvironment, including hypoxia, and augments tumorigenesis. Here we demonstrate that the inhibition of NMD by various cellular stresses leads to the stabilization and upregulation of SLC7A11 mRNA and protein. The inhibition of NMD and upregulation of SLC7A11 augments intracellular cystine transport and increases intracellular levels of cysteine and glutathione. Accordingly, the inhibition of NMD protects cells against oxidative stress via SLC7A11 upregulation. Together our studies identify a mechanism for the dynamic regulation of SLC7A11, through the stress-inhibited regulation of NMD, and add to the growing evidence that the inhibition of NMD is an adaptive response.

  14. Rapid Method To Determine Intracellular Drug Concentrations in Cellular Uptake Assays: Application to Metformin in Organic Cation Transporter 1-Transfected Human Embryonic Kidney 293 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Huan-Chieh; Zur, Arik A; Maurer, Tristan S; Yee, Sook Wah; Tolsma, John; Jasper, Paul; Scott, Dennis O; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    Because of the importance of intracellular unbound drug concentrations in the prediction of in vivo concentrations that are determinants of drug efficacy and toxicity, a number of assays have been developed to assess in vitro unbound concentrations of drugs. Here we present a rapid method to determine the intracellular unbound drug concentrations in cultured cells, and we apply the method along with a mechanistic model to predict concentrations of metformin in subcellular compartments of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Intracellular space (ICS) was calculated by subtracting the [(3)H]-inulin distribution volume (extracellular space, ECS) from the [(14)C]-urea distribution volume (total water space, TWS). Values obtained for intracellular space (mean ± S.E.M.; μl/10(6) cells) of monolayers of HEK cells (HEK-empty vector [EV]) and cells overexpressing human organic cation transporter 1 (HEK-OCT1), 1.21± 0.07 and 1.25±0.06, respectively, were used to determine the intracellular metformin concentrations. After incubation of the cells with 5 µM metformin, the intracellular concentrations were 26.4 ± 7.8 μM and 268 ± 11.0 μM, respectively, in HEK-EV and HEK-OCT1. In addition, intracellular metformin concentrations were lower in high K(+) buffer (140 mM KCl) compared with normal K(+) buffer (5.4 mM KCl) in HEK-OCT1 cells (54.8 ± 3.8 μM and 198.1 ± 11.2 μM, respectively; P < 0.05). Our mechanistic model suggests that, depending on the credible range of assumed physiologic values, the positively charged metformin accumulates to particularly high levels in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. This method together with the computational model can be used to determine intracellular unbound concentrations and to predict subcellular accumulation of drugs in other complex systems such as primary cells.

  15. Benthic processes affecting contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Carlson, Rick A; Parchaso, Francis; Fend, Steven V.; Stauffer-Olsen, Natalie; Manning, Andrew J.; Land, Jennie M.

    2016-09-30

    Executive SummaryMultiple sampling trips during calendar years 2013 through 2015 were coordinated to provide measurements of interdependent benthic processes that potentially affect contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon. The measurements were motivated by recognition that such internal processes (for example, solute benthic flux, bioturbation and solute efflux by benthic invertebrates, and physical groundwater-surface water interactions) were not integrated into existing management models for UKL. Up until 2013, all of the benthic-flux studies generally had been limited spatially to a number of sites in the northern part of UKL and limited temporally to 2–3 samplings per year. All of the benthic invertebrate studies also had been limited to the northern part of the lake; however, intensive temporal (weekly) studies had previously been completed independent of benthic-flux studies. Therefore, knowledge of both the spatial and temporal variability in benthic flux and benthic invertebrate distributions for the entire lake was lacking. To address these limitations, we completed a lakewide spatial study during 2013 and a coordinated temporal study with weekly sampling of benthic flux and benthic invertebrates during 2014. Field design of the spatially focused study in 2013 involved 21 sites sampled three times as the summer cyanobacterial bloom developed (that is, May 23, June 13, and July 3, 2013). Results of the 27-week, temporally focused study of one site in 2014 were summarized and partitioned into three periods (referred to herein as pre-bloom, bloom and post-bloom periods), each period involving 9 weeks of profiler deployments, water column and benthic sampling. Partitioning of the pre-bloom, bloom, and post-bloom periods were based on water-column chlorophyll concentrations and involved the following date intervals, respectively: April 15 through June 10, June 17 through August 13, and August 20 through October 16, 2014. To examine

  16. Kinetically influenced terms for solute transport affected by heterogeneous and homogeneous classical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper extends a four-step derivation procedure, previously presented for cases of transport affected by surface reactions, to transport problems involving homogeneous reactions. Derivations for these classes of reactions are used to illustrate the manner in which mathematical differences between reaction classes are reflected in the mathematical derivation procedures required to identify kinetically influenced terms. Simulation results for a case of transport affected by a single solution phase complexation reaction and for a case of transport affected by a precipitation-dissolution reaction are used to demonstrate the nature of departures from equilibrium-controlled transport as well as the use of kinetically influenced terms in determining criteria for the applicability of the local equilibrium assumption. A final derivation for a multireaction problem demonstrates the application of the generalized procedure to a case of transport affected by reactions of several classes. -from Author

  17. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Meier, E;

    1990-01-01

    differentiation and GABA receptor expression was investigated in cultured cerebellar granule cells. After 4 days in culture the neurons were exposed to the inhibitors for 6 h in the simultaneous presence of THIP. Subsequently, cultures were either fixed for electron microscopic examination or used for preparation...... of membranes for [3H]GABA binding assays. In some experiments the functional activity of the newly induced low-affinity GABA receptors was assessed by investigation of the ability of GABA to inhibit neurotransmitter release from the neurons. These experiments were performed to differentiate between...... an intracellular and a plasma membrane localization of the receptors. In all experiments cultures treated with THIP alone served as controls. The inhibitors of protein synthesis totally abolished the ability of THIP to induce low-affinity GABA receptors. In contrast, the inhibitors of intracellular transport...

  18. Benthic processes affecting contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Carlson, Rick A; Parchaso, Francis; Fend, Steven V.; Stauffer-Olsen, Natalie; Manning, Andrew J.; Land, Jennie M.

    2016-09-30

    Executive SummaryMultiple sampling trips during calendar years 2013 through 2015 were coordinated to provide measurements of interdependent benthic processes that potentially affect contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon. The measurements were motivated by recognition that such internal processes (for example, solute benthic flux, bioturbation and solute efflux by benthic invertebrates, and physical groundwater-surface water interactions) were not integrated into existing management models for UKL. Up until 2013, all of the benthic-flux studies generally had been limited spatially to a number of sites in the northern part of UKL and limited temporally to 2–3 samplings per year. All of the benthic invertebrate studies also had been limited to the northern part of the lake; however, intensive temporal (weekly) studies had previously been completed independent of benthic-flux studies. Therefore, knowledge of both the spatial and temporal variability in benthic flux and benthic invertebrate distributions for the entire lake was lacking. To address these limitations, we completed a lakewide spatial study during 2013 and a coordinated temporal study with weekly sampling of benthic flux and benthic invertebrates during 2014. Field design of the spatially focused study in 2013 involved 21 sites sampled three times as the summer cyanobacterial bloom developed (that is, May 23, June 13, and July 3, 2013). Results of the 27-week, temporally focused study of one site in 2014 were summarized and partitioned into three periods (referred to herein as pre-bloom, bloom and post-bloom periods), each period involving 9 weeks of profiler deployments, water column and benthic sampling. Partitioning of the pre-bloom, bloom, and post-bloom periods were based on water-column chlorophyll concentrations and involved the following date intervals, respectively: April 15 through June 10, June 17 through August 13, and August 20 through October 16, 2014. To examine

  19. Cell wall assembly and intracellular trafficking in plant cells are directly affected by changes in the magnitude of gravitational acceleration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Chebli

    Full Text Available Plants are able to sense the magnitude and direction of gravity. This capacity is thought to reside in selected cell types within the plant body that are equipped with specialized organelles called statoliths. However, most plant cells do not possess statoliths, yet they respond to changes in gravitational acceleration. To understand the effect of gravity on the metabolism and cellular functioning of non-specialized plant cells, we investigated a rapidly growing plant cell devoid of known statoliths and without gravitropic behavior, the pollen tube. The effects of hyper-gravity and omnidirectional exposure to gravity on intracellular trafficking and on cell wall assembly were assessed in Camellia pollen tubes, a model system with highly reproducible growth behavior in vitro. Using an epi-fluorescence microscope mounted on the Large Diameter Centrifuge at the European Space Agency, we were able to demonstrate that vesicular trafficking is reduced under hyper-gravity conditions. Immuno-cytochemistry confirmed that both in hyper and omnidirectional gravity conditions, the characteristic spatial profiles of cellulose and callose distribution in the pollen tube wall were altered, in accordance with a dose-dependent effect on pollen tube diameter. Our findings suggest that in response to gravity induced stress, the pollen tube responds by modifying cell wall assembly to compensate for the altered mechanical load. The effect was reversible within few minutes demonstrating that the pollen tube is able to quickly adapt to changing stress conditions.

  20. Amastin Knockdown in Leishmania braziliensis Affects Parasite-Macrophage Interaction and Results in Impaired Viability of Intracellular Amastigotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Marcia Cardoso de Paiva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a human parasitic disease with manifestations ranging from cutaneous ulcerations to fatal visceral infection, is caused by several Leishmania species. These protozoan parasites replicate as extracellular, flagellated promastigotes in the gut of a sandfly vector and as amastigotes inside the parasitophorous vacuole of vertebrate host macrophages. Amastins are surface glycoproteins encoded by large gene families present in the genomes of several trypanosomatids and highly expressed in the intracellular amastigote stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. Here, we showed that the genome of L. braziliensis contains 52 amastin genes belonging to all four previously described amastin subfamilies and that the expression of members of all subfamilies is upregulated in L. braziliensis amastigotes. Although primary sequence alignments showed no homology to any known protein sequence, homology searches based on secondary structure predictions indicate that amastins are related to claudins, a group of proteins that are components of eukaryotic tight junction complexes. By knocking-down the expression of δ-amastins in L. braziliensis, their essential role during infection became evident. δ-amastin knockdown parasites showed impaired growth after in vitro infection of mouse macrophages and completely failed to produce infection when inoculated in BALB/c mice, an attenuated phenotype that was reverted by the re-expression of an RNAi-resistant amastin gene. Further highlighting their essential role in host-parasite interactions, electron microscopy analyses of macrophages infected with amastin knockdown parasites showed significant alterations in the tight contact that is normally observed between the surface of wild type amastigotes and the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole.

  1. Modulation of intracellular calcium levels by calcium lactate affects colon cancer cell motility through calcium-dependent calpain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy

    Full Text Available Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+ supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa, its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+ levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer.

  2. Functional characterization of the protein C A267T mutation: evidence for impaired secretion due to defective intracellular transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeldhorn Lena

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated protein C (PC is a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation by inactivating coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. PC deficiency is an autosomally inherited disorder associated with a high risk of recurrent venous thrombosis. The aim of the study was to explore the mechanisms responsible for severe PC deficiency in a patient with the protein C A267T mutation by in-vitro expression studies. Results Huh7 and CHO-K1 cells were transiently transfected with expression vectors containing wild-type (WT PC and mutated PC (A267T PC cDNAs. PC mRNA levels were assessed by qRT-PCR and the PC protein levels were measured by ELISA. The mRNA levels of WT PC and A267T PC were similar, while the intracellular protein level of A267T PC was moderately decreased compared to WT PC. The secretion of A267T PC into the medium was severely impaired. No differences in molecular weights were observed between WT and A267T PC before and after treatment with endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Proteasomal and lysosomal degradations were examined using lactacystin and bafilomycin, respectively, and revealed that A267T PC was slightly more susceptible for proteasomal degradation than WT PC. Intracellular co-localization analysis indicated that A267T PC was mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, whereas WT PC was observed in both ER and Golgi. Conclusions In contrast to what has been reported for other PC mutants, intracellular degradation of A267T PC was not the main/dominant mechanism underlying the reduced intracellular and secretion levels of PC. Our results indicate that the A267T mutation most likely caused misfolding of PC, which might lead to increased retention of the mutated PC in ER.

  3. Expression of intracellular interferon-alpha confers antiviral properties in transfected bovine fetal fibroblasts and does not affect the full development of SCNT embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Yu

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease, one of the most significant diseases of dairy herds, has substantial effects on farm economics, and currently, disease control measures are limited. In this study, we constructed a vector with a human interferon-α (hIFN-α (without secretory signal sequence gene cassette containing the immediate early promoter of human cytomegalovirus. Stably transfected bovine fetal fibroblasts were obtained by G418 selection, and hIFN-α transgenic embryos were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Forty-six transgenic embryos were transplanted into surrogate cows, and five cows (10.9% became pregnant. Two male cloned calves were born. Expression of hIFN-α was detected in transfected bovine fetal fibroblasts, transgenic SCNT embryos, and different tissues from a transgenic SCNT calf at two days old. In transfected bovine fetal fibroblasts, expression of intracellular IFN-α induced resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection, increased apoptosis, and induced the expression of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase gene (PKR and the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene (2'-5' OAS, which are IFN-inducible genes with antiviral activity. Analysis by qRT-PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of PKR, 2'-5' OAS, and P53 were significantly increased in wild-type bovine fetal fibroblasts stimulated with extracellular recombinant human IFN-α-2b, showing that intracellular IFN-α induces biological functions similar to extracellular IFN-α. In conclusion, expression of intracellular hIFN-α conferred antiviral properties in transfected bovine fetal fibroblasts and did not significantly affect the full development of SCNT embryos. Thus, IFN-α transgenic technology may provide a revolutionary way to achieve elite breeding of livestock.

  4. Ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate inhibit ubiquitin activation through intracellular metal transport and increased oxidative stress in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Kathleen E; Valentine, William M

    2015-04-20

    Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional

  5. Essays on alternative energy policies affecting the US transportation sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rear, Eric G.

    This dissertation encompasses three essays evaluating the impacts of different policies targeting the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, fuel demands, etc. of the transportation sector. Though there are some similarities across the three chapters, each essay stands alone as an independent work. The 2010 US EPA MARKAL model is used in each essay to evaluate policy effects. Essay 1 focuses on the recent increases in Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, and the implications of a "rebound effect." These increases are compared to a carbon tax generating similar reductions in system-wide emissions. As anticipated, the largest reductions in fuel use by light-duty vehicles (LDV) and emissions are achieved under CAFE. Consideration of the rebound effect does little to distort CAFE benefits. Our work validates many economists' belief that a carbon tax is a more efficient approach. However, because the tax takes advantage of cheaper abatement opportunities in other sectors, reductions in transportation emissions will be much lower than what we observe with CAFE. Essay 2 compares CAFE increases with what some economists suggest would be a much more "efficient" alternative -- a system-wide oil tax internalizing some environmental externalities. Because oil taxes are likely to be implemented in addition to CAFE standards, we consider a combined policy case reflecting this. Our supplementary analysis approximates the appropriate tax rates to produce similar reductions in oil demands as CAFE (CAFE-equivalent tax rates). We discover that taxes result in greater and more cost-effective reductions in system-wide emissions and net oil imports than CAFE. The current fuel tax system is compared to three versions of a national vehicle miles traveled (VMT) tax charged to all LDVs in Essay 3. VMT taxes directly charge motorists for each mile driven and help to correct the problem of eroding tax revenues given the failure of today's fuel taxes to adjust with inflation. Results

  6. Brucella suis Vaccine Strain 2 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress that Affects Intracellular Replication in Goat Trophoblast Cells In vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangguo; Lin, Pengfei; Li, Yang; Xiang, Caixia; Yin, Yanlong; Chen, Zhi; Du, Yue; Zhou, Dong; Jin, Yaping; Wang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Brucella has been reported to impair placental trophoblasts, a cellular target where Brucella efficiently replicates in association with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ultimately trigger abortion in pregnant animals. However, the precise effects of Brucella on trophoblast cells remain unclear. Here, we describe the infection and replication of Brucella suis vaccine strain 2 (B.suis.S2) in goat trophoblast cells (GTCs) and the cellular and molecular responses induced in vitro. Our studies demonstrated that B.suis.S2 was able to infect and proliferate to high titers, hamper the proliferation of GTCs and induce apoptosis due to ER stress. Tunicamycin (Tm), a pharmacological chaperone that strongly mounts ER stress-induced apoptosis, inhibited B.suis.S2 replication in GTCs. In addition, 4 phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA), a pharmacological chaperone that alleviates ER stress-induced apoptosis, significantly enhanced B.suis.S2 replication in GTCs. The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) chaperone molecule GRP78 also promoted B.suis.S2 proliferation in GTCs by inhibiting ER stress-induced apoptosis. We also discovered that the IRE1 pathway, but not the PERK or ATF6 pathway, was activated in the process. However, decreasing the expression of phosphoIRE1α and IRE1α proteins with Irestatin 9389 (IRE1 antagonist) in GTCs did not affect the proliferation of B.suis.S2. Although GTC implantation was not affected upon B.suis.S2 infection, progesterone secretion was suppressed, and prolactin and estrogen secretion increased; these effects were accompanied by changes in the expression of genes encoding key steroidogenic enzymes. This study systematically explored the mechanisms of abortion in Brucella infection from the viewpoint of pathogen invasion, ER stress and reproductive endocrinology. Our findings may provide new insight for understanding the mechanisms involved in goat abortions caused by Brucella infection.

  7. Brucella suis vaccine strain 2 induces endoplasmic reticulum stress that affects intracellular replication in goat trophoblast cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangguo eWang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Brucella has been reported to impair placental trophoblasts, a cellular target where Brucella efficiently replicates in association with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and ultimately trigger abortion in pregnant animals. However, the precise effects of Brucella on trophoblast cells remain unclear. Here, we describe the infection and replication of Brucella suis vaccine strain 2 (B.suis.S2 in goat trophoblast cells (GTCs and the cellular and molecular responses induced in vitro. Our studies demonstrated that B.suis.S2 was able to infect and proliferate to high titers, hamper the proliferation of GTCs and induce apoptosis due to ER stress. Tunicamycin (Tm, a pharmacological chaperone that strongly mounts ER stress-induced apoptosis, inhibited B.suis.S2 replication in GTCs. In addition, 4 phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA, a pharmacological chaperone that alleviates ER stress-induced apoptosis, significantly enhanced B.suis.S2 replication in GTCs. The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR chaperone molecule GRP78 also promoted B.suis.S2 proliferation in GTCs by inhibiting ER stress-induced apoptosis. We also discovered that the IRE1 pathway, but not the PERK or ATF6 pathway, was activated in the process. However, decreasing the expression of phosphoIRE1α and IRE1α proteins with Irestatin 9389 (IRE1 antagonist in GTCs did not affect the proliferation of B.suis.S2. Although GTC implantation was not affected upon B.suis.S2 infection, progesterone secretion was suppressed, and prolactin and estrogen secretion increased; these effects were accompanied by changes in the expression of genes encoding key steroidogenic enzymes. This study systematically explored the mechanisms of abortion in Brucella infection from the viewpoint of pathogen invasion, ER stress and reproductive endocrinology. Our findings may provide new insight for understanding the mechanisms involved in goat abortions caused by Brucella infection.

  8. The Effect of Millisecond Pulsed Electric Fields (msPEF) on Intracellular Drug Transport with Negatively Charged Large Nanocarriers Made of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN): In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbacka, Julita; Pucek, Agata; Wilk, Kazimiera Anna; Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Rossowska, Joanna; Kulbacki, Marek; Kotulska, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    Drug delivery technology is still a dynamically developing field of medicine. The main direction in nanotechnology research (nanocarriers, nanovehicles, etc.) is efficient drug delivery to target cells with simultaneous drug reduction concentration. However, nanotechnology trends in reducing the carrier sizes to several nanometers limit the volume of the loaded substance and may pose a danger of uncontrolled access into the cells. On the other hand, nanoparticles larger than 200 nm in diameter have difficulties to undergo rapid diffusional transport through cell membranes. The main advantage of large nanoparticles is higher drug encapsulation efficiency and the ability to deliver a wider array of drugs. Our present study contributes a new approach with large Tween 80 solid lipid nanoparticles SLN (i.e., hydrodynamic GM-SLN-glycerol monostearate, GM, as the lipid and ATO5-SLNs-glyceryl palmitostearate, ATO5, as the lipid) with diameters DH of 379.4 nm and 547 nm, respectively. They are used as drug carriers alone and in combination with electroporation (EP) induced by millisecond pulsed electric fields. We evaluate if EP can support the transport of large nanocarriers into cells. The study was performed with two cell lines: human colon adenocarcinoma LoVo and hamster ovarian fibroblastoid CHO-K1 with coumarin 6 (C6) as a fluorescent marker for encapsulation. The biological safety of the potential treatment procedure was evaluated with cell viability after their exposure to nanoparticles and EP. The EP efficacy was evaluated by FACS method. The impact on intracellular structure organization of cytoskeleton was visualized by CLSM method with alpha-actin and beta-tubulin. The obtained results indicate low cytotoxicity of both carrier types, free and loaded with C6. The evaluation of cytoskeleton proteins indicated no intracellular structure damage. The intracellular uptake and accumulation show that SLNs do not support transport of C6 coumarin. Only application of

  9. Role of transportation in the persuasion process: cognitive and affective responses to antidrug narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Smita C; Greene, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This study examined transportation effects of first- and third-person narratives as well as the role of transportation in the persuasion process. In particular, the authors evaluated the role of transportation in affecting cognitive and affective responses. Last, they addressed the relation between (a) cognitive and affective responses and (b) antidrug expectancies. Participants were 500 undergraduate students at a large northern university in the United Kingdom who were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: first- or third-person narratives on cocaine use. The results demonstrated that there was no difference between first- and third-person narratives in terms of transportation. However, overall, greater transportation was associated with more favorable cognitive responses, and more favorable cognitive response was associated with stronger anticocaine expectancies. In terms of affective responses, results indicated the mediating role of sadness and contentment in the association between transportation and anticocaine expectancies. In particular, increased transportation was associated with greater sadness and lower contentment. Lower sadness and contentment were associated with stronger anticocaine expectancies. Important theoretical and empirical implications are discussed.

  10. From electron microscopy to molecular cell biology, molecular genetics and structural biology: intracellular transport and kinesin superfamily proteins, KIFs: genes, structure, dynamics and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    Cells transport and sort various proteins and lipids following synthesis as distinct types of membranous organelles and protein complexes to the correct destination at appropriate velocities. This intracellular transport is fundamental for cell morphogenesis, survival and functioning not only in highly polarized neurons but also in all types of cells in general. By developing quick-freeze electron microscopy (EM), new filamentous structures associated with cytoskeletons are uncovered. The characterization of chemical structures and functions of these new filamentous structures led us to discover kinesin superfamily molecular motors, KIFs. In this review, I discuss the identification of these new structures and characterization of their functions using molecular cell biology and molecular genetics. KIFs not only play significant roles by transporting various cargoes along microtubule rails, but also play unexpected fundamental roles on various important physiological processes such as learning and memory, brain wiring, development of central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, activity-dependent neuronal survival, development of early embryo, left-right determination of our body and tumourigenesis. Furthermore, by combining single-molecule biophysics with structural biology such as cryo-electrom microscopy and X-ray crystallography, atomic structures of KIF1A motor protein of almost all states during ATP hydrolysis have been determined and a common mechanism of motility has been proposed. Thus, this type of studies could be a good example of really integrative multidisciplinary life science in the twenty-first century.

  11. A Salt Bridge Linking the First Intracellular Loop with the C Terminus Facilitates the Folding of the Serotonin Transporter*

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The folding trajectory of solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family members is of interest because point mutations result in misfolding and thus cause clinically relevant phenotypes in people. Here we examined the contribution of the C terminus in supporting folding of the serotonin transporter (SERT; SLC6A4). Our working hypothesis posited that the amphipathic nature of the C-terminal α-helix (Thr603–Thr613) was important for folding of SERT. Accordingly, we disrupted the hydrophobic moment of the α-he...

  12. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  13. Multiple functions of inositolphosphorylceramides in the formation and intracellular transport of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Régine; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The mature sphingolipids of yeast consist of IPCs (inositolphosphorylceramides) and glycosylated derivatives thereof. Beyond being an abundant membrane constituent in the organelles of the secretory pathway, IPCs are also used to constitute the lipid moiety of the majority of GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) proteins, while a minority of GPI proteins contain PI (phosphatidylinositol). Thus all GPI anchor lipids (as well as free IPCs) typically contain C26 fatty acids. However, the primary GPI lipid that isadded to newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum consists of a PI with conventional C16 and C18 fatty acids. A new class of enzymes is required to replace the fatty acid in sn-2 by a C26 fatty acid. Cells lacking this activity make normal amounts of GPI proteins but accumulate GPI anchors containing lyso-PI. As a consequence, the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport of the GPI protein Gas1p is slow, and mature Gas1p is lost from the plasma membrane into the medium. The GPI anchor containing C26 in sn-2 can further be remodelled by the exchange of diacylglycerol for ceramide. This process is also dependent on the presence of specific phosphorylethanolamine side-chains on the GPI anchor.

  14. Difference between Extra- and Intracellular T1 Values of Carboxylic Acids Affects the Quantitative Analysis of Cellular Kinetics by Hyperpolarized NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete knowledge of the longitudinal relaxation time constant (T1) leads to incorrect assumptions in quantitative kinetic models of cellular systems, studied by hyperpolarized real-time NMR. Using an assay that measures the intracellular signal of small carboxylic acids in living cells......, the intracellular T1 of the carboxylic acid moiety of acetate, ketoisocaproate, pyruvate, and butyrate was determined. The intracellular T1 is shown to be up to four-fold shorter than the extracellular T1. Such a large difference in T1 values between the inside and the outside of the cell has significant influence...... on the quantification of intracellular metabolic activity. It is expected that the significantly shorter T1 value of the carboxylic moieties inside cells is a result of macromolecular crowding. An artificial cytosol has been prepared and applied to predict the T1 of other carboxylic acids. We demonstrate the value...

  15. Difference between Extra- and Intracellular T1 Values of Carboxylic Acids Affects the Quantitative Analysis of Cellular Kinetics by Hyperpolarized NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Lerche, Mathilde H

    2016-10-17

    Incomplete knowledge of the longitudinal relaxation time constant (T1 ) leads to incorrect assumptions in quantitative kinetic models of cellular systems, studied by hyperpolarized real-time NMR. Using an assay that measures the intracellular signal of small carboxylic acids in living cells, the intracellular T1 of the carboxylic acid moiety of acetate, keto-isocaproate, pyruvate, and butyrate was determined. The intracellular T1 is shown to be up to four-fold shorter than the extracellular T1 . Such a large difference in T1 values between the inside and the outside of the cell has significant influence on the quantification of intracellular metabolic activity. It is expected that the significantly shorter T1 value of the carboxylic moieties inside cells is a result of macromolecular crowding. An artificial cytosol has been prepared and applied to predict the T1 of other carboxylic acids. We demonstrate the value of this prediction tool.

  16. Identification of an Arabidopsis solute carrier critical for intracellular transport and inter-organ allocation of molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasber, A; Klaumann, S; Trentmann, O; Trampczynska, A; Clemens, S; Schneider, S; Sauer, N; Feifer, I; Bittner, F; Mendel, R R; Neuhaus, H E

    2011-09-01

    Plants represent an important source of molybdenum in the human diet. Recently, MOT1 has been identified as a transport protein responsible for molybdate import in Arabidopsis thaliana L.; however, the function of the homologous protein MOT2 has not been resolved. Interestingly, MOT2-GFP analysis indicated a vacuolar location of this carrier protein. By site directed mutagenesis at the N-terminal end of MOT2, we identified a di-leucine motif that is essential for driving the protein into the vacuolar membrane. Molybdate quantification in isolated vacuoles showed that this organelle serves as an important molybdate store in Arabidopsis cells. When grown on soil, leaves from mot2 T-DNA mutants contained more molybdate, whereas mot2 seeds contained significantly less molybdate than corresponding wild-type (Wt) tissues. Remarkably, MOT2 mRNA accumulates in senescing leaves and mot2 leaves from plants that had finished their life cycle had 15-fold higher molybdate levels than Wt leaves. Reintroduction of the endogenous MOT2 gene led to a Wt molybdate phenotype. Thus, mot2 mutants exhibit impaired inter-organ molybdate allocation. As total concentrations of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) and its precursor MPT correlates with leaf molybdate levels, we present novel evidence for an adjustment of Moco biosynthesis in response to cellular MoO₄²⁻ levels. We conclude that MOT2 is important for vacuolar molybdate export, an N-terminal di-leucine motif is critical for correct subcellular localisation of MOT2 and activity of this carrier is required for accumulation of molybdate in Arabidopsis seeds. MOT2 is a novel element in inter-organ translocation of an essential metal ion.

  17. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a “physical tethering” model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface.

  18. Familial Dysautonomia (FD Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Lefler

    Full Text Available A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD, affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS. Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD.

  19. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefler, Sharon; Cohen, Malkiel A; Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD.

  20. The effect of irradiation on the intracellular transportation of the parotid gland acinar cells in the mouse. Localization of monosaccharides studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Hajime (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of radiation on the ability to ingest monosaccharides and intracellular transportation in the parotid gland in mice. The submandibular regions, including the parotid gland, was exposed to 10 Gy of X-rays. Three days after irradiation, the localization of reducing silver grains in organelles was determined, using electron microscopic autoradiography with H-3 labeled galactosamine, glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. In the non-irradiated group, the proportion of reducing silver grains in the acinar cells began to increase 15 min after administration of monosaccharides, reached a peak at 180 min, and thereafter decreased. Similar findings were observed in the irradiated group, although the values were lower than the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the endoplasmic reticulum reached a peak at 15 min in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, and gradually decreased until 120 min. Thereafter, it became almost constant and low, but the proportion in the irradiated group was slightly higher than in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the Golgi apparatus was maximum at 60 min in the non-irradiated group, and gradually decreased until 360 min. A similar tendency was seen in the irradiated group, although its variation was not so marked as in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the condensing vacuoles was maximum at 120 min, and thereafter, it decreased; the decrease was only slight in the irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in secretory granules increased with time in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, although this was only slight in the irradiated group, and reached a peak at 360 min. Transportation of monosaccharides in an acinar cell was found to be delayed by irradiation. (N.K.).

  1. How historical copper contamination affects soil structure and mobilization and transport of colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo, Marcos; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin;

    between 0.01 to 0.43 pore volumes, with longer times for the most contaminated point, likely related with its higher soil density and lower air permeability. The copper pollution affected colloid and tracer transport in the soil columns. The release of colloids especially in the most contaminated points......Copper is accumulated in soils due to human activities such as mining industry, agriculture practises, or waste deposals. High concentrations of copper can affect plants and soil organisms, and subsequently the soil structure and its inner space architecture. In this work we investigated the effect...... of copper concentration on the movement of an inert tracer, tritium, and the mobilization and transport of colloid particles in undisturbed soil cores (10 cm diameter and 8 cm height). The cores were sampled along a copper gradient of 21 to 3837 mg Cu kg-1 soil on an abandoned arable soil polluted by copper...

  2. Effect of irradiation for intracellular transport on mouse parotid gland; Study of electron microscopic autoradiography with [sup 3]H-leucine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondou, Nobuyoshi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Using light and electron microscopic autoradiographies by means of [sup 3]H-leucine, the influence of X-radiation, 10 Gy upon the submandibular region including parotid gland of a mouse was examined. The number of reduced silver grain per unit area of acinar cell was compared, and the rate of reduced silver grain localized in the intracellular organelle involved in the synthesis and transport of protein was observed. In the non-radiation (NR) group, reduced silver grain in the acinar cell of parotid gland showed the maximum value 30 minutes after [sup 3]H-leucine administration and thereafter decreased with time. Even the 3 and 14 post-radiation (PR) day-groups showed the maximum values at 30 minutes, but to a lesser extent than the NR groups, and subsequent time-course was noted a little. Reduced silver grain localized in the rough surfaced reticulum showed the highest rate at 15 minutes for the NR, 3 and 14 PR groups, and thereafter decreased abruptly. In comparing the rate of reduced silver grain localized in Golgi apparatus, the NR group showed the highest rate at 60 minutes and gradually decreased thereafter. The 3 PR group showed the highest rate at 60 minutes and similar tendency up to 120 minutes. The 14 PR group showed almost the similar tendency to the NR group. Reduced silver particles localized peri- and intra-secretory granules showed higher rate at 60 minutes for the NR group. In the 3 PR group, peri- and intra-secretory granules showed almost the same rate at 180 minutes, with a time lag for the transition of [sup 3]H-leucine to the secretory granules. In the 3 and 14 PR groups, similar order of rate was noted at 60 minutes between peri- and intra-secretory granules, with a transition time approximating to that of the NR group. Subsequent discharge, however, showed a delay tendency. Pathohistological examination revealed strong morphological changes of intracellular organelle in the 3 PR group and less remarkable changes in the 14 PR group. (author).

  3. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, S M; Rostagno, M H; Patterson, J A; Yoon, I; Fitzner, G; Eicher, S D

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on innate immunity and intestinal microbial ecology after weaning and transport stress. In a randomized complete block design, before weaning and in a split-plot analysis of a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of yeast culture (YY) and transport (TT) after weaning, 3-d-old pigs (n = 108) were randomly assigned within litter (block) to either a control (NY, milk only) or yeast culture diet (YY; delivered in milk to provide 0.1 g of yeast culture product/kg of BW) from d 4 to 21. At weaning (d 21), randomly, one-half of the NY and YY pigs were assigned to a 6-h transport (NY-TT and YY-TT) before being moved to nursery housing, and the other one-half were moved directly to nursery housing (NY-NT and YY-NT, where NT is no transport). The yeast treatment was a 0.2% S. cerevisiae fermentation product and the control treatment was a 0.2% grain blank in feed for 2 wk. On d 1 before transport and on d 1, 4, 7, and 14 after transport, blood was collected for leukocyte assays, and mesenteric lymph node, jejunal, and ileal tissue, and jejunal, ileal, and cecal contents were collected for Toll-like receptor expression (TLR); enumeration of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, and lactobacilli; detection of Salmonella; and microbial analysis. After weaning, a yeast × transport interaction for ADG was seen (P = 0.05). Transport affected (P = 0.09) ADFI after weaning. Yeast treatment decreased hematocrit (P = 0.04). A yeast × transport interaction was found for counts of white blood cells (P = 0.01) and neutrophils (P = 0.02) and for the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (P = 0.02). Monocyte counts revealed a transport (P = 0.01) effect. Interactions of yeast × transport (P = 0.001) and yeast × transport × day (P = 0.09) for TLR2 and yeast × transport (P = 0.08) for TLR4 expression in the mesenteric lymph node were detected. Day affected lactobacilli, total coliform, and E

  4. Administration of Exogenous Growth Hormone Is Associated with Changes in Plasma and Intracellular Mammary Amino Acid Profiles and Abundance of the Mammary Gland Amino Acid Transporter SLC3A2 in Mid-Lactation Dairy Cows

    OpenAIRE

    Quentin L Sciascia; David Pacheco; McCoard, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) identify changes in plasma and mammary intracellular amino acid (AA) profiles in dairy cows treated with growth hormone (GH), and (2) evaluate the expression of mammary gland genes involved in the transport of AA identified in (1). Eight non-pregnant (n = 4 per group) lactating dairy cows were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of either a slow-release formulation of commercially available GH (Lactotropin 500 mg) or physiological saline solut...

  5. Activity of erdosteine on mucociliary transport in patients affected by chronic bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, D; Del Donno, M; Casalini, A; D'Ippolito, R; Fregnan, G B

    1991-01-01

    The influence of erdosteine (a mucomodulator endowed with mucolytic and antioxidant properties) on human mucociliary transport (MCT) was investigated in a double-blind placebo controlled study. Sixteen former smokers affected by chronic bronchitis, preselected for their mucociliary responsiveness to an inhaled beta 2-agonist, were divided into two groups (matched by number, sex, age and FEV1%) and orally treated with placebo or erdosteine (300 mg t.i.d.) for 8 days. Their MCT was assessed by the bronchofiberscopy technique just before starting the treatment and at the end of the treatment. The pretreatment mucus transport velocity in these patients was significantly decreased with respect to healthy subjects. The erdosteine treatment induced a significant improvement of MCT while placebo was inactive (mean % variation +/- SE against their baseline values being +60.4 +/- 18.4 and -3.0 +/- 5.9, respectively). This peculiar activity of erdosteine on mucus transport may be of clinical usefulness in chronic bronchitic patients and it can be added to beta 2-agonist to restore the decreased MCT.

  6. Modelling of reactive transport in a sedimentary basin affected by a glaciation/deglaciation event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bea, S.A.; Mayer, U. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Vancouver, BC (Canada); MacQuarrie, K.T.B. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Canada's plan for the long-term care of used nuclear fuel is containment and isolation in a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) constructed in a suitable sedimentary or crystalline rock formation. In sedimentary basins fluid migration and geochemical conditions may be impacted by multiple interacting processes including density-dependent groundwater flow, solute transport, heat transfer, mechanical loading, and rock-water interactions. Understanding the interactions among these processes is important when assessing the long-term hydrodynamic and geochemical stability of sedimentary basins during glaciation/deglaciation events. To improve the capability to investigate these processes, an enhanced version of the reactive transport code MIN3P (i.e. MIN3P-NWMO) was developed and tested. The processes incorporated in the new model were evaluated by simulating reactive transport in a hypothetical sedimentary basin affected by a simplified glaciation scenario consisting of a single cycle of ice sheet advance and retreat. The simulations are used to provide an illustrative assessment of the hydrogeological and geochemical stability of this sedimentary basin over a time period of 32,500 years. The results suggest a high degree of geochemical stability. (author)

  7. Land use impacts on transport : how land use factors affect travel behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litman, T.

    2005-11-16

    The relationship between land use patterns and travel behaviour was examined with reference to the ability of land use management strategies to achieve transportation planning objectives. The study examined how land use factors such as density, regional accessibility, roadway connectivity affect per capita motor vehicle ownership and use; mode split; non-motorized travel; and accessibility by people who are physically or economically disadvantaged. The social, economic and environmental impacts that result from higher travel were discussed with reference to the degree to which conventional planning accounts for this increased travel. Alternatives for improving mobility in urban and suburban areas were presented. It was concluded that travel behaviour can change by promoting more efficient use of existing roadway capacity, by improving travel options and providing incentives to use alternative transport modes. It was suggested that strategies such as Smart Growth and New Urbanism can be applied in a variety of land use scenarios, including urban, suburban and rural areas to help achieve transportation planning objectives. 122 refs., 16 tabs., 12 figs.

  8. Growth media simulating ileal and colonic environments affect the intracellular proteome and carbon fluxes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Sabrina; Huber, Claudia; Eylert, Eva; Elsenhans, Ines; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Herbert

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the intracellular proteome of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry after growth in simulated ileal environment media (SIEM) and simulated colonic environment media (SCEM) under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. Differentially expressed intracellular proteins were identified and allocated to functional protein groups. Moreover, metabolic fluxes were analyzed by isotopologue profiling with [U-(13)C(6)]glucose as a tracer. The results of this study show that EDL933 responds with differential expression of a complex network of proteins and metabolic pathways, reflecting the high metabolic adaptability of the strain. Growth in SIEM and SCEM is obviously facilitated by the upregulation of nucleotide biosynthesis pathway proteins and could be impaired by exposition to 50 µM 6-mercaptopurine under aerobic conditions. Notably, various stress and virulence factors, including Shiga toxin, were expressed without having contact with a human host.

  9. Fuel-mix, fuel efficiency, and transport demand affect prospects for biofuels in northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Ryan M; Strømman, Anders Hammer

    2010-04-01

    Rising greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the road transport sector represents a difficult mitigation challenge due to a multitude of intricate factors, namely the dependency on liquid energy carriers and infrastructure lock-in. For this reason, low-carbon renewable energy carriers, particularly second generation biofuels, are often seen as a prominent candidate for realizing reduced emissions and lowered oil dependency over the medium- and long-term horizons. However, the overarching question is whether advanced biofuels can be an environmentally effective mitigation strategy in the face of increasing consumption and resource constraints. Here we develop both biofuel production and road transport consumption scenarios for northern Europe-a region with a vast surplus of forest bioenergy resources-to assess the potential role that forest-based biofuels may play over the medium- and long-term time horizons using an environmentally extended, multiregion input-output model. Through scenarios, we explore how evolving vehicle technologies and consumption patterns will affect the mitigation opportunities afforded by any future supply of forest biofuels. We find that in a scenario involving ambitious biofuel targets, the size of the GHG mitigation wedge attributed to the market supply of biofuels is severely reduced under business-as-usual growth in consumption in the road transport sector. Our results indicate that climate policies targeting the road transport sector which give high emphases to reducing demand (volume), accelerating the deployment of more fuel-efficient vehicles, and promoting altered consumption patterns (structure) can be significantly more effective than those with single emphasis on expanded biofuel supply.

  10. Effects of potentially acidic air pollutants on the intracellular distribution and transport of plant growth regulators in mesophyll cells of leaves. Consequences on stress- and developmental physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, H.; Pfanz, H.; Hartung, W.

    1987-07-11

    The influence of SO/sub 2/ on the intracellular distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-acetic acid (IAA) in mesophyll cells of Picea abies, Tsuga americana and Hordeum vulgare was investigated. The compartmentation of ABA and IAA depends on intracellular pH-gradients. The hydrophilic anions ABA and IAA are accumulated in the alkaline cell compartments cytosol and chloroplasts, which act as anion traps for weak acids. Uptake of sulfur dioxide into leaves leads to an acidification of alkaline cell compartments, thus decreasing intracellular pH-gradients. Consequently this results in an increased release of plant growth regulators from the cell interior into the apoplast. Therefore the target cells of plant hormones i.e. meristems and stomates are exposed to altered hormone concentrations. Obviously this influences the regulation of cellular metabolism plant development and growth.

  11. Identification of rare high-risk copy number variants affecting the dopamine transporter gene in mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise K; Duong, Linh T T; Ingason, Andrés;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dopamine transporter, also known as solute carrier 6A3 (SLC6A3), plays an important role in synaptic transmission by regulating the reuptake of dopamine in the synapses. In line with this, variations in the gene encoding this transporter have been linked to both schizophrenia...... rare high-risk variants of psychiatric disorders. METHODS: We performed a systematic screening for CNVs affecting SLC6A3 in 761 healthy controls, 672 schizophrenia patients, and 194 patients with bipolar disorder in addition to 253 family members from six large pedigrees affected by mental disorders...... sizes and two affected several genes in addition to SLC6A3. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that rare high-risk CNVs affecting the gene encoding the dopamine transporter contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and affective disorders....

  12. Difference between Extra- and IntracellularT1Values of Carboxylic Acids Affects the Quantitative Analysis of Cellular Kinetics by Hyperpolarized NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete knowledge of the longitudinal relaxationtime constant (T1) leads to incorrect assumptions in quantita-tive kinetic models of cellular systems, studied by hyper-polarized real-time NMR. Using an assay that measures theintracellular signal of small carboxylic acids in living cells......, theintracellular T1of the carboxylic acid moiety of acetate, keto-isocaproate, pyruvate, and butyrate was determined. Theintracellular T1is shown to be up to four-fold shorter thanthe extracellular T1. Such a large difference in T1valuesbetween the inside and the outside of the cell has significantinfluence...... on the quantification of intracellular metabolicactivity. It is expected that the significantly shorter T1valueof the carboxylic moieties inside cells is a result of macro-molecular crowding. An artificial cytosol has been preparedand applied to predict the T1of other carboxylic acids. Wedemonstrate the value...

  13. Ground transport stress affects bacteria in the rumen of beef cattle: A real-time PCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lixin; He, Cong; Zhou, Yanwei; Xu, Lifan; Xiong, Huijun

    2016-10-03

    Transport stress syndrome often appears in beef cattle during ground transportation, leading to changes in their capacity to digest food due to changes in rumen microbiota. The present study aimed to analyze bacteria before and after cattle transport. Eight Xianan beef cattle were transported over 1000 km. Rumen fluid and blood were sampled before and after transport. Real-time PCR was used to quantify rumen bacteria. Cortisol and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) were measured. Cortisol and ACTH were increased on day 1 after transportation and decreased by day 3. Cellulolytic bacteria (Fibrobacter succinogenes and Ruminococcus flavefaciens), Ruminococcus amylophilus and Prevotella albensis were increased at 6 h and declined by 15 days after transport. There was a significant reduction in Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, Prevotella bryantii, Prevotella ruminicola and Anaerovibrio lipolytica after transport. Rumen concentration of acetic acid increased after transport, while rumen pH and concentrations of propionic and butyric acids were decreased. Body weight decreased by 3 days and increased by 15 days after transportation. Using real-time PCR analysis, we detected changes in bacteria in the rumen of beef cattle after transport, which might affect the growth of cattle after transport.

  14. Uptake and transport of roxarsone and its metabolites in water spinach as affected by phosphate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lixian; Li, Guoliang; Dang, Zhi; Yang, Baomei; He, Zhaohuan; Zhou, Changmin

    2010-04-01

    Roxarsone (ROX) is widely used as a feed additive in intensive animal production. While an animal is fed with ROX, the As compounds in the manure primarily occur as ROX and its metabolites, including arsenate (As[V]), arsenite (As[III]), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Animal manure is commonly land applied with phosphorous fertilizers in China. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the phytoavailability of ROX, As(V), As(III), MMA, and DMA in water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), with the soil amended with 0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, and 2.0 g PO(4)/kg, respectively, plus 2% (w/w manure/soil) chicken manure (CM) bearing ROX and its metabolites. The results indicate that this species of water spinach cannot accumulate ROX and MMA at detectable levels, but As(V), As(III), and DMA were present in all plant samples. Increased phosphorous decreased the shoot As(V) and As(III) in water spinach but did not affect the root As(V). The shoot DMA and root As(III) and DMA were decreased/increased and then increased/decreased by elevated phosphorous. The total phosphorous content (P) in plant tissue did not correlate with the total As or the three As species in tissues. Arsenate, As(III), and DMA were more easily accumulated in the roots, and phosphate considerably inhibited their upward transport. Dimethylarsinic acid had higher transport efficiency than As(V) and As(III), but As(III) was dominant in tissues. Conclusively, phosphate had multiple effects on the accumulation and transport of ROX metabolites, which depended on their levels. However, proper utilization of phosphate fertilizer can decrease the accumulation of ROX metabolites in water spinach when treated with CM containing ROX and its metabolites.

  15. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Masoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: "degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients." This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from "physical health statuses," "socioeconomic statuses," and "cultural background" subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of "characteristics of the mission" and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation.

  16. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs’ Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Ebrahimian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs’ decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: “degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients.” This theme consisted of two main categories: (1 patient’s condition’ and (2 the context of the EMS mission’. The patent’s condition category emerged from “physical health statuses,” “socioeconomic statuses,” and “cultural background” subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of “characteristics of the mission” and EMS staffs characteristics’. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients’ needs for transportation in a prehospital situation.

  17. Efflux kinetics and intracellular distribution of daunorubicin are not affected by major vault protein/lung resistance-related protein (vault) expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zon, van A; Mossink, MH; Schoester, M.; Scheper, R.J.; Sonneveld, P.; Wiemer, EA

    2004-01-01

    Vaults may contribute to multidrug resistance by transporting drugs away from their subcellular targets. To study the involvement of vaults in the extrusion of anthracyclines from the nucleus, we investigated the handling of daunorubicin by drug-sensitive and drug-resistant non-small lung cancer cel

  18. Monitoring suspended sediment transport in an ice-affected river using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S. A.; Ghareh Aghaji Zare, S.; Rennie, C. D.; Ahmari, H.; Seidou, O.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment budgets and understanding the processes which control fluvial sediment transport is paramount to monitoring river geomorphology and ecological habitat. In regions that are subject to freezing there is the added complexity of ice. River ice processes impact flow distribution, water stage and sediment transport. Ice processes typically have the largest impact on sediment transport and channel morphodynamics when ice jams occur during ice cover formation and breakup. Ice jams may restrict flow and cause local acceleration when released. Additionally, ice can mechanically scour river bed and banks. Under-ice sediment transport measurements are lacking due to obvious safety and logistical reasons, in addition to a lack of adequate measurement techniques. Since some rivers can be covered in ice during six months of the year, the lack of data in winter months leads to large uncertainty in annual sediment load calculations. To address this problem, acoustic profilers are being used to monitor flow velocity, suspended sediment and ice processes in the Lower Nelson River, Manitoba, Canada. Acoustic profilers are ideal for under-ice sediment flux measurements since they can be operated autonomously and continuously, they do not disturb the flow in the zone of measurement and acoustic backscatter can be related to sediment size and concentration. In March 2012 two upward-facing profilers (1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, 546 KHz acoustic backscatter profiler) were installed through a hole in the ice on the Nelson River, 50 km downstream of the Limestone Generating Station. Data were recorded for four months, including both stable cover and breakup periods. This paper presents suspended sediment fluxes calculated from the acoustic measurements. Velocity data were used to infer the vertical distribution of sediment sizes and concentrations; this information was then used in the interpretation of the backscattered intensity data. It was found that

  19. Ssh4, Rcr2 and Rcr1 affect plasma membrane transporter activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Jhansi; Melin-Larsson, Monika; Ljungdahl, Per O; Forsberg, Hanna

    2007-04-01

    Nutrient uptake in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a highly regulated process. Cells adjust levels of nutrient transporters within the plasma membrane at multiple stages of the secretory and endosomal pathways. In the absence of the ER-membrane-localized chaperone Shr3, amino acid permeases (AAP) inefficiently fold and are largely retained in the ER. Consequently, shr3 null mutants exhibit greatly reduced rates of amino acid uptake due to lower levels of AAPs in their plasma membranes. To further our understanding of mechanisms affecting AAP localization, we identified SSH4 and RCR2 as high-copy suppressors of shr3 null mutations. The overexpression of SSH4, RCR2, or the RCR2 homolog RCR1 increases steady-state AAP levels, whereas the genetic inactivation of these genes reduces steady-state AAP levels. Additionally, the overexpression of any of these suppressor genes exerts a positive effect on phosphate and uracil uptake systems. Ssh4 and Rcr2 primarily localize to structures associated with the vacuole; however, Rcr2 also localizes to endosome-like vesicles. Our findings are consistent with a model in which Ssh4, Rcr2, and presumably Rcr1, function within the endosome-vacuole trafficking pathway, where they affect events that determine whether plasma membrane proteins are degraded or routed to the plasma membrane.

  20. Aqueous extract of tamarind seeds selectively increases glucose transporter-2, glucose transporter-4, and islets' intracellular calcium levels and stimulates β-cell proliferation resulting in improved glucose homeostasis in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Sushant Shivdas; Srinivasan, B P

    2012-08-01

    Tamarindus indica Linn. has been in use for a long time in Asian food and traditional medicine for different diseases including diabetes and obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms of these effects have not been fully understood. In view of the multidimensional activity of tamarind seeds due to their having high levels of polyphenols and flavonoids, we hypothesized that the insulin mimetic effect of aqueous tamarind seed extract (TSE) might increase glucose uptake through improvement in the expression of genes of the glucose transporter (GLUT) family and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP) 1c messenger RNA (mRNA) in the liver. Daily oral administration of TSE to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced (90 mg/kg intraperitoneally) type 2 diabetic male Wistar rats at different doses (120 and 240 mg/kg body weight) for 4 weeks showed positive correlation with intracellular calcium and insulin release in isolated islets of Langerhans. Tamarind seed extract supplementation significantly improved the GLUT-2 protein and SREBP-1c mRNA expression in the liver and GLUT-4 protein and mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. The elevated levels of serum nitric oxide (NO), glycosylated hemoglobin level (hemoglobin (A1c)) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) decreased after TSE administration. Immunohistochemical findings revealed that TSE abrogated STZ-induced apoptosis and increased β-cell neogenesis, indicating its effect on islets and β-cell mass. In conclusion, it was found that the antidiabetic effect of TSE on STZ-induced diabetes resulted from complex mechanisms of β-cell neogenesis, calcium handling, GLUT-2, GLUT-4, and SREBP-1c. These findings show the scope for formulating a new herbal drug for diabetes therapy.

  1. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 for Rab5 proteins coordinated with GLUP6/GEF regulates the intracellular transport of the proglutelin from the Golgi apparatus to the protein storage vacuole in rice endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liuying; Fukuda, Masako; Sunada, Mariko; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Okita, Thomas W; Ogawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Takashi; Kumamaru, Toshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Rice glutelin polypeptides are initially synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane as a proglutelin, which are then transported to the protein storage vacuole (PSV) via the Golgi apparatus. Rab5 and its cognate activator guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) are essential for the intracellular transport of proglutelin from the Golgi apparatus to the PSV. Results from previous studies showed that the double recessive type of glup4/rab5a and glup6/gef mutant accumulated much higher amounts of proglutelin than either parent line. The present study demonstrates that the double recessive type of glup4/rab5a and glup6/gef mutant showed not only elevated proglutelin levels and much larger paramural bodies but also reduced the number and size of PSVs, indicating a synergistic mutation effect. These observations led us to the hypothesis that other isoforms of Rab5 and GEF also participate in the intracellular transport of rice glutelin. A database search identified a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Rab5-GEF2. Like GLUP6/GEF, Rab5-GEF2 was capable of activating Rab5a and two other Rab5 isoforms in in vitro GTP/GDP exchange assays. GEF proteins consist of the helical bundle (HB) domain at the N-terminus, Vps9 domain, and a C-terminal region. By the deletion analysis of GEFs, the HB domain was found essential for the activation of Rab5 proteins.

  2. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the methotrexate transport in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosogi, Aiko; Gao, Feng; Tomimatsu, Takashi; Hirata, Koji; Horie, Toshiharu

    2003-06-13

    Methotrexate (MTX) is used not only for the cancer chemotherapy but also for the treatment of rheumatic disease, often together with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). MTX is actively cotransported with H(+) in the small intestine, mediated by a reduced folate carrier (RFC). The coadministration of some NSAIDs with MTX to rats caused a decrease of MTX absorption through the small intestine. This may be due to the uncoupling effect of oxidative phosphorylation of the NSAIDs. The present study investigated whether flufenamic acid, diclofenac and indomethacin, NSAIDs, decreased ATP content of rat-derived intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6 cells and affected the MTX transport in IEC-6 cells. The MTX uptake in IEC-6 cells was dependent on medium pH and maximum around pH 4.5-5.5. The MTX uptake was composed of a transport inhibited by 4, 4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) and a non-saturable one. The DIDS-sensitive component in the MTX uptake showed a saturation kinetics (Michaelis-Menten constant (Km): 3.91 +/- 0.52 microM, Maximum velocity (Vmax): 94.66 +/- 6.56 pmol/mg protein/5 min). The cellular ATP content in IEC-6 cells decreased significantly at 30 min after the cells were started to incubate with the NSAIDs (250 microM flufenamic acid, 500 microM diclofenac and 500 microM indomethacin). The MTX uptake in IEC-6 cells in the presence of the NSAIDs decreased with the reduction of cellular ATP content and showed a good correlation with the ATP content (correlation coefficient: 0.982). Thus it seems likely that the ATP content in IEC-6 cells with the NSAIDs decreased due to the uncoupling effect of oxidative phosphorylation of the NSAIDs, resulting in the inhibition of the secondary active transport of MTX in IEC-6 cells. The present results also suggest that IEC-6 cells are useful to evaluate the drug interaction relating to this carrier system.

  3. Geochemical factors affecting radionuclide transport through near and far fields at a Low-Level Waste Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Piepkho, M.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The concentration of low-level waste (LLW) contaminants in groundwater is determined by the amount of contaminant present in the solid waste, rate of release from the waste and surrounding barriers, and a number of geochemical processes including adsorption, desorption, diffusion, precipitation, and dissolution. To accurately predict radionuclide transport through the subsurface, it is essential that the important geochemical processes affecting radionuclide transport be identified and, perhaps more importantly, accurately quantified and described in a mathematically defensible manner.

  4. Food chain transport of nanoparticles affects behaviour and fat metabolism in fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Cedervall

    Full Text Available Nano-sized (10(-9-10(-7 m particles offer many technical and biomedical advances over the bulk material. The use of nanoparticles in cosmetics, detergents, food and other commercial products is rapidly increasing despite little knowledge of their effect on organism metabolism. We show here that commercially manufactured polystyrene nanoparticles, transported through an aquatic food chain from algae, through zooplankton to fish, affect lipid metabolism and behaviour of the top consumer. At least three independent metabolic parameters differed between control and test fish: the weight loss, the triglycerides∶cholesterol ratio in blood serum, and the distribution of cholesterol between muscle and liver. Moreover, we demonstrate that nanoparticles bind to apolipoprotein A-I in fish serum in-vitro, thereby restraining them from properly utilising their fat reserves if absorbed through ingestion. In addition to the metabolic effects, we show that consumption of nanoparticle-containing zooplankton affects the feeding behaviour of the fish. The time it took the fish to consume 95% of the food presented to them was more than doubled for nanoparticle-exposed compared to control fish. Since many nano-sized products will, through the sewage system, end up in freshwater and marine habitats, our study provides a potential bioassay for testing new nano-sized material before manufacturing. In conclusion, our study shows that from knowledge of the molecular composition of the protein corona around nanoparticles it is possible to make a testable molecular hypothesis and bioassay of the potential biological risks of a defined nanoparticle at the organism and ecosystem level.

  5. Gibberellins inhibit adventitious rooting in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis by affecting auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Petterle, Anna; Bellini, Catherine; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of processes involved in adventitious rooting is important to improve both fundamental understanding of plant physiology and the propagation of numerous plants. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloïdes) plants overexpressing a key gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis gene (AtGA20ox1) grow rapidly but have poor rooting efficiency, which restricts their clonal propagation. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of adventitious rooting in Populus and the model plant Arabidopsis. The production of adventitious roots (ARs) in tree cuttings is initiated from the basal stem region, and involves the interplay of several endogenous and exogenous factors. The roles of several hormones in this process have been characterized, but the effects of GAs have not been fully investigated. Here, we show that a GA treatment negatively affects the numbers of ARs produced by wild-type hybrid aspen cuttings. Furthermore, both hybrid aspen plants and intact Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing AtGA20ox1, PttGID1.1 or PttGID1.3 genes (with a 35S promoter) produce few ARs, although ARs develop from the basal stem region of hybrid aspen and the hypocotyl of Arabidopsis. In Arabidopsis, auxin and strigolactones are known to affect AR formation. Our data show that the inhibitory effect of GA treatment on adventitious rooting is not mediated by perturbation of the auxin signalling pathway, or of the strigolactone biosynthetic and signalling pathways. Instead, GAs appear to act by perturbing polar auxin transport, in particular auxin efflux in hybrid aspen, and both efflux and influx in Arabidopsis.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa capability to recruit zinc under conditions of limited metal availability is affected by inactivation of the ZnuABC transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Melania; Mastropasqua, Maria Chiara; Cerasi, Mauro; Pacello, Francesca; Consalvo, Ada; Chirullo, Barbara; Mortensen, Brittany; Skaar, Eric P.; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Pasquali, Paolo; Battistoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a large number of bacterial pathogens to multiply in the infected host and cause disease is dependent on their ability to express high affinity zinc importers. In many bacteria ZnuABC, a transporter of the ABC family, plays a central role in the process of zinc uptake in zinc poor environments, including the tissues of the infected host. To initiate an investigation into the relevance of the zinc uptake apparatus for Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity, we have generated a znuA mutant in the PA14 strain. We have found that this mutant strain displays a limited growth defect in zinc depleted media. The znuA mutant strain is more sensitive than the wild type strain to calprotectin-mediated growth inhibition, but both the strains are highly resistant to this zinc sequestering antimicrobial protein. Moreover, intracellular zinc content is not evidently affected by inactivation of the ZnuABC transporter. These findings suggest that P. aeruginosa is equipped with redundant mechanisms for the acquisition of zinc that might favor P. aeruginosa colonization of environments containing low levels of this metal. Nonetheless, deletion of znuA affects alginate production, reduces the activity of extracellular zinc-containing proteases, including LasA, LasB and Protease IV, and decreases the ability of P. aeruginosa to disseminate during systemic infections. These results indicate that efficient zinc acquisition is critical for the expression of various virulence features typical of P. aeruginosa and that ZnuABC also plays an important role in zinc homeostasis in this microorganism. PMID:25751674

  7. The addition of organic carbon and nitrate affects reactive transport of heavy metals in sandy aquifers

    KAUST Repository

    Satyawali, Yamini

    2011-04-01

    Organic carbon introduction in the soil to initiate remedial measures, nitrate infiltration due to agricultural practices or sulphate intrusion owing to industrial usage can influence the redox conditions and pH, thus affecting the mobility of heavy metals in soil and groundwater. This study reports the fate of Zn and Cd in sandy aquifers under a variety of plausible in-situ redox conditions that were induced by introduction of carbon and various electron acceptors in column experiments. Up to 100% Zn and Cd removal (from the liquid phase) was observed in all the four columns, however the mechanisms were different. Metal removal in column K1 (containing sulphate), was attributed to biological sulphate reduction and subsequent metal precipitation (as sulphides). In the presence of both nitrate and sulphate (K2), the former dominated the process, precipitating the heavy metals as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In the presence of sulphate, nitrate and supplemental iron (Fe(OH)3) (K3), metal removal was also due to precipitation as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In abiotic column, K4, (with supplemental iron (Fe(OH)3), but no nitrate), cation exchange with soil led to metal removal. The results obtained were modeled using the reactive transport model PHREEQC-2 to elucidate governing processes and to evaluate scenarios of organic carbon, sulphate and nitrate inputs. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1 affects the expression of porcine Klotho (KL gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Klotho (KL, originally discovered as an aging suppressor, is a membrane protein that shares sequence similarity with the β-glucosidase enzymes. Recent reports showed Klotho might play a role in adipocyte maturation and systemic glucose metabolism. However, little is known about the transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of porcine KL gene. Deletion fragment analysis identified KL-D2 (−418 bp to −3 bp as the porcine KL core promoter. MARC0022311SNP (A or G in KL intron 1 was detected in Landrace × DIV pigs using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The pGL-D2-A and pGL-D2-G were constructed with KL-D2 and the intron fragment of different alleles and relative luciferase activity of pGL3-D2-G was significantly higher than that of pGL3-D2-A in the PK cells and ST cells. This was possibly the result of a change in KL binding ability with transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1, which was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA and chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP. Moreover, OCT-1 regulated endogenous KL expression by RNA interference experiments. Our study indicates SNP MARC0022311 affects porcine KL expression by regulating its promoter activity via OCT-1.

  9. "Who's been feeding in my bed?" Benthivorous fish affect fluvial sediment transport - fact or fairy tale?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen; Pledger, Andrew; Smith, James; Toone, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Many species of fish are benthivorous - they forage for food in the river bed - and their foraging disturbs, displaces and sorts bed materials with implications for fluvial sediment transport. Flume experiments have confirmed that benthic foraging by Barbel (Barbus barbus (L.)) and Chub (Squalius cephalus (L.)) modifies the structure and topography of water-worked gravels, thereby increasing particle entrainment probabilities and the quantity of sediment mobilised during experimental high flows. Field experiments and observations have demonstrated the impact of foraging on patch-scale bed disturbance, gravel structure, grain displacements and grain-size sorting. Initial ex-situ experiments support the suggestion that in low gradient rivers, shoals of fish like Bream (Abramis brama (L.)) entrain fine bed sediments, adding a biotic surcharge to the suspended sediment flux and modifying bed topography. These results underpin a novel proposal: that there is an aggregate, cumulative effect of benthic foraging on fluvial sediment transport at larger scales, including at scales where the contribution to sediment movement and river channel behaviour generates management concerns. Evaluating this proposal is a long-term goal, which is based on two intermediate objectives: to develop deeper mechanistic understanding of foraging impacts and to establish the spatial and temporal extent of geomorphologically significant feeding behaviours in river systems. The latter is crucial because field data are currently limited to a single reach on one UK river. It is reasonable to hypothesise that foraging impacts are spatially and temporally widespread because obligate and opportunistic benthic feeding is common and fish feed throughout their life. However, the effectiveness of foraging as a geomorphological process is likely to vary with factors including substrate size, fish community composition, food availability, water temperature, river flows and seasonal changes in fish

  10. Conformational Rearrangements to the Intracellular Open States of the LeuT and ApcT Transporters Are Modulated by Common Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel

    2010-01-01

    Recent crystallographic studies revealed that five transporter families without much sequence similarities among them have similar structure folds to LeuT, a bacterial neurotransmitter:sodium symporter homolog. The LeuT fold is characterized by an internal twofold structural pseudosymmetry. The transport cycle of some members of each of these families is dependent on a sodium gradient across the membrane, whereas in some others the role of sodium is mimicked by proton. We report on the identi...

  11. A CD36-related Transmembrane Protein Is Coordinated with an Intracellular Lipid-binding Protein in Selective Carotenoid Transport for Cocoon Coloration*

    OpenAIRE

    Sakudoh, Takashi; Iizuka, Tetsuya; Narukawa, Junko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kobayashi, Isao; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Banno, Yutaka; Kitamura, Akitoshi; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Takada, Naoko; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Mita, Kazuei; Tamura, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Kimiko

    2010-01-01

    The transport pathway of specific dietary carotenoids from the midgut lumen to the silk gland in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is a model system for selective carotenoid transport because several genetic mutants with defects in parts of this pathway have been identified that manifest altered cocoon pigmentation. In the wild-type silkworm, which has both genes, Yellow blood (Y) and Yellow cocoon (C), lutein is transferred selectively from the hemolymph lipoprotein to the silk gland cells where it...

  12. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J. O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little literature that characterizes transportation and logistics challenges and the associated effects on U.S. wind markets. The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address the challenges. The authors primarily relied on interviews with wind industry project developers, original equipment manufacturers, and transportation and logistics companies to obtain the information and industry perspectives needed for this study. They also reviewed published literature on trends and developments in increasing wind turbine size, logistics, and transportation issues.

  13. Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; Tick, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the role of the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion in transient anomalous transport, which is one of the major knowledge gaps in anomalous transport, by combining Monte Carlo simulations and stochastic model analysis. Two alluvial settings containing either short- or long-connected hydrofacies are generated and used as media for flow and transport modeling. Numerical experiments show that 1) the Peclet number affects both the duration of the power-law segment of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and the transition rate from anomalous to Fickian transport by determining the solute residence time for a given low-permeability layer, 2) mechanical dispersion has a limited contribution to the anomalous characteristics of late-time transport as compared to molecular diffusion due to an almost negligible velocity in floodplain deposits, and 3) the initial source dimensions only enhance the power-law tail of the BTCs at short travel distances. A tempered stable stochastic (TSS) model is then applied to analyze the modeled transport. Applications show that the time-nonlocal parameters in the TSS model relate to the Peclet number, Pe. In particular, the truncation parameter in the TSS model increases nonlinearly with a decrease in Pe due to the decrease of the mean residence time, and the capacity coefficient increases with an increase in molecular diffusion which is probably due to the increase in the number of immobile particles. The above numerical experiments and stochastic analysis therefore reveal that the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer–aquitard complexes.

  14. Intra-cellular transport by single-headed kinesin KIF1A: effects of single-motor mechano-chemistry and steric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Greulich, P; Garai, A; Nishinari, K; Schadschneider, A; Chowdhury, Debashish; Garai, Ashok; Greulich, Philip; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, many motor proteins can move simultaneously on a single microtubule track. This leads to interesting collective phenomena like jamming. Recently we reported ({\\it Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 95}, 118101 (2005)}) a lattice-gas model which describes traffic of unconventional (single-headed) kinesins KIF1A. Here we generalize this model, introducing a novel interaction parameter $c$, to account for an interesting mechano-chemical process which has not been considered in any earlier model. We have been able to extract all the parameters of the model, except $c$, from experimentally measured quantities. In contrast to earlier models of intra-cellular molecular motor traffic, our model assigns distinct ``chemical'' (or, conformational) states to each kinesin to account for the hydrolysis of ATP, the chemical fuel of the motor. Our model makes experimentally testable theoretical predictions. We determine the phase diagram of the model in planes spanned by experimentally controllable parameters, namely...

  15. The abcEDCBA-Encoded ABC Transporter and the virB Operon-Encoded Type IV Secretion System of Brucella ovis Are Critical for Intracellular Trafficking and Survival in Ovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auricelio A Macedo

    Full Text Available Brucella ovis infection is associated with epididymitis, orchitis and infertility in rams. Most of the information available on B. ovis and host cell interaction has been generated using murine macrophages or epithelial cell lines, but the interaction between B. ovis and primary ovine macrophages has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the B. ovis abcEDCBA-encoded ABC transporter and the virB operon-encoded Type IV Secretion System (T4SS during intracellular survival of B. ovis in ovine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutant strains were unable to survive in the intracellular environment when compared to the WT B. ovis at 48 hours post infection (hpi. In addition, these mutant strains cannot exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, and their vacuoles do not acquire the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin, which takes place in the WT B. ovis containing vacuole. Higher levels of nitric oxide production were observed in macrophages infected with WT B. ovis at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains. Conversely, higher levels of reactive oxygen species were detected in macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the WT strain. Our results demonstrate that B. ovis is able to persist and multiply in ovine macrophages, while ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutations prevent intracellular multiplication, favor phagolysosome fusion, and impair maturation of the B. ovis vacuole towards an endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment.

  16. Physical interaction and functional coupling between ACDP4 and the intracellular ion chaperone COX11, an implication of the role of ACDP4 in essential metal ion transport and homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Jianguo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Divalent metal ions such as copper, manganese, and cobalt are essential for cell development, differentiation, function and survival. These essential metal ions are delivered into intracellular domains as cofactors for enzymes involved in neuropeptide and neurotransmitter synthesis, superoxide metabolism, and other biological functions in a target specific fashion. Altering the homeostasis of these essential metal ions is known to connect to a number of human diseases including Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and pain. It remains unclear how these essential metal ions are delivered to intracellular targets in mammalian cells. Here we report that rat spinal cord dorsal horn neurons express ACDP4, a member of Ancient Conserved Domain Protein family. By screening a pretransformed human fetal brain cDNA library in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified that ACDP4 specifically interacts with COX11, an intracellular metal ion chaperone. Ectopic expression of ACDP4 in HEK293 cells resulted in enhanced toxicity to metal ions including copper, manganese, and cobalt. The metal ion toxicity became more pronounced when ACDP4 and COX11 were co-expressed ectopically in HEK293 cells, suggesting a functional coupling between them. Our results indicate a role of ACDP4 in metal ion homeostasis and toxicity. This is the first report revealing a functional aspect of this ancient conserved domain protein family. We propose that ACDP is a family of transporter protein or chaperone proteins for delivering essential metal ions in different mammalian tissues. The expression of ACDP4 on spinal cord dorsal horn neurons may have implications in sensory neuron functions under physiological and pathological conditions.

  17. Potassium nutrition and water availability affect phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon in eucalypt trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo; Trivelin, Paulo; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Potassium fertilisation strongly affects growth and carbon partitioning of eucalypt on tropical soil that are strongly weathered. In addition, potassium fertilization could be of great interest in mitigating the adverse consequences of drought in planted forests, as foliar K concentrations influence osmotic adjustment, stomatal regulation and phloem loading. Phloem is the main pathway for transferring photosynthate from source leaves to sink organs, thus controlling growth partitioning among the different tree compartments. But little is known about the effect of potassium nutrition on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon and on the interaction between K nutrition and water availability. In situ 13C pulse labelling was conducted on tropical eucalypt trees (Eucalyptus grandis L.) grown in a trial plantation with plots in which 37% of throughfall were excluded (about 500 mm/yr) using home-made transparent gutters (-W) or not (+W) and plots that received 0.45 mol K m-2 applied as KCl three months after planting (+K) or not (-K). Three trees were labelled in each of the four treatments (+K+W, +K-W, -K+W and -K-W). Trees were labelled for one hour by injecting pure 13CO2 in a 27 m3 whole crown chamber. We estimated the velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk by comparing time lags between the uptake of 13CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded by off axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research) in two chambers per tree, one just under the crown and one at the base of the trunk. We analyzed the dynamics of the label recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap by analysing carbon isotope composition of bulk leaf organic matter and phloem extracts using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk and the initial rate 13C disappearance from the foliage were much higher in +K trees than in -K trees with no significant effect of rainfall. The volumetric flow of phloem, roughly estimated by multiplying

  18. How uncertainty in socio-economic variables affects large-scale transport model forecasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzo, Stefano; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    time, especially with respect to large-scale transport models. The study described in this paper contributes to fill the gap by investigating the effects of uncertainty in socio-economic variables growth rate projections on large-scale transport model forecasts, using the Danish National Transport...... showed how the model output uncertainty grows over time, reflecting the increase in the uncertainty of the model variables. Furthermore, the resulting uncertainty temporal pattern was neither linear nor similar for the different model outputs investigated. This highlights the importance of investigating...

  19. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Cotrell, T. Stehly, J. Johnson, J. O. Roberts, Z. Parker, G. Scott, and D. Heimiller

    2014-01-28

    The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address the challenges.

  20. Serotonin Transporter Genotype Affects Serotonin 5-HT1A Binding in Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Christian, Bradley T; Wooten, Dustin W; Hillmer, Ansel T.; Tudorascu, Dana L.; Converse, Alexander K.; Moore, Colleen F.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Kalin, Ned H.; Barr, Christina S.; Schneider, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the serotonin system has been implicated in anxiety and depression and a related genetic variation has been identified that may predispose individuals for these illnesses. The relationship of a functional variation of the serotonin transporter promoter gene (5-HTTLPR) on serotonin transporter binding using in vivo imaging techniques have yielded inconsistent findings when comparing variants for short (s) and long (l) alleles. However, a significant 5-HTTLPR effect on receptor bi...

  1. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  2. Perturbation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport affects size of nucleus and nucleolus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharjee, Chumki; Bhave, Madhura; Kailaje, Vaishali; Jain, Bhawik K; Sengupta, Isha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2016-03-01

    Size regulation of human cell nucleus and nucleolus are poorly understood subjects. 3D reconstruction of live image shows that the karyoplasmic ratio (KR) increases by 30-80% in transformed cell lines compared to their immortalized counterpart. The attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes the KR value to increase by 30-50% in immortalized cell lines. Nucleolus volumes are significantly increased in transformed cell lines and the attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes a significant increase in the nucleolus volume of immortalized cell lines. A cytosol and nuclear fraction swapping experiment emphasizes the potential role of unknown cytosolic factors in nuclear and nucleolar size regulation.

  3. Colonic epithelial ion transport is not affected in patients with diverticulosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip S; Bindslev, Niels; Poulsen, Steen S;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colonic diverticular disease is a bothersome condition with an unresolved pathogenesis. It is unknown whether a neuroepithelial dysfunction is present. The aim of the study was two-fold; (1) to investigate colonic epithelial ion transport in patients with diverticulosis and (2) to adapt...... (controls) except for diverticulosis in 22 (D-patients). Biopsies were mounted in MUAS chambers with an exposed area of 5 mm2. Electrical responses to various stimulators and inhibitors of ion transport were investigated together with histological examination. The MUAS chamber was easy to use...... with diverticulosis and that the MUAS chamber can be adapted for studies of human colonic endoscopic biopsies. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  4. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  5. Genetic variation in serotonin transporter function affects human fear expression indexed by fear-potentiated startle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumpers, F.; Heitland, I.; Oosting, R.S.; Kenemans, J.L.; Baas, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) plays a crucial role in anxiety. Accordingly, variance in SERT functioning appears to constitute an important pathway to individual differences in anxiety. The current study tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in SERT function is associated with variability

  6. Intestinal microbial affects of yeast products on weaned and transport stressed pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Study objectives were to determine effects of a commercially available yeast product (XPC, Diamond-V Mills) and stress of transportation on total Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, coliforms, and Lactobacilli populations in the intestine of weaning pigs. In a RCB design with a 2 x 2 factorial ar...

  7. How Do Hydrodynamic Instabilities Affect 3D Transport in Geophysical Vortices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding three-dimensional (3D) transport in ocean eddies is important for processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. It is well known that geophysical vortices are subject to various hydrodynamic instabilities. Yet the influence of these instabilities on 3D material transport in vortex systems is not well investigated. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we analyze these instabilities with normal-mode method, and reproduce their characteristics via highly-resolved numerical simulations using a spectral element Navier-Stokes solver. By comparing the simulation results of stable and unstable vortices, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport through three major aspects: (i) energy transfer, (ii) overturning transport of the secondary circulation, and (iii) rates of vertical exchange and mixing. It is found that instabilities can enhance local nonlinear interactions and cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have slopes between the conventional -5/3 and -3 at inertial ranges. The cascade of a new quantity is proposed to explain these non-conventional slopes. One of our main results is the discovery of material exchange between the central vortex and satellite vortices through 3D pathways, called funnels. These funnels modify the concept of elliptic regions that can trap material when confined to 2D dynamics. Thus, we show that a family of vortices, created by the hydrodynamic instabilities of the initially unstable vortex, can still continue to operate in unity in order to complete the 3D transport in these systems. We also show that flow instabilities can double the magnitude of vertical velocity, increase the rate of vertical exchange by an order of magnitude and enhance mixing rate more than 100%.

  8. Transport of manure-borne testosterone in soils affected by artificial rainfall events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yong; Zhang, Tian C

    2016-04-15

    Information is very limited on fate and transport of steroidal hormones in soils. In this study, the rainfall simulation tests were conducted with a soil slab reactor to investigate the transport of manure-borne testosterone in a silty-clay loam soil under six controllable operation conditions (i.e., three rainfall intensities and two tillage practices). The properties [e.g., rainwater volume, particle size distribution (PSD)] of the slurry samples collected in runoff and leachate at different time intervals were measured; their correlation with the distribution of testosterone among runoff, leachate and soil matrix was analyzed. The results indicated that more than 88% of the testosterone was held by the applied manure and/or soil matrix even under the rainfall intensity of 100-year return frequency. The runoff facilitated testosterone transport through both dissolved and particle-associated phases, with the corresponding mass ratio being ∼7 to 3. Soil particles collected through runoff were mainly silt-sized aggregates (STA) and clays, indicating the necessity of using partially-dispersed soil particles as testing materials to conduct batch tests (e.g., sorption/desorption). No testosterone was detected at the soil depth >20 cm or in the leachate samples, indicating that transport of testosterone through the soil is very slow when there is no preferential flow. Tillage practice could impede the transport of testosterone in runoff. For the first time, results and the methodologies of this study allow one to quantify the hormone distribution among runoff, leachate and soil matrix at the same time and to obtain a comprehensive picture of the F/T of manure-borne testosterone in soil-water environments.

  9. The Acyl-CoA synthetases encoded within FAA1 and FAA4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as components of the fatty acid transport system linking import, activation, and intracellular Utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Black, P N; Zhao, X D

    2001-01-01

    are essential for long-chain fatty acid import, suggesting that one or both of these enzymes are components of the fatty acid transport system, which also includes Fat1p. By monitoring the intracellular accumulation of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid analogue 4,4-difluoro-5-methyl-4-bora-3a,4a......-diaza-s-indacene-3-dodecanoic acid, long-chain fatty acid transport was shown to be severely restricted in a faa1 Delta faa4 Delta strain. These data established for the first time a mechanistic linkage between the import and activation of exogenous fatty acids in yeast. To investigate this linkage further, oleoyl...... CoA levels were defined following incubation of wild type and mutant cells with limiting concentrations of exogenous oleate. These studies demonstrated oleoyl CoA levels were reduced to less than 10% wild-type levels in faa1 Delta and faa1 Delta faa4 Delta strains. Defects in metabolic utilization...

  10. Transport of root-derived CO2 via the transpiration stream affects aboveground tree physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, J.; McGuire, M. A.; Aubrey, D. P.; Teskey, R. O.; Steppe, K.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research on soil CO2 efflux has shown that belowground autotrophic respiration is largely underestimated using classical net CO2 flux measurements. Aubrey & Teskey (2009) found that in forest ecosystems a substantial portion of the CO2 released from root respiration remained within the root system and was transported aboveground in the stem via the transpiration stream. The magnitude of this upward movement of CO2 from belowground tissues suggested important implications for how we measure above- and belowground respiration. If a considerable fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported aboveground, where it might be fixed in woody and leaf tissues, then we are routinely underestimating the amount of C needed to sustain belowground tissues. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the base of field-grown poplar trees as a surrogate for root-respired CO2 to investigate the possible role of root-derived CO2 as substrate for carbon fixation. The label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and fixed by chlorophyll-containing woody (young bark and xylem) and leaf (petiole) tissues. Moreover, based on 13C analysis of gas samples, we observed that up to 88 ± 0.10 % of the label applied was lost to the atmosphere by stem and branch efflux higher in the trees. Given that one-half of root-respired CO2 may follow this internal flux pathway (Aubrey & Teskey, 2009), we calculated that up to 44% of the root-respired CO2 could diffuse to the atmosphere once transported to the stem and branches. Thus, a large portion of CO2 that diffuses out of aboveground tissues may actually result from root respiration. Our results show that CO2 originating belowground can be transported internally to aboveground parts of trees, where it will have an important impact on tree physiology. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the gas exchange approach to estimating above- and

  11. GTPases in intracellular trafficking: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Nava

    2011-02-01

    Small GTPases that belong to the ras sub-families of Rab, Arf, and Rho, and the large GTPase dynamin, regulate intracellular trafficking. This issue of Seminars of Cell and Developmental Biology highlights topics regarding mechanisms by which these GTPases regulate the different steps of vesicular transport: vesicle formation, scission, targeting and fusion. In addition, the emerging roles of GTPases in coordination of individual transport steps as well as coordination of intracellular trafficking with other cellular processes are reviewed. Finally, common structures and mechanisms underlying the function of the ras-like GTPases and the importance of their function to human health and disease are discussed.

  12. Allocation, stress tolerance and carbon transport in plants: how does phloem physiology affect plant ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jessica A; Clearwater, Michael J; Haines, Dustin F; Klein, Tamir; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Sevanto, Sanna; Turgeon, Robert; Zhang, Cankui

    2016-04-01

    Despite the crucial role of carbon transport in whole plant physiology and its impact on plant-environment interactions and ecosystem function, relatively little research has tried to examine how phloem physiology impacts plant ecology. In this review, we highlight several areas of active research where inquiry into phloem physiology has increased our understanding of whole plant function and ecological processes. We consider how xylem-phloem interactions impact plant drought tolerance and reproduction, how phloem transport influences carbon allocation in trees and carbon cycling in ecosystems and how phloem function mediates plant relations with insects, pests, microbes and symbiotes. We argue that in spite of challenges that exist in studying phloem physiology, it is critical that we consider the role of this dynamic vascular system when examining the relationship between plants and their biotic and abiotic environment.

  13. Transport and reaction processes affecting the attenuation of landfill gas in cover soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    to exopolymeric substance production, may result in reduced methane attenuation due to limited O2-ingress. Copyright © 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.......Methane and trace organic gases produced in landfill waste are partly oxidized in the top 40 cm of landfill cover soils under aerobic conditions. The balance between the oxidation of landfill gases and the ingress of atmospheric oxygen into the soil cover determines the attenuation of emissions...... of methane, chlorofluorocarbons, and hydrochlorofluorocarbons to the atmosphere. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of oxidation reactions on the overall gas transport regime and to evaluate, the contributions of various gas transport processes on methane attenuation in landfill cover soils...

  14. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  15. Proteins affecting thylakoid morphology - the key to understanding vesicle transport in chloroplasts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Emelie; Aronsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that a Rab protein, CPRabA5e (CP = chloroplast localized), is located in chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana where it is involved in various processes, such as thylakoid biogenesis and vesicle transport. Using a yeast two-hybrid method, CPRabA5e was shown to interact with a number of chloroplast proteins, including the CURVATURE THYLAKOID 1A (CURT1A) protein and the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein (LHCB1.5). CURT1A has recently been shown to modify thylakoid architecture by inducing membrane curvature in grana, whereas LHCB1.5 is a protein of PSII (Photosystem II) facilitating light capture. LHCB1.5 is imported to chloroplasts and transported to thylakoid membranes using the post-translational Signal Recognition Particle (SRP) pathway. With this information as starting point, we here discuss their subsequent protein-protein interactions, given by the literature and Interactome 3D. CURT1A itself and several of the proteins interacting with CURT1A and LHCB1.5 have relations to vesicle transport and thylakoid morphology, which are also characteristics of cprabA5e mutants. This highlights the previous hypothesis of an alternative thylakoid targeting pathway for LHC proteins using vesicles, in addition to the SRP pathway.

  16. Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Electrode Microstructures: Making Sense of the Internal Framework Affecting Gas Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Jeffrey

    Optimal electrodes for solid-oxide fuel cells will combine high porosity for gas diffusion, high phase connectivity for ion and electron conduction, and high surface area for chemical and electrochemical reactions. Tracer-diffusion simulations are used to gain a better understanding of the interplay between microstructure and transport in porous materials. Results indicate that the coefficient of diffusion through a porous medium is a function of the details of the internal geometry (microscopic) and porosity (macroscopic). I report that current solid-oxide fuel cell electrodes produced from high-temperature sintering of ceramic powders severely hinder gas transport because the resulting structures are highly tortuous, complex three-dimensional networks. In addition, poor phase connectivities will assuredly limit ion and electron transport, as well as the density of active sites for power-producing reactions. With new access to a wide range of technologies, micro- and nano-fabrication capabilities, and high-performance materials, there is a new ability to engineer the fuel cell electrode architecture, optimizing the physical processes within, increasing performance, and greatly reducing cost per kilowatt. Even simple packed-sphere and inverse-opal architectures will increase gas diffusion by an order of magnitude, and provide a higher level of connectivity than traditional powder-based structures.

  17. Transcription of hexose transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is affected by change in oxygen provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Laura

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene family of hexose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of 20 members; 18 genes encoding transporters (HXT1-HXT17, GAL2 and two genes encoding sensors (SNF3, RGT2. The effect of oxygen provision on the expression of these genes was studied in glucose-limited chemostat cultivations (D = 0.10 h-1, pH 5, 30°C. Transcript levels were measured from cells grown in five steady state oxygen levels (0, 0.5, 1, 2.8 and 20.9% O2, and from cells under conditions in which oxygen was introduced to anaerobic cultures or removed from cultures receiving oxygen. Results The expression pattern of the HXT gene family was distinct in cells grown under aerobic, hypoxic and anaerobic conditions. The transcription of HXT2, HXT4 and HXT5 was low when the oxygen concentration in the cultures was low, both under steady state and non-steady state conditions, whereas the expression of HXT6, HXT13 and HXT15/16 was higher in hypoxic than in fully aerobic or anaerobic conditions. None of the HXT genes showed higher transcript levels in strictly anaerobic conditions. Expression of HXT9, HXT14 and GAL2 was not detected under the culture conditions studied. Conclusion When oxygen becomes limiting in a glucose-limited chemostat cultivation, the glucose uptake rate per cell increases. However, the expression of none of the hexose transporter encoding genes was increased in anaerobic conditions. It thus seems that the decrease in the moderately low affinity uptake and consequently the relative increase of high affinity uptake may itself allow the higher specific glucose consumption rate to occur in anaerobic compared to aerobic conditions.

  18. From producer to consumer: greenhouse tomato quality as affected by variety, maturity stage at harvest, transport conditions, and supermarket storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, Michèl J; Slimestad, Rune; Tjøstheim, Irene Holta

    2015-05-27

    Possible causes for differences in quality traits at the time of buying were studied in two widely different red tomato types. Three maturity stages were harvested from commercial greenhouses and transferred immediately to controlled environments simulating different storage, transport, and supermarket conditions. Results show significant differences in development of color, fruit firmness, contents of soluble solids (SSC), titratable acids (TTA), phenolics, and carotenoids from harvest to sale, as related to postharvest conditions. Fruit firmness, SSC, and TTA of vine-ripened red cherry tomatoes was 30, 55 and 11% higher than for those harvested at breakers and ripened to red. Temperature, light, UVC radiation, or ethylene during 4 days transport affected tomato quality traits, and differences persisted during 3 weeks of supermarket storage. Ethylene exposure gave a 3.7-fold increase in lycopene content in cherry tomatoes, whereas UVC hormesis revealed a 6-fold increase compared with the control. Results can be used to update recommendations concerning optimal handling.

  19. Simulation of runaway electrons, transport affected by J-TEXT resonant magnetic perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Sun, X. F.; Xu, T.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The topology of a magnetic field and transport properties of runaway electrons can be changed by a resonant magnetic perturbation field. The J-TEXT magnetic topology can be effectively altered via static resonant magnetic perturbation (SRMP) and dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP). This paper studies the effect of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the confinement of runaway electrons via simulating their drift orbits in the magnetic perturbation field and calculating the orbit losses for different runaway initial energies and different runaway electrons, initial locations. The model adopted is based on Hamiltonian guiding center equations for runaway electrons, and the J-TEXT magnetic turbulences and RMP are taken into account. The simulation indicates that the loss rate of runaway electrons is sensitive to the radial position of electrons. The loss of energetic runaway beam is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region. Outside the shrinkage region of the runaway electrons are lost rapidly. Inside the shrinkage region the runaway beam is confined very well and is less sensitive to the magnetic perturbation. The experimental result on the response of runaway transport to the application RMP indicates that the loss of runaway electrons is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region, other than the external magnetic perturbation.

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza affects nickel translocation and expression of ABC transporter and metallothionein genes in Festuca arundinacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Leila; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Mostafavi pour, Sodabeh

    2016-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are key microorganisms for enhancing phytoremediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study, the effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Funneliformis mosseae (=Glomus mosseae) on physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the nickel (Ni) tolerance of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea = Schedonorus arundinaceus) were investigated. Nickel addition had a pronounced negative effect on tall fescue growth and photosynthetic pigment contents, as well as on AMF colonization. Phosphorus content increased markedly in mycorrhizal plants (M) compared to non-inoculated (NM) ones. However, no significant difference was observed in root carbohydrate content between AMF-inoculated and non-inoculated plants. For both M and NM plants, Ni concentrations in shoots and roots increased according to the addition of the metal into soil, but inoculation with F. mosseae led to significantly lower Ni translocation from roots to the aboveground parts compared to non-inoculated plants. ABC transporter and metallothionein transcripts accumulated to considerably higher levels in tall fescue plants colonized by F. mosseae than in the corresponding non-mycorrhizal plants. These results highlight the importance of mycorrhizal colonization in alleviating Ni-induced stress by reducing Ni transport from roots to shoots of tall fescue plants.

  1. Structure and function of subsurface microbial communities affecting radionuclide transport and bioimmobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostka, Joel E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Prakash, Om [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Green, Stefan J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Akob, Denise [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Chin, Kuk-Jeong [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Sheth, Mili [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Keller, Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Venkateswaran, Amudhan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Elkins, James G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Stucki, Joseph W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Our objectives were to: 1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), 2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and 3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations. Field sampling was conducted at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The ORFRC subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. In short, we effectively addressed all 3 stated objectives of the project. In particular, we isolated and characterized a large number of novel anaerobes with a high bioremediation potential that can be used as model organisms, and we are now able to quantify the function of subsurface sedimentary microbial communities in situ using state-of-the-art gene expression methods (molecular proxies).

  2. Colonic epithelial ion transport is not affected in patients with diverticulosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilotta Maria C

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colonic diverticular disease is a bothersome condition with an unresolved pathogenesis. It is unknown whether a neuroepithelial dysfunction is present. The aim of the study was two-fold; (1 to investigate colonic epithelial ion transport in patients with diverticulosis and (2 to adapt a miniaturized Modified Ussing Air-Suction (MUAS chamber for colonic endoscopic biopsies. Methods Biopsies were obtained from the sigmoid part of the colon. 86 patients were included. All patients were referred for colonoscopy on suspicion of neoplasia and they were without pathological findings at colonoscopy (controls except for diverticulosis in 22 (D-patients. Biopsies were mounted in MUAS chambers with an exposed area of 5 mm2. Electrical responses to various stimulators and inhibitors of ion transport were investigated together with histological examination. The MUAS chamber was easy to use and reproducible data were obtained. Results Median basal short circuit current (SCC was 43.8 μA·cm-2 (0.8 – 199 for controls and 59.3 μA·cm-2 (3.0 – 177.2 for D-patients. Slope conductance was 77.0 mS·cm-2 (18.6 – 204.0 equal to 13 Ω·cm2 for controls and 96.6 mS·cm-2 (8.4 – 191.4 equal to 10.3 Ω·cm2 for D-patients. Stimulation with serotonin, theophylline, forskolin and carbachol induced increases in SCC in a range of 4.9 – 18.6 μA·cm-2, while inhibition with indomethacin, bumetanide, ouabain and amiloride decreased SCC in a range of 6.5 – 27.4 μA·cm-2, and all with no significant differences between controls and D-patients. Histological examinations showed intact epithelium and lamina propria before and after mounting for both types of patients. Conclusion We conclude that epithelial ion transport is not significantly altered in patients with diverticulosis and that the MUAS chamber can be adapted for studies of human colonic endoscopic biopsies.

  3. Initial Sediment Transport Model of the Mining-Affected Aries River Basin, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.; Linard, Joshua I.

    2008-01-01

    The Romanian government is interested in understanding the effects of existing and future mining activities on long-term dispersal, storage, and remobilization of sediment-associated metals. An initial Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was prepared using available data to evaluate hypothetical failure of the Valea Sesei tailings dam at the Rosia Poieni mine in the Aries River basin. Using the available data, the initial Aries River Basin SWAT model could not be manually calibrated to accurately reproduce monthly streamflow values observed at the Turda gage station. The poor simulation of the monthly streamflow is attributed to spatially limited soil and precipitation data, limited constraint information due to spatially and temporally limited streamflow measurements, and in ability to obtain optimal parameter values when using a manual calibration process. Suggestions to improve the Aries River basin sediment transport model include accounting for heterogeneity in model input, a two-tier nonlinear calibration strategy, and analysis of uncertainty in predictions.

  4. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-10-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring.

  5. Long-term transport behavior of psychoactive compounds in sewage-affected groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nham, Hang Thuy Thi; Greskowiak, Janek; Hamann, Enrico; Meffe, Raffaella; Hass, Ulrike; Massmann, Gudrun

    2016-11-01

    The present study provides a model-based characterization of the long-term transport behavior of five psychoactive compounds (meprobamate, pyrithyldione, primidone, phenobarbital and phenylethylmalonamide) introduced into groundwater via sewage irrigation in Berlin, Germany. Compounds are still present in the groundwater despite the sewage farm closure in the year 1980. Due to the limited information on (i) compound concentrations in the source water and (ii) substance properties, a total of 180 cross-sectional model realizations for each compound were carried out, covering a large range of possible parameter combinations. Results were compared with the present-day contamination patterns in the aquifer and the most likely scenarios were identified based on a number of model performance criteria. The simulation results show that (i) compounds are highly persistent under the present field conditions, and (ii) sorption is insignificant. Thus, back-diffusion from low permeability zones appears as the main reason for the compound retardation.

  6. Physical factors affecting the transport and fate of colloids in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Yates, Scott R.; Bettahar, Mehdi; Simunek, Jirka

    2002-12-01

    Saturated soil column experiments were conducted to explore the influence of colloid size and soil grain size distribution characteristics on the transport and fate of colloid particles in saturated porous media. Stable monodispersed colloids and porous media that are negatively charged were employed in these studies. Effluent colloid concentration curves and the final spatial distribution of retained colloids by the porous media were found to be highly dependent on the colloid size and soil grain size distribution. Relative peak effluent concentrations decreased and surface mass removal by the soil increased when the colloid size increased and the soil median grain size decreased. These observations were attributed to increased straining of the colloids; i.e., blocked pores act as dead ends for the colloids. When the colloid size is small relative to the soil pore sizes, straining becomes a less significant mechanism of colloid removal and attachment becomes more important. Mathematical modeling of the colloid transport experiments using traditional colloid attachment theory was conducted to highlight differences in colloid attachment and straining behavior and to identify parameter ranges that are applicable for attachment models. Simulated colloid effluent curves using fitted first-order attachment and detachment parameters were able to describe much of the effluent concentration data. The model was, however, less adequate at describing systems which exhibited a gradual approach to the peak effluent concentration and the spatial distribution of colloids when significant mass was retained in the soil. Current colloid filtration theory did not adequately predict the fitted first-order attachment coefficients, presumably due to straining in these systems.

  7. Different Sorption Approaches and Leachate Fluxes Affecting on Mn2+ Transport through Lateritic Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srilert Chotpantarat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Contamination of the underlying aquifer beneath a mining area is usually of great concern even when a prevention plan has been implemented. Approach: To assess the potential risk of heavy metal contamination, the simulation of heavy metal transport was carried out with different leachate fluxes and sorption parameters derived from equilibrium models with linear and Langmuir isotherms and chemical non-equilibrium two-site model. The HYDRUS-2D numerical model was applied to simulate the transport of Mn2+ under single- and multi-metal systems with two variable leachate fluxes (0.002 and 0.0026 m day−1 through the lateritic aquifer, approximately 5 km down gradient of the tailing pond. The model assumed that the compacted clay layer of the Tailing Storage Facility (TSF had been cracked and led to contamination of the shallow ground water. Results: The simulation showed that the time required to reach the Thailand drinking water standard at a specific location of Mn2+ for multi-metal system were faster than those for single metal systems, although different models were applied. The Mn2+ concentration fronts derived from simulation with chemical non-equilibrium two-site model came earlier than those of both equilibrium models under single and multi-metal systems. In addition, with a 30% increase in the leachate flux, from 0.002- 0.0026 m/day, the time required to reach the drinking water standard at the nearest well, 1 km downgradient from the source (well 1 decreased. It took about 57 and 106 years (a 17 and 19% decrease, respectively for Mn2+ under multi- and single-metal systems, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusions, sorption parameters and leachate fluxes should be carefully determined and these predictive patterns used as a management tool for planning water well installations under field conditions.

  8. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. The intracellular transport of aminopeptidase N and sucrase-isomaltase occurs at different rates pre-Golgi but at the same rate post-Golgi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Cowell, G M

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of processing and microvillar expression of aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) and sucrose alpha-D-glucohydrolase-oligo-1,6-glucosidase (sucrase-isomaltase, EC 3.2.1.48 and EC 3.2.1.10) were compared by labelling of pig small intestinal mucosal explants with [35S]methionine. The conversi...... from transient (high mannose glycosylated) to mature (complex glycosylated) form was 1.7-times slower for sucrase-isomaltase than for aminopeptidase N, indicating a slower rate of migration from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex. Likewise, sucrase-isomaltase appeared...... in the microvillar fraction at a slower rate than aminopeptidase N. The relative pool sizes of mature and transient forms of both enzymes in intracellular membranes (Mg2+-precipitated fraction) were determined to obtain information on the relative time, spent pre- and post-Golgi, respectively, prior to microvillar...... expression. This ratio was 0.24 +/- 0.06 (mean +/- SD) for sucrase-isomaltase as compared to 0.40 +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SD) for aminopeptidase N. Considering the slower rate of pre-Golgi transport for sucrase-isomaltase, this indicates that the two microvillar enzymes have rather similar if not identical rates...

  9. Desiccation of sediments affects assimilate transport within aquatic plants and carbon transfer to microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rein, I; Kayler, Z E; Premke, K; Gessler, A

    2016-11-01

    With the projected increase in drought duration and intensity in future, small water bodies, and especially the terrestrial-aquatic interfaces, will be subjected to longer dry periods with desiccation of the sediment. Drought effects on the plant-sediment microorganism carbon continuum may disrupt the tight linkage between plants and microbes which governs sediment carbon and nutrient cycling, thus having a potential negative impact on carbon sequestration of small freshwater ecosystems. However, research on drought effects on the plant-sediment carbon transfer in aquatic ecosystems is scarce. We therefore exposed two emergent aquatic macrophytes, Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia, to a month-long summer drought in a mesocosm experiment. We followed the fate of carbon from leaves to sediment microbial communities with (13) CO2 pulse labelling and microbial phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. We found that drought reduced the total amount of carbon allocated to stem tissues but did not delay the transport. We also observed an increase in accumulation of (13) C-labelled sugars in roots and found a reduced incorporation of (13) C into the PLFAs of sediment microorganisms. Drought induced a switch in plant carbon allocation priorities, where stems received less new assimilates leading to reduced starch reserves whilst roots were prioritised with new assimilates, suggesting their use for osmoregulation. There were indications that the reduced carbon transfer from roots to microorganisms was due to the reduction of microbial activity via direct drought effects rather than to a decrease in root exudation or exudate availability.

  10. ABC transporter and metallothionein expression affected by NI and Epichloe endophyte infection in tall fescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahossini, Zahra; Shabani, Leila; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Sharifi-Tehrani, Majid

    2015-10-01

    Epichloe endophytes are symbiotic fungi which unlike mycorrhiza grow within aerial parts of host plants. The fungi may increase host tolerance to both biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, the effect of endophyte infection on growth and tolerance, carbohydrate contents and ABC (ABC transporter) and MET (metallothionein) expression in the leaves of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) plants cultivated in Ni polluted soil were evaluated. The endophyte infected (E+) and non-infected (E-) fescue plants were cultivated in soil under different Ni concentrations (30, 90 and 180mgkg(-1)). Growth parameters including root, shoot, total biomass, tiller number and total chlorophyll content of plants and H2O2 content of shoots were measured at the end of experiment. Ni translocation to the shoots, carbohydrate contents in roots and expression of ABC and MET of the leaves were also measured after 10 weeks of growth. Results demonstrated the beneficial effect of endophyte association on growth and Ni tolerance of tall fescue under Ni stress through an avoidance mechanism (reduction of Ni accumulation and translocation to the shoots). Endophyte infected plants showed less ABC and MET expression compared to the endophyte free plants. In endophyte free plants, H2O2 production had a significant positive correlation with genes expression, indicating that an increase in H2O2 might be involved in the up-regulation of ABC and MET under Ni stress.

  11. The sucrose transporter SlSUT2 from tomato interacts with brassinosteroid functioning and affects arbuscular mycorrhiza formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterlich, Michael; Krügel, Undine; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Franken, Philipp; Kühn, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Mycorrhizal plants benefit from the fungal partners by getting better access to soil nutrients. In exchange, the plant supplies carbohydrates to the fungus. The additional carbohydrate demand in mycorrhizal plants was shown to be balanced partially by higher CO2 assimilation and increased C metabolism in shoots and roots. In order to test the role of sucrose transport for fungal development in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) tomato, transgenic plants with down-regulated expression of three sucrose transporter genes were analysed. Plants that carried an antisense construct of SlSUT2 (SlSUT2as) repeatedly exhibited increased mycorrhizal colonization and the positive effect of plants to mycorrhiza was abolished. Grafting experiments between transgenic and wild-type rootstocks and scions indicated that mainly the root-specific function of SlSUT2 has an impact on colonization of tomato roots with the AM fungus. Localization of SISUT2 to the periarbuscular membrane indicates a role in back transport of sucrose from the periarbuscular matrix into the plant cell thereby affecting hyphal development. Screening of an expression library for SlSUT2-interacting proteins revealed interactions with candidates involved in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling or biosynthesis. Interaction of these candidates with SlSUT2 was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Tomato mutants defective in BR biosynthesis were analysed with respect to mycorrhizal symbiosis and showed indeed decreased mycorrhization. This finding suggests that BRs affect mycorrhizal infection and colonization. If the inhibitory effect of SlSUT2 on mycorrhizal growth involves components of BR synthesis and of the BR signaling pathway is discussed.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Major Factors Affecting Black Carbon Transport and Concentrations in the Unique Atmospheric Structures of Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Marissa Shuang

    Black carbon (BC) from vehicular emission in transportation is a principal component of particulate matters ≤ 2.5 mum (PM2.5). PM2.5 and other diesel emission pollutants (e.g., NOx) are regulated by the Clean Air Act (CAA) according to the National Ambient Air Quality standards (NAAQS). This doctoral dissertation details a study on transport behaviors of black carbon and PM2.5 from transportation routes, their relations with the atmospheric structure of an urban formation, and their relations with the use of biodiesel fuels. The results have implications to near-road risk assessment and to the development of sustainable transportation solutions in urban centers. The first part of study quantified near-roadside black carbon transport as a function of particulate matter (PM) size and composition, as well as microclimatic variables (temperature and wind fields) at the interstate highway I-75 in northern Cincinnati, Ohio. Among variables examined, wind speed and direction significantly affect the roadside transport of black carbon and hence its effective emission factor. Observed non-Gaussian dispersion occurred during low wind and for wind directions at acute angles or upwind to the receptors, mostly occurring in the morning hours. Meandering of air pollutant mass under thermal inversion is likely the driving force. In contrary, Gaussian distribution predominated in daytime of strong downwinds. The roles of urban atmospheric structure, wind fields, and the urban heat island (UHI) effects were further examined on pollutant dispersion and transport. Spatiotemporal variations of traffic flow, atmospheric structure, ambient temperature and PM2.5 concentration data from 14 EPA-certified NAAQS monitoring stations, were analyzed in relation to land-use in the Cincinnati metropolitan area. The results show a decade-long UHI effects with higher interior temperature than that in exurban, and a prominent nocturnal thermal inversion frequent in urban boundary layer. The

  13. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which

  14. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which

  15. Maternal separation affects dopamine transporter function in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat: An in vivo electrochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Womersley Jacqueline S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a developmental disorder characterised by symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR is a well-characterised model of this disorder and has been shown to exhibit dopamine dysregulation, one of the hypothesised causes of ADHD. Since stress experienced in the early stages of life can have long-lasting effects on behaviour, it was considered that early life stress may alter development of the dopaminergic system and thereby contribute to the behavioural characteristics of SHR. It was hypothesized that maternal separation would alter dopamine regulation by the transporter (DAT in ways that distinguish SHR from control rat strains. Methods SHR and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rats were subjected to maternal separation for 3 hours per day from postnatal day 2 to 14. Rats were tested for separation-induced anxiety-like behaviour followed by in vivo chronoamperometry to determine whether changes had occurred in striatal clearance of dopamine by DAT. The rate of disappearance of ejected dopamine was used as a measure of DAT function. Results Consistent with a model for ADHD, SHR were more active than WKY in the open field. SHR entered the inner zone more frequently and covered a significantly greater distance than WKY. Maternal separation increased the time that WKY spent in the closed arms and latency to enter the open arms of the elevated plus maze, consistent with other rat strains. Of note is that, maternal separation failed to produce anxiety-like behaviour in SHR. Analysis of the chronoamperometric data revealed that there was no difference in DAT function in the striatum of non-separated SHR and WKY. Maternal separation decreased the rate of dopamine clearance (k-1 in SHR striatum. Consistent with this observation, the dopamine clearance time (T100 was increased in SHR. These results suggest that the chronic mild stress of

  16. Groundwater contributions to metal transport in a small river affected by mining and smelting waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coynel, Alexandra; Schäfer, Jörg; Dabrin, Aymeric; Girardot, Naïg; Blanc, Gérard

    2007-08-01

    The Riou Mort watershed, strongly affected by former coal mining and Zn ore treatment, has been the major source of the historical polymetallic pollution of the Lot-Garonne-Gironde fluvial-estuarine system. Two decades after the end of ore treatment, the former industrial area still contributes important amounts of metals/metalloids from various, partly unidentified, sources to the downstream river system. This study presents the high spatial variability of metal/metalloid (Cd, Zn, As, Sb, U, V) concentrations in water and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from eight observation sites during a short, intense flood event. Despite important dilution effects, the observed concentration levels at the different sites suggested additional Cd and Zn inputs, probably from polluted groundwater. This formerly unknown metal source was then localized and characterized by sampling water and SPM along two longitudinal profiles during different hydrological situations. Groundwater inputs of "truly dissolved" (treatment of the polluted groundwater), that are expected to strongly reduce dissolved Cd and Zn emissions into the Riou Mort River.

  17. Fusarium Oxysporum Volatiles Enhance Plant Growth Via Affecting Auxin Transport and Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitas, Vasileios; McCartney, Nathaniel; Li, Ningxiao; Demers, Jill; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hye-Seon; Brown, Kathleen M; Kang, Seogchan

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption.

  18. Fusarium oxysporum volatiles enhance plant growth via affecting auxin transport and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios eBitas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption.

  19. Copper Toxicity Affects Photosystem II Electron Transport at the Secondary Quinone Acceptor, QB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Narendranath; Vass, Imre; Demeter, Sándor

    1989-01-01

    The nature of Cu2+ inhibition of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in pea (Pisum sativum L.) thylakoids was investigated monitoring Hill activity and light emission properties of photosystem II. In Cu2+-inhibited thylakoids, diphenyl carbazide addition does not relieve the loss of Hill activity. The maximum yield of fluorescence induction restored by hydroxylamine in Tris-inactivated thylakoids is markedly reduced by Cu2+. This suggests that Cu2+ does not act on the donor side of PSII but on the reaction center of PSII or on components beyond. Thermoluminescence and delayed luminescence studies show that charge recombination between the positively charged intermediate in water oxidation cycle (S2) and negatively charged primary quinone acceptor of pSII (QA−) is largely unaffected by Cu2+. The S2QB− charge recombination, however, is drastically inhibited which parallels the loss of Hill activity. This indicates that Cu2+ inhibits photosystem II photochemistry primarily affecting the function of the secondary quinone electron acceptor, QB. We suggest that Cu2+ does not block electron flow between the primary and secondary quinone acceptor but modifies the QB site in such a way that it becomes unsuitable for further photosystem II photochemistry. PMID:16666731

  20. Retrieving the intracellular topology from multi-scale protein mobility mapping in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Michael; Erdel, Fabian; Wachsmuth, Malte; Rippe, Karsten

    2014-07-24

    In living cells, most proteins diffuse over distances of micrometres within seconds. Protein translocation is constrained due to the cellular organization into subcompartments that impose diffusion barriers and guide enzymatic activities to their targets. Here, we introduce an approach to retrieve structural features from the scale-dependent mobility of green fluorescent protein monomer and multimers in human cells. We measure protein transport simultaneously between hundreds of positions by multi-scale fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy using a line-illuminating confocal microscope. From these data we derive a quantitative model of the intracellular architecture that resembles a random obstacle network for diffusing proteins. This topology partitions the cellular content and increases the dwell time of proteins in their local environment. The accessibility of obstacle surfaces depends on protein size. Our method links multi-scale mobility measurements with a quantitative description of intracellular structure that can be applied to evaluate how drug-induced perturbations affect protein transport and interactions.

  1. Groundwater contributions to metal transport in a small river affected by mining and smelting waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coynel, A.; Schafer, J.; Dabrin, A.; Girardot, N.; Blanc, G. [University of Bordeaux, Talence (France)

    2007-08-15

    The Riou Mort watershed, strongly affected by former coal mining and ZEE ore treatment, has been the major source of the historical polymetallic pollution of the Lot-Garonne-Gironde fluvial-estuarine system. Two decades after the end of ore treatment, the former industrial area still contributes important amounts of metals/metalloids from various, partly unidentified, sources to the downstream river system. This study presents the high spatial variability of metal/metalloid (Cd, Zn, As, Sb, U, V) concentrations in water and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from eight observation sites during a short, intense flood event. Despite important dilution effects, the observed concentration levels at the different sites suggested additional Cd and Zn inputs, probably from polluted groundwater. This formerly unknown metal source was then localized and characterized by sampling water and SPM along two longitudinal profiles during different hydrological situations. Groundwater inputs of 'truly dissolved' (<0.02pm) Cd and Zn occurred along -200m, contributing 43% and 28% to the total annual (2004) Cd and Zn fluxes in the Riou Mort River. The estimated groundwater concentrations of Cd and Zn (2500-6700 and 83,000-170,000 mu g1{sup -1}, respectively) in the source zone were consistent with values measured in samples from the near aquifer (5400-13,000 and 200,000-400,000 mu g1{sup -1}). The present work induced concrete remediation actions (pumping and treatment of the polluted groundwater), that are expected to strongly reduce dissolved Cd and Zn emissions into the Riou Mort River.

  2. Intracellular drug release nanosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghua Meng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to elicit therapeutic effects, many drugs including small molecule anticancer drugs, proteins, siRNA, and DNA have to be delivered and released into the specific cellular compartments typically the cytoplasm or nucleus of target cells. Intracellular environment-responsive nanosystems that exhibit good extracellular stability while rapidly releasing drugs inside cancer cells have been actively pursued for effective cancer therapy. Here, we highlight novel designs of smart nanosystems that release drugs in response to an intracellular biological signal of cancer cells such as acidic pH in endo/lysosomal compartments, enzymes in lysosomes, and redox potential in cytoplasm and the cell nucleus.

  3. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and intracellular traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Cecilia; Bakke, Oddmund; Progida, Cinzia

    2012-12-01

    Mutations of genes whose primary function is the regulation of membrane traffic are increasingly being identified as the underlying causes of various important human disorders. Intriguingly, mutations in ubiquitously expressed membrane traffic genes often lead to cell type- or organ-specific disorders. This is particularly true for neuronal diseases, identifying the nervous system as the most sensitive tissue to alterations of membrane traffic. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is one of the most common inherited peripheral neuropathies. It is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), which comprises a group of disorders specifically affecting peripheral nerves. This peripheral neuropathy, highly heterogeneous both clinically and genetically, is characterized by a slowly progressive degeneration of the muscle of the foot, lower leg, hand and forearm, accompanied by sensory loss in the toes, fingers and limbs. More than 30 genes have been identified as targets of mutations that cause CMT neuropathy. A number of these genes encode proteins directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of intracellular traffic. Indeed, the list of genes linked to CMT disease includes genes important for vesicle formation, phosphoinositide metabolism, lysosomal degradation, mitochondrial fission and fusion, and also genes encoding endosomal and cytoskeletal proteins. This review focuses on the link between intracellular transport and CMT disease, highlighting the molecular mechanisms that underlie the different forms of this peripheral neuropathy and discussing the pathophysiological impact of membrane transport genetic defects as well as possible future ways to counteract these defects.

  4. Zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 intraflagellar transport mutants disrupt cilia but do not affect hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Shannon C; Haynes, Tony; Perkins, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Cilia formation requires intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. Recent studies indicate that mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling requires cilia. It is unclear, however, if the requirement for cilia and IFT proteins in Hh signaling represents a general rule for all vertebrates. Here we examine zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 mutants and morphants for defects in Hh signaling. Although ift57 and ift88 mutants and morphants contained residual maternal protein, the cilia were disrupted. In contrast to previous genetic studies in mouse, mutations in zebrafish IFT genes did not affect the expression of Hh target genes in the neural tube and forebrain and had no quantitative effect on Hh target gene expression. Zebrafish IFT mutants also exhibited no dramatic changes in the craniofacial skeleton, somite formation, or motor neuron patterning. Thus, our data indicate the requirement for cilia in the Hh signal transduction pathway may not represent a universal mechanism in vertebrates.

  5. Implications for Ecosystem Services of Watershed Processes that affect the Transport and Transformations of Mercury in an Adirondack Stream Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, D. A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Bradley, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a potent neurotoxin that can affect the health of humans and wildlife through the ingestion of methyl Hg. Mercury contamination of ecosystems originates from human activities such as mining, coal burning and other industrial emissions, and the use of Hg-containing products. Natural sources such as volcanic and geothermal emissions and the weathering of Hg-bearing minerals also contribute to Hg contamination, but are believed to be minor sources in most ecosystems. Various ecosystem disturbances including fires, forest harvesting, and the submergence of land by impoundment may also contribute to Hg ecosystem contamination by mobilizing stores that have previously originated from the sources described above. Mercury from a mix of regional and global emissions sources is transported in the atmosphere to remote landscapes that are distant from local emissions sources. The Adirondacks of New York State is a forested, mountainous region characterized by abundant lakes and streams, and is distant from local emissions sources. Recreational fishing, wildlife viewing, hiking, and hunting are valued ecosystem services in this region. Here, we report on the relevance to ecosystem services of findings based on five years of Hg data collection of stream water, groundwater, invertebrates, and fish in the upper Hudson River basin in the central part of the Adirondack region. The New York State Dept. of Health has issued fish consumption advisories for the entire Adirondacks based on elevated levels previously measured in lakes and rivers of this region. Our work seeks improved understanding and models of the landscape sources and watershed processes that control the transformation of Hg to its methyl form (MeHg), the transport of MeHg to streams, and bioaccumulation of MeHg in aquatic food webs. Mean annual atmospheric Hg deposition was 6.3 μg/m2/yr during 2007-09, compared to mean annual filtered total Hg stream yields of 1.66 μg/m2/yr and filtered MeHg stream

  6. Serotonin transporter 5HTTLPR polymorphism and affective disorders: no evidence of association in a large European multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendlewicz, Julien; Massat, Isabelle; Souery, Daniel; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Oruc, Lilijana; Nöthen, Markus M; Blackwood, Douglas; Muir, Walter; Battersby, Sharon; Lerer, Beny; Segman, Ronen H; Kaneva, Radka; Serretti, Alessandro; Lilli, Roberta; Lorenzi, Christian; Jakovljevic, Miro; Ivezic, Sladana; Rietschel, Marcella; Milanova, Vihra; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2004-05-01

    The available data from preclinical and pharmacological studies on the role of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) support the hypothesis that a dysfunction in brain serotonergic system activity contributes to the vulnerability to affective disorders (AD). 5-HTT is the major site of serotonin reuptake into the presynaptic neuron, and it has been shown that the polymorphic repeat polymorphism in the 5-HTT promotor region (5-HTTLPR) may affect gene-transcription activity. 5-HTT maps to chromosome 17 at position 17q11.17-q12, and the 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms have been extensively investigated in AD with conflicting results. The present study tested the genetic contribution of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in a large European multicenter case-control sample, including 539 unipolar (UPAD), 572 bipolar patients (BPAD), and 821 controls (C). Our European collaboration has led to efforts to optimize a methodology that attenuates some of the major limitations of the case-control association approach. No association was found with primary psychiatric diagnosis (UPAD and BPAD) and with phenotypic traits (family history of AD, suicidal attempt, and presence of psychotic features). Our negative findings are not attributable to the lack of statistical power, and may contribute to clarify the role of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in AD.

  7. Observations of mesoscale and boundary-layer scale circulations affecting dust transport and uplift over the Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Marsham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the Saharan boundary layer, made during the GERBILS field campaign, show that mesoscale land surface temperature variations (which were related to albedo variations induced mesoscale circulations. With weak winds along the aircraft track, land surface temperature anomalies with scales of greater than 10 km are shown to significantly affect boundary-layer temperatures and winds. Such anomalies are expected to affect the vertical mixing of the dusty and weakly stratified Saharan Residual Layer (SRL. Mesoscale variations in winds are also shown to affect dust loadings in the boundary layer.

    Using the aircraft observations and data from the COSMO model, a region of local dust uplift, with strong along-track winds, was identified in one low-level flight. Large eddy model (LEM simulations based on this location showed linearly organised boundary-layer convection. Calculating dust uplift rates from the LEM wind field showed that the boundary-layer convection increased uplift by approximately 30%, compared with the uplift rate calculated neglecting the convection. The modelled effects of boundary-layer convection on uplift are shown to be larger when the boundary-layer wind is decreased, and most significant when the mean wind is below the threshold for dust uplift and the boundary-layer convection leads to uplift which would not otherwise occur.

    Both the coupling of albedo features to the atmosphere on the mesoscale, and the enhancement of dust uplift by boundary-layer convection are unrepresented in many climate models, but may have significant impacts on the vertical transport and uplift of desert dust. Mesoscale effects in particular tend to be difficult to parametrise.

  8. Intracellular pH regulation in unstimulated Calliphora salivary glands is Na+ dependent and requires V-ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewe, Bettina; Blenau, Wolfgang; Walz, Bernd

    2012-04-15

    Salivary gland cells of the blowfly Calliphora vicina have a vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) that lies in their apical membrane and energizes the secretion of a KCl-rich primary saliva upon stimulation with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine). Whether and to what extent V-ATPase contributes to intracellular pH (pH(i)) regulation in unstimulated gland cells is unknown. We used the fluorescent dye BCECF to study intracellular pH(i) regulation microfluorometrically and show that: (1) under resting conditions, the application of Na(+)-free physiological saline induces an intracellular alkalinization attributable to the inhibition of the activity of a Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporter; (2) the maintenance of resting pH(i) is Na(+), Cl(-), concanamycin A and DIDS sensitive; (3) recovery from an intracellular acid load is Na(+) sensitive and requires V-ATPase activity; (4) the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter is not involved in pH(i) recovery after a NH(4)Cl prepulse; and (5) at least one Na(+)-dependent transporter and the V-ATPase maintain recovery from an intracellular acid load. Thus, under resting conditions, the V-ATPase and at least one Na(+)-dependent transporter maintain normal pH(i) values of pH 7.5. We have also detected the presence of a Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporter, which seems to act as an acid loader. Despite this not being a common pH(i)-regulating transporter, its activity affects steady-state pH(i) in C. vicina salivary gland cells.

  9. Environmental Conditions Influence Induction of Key ABC-Transporter Genes Affecting Glyphosate Resistance Mechanism in Conyza canadensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Eleni; Chachalis, Demosthenis; Travlos, Ilias S; Bilalis, Dimitrios

    2016-04-20

    Conyza canadensis has been reported to be the most frequent weed species that evolved resistance to glyphosate in various parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions (temperature and light) on the expression levels of the EPSPS gene and two major ABC-transporter genes (M10 and M11) on glyphosate susceptible (GS) and glyphosate resistant (GR) horseweed populations, collected from several regions across Greece. Real-time PCR was conducted to determine the expression level of the aforementioned genes when glyphosate was applied at normal (1×; 533 g·a.e.·ha(-1)) and high rates (4×, 8×), measured at an early one day after treatment (DAT) and a later stage (four DAT) of expression. Plants were exposed to light or dark conditions, at three temperature regimes (8, 25, 35 °C). GR plants were made sensitive when exposed to 8 °C with light; those sensitized plants behaved biochemically (shikimate accumulation) and molecularly (expression of EPSPS and ABC-genes) like the GS plants. Results from the current study show the direct link between the environmental conditions and the induction level of the above key genes that likely affect the efficiency of the proposed mechanism of glyphosate resistance.

  10. Environmental Conditions Influence Induction of Key ABC-Transporter Genes Affecting Glyphosate Resistance Mechanism in Conyza canadensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Tani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Conyza canadensis has been reported to be the most frequent weed species that evolved resistance to glyphosate in various parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions (temperature and light on the expression levels of the EPSPS gene and two major ABC-transporter genes (M10 and M11 on glyphosate susceptible (GS and glyphosate resistant (GR horseweed populations, collected from several regions across Greece. Real-time PCR was conducted to determine the expression level of the aforementioned genes when glyphosate was applied at normal (1×; 533 g·a.e.·ha−1 and high rates (4×, 8×, measured at an early one day after treatment (DAT and a later stage (four DAT of expression. Plants were exposed to light or dark conditions, at three temperature regimes (8, 25, 35 °C. GR plants were made sensitive when exposed to 8 °C with light; those sensitized plants behaved biochemically (shikimate accumulation and molecularly (expression of EPSPS and ABC-genes like the GS plants. Results from the current study show the direct link between the environmental conditions and the induction level of the above key genes that likely affect the efficiency of the proposed mechanism of glyphosate resistance.

  11. Internal affairs: investigating the Brucella intracellular lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Salcedo, Suzana P

    2012-05-01

    Bacteria of the genus Brucella are Gram-negative pathogens of several animal species that cause a zoonotic disease in humans known as brucellosis or Malta fever. Within their hosts, brucellae reside within different cell types where they establish a replicative niche and remain protected from the immune response. The aim of this article is to discuss recent advances in the field in the specific context of the Brucella intracellular 'lifestyle'. We initially discuss the different host cell targets and their relevance during infection. As it represents the key to intracellular replication, the focus is then set on the maturation of the Brucella phagosome, with particular emphasis on the Brucella factors that are directly implicated in intracellular trafficking and modulation of host cell signalling pathways. Recent data on the role of the type IV secretion system are discussed, novel effector molecules identified and how some of them impact on trafficking events. Current knowledge on Brucella gene regulation and control of host cell death are summarized, as they directly affect intracellular persistence. Understanding how Brucella molecules interplay with their host cell targets to modulate cellular functions and establish the intracellular niche will help unravel how this pathogen causes disease.

  12. Evolution of intracellular compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Yoan; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2013-01-15

    Cells compartmentalize their biochemical functions in a variety of ways, notably by creating physical barriers that separate a compartment via membranes or proteins. Eukaryotes have a wide diversity of membrane-based compartments, many that are lineage- or tissue-specific. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that membrane-based compartmentalization of the cytosolic space is observed in multiple prokaryotic lineages, giving rise to several types of distinct prokaryotic organelles. Endosymbionts, previously believed to be a hallmark of eukaryotes, have been described in several bacteria. Protein-based compartments, frequent in bacteria, are also found in eukaryotes. In the present review, we focus on selected intracellular compartments from each of these three categories, membrane-based, endosymbiotic and protein-based, in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We review their diversity and the current theories and controversies regarding the evolutionary origins. Furthermore, we discuss the evolutionary processes acting on the genetic basis of intracellular compartments and how those differ across the domains of life. We conclude that the distinction between eukaryotes and prokaryotes no longer lies in the existence of a compartmentalized cell plan, but rather in its complexity.

  13. How AGN and SN Feedback Affect Mass Transport and Black Hole Growth in High-redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés; Volonteri, Marta; Dubois, Yohan

    2017-02-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we study the effect of supernova (SN) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the mass transport (MT) of gas onto galactic nuclei and the black hole (BH) growth down to redshift z∼ 6. We study the BH growth in relation to the MT processes associated with gravity and pressure torques and how they are modified by feedback. Cosmological gas funneled through cold flows reaches the galactic outer region close to freefall. Then torques associated with pressure triggered by gas turbulent motions produced in the circumgalactic medium by shocks and explosions from SNe are the main source of MT beyond the central ∼100 pc. Due to high concentrations of mass in the central galactic region, gravitational torques tend to be more important at high redshift. The combined effect of almost freefalling material and both gravity and pressure torques produces a mass accretion rate of order ∼ 1 {M}ȯ yr‑1 at approximately parsec scales. In the absence of SN feedback, AGN feedback alone does not affect significantly either star formation or BH growth until the BH reaches a sufficiently high mass of ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ to self-regulate. SN feedback alone, instead, decreases both stellar and BH growth. Finally, SN and AGN feedback in tandem efficiently quench the BH growth, while star formation remains at the levels set by SN feedback alone, due to the small final BH mass, ∼few times {10}5 {M}ȯ . SNe create a more rarefied and hot environment where energy injection from the central AGN can accelerate the gas further.

  14. Mitophagy induced by nanoparticle-peptide conjugates enabling an alternative intracellular trafficking route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaolei; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Yanqing; Liu, Jinyin; Xing, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Jun; Xu, Guoqiang; Kang, Zhenhui; Liu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular behaviors of nanoparticles are fundamentally important for the evaluation of their biosafety and the designs of nano carrier-assisted drug delivery with high therapeutic efficacy. It is still in a great need to discover how functionalized nanoparticles are transported inside the cells, for instance, in a complicated fashion of translocation between different types of cell organelles. Here we report a new understanding of the interactions between nanoparticles and cells by the development of polyoxometalates nanoparticle-peptide conjugates and investigation of their intracellular trafficking behaviors. The as-prepared nanoparticles are featured with a unique combination of fluorescence and high contrast for synchrotron X-ray-based imaging. Functional surface modification with peptides facilitates effective delivery of the nanoparticles onto the target organelle (mitochondria) and subsequent intracellular trafficking in a dynamic mode. Interestingly, our experimental results have revealed that autophagy of mitochondria (mitophagy) can be induced by NP-peptide as a cellular response for recycling the damaged organelles, through molecular mediation associated with the change of mitochondrial membrane potential. The biological effects induced by NP-peptide reciprocally affect the distribution patterns and fates of nanoparticles in the cell metabolism by providing an alternative route of intracellular trafficking. The new understanding of the mutual activities between nanoparticles and cells will enrich our approaches in the development of nanobiotechnology and nano-medicine for disease treatments.

  15. Intracellular concentrations determine the cytotoxicity of adefovir, cidofovir and tenofovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Wang, Ruduan; Piotrowski, Mary; Zhang, Hui; Leach, Karen L

    2015-02-01

    Lack of in vitro to in vivo translation is a major challenge in safety prediction during early drug discovery.One of the most common in vitro assays to evaluate the probability of a compound to cause adverse effects is a cytotoxicity assay. Cytotoxicity of a compound is often measured by dose–response curves assuming the administered doses and intracellular exposures are equal at the time of measurement.However, this may not be true for compounds with low membrane permeability or those which are substrates for drug transporters as intracellular concentrations are determined both by passive permeability and active uptake through drug transporters. We show here that three antiviral drugs, adefovir, cidofovir and tenofovir exhibit significantly increased cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells transfected with organic anion transporter (OAT) 1 and 3 compared to a lack of cytotoxicity in HEK293 wildtype cells. A further look at the media and intracellular drug concentrations showed that 24 h after dosing, all three drugs had higher intracellular drug concentrations than that of media in the HEK-OAT1 cells whereas the intracellular drug concentrations in the wildtype cells were much lower than the administered doses. Comparing cytotoxicity IC(50) values of adefovir, cidofovir and tenofovir based on administered doses and measured intracellular concentrations in HEK-OAT1 cells revealed that intracellular drug concentrations have significant impact on calculated IC(50) values. Tenofovir showed much less intrinsic cytotoxicity than adefovir and cidofovir using intracellular concentrations rather than media concentration. Our data suggest that for low permeable drugs or drugs that are substrates for drug transporters, the choice of cellular model is critical for providing an accurate determination of cytotoxicity.

  16. Effect of serum proteins on polystyrene nanoparticle uptake and intracellular trafficking in endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Guaccio, Angela; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A., E-mail: nettipa@unina.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Health Care atCRIB (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    The physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs), such as small dimensions, surface charge and surface functionalization, control their capability to interact with cells and, in particular, with sub-cellular components. This interaction can be also influenced by the adsorption of molecules present in biological fluids, like blood, on NP surface. Here, we analysed the effect of serum proteins on 49 and 100 nm red fluorescent polystyrene NP uptake in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells, as a model for vascular transport. To this aim, NP uptake kinetic, endocytic pathway and intracellular trafficking were studied by monitoring NPs inside cells through confocal microscopy and multiple particle tracking (MPT). We demonstrated that NPs are rapidly internalized by cells in serum-free (SF) medium, according to a saturation kinetic. Conversely, in 10% foetal bovine serum-enriched (SE) medium, NP uptake rate results drastically reduced. Moreover, NP internalization depends on an active endocytic mechanism that does not involve clathrin- and caveolae-mediated vesicular transport, in both SE and SF media. Furthermore, MPT data indicate that NP intracellular trafficking is unaffected by protein presence. Indeed, approximately 50-60% of internalized NPs is characterized by a sub-diffusive behaviour, whereas the remaining fraction shows an active motion. These findings demonstrate that the unspecific protein adsorption on NP surface can affect cellular uptake in terms of internalization kinetics, but it is not effective in controlling active and cellular-mediated uptake mechanisms of NPs and their intracellular routes.

  17. Transport of maternal cholesterol to the fetus is affected by maternal plasma cholesterol concentrations in the golden Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Katie T; Colvin, Perry L; Myatt, Leslie; Graf, Gregory A; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Woollett, Laura A

    2009-06-01

    The fetus has a high requirement for cholesterol and synthesizes cholesterol at elevated rates. Recent studies suggest that fetal cholesterol also can be obtained from exogenous sources. The purpose of the current study was to examine the transport of maternal cholesterol to the fetus and determine the mechanism responsible for any cholesterol-driven changes in transport. Studies were completed in pregnant hamsters with normal and elevated plasma cholesterol concentrations. Cholesterol feeding resulted in a 3.1-fold increase in the amount of LDL-cholesterol taken up by the fetus and a 2.4-fold increase in the amount of HDL-cholesterol taken up. LDL-cholesterol was transported to the fetus primarily by the placenta, and HDL-cholesterol was transported by the yolk sac and placenta. Several proteins associated with sterol transport and efflux, including those induced by activated liver X receptor, were expressed in hamster and human placentas: NPC1, NPC1L1, ABCA2, SCP-x, and ABCG1, but not ABCG8. NPC1L1 was the only protein increased in hypercholesterolemic placentas. Thus, increasing maternal lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations can enhance transport of maternal cholesterol to the fetus, leading to 1) increased movement of cholesterol down a concentration gradient in the placenta, 2) increased lipoprotein secretion from the yolk sac (shown previously), and possibly 3) increased placental NPC1L1 expression.

  18. AtSWEET4, a hexose facilitator, mediates sugar transport to axial sinks and affects plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhu; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Chao; Tian, Zhihong; Li, Jianxiong

    2016-04-22

    Plants transport photoassimilates from source organs to sink tissues through the phloem translocation pathway. In the transport phloem, sugars that escape from the sieve tubes are released into the apoplasmic space between the sieve element/companion cell complex (SE/CC) and phloem parenchyma cells (PPCs) during the process of long-distance transport. The competition for sugar acquisition between SE/CC and adjoining PPCs is mediated by plasma membrane translocators. YFP-tagged AtSWEET4 protein is localized in the plasma membrane, and PromoterAtSWEET4-GUS analysis showed that AtSWEET4 is expressed in the stele of roots and veins of leaves and flowers. Overexpression of AtSWEET4 in Arabidopsis increases plant size and accumulates more glucose and fructose. By contrast, knock-down of AtSWEET4 by RNA-interference leads to small plant size, reduction in glucose and fructose contents, chlorosis in the leaf vein network, and reduction in chlorophyll content in leaves. Yeast assays demonstrated that AtSWEET4 is able to complement both fructose and glucose transport deficiency. Transgenic plants of AtSWEET4 overexpression exhibit higher freezing tolerance and support more growth of bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121. We conclude that AtSWEET4 plays an important role in mediating sugar transport in axial tissues during plant growth and development.

  19. Failure of unilateral carotid artery ligation to affect pressure-induced interruption of rapid axonal transport in primate optic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Schwartz, E L; Anderson, D R

    1980-02-01

    Previous experiments showed that optic nerve axonal transport can be blocked at the level of the lamina cribrosa by elevated intraocular pressure. In an effort to discover if this blockage might be secondary to pressure-induced ischemia, we studied the effect of unilateral common carotid artery ligation upont the pressure-induced interruption of axonal transport. In 13 owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus), the right common carotid artery was ligated within the anterior cervical triangle. Three days later, ophtalmodynomometry was performed on all experimental eyes. In nine of the 13 animals, this estimate of ophthalmic artery pressure was 10 to 20 mm Hg less in the right compared to the left eye. Optic nerve axonal transport was studied in right and left eyes during 5 hours of increased intraocular pressure (ocular pressure 35 mm Hg less than mean femoral artery blood pressure). No significant difference in the extent to which the transport mechanisms were interrupted could be demonstrated when comparing right and left eyes of the experimental animals. These observations fail to support a vascular mechanism for this pressure-induced interruption of axonal transport.

  20. Supplemental leucine and isoleucine affect expression of cationic amino acid transporters and myosin, serum concentration of amino acids, and growth performance of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Ramírez, M; Mendez-Trujillo, V; Araiza-Piña, B A; Barrera-Silva, M A; González-Mendoza, D; Morales-Trejo, A

    2013-01-24

    Leucine (Leu) participates in the activity of cationic amino acid (aa) transporters. Also, branched-chain aa [Leu, isoleucine (Ile), and valine (Val)] share intestinal transporters for absorption. We conducted an experiment with 16 young pigs (body weight of about 16 kg) to determine whether Leu and Ile affect expression of aa transporters b(0,+) and CAT-1 in the jejunum and expression of myosin in muscle, as well as serum concentration of essential aa, and growth performance in pigs. Dietary treatments were: wheat-based diets fortified with Lys, Thr, and Met; basal diet plus 0.50% Leu; basal diet plus 0.50% Ile, and basal diet plus 0.50% Leu and 0.50% Ile. After 28 days, the pigs were sacrificed to collect blood, jejunum, and semitendinosus and longissimus muscle samples. The effects of single and combined addition of Leu and Ile were analyzed. Leu alone or combined with Ile significantly decreased daily weight gain and reduced feed conversion. Leu and Ile, alone or in combination, significantly decreased expression of b(0,+) and significantly increased CAT-1. Ile alone or combined with Leu significantly decreased myosin expression in semitendinosus and significantly decreased it in longissimus muscle. Leu alone significantly decreased Lys, Ile and Thr serum concentrations; Ile significantly decreased Thr serum concentration; combined Leu and Ile significantly decreased Thr and significantly increased Val serum concentration. We conclude that dietary levels of Leu and Ile affect growth performance, expression of aa transporters and myosin, and aa serum concentrations in pigs.

  1. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction.

  2. Auxin polar transport of etiolated Ageotropum pea epicotyls is not affected by gravistimulation: Relevance to automorphosis-like growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kensuke; Hoshino, Tomoki; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Ueda, Junichi

    There appears to be a close relationship between automorphosis and changes in auxin polar transport due to the fact that microgravity conditions cause both changes in the activity of auxin polar transport and in automorphosis of etiolated Alaska pea epicotyls. In addition, the application of inhibitors of auxin polar transport results in automorphosis-like growth and development. To elucidate the role of auxin polar transport in gravimorphogenesis in etiolated pea seedlings, we have studied the effects of gravistimulation on growth and development, and auxin polar transport in epicotyls of an agravitropic pea mutant " Ageotropum" seedlings and the normal "Alaska" seedlings. When the embryo axes in seeds of Alaska pea were set in a vertical (parallel to the direction of gravity) or a horizontal (vertical to the direction of gravity) position, and allowed to germinate and grow under 1 g conditions in the dark for 3 or 6.5 days, the epicotyls grew upward due to negative gravitropic responses regardless of gravistimulation during seed germination. On the other hand, epicotyls of etiolated Ageotropum pea seedlings showed automorphosis-like bending away from the cotyledons regardless of gravistimulation during seed germination. Automorphosis-like epicotyl bending of etiolated Ageotropum pea seedlings was also unaffected by clinorotation on a three-dimensional (3-D) clinostat. The activity of auxin polar transport in the 2nd internodes of 6.5-d-old etiolated Ageotropum pea seedlings was lower than those of Alaska pea seedlings, and was not affected by clinorotation on a 3-D clinostat or by changes in gravity conditions during seed germination. These findings strongly support our previous studies that showed that normal auxin polar transport is required for the normal graviresponse of epicotyls in etiolated pea seedlings.

  3. A Protein Kinase C Phosphorylation Motif in GLUT1 Affects Glucose Transport and is Mutated in GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunice E; Ma, Jing; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Mi, Wentao; Salato, Valerie K; Nguyen, Nam; Jiang, Youxing; Pascual, Juan M; North, Paula E; Shaul, Philip W; Mettlen, Marcel; Wang, Richard C

    2015-06-04

    Protein kinase C has been implicated in the phosphorylation of the erythrocyte/brain glucose transporter, GLUT1, without a clear understanding of the site(s) of phosphorylation and the possible effects on glucose transport. Through in vitro kinase assays, mass spectrometry, and phosphospecific antibodies, we identify serine 226 in GLUT1 as a PKC phosphorylation site. Phosphorylation of S226 is required for the rapid increase in glucose uptake and enhanced cell surface localization of GLUT1 induced by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Endogenous GLUT1 is phosphorylated on S226 in primary endothelial cells in response to TPA or VEGF. Several naturally occurring, pathogenic mutations that cause GLUT1 deficiency syndrome disrupt this PKC phosphomotif, impair the phosphorylation of S226 in vitro, and block TPA-mediated increases in glucose uptake. We demonstrate that the phosphorylation of GLUT1 on S226 regulates glucose transport and propose that this modification is important in the physiological regulation of glucose transport.

  4. Acrylamide increases dopamine levels by affecting dopamine transport and metabolism related genes in the striatal dopaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Guo, Xiongxiong; Xiong, Fei; Cheng, Guihong; Lu, Qing; Yan, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Dopaminergic system dysfunction is proved to be a possible mechanism in acrylamide (ACR) -induced neurotoxicity. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has an increasingly important role in the dopaminergic system. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate effects of ACR on dopamine and its metabolite levels, dopamine transport and metabolic gene expression in dopaminergic neurons. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed orally with ACR at 0 (saline), 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg/day for 20 days. Splayed hind limbs, reduced tail flick time and abnormal gait which preceded other neurologic parameters were observed in the above rats. ACR significantly increased dopamine levels, decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) contents in an area dependent manner in rat striatum. Immunohistochemical staining of the striatum revealed that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells significantly increased, while monoamine oxidase (MAO) positive cells were drastically reduced, which was consistent with changes in their mRNA and protein expressions. In addition, dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression levels were both down-regulated in the striatum. These results suggest that dopamine levels increase significantly in response to ACR, presumably due to changes in the dopamine transport and metabolism related genes expression in the striatal dopaminergic neurons.

  5. Zinc transporter 7 deficiency affects lipid synthesis in adipocytes by inhibiting insulin-dependent Akt activity and glucose uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mice deficient for zinc transporter 7 (Znt7) are mildly zinc deficient, accompanied with low body weight gain and body fat accumulation. To investigate the underlying mechanism of Znt7 deficiency in body adiposity, we investigated fatty acid composition and insulin sensitivity in visceral (epididyma...

  6. Biogenesis of lysosomal enzymes in the alpha-glucosidase II-deficient modA mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum: retention of alpha-1,3-linked glucose on N-linked oligosaccharides delays intracellular transport but does not alter sorting of alpha-mannosidase or beta-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D L; Bush, J M; Dimond, R L; Cardelli, J A

    1989-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme alpha-glucosidase II is responsible for removing the two alpha-1,3-linked glucose residues from N-linked oligosaccharides of glycoproteins. This activity is missing in the modA mutant strain, M31, of Dictyostelium discoideum. Results from both radiolabeled pulse-chase and subcellular fractionation experiments indicate that this deficiency did not prevent intracellular transport and proteolytic processing of the lysosomal enzymes, alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase. However, the rate at which the glucosylated precursors left the rough endoplasmic reticulum was several-fold slower than the rate at which the wild-type precursors left this compartment. Retention of glucose residues did not disrupt the binding of the precursor forms of the enzymes with intracellular membranes, indicating that the delay in movement of proteins from the ER did not result from lack of association with membranes. However, the mutant alpha-mannosidase precursor contained more trypsin-sensitive sites than did the wild-type precursor, suggesting that improper folding of precursor molecules might account for the slow rate of transport to the Golgi complex. Percoll density gradient fractionation of extracts prepared from M31 cells indicated that the proteolytically processed mature forms of alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase were localized to lysosomes. Finally, the mutation in M31 may have other, more dramatic, effects on the lysosomal system since two enzymes, N-acetylglucosaminidase and acid phosphatase, were secreted much less efficiently from lysosomal compartments by the mutant strain.

  7. Repeated Cycles of Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Increases Basal Glutamate in the Nucleus Accumbens of Mice without affecting glutamate transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Griffin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure increase voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice. Previous work has shown that extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc is significantly elevated in ethanol dependent mice and that pharmacologically manipulating glutamate concentrations in the NAc will alter ethanol drinking, indicating that glutamate homeostasis plays a crucial role in ethanol drinking in this model. The present studies were designed to measure extracellular glutamate at a time point in which mice would ordinarily be allowed voluntary access to ethanol in the CIE model and, additionally, to measure glutamate transport capacity in the NAc at the same time point. Extracellular glutamate was measured using quantitative microdialysis procedures. Glutamate transport capacity was measured under Na+ dependent and Na+ independent conditions to determine whether the function of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs; also known as system XAG or of system Xc- (Glial cysteine-glutamate exchanger was influenced by CIE exposure. The results of the quantitative microdialysis experiment confirm increased extracellular glutamate (~2 –fold in the NAc of CIE exposed mice (i.e. ethanol-dependent compared to non-dependent mice in the NAc, consistent with earlier work. However, the increase in extracellular glutamate was not due to altered transporter function in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice, because neither Na+ dependent nor Na+ independent glutamate transport was significantly altered by CIE exposure. These findings point to the possibility that hyperexcitability of cortical-striatal pathways underlies the increases in extracellular glutamate found in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent mice.

  8. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  9. Plant Transporter Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bo

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) play a critical role for numerous biological processes, by controlling the movements of ions and molecules in and out of cells. In plants, transporters thus function as gatekeepers between the plant and its surrounding environment and between organs......, tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. Since plants are highly compartmentalized organisms with complex transportation infrastructures, they consequently have many transporters. However, the vast majority of predicted transporters have not yet been experimentally verified to have transport...... activity. This project contains a review of the implemented methods, which have led to plant transporter identification, and present our progress on creating a high-throughput functional genomics transporter identification platform....

  10. The fluidity of the nuclear envelope lipid does not affect the rate of nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport in mammalian liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Suckling, K E

    1982-03-29

    The effects of in vitro and in vivo modifications of nuclear envelope lipid on DNa leakage and on ATP-stimulated RNA release from isolated rat liver nuclei were investigated. The modifications included corn-oil feeding of the animals to alter the fatty acid composition of the lipids, phospholipase treatment of the isolated nuclei, and extraction of the total lipid with Triton X-100. Significant changes in lipid composition and approximate order parameter values of the spin-label 5-doxylstearate resulted, but there was no significant effect on RNA transport rate. It was concluded that the nuclear envelope lipid does not play any important part in nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport in mammalian liver.

  11. Colloid formation and metal transport through two mixing zones affected by acid mine drainage near Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemel, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Bencala, K.E.

    2000-01-01

    Stream discharges and concentrations of dissolved and colloidal metals (Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, and Zn), SO4, and dissolved silica were measured to identify chemical transformations and determine mass transports through two mixing zones in the Animas River that receive the inflows from Cement and Mineral Creeks. The creeks were the dominant sources of Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb, whereas the upstream Animas River supplied about half of the Zn. With the exception of Fe, which was present in dissolved and colloidal forms, the metals were dissolved in the acidic, high-SO4 waters of Cement Creek (pH 3.8). Mixing of Cement Creek with the Animas River increased pH to near-neutral values and transformed Al and some additional Fe into colloids which also contained Cu and Pb. Aluminium and Fe colloids had already formed in the mildly acidic conditions in Mineral Creek (pH 6.6) upstream of the confluence with the Animas River. Colloidal Fe continued to form downstream of both mixing zones. The Fe- and Al-rich colloids were important for transport of Cu, Pb, and Zn, which appeared to have sorbed to them. Partitioning of Zn between dissolved and colloidal phases was dependent on pH and colloid concentration. Mass balances showed conservative transports for Ca, Mg, Mn, SO4, and dissolved silica through the two mixing zones and small losses (< 10%) of colloidal Al, Fe and Zn from the water column.

  12. Low Night Temperature Affects the Phloem Ultrastructure of Lateral Branches and Raffinose Family Oligosaccharide (RFO) Accumulation in RFO-Transporting Plant Melon (Cucumismelo L.) during Fruit Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jinghong; Gu, Fengying; Zhu, Jie; Lu, Shaowei; Liu, Yifei; Li, Yunfei; Chen, Weizhi; Wang, Liping; Fan, Shuangxi; Xian, Cory J.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the importance and complexity of photo assimilate transport in raffinose family oligosaccharide (RFO)-transporting plants such as melon, it is important to study the features of the transport structure (phloem) particularly of the lateral branches connecting the source leaves and the sink fruits, and its responses to environmental challenges. Currently, it is unclear to what extents the cold environmental temperature stress would alter the phloem ultrastructure and RFO accumulation in RFO-transporting plants. In this study, we firstly utilized electron microscopy to investigate the changes in the phloem ultrastructure of lateral branches and RFO accumulation in melons after being subjected to low night temperatures (12°C and 9°C). The results demonstrated that exposure to 9°C and 12°C altered the ultrastructure of the phloem, with the effect of 9°C being more obvious. The most obvious change was the appearance of plasma membrane invaginations in 99% companion cells and intermediary cells. In addition, phloem parenchyma cells contained chloroplasts with increased amounts of starch grains, sparse cytoplasm and reduced numbers of mitochondria. In the intermediary cells, the volume of cytoplasm was reduced by 50%, and the central vacuole was present. Moreover, the treatment at 9°C during the night led to RFO accumulation in the vascular bundles of the lateral branches and fruit carpopodiums. These ultrastructural changes of the transport structure (phloem) following the treatment at 9°C represented adaptive responses of melons to low temperature stresses. Future studies are required to examine whether these responses may affect phloem transport. PMID:27501301

  13. Biogeochemical investigations on processes affecting the transport behaviour of trace elements in the tidal Elbe River; Biogeochemische Prozessuntersuchungen zum Transportverhalten von Spurenelementen in der Tide-Elbe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennies, K. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Gewaesserphysik

    1997-12-31

    This work concentrates on distribution and transport of micropollutants in anthropogenically affected estuary systems. Choosing the tidal Elbe River as an example, the influence of microlagae on two important partial processes of the transport regime, the remobilization (a) from undisturbed sediments and (b) from suspended particulate matter, was simulated and quantified in the laboratory. Benthic and planktonic release of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn into the dissolved phase of the river pelagial were estimated and comparatively evaluated for summer/late summer situation. During that season natural decomposition of suspended particulate matter in the water column thus represents the quantitatively most significant mobilization pathway for particle bound heavy metals in the river section between Hamburg and Glueckstadt. Knowing the composition and heavy metal load of suspended particulate matter, rich in algae, mobilization rates can consequently be calculated for the water column with regard to conditions typical for estuaries. The prognosis of the differing transport behaviour of single heavy metals for greater sections of estuaries is also possible if these rates are implemented into transport-reaction models. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit Verteilung und Transport von Spurenschadstoffen in anthropogen belasteten Aestuarsystemen. Am Beispiel der Tide-Elbe wurde der Einfluss von Mikroalgen auf zwei wichtige Teilprozesse des Transportregimes, die Remobilisierung (a) aus ungestoerten Sedimenten und (b) aus suspendierten Schwebstoffen, im Labor simuliert und quantifiziert. Benthische und planktische Freisetzung von Cd, Cu, Pb und Zn in die Loesungsphase des Flusspelagials der Tide-Elbe wurden fuer die Sommer-/Spaetsommer-Situation abgeschaetzt und vergleichend bewertet. Der natuerliche Schwebstoff-Abbau in der Wassersaeule stellt demnach in dieser Jahreszeit im Stromabschnitt zwischen Hamburg und Glueckstadt den quantitativ bedeutsamsten

  14. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  15. An Assessment of Factors Affecting Reactive Transport of Biodegradable BTEX in an Unconfined Aquifer System, Tehran Oil Refinery, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Risk-based assessment methods are commonly used at the contaminated sites by hydrocarbon pollutants. This paper presents the results of a two-dimensional finite volume model of reactive transport of biodegradable BTEX which have been developed for the saturated zone of an unconfined aquifer in the Pump station area of Tehran oil refinery, Iran. The model governing equations were numerically solved by modification of a general commercial software called PHOENICS. To reduce costs in general, many input parameters of a model are often approximated based on the used values in the contaminated sites with same conditions. It was not fully recognised the effect of errors in these inputs on modelling outputs. Thus, a sensitivity analysis was carried out to determine the influence of parameters variability on the results of model. For this analysis, the sensitivity of the model to changes in the dispersivity, distribution coefficient, parameters of Monod, Michaelis-Menten, first- and zero- order kinetics modes on the BTEX contaminant plume were examined by performing several simulations. It was found that the model is sensitive to changes in dispersivity and parameters of Michaelis-Menten, first- and zero- order kinetics model. On the other hand, the predictions for plumes assuming Monod kinetics are similar, even if different values for parameterization are chosen. The reason for this insensibility is that degradation is not limited by microbial kinetics in the simulation, but by dispersive mixing. Quantifying the effect of changes in model input parameters on the modelling results is essential when it is desired to recognise which model parameters are more vital on the fate and transport of reactive pollutants. Furthermore, this process can provide an insight into understanding pollutant transportation mechanisms.

  16. Model Simulations of a Field Experiment on Cation Exchange-affected Multicomponent Solute Transport in a Sandy Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ammentorp, Hans Christian; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1993-01-01

    A large-scale and long-term field experiment on cation exchange in a sandy aquifer has been modelled by a three-dimensional geochemical transport model. The geochemical model includes cation-exchange processes using a Gaines-Thomas expression, the closed carbonate system and the effects of ionic...... of 800 days due to a substantially attenuation in the aquifer. The observed and the predicted breakthrough curves showed a reasonable accordance taking the duration of the experiment into account. However, some discrepancies were observed probably caused by the revealed non-ideal exchange behaviour of K+....

  17. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-29

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na(+)-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na(+)-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na(+) binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na(+) with Li(+) or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na(+) cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na(+) dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na(+) binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na(+) binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.

  18. Transport of Chemical Vapors from Subsurface Sources to Atmosphere as Affected by Shallow Subsurface and Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. K.; Smits, K. M.; Hosken, K.; Schulte, P.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the movement and modeling of chemical vapor through unsaturated soil in the shallow subsurface when subjected to natural atmospheric thermal and mass flux boundary conditions at the land surface is of importance to applications such as landmine detection and vapor intrusion into subsurface structures. New, advanced technologies exist to sense chemical signatures at the land/atmosphere interface, but interpretation of these sensor signals to make assessment of source conditions remains a challenge. Chemical signatures are subject to numerous interactions while migrating through the unsaturated soil environment, attenuating signal strength and masking contaminant source conditions. The dominant process governing movement of gases through porous media is often assumed to be Fickian diffusion through the air phase with minimal or no quantification of other processes contributing to vapor migration, such as thermal diffusion, convective gas flow due to the displacement of air, expansion/contraction of air due to temperature changes, temporal and spatial variations of soil moisture and fluctuations in atmospheric pressure. Soil water evaporation and interfacial mass transfer add to the complexity of the system. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmosphere interface and use the resulting dataset to test existing theories on subsurface gas flow and iterate between numerical modeling efforts and experimental data. Ultimately, we aim to update conceptual models of shallow subsurface vapor transport to include conditionally significant transport processes and inform placement of mobile sensors and/or networks. We have developed a two-dimensional tank apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and a flow-through head space for simulation of the atmospheric interface. A detailed matrix of realistic atmospheric boundary conditions was applied in a series of

  19. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A., E-mail: David.Jans@monash.edu

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  20. Elevated seawater PCO₂ differentially affects branchial acid-base transporters over the course of development in the cephalopod Sepia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Marian Y; Tseng, Yung-Che; Stumpp, Meike; Gutowska, Magdalena A; Kiko, Rainer; Lucassen, Magnus; Melzner, Frank

    2011-05-01

    The specific transporters involved in maintenance of blood pH homeostasis in cephalopod molluscs have not been identified to date. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical methods, we demonstrate that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (soNKA), a V-type H(+)-ATPase (soV-HA), and Na(+)/HCO(3)(-) cotransporter (soNBC) are colocalized in NKA-rich cells in the gills of Sepia officinalis. mRNA expression patterns of these transporters and selected metabolic genes were examined in response to moderately elevated seawater Pco(2) (0.16 and 0.35 kPa) over a time course of 6 wk in different ontogenetic stages. The applied CO(2) concentrations are relevant for ocean acidification scenarios projected for the coming decades. We determined strong expression changes in late-stage embryos and hatchlings, with one to three log2-fold reductions in soNKA, soNBCe, socCAII, and COX. In contrast, no hypercapnia-induced changes in mRNA expression were observed in juveniles during both short- and long-term exposure. However, a transiently increased ion regulatory demand was evident during the initial acclimation reaction to elevated seawater Pco(2). Gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and protein concentration were increased by ~15% during short (2-11 days) but not long-term (42-days) exposure. Our findings support the hypothesis that the energy budget of adult cephalopods is not significantly compromised during long-term exposure to moderate environmental hypercapnia. However, the downregulation of ion regulatory and metabolic genes in late-stage embryos, taken together with a significant reduction in somatic growth, indicates that cephalopod early life stages are challenged by elevated seawater Pco(2).

  1. Application of the SWAT model to an AMD-affected river (Meca River, SW Spain). Estimation of transported pollutant load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, L.; Olías, M.; Fernandez de Villarán, R.; Domingo Santos, J. M.; Nieto, J. M.; Sarmiento, A. M.; Cánovas, C. R.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThe Meca River is highly contaminated by acid mine drainage coming from the Tharsis mining district, belonging to the Iberian Pyrite Belt. This river is regulated by the Sancho reservoir (58 hm 3), with a pH close to 4.2. In this work, the load transported by the Meca River to the Sancho reservoir has been assessed. Due to the lack of streamflow data, the hydrological behaviour of the Meca River basin has been simulated using the SWAT model. The model has been calibrated against registered daily inflows of the Sancho reservoir (1982-2000), excluding the hydrological years 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 that were kept for the validation. The results were satisfactory; the evaluation coefficients for monthly calibration were: r = 0.85 (Pearson's correlation coefficient), NSE = 0.83 (Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient) and DV = 1.08 (runoff volume deviation). The main uncertainty was the calibration during low water because of the poor accuracy in the measurement of the inputs to the reservoir in these conditions. Discharge and dissolved concentration relationships for different elements were obtained from hydrochemical samplings, which allowed us to estimate the element pollutant load transported to the reservoir: 418 ton/year of Al, 8024 ton/year of SO 4, 121 ton/year of Zn, etc. Based on these loads, concentrations in the reservoir were calculated for some elements. Apart from Mn and Sr, good adjustment between calculated and measured values was observed (±20% for Ca, Co, Li, Mg, Na, Ni, Zn and SO 4). Capsule: Hydrological model combined with water quality data show how pollution by AMD can generate huge loads of contaminants acidifying streams and reservoirs.

  2. Key Role for Intracellular K+ and Protein Kinases Sat4/Hal4 and Hal5 in the Plasma Membrane Stabilization of Yeast Nutrient Transporters▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Valle, Jorge; Jenkins, Huw; Merchan, Stephanie; Montiel, Vera; Ramos, José; Sharma, Sukesh; Serrano, Ramón; Yenush, Lynne

    2007-01-01

    K+ transport in living cells must be tightly controlled because it affects basic physiological parameters such as turgor, membrane potential, ionic strength, and pH. In yeast, the major high-affinity K+ transporter, Trk1, is inhibited by high intracellular K+ levels and positively regulated by two redundant “halotolerance” protein kinases, Sat4/Hal4 and Hal5. Here we show that these kinases are not required for Trk1 activity; rather, they stabilize the transporter at the plasma membrane under low K+ conditions, preventing its endocytosis and vacuolar degradation. High concentrations (0.2 M) of K+, but not Na+ or sorbitol, transported by undefined low-affinity systems, maintain Trk1 at the plasma membrane in the hal4 hal5 mutant. Other nutrient transporters, such as Can1 (arginine permease), Fur4 (uracil permease), and Hxt1 (low-affinity glucose permease), are also destabilized in the hal4 hal5 mutant under low K+ conditions and, in the case of Can1, are stabilized by high K+ concentrations. Other plasma membrane proteins such as Pma1 (H+-pumping ATPase) and Sur7 (an eisosomal protein) are not regulated by halotolerance kinases or by high K+ levels. This novel regulatory mechanism of nutrient transporters may participate in the quiescence/growth transition and could result from effects of intracellular K+ and halotolerance kinases on membrane trafficking and/or on the transporters themselves. PMID:17548466

  3. Metallochaperones regulate intracellular copper levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Lee Pang

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is an important enzyme co-factor that is also extremely toxic at high intracellular concentrations, making active efflux mechanisms essential for preventing Cu accumulation. Here, we have investigated the mechanistic role of metallochaperones in regulating Cu efflux. We have constructed a computational model of Cu trafficking and efflux based on systems analysis of the Cu stress response of Halobacterium salinarum. We have validated several model predictions via assays of transcriptional dynamics and intracellular Cu levels, discovering a completely novel function for metallochaperones. We demonstrate that in addition to trafficking Cu ions, metallochaperones also function as buffers to modulate the transcriptional responsiveness and efficacy of Cu efflux. This buffering function of metallochaperones ultimately sets the upper limit for intracellular Cu levels and provides a mechanistic explanation for previously observed Cu metallochaperone mutation phenotypes.

  4. Characterization of copper transport in gill cells of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sá, M.G. [Biosciences Institute, Department of Physiology, University of São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, 101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Zanotto, F.P., E-mail: fzanotto@usp.br [Biosciences Institute, Department of Physiology, University of São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, 101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Department of Biophysics, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Três de Maio 100, Sao Paulo 04044-020 (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Copper transport in gill cells of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus is dependent of calcium. •Copper transport mechanism is ATP-dependent. •Transport was monitored second by second during 300 s. -- Abstract: The branchial epithelium of crustaceans is exposed to the environment and is the first site affected by metal pollution. The aim of this work was to characterize copper (Cu) transport using a fluorescent dye, Phen Green, in gill cells of a hypo-hyper-regulator mangrove crab Ucides cordatus. The results showed that added extracellular CuCl{sub 2} (0, 0.025, 0.150, 0.275, 0.550 and 1.110 μM) showed typical Michaelis–Menten transport for Cu in anterior and posterior gill cells (V{sub max} for anterior and posterior gills: 0.41 ± 0.12 and 1.76 ± 0.27 intracellular Cu in μM × 22.10{sup 4} cells{sup −1} × 300 s{sup −1} respectively and K{sub m} values: 0.44 ± 0.04 and 0.32 ± 0.13 μM, respectively). Intracellular Cu was significantly higher for posterior gill cells compared to anterior gill cells, suggesting differential accumulation for each gill type. Extracellular Ca at 20 mM decreased cellular Cu transport for both anterior and posterior gill cells. Nifedipine and verapamil, calcium channel inhibitors from plasma membrane, decreased Cu transport and affected K{sub m} for both gills. These results could be due to a competition between Cu and Ca. Amiloride, a Na/Ca exchanger inhibitor, as well as bafilomycin, a proton pump inhibitor, caused a decrease of intracellular Cu compared to control. Ouabain and KB-R 7943, acting on Na homeostasis, similarly decreased intracellular Cu in both gill cells. Besides that, gill cells exposed to ATP and Cu simultaneously, showed an increase in intracellular copper, which was inhibited by vanadate, an inhibitor of P-type ATPase. These results suggest either the presence of a Cu-ATPase in crab gill cells, responsible for Cu influx, or the effect of a change in electrochemical membrane potential that

  5. Serotonin (5-HT affects expression of liver metabolic enzymes and mammary gland glucose transporters during the transition from pregnancy to lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to demonstrate the ability of feeding serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine precursors to increase 5-HT production during the transition from pregnancy to lactation and the effects this has on maternal energy metabolism in the liver and mammary gland. Pregnant rats (n = 45 were fed one of three diets: I control (CON, II CON supplemented with 0.2% 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP or III CON supplemented with 1.35% L-tryptophan (L-TRP, beginning on d13 of pregnancy through d9 of lactation (d9. Serum (pre and post-partum, milk (daily, liver and mammary gland tissue (d9 were collected. Serum 5-HT was increased in the 5-HTP fed dams beginning on d20 of gestation and remained elevated through d9, while it was only increased on d9 in the L-TRP fed dams. 5-HT levels were increased in mammary gland and liver of both groups. Additionally, 5-HTP fed dams had serum and milk glucose levels similar to the CON, while L-TRP had decreased serum (d9 and milk glucose (all dates evaluated. Feeding 5-HTP resulted in increased mRNA expression of key gluconeogenic and glycolytic enzymes in liver and glucose transporters 1 and 8 (GLUT-1, -8 in the mammary gland. We demonstrated the location of GLUT-8 in the mammary gland both in the epithelial and vascular endothelial cells. Finally, phosphorylated 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK, a known regulator of intracellular energy status, was elevated in mammary glands of 5-HTP fed dams. Our results suggest that increasing 5-HT production during the transition from pregnancy to lactation increases mRNA expression of enzymes involved in energy metabolism in the liver, and mRNA abundance and distribution of glucose transporters within the mammary gland. This suggests the possibility that 5-HT may be involved in regulating energy metabolism during the transition from pregnancy to lactation.

  6. Gas transport processes in sea ice: How convection and diffusion processes might affect biological imprints, a challenge for modellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tison, J.-L.; Zhou, Shaola J. G.; Thomas, D. N.

    2012-01-01

    within the sea ice cover, including in the gaseous form. Diffusive processes will become dominant once internal melting is strong enough to stratify the brine network within the ice. In the Kapisilit case, the regular decrease of an internal gas peak intensity due to external forcing during ice growth......Recent data from a year-round survey of landfast sea ice growth in Barrow (Alaska) have shown how O2/N2 and O2/Ar ratios could be used to pinpoint primary production in sea ice and derive net productivity rates from the temporal evolution of the oxygen concentration at a given depth within the sea...... ice cover. These rates were however obtained surmising that neither convection, nor diffusion had affected the gas concentration profiles in the ice between discrete ice core collections. This paper discusses examples from three different field surveys (the above-mentioned Barrow experiment...

  7. The cost of transport of human running is not affected, as in walking, by wide acceleration/deceleration cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, Alberto E; Gaudino, Paolo; Seminati, Elena; Cazzola, Dario

    2013-02-15

    Although most of the literature on locomotion energetics and biomechanics is about constant-speed experiments, humans and animals tend to move at variable speeds in their daily life. This study addresses the following questions: 1) how much extra metabolic energy is associated with traveling a unit distance by adopting acceleration/deceleration cycles in walking and running, with respect to constant speed, and 2) how can biomechanics explain those metabolic findings. Ten males and ten females walked and ran at fluctuating speeds (5 ± 0, ± 1, ± 1.5, ± 2, ± 2.5 km/h for treadmill walking, 11 ± 0, ± 1, ± 2, ± 3, ± 4 km/h for treadmill and field running) in cycles lasting 6 s. Field experiments, consisting of subjects following a laser spot projected from a computer-controlled astronomic telescope, were necessary to check the noninertial bias of the oscillating-speed treadmill. Metabolic cost of transport was found to be almost constant at all speed oscillations for running and up to ±2 km/h for walking, with no remarkable differences between laboratory and field results. The substantial constancy of the metabolic cost is not explained by the predicted cost of pure acceleration/deceleration. As for walking, results from speed-oscillation running suggest that the inherent within-stride, elastic energy-free accelerations/decelerations when moving at constant speed work as a mechanical buffer for among-stride speed fluctuations, with no extra metabolic cost. Also, a recent theory about the analogy between sprint (level) running and constant-speed running on gradients, together with the mechanical determinants of gradient locomotion, helps to interpret the present findings.

  8. Poultry fat decreased fatty acid transporter protein mRNA expression and affected fatty acid composition in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jianmin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A study was undertaken to examine the effects of poultry fat (PF compared with those of soybean oil (SBO on intestinal development, fatty acid transporter protein (FATP mRNA expression, and fatty acid composition in broiler chickens. A total of 144 day-old male commercial broilers were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups (6 replicates of 12 chicks for each treatment and fed isocaloric diets containing 3.0% PF or 2.7% SBO at 0 to 3 wk and 3.8% PF or 3.5% SBO at 4 to 6 wk, respectively. Results PF had no influence on intestinal morphology, weight, or DNA, RNA, or protein concentrations at 2, 4, and 6 wk of age. However, compared with SBO, PF significantly decreased FATP mRNA abundance at 4 wk (P = 0.009 and 6 wk of age (P P = 0.039; and decreased C18:2 (P = 0.015, C18:3 (P P = 0.018, Σ-polyunsaturated fatty acids (Σ-PUFA (P = 0.020, and the proportion of PUFA (P P = 0.010, C18:3 (P P P = 0.005, and the proportion of PUFA (P  Conclusions PF decreases FATP and L-FABP mRNA expression and decreased the proportion of PUFA in the intestinal mucosa and breast muscle.

  9. The Arabidopsis DSO/ABCG11 transporter affects cutin metabolism in reproductive organs and suberin in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikashvili, David; Shi, Jian Xin; Bocobza, Samuel; Franke, Rochus Benni; Schreiber, Lukas; Aharoni, Asaph

    2010-05-01

    Apart from its significance in the protection against stress conditions, the cuticular cover is essential for proper development of the diverse surface structures formed on aerial plant organs. This layer mainly consists of a cutin matrix, embedded and overlaid with cuticular waxes. Following their biosynthesis in epidermal cells, cutin and waxes were suggested to be exported across the plasma membrane by ABCG-type transporters such as DSO/ABCG11 to the cell wall and further to extracellular matrix. Here, additional aspects of DSO/ABCG11 function were investigated, predominantly in reproductive organs, which were not revealed in the previous reports. This was facilitated by the generation of a transgenic DSO/ABCG11 silenced line (dso-4) that displayed relatively subtle morphological and chemical phenotypes. These included altered petal and silique morphology, fusion of seeds, and changes in levels of cutin monomers in flowers and siliques. The dso-4 phenotypes corresponded to the strong DSO/ABCG11 gene expression in the embryo epidermis as well as in the endosperm tissues of the developing seeds. Moreover, the DSO/ABCG11 protein displayed polar localization in the embryo protoderm. Transcriptome analysis of the dso-4 mutant leaves and stems showed that reduced DSO/ABCG11 activity suppressed the expression of a large number of cuticle-associated genes, implying that export of cuticular lipids from the plasma membrane is a rate-limiting step in cuticle metabolism. Surprisingly, root suberin composition of dso-4 was altered, as well as root expression of two suberin biosynthetic genes. Taken together, this study provides new insights into cutin and suberin metabolism and their role in reproductive organs and roots development.

  10. Photoperiodic regulation of the sucrose transporter StSUT4 affects the expression of circadian-regulated genes and ethylene production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela eChincinska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Several recent publications report different subcellular localisation of members of the SUT4 subfamily of sucrose transporters. The physiological function of SUT4 sucrose transporters is still not entirely clarified as down-regulation of members of the SUT4 clade had very different effects in rice, poplar and potato. Here, we provide new data on the localization and function of the Solanaceous StSUT4 protein, further elucidating involvement in the onset of flowering, tuberization and in the shade avoidance syndrome of potato plants.Induction of early flowering and tuberization in SUT4-inhibited potato plants correlates with increased sucrose export from leaves and increased sucrose and starch accumulation in terminal sink organs such as developing tubers. SUT4 does not only affect the expression of gibberellin and ethylene biosynthetic enzymes, but also the rate of ethylene synthesis in potato. In SUT4-inhibited plants, the ethylene production no longer follows a diurnal rhythm, leading to the assumption that StSUT4 controls circadian gene expression, potentially by regulating sucrose export from leaves. Furthermore, SUT4 expression affects clock-regulated genes such as StFT, StSOC1 and StCO, which might also be involved in a photoperiod-dependently controlled tuberization. A model is proposed in which StSUT4 controls a phloem-mobile signalling molecule generated in leaves which together with enhanced sucrose export affects developmental switches in apical meristems. SUT4 seems to link photoreceptor-perceived information about the light quality and day length, with phytohormone biosynthesis and the expression of circadian genes.

  11. Factors affecting microbial spoilage and shelf-life of chilled vacuum-packed lamb transported to distant markets: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, John; Donnison, Andrea; Brightwell, Gale

    2014-09-01

    Vacuum-packaging and stringent control of storage temperatures enable the export of meat to distant markets, supplying a chilled product that can favourably compete with local fresh meats. To save fuel and reduce emissions, the speed of ships travelling to international markets has decreased resulting in requirement for the shelf-life of chilled lamb to be extended beyond the recognised time of 60-70 days. Growth of microorganisms and ability to cause spoilage of vacuum-packed lamb are dependent on many factors, including the type and initial concentration of spoilage bacteria, meat pH, water activity, availability of substrates, oxygen availability and, most importantly, storage time and temperature of the packaged product. This paper reviews the existing knowledge of the spoilage bacteria affecting vacuum-packed lamb, discusses the impact of these bacteria on product quality, shelf-life and spoilage, and concludes that under specified conditions the shelf-life of chilled lamb can be extended to beyond 70 days.

  12. Studies on the roles of small GTP-binding proteins and heterotrimeric G proteins in intracellular vesicular transport; Saibonai shoho yuso ni okeru teibunshiryo GTP ketsugo tanpakushitsu oyobi 3 ryotai G tanpakushitus no kino ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Kazuhisa [Tsukuba University, Tsukuba (Japan). Institute of Science

    1998-12-16

    Transport of proteins between organelles involves carrier vesicles. A variety of GTP-binding proteins are responsible for the formation of carrier vesicles. A family of small GTP-binding proteins, ARFs, trigger budding of the vesicles, while a high molecular weight GTP-binding protein, dynamin, is responsible for fission of the neck of the budding vesicles. In this study, we cloned and determined the subcellular localization of six mouse ARF proteins, and cloned three human guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for ARF. We also cloned and determined its subcellular localization of a novel dynamin-like protein, named DVLP (for Dnm 1p/Vps 1p-like protein). (author)

  13. Transport Regimes of Air Masses Affecting the Tropospheric Composition of the Canadian and European Arctic During RACEPAC 2014 and NETCARE 2014/2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozem, H.; Hoor, P. M.; Koellner, F.; Kunkel, D.; Schneider, J.; Schulz, C.; Herber, A. B.; Borrmann, S.; Wendisch, M.; Ehrlich, A.; Leaitch, W. R.; Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Thomas, J. L.; Abbatt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic is warming much faster than any other place in the world and undergoes a rapid change dominated by a changing climate in this region. The impact of polluted air masses traveling to the Arctic from various remote sources significantly contributes to the observed climate change, in contrast there are additional local emission sources contributing to the level of pollutants (trace gases and aerosol). Processes affecting the emission and transport of these pollutants are not well understood and need to be further investigated. We present aircraft based trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC (2014) and NETCARE (2014 and 2015) with the Polar 6 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) covering an area from 134°W to 17°W and 68°N to 83°N. We focus on cloud, aerosol and general transport processes of polluted air masses into the high Arctic. Based on CO and CO2 measurements and kinematic 10-day back trajectories we analyze the transport regimes prevalent during spring (RACEPAC 2014 and NETCARE 2015) and summer (NETCARE 2014) in the observed region. Whereas the eastern part of the Canadian Arctic is affected by air masses with their origin in Asia, in the central and western parts of the Canadian and European Arctic air masses from North America are predominant at the time of the measurement. In general the more northern parts of the Arctic were relatively unaffected by pollution from mid-latitudes since air masses mostly travel within the polar dome, being quite isolated. Associated mixing ratios of CO and CO2 fit into the seasonal cycle observed at NOAA ground stations throughout the Arctic, but show a more mid-latitudinal characteristic at higher altitudes. The transition is remarkably sharp and allows for a chemical definition of the polar dome. At low altitudes, synoptic disturbances transport polluted air masses from mid-latitudes into regions of the polar dome. These air masses contribute to the Arctic pollution background, but also

  14. Intracellular Trafficking Network of Protein Nanocapsules: Endocytosis, Exocytosis and Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinxie; Zhang, Xudong; Liu, Gan; Chang, Danfeng; Liang, Xin; Zhu, Xianbing; Tao, Wei; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane vesicle system is a complex transport system that includes endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy. However, the details of the intracellular trafficking pathway of nanoparticles in cells have been poorly investigated. Here, we investigate in detail the intracellular trafficking pathway of protein nanocapsules using more than 30 Rab proteins as markers of multiple trafficking vesicles in endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy. We observed that FITC-labeled protein nanoparticles were internalized by the cells mainly through Arf6-dependent endocytosis and Rab34-mediated micropinocytosis. In addition to this classic pathway: early endosome (EEs)/late endosome (LEs) to lysosome, we identified two novel transport pathways: micropinocytosis (Rab34 positive)-LEs (Rab7 positive)-lysosome pathway and EEs-liposome (Rab18 positive)-lysosome pathway. Moreover, the cells use slow endocytosis recycling pathway (Rab11 and Rab35 positive vesicles) and GLUT4 exocytosis vesicles (Rab8 and Rab10 positive) transport the protein nanocapsules out of the cells. In addition, protein nanoparticles are observed in autophagosomes, which receive protein nanocapsules through multiple endocytosis vesicles. Using autophagy inhibitor to block these transport pathways could prevent the degradation of nanoparticles through lysosomes. Using Rab proteins as vesicle markers to investigation the detail intracellular trafficking of the protein nanocapsules, will provide new targets to interfere the cellular behaver of the nanoparticles, and improve the therapeutic effect of nanomedicine. PMID:27698943

  15. Cell-penetrating antimicrobial peptides - prospectives for targeting intracellular infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahnsen, Jesper S; Franzyk, Henrik; Sayers, Edward J;

    2015-01-01

    . TPk showed the highest antibacterial activity. SA-3 exhibited selective disruption of liposomes mimicking Gram-positive and Gram-negative membranes. CONCLUSION: PK-12-KKP is an unlikely candidate for targeting intracellular bacteria, as the eukaryotic cell-penetrating ability is poor. SA-3, affected...

  16. Superdiffusion dominates intracellular particle motion in the supercrowded space of pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii

    CERN Document Server

    Reverey, J F; Bao, H; Leippe, M; Metzler, R; Selhuber-Unkel, C

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoebae are free-living protists and human pathogens, whose cellular functions and pathogenicity strongly depend on the transport of intracellular vesicles and granules through the cytosol. Using high-speed live cell imaging in combination with single-particle tracking analysis, we show here that the motion of endogenous intracellular particles in the size range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers in Acanthamoeba castellanii is strongly superdiffusive and influenced by cell locomotion, cytoskeletal elements, and myosin II. We demonstrate that cell locomotion significantly contributes to intracellular particle motion, but is clearly not the only origin of superdiffusivity. By analyzing the contribution of microtubules, actin, and myosin II motors we show that myosin II is a major driving force of intracellular motion in A. castellanii. The cytoplasm of A. castellanii is supercrowded with intracellular vesicles and granules, such that significant intracellular motion can only be achieved ...

  17. Superdiffusion dominates intracellular particle motion in the supercrowded cytoplasm of pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverey, Julia F.; Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Bao, Han; Leippe, Matthias; Metzler, Ralf; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Acanthamoebae are free-living protists and human pathogens, whose cellular functions and pathogenicity strongly depend on the transport of intracellular vesicles and granules through the cytosol. Using high-speed live cell imaging in combination with single-particle tracking analysis, we show here that the motion of endogenous intracellular particles in the size range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers in Acanthamoeba castellanii is strongly superdiffusive and influenced by cell locomotion, cytoskeletal elements, and myosin II. We demonstrate that cell locomotion significantly contributes to intracellular particle motion, but is clearly not the only origin of superdiffusivity. By analyzing the contribution of microtubules, actin, and myosin II motors we show that myosin II is a major driving force of intracellular motion in A. castellanii. The cytoplasm of A. castellanii is supercrowded with intracellular vesicles and granules, such that significant intracellular motion can only be achieved by actively driven motion, while purely thermally driven diffusion is negligible.

  18. Transferrin iron uptake is stimulated by ascorbate via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Darius J R; Chikhani, Sherin; Richardson, Vera; Richardson, Des R

    2013-06-01

    Although ascorbate has long been known to stimulate dietary iron (Fe) absorption and non-transferrin Fe uptake, the role of ascorbate in transferrin Fe uptake is unknown. Transferrin is a serum Fe transport protein supplying almost all cellular Fe under physiological conditions. We sought to examine ascorbate's role in this process, particularly as cultured cells are typically ascorbate-deficient. At typical plasma concentrations, ascorbate significantly increased (59)Fe uptake from transferrin by 1.5-2-fold in a range of cells. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced ferritin expression and increased (59)Fe accumulation in ferritin. The lack of effect of cycloheximide or the cytosolic aconitase inhibitor, oxalomalate, on ascorbate-mediated (59)Fe uptake from transferrin indicate increased ferritin synthesis or cytosolic aconitase activity was not responsible for ascorbate's activity. Experiments with membrane-permeant and -impermeant ascorbate-oxidizing reagents indicate that while extracellular ascorbate is required for stimulation of (59)Fe uptake from (59)Fe-citrate, only intracellular ascorbate is needed for transferrin (59)Fe uptake. Additionally, experiments with l-ascorbate analogs indicate ascorbate's reducing ene-diol moiety is necessary for its stimulatory activity. Importantly, neither N-acetylcysteine nor buthionine sulfoximine, which increase or decrease intracellular glutathione, respectively, affected transferrin-dependent (59)Fe uptake. Thus, ascorbate's stimulatory effect is not due to a general increase in cellular reducing capacity. Ascorbate also did not affect expression of transferrin receptor 1 or (125)I-transferrin cellular flux. However, transferrin receptors, endocytosis, vacuolar-type ATPase activity and endosomal acidification were required for ascorbate's stimulatory activity. Therefore, ascorbate is a novel modulator of the classical transferrin Fe uptake pathway, acting via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

  19. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  20. Effects of citalopram and escitalopram on fMRI response to affective stimuli in healthy volunteers selected by serotonin transporter genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michael E; Lauriat, Tara L; Lowen, Steven B; Churchill, Jeffrey H; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-09-30

    This study was designed to assess whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following antidepressant administration (pharmaco-fMRI) is sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in patterns of activation between enantiomers of the same compound. Healthy adult males (n=11) participated in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial with three medication periods during which they received citalopram (racemic mixture), escitalopram (S-citalopram alone), or placebo for 2 weeks. All participants had high expression serotonin transporter genotypes. An fMRI scan that included passive viewing of overt and covert affective faces and affective words was performed after each medication period. Activation in response to overt faces was greater following escitalopram than following citalopram in the right insula, thalamus, and putamen when the faces were compared with a fixation stimulus. For the rapid covert presentation, a greater response was observed in the left middle temporal gyrus in the happy versus fearful contrast following escitalopram than following citalopram. Thus, the combination of genomics and fMRI was successful in discriminating between two very similar drugs. However, the pattern of activation observed suggests that further studies are indicated to understand how to optimally combine the two techniques.

  1. Intracardiac intracellular angiotensin system in diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, R.; Yong, Q.C.; Thomas, C.M.G.; Baker, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has mainly been categorized as a circulating and a local tissue RAS. A new component of the local system, known as the intracellular RAS, has recently been described. The intracellular RAS is defined as synthesis and action of ANG II intracellularly. This RAS appea

  2. Cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke E Tvermoes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to cadmium is associated with human pathologies and altered gene expression. The molecular mechanisms by which cadmium affects transcription remain unclear. It has been proposed that cadmium activates transcription by altering intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+](i and disrupting calcium-mediated intracellular signaling processes. This hypothesis is based on several studies that may be technically problematic; including the use of BAPTA chelators, BAPTA-based fluorescent sensors, and cytotoxic concentrations of metal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present report, the effects of cadmium on [Ca(2+](i under non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic conditions was monitored using the protein-based calcium sensor yellow cameleon (YC3.60, which was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. In HEK293 constitutively expressing YC3.60, this calcium sensor was found to be insensitive to cadmium. Exposing HEK293::YC3.60 cells to non-cytotoxic cadmium concentrations was sufficient to induce transcription of cadmium-responsive genes but did not affect [Ca(2+](i mobilization or increase steady-state mRNA levels of calcium-responsive genes. In contrast, exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of cadmium significantly reduced intracellular calcium stores and altered calcium-responsive gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that at low levels, cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization. The results also support a model whereby cytotoxic levels of cadmium activate calcium-responsive transcription as a general response to metal-induced intracellular damage and not via a specific mechanism. Thus, the modulation of intracellular calcium may not be a primary mechanism by which cadmium regulates transcription.

  3. Exploring anti-bacterial compounds against intracellular Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Harrison

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an 'accidental' human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target.

  4. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Patrick M.; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A. F.

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28005987

  5. Stress induced Salmonella Typhimurium recrudescence in pigs coincides with cortisol induced increased intracellular proliferation in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbrugghe Elin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in the development of carriers that intermittently excrete Salmonella in very low numbers. During periods of stress, for example transport to the slaughterhouse, recrudescence of Salmonella may occur, but the mechanism of this stress related recrudescence is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of the stress hormone cortisol in Salmonella recrudescence by pigs. We showed that a 24 h feed withdrawal increases the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in pigs, which is correlated with increased serum cortisol levels. A second in vivo trial demonstrated that stress related recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs can be induced by intramuscular injection of dexamethasone. Furthermore, we found that cortisol, but not epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, promotes intracellular proliferation of Salmonella Typhimurium in primary porcine alveolar macrophages, but not in intestinal epithelial cells and a transformed cell line of porcine alveolar macrophages. A microarray based transcriptomic analysis revealed that cortisol did not directly affect the growth or the gene expression or Salmonella Typhimurium in a rich medium, which implies that the enhanced intracellular proliferation of the bacterium is probably caused by an indirect effect through the cell. These results highlight the role of cortisol in the recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium by pigs and they provide new evidence for the role of microbial endocrinology in host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Methods to analyze subcellular localization and intracellular trafficking of Claudin-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausalya, P Jaya; Hunziker, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The integral tight junction protein Claudin-16 (Cldn16) is predominantly expressed in renal epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop where, together with claudin-19, it forms a cation-selective pore that allows influx of Na+ from the interstitial fluid into the lumen of the kidney tubule. This leads to an electrochemical gradient that drives the reabsorbtion of Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions from the renal filtrate. Mutations in the Cldn16 gene have been identified in patients suffering from familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, with excessive renal wastage of Mg2+ and Ca2+ being a hallmark of this condition. Studies into the mechanism by which mutations impair Cldn16 function have shown that although several mutations affect paracellular ion transport, many interfere with intracellular trafficking of Cldn16, ultimately compromising its localization to TJs. Here, we describe the experimental approaches that can be used to monitor intracellular localization and trafficking of Cldn16. These methods can easily be adapted to study other claudins, provided suitable antibodies are available.

  7. The Intracellular Destiny of the Protein Corona: A Study on its Cellular Internalization and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Filippo; Garry, David; Monopoli, Marco P; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2016-11-22

    It has been well established that the early stages of nanoparticle-cell interactions are governed, at least in part, by the layer of proteins and other biomolecules adsorbed and slowly exchanged with the surrounding biological media (biomolecular corona). Subsequent to membrane interactions, nanoparticles are typically internalized into the cell and trafficked along defined pathways such as, in many cases, the endolysosomal pathway. Indeed, if the original corona is partially retained on the nanoparticle surface, the biomolecules in this layer may play an important role in determining subsequent cellular processing. In this work, using a combination of organelle separation and fluorescence labeling of the initial extracellular corona, we clarify its intracellular evolution as nanoparticles travel within the cell. We show that specific proteins present in the original protein corona are retained on the nanoparticles until they accumulate in lysosomes, and, once there, they are degraded. We also report on how different bare surfaces (amino and carboxyl modified) affect the details of this evolution. One overarching discovery is that the same serum proteins can exhibit different intracellular processing when carried inside cells by nanoparticles, as components of their corona, compared to what is observed when they are transported freely from the extracellular medium.

  8. Personality and serotonin transporter genotype interact with social context to affect immunity and viral set-point in simian immunodeficiency virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, John P; Abel, Kristina; Mendoza, Sally P; Blozis, Shelley A; McChesney, Michael B; Cole, Steve W; Mason, William A

    2008-07-01

    From the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, stress has been a suspected contributor to the wide variation seen in disease progression, and some evidence supports this idea. Not all individuals respond to a stressor in the same way, however, and little is known about the biological mechanisms by which variations in individuals' responses to their environment affect disease-relevant immunologic processes. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus/rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we explored how personality (Sociability) and genotype (serotonin transporter promoter) independently interact with social context (Stable or Unstable social conditions) to influence behavioral expression, plasma cortisol concentrations, SIV-specific IgG, and expression of genes associated with Type I interferon early in infection. SIV viral RNA set-point was strongly and negatively correlated with survival as expected. Set-point was also associated with expression of interferon-stimulated genes, with CXCR3 expression, and with SIV-specific IgG titers. Poorer immune responses, in turn, were associated with display of sustained aggression and submission. Personality and genotype acted independently as well as in interaction with social condition to affect behavioral responses. Together, the data support an "interactionist" perspective [Eysenck, H.J., 1991. Personality, stress and disease: an interactionist perspective. Psychol. Inquiry 2, 221-232] on disease. Given that an important goal of HIV treatment is to maintain viral set-point as low as possible, our data suggest that supplementing anti-retroviral therapy with behavioral or pharmacologic modulation of other aspects of an organism's functioning might prolong survival, particularly among individuals living under conditions of threat or uncertainty.

  9. Flavonoid-mediated inhibition of intestinal ABC transporters may affect the oral bioavailability of drugs, food-borne toxic compounds and bioactive ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, W.; Schutte, M.E.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The transcellular transport of ingested food ingredients across the intestinal epithelial barrier is an important factor determining bioavailability upon oral intake. This transcellular transport of many chemicals, food ingredients, drugs or toxic compounds over the intestinal epithelium can be high

  10. Palladium-mediated intracellular chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Rahimi M.; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Johansson, Emma M. V.; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M.; Bradley, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Many important intracellular biochemical reactions are modulated by transition metals, typically in the form of metalloproteins. The ability to carry out selective transformations inside a cell would allow researchers to manipulate or interrogate innumerable biological processes. Here, we show that palladium nanoparticles trapped within polystyrene microspheres can enter cells and mediate a variety of Pd0-catalysed reactions, such as allylcarbamate cleavage and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling. The work provides the basis for the customization of heterogeneous unnatural catalysts as tools to carry out artificial chemistries within cells. Such in cellulo synthesis has potential for a plethora of applications ranging from cellular labelling to synthesis of modulators or inhibitors of cell function.

  11. Characteristics, sources, and transport of aerosols measured in spring 2008 during the aerosol, radiation, and cloud processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, C. A.; Cozic, J.; Bahreini, R.; Froyd, K. D.; Middlebrook, A. M.; McComiskey, A.; Brioude, J.; Cooper, O. R.; Stohl, A.; Aikin, K. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Gao, R.-S.; Gore, W.; Holloway, J. S.; Hübler, G.; Jefferson, A.; Lack, D. A.; Lance, S.; Moore, R. H.; Murphy, D. M.; Nenes, A.; Novelli, P. C.; Nowak, J. B.; Ogren, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Pierce, R. B.; Pilewskie, P.; Quinn, P. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schmidt, K. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Sodemann, H.; Spackman, J. R.; Stark, H.; Thomson, D. S.; Thornberry, T.; Veres, P.; Watts, L. A.; Warneke, C.; Wollny, A. G.

    2011-03-01

    We present an overview of the background, scientific goals, and execution of the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) project of April 2008. We then summarize airborne measurements, made in the troposphere of the Alaskan Arctic, of aerosol particle size distributions, composition, and optical properties and discuss the sources and transport of the aerosols. The aerosol data were grouped into four categories based on gas-phase composition. First, the background troposphere contained a relatively diffuse, sulfate-rich aerosol extending from the top of the sea-ice inversion layer to 7.4 km altitude. Second, a region of depleted (relative to the background) aerosol was present within the surface inversion layer over sea-ice. Third, layers of dense, organic-rich smoke from open biomass fires in southern Russia and southeastern Siberia were frequently encountered at all altitudes from the top of the inversion layer to 7.1 km. Finally, some aerosol layers were dominated by components originating from fossil fuel combustion. Of these four categories measured during ARCPAC, the diffuse background aerosol was most similar to the average springtime aerosol properties observed at a long-term monitoring site at Barrow, Alaska. The biomass burning (BB) and fossil fuel layers were present above the sea-ice inversion layer and did not reach the sea-ice surface during the course of the ARCPAC measurements. The BB aerosol layers were highly scattering and were moderately hygroscopic. On average, the layers produced a noontime net heating of ~0.1 K day-1 between 3 and 7 km and a slight cooling at the surface. The ratios of particle mass to carbon monoxide (CO) in the BB plumes, which had been transported over distances >5000 km, were comparable to the high end of literature values derived from previous measurements in wildfire smoke. These ratios suggest minimal precipitation scavenging and removal of the BB particles between the time they were

  12. Characteristics, sources, and transport of aerosols measured in spring 2008 during the aerosol, radiation, and cloud processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Brock

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the background, scientific goals, and execution of the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC project of April 2008. We then summarize airborne measurements, made in the troposphere of the Alaskan Arctic, of aerosol particle size distributions, composition, and optical properties and discuss the sources and transport of the aerosols. The aerosol data were grouped into four categories based on gas-phase composition. First, the background troposphere contained a relatively diffuse, sulfate-rich aerosol extending from the top of the sea-ice inversion layer to 7.4 km altitude. Second, a region of depleted (relative to the background aerosol was present within the surface inversion layer over sea-ice. Third, layers of dense, organic-rich smoke from open biomass fires in southern Russia and southeastern Siberia were frequently encountered at all altitudes from the top of the inversion layer to 7.1 km. Finally, some aerosol layers were dominated by components originating from fossil fuel combustion.

    Of these four categories measured during ARCPAC, the diffuse background aerosol was most similar to the average springtime aerosol properties observed at a long-term monitoring site at Barrow, Alaska. The biomass burning (BB and fossil fuel layers were present above the sea-ice inversion layer and did not reach the sea-ice surface during the course of the ARCPAC measurements. The BB aerosol layers were highly scattering and were moderately hygroscopic. On average, the layers produced a noontime net heating of ~0.1 K day−1 between 3 and 7 km and a slight cooling at the surface. The ratios of particle mass to carbon monoxide (CO in the BB plumes, which had been transported over distances >5000 km, were comparable to the high end of literature values derived from previous measurements in wildfire smoke. These ratios suggest minimal precipitation scavenging and removal of the BB

  13. Characteristics, sources, and transport of aerosols measured in spring 2008 during the aerosol, radiation, and cloud processes affecting Arctic climate (ARCPAC project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Brock

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the background, scientific goals, and execution of the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC project of April 2008. We then summarize airborne measurements, made in the troposphere of the Alaskan Arctic, of aerosol particle size distributions, composition, and optical properties and discuss the sources and transport of the aerosols. The aerosol data were grouped into four categories based on gas-phase composition. First, the background troposphere contained a relatively diffuse, sulfate-rich aerosol extending from the top of the sea-ice inversion layer to 7.4 km altitude. Second, a region of depleted (relative to the background aerosol was present within the surface inversion layer over sea-ice. Third, layers of dense, organic-rich smoke from open biomass fires in Southern Russia and Southeastern Siberia were frequently encountered at all altitudes from the top of the inversion layer to 7.1 km. Finally, some aerosol layers were dominated by components originating from fossil fuel combustion.

    Of these four categories measured during ARCPAC, the diffuse background aerosol was most similar to the average springtime aerosol properties observed at a long-term monitoring site at Barrow, Alaska. The biomass burning (BB and fossil fuel layers were present above the sea-ice inversion layer and did not reach the sea-ice surface during the course of the ARCPAC measurements. The BB aerosol layers were highly scattering and were moderately hygroscopic. On average, the layers produced a noontime net heating of ~0.1 K day−1 between 2 and 7 km and a~slight cooling at the surface. The ratios of particle mass to carbon monoxide (CO in the BB plumes, which had been transported over distances >5000 km, were comparable to the high end of literature values derived from previous measurements in fresh wildfire smoke. These ratios suggest minimal precipitation scavenging and removal of

  14. Non-contact intracellular binding of chloroplasts in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Li, Baojun

    2015-06-01

    Non-contact intracellular binding and controllable manipulation of chloroplasts in vivo was demonstrated using an optical fiber probe. Launching a 980-nm laser beam into a fiber, which was placed about 3 μm above the surface of a living plant (Hydrilla verticillata) leaf, enabled stable binding of different numbers of chloroplasts, as well as their arrangement into one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays inside the leaf without damaging the chloroplasts. Additionally, the formed chloroplast chains were controllably transported inside the living cells. The optical force exerted on the chloroplasts was calculated to explain the experimental results. This method provides a flexible method for studying intracellular organelle interaction with highly organized organelle-organelle contact in vivo in a non-contact manner.

  15. Legionella pneumophila transcriptome during intracellular multiplication in human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system (TFBSS, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins to host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular environment of A. castellanii has been investigated, much less is known about the Legionella transcriptional response inside human macrophages. In this study, the transcriptome of L. pneumophila was monitored during exponential and post-exponential phase in rich AYE broth as well as during infection of human cultured macrophages. This was accomplished with microarrays and an RNA amplification procedure called SCOTS to detect small amounts of mRNA from low numbers of intracellular bacteria. Among the genes induced intracellularly are those involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathways leading to L-arginine, L-histidine and L-proline as well as many transport systems involved in amino acid and iron uptake. Gene involved in catabolism of glycerol is also induced during intracellular growth and could be used as a carbon source. The genes encoding the Icm/Dot system are not differentially expressed inside cells compared to control bacteria grown in rich broth, but the genes encoding several translocated effectors are strongly induced. Moreover, we used the transcriptome data to predict previously unrecognized Icm/Dot effector genes based on their expression pattern and confirmed translocation for three candidates. This study provides a comprehensive view of how L. pneumophila responds to the human macrophage intracellular environment.

  16. Transporters in human platelets: physiologic function and impact for pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Greinacher, Andreas; Kroemer, Heyo K

    2012-04-12

    Platelets store signaling molecules (eg, serotonin and ADP) within their granules. Transporters mediate accumulation of these molecules in platelet granules and, on platelet activation, their translocation across the plasma membrane. The balance between transporter-mediated uptake and elimination of signaling molecules and drugs in platelets determines their intracellular concentrations and effects. Several members of the 2 major transporter families, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and solute carriers (SLCs), have been identified in platelets. An example of an ABC transporter is MRP4 (ABCC4), which facilitates ADP accumulation in dense granules. MRP4 is a versatile transporter, and various additional functions have been proposed, notably lipid mediator release and a role in aspirin resistance. Several other ABC proteins have been detected in platelets with functions in glutathione and lipid homeostasis. The serotonin transporter (SERT, SLC6A4) in the platelet plasma membrane represents a well-characterized example of the SLC family. Moreover, recent experiments indicate expression of OATP2B1 (SLCO2B1), a high affinity transporter for certain statins, in platelets. Changes in transporter localization and expression can affect platelet function and drug sensitivity. This review summarizes available data on the physiologic and pharmacologic role of transporters in platelets.

  17. Hydroxytyrosol increases norepinephrine transporter function in pheochromocytoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzon-Toro, Berta [Institute of Parasitology and Biomedicine ' Lopez-Neyra' , Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), 18100 Granada (Spain); Geerlings, Arjan [Puleva Biotech, 18004 Granada (Spain); Hilfiker, Sabine [Institute of Parasitology and Biomedicine ' Lopez-Neyra' , Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), 18100 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: sabine.hilfiker@ipb.csic.es

    2008-10-15

    Introduction: The norepinephrine transporter is responsible for the intracellular uptake of {sup 131}I- iodometaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 131}I-MIBG), which is used for the diagnostic localization and treatment of pheochromocytomas as well as other tumors such as neuroblastomas and carcinoids. This agent is variably delivered into tumor cells by the norepinephrine transporter, but few studies have shown treatments that work to increase norepinephrine transporter activity. The objective of the present study was to test the possible beneficial effects of hydroxytyrosol in enhancing norepinephrine transporter function, which may have implications for its combined use with {sup 131}I-MIBG in the diagnosis and treatment of pheochromocytomas. Methods: Rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells were labeled with [{sup 3}H]-norepinephrine in the presence or absence of different concentrations of hydroxytyrosol, a naturally occurring compound with strong antioxidant properties, followed by measurements of uptake and release of radiolabeled norepinephrine. Results: Hydroxytyrosol pronouncedly increased norepinephrine transporter activity, with the rapid onset excluding effects on norepinephrine transporter expression levels. Concomitant with increased norepinephrine transporter activity, hydroxytyrosol caused a decrease of both spontaneous and evoked norepinephrine release, indicating that it affects pre-existing plasma membrane-associated norepinephrine transporter, rather than the incorporation of novel norepinephrine transporter molecules into the plasma membrane. Conclusion: Hydroxytyrosol potently enhances norepinephrine transporter activity in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, suggesting that combinatorial therapy employing hydroxytyrosol may improve the effectiveness of {sup 131}I-MIBG as a diagnosis and treatment modality.

  18. Structural determinants of NH3 and NH4+ transport by mouse Rhbg, a renal Rh glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Le, Trang; Rabon, Edd; Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2016-12-01

    Renal Rhbg is localized to the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells and is involved in NH3/NH4(+) transport. The structure of Rhbg is not yet resolved; however, a high-resolution crystal structure of AmtB, a bacterial homolog of Rh, has been determined. We aligned the sequence of Rhbg to that of AmtB and identified important sites of Rhbg that may affect transport. Our analysis positioned three conserved amino acids, histidine 183 (H183), histidine 342 (H342), and tryptophan 230 (W230), within the hydrophobic pore where they presumably serve to control NH3 transport. A fourth residue, phenylalanine 128 (F128) was positioned at the upper vestibule, presumably contributing to recruitment of NH4(+) We generated three mutations each of H183, H342, W230, and F128 and expressed them in frog oocytes. Immunolabeling showed that W230 and F128 mutants were localized to the cell membrane, whereas H183 and H342 staining was diffuse and mostly intracellular. To determine function, we compared measurements of NH3/NH4(+) and methyl amine (MA)/methyl ammonium (MA(+))-induced currents, intracellular pH, and surface pH (pHs) among oocytes expressing the mutants, Rhbg, or injected with H2O. In H183 and W230 mutants, NH4(+)-induced current and intracellular acidification were inhibited compared with that of Rhbg, and MA-induced intracellular alkalinization was completely absent. Expression of H183A or W230A mutants inhibited NH3/NH4(+)- and MA/MA(+)-induced decrease in pHs to the level observed in H2O-injected oocytes. Mutations of F128 did not significantly affect transport of NH3 or NH4(+) These data demonstrated that mutating H183 or W230 caused loss of function but not F128. H183 and H342 may affect membrane expression of the transporter.

  19. Characterization of cadmium plasma membrane transport in gills of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, P.; Custódio, M.R. [Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, #101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Zanotto, F.P., E-mail: fzanotto@usp.br [Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa 14, #101, São Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Três de Maio 100, São Paulo 04044-020 (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cd{sup 2+} gill cell transport, a non-essential toxic metal, was characterized in a hypo-hyper-regulating mangrove crab Ucides cordatus. • Cd{sup 2+} enter gill cells through Ca{sup 2+} channels and is dependent of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. • Route of entry in gill cells also involves a Cd{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} (2Na) exchanger. • Cd transport depends on Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and gill cell electrochemical gradient. • Vanadate inhibits gill Cd{sup 2+} transport and ouabain increase gill Cd{sup 2+} transport. - Abstract: Membrane pathway for intracellular cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) accumulation is not fully elucidated in many organisms and has not been studied in crab gill cells. To characterize membrane Cd{sup 2+} transport of anterior and posterior gill cells of Ucides cordatus, a hypo-hyper-regulating crab, a change in intracellular Cd{sup 2+} concentration under various experimental conditions was examined by using FluoZin, a fluorescent probe. The membrane Cd{sup 2+} transport was estimated by the augmentation of FluoZin fluorescence induced by extracellular application of CdCl{sub 2} and different inhibitors. Addition of extracellular calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) to the cells affected little the fluorescence of FluoZin, confirming that Cd{sup 2+} was the main ion increasing intracellular fluorescence. Ca{sup 2+} channels blockers (nimodipine and verapamil) decreased Cd{sup 2+} influx as well as vanadate, a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase blocker. Chelating intracellular Ca{sup 2+} (BAPTA) decreased Cd{sup 2+} influx in gill cells, while increasing intracellular Ca{sup 2+} (caffeine) augmented Cd influx. Cd{sup 2+} and ATP added at different temporal conditions were not effective at increasing intracellular Cd{sup 2+} accumulation. Ouabain (Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase inhibitor) increased Cd{sup 2+} influx probably through a change in intracellular Na and/or a change in cell membrane potential. Routes of Cd{sup 2+} influx, a non-essential metal, through the

  20. Substrate affinity of photosensitizers derived from chlorophyll-a: the ABCG2 transporter affects the phototoxic response of side population stem cell-like cancer cells to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Janet; Jackson, Jennifer D; Zheng, Xiang; Pandey, Suresh K; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2010-10-04

    Photosensitizers (PS) synthesized with the aim of optimizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors do not always fulfill their potential when tested in vitro and in vivo in different tumor models. The ATP-dependent transporter ABCG2, a multidrug resistant pump expressed at variable levels in cancerous cells, can bind and efflux a wide range of structurally different classes of compounds including several PS used preclinically and clinically such as porphyrins and chlorins. ABCG2 may lower intracellular levels of substrate PS below the threshold for cell death in tumors treated by PDT, leaving resistant cells to repopulate the tumor. To determine some of the structural factors that affect substrate affinity of PS for ABCG2, we used an ABCG2-expressing cell line (HEK 293 482R) and its nonexpressing counterpart, and tyrosine kinase ABCG2 inhibitors in a simple flow cytometric assay to identify PS effluxed by the ABCG2 pump. We tested a series of conjugates of substrate PS with different groups attached at different positions on the tetrapyrrole macrocycle to examine whether a change in affinity for the pump occurred and whether such changes depended on the position or the structure/type of the attached group. PS without substitutions including pyropheophorbides and purpurinimides were generally substrates for ABCG2, but carbohydrate groups conjugated at positions 8, 12, 13, and 17 but not at position 3 abrogated ABCG2 affinity regardless of structure or linking moiety. At position 3, affinity was retained with the addition of iodobenzene, alkyl chains and monosaccharides, but not with disaccharides. This suggests that structural characteristics at position 3 may offer important contributions to requirements for binding to ABCG2. We examined several tumor cell lines for ABCG2 activity, and found that although some cell lines had negligible ABCG2 activity in bulk, they contained a small ABCG2-expressing side population (SP) thought to contain cells which are responsible

  1. Hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer for intracellular thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Okabe, Kohki; Funatsu, Takashi; Harada, Yoshie; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2009-03-01

    The first methodology to measure intracellular temperature is described. A highly hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer developed for this purpose stays in the cytoplasm and emits stronger fluorescence at a higher temperature. Thus, intracellular temperature variations associated with biological processes can be monitored by this novel thermometer with a temperature resolution of better than 0.5 degrees C.

  2. Intracellular Signals of T Cell Costimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxun Song; Fengyang Tylan Lei; Xiaofang Xiong; Rizwanul Haque

    2008-01-01

    Ligation of T cell receptor (TCR) alone is insufficient to induce full activation of T lymphocytes. Additional ligand-receptor interactions (costimulation) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T cells are required. T cell costimulation has been shown to be essential for eliciting efficient T cell responses, involving all phases during T cell development. However, the mechanisms by which costimulation affects the function of T cells still need to be elucidated. In recent years, advances have been made in studies of costimulation as potential therapies in cancer, infectious disease as well as autoimmune disease. In this review, we discussed intracellular costimulation signals that regulate T cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cytokine production, survival, and memory development. In general, the pathway of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PBK)/protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) might be central to many costimulatory effects. Through these pathways, costimulation controls T-cell expansion and proliferation by maintenance of survivin and aurora B expression, and sustains long-term T-cell survival and memory development by regulating the expression of bci-2 family members. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2008;5(4):239-247.

  3. Ionome and expression level of Si transporter genes (Lsi1, Lsi2, and Lsi6) affected by Zn and Si interaction in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokor, Boris; Bokorová, Silvia; Ondoš, Slavomír; Švubová, Renáta; Lukačová, Zuzana; Hýblová, Michaela; Szemes, Tomáš; Lux, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential microelement involved in various plant physiological processes. However, in excess, Zn becomes toxic and represents serious problem for plants resulting in Zn toxicity symptoms and decreasing biomass production. The effect of high Zn and its combination with silicon (Si) on ionome and expression level of ZmLsi genes was investigated in maize (Zea mays, L; hybrid Novania). Plants were cultivated hydroponically in different treatments: control (C), Zn (800 μM ZnSO4 · 7H2O), Si5 (5 mM of sodium silicate solution), and Si5 + Zn (combination of Zn and Si treatments). Growth of plants cultivated for 10 days was significantly inhibited in the presence of high Zn concentration and also by Zn and Si interaction in plants. Based on principal component analysis (PCA) and mineral element concentration in tissues, root ionome was significantly altered in both Zn and Si5 + Zn treatments in comparison to control. Mineral elements Mn, Fe, Ca, P, Mg, Ni, Co, and K significantly decreased, and Se increased in Zn and Si5 + Zn treatments. Shoot ionome was less affected than root ionome. Concentration of shoot Cu, Mn, and P decreased, and Mo increased in Zn and Si5 + Zn treatments. The PCA also revealed that the responsibility for ionome changes is mainly due to Zn exposure and also, but less, by Si application to Zn stressed plants. Expression level of Lsi1 and Lsi2 genes for the Si influx and efflux transporters was downregulated in roots after Si supply and even more downregulated by Zinc alone and also by Zn and Si interaction. Expression level of shoot Lsi6 gene was differently regulated in the first and second leaf. These results indicate negative effect of high Zn alone and also in interaction with Si on Lsi gene expression level and together with ionomic data, it was shown that homeostatic network of mineral elements was disrupted and caused negative alterations in mineral nutrition of young maize plants.

  4. X-linked dystonia parkinsonism syndrome (XDP, lubag): disease-specific sequence change DSC3 in TAF1/DYT3 affects genes in vesicular transport and dopamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, Thilo; Nolte, Dagmar; Grznarova, Maria; Hofmann, Andrea; Schultze, Joachim L; Müller, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    X-chromosomal dystonia parkinsonism syndrome (XDP, 'lubag') is associated with sequence changes within the TAF1/DYT3 multiple transcript system. Although most sequence changes are intronic, one, disease-specific single-nucleotide change 3 (DSC3), is located within an exon (d4). Transcribed exon d4 occurs as part of multiple splice variants. These variants include exons d3 and d4 spliced to exons of TAF1, and an independent transcript composed of exons d2-d4. Location of DSC3 in exon d4 and utilization of this exon in multiple splice variants suggest an important role of DSC3 in the XDP pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we transfected neuroblastoma cells with four expression constructs, including exons d2-d4 [d2-d4/wild-type (wt) and d2-d4/DSC3] and d3-d4 (d3-d4/wt and d3-d4/DSC3). Expression profiling revealed a dramatic effect of DSC3 on overall gene expression. Three hundred and sixty-two genes differed between cells containing d2-d4/wt and d2-d4/DSC3. Annotation clustering revealed enrichment of genes related to vesicular transport, dopamine metabolism, synapse function, Ca(2+) metabolism and oxidative stress. Two hundred and eleven genes were differentially expressed in d3-d4/wt versus d3-d4/DSC3. Annotation clustering highlighted genes in signal transduction and cell-cell interaction. The data show an important role of physiologically occurring transcript d2-d4 in normal brain function. Interference with this role by DSC3 is a likely pathological mechanism in XDP. Disturbance of dopamine function and of Ca(2+) metabolism can explain abnormal movement; loss of protection against reactive oxygen species may account for the neurodegenerative changes in XDP. Although d3-d4 also affect genes potentially related to neurodegenerative processes, their physiologic role as splice variants of TAF1 awaits further exploration.

  5. Intracellular Assessment of ATP Levels in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palikaras, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells heavily depend on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generated by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) within mitochondria. ATP is the major energy currency molecule, which fuels cell to carry out numerous processes, including growth, differentiation, transportation and cell death among others (Khakh and Burnstock, 2009). Therefore, ATP levels can serve as a metabolic gauge for cellular homeostasis and survival (Artal-Sanz and Tavernarakis, 2009; Gomes et al., 2011; Palikaras et al., 2015). In this protocol, we describe a method for the determination of intracellular ATP levels using a bioluminescence approach in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:28194429

  6. Intracellular coagulation inhibits the extraction of proteins from Prochloron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, R.; Lewin, R. A.; Fall, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Protein extraction from the prokaryotic alga Prochloron LP (isolated from the ascidian host Lissoclinum patella) was complicated by an irreversible loss of cell fragility in the isolated algae. Accompanying this phenomenon, which is termed intracellular coagulation, was a redistribution of thylakoids around the cell periphery, a loss of photosynthetic O2 production, and a drastic decrease in the extractability of cell proteins. Procedures are described for the successful preparation and transport of cell extracts yielding the enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase as well as other soluble proteins.

  7. Silicon nanowires as intracellular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, John F.

    Semiconductor nanowire devices are an exciting class of materials for biomedical and electrophysiology applications, with current studies primarily delivering substrate bound devices through mechanical abrasion or electroporation. However, the ability to distribute these devices in a drug-like fashion is an important step in developing next-generation active therapeutic devices. In this work, we will discuss the interaction of label free Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with cellular systems, showing that they can be internalized in multiple cell lines, and undergo an active 'burst-like' transport process. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  8. Nearshore transport processes affecting the dilution and fate of energy-related contaminants. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, J. O.

    1980-07-15

    Research was conducted on physical oceanograhic processes off the Georgia Coast. Spatral variations in momentum and salt flux were measured to determine their importance in generating flow and salt transport. Analyses of data are presently underway.

  9. Enhanced intracellular delivery and antibacterial efficacy of enrofloxacin-loaded docosanoic acid solid lipid nanoparticles against intracellular Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuyu; Yang, Fei; Tao, Yanfei; Chen, Dongmei; Qu, Wei; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Pan, Yuanhu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2017-01-01

    Enrofloxacin-loaded docosanoic acid solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with different physicochemical properties were developed to enhance activity against intracellular Salmonella. Their cellular uptake, intracellular elimination and antibacterial activity were studied in RAW 264.7 cells. During the experimental period, SLN-encapsulated enrofloxacin accumulated in the cells approximately 27.06–37.71 times more efficiently than free drugs at the same extracellular concentration. After incubation for 0.5 h, the intracellular enrofloxacin was enhanced from 0.336 to 1.147 μg/mg of protein as the sizes of nanoparticles were increased from 150 to 605 nm, and from 0.960 to 1.147 μg/mg of protein when the charge was improved from −8.1 to −24.9 mv. The cellular uptake was more significantly influenced by the size than it was by the charge, and was not affected by whether the charge was positive or negative. The elimination of optimal SLN-encapsulated enrofloxacin from the cells was significantly slower than that of free enrofloxacin after removing extracellular drug. The inhibition effect against intracellular Salmonella CVCC541 of 0.24 and 0.06 μg/mL encapsulated enrofloxacin was stronger than 0.6 μg/mL free drug after all of the incubation periods and at 48 h, respectively. Docosanoic acid SLNs are thus considered as a promising carrier for intracellular bacterial treatment. PMID:28112240

  10. Stochastic resonance in an intracellular genetic perceptron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Russell; Blyuss, Oleg; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular genetic networks are more intelligent than was first assumed due to their ability to learn. One of the manifestations of this intelligence is the ability to learn associations of two stimuli within gene-regulating circuitry: Hebbian-type learning within the cellular life. However, gene expression is an intrinsically noisy process; hence, we investigate the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic noise on this kind of intracellular intelligence. We report a stochastic resonance in an intracellular associative genetic perceptron, a noise-induced phenomenon, which manifests itself in noise-induced increase of response in efficiency after the learning event under the conditions of optimal stochasticity.

  11. Regulation of intracellular Na+ in health and disease: pathophysiological mechanisms and implications for treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Coppini R; Ferrantini C; Mazzoni L; Sartiani L; Olivotto I; Poggesi C; Cerbai E; Mugelli A

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane sodium (Na+) fluxes and intracellular sodium homeostasis are central players in the physiology of the cardiac myocyte, since they are crucial for both cell excitability and for the regulation of the intracellular calcium concentration. Furthermore, Na+ fluxes across the membrane of mitochondria affect the concentration of protons and calcium in the matrix, regulating mitochondrial function. In this review we first analyze the main molecular determinants of sodium fluxes across t...

  12. Intracellular nitrate of marine diatoms as a driver of anaerobic nitrogen cycling in sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.;

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species...... store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom......-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly...

  13. Sulphate and Chloride-Dependent Potassium Transport in Human Erythrocytes are Affected by Crude Venom from Nematocysts of the Jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Morabito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been reported that biologically active compounds extracted from Cnidaria venom may induce damage by oxidative stress. Erythrocytes are constantly exposed to oxidative stresses, which can contribute to sulphydril (SH- group oxidation and cell membrane deformability accompanied with activation of K-Cl co-transport and inhibition of anion transport. In this regard, Band 3 protein is responsible for mediating the electroneutral exchange of chloride (Cl- for bicarbonate (HCO3-, particularly in erythrocytes, where it is the most abundant membrane protein. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of crude venom extracted from Pelagia noctiluca nematocysts on Band 3 -mediated anion transport in human erythrocytes. Methods: Erythrocytes were tested for SO42- uptake, K+ efflux, glutathione (GSH levels and concentration of SH- groups. Results: The rate constant of SO42- uptake decreased progressively to 58% of control with increasing venom doses, and showed a 28% decrease after 2 mM NEM treatment. These effects can be explained by oxidative stress, which was reflected by decreased GSH levels in venom-treated erythrocytes. Hence, the decreased efficiency of anion transport may be due to changes in Band 3 structure caused by SH-group oxidation and reduced GSH concentration. In addition, an increased Cl--dependent K+ efflux was observed in venom-treated erythrocytes. Conclusion: Our results suggest that crude venom from Pelagia noctiluca alters cell membrane transport in human erythrocytes.

  14. Auxin polar transport of etiolated epicotyls of ageotropum pea seedlings is not affected by gravistimulation: Relevance to automorphosis-like growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K.; Hoshino, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Ueda, J.

    Both true microgravity conditions in space STS-95 space experiment and simulated ones on a three-dimensional 3-D clinostat have been demonstrated to induce automorphosis in etiolated pea Pisum sativum L cv Alaska seedlings represented as epicotyl bending as well as changes in root growth direction and inhibition of hook formation and to alter the activities of auxin polar transport of epicotyls The fact that the application of inhibitors of auxin polar transport phenocopied automorphosis together with the result of detail kinetic analyses of epicotyl bending on the 3-D clinostat suggests that automorphosis of etiolated pea epicotyls is due to suppression of a negative gravitropic response on 1 g conditions and graviresponse of etiolated pea seedlings under 1 g conditions requires normal activities of auxin polar transport To study the role of auxin polar transport in graviresponse in early growth stage of etiolated pea seedlings effect of gravistimulation on auxin polar transport in epicotyls of Alaska pea seedlings was studied in comparison with that of the agravitropic pea mutant ageotropum seedlings Dry pea seeds whose embryo axes were set in a horizontal position referred to as horizontal position or an inclinational one to the gravity vector referred to as inclinational position allowed to germinate and grow in the dark for 2 5 days Epicotyls of etiolated Alaska pea seedlings grown under horizontal position showed negative gravitropisum due to relatively larger elongation in the proximal side to the cotyledons

  15. Dithiocarbamate fungicides increase intracellular Zn(2+) levels by increasing influx of Zn(2+) in rat thymic lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemoto-Kataoka, Yumiko; Oyama, Tomohiro M; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Oyama, Yasuo

    2015-07-25

    Dithiocarbamate fungicides are used as alternative antifouling agents to highly toxic organotin antifouling agents, such as tri-n-butyltin and triphenyltin. There are some concerns regarding their environmental and health risks. It has been shown that tri-n-butyltin increases intracellular Zn(2+) levels of mammalian lymphocytes. Therefore, we examined the effects of dithiocarbamate fungicides (Ziram, Thiram, and Zineb) on rat thymic lymphocytes using a flow-cytometric technique to elucidate how these fungicides affect intracellular Zn(2+) levels. We further determined whether the agents increase intracellular Zn(2+) and/or Ca(2+), because both Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) are intracellular signals in lymphocytes, and excessive increases in their intracellular concentrations can have adverse effects. Dithiocarbamate fungicides increased intracellular Zn(2+) levels, without affecting intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Ziram was the most potent compound, increasing intracellular Zn(2+) levels via Zn(2+) influx. Ziram (1μM) greatly decreased the cellular nonprotein thiol content, and Zn(2+) chelators attenuated the Ziram-induced decrease. Ziram increased the population of annexin V-positive cells in a Zn(2+)-dependent manner. Therefore, we propose that dithiocarbamate fungicides induce Zn(2+) influx, resulting in an excessive elevation of intracellular Zn(2+) levels, leading to the induction of apoptosis. This study gives a basic insight into the mechanisms of dithiocarbamate fungicide-induced adverse events.

  16. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kamp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations > 60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2-3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations.

  17. Collective motor dynamics in membrane transport in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaklee, Paige Marie

    2009-01-01

    Key cellular processes such as cell division, internal cellular organization, membrane compartmentalization and intracellular transport rely on motor proteins. Motor proteins, ATP-based mechanoenzymes, actively transport cargo throughout the cell by walking on cytoskeletal filaments. Motors have bee

  18. The Francisella intracellular life cycle: towards molecular mechanisms of intracellular survival and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eChong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The tularemia-causing bacterium Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular organism with a complex intracellular lifecycle that ensures its survival and proliferation in a variety of mammalian cell types, including professional phagocytes. Because this cycle is essential to Francisella pathogenesis and virulence, much research has focused on deciphering the mechanisms of its intracellular survival and replication and characterizing both bacterial and host determinants of the bacterium’s intracellular cycle. Studies of various strains and host cell models have led to the consensual paradigm of Francisella as a cytosolic pathogen, but also to some controversy about its intracellular cycle. In this review, we will detail major findings that have advanced our knowledge of Francisella intracellular survival strategies and also attempt to reconcile discrepancies that exist in our molecular understanding of the Francisella-phagocyte interaction.

  19. Potassium nutrition of ectomycorrhizal Pinus pinaster: overexpression of the Hebeloma cylindrosporum HcTrk1 transporter affects the translocation of both K(+) and phosphorus in the host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kevin; Delteil, Amandine; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Becquer, Adeline; Plassard, Claude; Sentenac, Hervé; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    Mycorrhizal associations are known to improve the hydro-mineral nutrition of their host plants. However, the importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis for plant potassium nutrition has so far been poorly studied. We therefore investigated the impact of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum on the potassium nutrition of Pinus pinaster and examined the involvement of the fungal potassium transporter HcTrk1. HcTrk1 transcripts and proteins were localized in ectomycorrhizas using in situ hybridization and EGFP translational fusion constructs. Importantly, an overexpression strategy was performed on a H. cylindrosporum endogenous gene in order to dissect the role of this transporter. The potassium nutrition of mycorrhizal pine plants was significantly improved under potassium-limiting conditions. Fungal strains overexpressing HcTrk1 reduced the translocation of potassium and phosphorus from the roots to the shoots of inoculated plants in mycorrhizal experiments. Furthermore, expression of HcTrk1 and the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 were reciprocally linked to the external inorganic phosphate and potassium availability. The development of these approaches provides a deeper insight into the role of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis on host plant K(+) nutrition and in particular, the K(+) transporter HcTrk1. The work augments our knowledge of the link between potassium and phosphorus nutrition via the mycorrhizal pathway.

  20. Multiple-motor based transport and its regulation by Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershinin, Michael; Carter, Brian C.; Razafsky, David S.; King, Stephen J.; Gross, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    Motor-based intracellular transport and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of a cell. Disruption of transport is linked to Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, many fundamental aspects of transport are poorly understood. An important issue is how cells achieve and regulate efficient long-distance transport. Mounting evidence suggests that many in vivo cargoes are transported along microtubules by more than one motor, but we do not know how multiple motors work together or can be regulated. Here we first show that multiple kinesin motors, working in conjunction, can achieve very long distance transport and apply significantly larger forces without the need of additional factors. We then demonstrate in vitro that the important microtubule-associated protein, tau, regulates the number of engaged kinesin motors per cargo via its local concentration on microtubules. This function of tau provides a previously unappreciated mechanism to regulate transport. By reducing motor reattachment rates, tau affects cargo travel distance, motive force, and cargo dispersal. We also show that different isoforms of tau, at concentrations similar to those in cells, have dramatically different potency. These results provide a well defined mechanism for how altered tau isoform levels could impair transport and thereby lead to neurodegeneration without the need of any other pathway. PMID:17190808

  1. Forced resurgence and targeting of intracellular uropathogenic Escherichia coli reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Blango

    Full Text Available Intracellular quiescent reservoirs of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, which can seed the bladder mucosa during the acute phase of a urinary tract infection (UTI, are protected from antibiotic treatments and are extremely difficult to eliminate. These reservoirs are a potential source for recurrent UTIs that affect millions annually. Here, using murine infection models and the bladder cell exfoliant chitosan, we demonstrate that intracellular UPEC populations shift within the stratified layers of the urothelium during the course of a UTI. Following invasion of the terminally differentiated superficial layer of epithelial cells that line the bladder lumen, UPEC can multiply and disseminate, eventually establishing reservoirs within underlying immature host cells. If given access, UPEC can invade the superficial and immature bladder cells equally well. As infected immature host cells differentiate and migrate towards the apical surface of the bladder, UPEC can reinitiate growth and discharge into the bladder lumen. By inducing the exfoliation of the superficial layers of the urothelium, chitosan stimulates rapid regenerative processes and the reactivation and efflux of quiescent intracellular UPEC reservoirs. When combined with antibiotics, chitosan treatment significantly reduces bacterial loads within the bladder and may therefore be of therapeutic value to individuals with chronic, recurrent UTIs.

  2. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Bouret

    Full Text Available We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  3. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.bhattacharjee@wur.nl [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Opstal, Edward J. van; Alink, Gerrit M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands); Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size {approx}45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size {approx}50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  4. Inositol transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sabine

    2015-04-28

    The cyclic polyol myo-inositol is a key molecule in many different metabolic pathways among all organisms; in addition, it is fundamental for osmotic balance in the mammalian brain. This review sums up inositol transporters from eukaryotic organisms, elucidating their vital role in regulating the intracellular distribution and uptake of inositol. They can be divided into two groups according to their transport mechanisms: (1) sodium ion coupled inositol transporters that belong to the Solute Carrier Families 5 and 6-like Superfamily and, (2) proton coupled inositol symporters that are members of the Major Facilitator Superfamily. Intriguingly members of both families offer promising targets for medical treatment of a variety of diseases.

  5. Transmembrane anion transport and cytotoxicity of synthetic tambjamine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Elsa; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Cortés-Arroyo, Susana; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2014-03-21

    Ten synthetic analogs of the marine alkaloids tambjamines, bearing aromatic enamine moieties, have been synthesized. These compounds proved to be highly efficient transmembrane anion transporters in model liposomes. Changes in the electronic nature of the substituents of the aromatic enamine or the alkoxy group of the central pyrrole group did not affect this anionophore activity. The in vitro activity of these compounds has also been studied. They trigger apoptosis in several cancer cell lines with IC50 values in the low micromolar range as well as modify the intracellular pH, inducing the basification of acidic organelles.

  6. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkedal Rikke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20°C in the absence and presence of creatine. Results Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. Conclusions The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that

  7. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  8. Intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Ogawa, Taisuke; Takada, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Fujii, Hiroaki; Ando, Masaki

    2014-11-01

    The role of perforant pathway-dentate granule cell synapses in cognitive behavior was examined focusing on synaptic Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus. Object recognition memory was transiently impaired when extracellular Zn(2+) levels were decreased by injection of clioquinol and N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylendediamine. To pursue the effect of the loss and/or blockade of Zn(2+) signaling in dentate granule cells, ZnAF-2DA (100 pmol, 0.1 mM/1 µl), an intracellular Zn(2+) chelator, was locally injected into the dentate molecular layer of rats. ZnAF-2DA injection, which was estimated to chelate intracellular Zn(2+) signaling only in the dentate gyrus, affected object recognition memory 1 h after training without affecting intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in the dentate molecular layer. In vivo dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP) was affected under the local perfusion of the recording region (the dentate granule cell layer) with 0.1 mM ZnAF-2DA, but not with 1-10 mM CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator, suggesting that the blockade of intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in dentate granule cells affects dentate gyrus LTP. The present study demonstrates that intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition memory, probably via dentate gyrus LTP expression.

  9. How planners' use and non-use of expert knowledge in land use and transport planning affect the goal achievement potential of plans? Experiences from three Scandinavian cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennøy, Aud; Hansson, Lisa; Lissandrello, Enza;

    2016-01-01

    the plans (if implemented) contribute to achieve defined objectives, which in this paper concern transition toward more sustainable mobility patterns and reduction of traffic volumes. The expert knowledge in question concerns how land use and transport systems developments influence traffic volumes in urban......Changing urban development in more sustainable directions poses numerous challenges for planning practitioners. Expert knowledge could be helpful for planners aiming at facing up to these challenges by developing innovative ways of meeting seemingly contradictive objectives and solving planning...... their planning problems. Instead, they rely on their embedded professional knowledge, which is sometimes outdated or misleading. It is found that changing towards land use and transport systems developments contributing to more sustainable mobility patterns requires considerable efforts from planning...

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana AtUTr7 Encodes a Golgi-Localized UDP-Glucose/UDP-Galactose Transporter that Affects Lateral Root Emergence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Handford; Cecilia Rodríguez-Furlán; Lorena Marchant; Marcelo Segura; Daniela Gómez; Elena Alvarez-Buyll; Guang-Yan Xiong; Markus Pauly; Ariel Orellana

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs) are antiporters comprising a gene family that plays a fundamental role in the biosynthesis of complex cell wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins in plants.However,due to the limited number of related mutants that have observable phenotypes,the biological function(s) of most NSTs in cell wall biosynthesis and assembly have remained elusive.Here,we report the characterization of AtUTr7 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.),which is homologous to multi-specific UDP-sugar transporters from Drosophila melanogaster,humans,and Caenorhabditis elegans.We show that AtUTr7 possesses the common structural characteristics conserved among NSTs.Using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged version,we demonstrate that AtUTr7 is localized in the Golgi apparatus.We also show that AtUTr7 is widely expressed,especially in the roots and in specific floral organs.Additionally,the results of an in vitro nucleotide sugar transport assay carried out with a tobacco and a yeast expression system suggest that AtUTr7 is capable of transferring UDP-Gal and UDP-GIc,but not a range of other UDP-and GDP-sugars,into the Golgi lumen.Mutants lacking expression of AtUTr7 exhibited an early proliferation of lateral roots as well as distorted root hairs when cultivated at high sucrose concentrations.Furthermore,the distribution of homogalacturonan with a low degree of methyl esterification differed in lateral root tips of the mutant compared to wild-type plants,although additional analytical procedures revealed no further differences in the composition of the root cell walls.This evidence suggests that the transport of UDP-Gal and UDP-GIc into the Golgi under conditions of high root biomass production plays a role in lateral root and root hair development.

  11. Factors affecting the fate and transport of glyphosate and AMPA into surface waters of agricultural watersheds in the United States and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, R.; Kalkhoff, S.; Capel, P.; Gregoire, C.

    2012-04-01

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is a herbicide used extensively in almost all agricultural and urban areas of the United States and Europe. Although, glyphosate is used widely throughout the world in the production of many crops, it is predominately used in the United States on soybeans, corn, potatoes, and cotton that have been genetically modified to be tolerant to glyphosate. From 1992 to 2007, the agricultural use of glyphosate has increased from less than 10,000 Mg to more than 80,000 Mg, respectively. The greatest areal use is in the midwestern United States where glyphosate is applied on transgenic corn and soybeans. Because of the difficulty and expense in analyzing for glyphosate and AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid, a primary glyphosate degradate) in water, there have been only small scale studies on the fate and transport of glyphosate. The characterization of the transport of glyphosate and AMPA on a watershed scale is lacking. Glyphosate and AMPA were frequently detected in the surface waters of 4 agricultural watersheds in studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the United States and at the Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg. Two of these basins were located in the midwestern United States where the major crops are corn and soybean, the third is located the lower Mississippi River Basin where the major crops are soybean, corn, rice, and cotton, and the fourth was located near Strasbourg, France where the use of glyphosate was on a vineyard. The load as a percent of use ranged from 0.009 to 0.86 percent and could be related to 3 factors: source strength, hydrology, and flowpath. Glyphosate use in a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water at the part per billion level; however, those watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff, and a flowpath that does not include transport through the soil.

  12. How do antimalarial drugs reach their intracellular targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eBasore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Drugs represent the primary treatment available for human malaria, as caused by Plasmodium spp. Currently approved drugs and antimalarial drug leads generally work against parasite enzymes or activities within infected erythrocytes. To reach their specific targets, these chemicals must cross at least three membranes beginning with the host cell membrane. Uptake at each membrane may involve partitioning and diffusion through the lipid bilayer or facilitated transport through channels or carriers. Here, we review the features of available antimalarials and examine whether transporters may be required for their uptake. Our computational analysis suggests that most antimalarials have high intrinsic membrane permeability, obviating the need for uptake via transporters; a subset of compounds appear to require facilitated uptake. We also review parasite and host transporters that may contribute to drug uptake. Broad permeability channels at the erythrocyte and parasitophorous vacuolar membranes of infected cells relax permeability constraints on antimalarial drug design; however, this uptake mechanism is prone to acquired resistance as the parasite may alter channel activity to reduce drug uptake. A better understanding of how antimalarial drugs reach their intracellular targets is critical to prioritizing drug leads for antimalarial development and may reveal new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Mechanisms Associated with Activation of Intracellular Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor, mGluR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; O'Malley, Karen L

    2017-01-01

    The group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5, is found on the cell surface as well as on intracellular membranes where it can mediate both overlapping and unique signaling effects. Previously we have shown that glutamate activates intracellular mGluR5 by entry through sodium-dependent transporters and/or cystine glutamate exchangers. Calibrated antibody labelling suggests that the glutamate concentration within neurons is quite high (~10 mM) raising the question as to whether intracellular mGluR5 is maximally activated at all times or whether a different ligand might be responsible for receptor activation. To address this issue, we used cellular, optical and molecular techniques to show that intracellular glutamate is largely sequestered in mitochondria; that the glutamate concentration necessary to activate intracellular mGluR5 is about ten-fold higher than what is necessary to activate cell surface mGluR5; and uncaging caged glutamate within neurons can directly activate the receptor. Thus these studies further the concept that glutamate itself serves as the ligand for intracellular mGluR5.

  14. Efficient intracellular delivery and improved biocompatibility of colloidal silver nanoparticles towards intracellular SERS immuno-sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Vinay; Srinivasan, Supriya; McGoron, Anthony J

    2015-06-21

    High throughput intracellular delivery strategies, electroporation, passive and TATHA2 facilitated diffusion of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are investigated for cellular toxicity and uptake using state-of-art analytical techniques. The TATHA2 facilitated approach efficiently delivered high payload with no toxicity, pre-requisites for intracellular applications of plasmonic metal nanoparticles (PMNPs) in sensing and therapeutics.

  15. Loss of hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-4alpha affects colonic ion transport and causes chronic inflammation resembling inflammatory bowel disease in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Darsigny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hnf4alpha, an epithelial specific transcriptional regulator, is decreased in inflammatory bowel disease and protects against chemically-induced colitis in mice. However, the precise role of this factor in maintaining normal inflammatory homeostasis of the intestine remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sole role of epithelial Hnf4alpha in the maintenance of gut inflammatory homeostasis in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here that specific epithelial deletion of Hnf4alpha in mice causes spontaneous chronic intestinal inflammation leading to focal areas of crypt dropout, increased cytokines and chemokines secretion, immune cell infiltrates and crypt hyperplasia. A gene profiling analysis in diseased Hnf4alpha null colon confirms profound genetic changes in cell death and proliferative behaviour related to cancer. Among the genes involved in the immune protection through epithelial barrier function, we identify the ion transporter claudin-15 to be down-modulated early in the colon of Hnf4alpha mutants. This coincides with a significant decrease of mucosal ion transport but not of barrier permeability in young animals prior to the manifestation of the disease. We confirm that claudin-15 is a direct Hnf4alpha gene target in the intestinal epithelial context and is down-modulated in mouse experimental colitis and inflammatory bowel disease. CONCLUSION: Our results highlight the critical role of Hnf4alpha to maintain intestinal inflammatory homeostasis during mouse adult life and uncover a novel function for Hnf4alpha in the regulation of claudin-15 expression. This establishes Hnf4alpha as a mediator of ion epithelial transport, an important process for the maintenance of gut inflammatory homeostasis.

  16. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Intracellular processing of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Skovbjerg, H; Norén, Ove

    1984-01-01

    The biosynthesis of pig small intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.23-62) was studied by labelling of organ cultured mucosal explants with [35S]methionine. The earliest detactable form of the enzyme was an intracellular, membrane-bound polypeptide of Mr 225 000, sensitive to endo H...... 000 polypeptide is of the same size as the mature lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and was the only form expressed in the microvillar membrane. Together, these data are indicative of an intracellular proteolytic cleavage during transport. The presence of leupeptin during labelling prevented the appearance...

  17. CorA, the magnesium/nickel/cobalt transporter, affects virulence and extracellular enzyme production in the soft rot pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersey, Caleb M; Agyemang, Paul A; Dumenyo, C Korsi

    2012-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora) is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes soft rot disease, characterized by water-soaked soft decay, resulting from the action of cell wall-degrading exoenzymes secreted by the pathogen. Virulence in soft rot bacteria is regulated by environmental factors, host and bacterial chemical signals, and a network of global and gene-specific bacterial regulators. We isolated a mini-Tn5 mutant of P. carotovorum that is reduced in the production of extracellular pectate lyase, protease, polygalacturonase and cellulase. The mutant is also decreased in virulence as it macerates less host tissues than its parent and is severely impaired in multiplication in planta. The inactivated gene responsible for the reduced virulent phenotype was identified as corA. CorA, a magnesium/nickel/cobalt membrane transporter, is the primary magnesium transporter for many bacteria. Compared with the parent, the CorA(-) mutant is cobalt resistant. The mutant phenotype was confirmed in parental strain P. carotovorum by marker exchange inactivation of corA. A functional corA(+) DNA from P. carotovorum restored exoenzyme production and pathogenicity to the mutants. The P. carotovorum corA(+) clone also restored motility and cobalt sensitivity to a CorA(-) mutant of Salmonella enterica. These data indicate that CorA is required for exoenzyme production and virulence in P. carotovorum.

  18. Leucine transport is affected by Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins in brush border membrane vesicles from Ostrinia nubilalis Hb (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Sesamia nonagrioides Lefebvre (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, M Giovanna; Caccia, Silvia; González-Cabrera, Joel; Ferré, Juan; Giordana, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The pore-forming activity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Fa and Cry1Ca toxins and their interaction with leucine transport mediated by the K(+)/leucine cotransporter were studied in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) isolated from the midgut of Ostrinia nubilalis and Sesamia nonagrioides. In both species, as in other Lepidoptera, leucine uptake by BBMVs can take place in the absence of cations, but it can also be driven by a K(+) gradient. Experiments with the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide proved that Cry1Ab, a Bacillus thuringiensis toxin active in vivo, enhanced the membrane permeability to potassium in O. nubilalis BBMVs. This result is in agreement with similar effects observed in S. nonagrioides BBMV incubated with various Cry1 toxins active in vivo. The effect of the above toxins was tested on the initial rate of 0.1 mM: leucine influx. Instead of an increase in leucine influx, a reduction was observed with the Cry1 toxins active in vivo. Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa, but not the inactive toxin Cry1Da, inhibited in a dose-dependent manner leucine uptake both in the absence and in the presence of a K(+) gradient, a clear indication that their effect is independent of the channel formed by the toxins and that this effect is exerted directly on the amino acid transport system.

  19. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eJuenemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington’s disease is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion bodies composed of aggregated N-terminal huntingtin fragments and other sequestered proteins. Fluorescence microscopy and filter trap assay are conventional methods to study protein aggregates, but cannot be used to analyze the presence and levels of post-translational modifications of aggregated huntingtin such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of proteins can be a signal for degradation and intracellular localization, but also affects protein activity and protein-protein interactions. The function of ubiquitination relies on its mono- and polymeric isoforms attached to protein substrates. Studying the ubiquitination pattern of aggregated huntingtin fragments offers an important possibility to understand huntingtin degradation and aggregation processes within the cell. For the identification of aggregated huntingtin and its ubiquitinated species, solubilization of the cellular aggregates is mandatory. Here we describe methods to identify post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of aggregated mutant huntingtin. This approach is specifically described for use with mammalian cell culture and is suitable to study other disease-related proteins prone to aggregate.

  20. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by HIV protease inhibitors increases intracellular accumulation of berberine in murine and human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibin Zha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV protease inhibitor (PI-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR, a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123 efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic.

  1. Intracellular zinc in insulin secretion and action: a determinant of diabetes risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Guy A; Chabosseau, Pauline; Bellomo, Elisa A; Maret, Wolfgang; Mitchell, Ryan K; Hodson, David J; Solomou, Antonia; Hu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Zinc is an important micronutrient, essential in the diet to avoid a variety of conditions associated with malnutrition such as diarrhoea and alopecia. Lowered circulating levels of zinc are also found in diabetes mellitus, a condition which affects one in twelve of the adult population and whose treatments consume approximately 10 % of healthcare budgets. Zn2+ ions are essential for a huge range of cellular functions and, in the specialised pancreatic β-cell, for the storage of insulin within the secretory granule. Correspondingly, genetic variants in the SLC30A8 gene, which encodes the diabetes-associated granule-resident Zn2+ transporter ZnT8, are associated with an altered risk of type 2 diabetes. Here, we focus on (i) recent advances in measuring free zinc concentrations dynamically in subcellular compartments, and (ii) studies dissecting the role of intracellular zinc in the control of glucose homeostasis in vitro and in vivo. We discuss the effects on insulin secretion and action of deleting or over-expressing Slc30a8 highly selectively in the pancreatic β-cell, and the role of zinc in insulin signalling. While modulated by genetic variability, healthy levels of dietary zinc, and hence normal cellular zinc homeostasis, are likely to play an important role in the proper release and action of insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis and lower diabetes risk.

  2. Gene expression of the zinc transporter ZIP14 (SLC39a14) is affected by weight loss and metabolic status and associates with PPARγ in human adipose tissue and 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Trine Maxel; Smidt, Kamille; Larsen, Agnete

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expansion and function of adipose tissue are important during the development of insulin resistance and inflammation in obesity. Zinc dyshomeostasis is common in obese individuals. In the liver, zinc influx transporter ZIP14, affects proliferation and glucose metabolism but the role...... and during adipogenesis. However, in silico analysis revealed that the ZIP14 promoter does not contain PPARγ-binding motifs. CONCLUSIONS: We hypothesize that ZIP14-mediated zinc influx might directly influence PPARγ activity and that ZIP14 may regulate expansion and function of adipose tissue and serve...

  3. Personality and serotonin transporter genotype interact with social context to affect immunity and viral set-point in simian immunodeficiency virus disease

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    From the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, stress has been a suspected contributor to the wide variation seen in disease progression, and some evidence supports this idea. Not all individuals respond to a stressor in the same way, however, and little is known about the biological mechanisms by which variations in individuals’ responses to their environment affect disease-relevant immunologic processes. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus/rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we explored how persona...

  4. Uptake and intracellular trafficking of superantigens in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B Ganem

    Full Text Available Bacterial superantigens (SAgs are exotoxins produced mainly by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS. According to current paradigm, SAgs interact directly and simultaneously with T cell receptor (TCR on the T cell and MHC class II (MHC-II on the antigen-presenting cell (APC, thereby circumventing intracellular processing to trigger T cell activation. Dendritic cells (DCs are professional APCs that coat nearly all body surfaces and are the most probable candidate to interact with SAgs. We demonstrate that SAgs are taken up by mouse DCs without triggering DC maturation. SAgs were found in intracellular acidic compartment of DCs as biologically active molecules. Moreover, SAgs co-localized with EEA1, RAB-7 and LAMP-2, at different times, and were then recycled to the cell membrane. DCs loaded with SAgs are capable of triggering in vitro lymphocyte proliferation and, injected into mice, stimulate T cells bearing the proper TCR in draining lymph nodes. Transportation and trafficking of SAgs in DCs might increase the local concentration of these exotoxins where they will produce the highest effect by promoting their encounter with both MHC-II and TCR in lymph nodes, and may explain how just a few SAg molecules can induce the severe pathology associated with TSS.

  5. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David;

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A......)) receptor or serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences in 5-HT(2A) receptor or SERT binding were found between the val/val and met carriers, nor were blood BDNF values associated with SERT binding or 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. In conclusion, val66met...... BDNF polymorphism status is not associated with changes in the serotonergic system. Moreover, BDNF levels in blood do not correlate with either 5-HT(2A) or SERT binding....

  6. [Magnetic nanoparticles and intracellular delivery of biopolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, A A; Dubina, M V

    2014-03-01

    The basic methods of intracellular delivery of biopolymers are present in this review. The structure and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, their stabilizing surfactants are described. The examples of the interaction of nanoparticles with biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins are considered. The final part of the review is devoted to problems physiology and biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles.

  7. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...... buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did....... Under some conditions, these exchangers can be invoked to regulate cell pH....

  8. Delineation on Therapeutic Significance of Transporters as Molecular Targets of Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANAI Yoshikat; HE Xin; LIU Chang-xiao

    2011-01-01

    Transporters are membrane proteins mediating permeation of organic and inorganic solutes through the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organella.They play essential roles in the epithelial absorption and cellular uptake of nutrients as well as absorption,distribution,metabolism,and excretion of drugs.Because transporters contribute to determining the distribution of compounds in the body in concert with metabolic/synthetic enzymes,the drugs that affect the functions of transporters are expected to alter the distribution of compounds in the body and to ameliorate disrupted homeostasis.In this context,drugs targeting transporters have been used clinically.Such drugs include antidepressants targeting monoamine transporters,diuretics targeting inorganic ion transporters of renal tubules,and uricosuric agents targeting renal urate transporters.Now new transporter-targeting drugs designed based on post-genome drug development strategy have been in the process of clinical trials or basic/clinical researches.For example,the inhibitors of renal Na/glucose cotransporter SGLT2 have been proved for their efficacy in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.The cancer L-type amino acid transporter 1(LAT1)has been considered as a target of cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.The transporter-targeting drugs are expected to provide new rationale in the therapeutics of various diseases.

  9. Vinyl acetate induces intracellular acidification in mouse oral buccal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Wagner, Mark; Melvin, James E; Bogdanffy, Matthew S

    2005-08-14

    Vinyl acetate exposure in drinking water has been associated with tumor formation in the upper gastrointestinal tract of rats and mice. One potential mechanism for inducing carcinogenesis involves acidification of the intracellular environment due to the metabolism of vinyl acetate to acetic acid. Prolonged intracellular acidification is thought to produce cytotoxic and/or mitogenic responses that are the sentinel pharmacodynamic steps toward cancer. To determine whether exposure to vinyl acetate affects the intracellular pH of intact oral cavity tissue, isolated mouse oral buccal epithelium was loaded with the pH-sensitive dye BCECF, and then exposed to vinyl acetate concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000 microM for up to 4 min. Extracellular vinyl acetate exposure induced a progressive intracellular acidification that was reversible upon removal of the vinyl acetate. The rate of the acidification was concentration-dependent and increased exponentially within the concentration range tested. The magnitude of the vinyl acetate-induced acidification was inhibited by pretreatment with the carboxylesterase inhibitor bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that vinyl acetate contributes to the generation and progression of oral cavity tumors via a process of intracellular acidification. Such a process has been proposed to have practical dose-response thresholds below which the intracellular environment can be maintained within homeostatic bounds and the contribution of exposure to carcinogenic risk is negligible.

  10. The Arabidopsis thaliana RNA Editing FactorSLO2, which Affects the Mitochondrial ElectronTransport Chain, Participates in Multiple Stressand Hormone Resoonses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we reported that the novel mitochondrial RNA editing factor SLO2 is essential for mitochondrialelectron transport, and vital for plant growth through regulation of carbon and energy metabolism. Here, we show thatmutation in SL02 causes hypersensitivity to ABA and insensitivity to ethylene, suggesting a link with stress responses.Indeed, slo2 mutants are hypersensitive to salt and osmotic stress during the germination stage, while adult plantsshow increased drought and salt tolerance. Moreover, slo2 mutants are more susceptible to Botrytis cinerea infection.An increased expression of nuclear-encoded stress-responsive genes, as well as mitochondrial-encoded NAD genes ofcomplex I and genes of the alternative respiratory pathway, was observed in slo2 mutants, further enhanced by ABAtreatment. In addition, H202 accumulation and altered amino acid levels were recorded in slo2 mutants. We conclude thatSLO2 is required for plant sensitivity to ABA, ethylene, biotic, and abiotic stress. Although two stress-related RNA editingfactors were reported very recently, this study demonstrates a unique role of SLO2, and further supports a link betweenmitochondrial RNA editing events and stress response.

  11. Acclimatory responses of the Daphnia pulex proteome to environmental changes. I. Chronic exposure to hypoxia affects the oxygen transport system and carbohydrate metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlung Johannes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planktonic crustaceans of the genus Daphnia show a remarkable plasticity to cope with environmental changes in oxygen concentration and temperature. One of the key proteins of adaptive gene control in Daphnia pulex under hypoxia is hemoglobin (Hb, which increases in hemolymph concentration by an order of magnitude and shows an enhanced oxygen affinity due to changes in subunit composition. To explore the full spectrum of adaptive protein expression in response to low-oxygen conditions, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to analyze the proteome composition of animals acclimated to normoxia (oxygen partial pressure [Po2]: 20 kPa and hypoxia (Po2: 3 kPa, respectively. Results The comparative proteome analysis showed an up-regulation of more than 50 protein spots under hypoxia. Identification of a major share of these spots revealed acclimatory changes for Hb, glycolytic enzymes (enolase, and enzymes involved in the degradation of storage and structural carbohydrates (e.g. cellubiohydrolase. Proteolytic enzymes remained constitutively expressed on a high level. Conclusion Acclimatory adjustments of the D. pulex proteome to hypoxia included a strong induction of Hb and carbohydrate-degrading enzymes. The scenario of adaptive protein expression under environmental hypoxia can be interpreted as a process to improve oxygen transport and carbohydrate provision for the maintenance of ATP production, even during short episodes of tissue hypoxia requiring support from anaerobic metabolism.

  12. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  13. Intracellular lipophilic inclusions of mycobacteria in vitro and in sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, Natalie J; Christensen, Henriette; Minnikin, David E; Adegbola, Richard A; Barer, Michael R

    2002-10-01

    Although most mycobacterial lipids are thought to be associated with the cell envelope, the authors previously observed substantial deposits of intracellular lipophilic material. A Nile-red-based cytological assay was used to determine factors which affect the presence and natural history of intracellular lipophilic inclusions (ILIs) in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Development of ILIs was associated with stationary-phase cultures in broth and with aged (6 days) colonies on agar. Using variants of Youmans' defined medium, the frequency and size of ILIs was observed to be minimal in carbon-poor medium. ILIs were observed to form within 15 min after provision of fatty acids to the medium and after a period of several days in nitrogen-poor medium. Analysis of the non-polar lipid extracts of ILI-rich and -poor preparations indicated that the triacylglycerols (TAGs) were a major component of the inclusions. The acyl substituents of the TAGs varied according to whether they were formed in Middlebrook 7H9 broth, in low-nitrogen Youmans' broth or rapidly after oleic acid supplementation of Youmans' broth. These studies support a storage function for TAGs in mycobacteria in addition to their previously suggested occurrence as components of the cell envelope. To assess a possible role for ILIs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a combined acid-fast (Auramine)/Nile red assay was applied to heavily positive sputum samples from patients with tuberculosis. Strong intracellular Nile red signals were obtained from acid-fast cells, indicating that ILI occur in M. tuberculosis in vivo. This may reflect a distinct physiological state of these cells, which it has not been possible to reproduce in vitro. These findings indicate that the uptake of long-chain fatty acids and TAG biosynthetic and degradative pathways are important aspects of mycobacterial lipid metabolism, meriting further investigation.

  14. 细胞内高镁对豚鼠心室肌细胞L-型钙通道活性的影响%High intracellular Mg2+ affects the activities of L-type calcium channel in guineapig ventricular myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵美眯; 连雯雯; 孙睿; 王红梅; 封瑞; 胡慧媛; 孙雪菲; 郝丽英

    2014-01-01

    本文旨在研究细胞内高镁对离体豚鼠心室肌细胞L-型钙通道的单通道门控特性的影响.急性酶消化法分离豚鼠心室肌细胞,应用膜片钳膜内向外单通道记录模式观察不同浓度细胞内镁([Mg2+]i)对心肌细胞L-型钙通道单通道电流的影响.结果显示,对照组([Mg2+]i 0.9 mmol/L)的心肌细胞L-型钙通道相对活性为(176.5±34.1)%,而高镁组([Mg2+]i 8.1 mmol/L)钙通道相对活性显著降低至(64.8±18.1)%(P<0.05).另外,8.1 mmol/L [Mg2+]i使心肌细胞L-型钙通道的平均开放时间缩短至对照组的约25%(P<0.05),但对通道平均关闭时间无明显影响.以上结果提示,细胞内高镁主要通过缩短通道平均开放时间抑制豚鼠心室肌细胞L-型钙通道的活性.%This study is aimed to investigate the effects of high intracellular Mg2+ on L-type calcium channel in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.The cardiomyocytes were acutely isolated with enzyme digestion method.By adopting inside-out configuration of patch clamp technique,single channel currents of the L-type calcium channel were recorded under different intracellular Mg2+ concentrations ([Mg2+]i).In control group,which was treated with 0.9 mmol/L Mg2+,the relative activity of calcium channel was (176.5 ± 34.1)% (n =7).When [Mg2+]i was increased from 0.9 to 8.1 mmol/L (high Mg2+ group),the relative activities of calcium channel decreased to (64.8 ± 18.1)% (n =6,P < 0.05).Moreover,under 8.1 mmol/L Mg2+,the mean open time of calcium channel was shortened to about 25% of that under control condition (P < 0.05),but the mean close time of calcium channel was not altered.These results suggest that high intracellular Mg2+ may inhibit the activities of L-type calcium channel,which is mainly due to the shortening of the mean open time of single L-type calcium channel.

  15. Biogeochemical factors affecting the distribution, speciation, and transport of Hg species in the Deûle and Lys Rivers (Northern France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daye, Mirna; Kadlecova, Milada; Ouddane, Baghdad

    2015-02-01

    The Deûle River is a highly polluted River by heavy metals caused by the historical discharges of ore minerals from the former ore smelter "Metaleurop." The potential mercury (Hg) pollution in the Deûle River implicates the importance of Hg distribution study in the river. As well as to configure the different biogeochemical factors that control the distribution and the potential transport of Hg to distant places. Four different sites were studied as follows: D-A (Deûle River, a site located upstream the river), D-B (Deûle River, a site located near a Zn, Pb, Cu, and Ni smelter that closed in 2003), L-C (Lys River, a site located upstream the confluence of the Deûle River with Lys River), and L-D (downstream the rivers confluence). Different Hg analyses were performed including total mercury in sediment (HgTS), methylmercury (MeHg) in sediment, total mercury in pore water (HgTPW), total mercury in surface water (HgTD), and total suspended particulate Hg in water (HgTP). HgTS decreases downstream from the Deûle River sites with a mean value of 11 ± 0.34 mg/kg to Lys River site (L-D) with a mean value of 0.53 ± 0.02 mg/kg at the confluence. The unaffected side of the Lys River, localized before the confluence (L-C), is characterized by low HgTS of an average value of 0.042 ± 0.003 mg/kg and high % MeHg reaching 4.2 %. Whereas, the highly contaminated Deûle sites are designated by low % MeHg with an average value of 0.053 %. Low pristine environments like that found in L-C site with more favorable biogeochemical conditions of lower concentrations of HgTS, sulfides, and Corg host more active biotic methylation than that of the highly polluted Deûle sites with high concentrations of HgTS and sulfides concentrations. Methylation in D-B (the closet site to Metaleurop smelter) is an old and recent methylation activity that has contributed to MeHg accumulation in the sediments as opposed to the exclusive recent events of methylation in Lys sites. Me

  16. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 is involved in root gravitropism through regulation of polar auxin transport by affecting the cycling of PIN proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Mei; Wen-Jing Jia; Yu-Jia Chu; Hong-Wei Xue

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase(PIP5K)catalyzes the synthesis of PI-4,5-bisphosphate(PtdIns(4,5)P2)by phosphorylation of PI-4-phosphate at the 5 position of the inositol ring,and is involved in regulating multiple developmental processes and stress responses.We here report on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis PIP5K2,which is expressed during lateral root initiation and elongation,and whose expression is enhanced by exogenous auxin.The knockout mutant pip5k2 shows reduced lateral root formation,which could be recovered with exogenous auxin,and interestingly,delayed root gravity response that could not be recovered with exogenous auxin.Crossing with the DR5-GUS marker line and measurement of free IAA content confirmed the reduced auxin accumulation in pip5k2.In addition,analysis using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 revealed the decelerated vesicle trafficking caused by PtdIns(4,5)P2 reduction,which hence results in suppressed cycling of PIN proteins(PIN2 and 3),and delayed redistribution of PIN2 and auxin under gravistimulation in pipSk2 roots.On the contrary,PtdIns(4,5)P2 significantly enhanced the vesicle trafficking and cycling of PIN proteins.These results demonstrate that PIP5K2 is involved in regulating lateral root formation and root gravity response,and reveal a critical role of PIP5K2/Ptdlns(4,5)P2 in root development through regulation of PIN proteins,providing direct evidence of crosstalk between the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway and auxin response,and new insights into the control of polar auxin transport.

  17. Notch1 augments intracellular trafficking of adeno-associated virus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Changchun; White, April F; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2007-02-01

    We report here the significance of the Notch1 receptor in intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (rAAV2). RNA profiling of human prostate cancer cell lines with various degrees of AAV transduction indicated a correlation of the amount of Notch1 with rAAV transgene expression. A definitive role of Notch1 in enhancing AAV transduction was confirmed by developing clonal derivatives of DU145 cells overexpressing either full-length or intracellular Notch1. To discern stages of AAV2 transduction influenced by Notch1, competitive binding with soluble heparin and Notch1 antibody, intracellular trafficking using Cy3-labeled rAAV2, and blocking assays for proteasome and dynamin pathways were performed. Results indicated that in the absence or low-level expression of Notch1, only binding of virus was found on the cell surface and internalization was impaired. However, increased Notch1 expression in these cells allowed efficient perinuclear accumulation of labeled capsids. Nuclear transport of the vector was evident by transgene expression and real-time PCR analyses. Dynamin levels were not found to be different among these cell lines, but blocking dynamin function abrogated AAV2 transduction in DU145 clones overexpressing full-length Notch1 but not in clones overexpressing intracellular Notch1. These studies provide evidence for the role of activated Notch1 in intracellular trafficking of AAV2, which may have implications in the optimal use of AAV2 in human gene therapy.

  18. Intracellular electric fields produced by dielectric barrier discharge treatment of skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J, E-mail: nbabaeva@umich.ed, E-mail: mjkush@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-05-12

    The application of atmospheric pressure plasmas to human tissue has been shown to have therapeutic effects for wound healing and in treatment of skin diseases. These effects are attributed to both production of beneficial radicals which intersect with biological reaction chains and to the surface and intracellular generation of electric fields. In this paper, we report on computational studies of the intersection of plasma streamers in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in air with human skin tissue, with emphasis on the intracellular generation of electric fields. Intracellular structures and their electrical properties were incorporated into the computational mesh in order to self-consistently couple gas phase plasma transport with the charging of the surface of the skin and the intracellular production of electrical currents. The short duration of a single plasma filament in DBDs and its intersection with skin enables the intracellular penetration of electric fields. The magnitude of these electric fields can reach 100 kV cm{sup -1} which may exceed the threshold for electroporation.

  19. Substrate regulation of ascorbate transport activity in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.X.; Jaworski, E.M.; Kulaga, A.; Dixon, S.J. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1990-10-01

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na(+)-dependent L-ascorbate transporter located in the plasma membrane. The present experiments examined the effects of deprivation and supplementation of extracellular L-ascorbate on the activity of this transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-(14C)ascorbate for 1 min at 37 degrees C. We observed that the apparent maximal rate of uptake (Vmax) increased rapidly (less than 1 h) when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. In contrast, there was no change in the apparent affinity of the transport system for L-(14C)ascorbate. The increase in Vmax was reversed by addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The effects of external ascorbate on ascorbate transport activity were specific in that preincubation of cultures with L-ascorbate did not affect uptake of 2-deoxy-D-(3H(G))glucose. We conclude that the astroglial ascorbate transport system is modulated by changes in substrate availability. Regulation of transport activity may play a role in intracellular ascorbate homeostasis by compensating for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in external ascorbate levels.

  20. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M. [Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Shvartsman, Stanislav Y. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  1. FIB/SEM cell sectioning for intracellular metal granules characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Marziale; Brundu, Claudia; Santisi, Grazia; Savoia, Claudio; Tatti, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Focused Ion Beams (FIBs) provide a cross-sectioning tool for submicron dissection of cells and subcellular structures. In combination with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), FIB provides complementary morphological information, that can be further completed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). This study focus onto intracellular microstructures, particularly onto metal granules (typically Zn, Cu and Fe) and on the possibility of sectioning digestive gland cells of the terrestrial isopod P. scaber making the granules available for a compositional analysis with EDX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of metal granules size, amount and distribution are performed. Information is made available of the cellular storing pattern and, indirectly, metal metabolism. The extension to human level is of utmost interest since some pathologies of relevance are metal related. Apart from the common metal-overload-diseases (hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's and Menkes disease) it has been demonstrated that metal in excess can influence carcinogenesis in liver, kidney and breast. Therefore protocols will be established for the observation of mammal cells to improve our knowledge about the intracellular metal amount and distribution both in healthy cells and in those affected by primary or secondary metal overload or depletion.

  2. Biology and intracellular life of chlamydia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranin Lazar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chlamydiae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria. The developmental cycle of Chlamydiae is specific and different from other bacteria. The elementary body is the infectious form of the organism, responsible for attaching to the target host cell and promoting its entry. The reticulate body is the larger, metabolically active form of the organism, synthesizing deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid and proteins. The elementary body and reticulate body represent evolutionary adaptations to extracellular and intracellular environments. Intracellular persistence of Chlamydia. Predisposition of Chlamydia to persist within the host cell has been recognized as a major factor in the pathogenesis of chlamydial disease. The persistence implies a long-term association between chlamydiae and their host cell that may not manifest as clinically recognizable disease. The ability of chlamydia to remain within one morphological state for a long time in response to exogenous factors suggests an innate ability of these organisms to persist intracellulary in a unique developmental form. Chlamydiae induce interferon γ and exhibit growth inhibition in their presence. While the high levels of interferon γ completely restrict the development of chlamydia, its low levels induce the development of morphologically aberrant intracellular forms. The persistent forms contain reduced levels of major outer membrane protein but high levels of chlamydial heat shock protein. Conclusion. Immunopathogenesis of chlamydial infection is one of the main focal points of current research into Chlamydia. Chlamydial infections are highly prevalent, usually asymptomatic and associated with serious sequelae. Screening programmes are the most important in the prevention of a long-term sequele.

  3. Atomoxetine affects transcription/translation of the NMDA receptor and the norepinephrine transporter in the rat brain – an in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udvardi PT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patrick T Udvardi,1,2 Karl J Föhr,3 Carolin Henes,1,2 Stefan Liebau,2 Jens Dreyhaupt,4 Tobias M Boeckers,2 Andrea G Ludolph11Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, 2Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, 3Department of Anaesthesiology, 4Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, University of Ulm, Ulm, GermanyAbstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most frequently diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder. The norepinephrine transporter (NET inhibitor atomoxetine, the first nonstimulant drug licensed for ADHD treatment, also acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR antagonist. The compound's effects on gene expression and protein levels of NET and NMDAR subunits (1, 2A, and 2B are unknown. Therefore, adolescent Sprague Dawley rats were treated with atomoxetine (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [ip] or saline (0.9%, ip for 21 consecutive days on postnatal days (PND 21–41. In humans, atomoxetine's earliest clinical therapeutic effects emerge after 2–3 weeks. Material from prefrontal cortex, striatum (STR, mesencephalon (MES, and hippocampus (HC was analyzed either directly after treatment (PND 42 or 2 months after termination of treatment (PND 101 to assess the compound's long-term effects. In rat brains analyzed immediately after treatment, protein analysis exhibited decreased levels of the NET in HC, and NMDAR subunit 2B in both STR and HC; the transcript levels were unaltered. In rat brains probed 2 months after final atomoxetine exposure, messenger RNA analysis also revealed significantly reduced levels of genes coding for NMDAR subunits in MES and STR. NMDAR protein levels were reduced in STR and HC. Furthermore, the levels of two SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor proteins, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein 25, were also significantly altered in both treatment groups. This in vivo study detected atomoxetine's effects

  4. Detection of intracellular phosphatidylserine in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Frances; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2008-03-01

    To demonstrate the intracellular phosphatidylserine (PS) distribution in neuronal cells, neuroblastoma cells and hippocampal neurons expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-AnnexinV were stimulated with a calcium ionophore and localization of GFP-AnnexinV was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Initially, GFP-AnnexinV distributed evenly in the cytosol and nucleus. Raising the intracellular calcium level with ionomycin-induced translocation of cytoplasmic GFP-AnnexinV to the plasma membrane but not to the nuclear membrane, indicating that PS distributes in the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane. Nuclear GFP-AnnexinV subsequently translocated to the nuclear membrane, indicating PS localization in the nuclear envelope. GFP-AnnexinV also localized in a juxtanuclear organelle that was identified as the recycling endosome. However, minimal fluorescence was detected in any other subcellular organelles including mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, and lysosomes, strongly suggesting that PS distribution in the cytoplasmic face in these organelles is negligible. Similarly, in hippocampal primary neurons PS distributed in the inner leaflet of plasma membranes of cell body and dendrites, and in the nuclear envelope. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of intracellular PS localization in living cells, providing an insight for specific sites of PS interaction with soluble proteins involved in signaling processes.

  5. Invasion and intracellular survival by protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, L David

    2011-03-01

    Intracellular parasitism has arisen only a few times during the long ancestry of protozoan parasites including in diverse groups such as microsporidians, kinetoplastids, and apicomplexans. Strategies used to gain entry differ widely from injection (e.g. microsporidians), active penetration of the host cell (e.g. Toxoplasma), recruitment of lysosomes to a plasma membrane wound (e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi), to host cell-mediated phagocytosis (e.g. Leishmania). The resulting range of intracellular niches is equally diverse ranging from cytosolic (e.g. T. cruzi) to residing within a non-fusigenic vacuole (e.g. Toxoplasma, Encephalitozoon) or a modified phagolysosome (e.g. Leishmania). These lifestyle choices influence access to nutrients, interaction with host cell signaling pathways, and detection by pathogen recognition systems. As such, intracellular life requires a repertoire of adaptations to assure entry-exit from the cell, as well as to thwart innate immune mechanisms and prevent clearance. Elucidating these pathways at the cellular and molecular level may identify key steps that can be targeted to reduce parasite survival or augment immunologic responses and thereby prevent disease.

  6. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  7. Tight Coupling of Metabolic Oscillations and Intracellular Water Dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoke, Henrik Seir; Tobiesen, Asger; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    We detected very strong coupling between the oscillating concentration of ATP and the dynamics of intracellular water during glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate that: i) dipolar relaxation of intracellular water is heterogeneous within the cell and different from dilute...... conditions, ii) water dipolar relaxation oscillates with glycolysis and in phase with ATP concentration, iii) this phenomenon is scale-invariant from the subcellular to the ensemble of synchronized cells and, iv) the periodicity of both glycolytic oscillations and dipolar relaxation are equally affected by D...

  8. Integrin mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) in renal vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, W L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Yip, K P

    2001-01-01

    Peptides with the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif induce vasoconstriction in rat afferent arterioles by increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This finding suggests that occupancy of integrins on the plasma membrane of VSMC might affect...... vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to determine whether occupancy of integrins by exogenous RGD peptides initiates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in cultured renal VSMC. When smooth muscle cells were exposed to 0.1 mM hexapeptide GRGDSP, [Ca(2+)](i) rapidly increased from 91 +/- 4 to 287 +/- 37 n...

  9. The Zinc Concentration in the Diet and the Length of the Feeding Period Affect the Methylation Status of the ZIP4 Zinc Transporter Gene in Piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Karweina

    Full Text Available High doses of zinc oxide are commonly used in weaned pig diets to improve performance and health. Recent reports show that this may also lead to an imbalanced zinc homeostasis in the animal. For a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of different zinc intakes, we performed a feeding experiment to assess potential epigenetic regulation of the ZIP4 gene expression via DNA methylation in the small intestine of piglets. Fifty-four piglets were fed diets with 57 (LZn, 164 (NZn or 2,425 (HZn mg Zn/kg feed for one or four weeks. The ZIP4 expression data provided significant evidence for counter-regulation of zinc absorption with higher dietary zinc concentrations. The CpG +735 in the second exon had a 56% higher methylation in the HZn group compared to the others after one week of feeding (8.0·10-4 < p < 0.035; the methylation of this CpG was strongly negatively associated with the expression of the long ZIP4 transcripts (p < 0.007. In the LZn and NZn diets, the expression of the long ZIP4 transcripts were lower after four vs. one week of feeding (2.9·10-4 < p < 0.017. The strongest switch leading to high DNA methylation in nearly all analysed regions was dependent on feeding duration or age in all diet groups (3.7·10-10 < p < 0.099. The data suggest that DNA methylation serves as a fine-tuning mechanism of ZIP4 gene regulation to maintain zinc homeostasis. Methylation of the ZIP4 gene may play a minor role in the response to very high dietary zinc concentration, but may affect binding of alternate zinc-responsive transcription factors.

  10. The Zinc Concentration in the Diet and the Length of the Feeding Period Affect the Methylation Status of the ZIP4 Zinc Transporter Gene in Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karweina, Diana; Kreuzer-Redmer, Susanne; Müller, Uwe; Franken, Tobias; Pieper, Robert; Baron, Udo; Olek, Sven; Zentek, Jürgen; Brockmann, Gudrun A

    2015-01-01

    High doses of zinc oxide are commonly used in weaned pig diets to improve performance and health. Recent reports show that this may also lead to an imbalanced zinc homeostasis in the animal. For a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of different zinc intakes, we performed a feeding experiment to assess potential epigenetic regulation of the ZIP4 gene expression via DNA methylation in the small intestine of piglets. Fifty-four piglets were fed diets with 57 (LZn), 164 (NZn) or 2,425 (HZn) mg Zn/kg feed for one or four weeks. The ZIP4 expression data provided significant evidence for counter-regulation of zinc absorption with higher dietary zinc concentrations. The CpG +735 in the second exon had a 56% higher methylation in the HZn group compared to the others after one week of feeding (8.0·10-4 < p < 0.035); the methylation of this CpG was strongly negatively associated with the expression of the long ZIP4 transcripts (p < 0.007). In the LZn and NZn diets, the expression of the long ZIP4 transcripts were lower after four vs. one week of feeding (2.9·10-4 < p < 0.017). The strongest switch leading to high DNA methylation in nearly all analysed regions was dependent on feeding duration or age in all diet groups (3.7·10-10 < p < 0.099). The data suggest that DNA methylation serves as a fine-tuning mechanism of ZIP4 gene regulation to maintain zinc homeostasis. Methylation of the ZIP4 gene may play a minor role in the response to very high dietary zinc concentration, but may affect binding of alternate zinc-responsive transcription factors.

  11. Molecular properties determining unbound intracellular and extracellular brain exposure of CNS drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loryan, Irena; Sinha, Vikash; Mackie, Claire; Van Peer, Achiel; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H; Vermeulen, An; Heald, Donald; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta; Wassvik, Carola M

    2015-02-01

    In the present work we sought to gain a mechanistic understanding of the physicochemical properties that influence the transport of unbound drug across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) as well as the intra- and extracellular drug exposure in the brain. Interpretable molecular descriptors that significantly contribute to the three key neuropharmacokinetic properties related to BBB drug transport (Kp,uu,brain), intracellular accumulation (Kp,uu,cell), and binding and distribution in the brain (Vu,brain) for a set of 40 compounds were identified using partial least-squares (PLS) analysis. The tailoring of drug properties for improved brain exposure includes decreasing the polarity and/or hydrogen bonding capacity. The design of CNS drug candidates with intracellular targets may benefit from an increase in basicity and/or the number of hydrogen bond donors. Applying this knowledge in drug discovery chemistry programs will allow designing compounds with more desirable CNS pharmacokinetic properties.

  12. A detailed view of the intracellular transcriptome of Listeria monocytogenes in murine macrophages using RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Gunter Schultze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen and causative agent for the foodborne infection listeriosis, which is mainly a threat for pregnant, elderly or immunocompromised individuals. Due to its ability to invade and colonize diverse eukaryotic cell types including cells from invertebrates, L. monocytogenes has become a well-established model organism for intracellular growth. Almost ten years ago, we and others presented the first whole-genome microarray-based intracellular transcriptome of L. monocytogenes. With the advent of newer technologies addressing transcriptomes in greater detail, we revisit this work, and analyze the intracellular transcriptome of L. monocytogenes during growth in murine macrophages using a deep sequencing based approach.We detected 656 differentially expressed genes of which 367 were upregulated during intracellular growth in macrophages compared to extracellular growth in BHI. This study confirmed ~64% of all regulated genes previously identified by microarray analysis. Many of the regulated genes that were detected in the current study involve transporters for various metals, ions as well as complex sugars such as mannose. We also report changes in antisense transcription, especially upregulations during intracellular bacterial survival. A notable finding was the detection of regulatory changes for a subset of temperate A118-like prophage genes, thereby shedding light on the transcriptional profile of this bacteriophage during intracellular growth. In total, our study provides an updated genome-wide view of the transcriptional landscape of L. monocytogenes during intracellular growth and represents a rich resource for future detailed analysis.

  13. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical pr

  14. Neutrophils and intracellular pathogens: beyond phagocytosis and killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelberg, Rui

    2007-02-01

    Neutrophils are not simply scavenging phagocytes that clear extracellular spaces of rapidly proliferating microbes; they are also active in the control of infections by intracellular pathogens. Several mechanisms for nonphagocytic roles of neutrophils in protective immunity have been put forth over the years but further evidence has recently been accumulating at an increasing pace. In this review, I present the evidence that suggests neutrophils are involved in pathogen shuttling into the lymphoid tissues, in antigen presentation, and in early T cell recruitment and initiation of granuloma organization. Also, a clearer view on the antimicrobial molecules that can be acquired by macrophages to enhance their antimicrobial activity is now emerging. Finally, neutrophils can adversely affect immunity against certain parasites by causing immune deviation.

  15. Intracellular ethanol accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amore, T; C.J. Panchal; Stewart, G G

    1988-01-01

    An intracellular accumulation of ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed during the early stages of fermentation (3 h). However, after 12 h of fermentation, the intracellular and extracellular ethanol concentrations were similar. Increasing the osmotic pressure of the medium caused an increase in the ratio of intracellular to extracellular ethanol concentrations at 3 h of fermentation. As in the previous case, the intracellular and extracellular ethanol concentrations were similar af...

  16. An Intermittent Model for Intracellular Motions of Gold Nanostars by k-Space Scattering Image Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzin, Margaux; Sironi, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe; D'Alfonso, Laura; Inverso, Donato; Pallavicini, Piersandro; Collini, Maddalena

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropic metallic nanoparticles have been devised as powerful potential tools for in vivo imaging, photothermal therapy, and drug delivery thanks to plasmon-enhanced absorption and scattering cross sections, ease in synthesis and functionalization, and controlled cytotoxicity. The rational design of all these applications requires the characterization of the nanoparticles intracellular trafficking pathways. In this work, we exploit live-cell time-lapse confocal reflectance microscopy and image correlation in both direct and reciprocal space to investigate the intracellular transport of branched gold nanostars (GNSs). Different transport mechanisms, spanning from pure Brownian diffusion to (sub-)ballistic superdiffusion, are revealed by temporal and spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy on the tens-of-seconds timescale. According to these findings, combined with numerical simulations and with a Bayesian (hidden Markov model-based) analysis of single particle tracking data, we ascribe the superdiffusive, subballistic behavior characterizing the GNSs dynamics to a two-state switching between Brownian diffusion in the cytoplasm and molecular motor-mediated active transport. For the investigation of intermittent-type transport phenomena, we derive an analytical theoretical framework for Fourier-space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). At first, we evaluate the influence of all the dynamic and kinetic parameters (the diffusion coefficient, the drift velocity, and the transition rates between the diffusive and the active transport regimes) on simulated kICS correlation functions. Then we outline a protocol for data analysis and employ it to derive whole-cell maps for each parameter underlying the GNSs intracellular dynamics. Capable of identifying even simpler transport phenomena, whether purely diffusive or ballistic, our intermittent kICS approach allows an exhaustive investigation of the dynamics of GNSs and biological macromolecules.

  17. The Notch intracellular domain integrates signals from Wnt, Hedgehog, TGFβ/BMP and hypoxia pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggrefe, Tilman; Lauth, Matthias; Zwijsen, An; Huylebroeck, Danny; Oswald, Franz; Giaimo, Benedetto Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Notch signaling is a highly conserved signal transduction pathway that regulates stem cell maintenance and differentiation in several organ systems. Upon activation, the Notch receptor is proteolytically processed, its intracellular domain (NICD) translocates into the nucleus and activates expression of target genes. Output, strength and duration of the signal are tightly regulated by post-translational modifications. Here we review the intracellular post-translational regulation of Notch that fine-tunes the outcome of the Notch response. We also describe how crosstalk with other conserved signaling pathways like the Wnt, Hedgehog, hypoxia and TGFβ/BMP pathways can affect Notch signaling output. This regulation can happen by regulation of ligand, receptor or transcription factor expression, regulation of protein stability of intracellular key components, usage of the same cofactors or coregulation of the same key target genes. Since carcinogenesis is often dependent on at least two of these pathways, a better understanding of their molecular crosstalk is pivotal.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide attenuates refilling of intracellular calcium store in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mi Na; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Se Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) oscillation is an initial event in digestive enzyme secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Reactive oxygen species are known to be associated with a variety of oxidative stress-induced cellular disorders including pancreatitis. In this study, we investigated the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on intracellular Ca2+ accumulation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Perfusion of H2O2 at 300 µM resulted in additional elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels and termination of oscillatory Ca2+ signals induced by carbamylcholine (CCh) in the presence of normal extracellular Ca2+. Antioxidants, catalase or DTT, completely prevented H2O2-induced additional Ca2+ increase and termination of Ca2+ oscillation. In Ca2+-free medium, H2O2 still enhanced CCh-induced intracellular Ca2+ levels and thapsigargin (TG) mimicked H2O2-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increase. Furthermore, H2O2-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels was abolished under sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase-inactivated condition by TG pretreatment with CCh. H2O2 at 300 µM failed to affect store-operated Ca2+ entry or Ca2+ extrusion through plasma membrane. Additionally, ruthenium red, a mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter blocker, failed to attenuate H2O2-induced intracellular Ca2+ elevation. These results provide evidence that excessive generation of H2O2 in pathological conditions could accumulate intracellular Ca2+ by attenuating refilling of internal Ca2+ stores rather than by inhibiting Ca2+ extrusion to extracellular fluid or enhancing Ca2+ mobilization from extracellular medium in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

  19. Bioreducible Lipid-like Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Carlos Luis

    Protein-based therapy is one of the most direct ways to manipulate cell function and treat human disease. Although protein therapeutics has made its way to clinical practice, with five of the top fifteen global pharmaceuticals being peptide or protein-based drugs, one common limitation is that the effects of protein therapy are only achieved through the targeting of cell surface receptors and intracellular domains. Due to the impermeability of the cell membrane to most foreign materials, entire classes of potentially therapeutic proteins cannot thoroughly be studied without a safe and efficient method of transporting proteins into the cytosol. We report the use of a combinatorially-designed bioreducible lipid-like material (termed "lipidoid") - based protein delivery platform for the transfection of human cancer cell lines. Lipidoid nanoparticles are synthesized through a thin film dispersion method. The degradation of the bioreducible nanoparticles was observed when exposed to glutathione, a highly reductive compound present in the cytosol. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are capable of transfecting a dose-dependent concentration of our model protein, beta-galactosidase into HeLa cells. Furthermore, formulations of the lipidoid containing the cytotoxic proteins saporin and RNase-A are both capable of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as observed in in vitro treatment of different human cancer cell lines. There was no observed loss in protein activity after lyophilization and long--term storage, indicating the potential of pre-clinical applications. Overall, we demonstrate an effective approach to protein formulation and intracellular delivery. We believe that our formulations will lead to the study of a whole class of previously untapped therapeutics that may generate new solutions for previously untreatable diseases.

  20. The Effect of Bacteriophage Preparations on Intracellular Killing of Bacteria by Phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Kłak, Marlena; Bubak, Barbara; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Żaczek, Maciej; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Górski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular killing of bacteria is one of the fundamental mechanisms against invading pathogens. Impaired intracellular killing of bacteria by phagocytes may be the reason of chronic infections and may be caused by antibiotics or substances that can be produced by some bacteria. Therefore, it was of great practical importance to examine whether phage preparations may influence the process of phagocyte intracellular killing of bacteria. It may be important especially in the case of patients qualified for experimental phage therapy (approximately half of the patients with chronic bacterial infections have their immunity impaired). Our analysis included 51 patients with chronic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections treated with phage preparations at the Phage Therapy Unit in Wroclaw. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of experimental phage therapy on intracellular killing of bacteria by patients' peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We observed that phage therapy does not reduce patients' phagocytes' ability to kill bacteria, and it does not affect the activity of phagocytes in patients with initially reduced ability to kill bacteria intracellularly. Our results suggest that experimental phage therapy has no significant adverse effects on the bactericidal properties of phagocytes, which confirms the safety of the therapy.

  1. The Effect of Bacteriophage Preparations on Intracellular Killing of Bacteria by Phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular killing of bacteria is one of the fundamental mechanisms against invading pathogens. Impaired intracellular killing of bacteria by phagocytes may be the reason of chronic infections and may be caused by antibiotics or substances that can be produced by some bacteria. Therefore, it was of great practical importance to examine whether phage preparations may influence the process of phagocyte intracellular killing of bacteria. It may be important especially in the case of patients qualified for experimental phage therapy (approximately half of the patients with chronic bacterial infections have their immunity impaired. Our analysis included 51 patients with chronic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections treated with phage preparations at the Phage Therapy Unit in Wroclaw. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of experimental phage therapy on intracellular killing of bacteria by patients’ peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We observed that phage therapy does not reduce patients’ phagocytes’ ability to kill bacteria, and it does not affect the activity of phagocytes in patients with initially reduced ability to kill bacteria intracellularly. Our results suggest that experimental phage therapy has no significant adverse effects on the bactericidal properties of phagocytes, which confirms the safety of the therapy.

  2. Vitamin B6 metabolism influences the intracellular accumulation of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Marsili, Sabrina; Vitale, Ilio; Senovilla, Laura; Michels, Judith; Garcia, Pauline; Vacchelli, Erika; Chatelut, Etienne; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-02-01

    Vitamin B6 metabolism influences the adaptive response of non-small lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells to distinct, potentially lethal perturbations in homeostasis, encompassing nutrient deprivation, hyperthermia, hypoxia, irradiation as well as the exposure to cytotoxic chemicals, including the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin (CDDP). Thus, the siRNA-mediated downregulation of pyridoxal kinase (PDXK), the enzyme that generates the bioactive form of vitamin B6, protects NSCLC cells (as well as a large collection of human and murine malignant cells of distinct histological derivation) from the cytotoxic effects of CDDP. Accordingly, the administration of pyridoxine, one of the inactive precursors of vitamin B6, exacerbates cisplatin-induced cell death, in vitro and in vivo, but only when PDXK is expressed. Conversely, antioxidants such as non-oxidized glutathione (GSH) are known to protect cancer cells from CDDP toxicity. Pyridoxine increases the amount of CDDP-DNA adducts formed upon the exposure of NSCLC cells to CDDP and aggravates the consequent DNA damage response. On the contrary, in the presence of GSH, NSCLC cells exhibit near-to-undetectable levels of CDDP-DNA adducts and a small fraction of the cell population activates the DNA damage response. We therefore wondered whether vitamin B6 metabolism and GSH might interact with CDDP in a pharmacokinetic fashion. In this short communication, we demonstrate that GSH inhibits the intracellular accumulation of CDDP, while pyridoxine potentiates it in a PDXK-dependent fashion. Importantly, such pharmacokinetic effects do not involve plasma membrane transporters that mediate a prominent fraction of CDDP influx, i.e., solute carrier family 31, member 1 (SLC31A1, best known as copper transporter 1, CTR1) and efflux, i.e., ATPase, Cu ( 2+) transporting, β polypeptide (ATP7B).

  3. Update on vascular endothelial Ca(2+) signalling: A tale of ion channels, pumps and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Francesco; Berra-Romani, Roberto; Tanzi, Franco

    2012-07-26

    A monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs) lines the lumen of blood vessels and forms a multifunctional transducing organ that mediates a plethora of cardiovascular processes. The activation of ECs from as state of quiescence is, therefore, regarded among the early events leading to the onset and progression of potentially lethal diseases, such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, brain stroke, and tumor. Intracellular Ca(2+) signals have long been know to play a central role in the complex network of signaling pathways regulating the endothelial functions. Notably, recent work has outlined how any change in the pattern of expression of endothelial channels, transporters and pumps involved in the modulation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels may dramatically affect whole body homeostasis. Vascular ECs may react to both mechanical and chemical stimuli by generating a variety of intracellular Ca(2+) signals, ranging from brief, localized Ca(2+) pulses to prolonged Ca(2+) oscillations engulfing the whole cytoplasm. The well-defined spatiotemporal profile of the subcellular Ca(2+) signals elicited in ECs by specific extracellular inputs depends on the interaction between Ca(2+) releasing channels, which are located both on the plasma membrane and in a number of intracellular organelles, and Ca(2+) removing systems. The present article aims to summarize both the past and recent literature in the field to provide a clear-cut picture of our current knowledge on the molecular nature and the role played by the components of the Ca(2+) machinery in vascular ECs under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  4. Effect of amiloride on the intracellular sodium and potassium content of intact Streptococcus faecalis cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, S; Galeazzi, L; Turchetti, G; Sampaoli, G; Groppa, G

    1986-01-01

    Amiloride at millimolar concentrations caused marked changes in the growth-dependent intracellular balance of Na+ and K+ in Streptococcus faecalis. These results, whether specific to transport processes or resulting from indirect yet unknown mechanisms, constitute the first evidence of an effect of amiloride on bacterial electrolytes. Images PMID:3089143

  5. Gene Therapy for HIV Infections: Intracellular Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Piché

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in the past 10 years, it remains an incurable disease. The inability of traditional drug-based therapies to inhibit HIV replication effectively for extended periods of time has stimulated intense research to develop novel approaches for this disease. Current understanding of HIV molecular biology and pathogenesis has opened the way for the development of gene therapy strategies for HIV infections. In this context, a number of intracellular immunization-based strategies have been evaluated, and some of them have reached the stage of phase I/II human clinical trials. These strategies include the use of single-chain antibodies, capsid-targeted viral inactivation, transdominant negative mutants, ribozymes, antisense oligonucleotides and RNA decoys. While a number of issues remain to be studied before intracellular immunization can be applied to the treatment of HIV infections, the significant progress already made in this field is likely to lead to clinical applications.

  6. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  7. Mucolipins: Intracellular TRPML1-3 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiping; Shen, Dongbiao; Samie, Mohammad; Xu, Haoxing

    2010-05-17

    The mucolipin family of Transient Receptor Potential (TRPML) proteins is predicted to encode ion channels expressed in intracellular endosomes and lysosomes. Loss-of-function mutations of human TRPML1 cause type IV mucolipidosis (ML4), a childhood neurodegenerative disease. Meanwhile, gain-of-function mutations in the mouse TRPML3 result in the varitint-waddler (Va) phenotype with hearing and pigmentation defects. The broad spectrum phenotypes of ML4 and Va appear to result from certain aspects of endosomal/lysosomal dysfunction. Lysosomes, traditionally believed to be the terminal "recycling center" for biological "garbage", are now known to play indispensable roles in intracellular signal transduction and membrane trafficking. Studies employing animal models and cell lines in which TRPML genes have been genetically disrupted or depleted have uncovered roles of TRPMLs in multiple cellular functions including membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and organellar ion homeostasis. Physiological assays of mammalian cell lines in which TRPMLs are heterologously overexpressed have revealed the channel properties of TRPMLs in mediating cation (Ca(2+)/Fe(2+)) efflux from endosomes and lysosomes in response to unidentified cellular cues. This review aims to summarize these recent advances in the TRPML field and to correlate the channel properties of endolysosomal TRPMLs with their biological functions. We will also discuss the potential cellular mechanisms by which TRPML deficiency leads to neurodegeneration.

  8. Molecular motors transporting cargos in viscoelastic cytosol: how to beat subdiffusion with a power stroke?

    CERN Document Server

    Goychuk, Igor; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Anomalously slow passive diffusion, $\\langle \\delta x^2(t)\\rangle\\simeq t^{\\alpha}$, with $0<\\alpha<1$, of larger tracers such as messenger RNA and endogenous submicron granules in the cytoplasm of living biological cells has been demonstrated in a number of experiments and has been attributed to the viscoelastic physical nature of the cellular cytoplasm. This finding provokes the question to which extent active intracellular transport is affected by this viscoelastic environment: does the subdiffusion of free submicron cargo such as vesicles and organelles always imply anomalously slow transport by molecular motors such as kinesins, that is, directed transport characterized by a sublinear growth of the mean distance, $\\langle x(t)\\rangle\\simeq t^{\\alpha_{\\rm eff}}$, with $0<\\alpha_{\\rm eff}<1$? Here we study a generic model approach combining the commonly accepted two-state Brownian ratchet model of kinesin motors based on the continuous-state diffusion along microtubule driven by a flashing bind...

  9. Complexity of Public Transport Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Huapu; SHI Ye

    2007-01-01

    The theory of complex networks was used to classify public transport networks into public transportation route networks, public transportation transfer networks, and bus station networks. The practical significance of the network parameters was then analyzed. The public transport networks in Langfang, Jining, and Dalian were then chosen as specific research cases. The results show that the public transportation networks have the characteristics of complex networks. In addition, the urban transportation network parameters all significantly affect the accessibility, convenience, and terrorist security capability of the urban public transportation network. The results link the findings with the actual situations to explore means to solve transportation system problems.

  10. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...

  11. Visualization of Golgia apparatus as an intracellular calcium store by laser scanning confocal microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUIJIE; YANLI; 等

    1995-01-01

    Using laser scanning confocal microscopy,we have found that the in cells loaded with fluo-3/AM,highest intracellular Ca2+ in the perinuclear region is associated with the Golgi apparatus.The spatiotemporal subcellular distribution of Ca2+ in living human fibroblasts exposing to calcium-free medium in response to agonists has been investigated.PDGF,which releases Ca2+ from intracellular stores by inositol(1,4,5)-trisphosphate pathway ,produced a biphasic transient rise in intracellular calcium.The initial rise was resulted from a direct release of calcium from the golgi apparatus.Calcium could be also released from and reaccumulated into the Golgi apparatus by the stimulation of thapsigargin,an inhibitor of the Ca2+ transport ATPase of intracellular calcium store,Permeablizing the plasma membrane by 10μM digitonin resulted in the calcium release from the Golgi apparatus and depletion of the internal calcium store.These results suggest that the Golgi apparatus plays a role in Ca2+ regulation in signal transduction.

  12. Trade-Offs of Escherichia coli Adaptation to an Intracellular Lifestyle in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Azevedo

    Full Text Available The bacterium Escherichia coli exhibits remarkable genomic and phenotypic variation, with some pathogenic strains having evolved to survive and even replicate in the harsh intra-macrophage environment. The rate and effects of mutations that can cause pathoadaptation are key determinants of the pace at which E. coli can colonize such niches and become pathogenic. We used experimental evolution to determine the speed and evolutionary paths undertaken by a commensal strain of E. coli when adapting to intracellular life. We estimated the acquisition of pathoadaptive mutations at a rate of 10-6 per genome per generation, resulting in the fixation of more virulent strains in less than a hundred generations. Whole genome sequencing of independently evolved clones showed that the main targets of intracellular adaptation involved loss of function mutations in genes implicated in the assembly of the lipopolysaccharide core, iron metabolism and di- and tri-peptide transport, namely rfaI, fhuA and tppB, respectively. We found a substantial amount of antagonistic pleiotropy in evolved populations, as well as metabolic trade-offs, commonly found in intracellular bacteria with reduced genome sizes. Overall, the low levels of clonal interference detected indicate that the first steps of the transition of a commensal E. coli into intracellular pathogens are dominated by a few pathoadaptive mutations with very strong effects.

  13. The first intracellular loop of GLUT4 contains a retention motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talantikite, Maya; Berenguer, Marion; Gonzalez, Teresa; Alessi, Marie Christine; Poggi, Marjorie; Peiretti, Franck; Govers, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Glucose transporter GLUT4 (also known as SLC2A4) plays a major role in glucose homeostasis and is efficiently retained intracellularly in adipocytes and myocytes. To simplify the analysis of its retention, here, various intracellular GLUT4 domains were fused individually to reporter molecules. Of the four short cytoplasmic loops of GLUT4, only the first nine-residue-long loop conferred intracellular retention of truncated forms of the transferrin receptor and CD4 in adipocytes. In contrast, the same loop of GLUT1 was without effect. The reporter molecules to which the first loop of GLUT4 was fused localized, unlike GLUT4, to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), possibly explaining why these molecules did not respond to insulin. The retention induced by the GLUT4 loop was specific to adipocytes as it did not induce retention in preadipocytes. Of the SQWLGRKRA sequence that constitutes this loop, mutation of either the tryptophan or lysine residue abrogated reporter retention. Mutation of these residues individually into alanine residues in the full-length GLUT4 molecule resulted in a decreased retention for GLUT4-W105A. We conclude that the first intracellular loop of GLUT4 contains the retention motif WLGRK, in which W105 plays a prominent role.

  14. Solubilization capacity of nonionic surfactant micelles exhibiting strong influence on export of intracellular pigments in Monascus fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Biyu; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Zhenqiang; Qi, Hanshi; Wang, Zhilong

    2013-09-01

    In this study, perstractive fermentation of intracellular Monascus pigments in nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution had been studied. The permeability of cell membrane modified by nonionic surfactant might have influence on the rate of export of intracellular pigments into its extracellular broth while nearly no effect on the final extracellular pigment concentration. However, the solubilization of pigments in nonionic surfactant micelles strongly affected the final extracellular pigment concentration. The solubilization capacity of micelles depended on the kind of nonionic surfactant, the super-molecule assembly structure of nonionic surfactant in an aqueous solution, and the nonionic surfactant concentration. Elimination of pigment degradation by export of intracellular Monascus pigments and solubilizing them into nonionic surfactant micelles was also confirmed experimentally. Thus, nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution is potential for replacement of organic solvent for perstractive fermentation of intracellular product.

  15. Elevated Cholesterol in the Coxiella burnetii Intracellular Niche Is Bacteriolytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulye, Minal; Samanta, Dhritiman; Winfree, Seth; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen and a significant cause of culture-negative endocarditis in the United States. Upon infection, the nascent Coxiella phagosome fuses with the host endocytic pathway to form a large lysosome-like vacuole called the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV membrane is rich in sterols, and drugs perturbing host cell cholesterol homeostasis inhibit PV formation and bacterial growth. Using cholesterol supplementation of a cholesterol-free cell model system, we found smaller PVs and reduced Coxiella growth as cellular cholesterol concentration increased. Further, we observed in cells with cholesterol a significant number of nonfusogenic PVs that contained degraded bacteria, a phenotype not observed in cholesterol-free cells. Cholesterol had no effect on axenic Coxiella cultures, indicating that only intracellular bacteria are sensitive to cholesterol. Live-cell microscopy revealed that both plasma membrane-derived cholesterol and the exogenous cholesterol carrier protein low-density lipoprotein (LDL) traffic to the PV. To test the possibility that increasing PV cholesterol levels affects bacterial survival, infected cells were treated with U18666A, a drug that traps cholesterol in lysosomes and PVs. U18666A treatment led to PVs containing degraded bacteria and a significant loss in bacterial viability. The PV pH was significantly more acidic in cells with cholesterol or cells treated with U18666A, and the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin blocked cholesterol-induced PV acidification and bacterial death. Additionally, treatment of infected HeLa cells with several FDA-approved cholesterol-altering drugs led to a loss of bacterial viability, a phenotype also rescued by bafilomycin. Collectively, these data suggest that increasing PV cholesterol further acidifies the PV, leading to Coxiella death. PMID:28246364

  16. Early life stress and serotonin transporter gene variation interact to affect the transcription of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, and the co-chaperone FKBP5, in the adult rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick H. A. Van der Doelen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The short allelic variant of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT promoter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR has been associated with the etiology of major depression by interaction with early life stress (ELS. A frequently observed endophenotype in depression is the abnormal regulation of levels of stress hormones such as glucocorticoids. It is hypothesized that altered central glucocorticoid influence on stress-related behavior and memory processes could underlie the depressogenic interaction of 5-HTTLPR and ELS. One possible mechanism could be the altered expression of the genes encoding the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor (GR, MR and their inhibitory regulator FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP5 in stress-related forebrain areas. To test this notion, we exposed heterozygous (5-HTT+/- and homozygous (5-HTT-/- serotonin transporter knockout rats and their wildtype littermates (5-HTT+/+ to daily 3 h maternal separations from postnatal day 2 to 14. In the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and hippocampus of the adult male offspring, we found that GR, MR and FKBP5 mRNA levels were affected by ELS x 5-HTT genotype interaction. Specifically, 5-HTT+/+ rats exposed to ELS showed decreased GR and FKBP5 mRNA in the dorsal and ventral mPFC, respectively. In contrast, 5-HTT+/- rats showed increased MR mRNA levels in the hippocampus and 5-HTT-/- rats showed increased FKBP5 mRNA in the ventral mPFC after ELS exposure. These findings indicate that 5-HTT genotype determines the specific adaptation of GR, MR and FKBP5 expression in response to early life adversity. Therefore, altered extra-hypothalamic glucocorticoid signaling should be considered to play a role in the depressogenic interaction of ELS and 5-HTTLPR.

  17. [Measurement of intracellular pH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, K; Imai, M; Yoshitomi, K

    1992-09-01

    Since various cellular processes depend on changes in pH, the regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is important both for the individual cell and for the organism. The mechanisms of the regulation of pHi can be investigated by monitoring pHi. In this report, we discuss the four major techniques available for measuring pHi, which are 1) Distribution of weak acids and bases, 2) pH-sensitive microelectrodes, 3) pH-sensitive dyes, and 4) Nuclear magnetic resonance. Among four techniques, the advantage of the microelectrode approach is that it can monitor membrane potential at the same time and be applied to a single cell. The dye technique is a relative new developing technique, which has lots of advantages. It is easy to use, and is capable of monitoring rapid pHi changes, and being applied to a smaller cell, or a single cell.

  18. Citrus bergamia Risso Elevates Intracellular Ca2+ in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells due to Release of Ca2+ from Primary Intracellular Stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purum Kang

    2013-01-01

    , which was partially inhibited by a nonselective Ca2+ channel blocker La3+. In Ca2+-free extracellular solutions, BEO increased [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that BEO mobilizes intracellular Ca2+. BEO-induced [Ca2+]i increase was partially inhibited by a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor dantrolene, a phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, and an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3-gated Ca2+ channel blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borane (2-APB. BEO also increased [Ca2+]i in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. In addition, store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOC was potentiated by BEO. These results suggest that BEO mobilizes Ca2+ from primary intracellular stores via Ca2+-induced and IP3-mediated Ca2+ release and affect promotion of Ca2+ influx, likely via an SOC mechanism.

  19. [Phosphoinositides: lipidic essential actors in the intracellular traffic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzi, Dimitri L; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Sanjuan-Vazquez, Myriam; Raess, Matthieu A; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PPIn) are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins between the different intracellular compartments. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and are thus involved in crucial cellular functions including vesicle budding, fusion and dynamics of membranes and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Although they are present in low concentrations in membranes, their activity is essential for cell survival and needs to be tightly controlled. Therefore, phosphatases and kinases specific of the various cellular membranes can phosphorylate/dephosphorylate their inositol ring on the positions D3, D4 and/or D5. The differential phosphorylation determines the intracellular localisation and the activity of the PPIn. Indeed, non-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) is the basic component of the PPIn and can be found in all eukaryotic cells at the cytoplasmic face of the ER, the Golgi, mitochondria and microsomes. It can get phosphorylated on position D4 to obtain PtdIns4P, a PPIn enriched in the Golgi compartment and involved in the maintenance of this organelle as well as anterograde and retrograde transport to and from the Golgi. PtdIns phosphorylation on position D3 results in PtdIns3P that is required for endosomal transport and multivesicular body (MVB) formation and sorting. These monophosphorylated PtdIns can be further phosphorylated to produce bisphophorylated PtdIns. Thus, PtdIns(4,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation, is enriched in the plasma membrane and involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. PtdIns(3,5)P2, mainly produced by PtdIns3P phosphorylation, is enriched in late endosomes, MVBs and the lysosome/vacuole and plays a role in endosome to vacuole transport. PtdIns(3,4)P2 is absent in yeast, cells and mainly produced by PtdIns4P phosphorylation in human cells; PtdIns(3,4)P2 is localised in the plasma membrane and plays an important role as a second messenger by recruiting

  20. Multifunctional nanocarrier based on clay nanotubes for efficient intracellular siRNA delivery and gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Shi, Yinfeng; Huang, Chusen; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jiahui; Shen, Hebai; Jia, Nengqin

    2014-04-01

    RNA interference-mediated gene silencing relating to disease has recently emerged as a powerful method in gene therapy. Despite the promises, effective transport of siRNA with minimal side effects remains a challenge. Halloysites are cheap and naturally available aluminosilicate clay nanotubes with high mechanical strength and biocompatibility. In this study, a novel multifunctional nanocarrier based on functionalized halloysite nanotubes (f-HNTs) has been developed via electrostatic layer-by-layer assembling approach for loading and intracellular delivery of therapeutic antisurvivin siRNA and simultaneously tracking their intracellular transport, in which PEI-modified HNTs are used as gene vector, antisurvivin siRNA as gene therapeutic agent, and mercaptoacetic acid-capped CdSe quantum dots as fluorescent labeling probes. The successful assembly of the f-HNTs-siRNA complexes was systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible spectrophotometry, Zeta potential measurement, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Confocal microscopy, biological TEM, and flow cytometry studies revealed that the complexes enabled the efficient intracellular delivery of siRNA for cell-specific gene silencing. MTT assays exhibited that the complexes can enhance antitumor activity. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that f-HNTs-mediated siRNA delivery effectively knocked down gene expression of survivin and thereby decreased the levels of target proteins of PANC-1 cells. Therefore, this study suggested that the synthesized f-HNTs were a new effective drug delivery system for potential application in cancer gene therapy.

  1. Characterization of Intracellular Streaming and Traction Forces in Migrating Physarum Plasmodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shun; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Guy, Robert D.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2012-11-01

    Physarum plasmodium is a model organism for cell migration that exhibits fast intracellular streaming. Motile amoeboid physarum plasmodia were obtained from dish cultures of Physarum Polycephalum, a slime mold that inhabits shady cool moist areas in the wild, such as decaying vegetable material. The migrating amoebae were obtained by cutting successively smaller pieces from the growing tips of the cultured parent mold, and their size ranged 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Single amoebae were seeded and let adhere on flexible polyacrilamide gels that were functionalized with collagen, contained 0.2-micron fluorescent beads, and were embedded in an aqueous medium. Soon after adhering to the gel, the amoeabe began crawling at about 1mm/hr. Joint time-lapse sequences of intracellular streaming and gel deformation were acquired respectively in the bright and fluorescent fields of a confocal microscope at 20X magnification. These images were analyzed using particle-tracking algorithms, and the traction stresses applied by the amoebae on the surface were computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the gel using the measured bead displacements as boundary conditions. These measurements provide, for the first time, a joint characterization of intracellular mass transport and the forces driving this transport in motile amoeboid cells.

  2. Transportation: Topic Paper E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    As one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, this paper reviews the issue of transportation services. In the area of urban mass transit, four relevant pieces of legislation and public transportation accessibility regulations are cited, and cost issues are explored. Paratransit systems,…

  3. Late sodium current and intracellular ionic homeostasis in acute ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Carlotta; Torre, Eleonora; Rizzetto, Riccardo; Bernardi, Joyce; Rocchetti, Marcella; Zaza, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Blockade of the late Na(+) current (I NaL) protects from ischemia/reperfusion damage; nevertheless, information on changes in I NaL during acute ischemia and their effect on intracellular milieu is missing. I NaL, cytosolic Na(+) and Ca(2+) activities (Nacyt, Cacyt) were measured in isolated rat ventricular myocytes during 7 min of simulated ischemia (ISC); in all the conditions tested, effects consistently exerted by ranolazine (RAN) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) were interpreted as due to I NaL blockade. The results indicate that I NaL was enhanced during ISC in spite of changes in action potential (AP) contour; I NaL significantly contributed to Nacyt rise, but only marginally to Cacyt rise. The impact of I NaL on Cacyt was markedly enhanced by blockade of the sarcolemmal(s) Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and was due to the presence of (Na(+)-sensitive) Ca(2+) efflux through mitochondrial NCX (mNCX). sNCX blockade increased Cacyt and decreased Nacyt, thus indicating that, throughout ISC, sNCX operated in the forward mode, in spite of the substantial Nacyt increment. Thus, a robust Ca(2+) source, other than sNCX and including mitochondria, contributed to Cacyt during ISC. Most, but not all, of RAN effects were shared by TTX. (1) The paradigm that attributes Cacyt accumulation during acute ischemia to decrease/reversal of sNCX transport may not be of general applicability; (2) I NaL is enhanced during ISC, when the effect of Nacyt on mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport may substantially contribute to I NaL impact on Cacyt; (3) RAN may act mostly, but not exclusively, through I NaL blockade during ISC.

  4. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Kwon, Hanna; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A; Phillips, John D; Raven, Emma L; Reddi, Amit R; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-08-30

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models.

  5. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme inhibitor 2 regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanerva, Kristiina; Maekitie, Laura T. [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Baeck, Nils [Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Andersson, Leif C., E-mail: leif.andersson@helsinki.fi [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1) and 2 (AZIN2) are proteins that activate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis. Both AZINs release ODC from its inactive complex with antizyme (AZ), leading to formation of the catalytically active ODC. The ubiquitously expressed AZIN1 is involved in cell proliferation and transformation whereas the role of the recently found AZIN2 in cellular functions is unknown. Here we report the intracellular localization of AZIN2 and present novel evidence indicating that it acts as a regulator of vesicle trafficking. We used immunostaining to demonstrate that both endogenous and FLAG-tagged AZIN2 localize to post-Golgi vesicles of the secretory pathway. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed that the vesicles associate mainly with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). RNAi-mediated knockdown of AZIN2 or depletion of cellular polyamines caused selective fragmentation of the TGN and retarded the exocytotic release of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Exogenous addition of polyamines normalized the morphological changes and reversed the inhibition of protein secretion. Our findings demonstrate that AZIN2 regulates the transport of secretory vesicles by locally activating ODC and polyamine biosynthesis.

  6. Deciphering the intracellular metabolism of Listeria monocytogenes by mutant screening and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes resides and proliferates within the cytoplasm of epithelial cells. While the virulence factors essentially contributing to this step of the infection cycle are well characterized, the set of listerial genes contributing to intracellular replication remains to be defined on a genome-wide level. Results A comprehensive library of L. monocytogenes strain EGD knockout mutants was constructed upon insertion-duplication mutagenesis, and 1491 mutants were tested for their phenotypes in rich medium and in a Caco-2 cell culture assay. Following sequencing of the plasmid insertion site, 141 different genes required for invasion of and replication in Caco-2 cells were identified. Ten in-frame deletion mutants were constructed that confirmed the data. The genes with known functions are mainly involved in cellular processes including transport, in the intermediary metabolism of sugars, nucleotides and lipids, and in information pathways such as regulatory functions. No function could be ascribed to 18 genes, and a counterpart of eight genes is missing in the apathogenic species L. innocua. Mice infection studies revealed the in vivo requirement of IspE (Lmo0190 involved in mevalonate synthesis, and of the novel ABC transporter Lmo0135-0137 associated with cysteine transport. Based on the data of this genome-scale screening, an extreme pathway and elementary mode analysis was applied that demonstrates the critical role of glycerol and purine metabolism, of fucose utilization, and of the synthesis of glutathione, aspartate semialdehyde, serine and branched chain amino acids during intracellular replication of L. monocytogenes. Conclusion The combination of a genetic screening and a modelling approach revealed that a series of transporters help L. monocytogenes to overcome a putative lack of nutrients within cells, and that a high metabolic flexibility contributes to the intracellular replication of

  7. Unequivocal identification of intracellular aluminium adjuvant in a monocytic THP-1 cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium-based adjuvants (ABA) are the predominant adjuvants used in human vaccinations. While a consensus is yet to be reached on the aetiology of the biological activities of ABA several studies have identified shape, crystallinity and size as critical factors affecting their adjuvanticity. In spite of recent advances, the fate of ABA following their administration remains unclear. Few if any studies have demonstrated the unequivocal presence of intracellular ABA. Herein we demonstrate for...

  8. Purification of extracellular and intracellular amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi from mammalian host-infected cells

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Alexandre Marques, Ernesto Nakayasu & Igor Almeida ### Abstract The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, which affects millions of people in Latin America. T. cruzi has a complex life cycle characterized by several developmental forms present in vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In vertebrate mammalian hosts T. cruzi is found as intracellular amastigotes and bloodstream trypomastigotes. On the other hand, in the intestine of the ...

  9. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...... of the physical and biochemical conditions in plant cells. As model system, we use a H(2)O(2) signal originating at the plasma membrane (PM) and spreading through the cytosol. We consider two maximally simple types of signals, isolated pulses and harmonic oscillations. First we consider the basic limits...... which diffusion-mediated signaling is possible. We show that purely diffusive transmission of intracellular information by H(2)O(2) over a distance of 1 μm (typical distance between organelles, which may function as relay stations) is possible at frequencies well above 1 Hz, which is the highest...

  10. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian Lyngby; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca2+ ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...... of the physical and biochemical conditions in plant cells. As model system, we use a H2O2 signal originating at the plasma membrane (PM) and spreading through the cytosol. We consider two maximally simple types of signals, isolated pulses and harmonic oscillations. First we consider the basic limits...... diffusion-mediated signaling is possible. We show that purely diffusive transmission of intracellular information by H2O2 over a distance of 1 μm (typical distance between organelles, which may function as relay stations) is possible at frequencies well above 1 Hz, which is the highest frequency observed...

  11. Soluble Moringa oleifera leaf extract reduces intracellular cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Tatip, Supinda; Kosasih, Sattawat; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera leaves are a well-known source of antioxidants and traditionally used for medicinal applications. In the present study, the protective action of soluble M. oleifera leaf extract (MOLE) against cadmium toxicity was investigated in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that this extract exhibited a protective effect against oxidative stress induced by cadmium and H2O2 through the reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, not only the co-exposure of soluble MOLE with cadmium but also pretreatment of this extract prior to cadmium exposure significantly reduced the cadmium uptake through an inhibition of Fet4p, a low-affinity iron(II) transporter. In addition, the supplementation of soluble MOLE significantly reduced intracellular iron accumulation in a Fet4p-independent manner. Our findings suggest the potential use of soluble extract from M. oleifera leaves as a dietary supplement for protection against cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress.

  12. Quantitative comparison of the efficacy of various compounds in lowering intracellular cholesterol levels in Niemann-Pick type C fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary T Wehrmann

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C disease (NPC is a lethal, autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 and NPC2 cholesterol transport proteins. NPC's hallmark symptoms include an accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids in the late endosomal and lysosomal cellular compartments, causing progressive neurodegeneration and death. Although the age of onset may vary in those affected, NPC most often manifests in juveniles, and is usually fatal before adolescence. In this study, we investigated the effects of various drugs, many of which modify the epigenetic control of NPC1/NPC2 gene expression, in lowering the otherwise harmful elevated intracellular cholesterol levels in NPC cells. Our studies utilized a previously described image analysis technique, which allowed us to make quantitative comparisons of the efficacy of these drugs in lowering cholesterol levels in a common NPC1 mutant model. Of the drugs analyzed, several that have been previously studied (vorinostat, panobinostat, and β-cyclodextrin significantly lowered the relative amount of unesterified cellular cholesterol, consistent with earlier observations. In addition, a novel potential treatment, rapamycin, likewise alleviated the NPC phenotype. We also studied combinations of effective compounds with β-cyclodextrin; the addition of β-cyclodextrin significantly enhanced the cholesterol-lowering activity of vorinostat and panobinostat, but had mixed effects with rapamycin. Collectively, these results may provide a basis for the eventual development of improved NPC therapies.

  13. Strategies of Intracellular Pathogens for Obtaining Iron from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Leon-Sicairos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are destroyed by the host tissues through processes that usually involve phagocytosis and lysosomal disruption. However, some organisms, called intracellular pathogens, are capable of avoiding destruction by growing inside macrophages or other cells. During infection with intracellular pathogenic microorganisms, the element iron is required by both the host cell and the pathogen that inhabits the host cell. This minireview focuses on how intracellular pathogens use multiple strategies to obtain nutritional iron from the intracellular environment in order to use this element for replication. Additionally, the implications of these mechanisms for iron acquisition in the pathogen-host relationship are discussed.

  14. Mitochondrial swelling impairs the transport of organelles in cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasik, Allen; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Choubey, Vinay; Kuum, Malle; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Veksler, Vladimir

    2007-11-09

    Organelle transport in neuronal processes is central to the organization, developmental fate, and functions of neurons. Organelles must be transported through the slender, highly branched neuronal processes, making the axonal transport vulnerable to any perturbation. However, some intracellular structures like mitochondria are able to considerably modify their volume. We therefore hypothesized that swollen mitochondria could impair the traffic of other organelles in neurite shafts. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the effects of mitochondrial swellers on the organelle traffic. Our data demonstrate that treatment of neurons with potassium ionophore valinomycin led to the fast time-dependent inhibition of organelle movement in cerebellar granule neurons. Similar inhibition was observed in neurons treated with the inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, sodium azide and antimycin, which also induced swelling. No decrease in the motility of organelles was observed in cultures treated with inhibitors of ATP production or transport, oligomycin or bongkrekic acid, suggesting that inhibition of the ATP-generating activity itself without swelling does not affect the motility of organelles. The effect of swellers on the traffic was more important in thin processes, thus indicating the role of steric hindrance of swollen mitochondria. We propose that the size and morphology of the transported cargo is also relevant for seamless axonal transport and speculate that mitochondrial swelling could be one of the reasons for impaired organelle transport in neuronal processes.

  15. Salicylic acid binding of mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase E2 affects mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport chain components and plays a role in basal defense against tobacco mosaic virus in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yangwenke; Tian, Miaoying; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xin; Wang, Yu; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-02-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical role in plant defense against pathogen invasion. SA-induced viral defense in plants is distinct from the pathways mediating bacterial and fungal defense and involves a specific pathway mediated by mitochondria; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. The SA-binding activity of the recombinant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (Slα-kGDH) E2 subunit of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was characterized. The biological role of this binding in plant defenses against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was further investigated via Slα-kGDH E2 silencing and transient overexpression in plants. Slα-kGDH E2 was found to bind SA in two independent assays. SA treatment, as well as Slα-kGDH E2 silencing, increased resistance to TMV. SA did not further enhance TMV defense in Slα-kGDH E2-silenced tomato plants but did reduce TMV susceptibility in Nicotiana benthamiana plants transiently overexpressing Slα-kGDH E2. Furthermore, Slα-kGDH E2-silencing-induced TMV resistance was fully blocked by bongkrekic acid application and alternative oxidase 1a silencing. These results indicated that binding by Slα-kGDH E2 of SA acts upstream of and affects the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which plays an important role in basal defense against TMV. The findings of this study help to elucidate the mechanisms of SA-induced viral defense.

  16. Genetically encoded optical sensors for monitoring of intracellular chloride and chloride-selective channel activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bregestovski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This review briefly discusses the main approaches for monitoring chloride (Cl−, the most abundant physiological anion. Noninvasive monitoring of intracellular Cl− ([Cl−]i is a challenging task owing to two main difficulties: (i the low transmembrane ratio for Cl−, approximately 10:1; and (ii the small driving force for Cl−, as the Cl− reversal potential (ECl is usually close to the resting potential of the cells. Thus, for reliable monitoring of intracellular Cl−, one has to use highly sensitive probes. From several methods for intracellular Cl− analysis, genetically encoded chloride indicators represent the most promising tools. Recent achievements in the development of genetically encoded chloride probes are based on the fact that yellow fluorescent protein (YFP exhibits Cl−-sensitivity. YFP-based probes have been successfully used for quantitative analysis of Cl− transport in different cells and for high-throughput screening of modulators of Cl−-selective channels. Development of a ratiometric genetically encoded probe, Clomeleon, has provided a tool for noninvasive estimation of intracellular Cl− concentrations. While the sensitivity of this protein to Cl− is low (EC50 about 160 mM, it has been successfully used for monitoring intracellular Cl− in different cell types. Recently a CFP–YFP-based probe with a relatively high sensitivity to Cl− (EC50 about 30 mM has been developed. This construct, termed Cl-Sensor, allows ratiometric monitoring using the fluorescence excitation ratio. Of particular interest are genetically encoded probes for monitoring of ion channel distribution and activity. A new molecular probe has been constructed by introducing into the cytoplasmic domain of the Cl−-selective glycine receptor (GlyR channel the CFP–YFP-based Cl-Sensor. This construct, termed BioSensor-GlyR, has been successfully expressed in cell lines. The new genetically encoded chloride probes offer means of screening

  17. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    Urban design and architecture are increasingly used as material and affective strategies for setting the scene, for manipulation and the production of urban life: The orchestration of atmospheres, the framing and staging of urban actions, the programming for contemplation, involvement, play, expe...... affects can be choreographed and designed intentionally or whether it arises from unpredictable circumstances within urbanity itself....

  18. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  19. A sensor for intracellular ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans-Oldehinkel, Esther; Mahmood, Nik A.B.N.; Poolman, Bert

    2006-01-01

    Cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domains are found in >4,000 proteins in species from all kingdoms of life, yet their functions are largely unknown. Tandem CBS domains are associated with membrane transport proteins, most notably members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily; voltage-gated chl

  20. Stability properties of elementary dynamic models of membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Julio A

    2003-01-01

    Living cells are characterized by their capacity to maintain a stable steady state. For instance, cells are able to conserve their volume, internal ionic composition and electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane within values compatible with the overall cell functions. The dynamics of these cellular variables is described by complex integrated models of membrane transport. Some clues for the understanding of the processes involved in global cellular homeostasis may be obtained by the study of the local stability properties of some partial cellular processes. As an example of this approach, I perform, in this study, the neighborhood stability analysis of some elementary integrated models of membrane transport. In essence, the models describe the rate of change of the intracellular concentration of a ligand subject to active and passive transport across the plasma membrane of an ideal cell. The ligand can be ionic or nonionic, and it can affect the cell volume or the plasma membrane potential. The fundamental finding of this study is that, within the physiological range, the steady states are asymptotically stable. This basic property is a necessary consequence of the general forms of the expressions employed to describe the active and passive fluxes of the transported ligand.

  1. Differentiating intracellular from extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity in soil by sonication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Qin

    Full Text Available Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio  =  1/8 (w/v and power density  =  15 watt ml(-1], the activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (phosphatase in a Haplic Cambisol soil increased with sonication time in two distinct steps. A first plateau of enzyme activity was reached between 60 and 100 s, and a second higher plateau after 300 s. We also found that sonication for 100 s under optimal conditions activated most (about 80% of the alkaline phosphatase that was added to an autoclaved soil, while total bacteria number was not affected. Sonication for 300 s reduced the total bacteria number by three orders of magnitude but had no further effects on enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the first plateau of alkaline phosphatase activity was derived from extracellular enzymes attached to soil particles, and the second plateau to the combination of extracellular and intracellular enzymes after cell lysis. We conclude that our adjusted sonication method may be an alternative to the currently used physiological and chloroform-fumigation methods for differentiating intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Further testing is needed to find out whether this holds for other soil types.

  2. Tracking SERS-active nanoprobe intracellular uptake for chemical and biological sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregas, Molly K.; Yan, Fei; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Khoury, Christopher; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2007-09-01

    A critical aspect of the use of nanoprobes for intracellular studies in chemical and biological sensing involves a fundamental understanding of their uptake and trajectory in cells. In this study, we describe experiments using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and mapping to track cellular uptake of plasmonics-active labeled nanoparticles. Three different Raman-active labels with positive, negative, and neutral charges were conjugated to silver colloidal nanoparticles with the aim of spatially and temporally profiling intracellular delivery and tracking of nanoprobes during uptake in single mammalian cells. 1-D Raman spectra and 2-D Raman mapping are used to identify and locate the probes via their SERS signal intensities. Because Raman spectroscopy is very specific for identification of chemical and molecular signatures, the development of functionalized plasmonics-active nanoprobes capable of exploring intracellular spaces and processes has the ability to provide specific information on the effects of biological and chemical pollutants in the intracellular environment. The results indicate that this technique will allow study of when, where, and how these substances affect cells and living organisms.

  3. Dicarboxy-dichlorofluorescein: a new fluorescent probe for measuring acidic intracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedergaard, M; Desai, S; Pulsinelli, W

    1990-05-15

    Derivatives of fluorescein sensitive to pH are extensively utilized for the determination of intracellular pH (pHi). Available dyes have pKa values of approximately 7.0, and are not well suited for measuring acidic pHi. We examined the fluorescein derivative, 5 (and 6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (CDCF) for its potential in the microspectrofluorometric measurement of pHi during acidic conditions. CDCF showed intense fluorescence and pH sensitivity near its "effective" pKa value of 4.2, using a 495/440 nm dual excitation wave-length ratio method. Protein interactions caused fluorescence ratio deviations which were most pronounced at the extremes of pH, whereas calcium and magnesium concentrations had little effect on the fluorescent ratio intensity. Intracellular calibration performed using nigericin in the presence of high potassium eliminated the need to correct for protein interactions, and the ratio method minimized any variations due to dye concentration differences or instrument fluctuation. Intracellular retention of the dye was high, and 95% of the initial signal remained after 1 h. Fluorescence bleaching was 14.5% after 1 h of continuous excitation and cell survival was not affected by dye loading. We conclude that CDCF is an excellent intracellular pH indicator in the pH range of 4-5.

  4. Differentiating intracellular from extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity in soil by sonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuping; Hu, Chunsheng; Oenema, Oene

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio  =  1/8 (w/v) and power density  =  15 watt ml(-1)], the activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (phosphatase) in a Haplic Cambisol soil increased with sonication time in two distinct steps. A first plateau of enzyme activity was reached between 60 and 100 s, and a second higher plateau after 300 s. We also found that sonication for 100 s under optimal conditions activated most (about 80%) of the alkaline phosphatase that was added to an autoclaved soil, while total bacteria number was not affected. Sonication for 300 s reduced the total bacteria number by three orders of magnitude but had no further effects on enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the first plateau of alkaline phosphatase activity was derived from extracellular enzymes attached to soil particles, and the second plateau to the combination of extracellular and intracellular enzymes after cell lysis. We conclude that our adjusted sonication method may be an alternative to the currently used physiological and chloroform-fumigation methods for differentiating intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Further testing is needed to find out whether this holds for other soil types.

  5. Intracellular amyloid formation in muscle cells of Aβ-transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans: determinants and physiological role in copper detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bush Ashley I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid β-peptide is a ubiquitous peptide, which is prone to aggregate forming soluble toxic oligomers and insoluble less-toxic aggregates. The intrinsic and external/environmental factors that determine Aβ aggregation in vivo are poorly understood, as well as the cellular meaning of this process itself. Genetic data as well as cell biological and biochemical evidence strongly support the hypothesis that Aβ is a major player in the onset and development of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, it is also known that Aβ is involved in Inclusion Body Myositis, a common myopathy of the elderly in which the peptide accumulates intracellularly. Results In the present work, we found that intracellular Aβ aggregation in muscle cells of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing Aβ peptide is affected by two single amino acid substitutions, E22G (Arctic and V18A (NIC. Both variations show decrease intracellular amyloidogenesis compared to wild type Aβ. We show that intracellular amyloid aggregation of wild type Aβ is accelerated by Cu2+ and diminished by copper chelators. Moreover, we demonstrate through toxicity and behavioral assays that Aβ-transgenic worms display a higher tolerance to Cu2+ toxic effects and that this resistance may be linked to the formation of amyloid aggregates. Conclusion Our data show that intracellular Aβ amyloid aggregates may trap excess of free Cu2+ buffering its cytotoxic effects and that accelerated intracellular Aβ aggregation may be part of a cell protective mechanism.

  6. Duodenal Intracellular Bicarbonate and the 'CF Paradox'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaunitz JD

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available HCO(3(- secretion, which is believed to neutralize acid within the mucus gel, is the most studied duodenal defense mechanism. In general, HCO(3(- secretion rate and mucosal injury susceptibility correlate closely. Recent studies suggest that luminal acid can lower intracellular pH (pH(i of duodenal epithelial cells and that HCO(3(- secretion is unchanged during acid stress. Furthermore, peptic ulcers are rare in cystic fibrosis (CF, although, with impaired HCO(3(- secretion, increased ulcer prevalence is predicted, giving rise to the 'CF Paradox'. We thus tested the hypothesis that duodenal epithelial cell protection occurs as the result of pH(i regulation rather than by neutralization of acid by HCO(3(- in the pre-epithelial mucus. Cellular acidification during luminal acid perfusion, and unchanged HCO(3(- secretion during acid stress are inconsistent with pre-epithelial acid neutralization by secreted HCO(3(-. Furthermore, inhibition of HCO(3(- secretion by 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino benzoic acid (NPPB despite preservation of pH(i and protection from acid-induced injury further question the pre-epithelial acid neutralization hypothesis. This decoupling of HCO(3(- secretion and injury susceptibility by NPPB (and possibly by CF further suggest that cellular buffering, rather than HCO(3(- exit into the mucus, is of primary importance for duodenal mucosal protection, and may account for the lack of peptic ulceration in CF patients.

  7. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing.

  8. Update on vascular endothelial Ca2+ signalling:A tale of ion channels,pumps and transporters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco; Moccia; Roberto; Berra-Romani; Franco; Tanzi

    2012-01-01

    A monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs) lines the lumen of blood vessels and forms a multifunctional transducing organ that mediates a plethora of cardiovascular processes. The activation of ECs from as state of quiescence is, therefore, regarded among the early events leading to the onset and progression of potentially lethal diseases, such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, brain stroke, and tumor. Intracellular Ca2+ signals have long been know to play a central role in the complex network of signaling pathways regulating the endothelial functions. Notably, recent work has outlined how any change in the pattern of expression of endothelial channels, transporters and pumps involved in the modulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels may dramatically affect whole body homeostasis. Vascular ECs may react to both mechanical and chemical stimuli by generating a variety of intracellular Ca2+ signals, ranging from brief, localized Ca2+ pulses to prolonged Ca2+ oscillations engulfing the whole cytoplasm. The well-defined spatiotemporal profile of the subcellular Ca2+ signals elicited in ECs by specific extracellular inputs depends on the interaction between Ca2+ releasing channels, which arelocated both on the plasma membrane and in a number of intracellular organelles, and Ca2+ removing systems. The present article aims to summarize both the past and recent literature in the field to provide a clear-cut picture of our current knowledge on the molecular nature and the role played by the components of the Ca2+ machinery in vascular ECs under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Constitutively internalized dopamine transporter is targeted to late endosomes and lysosomal degradation in heterologous cell lines and dopaminergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Madsen, Kenneth; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard;

    (leupeptin, chloroquine, or ammonium chloride) increased the amount of transporter accumulated intracellularly over time, suggesting that constitutively endocytosed transporter was targeted to lysosomal degradation. This was further supported by expression of Tac-DAT in the immortalized dopaminergic cell...

  10. Intracellular mannose binding lectin mediates subcellular trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, C L; Kaul, M; Singh, K K

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons.

  11. Patho-epigenetics of Infectious Diseases Caused by Intracellular Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Minarovits, Janos

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular eukaryotes including plants, animals and humans, epigenetic reprogramming may play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of diseases. Recent studies revealed that in addition to viruses, pathogenic bacteria are also capable to dysregulate the epigenetic machinery of their target cells. In this chapter we focus on epigenetic alterations induced by bacteria infecting humans. Most of them are obligate or facultative intracellular bacteria that produce either bacterial toxins and surface proteins targeting the host cell membrane, or synthesise effector proteins entering the host cell nucleus. These bacterial products typically elicit histone modifications, i.e. alter the "histone code". Bacterial pathogens are capable to induce alterations of host cell DNA methylation patterns, too. Such changes in the host cell epigenotype and gene expression pattern may hinder the antibacterial immune response and create favourable conditions for bacterial colonization, growth, or spread. Epigenetic dysregulation mediated by bacterial products may also facilitate the production of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory mediators affecting the epigenotype of their target cells. Such indirect epigenetic changes as well as direct interference with the epigenetic machinery of the host cells may contribute to the initiation and progression of malignant tumors associated with distinct bacterial infections.

  12. A fusogenic peptide from a sea urchin fertilization protein promotes intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules by facilitating endosomal escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Keisuke; Horisawa, Kenichi; Doi, Nobuhide

    2015-08-28

    The low efficiency of endosomal escape has been considered a bottleneck for the cytosolic delivery of biomacromolecules such as proteins and DNA. Although fusogenic peptides (FPs) such as HA2 have been employed to improve the intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules, the FPs studied thus far are not adequately efficient in enabling endosomal escape; therefore, novel FPs with higher activity are required. In this context, we focused on FPs derived from a sea urchin fertilization protein, bindin, which is involved in gamete recognition (B18, residues 103-120 and B55, residues 83-137 of mature bindin). We show that enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused B55 peptide binds to plasma membranes more strongly than EGFP-B18 and promotes the intracellular delivery of dextrans, which were co-administered using the trans method in a pH-dependent manner without affecting cell viability and proliferation, whereas conventional EGFP-HA2 did not affect dextran internalization. Furthermore, EGFP-B55 promoted the intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules such as antibodies, ribonuclease and plasmidic DNA using the trans method. Because the promotion of intracellular delivery by EGFP-B55 was suppressed by endocytosis inhibitors, EGFP-B55 is considered to have facilitated the endosomal escape of co-administered cargos. These results suggested that an FP that promotes the intracellular delivery of a variety of biomacromolecules with no detectable cytotoxicity should be useful for the cytosolic delivery of membrane-impermeable molecules for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  13. k-space image correlation to probe the intracellular dynamics of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzin, M.; Sironi, L.; Chirico, G.; D'Alfonso, L.; Inverso, D.; Pallavicini, P.; Collini, M.

    2016-04-01

    The collective action of dynein, kinesin and myosin molecular motors is responsible for the intracellular active transport of cargoes, vesicles and organelles along the semi-flexible oriented filaments of the cytoskeleton. The overall mobility of the cargoes upon binding and unbinding to motor proteins can be modeled as an intermittency between Brownian diffusion in the cell cytoplasm and active ballistic excursions along actin filaments or microtubules. Such an intermittent intracellular active transport, exhibited by star-shaped gold nanoparticles (GNSs, Gold Nanostars) upon internalization in HeLa cancer cells, is investigated here by combining live-cell time-lapse confocal reflectance microscopy and the spatio-temporal correlation, in the reciprocal Fourier space, of the acquired image sequences. At first, the analytical theoretical framework for the investigation of a two-state intermittent dynamics is presented for Fourier-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS). Then simulated kICS correlation functions are employed to evaluate the influence of, and sensitivity to, all the kinetic and dynamic parameters the model involves (the transition rates between the diffusive and the active transport states, the diffusion coefficient and drift velocity of the imaged particles). The optimal procedure for the analysis of the experimental data is outlined and finally exploited to derive whole-cell maps for the parameters underlying the GNSs super-diffusive dynamics. Applied here to the GNSs subcellular trafficking, the proposed kICS analysis can be adopted for the characterization of the intracellular (super-) diffusive dynamics of any fluorescent or scattering biological macromolecule.

  14. The large intracellular loop of hZIP4 is an intrinsically disordered zinc binding domain†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafaro, Elizabeth M.; Antala, Sagar; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Dzul, Stephen P.; Doyon, Brian; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Dempski, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The human (h) ZIP4 transporter is a plasma membrane protein which functions to increase the cytosolic concentration of zinc. hZIP4 transports zinc into intestinal cells and therefore has a central role in the absorption of dietary zinc. hZIP4 has eight transmembrane domains and encodes a large intracellular loop between transmembrane domains III and IV, M3M4. Previously, it has been postulated that this domain regulates hZIP4 levels in the plasma membrane in a zinc-dependent manner. The objective of this research was to examine the zinc binding properties of the large intracellular loop of hZIP4. Therefore, we have recombineantly expressed and purified M3M4 and showed that this domain binds two zinc ions. Using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, metal binding affinity assays, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrated that the two Zn2+ ions bind sequentially, with the first Zn2+ binding to a CysHis3 site with a nanomolar binding affinity, and the second Zn2+ binding to a His4 site with a weaker affinity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the M3M4 domain is intrinsically disordered, with only a small structural change induced upon Zn2+ coordination. Our data supports a model in which the intracellular M3M4 domain senses high cytosolic Zn2+ concentrations and regulates the plasma membrane levels of the hZIP4 transporter in response to Zn2+ binding. PMID:25882556

  15. Quantum dot bioconjugates: uptake into cells and induction of changes in normal cellular transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Tore-Geir; Frerker, Nadine; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2009-02-01

    Can quantum dots (QDs) act as relevant intracellular probes to investigate routing of ligands in live cells? To answer this question we studied intracellular trafficking of QDs that were coupled to the plant toxin ricin, Shiga toxin or the ligand transferrin (Tf) by confocal fluorescence microscopy in three different cell lines. The Tf:QDs were internalized but instead of being recycled they accumulated within endosomes in all cell lines. However, for the HEp-2 and SW480 cells a higher fraction colocalized with a lysosomal marker as compared with HeLa cells. The Shiga:QD bioconjugate was internalized slowly and with poor efficiency in the HEp-2 and SW480 cells as compared with HeLa cells, and was not routed to the Golgi apparatus in any of the cell lines. The internalized ricin:QD bioconjugates localized to the same endosomes as ricin itself, but could in contrast to ricin not be visualized in the Golgi apparatus. Importantly, we find that the endosomal accumulation of either ricin:QDs or transferrin:QDs affects endosome-to-Golgi transport of both ricin and Shiga toxin: Transport of ricin was reduced whereas transport of Shiga toxin was increased. In conclusion, the data from different cells reveal that in general these ligand-coupled QD nanoparticles are arrested within endosomes, and somehow perturb the normal endosomal sorting in cells.

  16. Ascorbic Acid Efflux and Re-uptake in Endothelial Cells: Maintenance of Intracellular Ascorbate

    OpenAIRE

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2009-01-01

    Entry of vitamin C or ascorbate into most tissues requires its movement across the endothelial cell barrier of vessels. If trans-cellular ascorbate movement occurs, then it should be evident as ascorbate efflux from endothelial cells. Cultured EA.926 endothelial cells that had been loaded to about 3.5 mM intracellular ascorbate lost 70–80% of ascorbate to the medium over several hours at 37 °C via a non-saturable process that was insensitive to anion transport inhibitors and thiol reagents. O...

  17. Intracellular facilitated diffusion: searchers, crowders and blockers

    CERN Document Server

    Brackley, C A; Marenduzzo, D

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, regulatory proteins search for a specific DNA binding target via "facilitated diffusion": a series of rounds of 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm, and 1D linear diffusion along the DNA contour. Using large scale Brownian dynamics simulations we find that each of these steps is affected differently by crowding proteins, which can either be bound to the DNA acting as a road block to the 1D diffusion, or freely diffusing in the cytoplasm. Macromolecular crowding can strongly affect mechanistic features such as the balance between 3D and 1D diffusion, but leads to surprising robustness of the total search time.

  18. Cooperation between prokaryotic (Lde) and eukaryotic (MRP) efflux transporters in J774 macrophages infected with Listeria monocytogenes: studies with ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lismond, Ann; Tulkens, Paul M; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Courvalin, Patrice; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2008-09-01

    Antibiotic efflux is observed in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, modulating accumulation and resistance. The present study examines whether eukaryotic and prokaryotic fluoroquinolone transporters can cooperate in the context of an intracellular infection. We have used (i) J774 macrophages (comparing a ciprofloxacin-resistant cell line overexpressing an MRP-like transporter with wild-type cells with basal expression), (ii) Listeria monocytogenes (comparing a clinical isolate [CLIP21369] displaying ciprofloxacin resistance associated with overexpression of the Lde efflux system with a wild-type strain [EGD]), (iii) ciprofloxacin (substrate of both Lde and MRP) and moxifloxacin (nonsubstrate), and (iv) probenecid and reserpine (preferential inhibitors of MRP and Lde, respectively). The ciprofloxacin MICs for EGD were unaffected by reserpine, while those for CLIP21369 were decreased approximately fourfold (and made similar to those of EGD). Neither probenecid nor reserpine affected the moxifloxacin MICs against EGD or CLIP21369. In dose-response studies (0.01x to 100x MIC) in broth, reserpine fully restored the susceptibility of CLIP21369 to ciprofloxacin (no effect on EGD) but did not influence the activity of moxifloxacin. In studies with intracellular bacteria, reserpine, probenecid, and their combination increased the activity of ciprofloxacin in wild-type and ciprofloxacin-resistant macrophages in parallel with an increase in ciprofloxacin accumulation in macrophages for EGD and an increase in accumulation and decrease in MIC (in broth) for CLIP21369. Moxifloxacin accumulation and intracellular activity were consistently not affected by the inhibitors. A bacterial efflux pump may thus actively cooperate with a eukaryotic efflux transporter to reduce the activity of a common substrate (ciprofloxacin) toward an intracellular bacterial target.

  19. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  20. Effect of alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide on the intracellular cations of human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J R; Kowalski, M M; Wallas, C H

    1977-08-01

    The adsorption to human erythrocytes of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide treated by mild alkaline hydrolysis (h-LPS) stimulated an increase in the intracellular Na+ concentration and a decrease in the intracellular K+ concentration of the erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated by h-LPS remained responsive to the membrane adenosine triphosphatase inhibitors ouabain and ethacrynic acid, indicating that hLPS did not alter erythrocyte cations be depleting energy intermediates or uncoupling energy metabolism from active cation transport. The h-LPS-treated erythrocytes became non-agglutinable by the lectin concanavalin A prior to the development of changes in intracellular cations. In addition, h-LPS-treated erythrocytes demonstrated a three-fold greater cation response to ethacrynic acid than the untreated erythrocytes; this greater response was probably due to local membrane effects by h-LPS on the ethacrynic acid-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase. It is suggested that the h-LPS-induced alteration of erythrocyte cation content was secondary to an increase in ion permeability localized to the concanavalin A receptor regions of the erythrocyte membrane, possibly combined with indirect effects of membrane-bound h-LPS on ethacrynic acid-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase.

  1. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen;

    2015-01-01

    densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT2 receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT2 receptor...... of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high...... agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i...

  2. [Dynamic variance of intracellular metabolic energies under rhythmical control for dissolved oxygen in PHB mixed cultivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Z W; Tohyama, M; Hua, Q; Shimizu, K

    2001-07-01

    The mixed cultivation using cheaper carbon source-wasted food material contained glucose and lactate at the same time was conducted in 5L fermentor, within which glucose was converted to lactate by L. delbrueckii in anaerobic condition and the lactate was converted to PHB by R. eutropha in aerobic condition. Considering dissolved oxygen concentration may affect the level of intracellular ATP and NADPH of the metabolic pathways for R. eutropha in lactate under autotrophy or heterotrophy, rhythmical oscillated control for DO based on chaos control method was consequently presented. This method was employed to satisfy two strains for opposite oxygen preferences, moreover, excite the intracellular metabolic energy simultaneously. The values examined through spectrophotofluorimetry represented that both ATP and NADPH exhibited fluctuations in accordance with the DO rhythm. By means of this control design, the concentration of PHB can be doubled than the usual under stable DO control.

  3. Emancipating Chlamydia: Advances in the Genetic Manipulation of a Recalcitrant Intracellular Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastidas, Robert J; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2016-06-01

    Chlamydia species infect millions of individuals worldwide and are important etiological agents of sexually transmitted disease, infertility, and blinding trachoma. Historically, the genetic intractability of this intracellular pathogen has hindered the molecular dissection of virulence factors contributing to its pathogenesis. The obligate intracellular life cycle of Chlamydia and restrictions on the use of antibiotics as selectable markers have impeded the development of molecular tools to genetically manipulate these pathogens. However, recent developments in the field have resulted in significant gains in our ability to alter the genome of Chlamydia, which will expedite the elucidation of virulence mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the challenges affecting the development of molecular genetic tools for Chlamydia and the work that laid the foundation for recent advancements in the genetic analysis of this recalcitrant pathogen.

  4. Morphology of axonal transport abnormalities in primate eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1981-11-01

    The ultrastructure of the retina and optic nerve head was studied in primate eyes after central retinal artery occlusion. Within 2 hours of the vascular occlusion the inner retinal layers undergo watery (isosmotic) swelling. This watery swelling of axons and astroglia extends into the nerve head as far back as the anterior boundary of the scleral lamina cribrosa. The swelling is increased 4 hours after the occlusion, and by 24 hours disintegration has occurred. At the optic nerve head mitochondria and vesicles of smooth endoplasmic reticulum begin to accumulate within 2 hours. The accumulation increases at 4 hours and persists to 24 hours. The watery swelling seems characteristic of ischaemic axons. Membranous organelles accumulate at the boundary of an ischaemic zone when material carried by axonal transport is brought via the healthy axon segment to the boundary, but they cannot proceed further into the ischaemic zone. Such accumulation is typical of locations where rapid orthograde axonal transport or retrograde axonal transport is blocked. In contrast, when slow axonal flow is impaired, the swelling is characterised by an excess of cytoplasmic gel without a marked accumulation of organelles. Rapid orthograde transport and retrograde transport seem to be closely related to one another, while slow axoplasmic flow seems fundamentally different. From morphological findings we suspect that, in experimental glaucoma, intraocular pressure first affects the intracellular physiological process of rapid orthograde and retrograde axonal transport. Watery swelling may not occur unless the ischaemic injury to cell metabolism is more advanced. In contrast, in experimental papilloedema, the swelling results predominantly from impaired slow axoplasmic flow.

  5. Chamber transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  6. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parenta...

  7. Intracellular acidosis enhances the excitability of working muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Thomas H; Nielsen, Ole B; Lamb, Graham D; Stephenson, D George

    2004-08-20

    Intracellular acidification of skeletal muscles is commonly thought to contribute to muscle fatigue. However, intracellular acidosis also acts to preserve muscle excitability when muscles become depolarized, which occurs with working muscles. Here, we show that this process may be mediated by decreased chloride permeability, which enables action potentials to still be propagated along the internal network of tubules in a muscle fiber (the T system) despite muscle depolarization. These results implicate chloride ion channels in muscle function and emphasize that intracellular acidosis of muscle has protective effects during muscle fatigue.

  8. New perspective in the assessment of total intracellular magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Sargenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg is essential for biological processes, but its cellular homeostasis has not been thoroughly elucidated, mainly because of the inadequacy of the available techniques to map intracellular Mg distribution. Recently, particular interest has been raised by a new family of fluorescent probes, diaza-18-crown-hydroxyquinoline (DCHQ, that shows remarkably high affinity and specificity for Mg, thus permitting the detection of the total intracellular Mg. The data obtained by fluori- metric and cytofluorimetric assays performed with DCHQ5 are in good agreement with atomic absorption spectroscopy, confirming that DCHQ5 probe allows both qualitative and quantitative determination of total intracellular Mg.

  9. Human neutrophils dump Candida glabrata after intracellular killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Fabian; Hünniger, Kerstin; Dietrich, Stefanie; Figge, Marc Thilo; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    Interaction between fungal pathogens and human phagocytes can lead to remarkably variable outcomes, ranging from intracellular killing to prolonged survival and replication of the pathogen in the host cell. Using live cell imaging we observed primary human neutrophils that release phagocytosed Candida glabrata yeast cells after intracellular killing. This process, for which we propose the name "dumping", adds a new outcome to phagocyte-fungus interaction which may be of potential immunological importance as it allows professional antigen presenting cells to take up and process neutrophil-inactivated pathogens that in their viable state are able to evade intracellular degradation in these cells.

  10. Zn(II) transport and distribution in rat spermatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J G; Arrate, M P; Santander, M; Guzman, L; Benos, D J

    1993-10-01

    Zn(II) is an essential trace element. In spermatozoa, Zn(II) modulates metabolism and chromatin condensation. The mechanisms of uptake and distribution of this ion in sperm cells have not been explored. In rat spermatids, our results indicate that 1) 65Zn(II) binds with fast kinetics to a labile, presumably extracellular, compartment. This binding is temperature insensitive and not modified by metabolic inhibitors. 2) Entry of 65Zn(II) in the absence of externally added proteins occurs through a mediated transport system that allows exchange to reach steady state in approximately 15 min at 34 degrees C. 3) Upon entering the cells, 65Zn(II) binds tightly to cellular organelles. 4) Exchangeable Zn(II) bound to cytoplasmic proteins plus free intracellular Zn(II) appears to be Zn(II). 5) The intracellular exchangeable Zn(II) compartment is decreased by metabolic inhibitors, showing a direct or indirect link between energy metabolism and cellular Zn(II) levels. 6) 65Zn(II) efflux from rat spermatids is a process with a rate constant of 0.16 +/- 0.13 min-1 at 34 degrees C. This exit rate of Zn(II) is likely to be affected by Zn(II) release from cytoplasmic binding sites or organelles.

  11. Feedback Regulation of Intracellular Hydrostatic Pressure in Surface Cells of the Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; White, Thomas W; Delamere, Nicholas A; Mathias, Richard T

    2015-11-03

    In wild-type lenses from various species, an intracellular hydrostatic pressure gradient goes from ∼340 mmHg in central fiber cells to 0 mmHg in surface cells. This gradient drives a center-to-surface flow of intracellular fluid. In lenses in which gap-junction coupling is increased, the central pressure is lower, whereas if gap-junction coupling is reduced, the central pressure is higher but surface pressure is always zero. Recently, we found that surface cell pressure was elevated in PTEN null lenses. This suggested disruption of a feedback control system that normally maintained zero surface cell pressure. Our purpose in this study was to investigate and characterize this feedback control system. We measured intracellular hydrostatic pressures in mouse lenses using a microelectrode/manometer-based system. We found that all feedback went through transport by the Na/K ATPase, which adjusted surface cell osmolarity such that pressure was maintained at zero. We traced the regulation of Na/K ATPase activity back to either TRPV4, which sensed positive pressure and stimulated activity, or TRPV1, which sensed negative pressure and inhibited activity. The inhibitory effect of TRPV1 on Na/K pumps was shown to signal through activation of the PI3K/AKT axis. The stimulatory effect of TRPV4 was shown in previous studies to go through a different signal transduction path. Thus, there is a local two-legged feedback control system for pressure in lens surface cells. The surface pressure provides a pedestal on which the pressure gradient sits, so surface pressure determines the absolute value of pressure at each radial location. We speculate that the absolute value of intracellular pressure may set the radial gradient in the refractive index, which is essential for visual acuity.

  12. Thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases in the developing human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); T.J. Visser (Theo); A.J. Borgers (Anke); A. Kalsbeek (Andries); D.F. Swaab (Dick); E. Fliers (Eric); A. Alkemade (Anneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in brain cells is dependent on transport of TH across the plasma membrane followed by intracellular deiodination and binding to the nuclear TH receptors. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of the specific TH transporters monoc

  13. Thyroid hormone transporters and deiodinases in the developing human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesema, E.C.; Visser, T.J.; Borgers, A.J.F.; Kalsbeek, A.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.; Alkemade, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in brain cells is dependent on transport of TH across the plasma membrane followed by intracellular deiodination and binding to the nuclear TH receptors. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of the specific TH transporters monocarboxylate t

  14. Affective Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Dean

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out the idea of affective networks as a constitutive feature of communicative capitalism. It explores the circulation of intensities in contemporary information and communication networks, arguing that this circulation should be theorized in terms of the psychoanalytic notion of the drive. The article includes critical engagements with theorists such as Guy Debord, Jacques Lacan, Tiziana Terranova, and Slavoj Zizek.

  15. Opposite temperature effect on transport activity of KCC2/KCC4 and N(KCCs in HEK-293 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmann Anna-Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cation chloride cotransporters play essential roles in many physiological processes such as volume regulation, transepithelial salt transport and setting the intracellular chloride concentration in neurons. They consist mainly of the inward transporters NCC, NKCC1, and NKCC2, and the outward transporters KCC1 to KCC4. To gain insight into regulatory and structure-function relationships, precise determination of their activity is required. Frequently, these analyses are performed in HEK-293 cells. Recently the activity of the inward transporters NKCC1 and NCC was shown to increase with temperature in these cells. However, the temperature effect on KCCs remains largely unknown. Findings Here, we determined the temperature effect on KCC2 and KCC4 transport activity in HEK-293 cells. Both transporters demonstrated significantly higher transport activity (2.5 fold for KCC2 and 3.3 fold for KCC4 after pre-incubation at room temperature compared to 37°C. Conclusions These data identify a reciprocal temperature dependence of cation chloride inward and outward cotransporters in HEK-293 cells. Thus, lower temperature should be used for functional characterization of KCC2 and KCC4 and higher temperatures for N(KCCs in heterologous mammalian expression systems. Furthermore, if this reciprocal effect also applies to neurons, the action of inhibitory neurotransmitters might be more affected by changes in temperature than previously thought.

  16. Intracellular sodium sensing: SIK1 network, hormone action and high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaitovich, Ariel; Bertorello, Alejandro M

    2010-12-01

    Sodium is the main determinant of body fluid distribution. Sodium accumulation causes water retention and, often, high blood pressure. At the cellular level, the concentration and active transport of sodium is handled by the enzyme Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, whose appearance enabled evolving primitive cells to cope with osmotic stress and contributed to the complexity of mammalian organisms. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is a platform at the hub of many cellular signaling pathways related to sensing intracellular sodium and dealing with its detrimental excess. One of these pathways relies on an intracellular sodium-sensor network with the salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) at its core. When intracellular sodium levels rise, and after the activation of calcium-related signals, this network activates the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and expel the excess of sodium from the cytosol. The SIK1 network also mediates sodium-independent signals that modulate the activity of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, like dopamine and angiotensin, which are relevant per se in the development of high blood pressure. Animal models of high blood pressure, with identified mutations in components of multiple pathways, also have alterations in the SIK1 network. The introduction of some of these mutants into normal cells causes changes in SIK1 activity as well. Some cellular processes related to the metabolic syndrome, such as insulin effects on the kidney and other tissues, also appear to involve the SIK1. Therefore, it is likely that this protein, by modulating active sodium transport and numerous hormonal responses, represents a "crossroad" in the development and adaptation to high blood pressure and associated diseases.

  17. Intracellular organelles mediate cytoplasmic pulling force for centrosome centration in the Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akatsuki

    2010-01-01

    The centrosome is generally maintained at the center of the cell. In animal cells, centrosome centration is powered by the pulling force of microtubules, which is dependent on cytoplasmic dynein. However, it is unclear how dynein brings the centrosome to the cell center, i.e., which structure inside the cell functions as a substrate to anchor dynein. Here, we provide evidence that a population of dynein, which is located on intracellular organelles and is responsible for organelle transport toward the centrosome, generates the force required for centrosome centration in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. By using the database of full-genome RNAi in C. elegans, we identified dyrb-1, a dynein light chain subunit, as a potential subunit involved in dynein anchoring for centrosome centration. DYRB-1 is required for organelle movement toward the minus end of the microtubules. The temporal correlation between centrosome centration and the net movement of organelle transport was found to be significant. Centrosome centration was impaired when Rab7 and RILP, which mediate the association between organelles and dynein in mammalian cells, were knocked down. These results indicate that minus end-directed transport of intracellular organelles along the microtubules is required for centrosome centration in C. elegans embryos. On the basis of this finding, we propose a model in which the reaction forces of organelle transport generated along microtubules act as a driving force that pulls the centrosomes toward the cell center. This is the first model, to our knowledge, providing a mechanical basis for cytoplasmic pulling force for centrosome centration. PMID:21173218

  18. Transportation Outreach Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Transportation Management Program (TMP) is committed to providing opportunities for public interaction, working cooperatively with groups interested in or affected by DOE transportation, and providing information through the development and implementation of its Outreach Program. This Plan describes how the DOE plans to involve the public in its transportation programs. This Transportation Outreach Program Plan will assist the Secretary of Energy is carrying out his vision of the good neighbor'' policy. The Department of Energy encourages face to face interaction and welcomes comments from everyone. Outreach means to go beyond,'' and the TMP, through its Outreach Program, will hear and address the public's concerns and recommendations about transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials. The TMP Outreach Program is based on a commitment to two-way communication. The TMP coordinates transportation policy for all DOE programs to ensure consistent approaches issues and operations. The TMP conducts outreach by interacting with many groups interested in DOE transportation, facilitating resolution of issues and information exchange, and coordinating the DOE's transportation emergency preparedness capabilities. Many of the specific activities in transportation outreach are usually carried out by field and area offices. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Study of neurotoxic intracellular calcium signalling triggered by amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Carlos; Caballero, Erica; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Núñez, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated to dishomeostasis of intracellular Ca(2+) induced by amyloid β peptide (Aβ) species. Understanding of the effects of Aβ on intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis requires preparation of the different Aβ assemblies including oligomers and fibrils and the testing of their effects on cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in neurons. Procedures for cerebellar granule cell culture, preparation of Aβ species as well as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in neurons are described.

  20. In vivo metabolite compartmentalization probed using intracellular GdDTPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg; Rowland, Ian

    Fast trans-membrane water exchange enables in- tracellular relaxation enhancement of water by contrast agents in the extracellular space. For me- tabolites not in fast exchange across membranes, intracellular metabolite relaxation enhancement will only occur if the contrast agent and metabolite a...... are in the same compartment. Extracellular contrast has utilized electroporation methods to deliver GdDTPA into the cytosol of rat muscle in vivo in order to probe the intracellular compart- mentalization of MR-visible metabolites....

  1. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); James, John; Prescott, Alan [Division of Cell Signalling and Immunology, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Haga, Ismar R. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Beard, Philippa M., E-mail: pip.beard@roslin.ed.ac.uk [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  2. Regulation of intracellular Zn homeostasis in two intestinal epithelial cell models at various maturation time points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefeller, Eva-Maria; Bondzio, Angelika; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Martens, Holger; Einspanier, Ralf; Scharfen, Franziska; Zentek, Jürgen; Pieper, Robert; Lodemann, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    After weaning, piglets are often fed diets supplemented with high concentrations of zinc (Zn) to decrease post-weaning diarrhea. The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulation of Zn homeostasis within intestinal epithelial cells during excessive Zn exposure. High Zn concentrations elevated the intracellular Zn level in IPEC-J2 and Caco-2 cells which was influenced by differentiation status and time of exposure. With increasing Zn concentrations, mRNA and protein levels of metallothionein (MT) and zinc transporter 1 (ZnT1) were upregulated, whereas zinc transporter 4 (ZIP4) expression was downregulated. Metal-regulatory transcription factor-1 (MTF1) mRNA expression was upregulated at high Zn concentrations in IPEC-J2 cells, which corresponded to higher intracellular Zn concentrations. Based on these results, we suggest that intestinal epithelial cells adapt the expression of these genes to the amount of extracellular Zn available in order to maintain Zn homeostasis. Cell line-dependent differences in the regulation of Zn homeostasis were detected.

  3. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S. F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three gen...

  4. Influence of DNA-methylation on zinc homeostasis in myeloid cells: Regulation of zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, Jana Elena; Wessels, Inga; Haase, Hajo; Rink, Lothar; Uciechowski, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of intracellular zinc, predominantly regulated through zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins, is required to support an efficient immune response. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are involved in the expression of these genes. In demethylation experiments using 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA) increased intracellular (after 24 and 48h) and total cellular zinc levels (after 48h) were observed in the myeloid cell line HL-60. To uncover the mechanisms that cause the disturbed zinc homeostasis after DNA demethylation, the expression of human zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins were investigated. Real time PCR analyses of 14 ZIP (solute-linked carrier (SLC) SLC39A; Zrt/IRT-like protein), and 9 ZnT (SLC30A) zinc transporters revealed significantly enhanced mRNA expression of the zinc importer ZIP1 after AZA treatment. Because ZIP1 protein was also enhanced after AZA treatment, ZIP1 up-regulation might be the mediator of enhanced intracellular zinc levels. The mRNA expression of ZIP14 was decreased, whereas zinc exporter ZnT3 mRNA was also significantly increased; which might be a cellular reaction to compensate elevated zinc levels. An enhanced but not significant chromatin accessibility of ZIP1 promoter region I was detected by chromatin accessibility by real-time PCR (CHART) assays after demethylation. Additionally, DNA demethylation resulted in increased mRNA accumulation of zinc binding proteins metallothionein (MT) and S100A8/S100A9 after 48h. MT mRNA was significantly enhanced after 24h of AZA treatment also suggesting a reaction of the cell to restore zinc homeostasis. These data indicate that DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism affecting zinc binding proteins and transporters, and, therefore, regulating zinc homeostasis in myeloid cells.

  5. Transport logistics in pollen tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebli, Youssef; Kroeger, Jens; Geitmann, Anja

    2013-07-01

    Cellular organelles move within the cellular volume and the effect of the resulting drag forces on the liquid causes bulk movement in the cytosol. The movement of both organelles and cytosol leads to an overall motion pattern called cytoplasmic streaming or cyclosis. This streaming enables the active and passive transport of molecules and organelles between cellular compartments. Furthermore, the fusion and budding of vesicles with and from the plasma membrane (exo/endocytosis) allow for transport of material between the inside and the outside of the cell. In the pollen tube, cytoplasmic streaming and exo/endocytosis are very active and fulfill several different functions. In this review, we focus on the logistics of intracellular motion and transport processes as well as their biophysical underpinnings. We discuss various modeling attempts that have been performed to understand both long-distance shuttling and short-distance targeting of organelles. We show how the combination of mechanical and mathematical modeling with cell biological approaches has contributed to our understanding of intracellular transport logistics.

  6. [Intracellular signals involved in glucose control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M; Velasco, E; Kumate, J

    2001-01-01

    Many proteins are involved in glucose control. The first step for glucose uptake is insulin receptor-binding. Stimulation of the insulin receptor results in rapid autophosphorylation and conformational changes in the beta chain and the subsequent phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate. This results in the docking of several SH2 domain proteins, including PI 3-kinase and other adapters. The final event is glucose transporter (GLUT) translocation to the cell surface. GLUT is in the cytosol but after insulin stimulation, several proteins are activated either in the GLUT vesicles or in the inner membrane. The role of the cytoskeleton is not well known, but it apparently participates in membrane fusion and vesicle mobilization. After glucose uptake, several hexokines metabolize the glucose to generate energy, convert the glucose in glycogen and store it. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high glucose levels and insulin resistance. The insulin receptor is diminished on the cell surface membrane, tyrosine phosphorylation is decreased, serine and threonine phosphorylation is augmented. Apparently, the main problem with GLUT protein is in its translocation to the cell surface. At present, we know the role of many proteins involved in glucose control. However, we do not understand the significance of insulin resistance at the molecular level with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Aluminum neurotoxicity effects on intracellular Ca2+homeostasis in the rat cerebral cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Ren; Yang Zhang; Xiaofeng Zhang; Yanping Wu; Dandan Zhang; Baixiang Li

    2010-01-01

    Studies have suggested that aluminum,a neurotoxic metal,is involved in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.Previous studies have confirmed that aluminum influences intracellular Ca2+homeostasis.However,it remains unclear whether aluminum increases or decreases intracellular Ca2+concentrations.The present study demonstrated that Al3+competitively binds to calmodulin(CAM),together with Ca2+,which resulted in loss of capacity of CaM to bind to Ca2+,leading to increased[Ca2+],.Al3+stimulated voltage-gated calcium channels on cell membranes,which allowed a small quantity of Ca2+into the cells.Al3+also promoted calcium release from organelles by stimulating L-Ca2+α1c to trigger calcium-induced calcium release.Although Al3+upregulated expression of Na+/Ca2+exchanger mRNA,increased levels of Ca2+and Na+/Ca2+exchanger did not maintain a normal Ca2+balance.Al3+resulted in disordered intracellular calcium homeostasis by affecting calcium channels,calcium buffering,and calcium expulsion.

  8. Where does slow axonal transport go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Sumio

    2003-12-01

    Axonal transport is the specialized and well-developed intracellular transport system for regulated and/or long-distance transport based on generalized cellular machineries. Among them, slow axonal transport conveys cytoplasmic proteins. The motor molecule, the nature of transporting complex and the transport regulation mechanism for slow transport are still unclarified. There has been a dispute regarding the nature of transporting complex of cytoskeletal proteins, polymer-sliding hypothesis versus subunit-transport theory. Recent data supporting the hypothesis of polymer sliding in cultured neurons only reconfirm the previously reported structure and this inference suffers from the lack of ultrastructural evidence and the direct relevance to the physiological slow transport phenomenon in vivo. Observation of the moving cytoskeletal proteins in vivo using transgenic mice or squid giant axons revealed that subunits do move in a microtubule-dependent manner, strongly indicating the involvement of microtubule-based motor kinesin. If the slow transport rate reflects the intermittent fast transport dependent on kinesin motor, we have to investigate the molecular constituents of the transporting complex in more detail and evaluate why the motor and cargo interaction is so unstable. This kind of weak and fluctuating interaction between various molecular pairs could not be detected by conventional techniques, thus necessitating the establishment of a new experimental system before approaching the molecular regulation problem.

  9. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  10. Measurements of Intracellular Ca2+ Content and Phosphatidylserine Exposure in Human Red Blood Cells: Methodological Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro C. Wesseling

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The increase of the intracellular Ca2+ content as well as the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS on the outer cell membrane surface after activation of red blood cells (RBCs by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA has been investigated by a variety of research groups. Carrying out experiments, which we described in several previous publications, we observed some discrepancies when comparing data obtained by different investigators within our research group and also between batches of LPA. In addition, we found differences comparing the results of double and single labelling experiments (for Ca2+ and PS. Furthermore, the results of PS exposure depended on the fluorescent dye used (annexin V-FITC versus annexin V alexa fluor® 647. Therefore, it seems necessary to investigate these methodological approaches in more detail to be able to quantify results and to compare data obtained by different research groups. Methods: The intracellular Ca2+ content and the PS exposure of RBCs separated from whole blood have been investigated after treatment with LPA (2.5 µM obtained from three different companies (Sigma-Aldrich, Cayman Chemical Company, and Santa Cruz Biotechnology Inc.. Fluo-4 and x-rhod-1 have been used to detect intracellular Ca2+ content, annexin V alexa fluor® 647 and annexin V-FITC have been used for PS exposure measurements. Both parameters (Ca2+ content, PS exposure were studied using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Results: The percentage of RBCs showing increased intracellular Ca2+ content as well as PS exposure changes significantly between different LPA manufacturers as well as on the condition of mixing of LPA with the RBC suspension. Furthermore, the percentage of RBCs showing PS exposure is reduced in double labelling compared to single labelling experiments and depends also on the fluorescent dye used. Finally, data on Ca2+ content are slightly affected whereas PS exposure data are not affected significantly

  11. Intracellular pH of giant salivary gland cells of the leech Haementeria ghilianii: regulation and effects on secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, W A; Munsch, T; Berry, M S

    1994-04-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) and membrane potential (Em) of giant salivary gland cells of the leech, Haementeria ghilianii, were measured with double-barrelled, neutral-carrier, pH-sensitive microelectrodes. 2. Em was -51 +/- 11.2 mV and pHi was 6.98 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- S.D., N = 41) in Hepes-buffered saline (nominally HCO3(-)-free; extracellular pH, pHe = 7.4). pHi was independent of Em. 3. Amiloride (2 mmol l-1) had no effect on resting pHi or on pHi recovery from an acid load (induced by the NH4+ pre-pulse technique). Removal of external Na+ produced a progressive acidification which was blocked by amiloride, and the drug also slowed the recovery of pHi on reintroduction of Na+. The results indicate the presence of an electroneutral Na+/H+ exchanger whose access to amiloride is competitively blocked by Na+. 4. In certain smaller cells of the gland, which probably form a separate population, removal of external Na+ did not affect pHi, and recovery from an acid load was blocked by amiloride. There may, therefore, be two types of Na+/H+ exchanger, differing in reversibility and sensitivity to amiloride. 5. Recovery of pHi from NH4(+)-induced acid loading was not affected by bicarbonate-buffered saline (2% CO2; 11 mmol l-1 HCO3-) or by addition of the anion-exchange blocker SITS (10(-4) mol l-1). This suggests that there is no significant contribution of a HCO3(-)-dependent transport mechanism to pHi regulation in the gland cells. 6. Removal of external Cl- slowly reduced pHi and there was a transient increase (overshoot) in pHi when Cl- was reintroduced. These effects of Cl- are probably explained by changes in the Na+ gradient. Intracellular Na+ and Cl- activities were measured with ion-selective microelectrodes. 7. Acidification with NH4+ was difficult, probably because of the cells' poor permeability to this ion. Attempts to introduce NH4+ via the Na+ pump or Na+/Cl- transporter were not successful. The H+/K+ ionophore nigericin (1 microgram ml-1), however, produced

  12. Type IV pili in Francisella – A virulence trait in an intracellular pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emelie eNäslund Salomonsson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular human pathogen that is capable of rapid proliferation in the infected host. Mutants affected in intracellular survival and growth are highly attenuated which highlights the importance of the intracellular phase of the infection. Genomic analysis has revealed that Francisella encodes all genes required for expression of functional type IV pili (Tfp, and in this focused review we summarise recent findings regarding this system in the pathogenesis of tularemia. Tfp are dynamic adhesive structures that have been identified as major virulence determinants in several human pathogens, but it is not obvious what role these structures could have in an intracellular pathogen like Francisella. In the human pathogenic strains, genes required for secretion and assembly of Tfp and one pilin, PilA, have shown to be required for full virulence. Importantly, specific genetic differences have been identified between the different Francisella subspecies where in the most pathogenic type A variants all genes are intact while several Tfp genes are pseudogenes in the less pathogenic type B strains. This suggests that there has been a selection for expression of Tfp with different properties in the different subspecies. There is also a possibility that the genetic differences reflect adaption to different environmental niches of the subspecies and plays a role in transmission of tularemia. This is also in line with recent findings where Tfp pilins are found to be glycosylated which could reflect a role for Tfp in the environment to promote survival and transmission. We are still far from understanding the role of Tfp in virulence and transmission of tularemia, but with the genomic information and genetic tools available we are in a good position to address these issues in the future.

  13. The impact of extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ on ethanol-induced smooth muscle contraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naciye YAKTUBAY DONDAS; Mahir KAPLAN; Derya KAYA; Ergin SiNGiRiK

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the impact of extracellular and intracellular Ca~(2+) on contractions induced by ethanol in smooth muscle.Methods: Longitudinal smooth muscle strips were prepared from the gastric fundi of mice. The contractions of smooth muscle strips were recorded with an isometric force displacement transducer.Results: Ethanol (164 mmol/L) produced reproducible contractions in isolated gastric fundal strips of mice. Although lidocaine (50 and 100 μmol/L), a local anesthetic agent, and hexamethonium (100 and 500 μmol/L), a ganglionic blocking agent, failed to affect these contractions, verapamil (1-50 μmol/L) and nifedipine (1-50 μmol/L), selective blockers of L-type Ca~(2+) channels, significantly inhibited the contractile responses of ethanol. Using a Ca~(2+)-free medium nearly eliminated these contractions in the same tissue. Ryanodine (1-50 μmol/L) and ruthenium red (10-100 μmol/L), selective blockers of intracellular Ca~(2+) channels/ryanodine receptors; cyclopiazonic acid (CPA; 1-10 μmol/L), a selective inhibitor of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca~(2+)-ATPase; and caffeine (0.5-5 mmol/L), a depleting agent of intracellular Ca~(2+) stores, significantly inhibited the contractile responses induced by ethanol. In addition, the com-bination of caffeine (5 mmol/L) plus CPA (10 μmol/L), and ryanodine (10 μmol/L) plus CPA (10 μmol/L), caused further inhibition of contractions in response to ethanol. This inhibition was significantly different from those associated with caffeine, ryanodine or CPA. Furthermore the combination of caffeine (5 mmol/L), ryanodine (10 μmol/L) and CPA(10 μmol/L) eliminated the contractions induced by ethanol in isolated gastric fundal strips of mice.Conclusion: Both extracellular and intracellular Ca~(2+) may have important roles in regulating contractions induced by ethanol in the mouse gastric fundus.

  14. Toward intracellular targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics: progress and clinical outlook for brain tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2012-08-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells.

  15. FAD-linked Presenilin-1 V97L mutation impede tranport regulation and intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis under ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yankun; Li, Miao; Wu, Miao; Shi, Kai; Fang, Boyan; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    We report a PS1 gene mutation (Val 97Leu) in a Chinese familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) pedigree and a cell model of FAD built by transfecting PS1 v97L mutants into human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. To test our hypothesis that the PS1 v97L mutation is pathogenic, we investigated possible alterations in transport regulation and intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Grp78 is an ER-resident chaperone mediating the unfolded protein response (UPR) and is a key regulator of ER stress transducers. KDEL is a 4-amino-acid retention sequence made of Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu-COO. KDEL is a "resident" sequence as protein residence in ER is consistently associated with KDEL at the C-extremity. Our group used KDEL recognizing anti-Grp78 monoclonal antibody to detect the level of Grp78. We found increased KDEL level in all the transfected cells including cells transfected with PS1 V97L genes, wild-type and the mock. However cells with PS1 V97L mutation expressed a relatively lower KDEL compared with the wild-type and the mock, and a significantly lower Grp78 level compared with the wild-type, the mock and control. These results suggest that PS1 V97L mutation impedes intracellular transport regulation in ER. PS1 V97L mutation mediates increased ER Ca(2+) content in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The increased intracellular Ca(2+) release is due to depleted Ca(2+) storing content of ER but not due to extracellular environment as capacitative Ca(2+) entry (CCE) is invariant. PS1 V97L mutation interferes with intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Abnormal transport regulation and Ca(2+) homeostasis attributed to PS1 V97L mutation may be associated with the pathology of Chinese familial FAD.

  16. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....../or glial cells: the solute carrier (SLC)1 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of glutamate, and the SLC6 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of dopamine, 5-HT, norepinephrine, glycine and GABA....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  17. The glutamate transport inhibitor DL-Threo-β-Benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) differentially affects SN38- and oxaliplatin-induced death of drug-resistant colorectal cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Elena Pedraz; Christensen, Sandra; Jensen, Anders A.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death globally and new biomarkers and treatments are severely needed. METHODS: Here, we employed HCT116 and LoVo human CRC cells made resistant to either SN38 or oxaliplatin, to investigate whether altered expression of the high...... affinity glutamate transporters Solute Carrier (SLC)-1A1 and -1A3 (EAAT3, EAAT1) is associated with the resistant phenotypes. Analyses included real-time quantitative PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses, radioactive tracer flux measurements, and biochemical analyses of cell viability...... and glutamate transporter activity are altered in SN38-resistant CRC cells. Importantly, the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-TBOA reduces chemotherapy-induced p53 induction and augments CRC cell death induced by SN38, while attenuating that induced by oxaliplatin. These findings may point...

  18. Fundamentals of Biomedical Transport Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Transport processes represent important life-sustaining elements in all humans. These include mass transfer processes, including gas exchange in the lungs, transport across capillaries and alveoli, transport across the kidneys, and transport across cell membranes. These mass transfer processes affect how oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged in your bloodstream, how metabolic waste products are removed from your blood, how nutrients are transported to tissues, and how all cells function throughout the body. A discussion of kidney dialysis and gas exchange mechanisms is included. Another elem

  19. Role of ABC transporters in cancer chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Li Sun; Atish Patel; Priyank Kumar; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells can significantly attenuate the response to chemotherapy and increase the likelihood of mortality.The major mechanism involved in conferring MDR is the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters,which can increase efflux of drugs from cancer cells,thereby decreasing intracellular drug concentration.Modulators of ABC transporters have the potential to augment the efficacy of anticancer drugs.This editorial highlights some major findings related to ABC transporters and current strategies to overcome MDR.

  20. School Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Executive Educator, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This special section on student transportation offers a case study of a school system that recycles buses for safety drills; articles on fuel-saving strategies, the pros and cons of contracting for transportation services or operating a publicly owned bus fleet, and advice on full cost accounting for transportation costs; and a transportation…

  1. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-07-29

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria.

  2. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria.

  3. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  4. Iron Limitation Triggers Early Egress by the Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huaixin; VanRheenen, Susan M.; Ghosh, Soma; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates in alveolar macrophages, causing a severe form of pneumonia. Intracellular growth of the bacterium depends on its ability to sequester iron from the host cell. In the L. pneumophila strain 130b, one mechanism used to acquire this essential nutrient is the siderophore legiobactin. Iron-bound legiobactin is imported by the transport protein LbtU. Here, we describe the role of LbtP, a paralog of LbtU, in iron acquisition in the L. pneumophila strain Philadelphia-1. Similar to LbtU, LbtP is a siderophore transport protein and is required for robust growth under iron-limiting conditions. Despite their similar functions, however, LbtU and LbtP do not contribute equally to iron acquisition. The Philadelphia-1 strain lacking LbtP is more sensitive to iron deprivation in vitro. Moreover, LbtP is important for L. pneumophila growth within macrophages while LbtU is dispensable. These results demonstrate that LbtP plays a dominant role over LbtU in iron acquisition. In contrast, loss of both LbtP and LbtU does not impair L. pneumophila growth in the amoebal host Acanthamoeba castellanii, demonstrating a host-specific requirement for the activities of these two transporters in iron acquisition. The growth defect of the ΔlbtP mutant in macrophages is not due to alterations in growth kinetics. Instead, the absence of LbtP limits L. pneumophila replication and causes bacteria to prematurely exit the host cell. These results demonstrate the existence of a preprogrammed exit strategy in response to iron limitation that allows L. pneumophila to abandon the host cell when nutrients are exhausted. PMID:27185787

  5. Sustainable Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The transportation system is the backbone of economic and social progress and the means by which humans access goods and services and connect with one another. Yet, as the scale of transportation activities has grown worldwide, so too have the negative environmental, social, and economic impacts...... that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the transportation...... sector’s significant contribution to global challenges such as climate change, it is often said that sustainable development cannot be achieved without sustainable transportation....

  6. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  7. Non-recessive Bt toxin resistance conferred by an intracellular cadherin mutation in field-selected populations of cotton bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haonan; Wu, Shuwen; Yang, Yihua; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Yidong

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins.

  8. Non-recessive Bt toxin resistance conferred by an intracellular cadherin mutation in field-selected populations of cotton bollworm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haonan Zhang

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins.

  9. Modulation of Macrophage Inflammatory Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling by Intracellular Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, James B; Sircy, Linda M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Ding, Wandi; Leander, Rachel N; McClelland, Erin E; Nelson, David E

    2016-07-22

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a common facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause life-threatening fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. Shortly after infection, Cn is detectable as both extra- and intracellular yeast particles, with Cn being capable of establishing long-lasting latent infections within host macrophages. Although recent studies have shown that shed capsular polysaccharides and intact extracellular Cn can compromise macrophage function through modulation of NF-κB signaling, it is currently unclear whether intracellular Cn also affects NF-κB signaling. Utilizing live cell imaging and computational modeling, we find that extra- and intracellular Cn support distinct modes of NF-κB signaling in cultured murine macrophages. Specifically, in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages treated with extracellular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major Cn capsular polysaccharide, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is inhibited, whereas in cells with intracellular Cn, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is both amplified and sustained. Mathematical simulations and quantification of nascent protein expression indicate that this is a possible consequence of Cn-induced "translational interference," impeding IκBα resynthesis. We also show that long term Cn infection induces stable nuclear localization of p65 and IκBα proteins in the absence of additional pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this case, nuclear localization of p65 is not accompanied by TNFα or inducible NOS (iNOS) expression. These results demonstrate that capsular polysaccharides and intact intracellular yeast manipulate NF-κB via multiple distinct mechanisms and provide new insights into how Cn might modulate cellular signaling at different stages of an infection.

  10. Taurine Boosts Cellular Uptake of Small D-Peptides for Enzyme-Instructed Intracellular Molecular Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Li, Jie; Yamagata, Natsuko; Xu, Bing

    2015-08-19

    Due to their biostability, D-peptides are emerging as an important molecular platform for biomedical applications. Being proteolytically resistant, D-peptides lack interactions with endogenous transporters and hardly enter cells. Here we show that taurine, a natural amino acid, drastically boosts the cellular uptake of small D-peptides in mammalian cells by >10-fold, from 118 μM (without conjugating taurine) to >1.6 mM (after conjugating taurine). The uptake of a large amount of the ester conjugate of taurine and D-peptide allows intracellular esterase to trigger intracellular self-assembly of the D-peptide derivative, further enhancing their cellular accumulation. The study on the mechanism of the uptake reveals that the conjugates enter cells via both dynamin-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis, but likely not relying on taurine transporters. Differing fundamentally from the positively charged cell-penetrating peptides, the biocompatibility, stability, and simplicity of the enzyme-cleavable taurine motif promise new ways to promote the uptake of bioactive molecules for countering the action of efflux pump and contributing to intracellular molecular self-assembly.

  11. Modulation of mammalian apoptotic pathways by intracellular protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, V; Cordeiro-da-Silva, A; Laforge, M; Ouaissi, A; Silvestre, R; Estaquier, J

    2012-03-01

    During intracellular parasitic infections, pathogens and host cells take part in a complex web of events that are crucial for the outcome of the infection. Modulation of host cell apoptosis by pathogens attracted the attention of scientists during the last decade. Apoptosis is an efficient mechanism used by the host to control infection and limit pathogen multiplication and dissemination. In order to ensure completion of their complex life cycles and to guarantee transmission between different hosts, intracellular parasites have developed mechanisms to block apoptosis and sustain the viability of their host cells. Here, we review how some of the most prominent intracellular protozoan parasites modulate the main mammalian apoptotic pathways by emphasizing the advances from the last decade, which have begun to dissect this dynamic and complex interaction.

  12. Monitoring the Intracellular Tacrolimus Concentration in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Stable Graft Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Seok; Yang, Seung Hee; Kim, Min Chang; Cho, Joo-Youn; Min, Sang-Il; Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Dong Ki; Ha, Jongwon; Kim, Yon Su

    2016-01-01

    Although monitoring the intracellular concentration of immunosuppressive agents may be a promising approach to individualizing the therapy after organ transplantation, additional studies on this issue are needed prior to its clinical approval. We investigated the relationship between intracellular and whole blood concentrations of tacrolimus (IC-TAC and WB-TAC, respectively), the factors affecting this relationship, and the risk of rejection based upon IC-TAC in stable kidney recipients. Both IC-TAC and WB-TAC were measured simultaneously in 213 kidney recipients with stable graft function using LC-MS/MS. The tacrolimus ratio was defined as IC-TAC per WB-TAC. The genetic polymorphism of ABCB1 gene and flow cytometric analyses were conducted to probe the correlation between tacrolimus concentration