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Sample records for affect early post-fire

  1. Factors affecting plant diversity during post-fire recovery and succession of mediterranean-climate shrublands in California, USA

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    Keeley, J.E.; Fotheringham, C.J.; Baer-Keeley, M.

    2005-01-01

    Plant community diversity, measured as species richness, is typically highest in the early post-fire years in California shrublands. However, this generalization is overly simplistic and the present study demonstrates that diversity is determined by a complex of temporal and spatial effects. Ninety sites distributed across southern California were studied for 5 years after a series of fires. Characteristics of the disturbance event, in this case fire severity, can alter post-fire diversity, both decreasing and increasing diversity, depending on life form. Spatial variability in resource availability is an important factor explaining patterns of diversity, and there is a complex interaction between landscape features and life form. Temporal variability in resource availability affects diversity, and the diversity peak in the immediate post-fire year (or two) appears to be driven by factors different from subsequent diversity peaks. Early post-fire diversity is influenced by life-history specialization, illustrated by species that spend the bulk of their life cycle as a dormant seed bank, which is then triggered to germinate by fire. Resource fluctuations, precipitation in particular, may be associated with subsequent post-fire diversity peaks. These later peaks in diversity comprise a flora that is compositionally different from the immediate post-fire flora, and their presence may be due to mass effects from population expansion of local populations in adjacent burned areas. ?? 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Early Spring Post-Fire Snow Albedo Dynamics in High Latitude Boreal Forests Using Landsat-8 OLI Data

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    Wang, Zhuosen; Erb, Angela M.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Sun, Qingsong; Liu, Yan; Yang, Yun; Shuai, Yanmin; Casey, Kimberly A.; Roman, Miguel O.

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of the improved radiometric resolution of Landsat-8 OLI which, unlike previous Landsat sensors, does not saturate over snow, the progress of fire recovery progress at the landscape scale (less than 100 m) is examined. High quality Landsat-8 albedo retrievals can now capture the true reflective and layered character of snow cover over a full range of land surface conditions and vegetation densities. This new capability particularly improves the assessment of post-fire vegetation dynamics across low- to high-burn severity gradients in Arctic and boreal regions in the early spring, when the albedos during recovery show the greatest variation. We use 30 m resolution Landsat-8 surface reflectances with concurrent coarser resolution (500 m) MODIS high quality full inversion surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDF) products to produce higher resolution values of surface albedo. The high resolution full expression shortwave blue sky albedo product performs well with an overall RMSE of 0.0267 between tower and satellite measures under both snow-free and snow-covered conditions. While the importance of post-fire albedo recovery can be discerned from the MODIS albedo product at regional and global scales, our study addresses the particular importance of early spring post-fire albedo recovery at the landscape scale by considering the significant spatial heterogeneity of burn severity, and the impact of snow on the early spring albedo of various vegetation recovery types. We found that variations in early spring albedo within a single MODIS gridded pixel can be larger than 0.6. Since the frequency and severity of wildfires in Arctic and boreal systems is expected to increase in the coming decades, the dynamics of albedo in response to these rapid surface changes will increasingly impact the energy balance and contribute to other climate processes and physical feedback mechanisms. Surface radiation products derived from Landsat-8 data will

  3. Identifying key climate and environmental factors affecting rates of post-fire big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) recovery in the northern Columbia Basin, USA

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    Shinneman, Douglas; McIlroy, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Sagebrush steppe of North America is considered highly imperilled, in part owing to increased fire frequency. Sagebrush ecosystems support numerous species, and it is important to understand those factors that affect rates of post-fire sagebrush recovery. We explored recovery of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp.wyomingensis) and basin big sagebrush (A. tridentata ssp. tridentata) communities following fire in the northern Columbia Basin (Washington, USA). We sampled plots across 16 fires that burned in big sagebrush communities from 5 to 28 years ago, and also sampled nearby unburned locations. Mixed-effects models demonstrated that density of large–mature big sagebrush plants and percentage cover of big sagebrush were higher with time since fire and in plots with more precipitation during the winter immediately following fire, but were lower when precipitation the next winter was higher than average, especially on soils with higher available water supply, and with greater post-fire mortality of mature big sagebrush plants. Bunchgrass cover 5 to 28 years after fire was predicted to be lower with higher cover of both shrubs and non-native herbaceous species, and only slightly higher with time. Post-fire recovery of big sagebrush in the northern Columbia Basin is a slow process that may require several decades on average, but faster recovery rates may occur under specific site and climate conditions.

  4. Is timing of prescribed fire critical for limiting post-fire erosion? Lessons from Portugal

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    Shakesby, Richard A.; Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Urbanek, Emilia; Stoof, Cathelijne R.

    2010-05-01

    The rapid increase in fire activity in parts of the Mediterranean from the 1960s onwards led to a rise in interest in the application of prescribed fire as a method of reducing fuel loads and thereby limiting the likelihood of the occurrence of severe wildfires and the size of the areas affected. The ‘windows of opportunity' for carrying out controlled burning are restricted to comparatively brief periods during the autumn through to late spring when wind direction and strength, air temperature and humidity, and fuel load moisture contents are judged to be appropriate. Given that the most erosive rainfall events are often in the autumn to early winter, delaying prescribed fire until later in the winter might be seen as having advantages in reducing post-fire erosional losses of ash, sediment and nutrients, particularly in wetter regions, as on the Atlantic fringe of the Mediterranean. Burning in late winter or spring might be expected to limit the chances of early post-fire heavy and erosive rainfall events. This would allow good vegetation recovery throughout spring and summer before the intense rainfall events likely to occur from the autumn onwards. As part of the EU-funded DESIRE project investigating ways of mitigating the detrimental effects of wildfire on land degradation, a small (9 ha), steep catchment comprising mainly scrub vegetation with encroaching pines in central Portugal was subjected to experimental fire. Although scheduled for autumn-early winter, delay of burning until February 20th 2009 proved necessary because of persistent rainfall and ground conditions too wet for burning. Sediment losses were monitored before and after the burn at the hillslope scale using a series of sediment fences. These comprise geotextile material supported against a frame made of steel bars forming a trap for sediment eroded from upslope. Knowing the contributing areas for eroded material reaching the fences enables erosion rates to be determined. Early results

  5. Effects of Burn Severity and Environmental Conditions on Post-Fire Regeneration in Siberian Larch Forest

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    Thuan Chu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-fire forest regeneration is strongly influenced by abiotic and biotic heterogeneity in the pre- and post-fire environments, including fire regimes, species characteristics, landforms, hydrology, regional climate, and soil properties. Assessing these drivers is key to understanding the long-term effects of fire disturbances on forest succession. We evaluated multiple factors influencing patterns of variability in a post-fire boreal Larch (Larix sibirica forest in Siberia. A time-series of remote sensing images was analyzed to estimate post-fire recovery as a response variable across the burned area in 1996. Our results suggested that burn severity and water content were primary controllers of both Larch forest recruitment and green vegetation cover as defined by the forest recovery index (FRI and the fractional vegetation cover (FVC, respectively. We found a high rate of Larch forest recruitment in sites of moderate burn severity, while a more severe burn was the preferable condition for quick occupation by vegetation that included early seral communities of shrubs, grasses, conifers and broadleaf trees. Sites close to water and that received higher solar energy during the summer months showed a higher rate of both recovery types, defined by the FRI and FVC, dependent on burn severity. In addition to these factors, topographic variables and pre-fire condition were important predictors of post-fire forest patterns. These results have direct implications for the post-fire forest management in the Siberian boreal Larch region.

  6. Production and aerial application of wood shreds as a post-fire hillslope erosion mitigation treatment

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    Peter R. Robichaud; Louise E. Ashmun; Randy B. Foltz; Charles G. Showers; J. Scott Groenier; Jennifer Kesler; Claire DeLeo; Mary Moore

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for the production and aerial application of wood shred mulch as a post-fire hillslope treatment were developed from laboratory and field studies, several field operations, and the evaluations of professionals involved in those operations. At two early trial sites, the wood shred mulch was produced off-site and transported to the area of use. At the 2010...

  7. Effects of post-fire salvage logging and a skid trail treatment on ground cover, soils, and sediment production in the interior western United States

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    Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Lee H. MacDonald; Robert N. Coats; Peter R. Robichaud; Robert E. Brown

    2015-01-01

    Post-fire salvage logging adds another set of environmental effects to recently burned areas, and previous studies have reported varying impacts on vegetation, soil disturbance, and sediment production with limited data on the underlying processes. Our objectives were to determine how: (1) ground-based post-fire logging affects surface cover, soil water repellency,...

  8. Post-fire ecohydrological conditions at peatland margins in different hydrogeological settings of the Boreal Plain

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    Lukenbach, M. C.; Hokanson, K. J.; Devito, K. J.; Kettridge, N.; Petrone, R. M.; Mendoza, C. A.; Granath, G.; Waddington, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    In the Boreal Plain of Canada, the margins of peatland ecosystems that regulate solute and nutrient fluxes between peatlands and adjacent mineral uplands are prone to deep peat burning. Whether post-fire carbon accumulation is able to offset large carbon losses associated with the deep burning at peatland margins is unknown. For this reason, we examined how post-fire hydrological conditions (i.e. water table depth and periodicity, soil tension, and surface moisture content) and depth of burn were associated with moss recolonization at the peatland margins of three sites. We then interpreted these findings using a hydrogeological systems approach, given the importance of groundwater in determining conditions in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in peatlands. Peatland margins dominated by local groundwater flow from adjacent peatland middles were characterized by dynamic hydrological conditions that, when coupled with lowered peatland margin surface elevations due to deep burning, produced two common hydrological states: 1) flooding during wet periods and 2) rapid water table declines during dry periods. These dynamic hydrological states were unfavorable to peatland moss recolonization and bryophytes typical of post-fire recovery in mineral uplands became established. In contrast, at a peatland margin where post-fire hydrological conditions were moderated by larger-scale groundwater flow, flooding and rapid water table declines were infrequent and, subsequently, greater peatland-dwelling moss recolonization was observed. We argue that peatland margins poorly connected to larger-scale groundwater flow are not only prone to deep burning but also lags in post-fire moss recovery. Consequently, an associated reduction in post-fire peat accumulation may occur and negatively affect the net carbon sink status and ecohydrological and biogeochemical function of these peatlands.

  9. Ecohydrologic Implications and Management of Post-fire Soil Water Repellency in Burned Pinon-Juniper Woodlands

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    Madsen, Matthew; Zvirzdin, Daniel; Fernelius, Kaitlynn; McMillan, Mica; Kostka, Stanley

    2014-05-01

    Erosion and weed dominance often limit the recovery of piñon-juniper woodlands of western North America after high intensity wildfires. Soil water repellency (SWR) is one factor that may promote overland flow and impede seedling establishment. In spite of these effects, the influence of post-fire SWR on site recovery is poorly understood. Our presentation summarizes data collected within studies on burned piñon-juniper woodlands that provide new insight on: 1) the spatial distribution and severity of SWR, 2) influence of SWR on soil hydrology, nitrogen cycling, and site revegetation, and 3) the suitability of soil surfactants as a post-fire restoration tool. We demonstrate how patterns of SWR are highly correlated to pre-fire woodland canopy structure. At sites where SWR is present, infiltration, soil water content, and plant establishment is significantly less than at non-hydrophobic sites. We show how newly developed soil surfactants can significantly improve ecohydrologic properties required for plant growth by overcoming SWR; thus, increasing the amount and duration of available water for seed germination and plant growth. However, the application of soil surfactants in wildfire-affected ecosystems has been limited due to logistical and economic constraints associated with the standard practice of using large quantities of irrigation water as the surfactant carrier. We have developed a potential solution to this problem by using seed coating technology to use the seed as the carrier for the delivery of soil surfactant. Through this approach, precipitation leaches the surfactant from the seed into the soil where it absorbs onto the soil particles and ameliorates water repellency within the seeds microsite. We present findings from laboratory and field evaluations of surfactant seed coatings, which provide evidence that it may be plausible for the technology to improve post-fire seeding efforts by restoring soil hydrologic function and increasing seedling

  10. Post-Fire Recovery in Coastal Sage Scrub: Seed Rain and Community Trajectory

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    Conlisk, Erin; Swab, Rebecca; Martínez-Berdeja, Alejandra; Daugherty, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance is a primary mechanism structuring ecological communities. However, human activity has the potential to alter the frequency and intensity of natural disturbance regimes, with subsequent effects on ecosystem processes. In Southern California, human development has led to increased fire frequency close to urban areas that can form a positive feedback with invasive plant spread. Understanding how abiotic and biotic factors structure post-fire plant communities is a critical component of post-fire management and restoration. In this study we considered a variety of mechanisms affecting post-fire vegetation recovery in Riversidean sage scrub. Comparing recently burned plots to unburned plots, we found that burning significantly reduced species richness and percent cover of exotic vegetation the first two years following a 100-hectare wildfire. Seed rain was higher in burned plots, with more native forb seeds, while unburned plots had more exotic grass seeds. Moreover, there were significant correlations between seed rain composition and plant cover composition the year prior and the year after. Collectively, this case study suggests that fire can alter community composition, but there was not compelling evidence of a vegetation-type conversion. Instead, the changes in the community composition were temporary and convergence in community composition was apparent within two years post-fire. PMID:27649564

  11. Post-fire vegetation dynamics in Portugal

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    Gouveia, C.; Dacamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    The number of fires and the extent of the burned surface in Mediterranean Europe have increased significantly during the last three decades. This may be due either to modifications in land-use (e.g. land abandonment and fuel accumulation) or to climatic changes (e.g. reduction of fuel humidity), both factors leading to an increase of fire risk and fire spread. As in the Mediterranean ecosystems, fires in Portugal have an intricate effect on vegetation regeneration due to the complexity of landscape structures as well as to the different responses of vegetation to the variety of fire regimes. A thorough evaluation of vegetation recovery after fire events becomes therefore crucial in land management. In the above mentioned context remote sensing plays an important role because of its ability to monitor and characterise post-fire vegetation dynamics. A number of fire recovery studies, based on remote sensing, have been conducted in regions characterised by Mediterranean climates and the use of NDVI to monitor plant regeneration after fire events was successfully tested (Díaz-Delgado et al., 1998). In particular, several studies have shown that rapid regeneration occurs within the first 2 years after the fire occurrences, with distinct recovery rates according to the geographical facing of the slopes (Pausas and Vallejo, 1999). In 2003 Portugal was hit by the most devastating sequence of large fires, responsible by a total burnt area of 450 000 ha (including 280 000 ha of forest), representing about 5% of the Portuguese mainland (Trigo et al., 2006). The aim of the present work is to assess and monitor the vegetation behaviour over Portugal following the 2003 fire episodes. For this purpose we have used the regional fields of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as obtained from the VEGETATION-SPOT5 instrument, from 1999 to 2008. We developed a methodology to identify large burnt scars in Portugal for the 2003 fire season. The vegetation dynamics was then

  12. Post-fire vegetation succession in Mediterranean gorse shrublands

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    De Luis, Martin; Raventós, José; González-Hidalgo, José Carlos

    2006-07-01

    In Western Mediterranean areas, forest fires are frequent in forests established on old croplands where post-fire regeneration is limited to obligate-seeder species. This has resulted in the spread of Mediterranean gorse ( Ulex parviflorus) increasing the risk and severity of fires. The aim of this paper is to test the autosuccessional hypothesis on a Mediterranean gorse shrubland dominated by seeders species. Particular objectives are: a) to analyze the effect of fire on seedling emergence, survival and growth on the main species involved on plant regeneration process. b) to identify changes in the relative abundance of species as consequence of fire by using a before-after experiment. Then, after experimental fires, seedling emergence, survival and growth rates were analyzed for the main species present in the vegetation regeneration process. Our results show that Mediterranean gorse communities are dominated by Fabaceae species (64% of individuals, mainly of Ulex parviflorus). However, our study demonstrates that vegetation regeneration after fire does not display an autosuccessional pattern and is produced a change on dominance from Fabaceae (mainly U. parviflorus) to Cistaceae (mainly C. albidus) species. Cistaceae seedlings (mainly Cistus albidus and Helianthemum marifolium) were the most abundant post-fire (63% of total germination) while species of Fabaceae (including U. parviflorus and Ononis fruticosa) represented 25%, and Lamiaceae (restricted to Rosmarinus officinalis) comprised only 3% of total emergences. Seedling survival did not differ significantly from one species to another (25-30% of initial individuals over 3 years) but seedling growth rates were also higher for Cistaceae than for Fabaceae individuals. Then, after fire, in terms of biomass, Fabaceae presence decreased from 78.7% to 13.1% while Cistaceae increase from 8% to 83.4%. Given that fire frequency, intensity or severity is partially controlled by the composition and structure of the

  13. FEMME- post-Fire Emergency ManageMEnt tool.

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    Vieira, Diana; Serpa, Dalila; Rocha, João; Nunes, João; Keizer, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Wildfires can have important impacts on hydrological and soil erosion processes in forest catchments, due to the destruction of vegetation cover and changes to soil properties. The involved processes however, are non-linear and not fully understood. This has severely limited the understanding on the impacts of wildfires, and, as a consequence, current runoff-erosion models are poorly adapted to recently burned forest conditions. Furthermore, while post-fire forestry operations and, to a lesser extent, post-fire soil conservation measures are commonly applied, their hydrological and erosion impacts continue poorly known, hampering decision-making by land owners and managers. Past post-wildfire research in Portugal has involved simple adaptations of plot-scale runoff-erosion models to post-fire conditions. This follow-up study focusses on model adaptation to selected post-fire soil conservation measures. To this end, full stock is taken of various datasets collected by several (past and ongoing research projects. The selected model is the Morgan-Morgan-Finney model (MMF, Morgan,2001), which already proved its suitability for post-fire conditions in Portugal (Vieira et al, 2010, 2014) as well as NW-Spain ( Fernández et al., 2010). The present results concerned runoff and erosion different burn severities and various post-fire mitigation treatments (mulch, hydromulch, needle cast, barriers), focussing on the plot and field scale. The results for both the first and the second year following the wildfire revealed good model efficiency, not only for burned and untreated conditions but also for burned and treated conditions. These results thus reinforced earlier findings that MMF is a suitable model for the envisaged post-fire soil erosion assessment tool, coined "FEMME". The data used for post-fire soil erosion calibration with the MMF already allows the delineation of the post-fire management FEMME tool. Nevertheless, further model assessment will address additional

  14. Post-fire succession of ground vegetation of central Siberia in Scots pine forests

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    Kovaleva, N.; Ivanova, G. A.; Conard, S. G.

    2012-04-01

    Extensive wildfires have affected the Russian region in the last decade. Scots pine forests (Pinus sylvestris L.) are widespread in central Siberia and fire occurrence is high in these forests, whose dominant fire regime is one of frequent surface fires. We studied post- fire succession of ground vegetation has been studied on nine experimental fires of varying severity (from 620 to 5220 kW/m) in middle taiga Scots pine forests of central Siberia (Russia). It proved from our study that all species of the succession process are present from initial stages. We did not find any trend of ground vegetation diversity with the time during 8 years after the fire. Our investigation showed that post- fire recovery of the ground vegetation is determined by initial forest type, fire severity and litter burning depth. Fire severity had a clear effect in initial succession in study area and it clearly had an impact on percentage cover, biomass and structure of ground vegetation. In a lesser degree the small shrubs are damaged during ground fires. The dominating species (Vaccinium vitis-idaea and V. myrtillus) regained the cover values above or close to 6—8 years. The post- fire biomass of ground vegetation 93—100% consists of species (Vaccinium vitis-idaea and V. myrtillus) that survived after the fire and increased in the cover with the time. In pine forests mosses and lichens suffer to a greater degree after ground fires. Lichen layer was completely lost after the fires of any severity. Decrease of mosses species diversity takes place after ground fires. The post- fire cover and species diversity of the green mosses were progressively lower with increasing the fire severity during the observation period. Maximum changes are discovered in the post- fire structure of plant microgroups after the high- severity fire which resulted in intensive invasion by the post- fire mosses (Polytrichum strictum and P. commune). There is a positive trend of green moss microgroups recovery

  15. An investigation on graphene and nanoclay effects on hybrid nanocomposites post fire dynamic behavior

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    Antonio Ferreira Ávila

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the post fire behavior of hybrid nanocomposites under dynamic loadings. A series of tests were performed to investigate how nanoparticles (i.e. nanoclay and graphene nanosheets affect the post-fire overall composite behavior. Carbon fiber/epoxy-nanoclay and carbon fiber/epoxy-graphene nanosheets were manufactured. The nanoparticles employed were Cloisite 30B nanoclay, and surface modified graphene nanosheets. The epoxy system used was RemLam M/HY956. The nanocomposites were made using ultrasonic mixer for nanoparticle dispersion in acetone followed by a shear mixing of acetone/nanoparticle/hardener. The following steps involved degassing, the addition of resin to the mixture and, the hand lay-up with vacuum assisted cure. Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA indicates an average decrease on peak mass loss around 41% with the addition of small amount of nanoparticles. The sample plates were exposed to a heat flux of 800 kW.m-2 for a period up to 120 seconds. The post-fire low velocity impact tests indicated the impact resistance degraded as a function of heat exposure. However, the addition of nanoclay leads to an increase on impact peak force of 11.69%. The carbon oxidation could be the main cause of the increase on impact peak load is lower than expected, only 6.72%. The model predictions are overestimated by approximately 8%. Even though, it can be a good tool for composites design.

  16. Effects of Post-Fire Plant Cover in the Performance of Two Cordilleran Cypress ( Austrocedrus chilensis) Seedling Stocktypes Planted in Burned Forests of Northeastern Patagonia, Argentina

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    Urretavizcaya, María F.; Gonda, Héctor E.; Defossé, Guillermo E.

    2017-03-01

    Cordilleran cypress ( Austrocedrus chilensis [D.Don] Pic. Serm. et Bizarri) forests occupy 140,000 ha along a sharp environmental gradient of central Andean-Patagonia in Argentina. Every summer, about 3200 ha of these forests are affected by wildfires, taking thereafter long time to recover. To accelerate forest recovery, we determined in xeric and mesic cypress stands burned 5 and 2 year before whether survival and growth of two planted cypress seedling stocktypes are affected by plant cover and contrasting precipitation conditions. Two experiments were conducted on each site, involving 100 replicates of two seedling stocktypes, having each significantly different morphological attributes. The experiments comprised a dry and humid growing season on each site. Both stocktypes performed similarly within stands, but differently between stands. In the xeric stand, plant cover had neutral effects on seedling survival, favored seedling height growth in the dry season, and was negative on collar diameter and stem growth. In the mesic site, high plant cover favored survival and height growth, but was inconsequential for collar diameter and stem growth. In this short-term post-fire period, and independent of precipitation received during both seasons (dry or humid), plant cover appears as playing a facilitative role, having neutral or even positive effects on survival and growth of planted seedlings. During the early post-fire successional stages, and besides seedling stocktype, there was a synergistic balance between light and soil moisture that seems to benefit planted seedling performance in burned cypress forests, and especially in mesic sites.

  17. Are post-fire silvicultural treatments a useful tool to fight the climate change threat in terms of plant diversity?

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    Hedo de Santiago, Javier; Esteban Lucasr Borja, Manuel; de las Heras, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Adaptative forest management demands a huge scientific knowledge about post-fire vegetation dynamics, taking into account the current context of global change. We hypothesized that management practices should be carry out taking into account the climate change effect, to obtain better results in the biodiversity maintenance across time. All of this with respect to diversity and species composition of the post-fire naturally regenerated Aleppo pine forests understory. The study was carried out in two post-fire naturally regenerated Aleppo pine forests in the Southeastern of the Iberian Peninsula, under contrasting climatic conditions: Yeste (Albacete) shows a dry climate and Calasparra (Murcia) shows a semiarid climate. Thinning as post-fire silvicultural treatment was carried out five years after the wildfire event, in the year 1999. An experiment of artificial drought was designed to evacuate 15% of the natural rainfall in both sites, Yeste and Calasparra, to simulate climate change. Taking into account all the variables (site, silvicultural treatment and artificial drought), alpha diversity indices including species richness, Shannon and Simpson diversity indices, and plant cover, were analyzed as a measure of vegetation abundance. The results showed that plant species were affected by thinning, whereas induced drought affected total cover and species, with lower values at Yeste. Significant site variation was also observed in soil properties, species richness and total plant cover, conversely to the plant species diversity indices. We conclude that the plant community shows different responses to a simulated environment of climate change depending on the experimental site.

  18. Post-fire environments are favourable for plant functioning of seeder and resprouter Mediterranean shrubs, even under drought.

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    Parra, Antonio; Moreno, José M

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how drought affects seeder and resprouter plants during post-fire regeneration is important for the anticipation of Mediterranean vegetation vulnerability in a context of increasing drought and fire caused by climate change. A Mediterranean shrubland was subjected to various drought treatments (including 45% rainfall reduction, 7 months drought yr(-1) ), before and after experimental burning, by means of a rainout-shelter system with an irrigation facility. Predawn shoot water potential (Ψpd ), relative growth rate (RGR), specific leaf area (SLA) and bulk leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13) C) were monitored in the main woody species during the first 3 yr after fire. Cistus ladanifer seedlings showed higher Ψpd , RGR and SLA, and lower δ(13) C, than unburned plants during the first two post-fire years. Seedlings under drought maintained relatively high Ψpd , but suffered a decrease in Ψpd and RGR, and an increase in δ(13) C, relative to control treatments. Erica arborea, E. scoparia and Phillyrea angustifolia resprouts had higher Ψpd and RGR than unburned plants during the first post-fire year. Resprouters were largely unaffected by drought. Overall, despite marked differences between the two functional groups, post-fire environments were favourable for plant functioning of both seeder and resprouter shrubs, even under the most severe drought conditions implemented. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Remote Sensing Techniques in Monitoring Post-Fire Effects and Patterns of Forest Recovery in Boreal Forest Regions: A Review

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    Thuan Chu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and severity of forest fires, coupled with changes in spatial and temporal precipitation and temperature patterns, are likely to severely affect the characteristics of forest and permafrost patterns in boreal eco-regions. Forest fires, however, are also an ecological factor in how forest ecosystems form and function, as they affect the rate and characteristics of tree recruitment. A better understanding of fire regimes and forest recovery patterns in different environmental and climatic conditions will improve the management of sustainable forests by facilitating the process of forest resilience. Remote sensing has been identified as an effective tool for preventing and monitoring forest fires, as well as being a potential tool for understanding how forest ecosystems respond to them. However, a number of challenges remain before remote sensing practitioners will be able to better understand the effects of forest fires and how vegetation responds afterward. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive review of current research with respect to remotely sensed data and methods used to model post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns in boreal forest regions. The review reveals that remote sensing-based monitoring of post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns in boreal forest regions is not only limited by the gaps in both field data and remotely sensed data, but also the complexity of far-northern fire regimes, climatic conditions and environmental conditions. We expect that the integration of different remotely sensed data coupled with field campaigns can provide an important data source to support the monitoring of post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns. Additionally, the variation and stratification of pre- and post-fire vegetation and environmental conditions should be considered to achieve a reasonable, operational model for monitoring post-fire effects and forest patterns in boreal regions.

  20. Hydrological modelling for flood forecasting: Calibrating the post-fire initial conditions

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    Papathanasiou, C.; Makropoulos, C.; Mimikou, M.

    2015-10-01

    Floods and forest fires are two of the most devastating natural hazards with severe socioeconomic, environmental as well as aesthetic impacts on the affected areas. Traditionally, these hazards are examined from different perspectives and are thus investigated through different, independent systems, overlooking the fact that they are tightly interrelated phenomena. In fact, the same flood event is more severe, i.e. associated with increased runoff discharge and peak flow and decreased time to peak, if it occurs over a burnt area than that occurring over a land not affected by fire. Mediterranean periurban areas, where forests covered with flammable vegetation coexist with agricultural land and urban zones, are typical areas particularly prone to the combined impact of floods and forest fires. Hence, the accurate assessment and effective management of post-fire flood risk becomes an issue of priority. The research presented in this paper aims to develop a robust methodological framework, using state of art tools and modern technologies to support the estimation of the change in time of five representative hydrological parameters for post-fire conditions. The proposed methodology considers both longer- and short-term initial conditions in order to assess the dynamic evolution of the selected parameters. The research focuses on typical Mediterranean periurban areas that are subjected to both hazards and concludes with a set of equations that associate post-fire and pre-fire conditions for five Fire Severity (FS) classes and three soil moisture states. The methodology has been tested for several flood events on the Rafina catchment, a periurban catchment in Eastern Attica (Greece). In order to validate the methodology, simulated hydrographs were produced and compared against available observed data. Results indicate a close convergence of observed and simulated flows. The proposed methodology is particularly flexible and thus easily adaptable to catchments with similar

  1. Synthesis of current knowledge on post-fire seeding for soil stabilization and invasive species control

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    Beyers, Jan L.; Pyke, David A.; Wirth, Troy

    2015-01-01

    The General Accounting Office has identified a need for better information on the effectiveness of post-fire emergency stabilization and rehabilitation methods used by the U.S. Forest Service and Department of Interior (DOI) agencies. Since reviews were published on treatment effectiveness in the early 2000s, treatment choices have changed and increased monitoring has been done. Greater use of native species has added substantially to burned area emergency response (BAER) treatment costs, for example, but quantitative data on this treatment were scarce in earlier reviews. We synthesized current information on the effectiveness of post-fire seeding for both soil stabilization and for prevention of the spread of invasive species in rangelands. We reviewed published literature (peer-reviewed and “gray”) and agency monitoring reports, as well as compiled and analyzed quantitative data in agency files. Products of this review include a web-accessible database of monitoring reports and published information, a scientific journal paper summarizing findings of scientific studies, an annotated bibliography of peer-reviewed papers, a summary report published as a General Technical Report that will be available online (in progress), and presentations to scientific meetings and BAER/ESR team training sessions and workshops. By combining results from studies done by Forest Service and DOI agency personnel with research studies published since the initial reviews, we presented a comprehensive synthesis of seeding effectiveness knowledge that complements the review of other hillslope treatments published by other researchers. This information will help federal land managers make more cost-effective decisions on post-fire stabilization and rehabilitation treatments.

  2. Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi) biomass distribution, fire regime and post-fire recovery in northeastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, L. T.; Beck, P. S. A.; Loranty, M. M.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Goetz, S. J.

    2012-10-01

    Climate change and land-use activities are increasing fire activity across much of the Siberian boreal forest, yet the climate feedbacks from forest disturbances remain difficult to quantify due to limited information on forest biomass distribution, disturbance regimes and post-disturbance ecosystem recovery. Our primary objective here was to analyse post-fire accumulation of Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi Mayr.) aboveground biomass for a 100 000 km2 area of open forest in far northeastern Siberia. In addition to examining effects of fire size and topography on post-fire larch aboveground biomass, we assessed regional fire rotation and density, as well as performance of burned area maps generated from MODIS satellite imagery. Using Landsat imagery, we mapped 116 fire scar perimeters that dated c. 1966-2007. We then mapped larch aboveground biomass by linking field biomass measurements to tree shadows mapped synergistically from WorldView-1 and Landsat 5 satellite imagery. Larch aboveground biomass tended to be low during early succession (≤ 25 yr, 271 ± 26 g m-2, n = 66 [mean ± SE]) and decreased with increasing elevation and northwardly aspect. Larch aboveground biomass tended to be higher during mid-succession (33-38 yr, 746 ± 100 g m-2, n = 32), though was highly variable. The high variability was not associated with topography and potentially reflected differences in post-fire density of tree regrowth. Neither fire size nor latitude were significant predictors of post-fire larch aboveground biomass. Fire activity was considerably higher in the Kolyma Mountains (fire rotation = 110 yr, fire density = 1.0 ± 1.0 fires yr-1 × 104 km-2) than along the forest-tundra border (fire rotation = 792 yr, fire density = 0.3 ± 0.3 fires yr-1 × 104 km-2). The MODIS burned area maps underestimated the total area burned in this region from 2000-2007 by 40%. Tree shadows mapped jointly using high and medium resolution satellite imagery were strongly associated (r2 ≈ 0

  3. The ramp or the staircase? A process-hierarchy in post-fire hydrogeomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Gary; Langhans, Christoph; Nyman, Petter; Lane, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Three decades of data show that annual average post-fire erosion rates vary within se Australian forested landscapes over ca. 4 orders of magnitude from flow, and large increases in erosion rates are broadly associated with shifts or "jumps" across erosion process-thresholds. Additional higher- yielding processes are added hierarchically with increased rainfall forcing, starting with raindrop splash, to interill, to rill, to hillslope debris flows, and finally to channel debris flows. In this conceptual framework, the first-order control on the erosion rate results from the combination of system properties and forcing that enables additional erosion processes to be activated in the hierarchy. Second-order controls are process-specific, and explain the remaining variability in erosion rates within each of the processes for a given forcing. Large erosion increases are related to the way in which soil properties, fire severity, hillslope gradient, and channel gradient trigger "jumps" across these process thresholds, which, it is argued, explain the majority of the variability in post-fire erosion rates at headwater catchment scales. The applicability and usefulness of this conceptual framework to erosion prediction in a range of fire affected environments (eg. Western US, Canada, the Mediterranean) will be explored.

  4. Broad-Scale Environmental Conditions Responsible for Post-Fire Vegetation Dynamics

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    Stuart E. Marsh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem response to disturbance is influenced by environmental conditions at a number of scales. Changes in climate have altered fire regimes across the western United States, and have also likely altered spatio-temporal patterns of post-fire vegetation regeneration. Fire occurrence data and a vegetation index (NDVI derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR were used to monitor post-fire vegetation from 1989 to 2007. We first investigated differences in post-fire rates of vegetation regeneration between ecoregions. We then related precipitation, temperature, and elevation records at four temporal scales to rates of post-fire vegetation regeneration to ascertain the influence of climate on post-fire vegetation dynamics. We found that broad-scale climate factors are an important influence on post-fire vegetation regeneration. Most notably, higher rates of post-fire regeneration occurred with warmer minimum temperatures. Increases in precipitation also resulted in higher rates of post-fire vegetation growth. While explanatory power was slight, multiple statistical approaches provided evidence for real ecological drivers of post-fire regeneration that should be investigated further at finer scales. The sensitivity of post-disturbance vegetation dynamics to climatic drivers has important ramifications for the management of ecosystems under changing climatic conditions. Shifts in temperature and precipitation regimes are likely to result in changes in post-disturbance dynamics, which could represent important feedbacks into the global climate system.

  5. Post-fire forest sustainability in north-central Portugal: Assessing the impacts of pre- and post-fire ground preparations, logging and mitigation treatments on post-fire runoff and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvar, Maruxa; Prats, Sérgio A.; Martins, Martinho A. S.; Gonzalez-Pelayo, Óscar; Keizer, Jacob J.

    2014-05-01

    Wildfires have been reported worldwide as producing strong and sometimes extreme responses in runoff and soil erosion. However, in the case of North-Central Portugal, little research had been carried out regarding the hydrologic and erosive impacts of several land management activities in recently burnt areas (such as ground preparation, post-fire logging or post-fire mitigation treatments). This is the main objective of this research. Several pre- and post-fire ground preparation operations (down-slope rip-ploughed, contour ploughed and terracing), post-fire logging activities, and post-fire soil erosion mitigation treatments (forest residue mulches, polyacrylamide and hydromulch) were assessed from the first to the third post-fire years. Repeated rainfall simulation experiments (RSE's), micro-scale runoff plots and bounded sediment fences were installed immediately after the wildfire in twelve burnt slopes and monitored at weekly-basis intervals. The results for the first post-fire year showed comparable runoff coefficient (20-60%) but lower sediment losses (1.2-10 Mg ha-1) than prior studies in Portugal and worldwide, which corresponded well with the historic intensive land use in the area. Terracing sharply increased soil erosion (up to 30 Mg ha-1) at the micro-plots scale during the first year after a wildfire and terracing. However, sediment limited erosion was measured in all the pre-fire ploughed sites, probably due to the time elapsed since ploughing. Post-fire logging activities enhanced 5- to 10- fold the sediment losses, which was related to the disturbance of the soil surface cover. The mulches (forest residue or hydromulch) were highly effective reducing post-fire soil erosion in more than 80%. The increase on sediment losses of the recently terraced area and the measured sediment exhaustion at all the pre-fire ploughed sites as well as the increasing frequency of ploughing in the forest areas implies the need to consider ploughing as a hazardous

  6. Soil microbiological properties and enzymatic activities of long-term post-fire recovery in dry and semiarid Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedo, J.; Lucas-Borja, M. E.; Wic, C.; Andrés-Abellán, M.; de Las Heras, J.

    2015-02-01

    Wildfires affecting forest ecosystems and post-fire silvicultural treatments may cause considerable changes in soil properties. The capacity of different microbial groups to recolonise soil after disturbances is crucial for proper soil functioning. The aim of this work was to investigate some microbial soil properties and enzyme activities in semiarid and dry Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis M.) forest stands. Different plots affected by a wildfire event 17 years ago without or with post-fire silvicultural treatments 5 years after the fire event were selected. A mature Aleppo pine stand, unaffected by wildfire and not thinned was used as a control. Physicochemical soil properties (soil texture, pH, carbonates, organic matter, electrical conductivity, total N and P), soil enzymes (urease, phosphatase, β-glucosidase and dehydrogenase activities), soil respiration and soil microbial biomass carbon were analysed in the selected forests areas and plots. The main finding was that long time after this fire event produces no differences in the microbiological soil properties and enzyme activities of soil after comparing burned and thinned, burned and not thinned, and mature plots. Moreover, significant site variation was generally seen in soil enzyme activities and microbiological parameters. We conclude that total vegetation recovery normalises post-fire soil microbial parameters, and that wildfire and post-fire silvicultural treatments are not significant factors affecting soil properties after 17 years.

  7. Post-Fire Soil Respiration in Relation to the Burnt Wood Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón Jiménez, Sara; Castro, J.; Kowalski, A.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Ruiz, B.; Sancez-Canete, Ep; Zamora, R.

    2010-05-01

    Wildfires are the main cause of forests and understory destruction in Mediterranean areas. One of the most dramatic consequences is the perturbation of carbon fluxes. A high percentage of the CO2 emitted by the ecosystem after a wildfire is due to soil respiration, which represents the most important uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. In this study we have quantified the soil respiration and its seasonal variability in reforested pine forests in the National and Natural Park of Sierra Nevada which were burned in September of 2005. Measurement campaigns were carried out along two years in two experimental plots at different altitudinal levels (1500 and 2200 m a.s.l.), in which three post-fire silvicultural treatments of burned wood were established: 1) "Non-Intervention" (NI), leaving all of the burnt trees standing. 2) "Cut plus Lopping" (CL), a treatment where most of the trees were cut and felled, with the main branches also lopped off, but leaving all the cut biomass in situ covering partially the ground surface 3) "Salvage Logging" (SL), all trees were cut and the trunks and branches were removed. Soil respiration was highly determined by the effects derived of the altitudinal level, with the highest values at the lowest altitude. The seasonal precipitation regime had also a key role. Soil respiration kept a basal level during the summer drought, during this period the response to the altitudinal level and post-fire treatments were reduced. On the other hand, soil respiration boosted after rain events, when the differences between treatments became more pronounced. In general, especially under these conditions of absence of water limitation, the post-fire burnt wood treatment with the highest CO2 fluxes was that in which all the burnt wood biomass remained covering partially the soil surface ("Cut plus Lopping") while the lowest values were registered in the treatment in which the soil was bared ("Salvage Logging"). Results of this study are especially

  8. Regional constraints to biological nitrogen fixation in post-fire forest communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelenik, Stephanie; Perakis, Steven; Hibbs, David

    2013-03-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a key ecological process that can restore nitrogen (N) lost in wildfire and shape the pace and pattern of post-fire forest recovery. To date, there is limited information on how climate and soil fertility interact to influence different pathways of BNF in early forest succession. We studied asymbiotic (forest floor and soil) and symbiotic (the shrub Ceanothus integerrimus) BNF rates across six sites in the Klamath National Forest, California, USA. We used combined gradient and experimental phosphorus (P) fertilization studies to explore cross-site variation in BNF rates and then related these rates to abiotic and biotic variables. We estimate that our measured BNF rates 22 years after wildfire (6.1-12.1 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) are unlikely to fully replace wildfire N losses. We found that asymbiotic BNF is P limited, although this is not the case for symbiotic BNF in Ceanothus. In contrast, Ceanothus BNF is largely driven by competition from other vegetation: in high-productivity sites with high potential evapotranspiration (Et), shrub biomass is suppressed as tree biomass increases. Because shrub biomass governed cross-site variation in Ceanothus BNF, this competitive interaction led to lower BNF in sites with high productivity and Et. Overall, these results suggest that the effects of nutrients play a larger role in driving asymbiotic than symbiotic fixation across our post-fire sites. However, because symbiotic BNF is 8-90x greater than asymbiotic BNF, it is interspecific plant competition that governs overall BNF inputs in these forests.

  9. Regional constraints to biological nitrogen fixation in post-fire forest communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelenik, Stephanie; Perakis, Steven S.; Hibbs, David

    2013-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a key ecological process that can restore nitrogen (N) lost in wildfire and shape the pace and pattern of post-fire forest recovery. To date, there is limited information on how climate and soil fertility interact to influence different pathways of BNF in early forest succession. We studied asymbiotic (forest floor and soil) and symbiotic (the shrub Ceanothus integerrimus) BNF rates across six sites in the Klamath National Forest, California, USA. We used combined gradient and experimental phosphorus (P) fertilization studies to explore cross-site variation in BNF rates and then related these rates to abiotic and biotic variables. We estimate that our measured BNF rates 22 years after wildfire (6.1–12.1 kg N·ha-1·yr-1) are unlikely to fully replace wildfire N losses. We found that asymbiotic BNF is P limited, although this is not the case for symbiotic BNF in Ceanothus. In contrast, Ceanothus BNF is largely driven by competition from other vegetation: in high-productivity sites with high potential evapotranspiration (Et), shrub biomass is suppressed as tree biomass increases. Because shrub biomass governed cross-site variation in Ceanothus BNF, this competitive interaction led to lower BNF in sites with high productivity and Et. Overall, these results suggest that the effects of nutrients play a larger role in driving asymbiotic than symbiotic fixation across our post-fire sites. However, because symbiotic BNF is 8–90x greater than asymbiotic BNF, it is interspecific plant competition that governs overall BNF inputs in these forests.

  10. Post-fire spatial patterns of soil nitrogen mineralization and microbial abundance.

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    Erica A H Smithwick

    Full Text Available Stand-replacing fires influence soil nitrogen availability and microbial community composition, which may in turn mediate post-fire successional dynamics and nutrient cycling. However, fires create patchiness at both local and landscape scales and do not result in consistent patterns of ecological dynamics. The objectives of this study were to (1 quantify the spatial structure of microbial communities in forest stands recently affected by stand-replacing fire and (2 determine whether microbial variables aid predictions of in situ net nitrogen mineralization rates in recently burned stands. The study was conducted in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia and Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir (Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa forest stands that burned during summer 2000 in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA. Using a fully probabilistic spatial process model and Bayesian kriging, the spatial structure of microbial lipid abundance and fungi-to-bacteria ratios were found to be spatially structured within plots two years following fire (for most plots, autocorrelation range varied from 1.5 to 10.5 m. Congruence of spatial patterns among microbial variables, in situ net N mineralization, and cover variables was evident. Stepwise regression resulted in significant models of in situ net N mineralization and included variables describing fungal and bacterial abundance, although explained variance was low (R²<0.29. Unraveling complex spatial patterns of nutrient cycling and the biotic factors that regulate it remains challenging but is critical for explaining post-fire ecosystem function, especially in Greater Yellowstone, which is projected to experience increased fire frequencies by mid 21(st Century.

  11. Spatial Patterns of Post-Fire Soil Water Repellency in Rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N. A.; Pierce, J. L.

    2006-12-01

    Water repellent soils are naturally occurring but can be created or enhanced by wildfires. Post-fire runoff and the occurrence of fire-related floods and debris flows are related to the extent and continuity of water repellent soils. While many studies have positively correlated post-fire soil water repellency with burn severity and ash thickness in forested and chaparral environments, few studies have examined fire-related water repellency in sage-bitterbrush rangelands (but see Pierson et al., 2001). Rangelands, which comprise 40% of the landmass of the United States and nearly 80% of the lands of the western U.S., burn frequently during the summer with burn areas that often exceed 200 km2. The most commonly used method to measure the extent and severity of post-fire soil water repellency is the water drop penetration test (WDPT): other tests include the molarity of ethanol test, infiltration measured with a minidisk infiltrometer, and patterns of water infiltration measured with blue dye. Unlike tests that measure time until infiltration, the blue dye test provides a means of measuring the spatial extent of water repellent soils as well as area quantification of water saturation and locations of subsurface flowpaths. In early July, 2006, fires burned approximately 1.6 km2 of sagebrush and bitterbrush-dominated rangelands in foothills near Boise, Idaho. Initial studies in August 2006 using both water drop penetration time and the blue dye test show that soil water repellency is highly variable in both extent and severity, and that repellency varies with proximity to burned sage or bitterbrush coppice sites. Out of sixty sample sites, slight soil water repellency occurred outside of coppice boundaries on three occasions, each time in an area with grass and within 1 m of a coppice. Not all coppices exhibited soil water repellency, and only 23% of sites within coppice boundaries exhibited moderate to strong water repellency, as measured by WDPT. Use of the blue dye

  12. Post-fire vegetation behaviour in large burnt scars from 2005 fire season in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, A.; Gouveia, C. M.; DaCamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    Wildfires have a wide diversity of impacts on landscape which, in turn, depend on the interaction of fire regimes (e.g. intensity, extent, frequency) and the response of vegetation to them in short and long-terms. The increase in erosion rates and the loss of nutrients by runoff in the first months following the fire are among the major impacts of wildfires. A minimum of 30% of vegetation cover is enough to protect soils against erosion but vegetation may require a long period to reach this threshold after severe fires. Since erosion risk is strongly linked to vegetation recovery rates, post-fire vegetation monitoring becomes crucial in land management. Fire regimes in the Mediterranean have been changing in the past decades due to modifications in both socio-economic and climate patterns. Although many vegetation species in Mediterranean ecosystems are adapted to wildfires, changes in fire regime characteristics affect the ability of ecosystems to recover to their previous state. In Spain, fire is an important driver of changes in landscape composition, leading to dominance of shrubland following fire and to a major decrease of pine woodlands (Viedma et al., 2006). Remote sensing is a powerful tool in land management, allowing vegetation monitoring on large spatial scales for relatively long periods of time. In order to assess vegetation dynamics, monthly NDVI data from 1998-2009 from SPOT/VEGETATION at 1km spatial resolution over the Iberian Peninsula were used. This work focuses on 2005 fire season in Spain, which registered the highest amount of burnt area since 1994, with more than 188000 ha burnt. Burnt scars in this fire season were identified by cluster analysis. Post-fire vegetation recovery was assessed based on the monoparametric model developed by Gouveia et al. (2010) that was applied to four large scars located in different geographical settings with different land cover characteristics. While the two northern regions presented fast recovery, in the

  13. Wildfires and post-fire erosion risk in a coastal area under severe anthropic pressure associated with the touristic fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Annalisa; Arca, Bachisio; Pellizzaro, Grazia; Valeriano Pintus, Gian; Ferrara, Roberto; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades a rapid and intense development of the tourism industry led to an increasing of anthropic pressure on several coastal areas of Sardinia. This fact not only modified the coastal aesthetics, but has also generated an increase of risk for the environment. This phenomenon affected also the ancient structure of the landscape with a negative impact mainly caused by the following factors: land abandonment, wildfire occurrence, post-fire erosion, urbanization. These regional changes can be analyzed in detail by considering the geo-diachronic dynamics. The main objectives of this work were i) to perform a diachronic analysis of land use and land cover dynamics, ii) to analyse the recent dynamics of wildfires, and iii) to predict the soil erosion risk in relation to land use change occurred between the 1950s and the 2000s. The study was realized in a coastal area located in North-East Sardinia where the geo-historical processes were summarized and organized in a geographic information system that has been employed to examine the landscape variations at three different time steps: 1954, 1977 and 2000. In addition, different scenarios of wildfire propagation were simulated by FlamMap in order to estimate the spatial pattern of fire danger factors in the study area. Afterwards, maps of post-fire soil erosion were produced to identify the temporal and spatial variations of the erosion risk. The results show how the changes in land use and the significant and rapid increase of the residential areas affect the risk of both wildfires and post-fire soil erosion. The study reveals the capabilities of this type of approach and can be used by management agencies and policy makers e in sustainable landscape management planning. This approach can be extended to other regions of the Mediterranean basin characterized by complex interactions among landscape and anthropic factors affecting the environmental risk.

  14. Increasing microbial diversity and nitrogen cycling potential of burnt forest soil in Spain through post-fire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Lily; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; McMillan, Mary; García-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2016-04-01

    Microbial diversity and function in soils are increasingly assessed by the application of molecular methods such as sequencing and PCR technology. We applied these techniques to study microbial recovery in post-fire forest soils. The recovery of forest ecosystems following severe fire is influenced by post-fire management. The removal of burnt tree stumps (salvage logging) is a common practice in Spain following fire. In some cases, the use of heavy machinery in addition to the vulnerability of soils to erosion and degradation make this management potentially damaging to soil, and therefore to the ecosystem. We hypothesized that tree removal slows down the recovery of soil biological communities including microbial and plant communities and contributes to soil degradation in the burnt affected area. The study area is located in "Sierra de Mariola Natural Park" in Alcoi, Alicante (E Spain). A big forest fire (>500 has) occurred in July 2012. The forest is composed mainly of Pinus halepensis trees with an understory of typical Mediterranean shrubs species such as Quercus coccifera, Rosmarinus officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, Brachypodium retusum, etc. Soil is classified as a Typic Xerorthent (Soil Survey Staff, 2014) developed over marls. In February 2013, salvage logging (SL) treatment, with a complete extraction of the burned wood using heavy machinery, was applied to a part of the affected forest. Plots for monitoring the effects of SL were installed in this area and in a similar nearby control (C) area, where no SL treatment was done. The recovery of soil bacterial and fungal communities post-fire with and without tree removal was analysed by using Next-Generation sequencing and the abundance of functional genes, related to nitrogen cycling, in the soil was estimated using quantitative PCR (qPCR). We will present the methods used and the results of our study in this PICO presentation.

  15. An Advanced Smoke-Eater for Post-fire Cabin Atmosphere Cleanup Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) proposes to develop a post-fire air purification system that consists of a particulate removal assembly, a sorbent bed to remove the...

  16. Index for characterizing post-fire soil environments in temperate coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Theresa B.; Pilliod, David S.; Graham, Russell T.; Lentile, Leigh B.; Sandquist, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Many scientists and managers have an interest in describing the environment following a fire to understand the effects on soil productivity, vegetation growth, and wildlife habitat, but little research has focused on the scientific rationale for classifying the post-fire environment. We developed an empirically-grounded soil post-fire index (PFI) based on available science and ecological thresholds. Using over 50 literature sources, we identified a minimum of five broad categories of post-fire outcomes: (a) unburned, (b) abundant surface organic matter ( > 85% surface organic matter), (c) moderate amount of surface organic matter ( ≥ 40 through 85%), (d) small amounts of surface organic matter ( < 40%), and (e) absence of surface organic matter (no organic matter left). We then subdivided each broad category on the basis of post-fire mineral soil colors providing a more fine-tuned post-fire soil index. We related each PFI category to characteristics such as soil temperature and duration of heating during fire, and physical, chemical, and biological responses. Classifying or describing post-fire soil conditions consistently will improve interpretations of fire effects research and facilitate communication of potential responses or outcomes (e.g., erosion potential) from fires of varying severities.

  17. Post-Fire Restoration Plan for Sustainable Forest Management in South Korea

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    Soung-Ryoul Ryu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This review was to determine a standard post-fire restoration strategy for use in South Korea according to the magnitude of the damage and the condition of the affected site. The government has strongly enforced reforestation in deforested areas as well as fire prevention and suppression since the 1960s. These efforts have successfully recovered dense even-aged forests over the last five decades. However, high fuel loading and the homogeneous structure have made forests vulnerable to large fires. In recent years, large forest fires have occurred in the eastern coastal region of Korea. Forest fires can significantly influence the economic and social activities of the residents of such affected forest regions. Burned areas may require urgent and long-term restoration strategies, depending on the condition of the affected site. Erosion control is the most important component of an urgent restoration and should be completed before a rainy season to prevent secondary damage such as landslides and sediment runoff in burned areas. Long-term restoration is necessary to renew forest functions such as timber production, water conservation, ecosystem conservation, and recreation for residents. Sound restoration for burned areas is critical for restoring healthy ecological functions of forests and providing economic incentives to local residents.

  18. Rapid response tools and datasets for post-fire modeling: Linking Earth Observations and process-based hydrological models to support post-fire remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. E. Miller; M. Billmire; W. J. Elliot; K. A. Endsley; P. R. Robichaud

    2015-01-01

    Preparation is key to utilizing Earth Observations and process-based models to support post-wildfire mitigation. Post-fire flooding and erosion can pose a serious threat to life, property and municipal water supplies. Increased runoff and sediment delivery due to the loss of surface cover and fire-induced changes in soil properties are of great concern. Remediation...

  19. First post-fire flush in a Mediterranean temporary stream: source ascription in bed sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrany Bertos, Joan; García-Comendador, Julián; Fortesa, Josep; Calsamiglia, Aleix; Garcias, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    First flushes can be of great importance for suspended-sediment transport in fluvial systems of drylands, being temporary streams a characteristic feature of Mediterranean basins. After a wildfire, storm flows may enhance runoff delivery to channels and then increasing the first-flush effect. 137Cs and 210Pbex were used as tracers for recognizing the first post-fire flush effect in the source ascription of bed sediments temporarily stored in a Mediterranean temporary stream severely affected by a wildfire. Thirty potential sediment source samples were collected along the main stem of a catchment located in Mallorca (Spain) during a field campaign developed some weeks after the wildfire. The sample collection was designed considering the wildfire affection, and also distinguishing between soil surface and channel bank. To quantify the relative source contribution to the bed sediment temporarily stored, five sediment samples -deposited during the first storm occurred three months after the wildfire- were collected into the bed stream of the main channel. The 137Cs and 210Pbex concentrations were measured by gamma spectrometry. Then, a linear mixing model was used to establish the relative contribution of each source type to the bed sediments discerning between the most upstream and the downstream parts of the catchment. Post-fire first-flush effect was generated by a torrential event with a suspended-sediment concentration peak ca. 33,618 mg L-1, although transmission losses under a very low runoff coefficient (1%) promoted sediment deposition. Significant differences were observed in fallout radionuclide concentrations between burned surface soil and channel bank samples (p 0.05). Source ascription in bed sediments in the middle stream shows that 67% was generated in burned hillslopes, reaching 75% in the downstream part because downstream propagation of the sediment derived from the burned area. Bed sediments were mostly generated in burned hillslopes because of

  20. Drought impact on vegetation in pre and post fire events in Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, C. M.; Bastos, A.; Trigo, R. M.; DaCamara, C.

    2012-04-01

    In 2004/2005, the Iberian Peninsula was stricken by an exceptional drought that affected more than one third of Portugal and part of southern Spain during more than 9 months. This severe drought had a strong negative impact on vegetation dynamics, as it coincided with the period of high photosynthetic activity (Gouveia et al., 2009). Since water availability is a crucial factor in post-fire vegetation recovery, it is desirable to assess the impact that such water-stress conditions had on fire sensitivity and post-fire vegetation recovery. Fire events in the European Mediterranean areas have become a serious problem and a major ecosystem disturbance, increasing erosion and soil degradation. In Portugal, the years 2003 and 2005 were particularly devastating. In 2003 it was registered the maximal burnt area since 1980, with more than 425000 ha burned, representing about 5% of Portuguese mainland. The 2005 fire season registered the highest number of fire occurrences in Portugal and the second year with the greatest number of fires in Spain. The high number of fire events observed during the summer 2005 in the Iberian Peninsula is linked, in part, to the extreme drought conditions that prevailed during the preceding winter and spring seasons of 2004/2005. Vegetation recovery after the 2003 and 2005 fire seasons was estimated using the mono-parametric model developed by Gouveia et al. (2010), which relies on monthly values of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), from 1999 to 2009, at 1kmresolution, as obtained from the VEGETATION-SPOT5 instrument.. This model was further used to evaluate the effect of drought in pre and post vegetation activity. Besides the standard NDVI, the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the Normalized Difference Drought Index (NDDI) were computed in order to evaluate drought intensity. In the case of the burnt scars of 2003, when data corresponding to the months of drought are removed, recovery times are considerably shorter

  1. Source Material and Concentration of Wildfire-Produced Pyrogenic Carbon Influence Post-Fire Soil Nutrient Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas A. Michelotti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic carbon (PyC is produced by the thermal decomposition of organic matter in the absence of oxygen (O. PyC affects nutrient availability, may enhance post-fire nitrogen (N mineralization rates, and can be a significant carbon (C pool in fire-prone ecosystems. Our objectives were to characterize PyC produced by wildfires and examine the influence that contrasting types of PyC have on C and N mineralization rates. We determined C, N, O, and hydrogen (H concentrations and atomic ratios of charred bark (BK, charred pine cones (PC, and charred woody debris (WD using elemental analysis. We also incubated soil amended with BK, PC, and WD at two concentrations for 60 days to measure C and N mineralization rates. PC had greater H/C and O/C ratios than BK and WD, suggesting that PC may have a lesser aromatic component than BK and WD. C and N mineralization rates decreased with increasing PyC concentrations, and control samples produced more CO2 than soils amended with PyC. Soils with PC produced greater CO2 and had lower N mineralization rates than soils with BK or WD. These results demonstrate that PyC type and concentration have potential to impact nutrient dynamics and C flux to the atmosphere in post-fire forest soils.

  2. Prediction of spatially explicit rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for post-fire debris-flow generation in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis M.; Negri, Jacquelyn A.; Kean, Jason W.; Laber, Jayme L.; Tillery, Anne C.; Youberg, Ann M.

    2017-02-01

    Early warning of post-fire debris-flow occurrence during intense rainfall has traditionally relied upon a library of regionally specific empirical rainfall intensity-duration thresholds. Development of this library and the calculation of rainfall intensity-duration thresholds often require several years of monitoring local rainfall and hydrologic response to rainstorms, a time-consuming approach where results are often only applicable to the specific region where data were collected. Here, we present a new, fully predictive approach that utilizes rainfall, hydrologic response, and readily available geospatial data to predict rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for debris-flow generation in recently burned locations in the western United States. Unlike the traditional approach to defining regional thresholds from historical data, the proposed methodology permits the direct calculation of rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for areas where no such data exist. The thresholds calculated by this method are demonstrated to provide predictions that are of similar accuracy, and in some cases outperform, previously published regional intensity-duration thresholds. The method also provides improved predictions of debris-flow likelihood, which can be incorporated into existing approaches for post-fire debris-flow hazard assessment. Our results also provide guidance for the operational expansion of post-fire debris-flow early warning systems in areas where empirically defined regional rainfall intensity-duration thresholds do not currently exist.

  3. Prediction of spatially explicit rainfall intensity–duration thresholds for post-fire debris-flow generation in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis M.; Negri, Jacquelyn; Kean, Jason W.; Laber, Jayme L.; Tillery, Anne C.; Youberg, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    Early warning of post-fire debris-flow occurrence during intense rainfall has traditionally relied upon a library of regionally specific empirical rainfall intensity–duration thresholds. Development of this library and the calculation of rainfall intensity-duration thresholds often require several years of monitoring local rainfall and hydrologic response to rainstorms, a time-consuming approach where results are often only applicable to the specific region where data were collected. Here, we present a new, fully predictive approach that utilizes rainfall, hydrologic response, and readily available geospatial data to predict rainfall intensity–duration thresholds for debris-flow generation in recently burned locations in the western United States. Unlike the traditional approach to defining regional thresholds from historical data, the proposed methodology permits the direct calculation of rainfall intensity–duration thresholds for areas where no such data exist. The thresholds calculated by this method are demonstrated to provide predictions that are of similar accuracy, and in some cases outperform, previously published regional intensity–duration thresholds. The method also provides improved predictions of debris-flow likelihood, which can be incorporated into existing approaches for post-fire debris-flow hazard assessment. Our results also provide guidance for the operational expansion of post-fire debris-flow early warning systems in areas where empirically defined regional rainfall intensity–duration thresholds do not currently exist.

  4. Functional activity of soil microbial communities in post-fire pine stands of Tolyatti, Samara oblast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, E. Yu.; Kudinova, A. G.; Abakumov, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    The state of microbial communities in gray-humus soils (Eutric Fluvic Arenosols (Ochric)) of pine stands in the city of Tolyatti after forest fires of 2010 is analyzed. It is shown that fires exert negative effects on the structure and metabolic activity of microbial communities in the postpyrogenic soils. The content of the carbon of microbial biomass and the intensity of microbial respiration in the upper organic horizons of the post-fire plots decrease by 6.5 and 3.4 times, respectively, in comparison with those in the soils of background plots. However, the fire has not affected the studied microbiological parameters of the soils at the depths of more than 10 cm. The maximum content of the carbon of microbial biomass carbon and the maximum intensity of microbial respiration have been found in the subsurface AY2 and AC horizons two-three years the fire. An increase in the microbial metabolic quotient (the ratio of soil respiration to microbial biomass) attests to the disturbance of the ecophysiological state of soil microbial communities after the pyrogenic impact.

  5. Can pore-clogging by ash explain post-fire runoff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, Cathelijne R.; Gevaert, Anouk I.; Baver, Christine; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Morales, Veronica L.; Zhang, Wei; Martin, Deborah; Giri, Shree K.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2016-01-01

    Ash plays an important role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire and has frequently been hypothesised to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Yet evidence for clogging is incomplete, as research has focussed on identifying the presence of ash in soil; the actual flow processes remain unknown. We conducted laboratory infiltration experiments coupled with microscope observations in pure sands, saturated hydraulic conductivity analysis, and interaction energy calculations, to test whether ash can clog pores (i.e. block pores such that infiltration is hampered and ponding occurs). Although results confirmed previous observations of ash washing into pores, clogging was not observed in the pure sands tested, nor were conditions found for which this does occur. Clogging by means of strong attachment of ash to sand was deemed unlikely given the negative surface charge of the two materials. Ponding due to washing in of ash was also considered improbable given the high saturated conductivity of pure ash and ash–sand mixtures. This first mechanistic step towards analysing ash transport and attachment processes in field soils therefore suggests that pore clogging by ash is unlikely to occur in sands. Discussion is provided on other mechanisms by which ash can affect post-fire hydrology.

  6. Post-fire recolonization of dominant epiphytic lichen species on Quercus hypoleucoides (Fagaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagni, J G; Gries, C

    2000-12-01

    Following a forest fire (27 500 ha) in 1994, post-fire recolonization of Quercus hypoeleucoides by epiphytic lichens was documented as changes in lichen cover, number of small thalli, specific factors that affected reestablishment of lichens, and modes of dispersal. Three sites in the Chiricahua Mountains (Arizona, USA) were chosen according to the severity of fire damage-unburned, moderately burned, and severely burned. From 1994 through 1997, the amount of dead lichen cover significantly increased at the moderately burned site. For the same time period, the amount of live lichen cover significantly increased at the severely burned site. Numbers of new thalli increased significantly at the severely burned site each year but only in the last year (1996-1997) for the moderately burned site. Bark texture and proximity to trees with lichens were among the most important physical factors for recolonization. The most important means of dispersal for Flavopunctelia praesignis was fragmentation. For Punctelia hypoleucites, the primary means of dispersal was spores. Increases in live lichen cover and numbers of new thalli occur faster in severely burned areas probably due to the loss of lichens on tree trunks, which provides space and a lack of competition.

  7. Impact of the post fire management in some soil chemical properties. First results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francos, Marcos; Pereira, Paulo; Alcañiz, Meritxell; Úbeda, Xavi

    2016-04-01

    Post-fire management after severe wildfires has impact on soil properties. In Mediterranean environments management of fire affected areas is a common practice. This intervention may change soil chemical properties of the soil such as major cations. The aim of this work is to study the impact of different types of forest management in soil extractable calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium after a severe wildfire. The study area is located in Ódena (Catalonia, Spain). The wildfire occurred at July 27th of 2015 and burned 1235 ha. After the fire an experimental plot was designed 9 plots with 2x2 meters (4 square meters). The different managements were: a) clear-cuted area and wood removed, b) no treatment); and c) clear-cutted. The results of the first sampling showed significant differences among all treatments in extractable calcium, sodium and potassium. The amount of these extractable elements was high in clear-cutted treatment in comparison to the others. No differences were identified in extractable magnesium. Overall, in the immediate period after the fire, burned area management, changed the studied soil properties. We are currently studying the evolution of this soil properties in these plots with the time

  8. Early Adolescent Affect Predicts Later Life Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, Jessica; Allen, Joseph P; Diener, Ed

    2016-07-01

    Subjective well-being as a predictor for later behavior and health has highlighted its relationship to health, work performance, and social relationships. However, the majority of such studies neglect the developmental nature of well-being in contributing to important changes across the transition to adulthood. To examine the potential role of subjective well-being as a long-term predictor of critical life outcomes, we examined indicators of positive and negative affect at age 14 as predictors of relationship, adjustment, self-worth, and career outcomes a decade later at ages 23 to 25, controlling for family income and gender. We utilised multi-informant methods including reports from the target participant, close friends, and romantic partners in a demographically diverse community sample of 184 participants. Early adolescent positive affect predicted fewer relationship problems (less self-reported and partner-reported conflict, and greater friendship attachment as rated by close peers) and healthy adjustment to adulthood (lower levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness). It also predicted positive work functioning (higher levels of career satisfaction and job competence) and increased self-worth. Negative affect did not significantly predict any of these important life outcomes. In addition to predicting desirable mean levels of later outcomes, early positive affect predicted beneficial changes across time in many outcomes. The findings extend early research on the beneficial outcomes of subjective well-being by having an earlier assessment of well-being, including informant reports in measuring a large variety of outcome variables, and by extending the findings to a lower socioeconomic group of a diverse and younger sample. The results highlight the importance of considering positive affect as an important component of subjective well-being distinct from negative affect. © 2016 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  9. Post-fire runoff and soil (fertility) losses in long-unburnt vs. repeatedly-burnt Maritime Pine stands, north-central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mohammad; Gonzaléz-Pelayo, Oscar; Buchspies, Ben; Maia, Paula; Martins, Martinho; Varandas, Daniela; Geissen, Violette; Coelho, Celeste; Ritsem, Coen; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Whilst wildfires are a natural phenomenon in Mediterranean climate regions and a key evolutionary and ecological factor in several of its ecosystems, there are widespread concerns about the resilience of even these fire-adapted ecosystems under present-day fire regimes. The role of repeated wildfires in land degradation, however, has not been extensively studied. The EU-funded CASCADE project addresses this research gap in the study case in Portugal, assessing whether repeated wildfires in Maritime Pine stands lead to land degradation through a gradual process or, instead, through tipping-points in plant-water-soil relationships. In the present study, focus is on the indirect effects of (repeated) wildfires, due to fire-enhanced overland flow generation and the associated losses of sediments, organic matter and nutrients (N and P). Following a large wildfire in early September 2013, affecting roughly 3000 ha in the municipality of Viseu, six Maritime Pine stands were selected within the burnt area. According to the available burnt-area maps, covering the period 1975-2011, three of these sites were unburnt for over 35 years, whereas the other three sites had burnt three more times before 2012. At each of these sites, two pairs of micro-plots of approximately 0.25 m2 were installed as soon as possible after the wildfire, albeit not before the first two post-fire rainfall events, whilst a third pair was installed several weeks later. The first two plot pairs were installed halfway the upper and lower halves of the slope, the third pair in between. The paired-plot design was chosen to compare the hydrological and erosion response for two adjacent patches with contrasting post-fire vegetation recovery processes, i.e. through re-sprouting (by the shrub Pterospartum tridentatum) and by germination. Since the installation of the plots, runoff has been measured at 1- to 2-weekly intervals, depending on rainfall, and samples taken for laboratory analysis of sediment and

  10. Impacts of Boreal Forest Fires and Post-Fire Succession on Energy Budgets and Climate in the Community Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Bonan, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    Vegetation compositions of boreal forests are determined largely by recovery patterns after large-scale disturbances, the most notable of which is wildfire. Forest compositions exert large controls on regional energy and greenhouse gas budgets by affecting surface albedo, net radiation, turbulent energy fluxes, and carbon stocks. Impacts of boreal forest fires on climate are therefore products of direct fire effects, including charred surfaces and emitted aerosols and greenhouse gasses, and post-fire vegetation succession, which affects carbon and energy exchange for many decades after the initial disturbance. Climate changes are expected to be greatest at high latitudes, leading many to project increases in boreal forest fires. While numerous studies have documented the effects of post-fire landscape on energy and gas budgets in boreal forests, to date no continental analysis using a coupled model has been performed. In this study we quantified the effects of boreal forest fires and post-fire succession on regional and global climate using model experiments in the Community Earth System Model. We used 20th century climate data and MODIS vegetation continuous fields and land cover classes to identify boreal forests across North America and Eurasia. Historical fire return intervals were derived from a regression approach utilizing the Canadian and Alaskan Large Fire Databases, the Global Fire Emissions Database v3, and land cover and climate data. Succession trajectories were derived from the literature and MODIS land cover over known fire scars. Major improvements in model-data comparisons of long-term energy budgets were observed by prescribing post-fire vegetation succession. Global simulations using historical and future burn area scenarios highlight the potential impacts on climate from changing fire regimes and provide motivation for including vegetation succession in coupled simulations.

  11. Effectiveness of two contrasting mulching rates to reduce post-fire soil and organic matter losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Flavio; Prats, Sergio; Vieira, Diana; Puga, João; Lopes, Rita; Gonzaléz-Pelayo, Oscar; Caetano, Ana; Campos, Isabel; Keizer, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Wildfire-affected soils can reveal strong responses in runoff generation and associated soil (fertility) losses, thereby constituting a major threat to the typically shallow and poor forest soils of the Portuguese mountain areas. Mulching with logging residues from these forests has proven to provide a protective soil cover that is highly effective in reducing post-fire runoff and especially erosion (Prats et al., 2012, 2014, 2016a, 2016b). However, these past experiments have all applied comparatively large amounts of forest residues, in the order of 10 Mg ha-1, so that the relationship between application rate and effectiveness is still poorly known. Such relationship would nonetheless be of crucial importance for the employment of forest residue mulching in practice, as one of the possible emergency stabilization measures to be contemplated in post-fire land management of a recently-burned area. Further research gaps that exist in relation to post-fire forest residue mulching include its effectiveness in reducing soil fertility losses (C, N, P; Ferreira et al., 2016a, 2016b) and in minimizing export of contaminants (especially PAHs and metals; Campos et al., 2016), and its (secondary) impacts on soil biological activity and diversity (Puga et al., 2016) and on forest productivity (including through the addition of organic matter to the soil surface, partially replacing the burned litter layer; Prats et al. 2016b). In the framework of the EU-project RECARE, the effectiveness of two contrasting mulching rates with forest logging residues has been tested following a wildfire that on August 9th - 10th 2015 consumed some 715 ha of eucalypt plantations in the Semide municipality, central Portugal. Commercially-available logging residues (chopped bark and twigs) from eucalypt plantations were purchased, transported to the study site and applied to six out of nine 16 m2 erosion bounded plots that had been installed in a burned eucalypt plantation using a randomized

  12. A database on post-fire erosion rates and debris flows in Mediterranean-Basin watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, M.; Cannon, S. H.

    2009-04-01

    proceedings. The database derives from critical analysis of the existing literature, integrated by case studies directly studied by the authors. Studies on recently burned areas in the Mediterranean basin are most frequently carried out on small experimental plots, often with simulated rainfall A problem of scale therefore exists when trying to extrapolate the erosion rates (also reported as sediment yields or as sediment losses) from these studies to a watershed scale. Very few articles, on the other hand, were found that document the watershed-scale response of basins to rainfall-induced erosion and debris flows following wildfires. The few reported cases of debris flows in the Mediterranean Basin describe erosion of sediment from the hillslopes and the channels (sometimes down to bedrock), and, for a limited number of sites, failure of discrete landslides. This information indicates that debris-flow generation from recently burned areas in the Mediterranean basin appears to occur primarily through sediment bulking processes. Nevertheless, the database so far compiled shows a distribution of post-fire erosion and debris flows in the western Mediterranean basin (Spain, essentially, but also Portugal), followed by the eastern Mediterranean area (Israel), and then by France, Italy and Greece. Even though still in a preliminary version, that needs to be integrated and updated from further sources, our data compilation allows for the unique opportunity to examine issues related to the generation of post-wildfire debris flows across a variety of environments and under a variety of conditions, and to move from a qualitative conception of the controls on post-fire debris-flow generation to the definition of specific conditions that result in their occurrence. Future activities of the project will include: i) updating and integration of the preliminary version of the database; ii) development of models that can be used to identify the probability of debris-flow occurrence and the

  13. Rapid Response Tools and Datasets for Post-fire Erosion Modeling: An Online Database to Support Post-fire Erosion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. E.; Russel, A. M.; Billmire, M.; Endsley, K.; Elliot, W. E.; Robichaud, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Renschler, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Once the danger posed by an active wildfire has passed, land managers must rapidly assess risks posed by post-fire runoff and erosion due to fire-induced changes in soil properties and the loss of surface cover. Post-fire assessments and proposals to mitigate risks to downstream areas due to flooding, erosion, and sedimentation are typically undertaken by interdisciplinary Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams. One of the first and most important priorities of a BAER team is the development of a burn severity map that reflects the fire-induced changes in both vegetative cover and soils. Currently these maps are known as BARC (Burned Area Reflectance Classification) maps and they are generated from multi-spectral remote sensing data. BAER teams also have access to many erosion modeling tools and datasets, but process-based, spatially explicit models are currently under-utilized relative to simpler, lumped models because they are more difficult to set up and they require the preparation of spatially-explicit data layers such as digital elevation models (DEM), soils, and land cover. We are working to make spatially-explicit modeling easier by preparing large-scale spatial data sets that can be rapidly combined with burn severity maps and then used to quickly run more accurate, process-based models for spatially explicit predictions of post-fire erosion and runoff. A prototype database consisting of 30-m DEM, soil, land cover, and Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) maps for Colorado has been created for use in GeoWEPP (Geo-spatial interface for the Water Erosion Prediction Project) with Disturbed WEPP parameters developed for post-fire conditions. Additional soil data layers have been gathered to support a spatial empirical debris flow model that also utilizes BARC maps. Future plans include developing the dataset to support other models commonly used by BAER teams. The importance of preparing spatial data ahead of time can be illustrated with two

  14. Early growth trajectories affect sexual responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Who-Seung; Metcalfe, Neil B; Réale, Denis; Peres-Neto, Pedro R

    2014-02-22

    The trajectory of an animal's growth in early development has been shown to have long-term effects on a range of life-history traits. Although it is known that individual differences in behaviour may also be related to certain life-history traits, the linkage between early growth or development and individual variation in behaviour has received little attention. We used brief temperature manipulations, independent of food availability, to stimulate compensatory growth in juvenile three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus. Here, we examine how these manipulated growth trajectories affected the sexual responsiveness of the male fish at the time of sexual maturation, explore associations between reproductive behaviour and investment and lifespan and test whether the perceived time stress (until the onset of the breeding season) influenced such trade-offs. We found a negative impact of growth rate on sexual responsiveness: fish induced (by temperature manipulation) to grow slowest prior to the breeding season were consistently quickest to respond to the presence of a gravid female. This speed of sexual responsiveness was also positively correlated with the rate of development of sexual ornaments and time taken to build a nest. However, after controlling for effects of growth rate, those males that had the greatest sexual responsiveness to females had the shortest lifespan. Moreover, the time available to compensate in size before the onset of the breeding season (time stress) affected the magnitude of these effects. Our results demonstrate that developmental perturbations in early life can influence mating behaviour, with long-term effects on longevity.

  15. A comparative study of aboveground biomass of three Mediterranean species in a post-fire succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montès, N.; Ballini, C.; Bonin, G.; Faures, J.

    2004-03-01

    The aboveground biomass of three woody species ( Cistus albidus, Quercus coccifera and Pinus halepensis) in two early successional stages (3- and 10-year old) of a post-fire Mediterranean ecosystem was investigated. Among these three species, which belong to the successional series of holm oak ( Quercus ilex), C. albidus and Q. coccifera are two dominant shrub species in the garrigue ecosystem and P. halepensis is a pioneer tree species widely represented in the Mediterranean area. The results obtained showed that in monospecific stands, C. albidus and Q. coccifera had a high recovery potential. In the 3-year-old stands, the cover of P. halepensis was only 19.8% for a total biomass of 0.75 ± 0.21 t ha -1, while the plant cover of C. albidus and Q. coccifera was, respectively, 26% and 85.5% and biomass was 4.72 ± 1.09 and 11.5 ± 0.16 t ha -1. Only 10 years after fire, the plant cover of C. albidus and Q. coccifera was, respectively, 55% and 100% and total biomass 13.2 ± 1.7 and 35.8 ± 4.7 t ha -1. The greatest increase in biomass was noted for P. halepensis (29.7 t ha -1). If mean annual biomass increments are considered, it appears that there was a significant decrease with the stand age for the two shrub species although the tree species showed an increase in productivity. These differing patterns in biomass and productivity of shrub and tree species with stand age provide information on biomass accumulation rates of pioneer species in a Mediterranean succession and their importance in the vegetation dynamics.

  16. Modeling post-fire hydro-geomorphic recovery in the Waldo Canyon Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Alicia; Nourbakhshbeidokhti, Samira; Chin, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Wildfire can have significant impacts on watershed hydrology and geomorphology by changing soil properties and removing vegetation, often increasing runoff and soil erosion and deposition, debris flows, and flooding. Watershed systems may take several years or longer to recover. During this time, post-fire channel changes have the potential to alter hydraulics that influence characteristics such as time of concentration and increase time to peak flow, flow capacity, and velocity. Using the case of the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire in Colorado (USA), this research will leverage field-based surveys and terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to parameterize KINEROS2 (KINematic runoff and EROSion), an event oriented, physically-based watershed runoff and erosion model. We will use the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool, which is a GIS-based hydrologic modeling tool that uses commonly available GIS data layers to parameterize, execute, and spatially visualize runoff and sediment yield for watersheds impacted by the Waldo Canyon Fire. Specifically, two models are developed, an unburned (Bear Creek) and burned (Williams) watershed. The models will simulate burn severity and treatment conditions. Field data will be used to validate the burned watersheds for pre- and post-fire changes in infiltration, runoff, peak flow, sediment yield, and sediment discharge. Spatial modeling will provide insight into post-fire patterns for varying treatment, burn severity, and climate scenarios. Results will also provide post-fire managers with improved hydro-geomorphic modeling and prediction tools for water resources management and mitigation efforts.

  17. A rapid response database in support of post-fire hydrological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Ellen Miller; William J. Elliot

    2016-01-01

    Being prepared for an emergency is important. Every year wildfires threaten homes and lives, but danger persists even after the flames are extinguished. Post-fire flooding and erosion (Figure 1) can threaten lives, property, and natural resources. To respond to this threat, interdisciplinary Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams assess potential erosion and flood...

  18. Improving rangeland seeding success in post-fire water repellent soil using surfactant seed coating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe disturbance from catastrophic wildfires often requires that native plant materials be reintroduced through reseeding, but the success rate of these restoration efforts in arid environments is notoriously low. Post-fire soil water repellency can limit reseeding success by decreasing soil moist...

  19. Shrub removal in reforested post-fire areas increases native plant species richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielle N. Bohlman; Malcolm North; Hugh D. Safford

    2016-01-01

    Large, high severity fires are becoming more prevalent in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forests, largely due to heavy fuel loading and forest densification caused by past and current management practices. In post-fire areas distant from seed trees, conifers are often planted to re-establish a forest and to prevent a potential type-conversion to shrub fields. Typical...

  20. Effects of post-fire soil hydrophobicity on inorganic soil nitrogen and sulfur cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fire plays an important role in many native ecosystems, and its suppression has increased woody encroachment across the globe. Restoring native herbaceous communities following fire in encroached systems is often challenging. Post-fire soil hydrophobicity is one factor that may further limit site re...

  1. Fungal role in post-fire ecosystem recovery in Sierra Nevada National Park (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcenas-Moreno, Gema; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; Mataix-Beneyto, Jorge; Martín Sánchez, Ines

    2016-04-01

    Fire effect on soil microorganisms has been studies for decades in several ecosystems and different microbial response can be found in the bibliography depending on numerous intrinsic and extrinsic soil factors. These factors will determine preliminary soil microbial community composition, subsequent pos-fire initial colonizers and even post-fire growth media characteristics that microbial community will find to start recolonisation. Fire-induced soil bacterial proliferation is a common pattern found after fire, usually related to pH and C availability increased. But when original soil pH is not altered by fire in acid soils, microbial response can be different and fungal response can be crucial to ecosystem recovery. In this study we have compile data related to high mountain soil from Sierra Nevada National park which was affected by a wildfire in 2006 and data obtained by laboratory heating experiment, trying to elucidate the ecological role of fungi in this fragile ecosystem. On the one hand we can observe fire-induced fungal abundance proliferation estimated by plate count method 8 and 32 months after wildfire and even in a short-term (21 d) after laboratory heating at 300 °C. Six years after fire, fungal abundance was similar between samples collected in burnt and unburnt-control area but we found higher proportion of species capable to degrade PAHs (lacase activity) in burnt soil than I the unburnt one. This finding evidences the crucial role of fungal enzymatic capacities to detoxify burnt soils when fire-induced recalcitrant and even toxic carbon compounds could be partially limiting total ecosystem recovery.

  2. Finding simplicity in complexity: modelling post-fire hydrogeomorphic processes and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Gary; Langhans, Christoph; Lane, Patrick; Nyman, Petter

    2017-04-01

    Post-fire runoff and erosion can shape landscapes, destroy infrastructure, and result in the loss of human life. However even within seemingly similar geographic regions post-fire hydro-geomorphic responses vary from almost no response through to catastrophic flash floods and debris flows. Why is there so much variability, and how can we predict areas at risk? This presentation describes the research journey taken by the post-fire research group at The University of Melbourne to answer this question for the se Australian uplands. Key steps along the way have included identifying the dominant erosion processes (and their forcings), and the key system properties controlling the rates of these dominant processes. The high degree of complexity in the interactions between the forcings, the system properties, and the erosion processes, necessitated the development of a simplified conceptual representation of post-fire hydrogeomorphic system that was conducive to modelling and simulation. Spatially mappable metrics (and proxies) for key system forcings and properties were then required to parameterize and drive the model. Each step in this journey has depended on new research, as well as ongoing feedback from land and water management agencies tasked with implementing these risk models and interpreting the results. These models are now imbedded within agencies and used for strategic risk assessments, for tactical response during fires, and for post-fire remediation and risk planning. Reflecting on the successes and failures along the way provides for some more general insights into the process of developing research-based models for operational use by land and water management agencies.

  3. Early environment affects neuroendocrine regulation in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shelley E; Karlamangla, Arun S; Friedman, Esther M; Seeman, Teresa E

    2011-04-01

    Animal and human research indicates that the early environment can exert effects on hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis functioning across the lifespan. Using data from the National Study of Midlife Development in the United States and the National Study of Daily Experience substudy, we identified curvilinear relations between adult reports of parental affection in childhood and adult diurnal cortisol rhythms. Reports of both very affectionate and very unaffectionate parental relations in childhood were associated with flatter diurnal rhythms, suggesting potential dysregulation of the HPA axis at both extremes of family environment. Participants in the bottom tertile showed more signs of HPA axis dysregulation than those in the top tertile. We discuss processes that may underlie these effects, with reference to the theory of allostatic load.

  4. Potential for Extensive Forest Loss in the Klamath Mountains due to Increased Fire Activity and Altered Post-Fire Forest Recovery Dynamics in a Warming Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepley, A. J.; Thompson, J. R.; Epstein, H. E.; Anderson-Teixeira, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of ongoing climatic warming, certain landscapes could be near a tipping point where relatively small changes to their fire regimes or post-fire forest recovery dynamics could bring about extensive conversion of forests to shorter-statured, more fire-prone vegetation, with associated changes in biodiversity, carbon dynamics, and climate feedbacks. Such concerns are particularly valid in the Klamath Region of northern California and southwestern Oregon, where montane landscapes support conifer forests, but severe fire converts them to systems dominated by broadleaf trees and shrubs that rapidly resprout or germinate from a dormant seedbank. Conifers eventually overtop the competing vegetation, but until they do, these systems are highly fire prone and susceptible to perpetuation through a cycle of reburning. To assess the vulnerability to fire-driven loss of conifer forests in a warming climate, we characterized the trajectories of post-fire forest recovery in 57 sites that burned severely within the last three decades and span the aridity gradient of montane conifer forests. Post-fire conifer regeneration was limited to a surprisingly narrow window, with 89% of all seedlings established in the first four years after fire. Early establishment conferred a competitive growth advantage such that the longer the lag between the fire year and the year of seedling establishment, the slower its height growth. A substantial portion of variation in post-fire conifer seedling density was driven by an interaction between propagule pressure and site moisture status (climatic water deficit). Mesic sites had abundant regeneration except where seed sources were nearly absent across large (ca. 50 ha) high-severity patches. Toward the dry end of the moisture gradient, much higher propagule pressure was required to support even moderate levels of conifer regeneration. The present distribution of conifer forests falls largely within the portion of the moisture gradient

  5. Drought impacts on vegetation in the pre- and post-fire events over Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, C. M.; Bastos, A.; Trigo, R. M.; DaCamara, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    The present work aims to study the combined effect of drought and large wildfires in the Iberian Peninsula relying on remotely sensed data of vegetation dynamics and leaf moisture content, in particular monthly NDVI, NDWI and NDDI time series from 1999-2009, derived from VEGETATION dataset. The impact of the exceptional 2004/2005 drought on vegetation was assessed for vegetation recovering from the extraordinary fire season of 2003 and on the conditions that contributed to the onsetting of the fire season of 2005. Drought severity was estimated by the cumulative negative effect on photosynthetic activity (NDVI) and vegetation dryness (NDDI), with about 2/3 of Iberian Peninsula presenting vegetative stress and low water availability conditions, in spring and early summer of 2005. Furthermore, NDDI has shown to be very useful to assess drought, since it combines information on vegetation and water conditions. Moreover, we show that besides looking at the inter-annual variability of NDVI and NDDI, it is useful to evaluate intra-annual changes (δNDVI and δNDDI), as indicators of change in vegetation greenness, allowing a detailed picture of the ability of the different land-cover types to resist to short-term dry conditions. In order to assess drought impact on post-fire regeneration, recovery times were evaluated by a mono-parametric model based on NDVI data and values corresponding to drought months were set to no value. Drought has shown to delay recovery times for several months in all the selected scars from 2003. The analysis of vegetation dynamics and fire selectivity in 2005 suggests that fires tended to occur in pixels presenting lower vegetative and water stress conditions during spring and early summer months. Additionally, pre-fire vegetation dynamics, in particular vegetation density and water availability during spring and early summer, has shown to influence significantly the levels of fire damage. These results stress the role of fuel availability in

  6. Post-Fire Moss Recovery in Northern Peatlands: Separating the Effects of Species and Water Content on Moss Water Repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul; Lukenbach, Max; Waddington, James Michael

    2016-04-01

    Wildfire is the largest disturbance affecting peatlands, where northern peat reserves are becoming increasingly vulnerable to wildfire as climate change is projected to enhance the length and severity of the fire season. However, little is known about the spatio-temporal variability of post-fire recovery in these ecosystems. High water table positions after wildfire are critical to limit atmospheric carbon losses and enable the re-establishment of keystone peatland mosses (i.e., Sphagnum). Post-fire recovery of the moss surface in Sphagnum-feathermoss peatlands, however, has been shown to be limited where moss type and burn severity interact to result in a water repellent surface. While in situ measurements of moss water repellency in peatlands has been shown to be greater for feathermoss in both a burned and unburned state in comparison to Sphagnum moss, it is difficult to separate effects of water content from species. Consequently, we carried out a drying experiment in the lab where we compared the water repellency of two dominant peatland moss species, Sphagnum and feathermoss, for several burn severity classes as well as for unburned samples. The results suggest that water repellency in moss is primarily controlled by water content, where a sharp threshold exists at gravimetric water contents (GWC) lower than ~3 g g-1. While GWC is shown to be a strong predictor of water repellency, the effect is enhanced by combustion. Based on field GWC, we show that there are significant differences in the frequency distribution of near-surface GWC between moss type and burn severity. The differences in the distributions of field GWC are related to characteristic moisture retention curves of unburned samples measured in the lab, as well as morphological differences between moss type.

  7. Quantifying soil burn severity for hydrologic modeling to assess post-fire effects on sediment delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mariana; Brooks, Erin; Lew, Roger; Kolden, Crystal; Quinn, Dylan; Elliot, William; Robichaud, Pete

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion is a secondary fire effect with great implications for many ecosystem resources. Depending on the burn severity, topography, and the weather immediately after the fire, soil erosion can impact municipal water supplies, degrade water quality, and reduce reservoirs' storage capacity. Scientists and managers use field and remotely sensed data to quickly assess post-fire burn severity in ecologically-sensitive areas. From these assessments, mitigation activities are implemented to minimize post-fire flood and soil erosion and to facilitate post-fire vegetation recovery. Alternatively, land managers can use fire behavior and spread models (e.g. FlamMap, FARSITE, FOFEM, or CONSUME) to identify sensitive areas a priori, and apply strategies such as fuel reduction treatments to proactively minimize the risk of wildfire spread and increased burn severity. There is a growing interest in linking fire behavior and spread models with hydrology-based soil erosion models to provide site-specific assessment of mitigation treatments on post-fire runoff and erosion. The challenge remains, however, that many burn severity mapping and modeling products quantify vegetation loss rather than measuring soil burn severity. Wildfire burn severity is spatially heterogeneous and depends on the pre-fire vegetation cover, fuel load, topography, and weather. Severities also differ depending on the variable of interest (e.g. soil, vegetation). In the United States, Burned Area Reflectance Classification (BARC) maps, derived from Landsat satellite images, are used as an initial burn severity assessment. BARC maps are classified from either a Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) or differenced Normalized Burned Ratio (dNBR) scene into four classes (Unburned, Low, Moderate, and High severity). The development of soil burn severity maps requires further manual field validation efforts to transform the BARC maps into a product more applicable for post-fire soil rehabilitation activities

  8. Size-dependent enhancement of water relations during post-fire resprouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Jennifer L; Breslow, Bradley P; Hollingsworth, Stephanie N; Hohmann, Matthew G; Hoffmann, William A

    2014-04-01

    In resprouting species, fire-induced topkill causes a reduction in height and leaf area without a comparable reduction in the size of the root system, which should lead to an increase in the efficiency of water transport after fire. However, large plants undergo a greater relative reduction in size, compared with small plants, so we hypothesized that this enhancement in hydraulic efficiency would be greatest among large growth forms. In the ecotone between long-leaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) savannas and wetlands, we measured stomatal conductance (gs), mid-day leaf water potential (Ψleaf), leaf-specific whole-plant hydraulic conductance (KL.p), leaf area and height of 10 species covering a range of growth forms in burned and unburned sites. As predicted, KL.p was higher in post-fire resprouts than in unburned plants, and the post-fire increase in KL.p was positively related to plant size. Specifically, large-statured species tended to undergo the greatest relative reductions in leaf area and height, and correspondingly experienced the greatest increases in KL.p. The post-fire increase in KL.p was smaller than expected, however, due to a decrease in absolute root hydraulic conductance (i.e., not scaled to leaf area). The higher KL.p in burned sites was manifested as an increase in gs rather than an increase in Ψleaf. Post-fire increases in gs should promote high rates of photosynthesis for recovery of carbohydrate reserves and aboveground biomass, which is particularly important for large-statured species that require more time to recover their pre-fire size.

  9. Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion -- lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2012-01-01

    We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar–Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0 g m−2 d−1 in unburned plots (n = 8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2–555.3 g m−2 d−1 in burned plots that were not treated (n = 5), and 21.0–44,010.7 g m−2 d−1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n = 12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar–Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

  10. Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2012-12-01

    We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar-Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0 g m-2 d-1 in unburned plots (n = 8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2-555.3 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that were not treated (n = 5), and 21.0-44,010.7 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n = 12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar-Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

  11. RECOVER: An Automated, Cloud-Based Decision Support System for Post-Fire Rehabilitation Planning

    OpenAIRE

    J. L. Schnase; Carroll, M. L.; Weber, K. T.; Brown, M. E.; R. L. Gill; Wooten, M.; J. May; K. Serr; Smith, E.; Goldsby, R.; K. Newtoff; K. Bradford; Doyle, C; E. Volker; Weber, S

    2014-01-01

    RECOVER is a site-specific decision support system that automatically brings together in a single analysis environment the information necessary for post-fire rehabilitation decision-making. After a major wildfire, law requires that the federal land management agencies certify a comprehensive plan for public safety, burned area stabilization, resource protection, and site recovery. These burned area emergency response (BAER) plans are a crucial part of our national response to wildfi...

  12. An overview of passive remote sensing for post-fire monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of forest burnt areas has several aims: to locate and estimate the extent of such areas; to assess the damages suffered by the forest stands; to check the ability of the ecosystem to naturally recover after the fire; to support the planning of reclamation interventions; to assess the dynamics (pattern and speed of the natural recovery; to check the outcome of any eventual restoration intervention. Remote sensing is an important source of information to support all such tasks. In the last decades, the effectiveness of remotely sensed imagery is increasing due to the advancement of tools and techniques, and to the lowering of the costs, in relative terms. For an effective support to post-fire management (burnt scar perimeter mapping, damage severity assessment, post-fire vegetation monitoring, a mapping scale of at least 1:10000-1:20000 is required: hence, the selection of remotely sensed data is restricted to aerial imagery and to satellite imagery characterized by high (HR and, above all, very high (VHR spatial resolution. In the last decade, HR and VHR passive remote sensing has widespread, providing affordable multitemporal and multispectral pictures of the considered phenomena, at different scales (spatial, temporal and spectral resolutions with reference to the monitoring needs. In the light of such a potential, the integration of GPS field survey and HR (Landsat 7, Spot HVR and VHR satellite imagery (Ikonos, Quickbird, Spot 5 is currently sought as a highly viable option for the post-fire monitoring.

  13. Post-fire succession on abandoned fields in coniferous forest habitat (Nord-East Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J. Kwiatkowska-Falińska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In July, 1992, fire swept through the Jelonka Reserve (52o35'33"N; 23o22'10"E. Litter, herbs layer and juniper shrubs were razed and the tree trunks of Pinus sylvestris and Populus tremula damaged, which resulted in their death the following year. Five research plots of 25 m2 each were established in the post-fire area. The species present there and their degrees of coverage were listed on the Londo scale between 1993 and 2002. The calculation of average degrees of coverage for individual populations allowed for the establishing of a chronological pattern of post-fire succession. The following findings have been made: 1 the primary function in colonization belongs to species of guerilla strategy of growth whose dormant buds survived fire underground (Holcus mollis, Calluna vulgaris and Populus tremula or phalanx strategy of growth (Corynephoms canescens; 2 the dominants of the initial succession stage are perennial grasses, not therophytes; 3 the spatial pattern of succession is influenced by the occurrence of H. mollis or C. canescens in a particular location; 4 the initial stage terminates with the occurrence and further growth of C. vulgaris clumps; the post-fire succession in the Jelonka Reserve attained a brushwood stage faster in comparison to secondary succession, formerly triggered by the cessation of cultivation on arable land.

  14. Post-fire stand structure impacts carbon storage within Siberian larch forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H. D.; Natali, S.; Loranty, M. M.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S. P.; Zimov, N.

    2015-12-01

    Increased fire severity within boreal forests of the Siberian Arctic has the potential to alter forest stand development thereby altering carbon (C) accumulation rates and storage during the post-fire successional interval. One potential change is increased stand density, which may result from fire consumption of the soil organic layer and changes to the seedbed that favor germination and establishment of larch trees during early succession. In this study, we evaluated above- and belowground C pools across 12 stands of varying tree density within a single 75-year old fire scar located near Cherskii, Sakha Republic, Russia. In each stand, we inventoried the size and density of larch trees and large shrubs (Salix and Betula spp.), and in combination with with allometric equations, estimated aboveground contribution to C pools. We quantified woody debris C pools using the line intercept method. We sampled belowground C pools in the soil organic layer + upper (0-10 cm) mineral soil and coarse roots (> 2 mm diameter) using sediment cores and 0.25 x 0.25-m trenches, respectively. We found that high density stands store ~ 20% more C (~7,500 g C m-2) than low density stands (~5,800 g C m-2). In high density stands, about 35% more C is stored aboveground within live larch trees (1650 g C m-2) compared to low density stands (940 g C m-2), and about 15% more C is stored in the soil organic layer and upper mineral soil. Coarse root C was 20% higher in high density stands (~475 g C m-2) compared to those with low density (~350 g C m-2). Less C was stored in large shrubs in high density stands, both in aboveground portions and coarse roots, but these amounts were relatively small (increase C storage, leading to a negative feedback to climate, but the combined effects of density on C dynamics, summer and winter albedo, and future fire regimes will interact to determine the magnitude of any vegetation-climate feedbacks.

  15. Post-Fire Changes in Forest Biomass Retrieved by Airborne LiDAR in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Yumie Sato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fire is one of the main factors directly impacting Amazonian forest biomass and dynamics. Because of Amazonia’s large geographical extent, remote sensing techniques are required for comprehensively assessing forest fire impacts at the landscape level. In this context, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR stands out as a technology capable of retrieving direct measurements of vegetation vertical arrangement, which can be directly associated with aboveground biomass. This work aims, for the first time, to quantify post-fire changes in forest canopy height and biomass using airborne LiDAR in western Amazonia. For this, the present study evaluated four areas located in the state of Acre, called Rio Branco, Humaitá, Bonal and Talismã. Rio Branco and Humaitá burned in 2005 and Bonal and Talismã burned in 2010. In these areas, we inventoried a total of 25 plots (0.25 ha each in 2014. Humaitá and Talismã are located in an open forest with bamboo and Bonal and Rio Branco are located in a dense forest. Our results showed that even ten years after the fire event, there was no complete recovery of the height and biomass of the burned areas (p < 0.05. The percentage difference in height between control and burned sites was 2.23% for Rio Branco, 9.26% for Humaitá, 10.03% for Talismã and 20.25% for Bonal. All burned sites had significantly lower biomass values than control sites. In Rio Branco (ten years after fire, Humaitá (nine years after fire, Bonal (four years after fire and Talismã (five years after fire biomass was 6.71%, 13.66%, 17.89% and 22.69% lower than control sites, respectively. The total amount of biomass lost for the studied sites was 16,706.3 Mg, with an average loss of 4176.6 Mg for sites burned in 2005 and 2890 Mg for sites burned in 2010, with an average loss of 3615 Mg. Fire impact associated with tree mortality was clearly detected using LiDAR data up to ten years after the fire event. This study indicates that fire disturbance

  16. Post Fire Vegetation Recovery in Greece after the large Drought event of 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Célia M.; Bastos, Ana; DaCamara, Carlos; Trigo, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Fire is a natural factor of Mediterranean ecosystems. However, fire regimes in the European Mediterranean areas have been changing in the last decades, mainly due to land-use changes and climate driven factors possibly associated with climatic warming (e.g. decline of precipitation, increasing temperatures but also higher frequency of heatwaves). In Greece, the fire season of 2007 was particularly devastating, achieving the new all-time record of estimated burnt area (225 734 ha), since 1980. Additionally, we must stress that prior to the summer fire season in 2007, Greece suffered an exceptional drought event. This severe drought had a strong negative impact in vegetation dynamics. Since water availability is a crucial factor in post-fire vegetation recovery, it is desirable to assess the impact that such water-stress conditions had on fire sensitivity and post-fire vegetation recovery. Based on monthly values of NDVI, at the 1km×1km spatial scale, as obtained from the VEGETATION-SPOT5 instrument, from 1999 to 2010, large burnt scars are identified in Greece, during 2007 fire season. Vegetation recovery is then assessed based on a mono parametric regression model originally developed by Gouveia et al. (2010) to identify large burnt scars in Portugal during the 2003 fire season and after applied to 2005 fire season (Bastos et al., 2012). Some large burnt areas are selected and the respective NDVI behaviour is monitored throughout the pre and the post fire period. The vegetation dynamics during the pre-fire period is analysed and related to the extreme climatic events that characterised the considered period. An analysis is made of the dependence of recovery rates on land cover types and fire damage. Finally results are compared to results already obtained for Portugal (Gouveia et al. 2010). This work emphasises the use of a simple methodology, when applied to low resolution satellite imagery in order to monitor vegetation recovery after large fires events over

  17. Perspectives on disconnects between scientific information and management decisions on post-fire recovery in Western US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Emery, Nathan; Garcia, Elizabeth S; Hanan, Erin J; Hodges, Heather E; Martin, Tyronne; Meyers, Matthew A; Peavey, Lindsey E; Peng, Hui; Santamaria, Jaime Sainz; Uyeda, Kellie A; Anderson, Sarah E; Tague, Christina

    2013-12-01

    Environmental regulations frequently mandate the use of "best available" science, but ensuring that it is used in decisions around the use and protection of natural resources is often challenging. In the Western US, this relationship between science and management is at the forefront of post-fire land management decisions. Recent fires, post-fire threats (e.g. flooding, erosion), and the role of fire in ecosystem health combine to make post-fire management highly visible and often controversial. This paper uses post-fire management to present a framework for understanding why disconnects between science and management decisions may occur. We argue that attributes of agencies, such as their political or financial incentives, can limit how effectively science is incorporated into decision-making. At the other end of the spectrum, the lack of synthesis or limited data in science can result in disconnects between science-based analysis of post-fire effects and agency policy and decisions. Disconnects also occur because of the interaction between the attributes of agencies and the attributes of science, such as their different spatial and temporal scales of interest. After offering examples of these disconnects in post-fire treatment, the paper concludes with recommendations to reduce disconnects by improving monitoring, increasing synthesis of scientific findings, and directing social-science research toward identifying and deepening understanding of these disconnects.

  18. Predicting the effectiveness of different mulching techniques to reduce post-fire runoff and erosion in Mediterranean pine stands - does cover matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Diana; Nunes, João; Prats, Sergio; Serpa, Dalila; Keizer, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires have become a recurrent threat for many forest ecosystems of the Mediterranean. The characteristics of the Mediterranean climate with its warm and dry summers and mild and wet winters make it prone to wildfire occurrence as well as to post-fire soil erosion. Furthermore, climate change and continuation of current land management practices and planning are generally expected to further increase this threat. The wide recognition of the effects of wildfires to enhance runoff and erosion has created a strong demand for model-based tools for predicting the post-fire hydrological and erosion response and, in particular, for predicting the effectiveness of post-fire forestry operations to mitigate these responses. Such a tool should allow to identify areas with elevated risks of soil erosion and to evaluate which measures should be applied and when to minimize these risks. A key element in evaluating these measures is also their costs, in order to optimize the use of the limited resources that are typically available for post-fire land management. In this study, two "treatments" are compared with control conditions (i.e. doing nothing) after a wildfire with a moderate soil burn severity: (i) 4 erosion plots were treated with hydro-mulch, (ii) 4 erosion plots were untreated but had a high pine needle cover quickly after the fire, due to needle cast from scorched pine crowns (often referred to as "natural mulching") (iii) 4 plots were untreated and had a very reduced protective litter cover . The main objective of this study was to asses if the revised MMF model could effectively predict the impacts of hydro-mulching and natural mulching with pine needle on runoff generation and the associated soil losses. If MMF could predict well the impact of natural mulching, it could be very useful in limiting the areas that should be considered for specific soil mitigation measures, especially in the case of wildfires that affect large areas with moderate severity. The

  19. Evaluation of vegetation post-fire resilience in the Alpine region using descriptors derived from MODIS spectral index time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Fava, Francesco; Busetto, Lorenzo; Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Colombo, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    In this study a method based on the analysis of MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) time series is proposed to estimate the post-fire resilience of mountain vegetation (broadleaf forest and prairies) in the Italian Alps. Resilience is defined herewith as the ability of a dynamical system to counteract disturbances. It can be quantified by the amount of time the disturbed system takes to resume, in statistical terms, an ecological functionality comparable with its undisturbed behavior. Satellite images of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) with spatial resolution of 250m and temporal resolution of 16 days in the 2000-2012 time period were used. Wildfire affected areas in the Lombardy region between the years 2000 and 2010 were analysed. Only large fires (affected area >40ha) were selected. For each burned area, an undisturbed adjacent control site was located. Data pre-processing consisted in the smoothing of MODIS time series for noise removal and then a double logistic function was fitted. Land surface phenology descriptors (proxies for growing season start/end/length and green biomass) were extracted in order to characterize the time evolution of the vegetation. Descriptors from a burned area were compared to those extracted from the respective control site by means of the one-way analysis of variance. According to the number of subsequent years which exhibit statistically meaningful difference between burned and control site, five classes of resilience were identified and a set of thematic maps was created for each descriptor. The same method was applied to all 84 aggregated events and to events aggregated by main land cover. EVI index results more sensitive to fire impact than NDVI index. Analysis shows that fire causes both a reduction of the biomass and a variation in the phenology of the Alpine vegetation. Results suggest an average ecosystem resilience of 6-7 years. Moreover

  20. Do psychological variables affect early surgical recovery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael N Mavros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have examined the effect of psychological variables on surgical recovery, but no definite conclusion has been reached yet. We sought to examine whether psychological factors influence early surgical recovery. METHODS: We performed a systematic search in PubMed, Scopus and PsycINFO databases to identify studies examining the association of preoperative psychological variables or interventions with objectively measured, early surgical outcomes. RESULTS: We identified 16 eligible studies, 15 of which reported a significant association between at least one psychological variable or intervention and an early postoperative outcome. However, most studies also reported psychological factors not influencing surgical recovery and there was significant heterogeneity across the studies. Overall, trait and state anxiety, state anger, active coping, subclinical depression, and intramarital hostility appeared to complicate recovery, while dispositional optimism, religiousness, anger control, low pain expectations, and external locus of control seemed to promote healing. Psychological interventions (guided relaxation, couple support visit, and psychiatric interview also appeared to favor recovery. Psychological factors unrelated to surgical outcomes included loneliness, perceived social support, anger expression, and trait anger. CONCLUSION: Although the heterogeneity of the available evidence precludes any safe conclusions, psychological variables appear to be associated with early surgical recovery; this association could bear important implications for clinical practice. Large clinical trials and further analyses are needed to precisely evaluate the contribution of psychology in surgical recovery.

  1. Wildfires effects on soils: water repellency, NIR models and post-fire treatments. My personal view (SSS Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcenegui, Victoria

    2017-04-01

    I first was intrigued by fire, because all summers we had some of them in our location, and then I was involve in fire effects on soils. We had, and also have, a lot of question to answer. I am absolutely sure that soil science was my best choice. Soils are amazing, a lot of things are happening in soils. Soils and fire, are my main research topics. I studied the immediately effect of fire on soils, focus on the effect of fire in soil water repellency and aggregate stability. Two physical properties that are crucial to post-fire soil response. I also construct NIR models to know the maximum temperature reached in soils. It is well known that temperature is a key factor affecting soils properties. Then, it is a really important tool to predict the temperature reached in a soil after a wildfire. Currently, I am involve in a project to investigate what are the best post-fire treatments in our soils and how this treatments affects soil properties.

  2. Moving beyond the cambium necrosis hypothesis of post-fire tree mortality: cavitation and deformation of xylem in forest fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaletz, S T; Johnson, E A; Tyree, M T

    2012-04-01

    • It is widely assumed that post-fire tree mortality results from necrosis of phloem and vascular cambium in stems, despite strong evidence that reduced xylem conductivity also plays an important role. • In this study, experiments with Populus balsamifera were used to demonstrate two mechanisms by which heat reduces the hydraulic conductivity of xylem: air seed cavitation and conduit wall deformation. Heat effects on air seed cavitation were quantified using air injection experiments that isolate potential temperature-dependent changes in sap surface tension and pit membrane pore diameters. Heat effects on conduit wall structure were demonstrated using air conductivity measurements and light microscopy. • Heating increased vulnerability to cavitation because sap surface tension varies inversely with temperature. Heating did not affect cavitation via changes in pit membrane pore diameters, but did cause significant reductions in xylem air conductivity that were associated with deformation of conduit walls (probably resulting from thermal softening of viscoelastic cell wall polymers). • Additional work is required to understand the relative roles of cavitation and deformation in the reduction of xylem conductivity, and how reduced xylem conductivity in roots, stems, and branches correlates and interacts with foliage and root necroses to cause tree mortality. Future research should also examine how heat necrosis of ray parenchyma cells affects refilling of embolisms that occur during and after the fire event. © No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Assessing post-fire ground cover in Mediterranean shrublands with field spectrometry and digital photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montorio Llovería, Raquel; Pérez-Cabello, Fernando; García-Martín, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Fire severity can be assessed by identifying and quantifying the fractional abundance of post-fire ground cover types, an approach with great capacity to predict ecosystem response. Focused on shrubland formations of Mediterranean-type ecosystems, three burned areas (Ibieca and Zuera wildfires and Peñaflor experimental fire) were sampled in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Two different ground measurements were made for each of the 356 plots: (i) 3-band high spatial resolution photography (HSRP) and (ii) the hemispherical-conical reflectance factor (HCRF) in the visible to near-infrared spectral range (VNIR, 400-900 nm). Stepwise multiple lineal regression (SMLR) models were fitted to spectral variables (HCRF, first derivative spectra or FDS, and four absorption indices) to estimate the fractional cover of seven post-fire ground cover types (vegetation and soil - unburned and charred components - and ash - char and ash, individually and as a combined category). Models were developed and validated at the Peñaflor site (training, n = 217; validation, n = 88) and applied to the samples from the Ibieca and Zuera sites (n = 51). The best results were observed for the abundance estimations of green vegetation (Radj.20.70-0.90), unburned soil (Radj.20.40-0.75), and the combination of ashes (Radj.20.65-0.80). In comparison of spectral data, FDS outperforms reflectance or absorption data because of its higher accuracy levels and, importantly, its greater capacity to yield generalizable models. Future efforts should be made to improve the estimation of intermediate severity levels and upscaling the developed models. In the context of fire severity assessment, our study demonstrates the potential of hyperspectral data to estimate in a quick and objective manner post-fire ground cover fractions and thus provide valuable information to guide management responses.

  4. Effects of sowing native herbaceous species on the post-fire recovery in a heathland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Abascal, I.; Tárrega, R.; Luis-Calabuig, E.; Marcos, E.

    2003-07-01

    Erica australis heathlands in León province (NW Spain) have high resilience to disturbances and their post-fire recovery is very fast. The risk of soil erosion is high in the first few months after fire. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects on post-fire succession of sowing grass ( Agrostis capillaris and Festuca rubra) and legume ( Lotus corniculatus) seeds in a heathland burned by a summer wildfire, and to determine the most suitable native herbaceous species combination for protecting the soil in the first few phases of recovery. Fifteen permanent 4 m 2 plots are established in the burned area; four treatments and a control (unsown) are applied, each with three replicates. Three similar unburned plots are also considered (unburned control). Total cover is significantly higher in the sown plots in relation to the control in the first few months after sowing, but there are no differences after 18 months. Lotus corniculatus appears only in the first year and has no effect on the total cover. F. rubra appears earlier than Agrostis capillaris, but decreases significantly in cover after 18 months. Shrub species have the highest cover in the control plots and the lowest in the Agrostis plots. The correspondence analysis shows that the trend for vegetation in all plots reaches similar species composition by the time of final sampling. The last sampling of sown plots shows greater similarity to the control plots than the sampling of these plots within the first year. The fast initial growth of F. rubra, together with its decrease and subsequent low cover from the second year, make it more preferable than Agrostis capillaris for purposes of soil protection. However, additional research, both species- and site-specific, is necessary, as different responses due to different post-fire conditions and pre-fire species composition can have important implications on community dynamics.

  5. Seedling establishment along post-fire succession in Mediterranean shrublands dominated by obligate seeders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M.; Baeza, M. Jaime; Maestre, Fernando T.

    2012-02-01

    Seedlings are expected to be particularly sensitive to the environmental conditions at the time of establishment. Within succession, environmental conditions vary over time and a species will have a better chance to regenerate on a particular place depending on the intrinsic traits that determine its regeneration niche. We examined the regeneration niche and the pattern of seedling establishment along succession of the main species present in a Mediterranean shrubland. The establishment of Cistus albidus, Rosmarinus officinalis and Ulex parviflorus was monitored for three years using seasonal cohorts in three different stages along a successional gradient (post-fire, building and mature). There was a flush of establishment immediately after fire in all species. After this event, there was a decline in establishment as succession progressed, until practically no seedling establishment was found at mature stages. The presence of a thick litter layer probably precluded seedling establishment at this stage. The establishment of Cistus was very closely tied to the post-fire environment, while recruitment of Rosmarinus and Ulex also occurred in the building stage. In contrast to what has been reported in other Mediterranean shrublands, recruitment in our study area was not restricted solely to post-fire stages, and shrubs also recruited opportunistically when open gaps in the canopy were available along succession. The differences in preferred micro-sites for the establishment suggest a differentiation in regeneration niches and a particular set of environmental conditions where the different species would be particularly competitive through succession. Thus, Cistus regenerates mostly in highly perturbed environments, whereas Ulex and Rosmarinus benefit from environments with longer inter-fire periods.

  6. Long-Term Satellite Detection of Post-Fire Vegetation Trends in Boreal Forests of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunpeng Yi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the long-term effects on vegetation following the catastrophic fire in 1987 on the northern Great Xing’an Mountain by analyzing the AVHRR GIMMS 15-day composite normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI dataset. Both temporal and spatial characteristics were analyzed for natural regeneration and tree planting scenarios from 1984 to 2006. Regressing post-fire NDVI values on the pre-fire values helped identify the NDVI for burnt pixels in vegetation stands. Stand differences in fire damage were classified into five levels: Very High (VH, High (H, Moderate (M, Low (L and Slight (S. Furthermore, intra-annual and inter-annual post-fire vegetation recovery trajectories were analyzed by deriving a time series of NDVI and relative regrowth index (RRI values for the entire burned area. Finally, spatial pattern and trend analyses were conducted using the pixel-based post-fire annual stands regrowth index (SRI with a nonparametric Mann-Kendall (MK statistics method. The results show that October was a better period compared to other months for distinguishing the post- and pre-fire vegetation conditions using the NDVI signals in boreal forests of China because colored leaves on grasses and shrubs fall down, while the leaves on healthy trees remain green in October. The MK statistics method is robustly capable of detecting vegetation trends in a relatively long time series. Because tree planting primarily occurred in the severely burned area (approximately equal to the Medium, High and Very High fire damage areas following the Daxing’anling fire in 1987, the severely burned area exhibited a better recovery trend than the lightly burned regions. Reasonable tree planting can substantially quicken the recovery and shorten the restoration time of the target species. More detailed satellite analyses and field data will be required in the future for a more convincing validation of the results.

  7. How long will my reservoir be contaminated following a post-fire erosion event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schärer, Christine; Yeates, Peter; Sheridan, Gary; Doerr, Stefan; Nyman, Petter; Langhans, Christoph; Haydon, Shane; Santin, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Post fire erosion processes such as debris flows can generate large volumes of sediment, contaminating streams and reservoirs for extended periods. Recent research has enabled the magnitude of the generated load to be reasonably estimated, but what happens once this load of sediment and ash reaches the reservoir? Water treatment plants typically have a threshold contaminant level, above which the treatment capacity is exceeded and the water becomes undeliverable. As hydrologists, soils scientists and geomorphologists we think in terms of volumes of water and masses of sediment, but for water managers the metric that really matters is "How many days will my reservoir be unable to supply water, and what is the chance of that occurring?" Answering this question is difficult as it involves modelling the weather, the fire regime, the post fire hydrology and erosion processes, and finally the hydrodynamics of the reservoir so to be able to predict the propagation of the contaminant plume from the entry point to the reservoir take off point. These models are numerically intensive, and this study develops a new method to combine these models in a way that allows them to be implemented within a Monte Carlo simulation. The new approach was applied to the case study of the Upper Yarra reservoir in south east Australia, the main water supply for Melbourne's 4M residents. The results indicate that following fire water managers should be prepared for post-fire reservoir contamination events extending from several months to more than a year. The duration of the contamination events was found to be extremely sensitive to the quantity, size distribution, and density of the <5um particles of ash and soil, which makes up a small fraction of the total debris flow load.

  8. Linear Modeling and Evaluation of Controls on Flow Response in Western Post-Fire Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, S.; Hogue, T. S.; Hay, L.

    2015-12-01

    This research investigates the impact of wildfires on watershed flow regimes throughout the western United States, specifically focusing on evaluation of fire events within specified subregions and determination of the impact of climate and geophysical variables in post-fire flow response. Fire events were collected through federal and state-level databases and streamflow data were collected from U.S. Geological Survey stream gages. 263 watersheds were identified with at least 10 years of continuous pre-fire daily streamflow records and 5 years of continuous post-fire daily flow records. For each watershed, percent changes in runoff ratio (RO), annual seven day low-flows (7Q2) and annual seven day high-flows (7Q10) were calculated from pre- to post-fire. Numerous independent variables were identified for each watershed and fire event, including topographic, land cover, climate, burn severity, and soils data. The national watersheds were divided into five regions through K-clustering and a lasso linear regression model, applying the Leave-One-Out calibration method, was calculated for each region. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) was used to determine the accuracy of the resulting models. The regions encompassing the United States along and west of the Rocky Mountains, excluding the coastal watersheds, produced the most accurate linear models. The Pacific coast region models produced poor and inconsistent results, indicating that the regions need to be further subdivided. Presently, RO and HF response variables appear to be more easily modeled than LF. Results of linear regression modeling showed varying importance of watershed and fire event variables, with conflicting correlation between land cover types and soil types by region. The addition of further independent variables and constriction of current variables based on correlation indicators is ongoing and should allow for more accurate linear regression modeling.

  9. A New Application to Facilitate Post-Fire Recovery and Rehabilitation in Savanna Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Mark L.; Schnase, John L.; Weber, Keith T.; Brown, Molly E.; Gill, Roger L.; Haskett, George W.; Gardner, Tess A.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. government spends an estimated $3billion per year to fight forest fires in the United States. Post-fire rehabilitation activities represent a small but essential portion of that total. The Rehabilitation Capability Convergence for Ecosystem Recovery (RECOVER) system is currently under development for Savanna ecosystems in the western U.S. The prototype of this system has been built and will have realworld testing during the summer 2013 fire season. When fully deployed, the RECOVER system will provide the emergency rehabilitation teams with critical and timely information for management decisions regarding stabilization and rehabilitation strategies.

  10. Monitoring the Effects of Forest Restoration Treatments on Post-Fire Vegetation Recovery with MODIS Multitemporal Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem J. D. van Leeuwen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines how satellite based time-series vegetation greenness data and phenological measurements can be used to monitor and quantify vegetation recovery after wildfire disturbances and examine how pre-fire fuel reduction restoration treatments impact fire severity and impact vegetation recovery trajectories. Pairs of wildfire affected sites and a nearby unburned reference site were chosen to measure the post-disturbance recovery in relation to climate variation. All site pairs were chosen in forested uplands in Arizona and were restricted to the area of the Rodeo-Chediski fire that occurred in 2002. Fuel reduction treatments were performed in 1999 and 2001. The inter-annual and seasonal vegetation dynamics before, during, and after wildfire events can be monitored using a time series of biweekly composited MODIS NDVI (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data. Time series analysis methods included difference metrics, smoothing filters, and fitting functions that were applied to extract seasonal and inter-annual change and phenological metrics from the NDVI time series data from 2000 to 2007. Pre- and post-fire Landsat data were used to compute the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR and examine burn severity at the selected sites. The phenological metrics (pheno-metrics included the timing and greenness (i.e. NDVI for the start, peak and end of the growing season as well as proxy measures for the rate of green-up and senescence and the annual vegetation productivity. Pre-fire fuel reduction treatments resulted in lower fire severity, which reduced annual productivity much less than untreated areas within the Rodeo-Chediski fire perimeter. The seasonal metrics were shown to be useful for estimating the rate of post-fire disturbance recovery and the timing of phenological greenness phases. The use of satellite time series NDVI data and derived pheno-metrics show potential for tracking vegetation

  11. Drivers of post-fire successional trajectories in arctic tundra: the importance of physical and biophysical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, A. V.; Jiang, Y.; Rastetter, E. B.; Drysdale, J.; Kremers, K.; Shaver, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Fires in arctic tundra are rare with return intervals in the hundreds to thousands of years, but these events have large implications for carbon and energy fluxes in an environmentally changing and sensitive ecosystem. Permafrost degradation, species composition shifts, and ecosystem function alterations are just a few of the potential consequences of fire that could feedback on future climate change. Here we describe remote sensing, eddy covariance, thaw depth, and biomass measurements along an arctic tundra chronosequence to understand long-term post-fire carbon and energy budgets. Historical remote sensing and fire perimeter data were used to choose sites that were representative of a 0-6, 18, and 36 year old fire scar, which were paired with a representative nearby unburned control. Fires caused successional changes to carbon and energy budgets through changes to the soil thermal regime, caused by decreased organic layer from combustion, and shifts from tussock to grass and shrub dominated systems. Measurements and modeling with the Multiple Element Limitation (MEL) model indicate that nutrients played a key role in these shifts and that these dynamics change are controlled by biophysical conditions immediately after fire (i.e. residual organic layer depth) and climate during early succession. Results highlight the importance of initial conditions in determining the successional trajectory of arctic tundra and yield important insights on how these systems will respond to future climate change.

  12. How well does the Post-fire Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) really work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, Peter; Elliot, William; Lewis, Sarah; Miller, Mary Ellen

    2016-04-01

    The decision of where, when, and how to apply the most effective postfire erosion mitigation treatments requires land managers to assess the risk of damaging runoff and erosion events occurring after a fire. The Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) was developed to assist post fire assessment teams identify high erosion risk areas and effectiveness of various mitigation treatments to reduce that risk. ERMiT is a web-based application that uses the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) technology to estimate erosion, in probabilistic terms, on burned and recovering forest, range, and chaparral lands with and without the application of mitigation treatments. User inputs are processed by ERMiT to combine rain event variability with spatial and temporal variabilities of hillslope burn severity and soil properties which are then used as WEPP inputs. Since 2007, the model has been used in making hundreds of land management decisions in the US and elsewhere. We use eight published field study sites in the Western US to compare ERMiT predictions to observed hillslope erosion rates. Most sites experience only a few rainfall events that produced runoff and sediment except for a California site with a Mediterranean climate. When hillslope erosion occurred, significant correlations occurred between the observed hillslope erosion and those predicted by ERMiT. Significant correlation occurred for most mitigation treatments as well as the five recovery years. These model validation results suggest reasonable estimates of probabilistic post-fire hillslope sediment delivery when compared to observation.

  13. Mid-term and scaling effects of forest residue mulching on post-fire runoff and soil erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, Sergio Alegre; Wagenbrenner, Joseph W; Martins, Martinho António Santos; Malvar, Maruxa Cortizo; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2016-12-15

    Mulching is an effective post-fire soil erosion mitigation treatment. Experiments with forest residue mulch have demonstrated that it increased ground cover to 70% and reduced runoff and soil loss at small spatial scales and for short post-fire periods. However, no studies have systematically assessed the joint effects of scale, time since burning, and mulching on runoff, soil loss, and organic matter loss. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of scale and forest residue mulch using 0.25m(2) micro-plots and 100m(2) slope-scale plots in a burnt eucalypt plantation in central Portugal. We assessed the underlying processes involved in the post-fire hydrologic and erosive responses, particularly the effects of soil moisture and soil water repellency. Runoff amount in the micro-plots was more than ten-fold the runoff in the larger slope-scale plots in the first year and decreased to eight-fold in the third post-fire year. Soil losses in the micro-plots were initially about twice the values in the slope-scale plots and this ratio increased over time. The mulch greatly reduced the cumulative soil loss measured in the untreated slope-scale plots (616gm(-2)) by 91% during the five post-fire years. The implications are that applying forest residue mulch immediately after a wildfire can reduce soil losses at spatial scales of interest to land managers throughout the expected post-fire window of disturbance, and that mulching resulted in a substantial relative gain in soil organic matter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamics of learner affective development in early FLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mihaljević Djigunović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Affective learner factors were first considered as a cause of success in language learning. This was followed by a change in approach and recently authors (e.g., Edelenbos, Johnstone, & Kubanek, 2006 have considered them an important outcome, especially in early foreign language learning (FLL. Current research into affective learner factors in early FLL tries to catch the developmental aspects too, and studies are emerging that take a contextual view as well. This paper describes a study on affective characteristics of young FL learners that combines the developmental and contextual perspectives. Using the case study methodology the author analyses the affective profiles of three young learners of English as a foreign language who were followed for 4 years. The analyses are done taking into account their immediate language learning environment, home support, out-of-school exposure to English and language achievement. The findings suggest that affective learner factors contribute to the dynamic complexity of early FLL.

  15. Post-fire effects and short-term regeneration dynamics following high-severity crown fires in a Mediterranean forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbarino M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resilience against fire disturbance of Mediterranean vegetation has been frequently described. However, due to climatic change and abandonment of local land use practices, the fire regime is changing, probably leading to higher intensities and frequencies of disturbance events. The forthcoming scenario calls for a full understanding of post-disturbance tree recruitment processes, structural resilience and possible consequences on the overall forest biodiversity. In particular, knowledge on severe crown fires’ effects on forest stand structural attributes needs to be further explored. In this work, we describe and quantify fire impact and short-term response of a Mediterranean forest affected by high severity crown fires, focusing on the compositional and structural diversity of living and dead trees, spatial pattern of fire-induced mortality, recovery dynamics of tree species. The analysis, based on a synchronic approach, was carried out within four burned and two not burned fully stem-mapped research plots located in NW Italy, belonging to two forest categories differing for their main tree restoration strategies. Distance-dependent and distance-independent indices were applied to assess structural diversity dynamics over time since fire occurrence. Within the analyzed forests fire was found to affect mostly forest structure rather than its composition. Number of snags largely increases immediately after the fire, but it levels off due to their fall dynamics. Regeneration strategies and fire severity influenced species abundance and consequently diversity patterns. Stem diameter and height diversity were modified as well, with a strong increase in the first post-fire year and a sharp reduction six years after the disturbance. Fire determined also a higher heterogeneity in crown cover and vertical structure. Spatial patterns of surviving trees and snags were greatly affected by fire, producing an increase in aggregation and segregation

  16. Alterations caused to soil organic matter by post-fire rehabilitation actions in a pine forest from doñana national park (southwest Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, José A.; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.; Granged, Arturo J. P.; González-Vila, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    Post-fire rehabilitation actions and recovery attempts of burned soils include a range of management practices (tillage, tree logging, reforestation …), in some cases producing an additional damage to that directly caused by fire. Among negative impacts derived from unappropriated rehab practices are the increase soil erosion, loss of soil fertility and alterations in the hydrological cycle. Analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) is an appropriate technique to study organic matter characteristics within complex matrices. Here this technique is used to study the alterations caused by burning and post-fire rehab plans to soil organic matter (SOM). Fire and post-fire rehab actions impact on SOM is studied in a sandy soil under pine (Pinus pinea) forest that was affected by a severe fire in August 2012 in Doñana National Park (SW Spain). Bulk samples as well as its sieved soil fractions (coarse, 1-2 mm, and fine, families obtained by analytical pyrolysis, including alkane/alkene pairs, unspecific aromatic compounds (UAC), peptides, methoxyphenols, fatty acids, carbohydrates, N-compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The B site SOM showed lower proportion of lignin methoxyphenols and higher of UAC and PAH than the SOM from the UB site. This indicates that fire produced methoxyphenol de-functionalization, increasing the proportion of recalcitrant compounds. With respect to soil size fractions, in all cases, the coarse fraction showed a high content of carbohydrate-derived compounds and methoxyphenols followed by fatty acids, in line with inputs of new litter from stressed post-fire vegetation (Jiménez-Morillo et al., 2014). The BR soil coarse fraction showed the highest proportion of methoxyphenols whereas that from the UB soil showed the highest value for alkyl compounds. With respect to the fine soil fractions, although SOM composition varied largely from one area to another, it was found generally more altered than in the coarse fractions. SOM from the UB

  17. Quantifying post-fire ponderosa pine snags using GIS techniques on scanned aerial photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Kevin

    Snags are an important component of forest ecosystems because of their utility in forest-nutrient cycling and provision of critical wildlife habitat, as well as associated fuel management concerns relating to coarse woody debris (CWD). Knowledge of snag and CWD trajectories are needed for land managers to plan for long-term ecosystem change in post-fire regimes. This need will likely be exacerbated by increasingly warm and dry climatic conditions projected for the U.S. Southwest. One of the best prospects for studying fire-induced landscape change beyond the plot scale, but still at a resolution sufficient to resolve individual snags, is to utilize the available aerial photography record. Previous field-based studies of snag and CWD loads in the Southwest have relied on regional chronosequences to judge the recovery dynamic of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) burns. This previous research has been spatially and temporally restricted because of field survey extent limitations and uncertainty associated with the chronosequence approach (i.e., space-for-time substitution), which does not consider differences between specific site conditions and histories. This study develops highly automated methods for remotely quantifying and characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of large snags associated with severe forest fires from very high resolution (VHR) landscape imagery I obtained from scans of aerial photos. Associated algorithms utilize the sharp edges, shape, shadow, and contrast characteristics of snags to enable feature recognition. Additionally, using snag shadow length, image acquisition time, and location information, heights were estimated for each identified snag. Furthermore, a novel solution was developed for extracting individual snags from areas of high snag density by overlaying parallel lines in the direction of the snag shadows and extracting local maxima lines contained by each snag polygon. Field survey data coincident to imagery coverage

  18. Dynamics of Learner Affective Development in Early FLL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaljevic Djigunovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Affective learner factors were first considered as a cause of success in language learning. This was followed by a change in approach and recently authors (e.g., Edelenbos, Johnstone, & Kubanek, 2006) have considered them an important outcome, especially in early foreign language learning (FLL). Current research into affective learner factors…

  19. Usability and Functional Enhancements to an Online Interface for Predicting Post Fire Erosion (WEPP-PEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Roger; Dobre, Mariana; Elliot, William; Robichaud, Pete; Brooks, Erin; Frankenberger, Jim

    2017-04-01

    There is an increased interest in the United States to use soil burn severity maps in watershed-scale hydrologic models to estimate post-fire sediment erosion from burned areas. This information is needed by stakeholders in order to concentrate their pre- or post-fire management efforts in ecologically sensitive areas to decrease the probability of post-fire sediment delivery. But these tools traditionally have been time consuming and difficult to use by managers because input datasets must be obtained and correctly processed for valid results. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) has previously been developed as an online and easy-to-use interface to help land managers with running simulations without any knowledge of computer programming or hydrologic modeling. The interface automates the acquisition of DEM, climate, soils, and landcover data, and also automates channel and hillslope delineation for the users. The backend is built with Mapserver, GDAL, PHP, C++, Python while the front end uses OpenLayers, and, of course, JavaScript. The existing WEPP online interface was enhanced to provide better usability to stakeholders in United States (Forest Service, BLM, USDA) as well as to provide enhanced functionality for managing both pre-fire and post-fire treatments. Previously, only site administrators could add burn severity maps. The interface now allows users to create accounts to upload and share FlamMap prediction maps, differenced Normalized Burned Ratio (dNBR), or Burned Area Reflectance Classification (BARC) maps. All maps are loaded into a sortable catalog so users can quickly find their area of interest. Once loaded, the interface has been modified to support running comparisons between baseline condition with "no burn" and with a burn severity classification map. The interface has also been enhanced to allow users to conduct single storm analyses to examine, for example, how much soil loss would result after a 100-year storm. An OpenLayers map

  20. Post-fire vegetation recovery in Portugal based on spot/vegetation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, C.; Dacamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2010-04-01

    A procedure is presented that allows identifying large burned scars and the monitoring of vegetation recovery in the years following major fire episodes. The procedure relies on 10-day fields of Maximum Value Composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (MVC-NDVI), with a 1 km×1 km spatial resolution obtained from the VEGETATION instrument. The identification of fire scars during the extremely severe 2003 fire season is performed based on cluster analysis of NDVI anomalies that persist during the vegetative cycle of the year following the fire event. Two regions containing very large burned scars were selected, located in Central and Southwestern Portugal, respectively, and time series of MVC-NDVI analysed before the fire events took place and throughout the post-fire period. It is shown that post-fire vegetation dynamics in the two selected regions may be characterised based on maps of recovery rates as estimated by fitting a monoparametric model of vegetation recovery to MVC-NDVI data over each burned scar. Results indicated that the recovery process in the region located in Central Portugal is mostly related to fire damage rather than to vegetation density before 2003, whereas the latter seems to have a more prominent role than vegetation conditions after the fire episode, e.g. in the case of the region in Southwestern Portugal. These differences are consistent with the respective predominant types of vegetation. The burned area located in Central Portugal is dominated by Pinus Pinaster whose natural regeneration crucially depends on the destruction of seeds present on the soil surface during the fire, whereas the burned scar in Southwestern Portugal was populated by Eucalyptus that may quickly re-sprout from buds after fire. Besides its simplicity, the monoparametric model of vegetation recovery has the advantage of being easily adapted to other low-resolution satellite data, as well as to other types of vegetation indices.

  1. Quantifying Post-Fire Aeolian Sediment Transport Using Rare Earth Element Tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, D.; Ravi, S.; Grandstaff, D. E.; Gonzales, H. B.; Li, J. J.; Sankey, J. B.; Wang, G.; Van Pelt, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Grasslands and rangelands in arid and semi-arid regions of the world, which provide fundamental ecosystem services, are undergoing rapid increases in fire activity and are highly susceptible to post-fire accelerated soil erosion by wind. A quantitative assessment that integrates fire-wind erosion feedbacks is therefore critically needed in understanding vegetation change, soil biogeochemical cycling, air quality, and landscape evolution. We investigated the applicability of a novel tracer technique - the use of rare earth element (REE) tracers - to quantify soil erosion by wind and to identify sources and sinks of wind-blown sediments in both a burned and unburned shrub-grass transition zone within the Chihuahuan desert (New Mexico, USA). At the beginning of the windy season, March 2016, silt and sand sized particles in shrub, grass, and bare microsites were each tagged with a unique REE oxide, Ho, Eu, and Yb respectively. Samples were then taken directly after application prior to a prescribed fire and again at the end of the windy season in June 2016. All REE tracers showed signs of depletion and mixing, with the depletion in the burned site up to 20% greater than the unburned. REE concentration comparisons between the burned and unburned plots reveal a shift in the source and sink dynamics of sediment post fire. In unburned plots, changes in microsite REE concentrations indicate that sediment moved from the bare to vegetated microsites, whereas the opposite occurred in burned plots. However, burned plot grass microsites acted as a sink for sediment from shrub microsites, whereas unburned plot grass microsites exhibited no enrichment from shrub microsite-sourced sediment. Though fires are known to immediately increase aeolian sediment transport, accompanying changes in the sources and sinks of wind borne sediment may influence biogeochemical cycling and vegetation shifts possibly providing a feedback mechanism for land degradation in dryland ecosystems.

  2. ERMiT: Estimating Post-Fire Erosion in Probabilistic Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, F. B.; Robichaud, P. R.; Elliot, W. J.; Hall, D. E.; Moffet, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    Mitigating the impact of post-wildfire runoff and erosion on life, property, and natural resources have cost the United States government tens of millions of dollars over the past decade. The decision of where, when, and how to apply the most effective mitigation treatments requires land managers to assess the risk of damaging runoff and erosion events occurring after a fire. The Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) is a web-based application that estimates erosion in probabilistic terms on burned and recovering forest, range, and chaparral lands. Unlike most erosion prediction models, ERMiT does not provide `average annual erosion rates;' rather, it provides a distribution of erosion rates with the likelihood of their occurrence. ERMiT combines rain event variability with spatial and temporal variabilities of hillslope burn severity, soil properties, and ground cover to estimate Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model input parameter values. Based on 20 to 40 individual WEPP runs, ERMiT produces a distribution of rain event erosion rates with a probability of occurrence for each of five post-fire years. Over the 5 years of modeled recovery, the occurrence probability of the less erodible soil parameters is increased and the occurrence probability of the more erodible soil parameters is decreased. In addition, the occurrence probabilities and the four spatial arrangements of burn severity (arrangements of overland flow elements (OFE's)), are shifted toward lower burn severity with each year of recovery. These yearly adjustments are based on field measurements made through post-fire recovery periods. ERMiT also provides rain event erosion rate distributions for hillslopes that have been treated with seeding, straw mulch, straw wattles and contour-felled log erosion barriers. Such output can help managers make erosion mitigation treatment decisions based on the probability of high sediment yields occurring, the value of resources at risk for damage, cost, and

  3. Post-fire vegetation recovery in Portugal based ewline on spot/vegetation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gouveia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is presented that allows identifying large burned scars and the monitoring of vegetation recovery in the years following major fire episodes. The procedure relies on 10-day fields of Maximum Value Composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (MVC-NDVI, with a 1 km×1 km spatial resolution obtained from the VEGETATION instrument. The identification of fire scars during the extremely severe 2003 fire season is performed based on cluster analysis of NDVI anomalies that persist during the vegetative cycle of the year following the fire event. Two regions containing very large burned scars were selected, located in Central and Southwestern Portugal, respectively, and time series of MVC-NDVI analysed before the fire events took place and throughout the post-fire period. It is shown that post-fire vegetation dynamics in the two selected regions may be characterised based on maps of recovery rates as estimated by fitting a monoparametric model of vegetation recovery to MVC-NDVI data over each burned scar. Results indicated that the recovery process in the region located in Central Portugal is mostly related to fire damage rather than to vegetation density before 2003, whereas the latter seems to have a more prominent role than vegetation conditions after the fire episode, e.g. in the case of the region in Southwestern Portugal. These differences are consistent with the respective predominant types of vegetation. The burned area located in Central Portugal is dominated by Pinus Pinaster whose natural regeneration crucially depends on the destruction of seeds present on the soil surface during the fire, whereas the burned scar in Southwestern Portugal was populated by Eucalyptus that may quickly re-sprout from buds after fire. Besides its simplicity, the monoparametric model of vegetation recovery has the advantage of being easily adapted to other low-resolution satellite data, as well as to other types of vegetation

  4. Temporal changes in native-exotic richness correlations during early post-fire succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between native and exotic richness has mostly been studied with respect to space (i.e., positive at larger scales, but negative or more variable at smaller scales) and its temporal patterns have rarely been investigated. Although some studies have monitored the temporal trends of both native and exotic richness, how these two groups of species might be...

  5. Massive post-fire flowering events in a tropical mountain region of Brazil: high episodic supply of floral resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Augusto Conceição

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The species Vellozia sincorana L.B.Sm. & Ayensu is key to biodiversity conservation in the tropical mountain region of Brazil. The massive post-fire flowering of this endemic species provides a large, episodic supply of floral resources, mostly nectar, to animals.

  6. Post-fire seeding of great basin native plants using conventional and minimum-till rangeland drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives of post-fire seeding in the Great Basin include reestablishment of perennial cover, suppression of exotic annual weeds, and increasingly restoration of diverse plant communities. Non-conventional seeding techniques may be required when seeding mixes of grasses, forbs and shrubs containing...

  7. Post-Fire soil water repellency, hydrologic response, and sediment yield compared between grass-converted and chaparral watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken R. Hubbert; Pete M. Wohlgemuth; Jan L. Beyers; Marcia G. Narog; Ross Gerrard

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, the Williams Fire burned >90 % of the San Dimas Experimental Forest, providing an opportunity to investigate differences in soil water repellency, peak discharge, and sediment yield between grass-converted and chaparral watersheds. Post-fire water repellency and moisture content were measured in the winter and summer for four years. Peak discharge was...

  8. Avian community responses to post-fire forest structure: implications for fire management in mixed conifer forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela White; Patricia Manley; Gina Tarbill; T. W. Richardson; R. E. Russell; H. D. Safford; S. Z. Dobrowski

    2016-01-01

    Fire is a natural process and the dominant disturbance shaping plant and animal communities in many coniferous forests of the western US. Given that fire size and severity are predicted to increase in the future, it has become increasingly important to understand how wildlife responds to fire and post-fire management. The Angora Fire...

  9. Thermodynamic Analyses of Biomass Gasification Integrated Externally Fired, Post-Firing and Dual-Fuel Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Soltani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the results are reported of the energy and exergy analyses of three biomass-related processes for electricity generation: the biomass gasification integrated externally fired combined cycle, the biomass gasification integrated dual-fuel combined cycle, and the biomass gasification integrated post-firing combined cycle. The energy efficiency for the biomass gasification integrated post-firing combined cycle is 3% to 6% points higher than for the other cycles. Although the efficiency of the externally fired biomass combined cycle is the lowest, it has an advantage in that it only uses biomass. The energy and exergy efficiencies are maximized for the three configurations at particular values of compressor pressure ratios, and increase with gas turbine inlet temperature. As pressure ratio increases, the mass of air per mass of steam decreases for the biomass gasification integrated post-firing combined cycle, but the pressure ratio has little influence on the ratio of mass of air per mass of steam for the other cycles. The gas turbine exergy efficiency is the highest for the three configurations. The combustion chamber for the dual-fuel cycle exhibits the highest exergy efficiency and that for the post-firing cycle the lowest. Another benefit of the biomass gasification integrated externally fired combined cycle is that it exhibits the highest air preheater and heat recovery steam generator exergy efficiencies.

  10. Moving beyond the cambium necrosis hypothesis of post-fire tree mortality: cavitation and deformation of xylem in forest fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.T. Michaletz; E.A. Johnson; M.T. Tyree

    2012-01-01

    It is widely assumed that post-fire tree mortality results from necrosis of phloem and vascular cambium in stems, despite strong evidence that reduced xylem conductivity also plays an important role. In this study, experiments with Populus balsamifera were used to demonstrate two mechanisms by which heat reduces the hydraulic conductivity of xylem:...

  11. Rock gabion, rip-rap, and culvert treatments: Successes and failures in post-fire erosion mitigation, Schultz Fire 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel G. Neary; Karen A. Koestner

    2011-01-01

    Following the Schultz Fire in June of 2010, several erosion mitigation efforts were undertaken to reduce the impacts of post-fire flooding expected during the 2010 monsoon. One treatment consisted of the placement of large rock rip-rap on targeted fill slopes of a high elevation forest road that contains a buried pipeline supplying water to the city of Flagstaff....

  12. Remote Sensing Techniques to Assess Post-Fire Effects at the Hillslope and Sub-Basin Scales via Multi-Scale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, A.; Polinova, M.; Kopel, D.; Malkinson, D.; Wittenberg, L.; Roberts, D.; Shtober-Zisu, N.

    2017-05-01

    Post-fire environmental footprint is expected at varying scales in space and in time and demands development of multi-scale monitoring approaches. In this paper, a spatially and temporally explicit multi-scale model that reveals the physical and morphological indicators affecting hillslope susceptibility at varying scales, is explained and demonstrated. The qualitative and quantitative suitability classification procedures are adapted to translate the large-scale space-borne data supplied by satellite systems (Landsat OLS8 and Sentinel 2 and 3) to local scale produced by a regional airborne survey performed by unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). At the smallest spatial and temporal resolution, a daily airborne imagery collection by UAV is linked to micro-topography model, using statistical and mathematical approaches.

  13. Predicting Post-fire Flooding and Sediment Delivery at the Watershed Scale: An Urgent Need for Upscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lee; Wagenbrenner, Joe; Nelson, Peter; Brogan, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 10-15 years tremendous advances have been made in understanding the effects of fires on runoff and erosion processes, the effectiveness of various post-fire rehabilitation treatments, and the prediction of these changes. The problem is that nearly all of this work has been done at the plot and hillslope scale, while it is the larger-scale issues of flooding, water quality, and sedimentation that are of primary concern to resource managers and the public. In most cases these larger-scale changes are predicted either by simple lumped models, such as the curve number technique, or by summing up the hillslope-scale responses. These approaches can greatly overestimate the downstream effects because they do not account for the spatial variability of rainfall or the complexities of routing and storage. While post-fire stormflows may be efficiently routed downstream, our observations from fires across the western US indicate very large differences in the amount of sediment delivered to downstream areas. As one example, a large storm after the 2012 High Park fire near Fort Collins generated huge amounts of sediment, but relatively little of this was delivered to the Cache la Poudre River; in the case of the 2002 Hayman fire near Denver even moderate-sized storms delivered enough sand and fine gravel to temporarily dam up the South Platte River and over time around 750,000 m3 of sediment was deposited into Strontia Springs Reservoir. In this paper we hypothesize that relatively simple set of tools can greatly improve our ability to predict post-fire runoff and sediment delivery at the watershed scale (5-100 km2). In areas dominated by convective storms post-fire flood risks should be modified according to the size of those storms relative to the upslope contributing area and extent of high or moderate burn severity. The potential delivery of post-fire sediment can be improved by combining the predicted flood risk with empirical adjustments based on valley

  14. How do geomorphic effects of rainfall vary with storm type and spatial scale in a post-fire landscape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Brogan, Daniel J.; Schmeer, Sarah; MacDonald, Lee H.; Nelson, Peter A.

    2016-11-01

    In post-fire landscapes, increased runoff and soil erosion can cause rapid geomorphic change. We examined how different types of rainfall events in 2013 affected hillslope-scale erosion and watershed-scale channel change in two 14-16 km2 watersheds within the 2012 High Park Fire burn area in northern Colorado, USA. The first set of rainfall events was a sequence of 12 short, spatially variable summer convective rain storms, and the second was a > 200 mm week-long storm in September. We compared rainfall characteristics, hillslope sediment yields, stream stage, and channel geometry changes from the summer storms to those from the September storm. The summer storms had a wide range of rainfall intensities, and each storm produced erosion primarily in one study watershed. The September storm rainfall had less spatial variability, covered both watersheds, and its total rainfall depth was 1.5 to 2.5 times greater than the total summer rainfall. Because rainfall intensities were highest during some summer storms, average hillslope sediment yields were higher for summer storms (6 Mg ha- 1) than for the September storm (3 Mg ha- 1). Maximum storm rainfall intensities were good predictors of hillslope sediment yield, but sediment yield correlated most strongly with total depths of rainfall exceeding 10-30 mm h- 1 intensity thresholds. The combined summer storms produced relatively small changes in mean channel bed elevation and cross section area, with no clear pattern of incision or aggradation. In contrast, the sustained rain across the entire study area during the September storm led to extensive upstream incision and downstream aggradation. Because of different spatial coverage of storms, summer storms produced more total hillslope erosion, whereas the September storm produced the greatest total channel changes. At both scales, high intensity rainfall above a threshold was responsible for inducing most of the geomorphic change.

  15. Scale-dependent effects of post-fire canopy cover on snowpack depth in montane coniferous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jens T

    2017-09-01

    Winter snowpack in dry montane regions provides a valuable ecosystem service by storing water into the growing season. Wildfire in coniferous montane forests has the potential to indirectly affect snowpack accumulation and ablation (mass loss) rates by reducing canopy cover, which reduces canopy interception of snow but also increases solar radiation and wind speed. These counteracting effects create uncertainty regarding the canopy conditions that maximize post-fire snowpack duration, which is of concern as montane regions across the western United States experience increasingly warm, dry winters with below-average snowpack. The net effect of wildfire on snowpack depth and duration across the landscape is uncertain, and likely scale dependent. In this study, I tested whether intermediate levels of wildfire severity maximize snowpack depth by increasing accumulation while slowing ablation, using gridded, repeated snow depth measurements from three fires in the Sierra Nevada of California. Increasing fire severity had a strong negative effect on snowpack depth, suggesting that increased ablation after fire, rather than increased accumulation, was the dominant control over snowpack duration. Contrary to expectations, the unburned forest condition had the highest overall snowpack depth, and mean snow depth among all site visits was reduced by 78% from unburned forest to high-severity fire. However, at the individual tree scale, snowpack depth was greater under canopy openings than underneath canopy, controlling for effects of fire severity and aspect. This apparent paradox in snowpack response to fire at the stand vs. individual tree scales is likely due to greater variation in canopy cover within unburned and very low severity areas, which creates smaller areas for snow accumulation while reducing ablation via shading. Management efforts to maximize snowpack duration in montane forests should focus on retaining fine-scale heterogeneity in forest structure. © 2017 by

  16. Rapid Response Tools and Datasets for Post-fire Hydrological Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary Ellen; MacDonald, Lee H.; Billmire, Michael; Elliot, William J.; Robichaud, Pete R.

    2016-04-01

    Rapid response is critical following natural disasters. Flooding, erosion, and debris flows are a major threat to life, property and municipal water supplies after moderate and high severity wildfires. The problem is that mitigation measures must be rapidly implemented if they are to be effective, but they are expensive and cannot be applied everywhere. Fires, runoff, and erosion risks also are highly heterogeneous in space, so there is an urgent need for a rapid, spatially-explicit assessment. Past post-fire modeling efforts have usually relied on lumped, conceptual models because of the lack of readily available, spatially-explicit data layers on the key controls of topography, vegetation type, climate, and soil characteristics. The purpose of this project is to develop a set of spatially-explicit data layers for use in process-based models such as WEPP, and to make these data layers freely available. The resulting interactive online modeling database (http://geodjango.mtri.org/geowepp/) is now operational and publically available for 17 western states in the USA. After a fire, users only need to upload a soil burn severity map, and this is combined with the pre-existing data layers to generate the model inputs needed for spatially explicit models such as GeoWEPP (Renschler, 2003). The development of this online database has allowed us to predict post-fire erosion and various remediation scenarios in just 1-7 days for six fires ranging in size from 4-540 km2. These initial successes have stimulated efforts to further improve the spatial extent and amount of data, and add functionality to support the USGS debris flow model, batch processing for Disturbed WEPP (Elliot et al., 2004) and ERMiT (Robichaud et al., 2007), and to support erosion modeling for other land uses, such as agriculture or mining. The design and techniques used to create the database and the modeling interface are readily repeatable for any area or country that has the necessary topography

  17. Research progress in post-fire debris flow%火后泥石流研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邸雪颖; 陶玉柱

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of the secondary disasters of forest fire has significant impacts on the environment quality and human health and safety.Post-fire debris flow is one of the most hazardous secondary disasters of forest fire.To understand the occurrence conditions of post-fire debris flow and to master its occurrence situation are the critical elements in post-fire hazard assessment.From the viewpoints of vegetation,precipitation threshold and debris flow material sources,this paper elaborated the impacts of forest fire on the debris flow,analyzed the geologic and geomorphic conditions,precipitation and slope condition that caused the post-fire debris flow as well as the primary mechanisms of debris-flow initiation caused by shallow landslide or surface runoff,and reviewed the research progress in the prediction and forecast of post-fire debris flow and the related control measures.In the future research,four aspects to be focused on were proposed,i.e.,the quantification of the relationships between the fire behaviors and environmental factors and the post-fire debris flow,the quantitative research on the post-fire debris flow initiation and movement processes,the mechanistic model of post-fire debris flow,and the rapid and efficient control countermeasures of post-fire debris flow.%林火次生灾害的发生对环境质量和人类的健康与安全具有重要影响.火后泥石流是最危险的林火次生灾害之一,了解其发生条件、掌握其发生状况,是火后灾害风险评估的重要基础.本文从植被、降雨阈值、物源3方面阐述了火对泥石流的影响,分析了火后泥石流起动的地形地质、降雨、坡面条件以及浅层滑坡与地表径流引发火后泥石流的起动机制,并综述了火后泥石流预测预报与治理措施的研究进展.最后提出了在未来的研究中应该着重关注4个方面:量化火行为及环境因子与火后泥石流的关系;火后泥石流起动、运动过程的定量分析

  18. Studying the Post-Fire Response of Vegetation in California Protected Areas with NDVI-based Pheno-Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, S.; Gillespie, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Post-fire response from vegetation is determined by the intensity and timing of fires as well as the nature of local biomes. Though the field-based studies focusing on selected study sites helped to understand the mechanisms of post-fire response, there is a need to extend the analysis to a broader spatial extent with the assistance of remotely sensed imagery of fires and vegetation. Pheno-metrics, a series of variables on the growing cycle extracted from basic satellite measurements of vegetation coverage, translate the basic remote sensing measurements such as NDVI to the language of phenology and fire ecology in a quantitative form. In this study, we analyzed the rate of biomass removal after ignition and the speed of post-fire recovery in California protected areas from 2000 to 2014 with USGS MTBS fire data and USGS eMODIS pheno-metrics. NDVI drop caused by fire showed the aboveground biomass of evergreen forest was removed much slower than shrubland because of higher moisture level and greater density of fuel. In addition, the above two major land cover types experienced a greatly weakened immediate post-fire growing season, featuring a later start and peak of season, a shorter length of season, and a lower start and peak of NDVI. Such weakening was highly correlated with burn severity, and also influenced by the season of fire and the land cover type, according to our modeling between the anomalies of pheno-metrics and the difference of normalized burn ratio (dNBR). The influence generally decayed over time, but can remain high within the first 5 years after fire, mostly because of the introduction of exotic species when the native species were missing. Local-specific variables are necessary to better address the variance within the same fire and improve the outcomes of models. This study can help ecologists in validating the theories of post-fire vegetation response mechanisms and assist local fire managers in post-fire vegetation recovery.

  19. Forest Fires and Post - Fire Regeneration in Algeria Analysis with Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegrar, Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    The Algerian forests are characterized by a particularly flammable material and fuel. The wind, the relief and the slope facilitates the propagation of fire. The use of remote sensing data multi-­dates, combined with other types of data of various kinds on the environment and forest burned, opens up interesting perspectives for the management of post-­fire regeneration. In this study the use of multi-­temporal remote sensing image Alsat-­1 and Landsat combined with other types of data concerning both background and burned down forest appears to be promising in evaluating and spatial and temporal effects of post fire regeneration. A spatial analysis taking into consideration the characteristics of the burned down site in the North West of Algeria, allowed to better account new factors to explain the regeneration and its temporal and spatial variation. We intended to show the potential use of remote sensing data from satellite ALSAT-­1, of spatial resolution of 32 m. . This approach allows showing the contribution of the data of Algerian satellite ALSAT in the detection and the well attended some forest fires in Algeria.

  20. Polyacrylamide application versus forest residue mulching for reducing post-fire runoff and soil erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, Sergio Alegre; Martins, Martinho António Dos Santos; Malvar, Maruxa Cortizo; Ben-Hur, Meni; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2014-01-15

    For several years now, forest fires have been known to increase overland flow and soil erosion. However, mitigation of these effects has been little studied, especially outside the USA. This study aimed to quantify the effectiveness of two so-called emergency treatments to reduce post-fire runoff and soil losses at the microplot scale in a eucalyptus plantation in north-central Portugal. The treatments involved the application of chopped eucalyptus bark mulch at a rate of 10-12 Mg ha(-1), and surface application of a dry, granular, anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) at a rate of 50 kg ha(-1). During the first year after a wildfire in 2010, 1419 mm of rainfall produced, on average, 785 mm of overland flow in the untreated plots and 8.4 Mg ha(-1) of soil losses. Mulching reduced these two figures significantly, by an average 52 and 93%, respectively. In contrast, the PAM-treated plots did not differ from the control plots, despite slightly lower runoff but higher soil erosion figures. When compared to the control plots, mean key factors for runoff and soil erosion were different in the case of the mulched but not the PAM plots. Notably, the plots on the lower half of the slope registered bigger runoff and erosion figures than those on the upper half of the slope. This could be explained by differences in fire intensity and, ultimately, in pre-fire standing biomass.

  1. Development of a Test Protocol for Spacecraft Post-Fire Atmospheric Cleanup and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, David; Hornung, Steven D.; Haas, Jon P.; Graf, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Detecting and extinguishing fires, along with post-fire atmospheric cleaning and monitoring, are vital components of a spacecraft fire response system. Preliminary efforts focused on the technology evaluation of these systems under realistic conditions are described in this paper. While the primary objective of testing is to determine a smoke mitigation filter s performance, supplemental evaluations measuring the smoke-filled chamber handheld commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) atmospheric monitoring devices (combustion product monitors) are also conducted. The test chamber consists of a 1.4 cubic meter (50 cu. ft.) volume containing a smoke generator. The fuel used to generate the smoke is a mixture of polymers in quantities representative of materials involved in a circuit board fire as a typical spacecraft fire. Two fire conditions were examined: no flame and flame. No flame events are produced by pyrolyzing the fuel mixture in a quartz tube furnace with forced ventilation to produce a white, lingering-type smoke. Flame events ignite the smoke at the outlet of the tube furnace producing combustion characterized by a less opaque smoke with black soot. Electrochemical sensor measurements showed carbon monoxide is a major indicator of each fire. Acid gas measurements were recorded, but cross interferents are currently uncharacterized. Electrochemical sensor measurements and sample acquisition techniques from photoacoustic sensors are being improved. Overall, this research shows fire characterization using traditional analytical chemistry techniques is required to verify measurements recorded using COTS atmospheric monitoring devices.

  2. Fire effects on soil properties and post-fire recovery in a Mediterranean area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, A.; Arca, B.; Ventura, A.; Ghiglieri, G.; Pittalis, D.; Deroma, M.

    2009-04-01

    Despite the large number of works on fire effects on soil and post-fire recovery in Mediterranean areas, several aspects need to be established. The study area is located in north-western Sardinia. The climate is sub-arid Mediterranean, with a mean annual temperature of about 16.8 °C and mean annual precipitation ranging from 600 mm to 700 mm, with an autumn maximum. The area is mainly covered by the typical shrubland Mediterranean vegetation. The object of this study is: i) to compare burned and unburned soil in order to evaluate the effect of fire on physical and chemical soil properties; ii) to analyse the vegetation recovery of the main Mediterranean maquis species. The analysis was carried out in a human caused fire occurred in North-West Sardinia (Italy) immediately after fire in 2006, and during the 2007 and 2008 summer seasons. Several pedological samples were collected from various depths (0-5, 5-15 and 15-25 cm) and under the canopy of different species (Chamaerops humilis L., Pistacia lentiscus L. and Calycotome spinosa L.), both in burned and in unburned plots. The soil organic matter content, total and available element concentrations, and soil texture were then determined in laboratory. Different statistical parameters were calculated to describe the relationships between soil properties and species composition comparing burned and unburned plots.

  3. Effect of post-fire resprouting on leaf fluctuating asymmetry, extrafloral nectar quality, and ant-plant-herbivore interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Silva, Estevão; Del-Claro, Kleber

    2013-06-01

    Fires in the Cerrado savanna are a severe form of disturbance, but some species are capable of resprouting afterwards. It is unknown, however, how and whether post-fire resprouting represents a stressful condition to plants and how their rapid re-growth influences both the production of biochemical compounds, and interactions with mutualistic ants. In this study, we examined the influence of post-fire resprouting on biotic interactions (ant-plant-herbivore relationships) and on plant stress. The study was performed on two groups of the extrafloral nectaried shrub Banisteriopsis campestris (Malpighiaceae); one group was recovering from fire while the other acted as control. With respect to biotic interactions, we examined whether resprouting influenced extrafloral nectar concentration (milligrams per microliter), the abundance of the ant Camponotus crassus and leaf herbivory rates. Plant stress was assessed via fluctuating asymmetry (FA) analysis, which refers to deviations from perfect symmetry in bilaterally symmetrical traits (e.g., leaves) and indicates whether species are under stress. Results revealed that FA, sugar concentration, and ant abundance were 51.7 %, 35.7 % and 21.7 % higher in resprouting plants. Furthermore, C. crassus was significantly associated with low herbivory rates, but only in resprouting plants. This study showed that post-fire resprouting induced high levels of plant stress and influenced extrafloral nectar quality and ant-herbivore relationships in B. campestris. Therefore, despite being a stressful condition to the plant, post-fire resprouting individuals had concentrated extrafloral nectar and sustained more ants, thus strengthening the outcomes of ant-plant mutualism.

  4. Modeling hydrologic and geomorphic hazards across post-fire landscapes using a self-organizing map approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies attempt to model the range of possible post-fire hydrologic and geomorphic hazards because of the sparseness of data and the coupled, nonlinear, spatial, and temporal relationships among landscape variables. In this study, a type of unsupervised artificial neural network, called a self-organized map (SOM), is trained using data from 540 burned basins in the western United States. The sparsely populated data set includes variables from independent numerical landscape categories (climate, land surface form, geologic texture, and post-fire condition), independent landscape classes (bedrock geology and state), and dependent initiation processes (runoff, landslide, and runoff and landslide combination) and responses (debris flows, floods, and no events). Pattern analysis of the SOM-based component planes is used to identify and interpret relations among the variables. Application of the Davies-Bouldin criteria following k-means clustering of the SOM neurons identified eight conceptual regional models for focusing future research and empirical model development. A split-sample validation on 60 independent basins (not included in the training) indicates that simultaneous predictions of initiation process and response types are at least 78% accurate. As climate shifts from wet to dry conditions, forecasts across the burned landscape reveal a decreasing trend in the total number of debris flow, flood, and runoff events with considerable variability among individual basins. These findings suggest the SOM may be useful in forecasting real-time post-fire hazards, and long-term post-recovery processes and effects of climate change scenarios.

  5. Higher sensitivity and lower specificity in post-fire mortality model validation of 11 western US tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jeffrey M.; van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Lalemand, Laura; Keifer, MaryBeth

    2017-01-01

    Managers require accurate models to predict post-fire tree mortality to plan prescribed fire treatments and examine their effectiveness. Here we assess the performance of a common post-fire tree mortality model with an independent dataset of 11 tree species from 13 National Park Service units in the western USA. Overall model discrimination was generally strong, but performance varied considerably among species and sites. The model tended to have higher sensitivity (proportion of correctly classified dead trees) and lower specificity (proportion of correctly classified live trees) for many species, indicating an overestimation of mortality. Variation in model accuracy (percentage of live and dead trees correctly classified) among species was not related to sample size or percentage observed mortality. However, we observed a positive relationship between specificity and a species-specific bark thickness multiplier, indicating that overestimation was more common in thin-barked species. Accuracy was also quite low for thinner bark classes (<1 cm) for many species, leading to poorer model performance. Our results indicate that a common post-fire mortality model generally performs well across a range of species and sites; however, some thin-barked species and size classes would benefit from further refinement to improve model specificity.

  6. Post-fire vegetation and fuel development influences fire severity patterns in reburns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppoletta, Michelle; Merriam, Kyle E; Collins, Brandon M

    2016-04-01

    In areas where fire regimes and forest structure have been dramatically altered, there is increasing concern that contemporary fires have the potential to set forests on a positive feedback trajectory with successive reburns, one in which extensive stand-replacing fire could promote more stand-replacing fire. Our study utilized an extensive set of field plots established following four fires that occurred between 2000 and 2010 in the northern Sierra Nevada, California, USA that were subsequently reburned in 2012. The information obtained from these field plots allowed for a unique set of analyses investigating the effect of vegetation, fuels, topography, fire weather, and forest management on reburn severity. We also examined the influence of initial fire severity and time since initial fire on influential predictors of reburn severity. Our results suggest that high- to moderate-severity fire in the initial fires led to an increase in standing snags and shrub vegetation, which in combination with severe fire weather promoted high-severity fire effects in the subsequent reburn. Although fire behavior is largely driven by weather, our study demonstrates that post-fire vegetation composition and structure are also important drivers of reburn severity. In the face of changing climatic regimes and increases in extreme fire weather, these results may provide managers with options to create more fire-resilient ecosystems. In areas where frequent high-severity fire is undesirable, management activities such as thinning, prescribed fire, or managed wildland fire can be used to moderate fire behavior not only prior to initial fires, but also before subsequent reburns.

  7. RECOVER: An Automated Cloud-Based Decision Support System for Post-fire Rehabilitation Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, John L.; Carroll, Mark; Weber, K. T.; Brown, Molly E.; Gill, Roger L.; Wooten, Margaret; May J.; Serr, K.; Smith, E.; Goldsby, R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    RECOVER is a site-specific decision support system that automatically brings together in a single analysis environment the information necessary for post-fire rehabilitation decision-making. After a major wildfire, law requires that the federal land management agencies certify a comprehensive plan for public safety, burned area stabilization, resource protection, and site recovery. These burned area emergency response (BAER) plans are a crucial part of our national response to wildfire disasters and depend heavily on data acquired from a variety of sources. Final plans are due within 21 days of control of a major wildfire and become the guiding document for managing the activities and budgets for all subsequent remediation efforts. There are few instances in the federal government where plans of such wide-ranging scope and importance are assembled on such short notice and translated into action more quickly. RECOVER has been designed in close collaboration with our agency partners and directly addresses their high-priority decision-making requirements. In response to a fire detection event, RECOVER uses the rapid resource allocation capabilities of cloud computing to automatically collect Earth observational data, derived decision products, and historic biophysical data so that when the fire is contained, BAER teams will have a complete and ready-to-use RECOVER dataset and GIS analysis environment customized for the target wildfire. Initial studies suggest that RECOVER can transform this information-intensive process by reducing from days to a matter of minutes the time required to assemble and deliver crucial wildfire-related data.

  8. Post-fire Thermokarst Development Along a Planned Road Corridor in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. M.; Grosse, G.; Larsen, C. F.; Hayes, D. J.; Arp, C. D.; Liu, L.; Miller, E.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfire disturbance in northern high latitude regions is an important factor contributing to ecosystem and landscape change. In permafrost influenced terrain, fire may initiate thermokarst development which impacts hydrology, vegetation, wildlife, carbon storage and infrastructure. In this study we differenced two airborne LiDAR datasets that were acquired in the aftermath of the large and severe Anaktuvuk River tundra fire, which in 2007 burned across a proposed road corridor in Arctic Alaska. The 2009 LiDAR dataset was acquired by the Alaska Department of Transportation in preparation for construction of a gravel road that would connect the Dalton Highway with the logistical camp of Umiat. The 2014 LiDAR dataset was acquired by the USGS to quantify potential post-fire thermokarst development over the first seven years following the tundra fire event. By differencing the two 1 m resolution digital terrain models, we measured permafrost thaw subsidence across 34% of the burned tundra area studied, and observed less than 1% in similar, undisturbed tundra terrain units. Ice-rich, yedoma upland terrain was most susceptible to thermokarst development following the disturbance, accounting for 50% of the areal and volumetric change detected, with some locations subsiding more than six meters over the study period. Calculation of rugosity, or surface roughness, in the two datasets showed a doubling in microtopography on average across the burned portion of the study area, with a 340% increase in yedoma upland terrain. An additional LiDAR dataset was acquired in April 2015 to document the role of thermokarst development on enhanced snow accumulation and subsequent snowmelt runoff within the burn area. Our findings will enable future vulnerability assessments of ice-rich permafrost terrain as a result of shifting disturbance regimes. Such assessments are needed to address questions focused on the impact of permafrost degradation on physical, ecological, and socio

  9. Post-fire hydrologic response in Central Portugal. A four years study at microplot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Diana; Malvar, Maruxa; Martins, Martinho; Machado, Ana; Nunes, João; Keizer, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Wildfires are a natural phenomenon in regions with a Mediterranean-type climate. However, their present-day widespread occurrence in southern Europe is unprecedented and strongly reflects human activity such as ignition, land-use changes, land abandonment and introduction of highly flammable plantations. Besides wildfires, post-fire management practices such as plowing, terracing, clearcutting and logging should also be considered, since their occurrence is getting increasingly common. And, in a long-term period these practices seem to be executed intercalated with repeated fire occurrences in the same site, sharing the impacts together with fire in an escalated degradational effect. In this sense, the work presented here concerns four years of runoff and erosion data at microplot scale after the wildfire, comparing different land management practices that occurred before the fire. Preliminary results indicate that in four years of monitoring, runoff is constantly higher in plowed sites than in the unplowed ones, with the exception of the first year. Regarding soil losses the plowed plots present always higher sediment rates than the unplowed ones. The comparison between two unplowed sites with different land uses, indicate higher runoff and erosion risk for pine comparatively to the eucalypt ones, however the reduced soil depth in the first can have an important role in these differences. Following these facts, the aim of the present work is to answer the following research questions: i) Do these four years of observations fit with the window of disturbance model presented by Prosser and Williams (1998). or the alternative version by Wittenberg and Inbar (2009)?; ii) Does pre-fire disturbances (wildfire, land use changes and land management practices) still have repercussions after wildfire?; In what sense does four years of intensive monitoring provides that one year couldn't provide?

  10. Contrasting long-term survival of two outplanted Mojave Desert perennials for post-fire revegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoles-Sciulla, Sara J.; Defalco, Lesley A.; Esque, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Post-fire recovery of arid shrublands is typically slow, and planting greenhouse-raised seedlings may be a means of jump-starting this process. Recovery can be further accelerated by understanding the factors controlling post-planting survival. In fall 2007 and 2009, we outplanted seedlings of two contrasting native evergreen shrubs—fast-growing Nevada jointfir and slow-growing blackbrush—across five burned sites in the Mojave Desert. To increase soil moisture and optimize seedling survival, we experimentally applied and evaluated soil amendments and supplemental watering. We also evaluated two herbicides that reduce competitive invasive annual grasses and two types of herbivore protection. Survival of jointfir outplanted in 2007 was 61% after 43 months, and site largely influenced survival, while herbicide containing imazapic applied more than one year after outplanting reduced survival. Reduced survival of jointfir outplanted in 2009 coincided with delayed seasonal precipitation that intensified foliar damage by small mammals. In contrast, blackbrush survival was 4% after 43 months, and was influenced by site, type of herbivore protection, and greenhouse during the 2007 outplanting, and soil amendment during 2009. Counter to expectations, we found that supplemental watering and soil amendments did not influence long-term survival of either blackbrush or jointfir. Shrub species with rapid growth rates and broad environmental tolerances, such as jointfir, make ideal candidates for outplanting, provided that seedlings are protected from herbivores. Re-introduction of species with slow growth rates and narrow environmental tolerances, such as blackbrush, requires careful consideration to optimize pre- and post-planting conditions.

  11. RECOVER: An Automated, Cloud-Based Decision Support System for Post-Fire Rehabilitation Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, J. L.; Carroll, M. L.; Weber, K. T.; Brown, M. E.; Gill, R. L.; Wooten, M.; May, J.; Serr, K.; Smith, E.; Goldsby, R.; Newtoff, K.; Bradford, K.; Doyle, C.; Volker, E.; Weber, S.

    2014-11-01

    RECOVER is a site-specific decision support system that automatically brings together in a single analysis environment the information necessary for post-fire rehabilitation decision-making. After a major wildfire, law requires that the federal land management agencies certify a comprehensive plan for public safety, burned area stabilization, resource protection, and site recovery. These burned area emergency response (BAER) plans are a crucial part of our national response to wildfire disasters and depend heavily on data acquired from a variety of sources. Final plans are due within 21 days of control of a major wildfire and become the guiding document for managing the activities and budgets for all subsequent remediation efforts. There are few instances in the federal government where plans of such wide-ranging scope and importance are assembled on such short notice and translated into action more quickly. RECOVER has been designed in close collaboration with our agency partners and directly addresses their high-priority decision-making requirements. In response to a fire detection event, RECOVER uses the rapid resource allocation capabilities of cloud computing to automatically collect Earth observational data, derived decision products, and historic biophysical data so that when the fire is contained, BAER teams will have a complete and ready-to-use RECOVER dataset and GIS analysis environment customized for the target wildfire. Initial studies suggest that RECOVER can transform this information-intensive process by reducing from days to a matter of minutes the time required to assemble and deliver crucial wildfire-related data.

  12. Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessments at the U.S. Geological Survey - Recent Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, D. M.; Kean, J. W.; Smoczyk, G. M.; Negri, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfire can have profound effects on the hydrologic response of a watershed, and debris-flow activity is among the most destructive consequences of these effects. The continued high likelihood of catastrophic wildfires in the western U. S. and the encroachment of development into fire-prone areas have created the need to develop tools to identify and quantify the potential hazards posed by debris flows generated from burned watersheds. These tools are critically needed by Federal, State, and local agencies to mitigate the impacts of debris flows on people, their property, infrastructure and natural resources. Applied research at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Program is focused on providing timely, science-based assessments of post-fire debris-flow hazard. Formerly, post-fire debris-flow hazard assessments were disseminated by means of the USGS Open-File Report publication series, which included poster-sized maps that predicted the probability, volume, and combined hazard for given watersheds. Feedback from collaborators suggested that 1) the reports were not sufficiently timely for immediate post-fire use, 2) the static maps were difficult to use for site-specific assessments, and 3) individual assessments were often cost-prohibitive. Beginning in January 2014, the USGS has transitioned to a web-based method for disseminating post-fire debris-flow hazard assessments. This new platform addresses the primary concerns of our stakeholders in three ways. First, the turnaround time has been reduced from 1-2 months for a map and written report, to 3-4 days for a web-based map assessment. This allows response teams to incorporate the assessment results into their reports, which are urgently needed immediately after fires. Second, the new website is interactive and accompanied by downloadable geospatial data of predictions for several storm scenarios. These features permit casual (local residents) and power-users (GIS experts) to evaluate site

  13. Prediction of spatially explicit rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for post-fire debris-flow generation in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis; Negri, Jacquelyn; Kean, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Population expansion into fire-prone steeplands has resulted in an increase in post-fire debris-flow risk in the western United States. Logistic regression methods for determining debris-flow likelihood and the calculation of empirical rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for debris-flow initiation represent two common approaches for characterizing hazard and reducing risk. Logistic regression models are currently being used to rapidly assess debris-flow hazard in response to design storms of known intensities (e.g. a 10-year recurrence interval rainstorm). Empirical rainfall intensity-duration thresholds comprise a major component of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Weather Service (NWS) debris-flow early warning system at a regional scale in southern California. However, these two modeling approaches remain independent, with each approach having limitations that do not allow for synergistic local-scale (e.g. drainage-basin scale) characterization of debris-flow hazard during intense rainfall. The current logistic regression equations consider rainfall a unique independent variable, which prevents the direct calculation of the relation between rainfall intensity and debris-flow likelihood. Regional (e.g. mountain range or physiographic province scale) rainfall intensity-duration thresholds fail to provide insight into the basin-scale variability of post-fire debris-flow hazard and require an extensive database of historical debris-flow occurrence and rainfall characteristics. Here, we present a new approach that combines traditional logistic regression and intensity-duration threshold methodologies. This method allows for local characterization of both the likelihood that a debris-flow will occur at a given rainfall intensity, the direct calculation of the rainfall rates that will result in a given likelihood, and the ability to calculate spatially explicit rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for debris-flow generation in recently

  14. Post-fire drought effects and their legacy on soil functionality and microbial community structure in a Mediterranean shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belen Hinojosa, M.; Parra, Antonio; Laudicina, V. Armando; Moreno, José M.

    2017-04-01

    Climate change in subtropical areas, like the Mediterranean, is projected to decrease precipitation and to lengthen the seasonal drought period. Fire danger is also projected to increase under the most severe conditions. Little is known about the effects of increasing drought and, particularly, its legacy when precipitation resumes to normal, on the recovery of burned ecosystems. Here we studied the effects of post-fire drought and its legacy two years after it stopped on soil microbial community structure and functionality of a Cistus-Erica shrubland. To do this, a manipulative experiment was setup in which rainfall total patterns were modified by means of a rain-out shelters and irrigation system in a fully replicated set of previously burned plots. The treatments were: environmental control (natural rainfall), historical control (average rainfall, 2 months drought), moderate drought (25% reduction of historical control, 5 months drought) and severe drought (45% reduction, 7 months drought). One set of unburned plots under natural rainfall served as an additional control. Availability of the main soil nutrients and microbial community composition and functionality were monitored over 4 years under these rainfall manipulation treatments. Thereafter, treatments were discontinued and plots were subjected to ambient rainfall for two additional years. Post-fire drought had not effect on total C or N. Fire increased soil P and N availability. However, post-fire drought reduced available soil P and increased nitrate in the short term. Post- fire reduction of available K was accentuated by continued drought. Fire significantly reduced soil organic matter, enzyme activities and carbon mineralization, mainly in drought treated soils. Fire also decreased soil microbial biomass and the proportion of fungi, while that of actinomycetes increased in the short term. Post-fire drought accentuated the decrease of soil total microbial biomass and fungi, with bacteria becoming more

  15. Older Siblings Affect Gut Microbiota Development in Early Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Zachariassen, Gitte; Bahl, Martin Iain

    of allergies. Methods: We investigated whether presence of older siblings, furred pets and early life infections affected gut microbial communities at 9 and 18 months of age and whether these differences were associated with the cumulative prevalence of atopic symptoms of eczema and asthmatic bronchitis...... and the cumulative prevalence of diagnosed asthmatic bronchitis and self-reported eczema at three years of age. Results: The number of older siblings correlated positively with bacterial diversity (p = 0.030), diversity of the phyla Firmicutes (p = 0.014) and Bacteroidetes (p = 0.004) and bacterial richness (p = 0....... Gut microbiota characteristics were not significantly associated with cumulative occurrence of eczema and asthmatic bronchitis during the first three years of life. Conclusions: Presence of older siblings is associated with increased gut microbial diversity and richness during early childhood, which...

  16. Traits affecting early season nitrogen uptake in nine legume species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elana Dayoub

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Legume crops are known to have low soil N uptake early in their life cycle, which can weaken their ability to compete with other species, such as weeds or other crops in intercropping systems. However, there is limited knowledge on the main traits involved in soil N uptake during early growth and for a range of species. The objective of this research was to identify the main traits explaining the variability among legume species in soil N uptake and to study the effect of the soil mineral N supply on the legume strategy for the use of available N sources during early growth. Nine legume species were grown in rhizotrons with or without N supply. Root expansion, shoot and root biomass, nodule establishment, N2 fixation and mineral soil N uptake were measured. A large interspecific variability was observed for all traits affecting soil N uptake. Root lateral expansion and early biomass in relation to seed mass were the major traits influencing soil N uptake regardless of the level of soil N availability. Fenugreek, lentil, alfalfa, and common vetch could be considered weak competitors for soil N due to their low plant biomass and low lateral root expansion. Conversely, peanut, pea, chickpea and soybean had a greater soil N uptake. Faba bean was separated from other species having a higher nodule biomass, a higher N2 fixation and a lower seed reserve depletion. Faba bean was able to simultaneously fix N2 and take up soil N. This work has identified traits of seed mass, shoot and root biomass, root lateral expansion, N2 fixation and seed reserve depletion that allowing classification of legume species regarding their soil N uptake ability during early growth.

  17. Analysis and mapping of post-fire hydrologic hazards for the 2002 Hayman, Coal Seam, and Missionary Ridge wildfires, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J.G.; Smith, M.E.; Friedel, M.J.; Stevens, M.R.; Bossong, C.R.; Litke, D.W.; Parker, R.S.; Costello, C.; Wagner, J.; Char, S.J.; Bauer, M.A.; Wilds, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    Wildfires caused extreme changes in the hydrologic, hydraulic, and geomorphologic characteristics of many Colorado drainage basins in the summer of 2002. Detailed assessments were made of the short-term effects of three wildfires on burned and adjacent unburned parts of drainage basins. These were the Hayman, Coal Seam, and Missionary Ridge wildfires. Longer term runoff characteristics that reflect post-fire drainage basin recovery expected to develop over a period of several years also were analyzed for two affected stream reaches: the South Platte River between Deckers and Trumbull, and Mitchell Creek in Glenwood Springs. The 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year flood-plain boundaries and water-surface profiles were computed in a detailed hydraulic study of the Deckers-to-Trumbull reach. The Hayman wildfire burned approximately 138,000 acres (216 square miles) in granitic terrain near Denver, and the predominant potential hazard in this area is flooding by sediment-laden water along the large tributaries to and the main stem of the South Platte River. The Coal Seam wildfire burned approximately 12,200 acres (19.1 square miles) near Glenwood Springs, and the Missionary Ridge wildfire burned approximately 70,500 acres (110 square miles) near Durango, both in areas underlain by marine shales where the predominant potential hazard is debris-flow inundation of low-lying areas. Hydrographs and peak discharges for pre-burn and post-burn scenarios were computed for each drainage basin and tributary subbasin by using rainfall-runoff models because streamflow data for most tributary subbasins were not available. An objective rainfall-runoff model calibration method based on nonlinear regression and referred to as the ?objective calibration method? was developed and applied to rainfall-runoff models for three burned areas. The HEC-1 rainfall-runoff model was used to simulate the pre-burn rainfall-runoff processes in response to the 100-year storm, and HEC-HMS was used for runoff

  18. Mountain Pine Beetle Dynamics and Reproductive Success in Post-Fire Lodgepole and Ponderosa Pine Forests in Northeastern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Andrew P; Pfammatter, Jesse A; Bentz, Barbara J; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2016-01-01

    Fire injury can increase tree susceptibility to some bark beetles (Curculionidae, Scolytinae), but whether wildfires can trigger outbreaks of species such as mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is not well understood. We monitored 1173 lodgepole (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Doug.) and 599 ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa Doug. ex Law) pines for three years post-wildfire in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah in an area with locally endemic mountain pine beetle. We examined how the degree and type of fire injury influenced beetle attacks, brood production, and subsequent tree mortality, and related these to beetle population changes over time. Mountain pine beetle population levels were high the first two post-fire years in lodgepole pine, and then declined. In ponderosa pine, populations declined each year after initial post-fire sampling. Compared to trees with strip or failed attacks, mass attacks occurred on trees with greater fire injury, in both species. Overall, a higher degree of damage to crowns and boles was associated with higher attack rates in ponderosa pines, but additional injury was more likely to decrease attack rates in lodgepole pines. In lodgepole pine, attacks were initially concentrated on fire-injured trees, but during subsequent years beetles attacked substantial numbers of uninjured trees. In ponderosa pine, attacks were primarily on injured trees each year, although these stands were more heavily burned and had few uninjured trees. In total, 46% of all lodgepole and 56% of ponderosa pines underwent some degree of attack. Adult brood emergence within caged bole sections decreased with increasing bole char in lodgepole pine but increased in ponderosa pine, however these relationships did not scale to whole trees. Mountain pine beetle populations in both tree species four years post-fire were substantially lower than the year after fire, and wildfire did not result in population outbreaks.

  19. Mapping and exploring variation in post-fire vegetation recovery following mixed severity wildfire using airborne LiDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Christopher E; Price, Owen F; Tasker, Elizabeth M

    2017-07-01

    There is a public perception that large high-severity wildfires decrease biodiversity and increase fire hazard by homogenizing vegetation composition and increasing the cover of mid-story vegetation. But a growing literature suggests that vegetation responses are nuanced. LiDAR technology provides a promising remote sensing tool to test hypotheses about post-fire vegetation regrowth because vegetation cover can be quantified within different height strata at fine scales over large areas. We assess the usefulness of airborne LiDAR data for measuring post-fire mid-story vegetation regrowth over a range of spatial resolutions (10 × 10 m, 30 × 30 m, 50 × 50 m, 100 × 100 m cell size) and investigate the effect of fire severity on regrowth amount and spatial pattern following a mixed severity wildfire in Warrumbungle National Park, Australia. We predicted that recovery would be more vigorous in areas of high fire severity, because park managers observed dense post-fire regrowth in these areas. Moderate to strong positive associations were observed between LiDAR and field surveys of mid-story vegetation cover between 0.5-3.0 m. Thus our LiDAR survey was an apt representation of on-ground vegetation cover. LiDAR-derived mid-story vegetation cover was 22-40% lower in areas of low and moderate than high fire severity. Linear mixed-effects models showed that fire severity was among the strongest biophysical predictors of mid-story vegetation cover irrespective of spatial resolution. However much of the variance associated with these models was unexplained, presumably because soil seed banks varied at finer scales than our LiDAR maps. Dense patches of mid-story vegetation regrowth were small (median size 0.01 ha) and evenly distributed between areas of low, moderate and high fire severity, demonstrating that high-severity fires do not homogenize vegetation cover. Our results are relevant for ecosystem conservation and fire management because they: indicate

  20. Post-fire wood management alters water stress, growth, and performance of pine regeneration in a Mediterranean ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranon-Jimenez, Sara; Castro, Jorge; Querejeta, José Ignacio; Fernandez-Ondono, Emilia; Allen, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research has focused on comparing the impacts of post-fire salvage logging versus those of less aggressive management practices on forest regeneration. However, few studies have addressed the effects of different burnt-wood management options on seedling/sapling performance, or the ecophysiological mechanisms underlying differences among treatments. In this study, we experimentally assess the effects of post-fire management of the burnt wood on the growth and performance of naturally regenerating pine seedlings (Pinus pinaster). Three post-fire management treatments varying in degree of intervention were implemented seven months after a high-severity wildfire burned Mediterranean pine forests in the Sierra Nevada, southeast Spain: (a) “No Intervention” (NI, all burnt trees left standing); (b) “Partial Cut plus Lopping” (PCL, felling most of the burnt trees, cutting off branches, and leaving all the biomass on site without mastication); and (c) “Salvage Logging” (SL, felling the burnt trees, piling up the logs and masticating the fine woody debris). Three years after the fire, the growth, foliar nutrient concentrations, and leaf carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition (δ13C, δ18O and δ15N) of naturally regenerating seedlings were measured in all the treatments. Pine seedlings showed greatest vigor and size in the PCL treatment, whereas growth was poorest in SL. The nutrient concentrations were similar among treatments, although greater growth in the two treatments with residual wood present indicated higher plant uptake. Seedlings in the SL treatment showed high leaf δ13C and δ18O values indicating severe water stress, in contrast to significantly alleviated water stress indications in the PCL treatment. Seedling growth and physiological performance in NI was intermediate between that of PCL and SL. After six growing seasons, P. pinaster saplings in PCL showed greater growth and cone production than SL saplings. In summary

  1. Geospatial Data Combined With The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) Tool For Rapid Post-Fire Watershed Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Clifford, T. J.; Guertin, D. P.; Sheppard, B. S.; Barlow, J. E.; Korgaonkar, Y.; Burns, I. S.; Unkrich, C. C.

    2016-12-01

    Wildfires disasters are common throughout the western US. While many feel fire suppression is the largest cost of wildfires, case studies note rehabilitation costs often equal or greatly exceed suppression costs. Using geospatial data sets, and post-fire burn severity products, coupled with the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment tool (AGWA - www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa), the Dept. of Interior, Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams can rapidly analyze and identify at-risk areas to target rehabilitation efforts. AGWA employs nationally available geospatial elevation, soils, and land cover data to parameterize the KINEROS2 hydrology and erosion model. A pre-fire watershed simulation can be done prior to BAER deployment using design storms. As soon as the satellite-derived Burned Area Reflectance Classification (BARC) map is obtained, a post-fire watershed simulation using the same storm is conducted. The pre- and post-fire simulations can be spatially differenced in the GIS for rapid identification of high at-risk areas of erosion or flooding. This difference map is used by BAER teams to prioritize field observations and in-turn produce a final burn severity map that is used in AGWA/KINEROS2 simulations to provide report ready results. The 2013 Elk Wildfire Complex that burned over 52,600 ha east of Boise, Idaho provides a tangible example of how BAER experts combined AGWA and geospatial data that resulted in substantial rehabilitation cost savings. The BAER team initially, they identified approximately 6,500 burned ha for rehabilitation. The team then used the AGWA pre- and post-fire watershed simulation results, accessibility constraints, and land slope conditions in an interactive process to locate burned areas that posed the greatest threat to downstream values-at-risk. The group combined the treatable area, field observations, and the spatial results from AGWA to target seed and mulch treatments that most effectively reduced the threats. Using this

  2. Use of spectral channels and vegetation indices from satellite VEGETATION time series for the Post-Fire vegetation recovery estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Rosa; Lasaponara, Rosa; Montesano, Tiziana; Lanorte, Antonio; de Santis, Fortunato

    2010-05-01

    Satellite data can help monitoring the dynamics of vegetation in burned and unburned areas. Several methods can be used to perform such kind of analysis. This paper is focused on the use of different satellite-based parameters for fire recovery monitoring. In particular, time series of single spectral channels and vegetation indices from SPOT-VEGETATION have investigated. The test areas is the Mediterranean ecosystems of Southern Italy. For this study we considered: 1) the most widely used index to follow the process of recovery after fire: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) obtained from the visible (Red) and near infrared (NIR) by using the following formula NDVI = (NIR_Red)/(NIR + Red), 2) moisture index MSI obtained from the near infrared and Mir for characterization of leaf and canopy water content. 3) NDWI obtained from the near infrared and Mir as in the case of MSI, but with the normalization (as the NDVI) to reduce the atmospheric effects. All analysis for this work was performed on ten-daily normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) image composites (S10) from the SPOT- VEGETATION (VGT) sensor. The final data set consisted of 279 ten-daily, 1 km resolution NDVI S1O composites for the period 1 April 1998 to 31 December 2005 with additional surface reflectance values in the blue (B; 0.43-0.47,um), red (R; 0.61-0.68,um), near-infrared (NIR; 0.78-0.89,um) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR; 1.58-1.75,um) spectral bands, and information on the viewing geometry and pixel status. Preprocessing of the data was performed by the Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek (VITO) in the framework of the Global Vegetation Monitoring (GLOVEG) preprocessing chain. It consisted of the Simplified Method for Atmospheric Correction (SMAC) and compositing at ten-day intervals based on the Maximum Value Compositing (MVC) criterion. All the satellite time series were analysed using the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) to estimate post fire vegetation recovery

  3. Exploring functional relationships between post-fire soil water repellency, soil structure and physico-chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarfeld, Jamie; Brook, Anna; Keestra, Saskia; Wittenberg, Lea

    2016-04-01

    composition in determining wettability rather than quantity, as evidenced both by the high variation observed in the field and the strong presence of aliphatic functional groups in the absence of WR; and (ii) commonly proposed mechanisms affecting soil aggregate properties - albeit with differing temperature thresholds and longer exposure times employed in this study. Namely, these mechanisms tend to involve: (i) soil OM and WR reduction at low to moderate temperatures, and (ii) thermal fusion of particles within moderate to high temperatures. Overall, results suggest a positive influence of management on soil properties as well as high soil resilience to moderate severity fire disturbance in the studied areas. However, the specific changes in soil OM and mineral composition that are responsible for destruction of WR and subsequent changes in AS remain poorly understood. Based on these results, a key next step within this study will entail a closer examination of OC ratios and their potential links with certain mineral species known to influence soil aggregation and soil WR. Noting the importance of soil OM-mineralogical interactions on run-off and erosion processes, results may contribute to better prediction of post-fire responses in the future and improve the ability to fine-tune site specific management approaches accordingly.

  4. Impact of a high severity wildfire and two post-fire stabilisation treatments on the structure of the microbial community in a soil located in Laza (Ourense, NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lombao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning the microbial communities in burnt soils have been focused on biochemical properties and, despite its interest, information about the microbial community structure is scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and medium- term effects produced by a high severity fire and the application of post-fire stabilization methods (mulching and seeding in the structure of soil microbial population, determined by means of the analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA. The study was performed in a forest ecosystem affected by a high severity wildfire and highly susceptible to post-fire soil erosion (Laza, NW Spain. Samples were collected from the A horizon (0-2 cm immediately and 4, 8 and 12 months after the wildfire. The results of principal component analysis carried out with PLFA data make possible to differentiate between burnt and unburnt samples, indicating a clear effect of the wildfire on composition of microbial communities. Unburnt samples were characterized by the presence of fungal fatty acid as 18:2ω6, 18:1ω9 o 16:ω5, whereas fatty acid characteristics of actinomycetes tended to be higher in burnt samples than in the corresponding unburnt samples. The structure of microbial communities also varied with sampling time, confirming seasonal fluctuations of soil microbial parameters.

  5. Factors affecting daughter cells' arrangement during the early bacterial divisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Tzu Su

    Full Text Available On agar plates, daughter cells of Escherichia coli mutually slide and align side-by-side in parallel during the first round of binary fission. This phenomenon has been previously attributed to an elastic material that restricts apparently separated bacteria from being in string. We hypothesize that the interaction between bacteria and the underneath substratum may affect the arrangement of the daughter bacteria. To test this hypothesis, bacterial division on hyaluronic acid (HA gel, as an alternative substratum, was examined. Consistent with our proposition, the HA gel differs from agar by suppressing the typical side-by-side alignments to a rare population. Examination of bacterial surface molecules that may contribute to the daughter cells' arrangement yielded an observation that, with disrupted lpp, the E. coli daughter cells increasingly formed non-typical patterns, i.e. neither sliding side-by-side in parallel nor forming elongated strings. Therefore, our results suggest strongly that the early cell patterning is affected by multiple interaction factors. With oscillatory optical tweezers, we further demonstrated that the interaction force decreased in bacteria without Lpp, a result substantiating our notion that the side-by-side sliding phenomenon directly reflects the strength of in-situ interaction between bacteria and substratum.

  6. A Passive Pressure Sensor Fabricated by Post-Fire Metallization on Zirconia Ceramic for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Luo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature pressure sensor realized by the post-fire metallization on zirconia ceramic is presented. The pressure signal can be read out wirelessly through the magnetic coupling between the reader antenna and the sensor due to that the sensor is equivalent to an inductive-capacitive (LC resonance circuit which has a pressure-sensitive resonance frequency. Considering the excellent mechanical properties in high-temperature environment, multilayered zirconia ceramic tapes were used to fabricate the pressure-sensitive structure. Owing to its low resistivity, sliver paste was chosen to form the electrical circuit via post-fire metallization, thereby enhancing the quality factor compared to sensors fabricated by cofiring with a high-melting-point metal such as platinum, tungsten or manganese. The design, fabrication, and experiments are demonstrated and discussed in detail. Experimental results showed that the sensor can operate at 600 °C with quite good coupling. Furthermore, the average sensitivity is as high as 790 kHz/bar within the measurement range between 0 and 1 Bar.

  7. Testing the effectiveness of pine needlecast in reducing post-fire soil erosion using complementary experimental approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, C. P. M.; Shakesby, R. A.; Walsh, R. P. D.; Ferreira, C. S. S.; Ferreira, A. J. D.; Urbanek, E.

    2012-04-01

    Mediterranean wildfire activity has increased markedly in recent decades, leading to enhanced runoff and erosion. Limiting post-fire on-site soil degradation and off-site flooding and sedimentation, however, often has a low priority because of the high costs of materials and labour needed to implement many recognised techniques (e.g. seeding, hydromulching, installing logs along the contour). However, in pine plantations, the crowns may only be scorched so that after fire the needlecast can form a comparatively dense ground cover. Its post-fire erosion-limiting effectiveness is virtually unknown in the Mediterranean context, despite potentially protecting soil with minimal effort (requiring only a delay to existing salvage logging procedures at most). As part of the DESIRE research programme, this paper presents results from two complementary approaches testing the erosion-limiting effectiveness of needlecast. (1) Near Moinhos, central Portugal, two 8m2 erosion plots were established immediately post-fire in September 2009 on a steep (30°) slope representative of an adjacent burnt Pinus pinaster plantation. Soil erosion was monitored during a 3-month pre-treatment phase. Needles were then applied to one plot at a density (37.7% cover) measured on a post-fire pine plantation. Soil losses from treated and untreated plots were then monitored until April 2011. By taking the percentage increase or decrease in erosion between the two monitoring phases for the untreated control plot as the 'expected' pattern, the erosion-limiting effectiveness of needles applied to the treated plot could then be determined. (2) Six adjacent rectangular 1.23m2 lysimeters were filled with gravel and sand, and capped by 10 cm of topsoil taken from a long unburnt Pinus pinaster plantation. They were set at 15° and left open to natural rainfall. This angle was considered the steepest possible from logistical and soil stability points of view. All lysimeters underwent a phase under bare soil

  8. Gestational length affects neurocognition in early-onset schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teigset, Charlotte M; Mohn, Christine; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2016-10-30

    Obstetric complications (OC) have been linked to an increased risk for schizophrenia in offspring, especially in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS). Extensive cognitive deficits occur in EOS, although no study has yet to investigate the relationship between OC and cognition in EOS. This study aims to examine the frequency of OC in EOS compared to controls, and also investigates the relationship between OC and neurocognitive dysfunction in the two groups. Nineteen EOS patients and 53 healthy controls were tested with the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB), and the cognitive measures were combined with OC data from the Norwegian Birth Registry. The results indicated no group differences in OC in EOS and healthy controls, but a shorter gestational length in the EOS group led to significant decreases in the overall neurocognitive composite score, and in processing speed. This suggests that the poorer neuropsychological performances commonly found in EOS may be partly attributable to the length of gestation. The worsened neurocognitive functioning did not appear among controls, so gestational length had a different impact on the two groups. Our findings indicated that a shorter gestational length did not increase the risk for developing EOS, but did significantly affect the cognitive difficulties in this group.

  9. Short- term effects of post-fire logging on runoff and soil erosion at two spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvar, Maruxa; Silva, Flavio; Prats, Sergio; Vieira, Diana; Keizer, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Logging is the most common management practice after wildfires in forested areas in Portugal. Clearcutting is undertaken to recover burnt timber resources, to control resprouting, notably in the case of eucalypt plantations, and to reduce the risks of possible insect plagues, notably in the case of maritime pine because of the nematode plague. Still, relatively little is known about the combined effect of wildfire and post-fire logging on erosion processes. In the framework of the EU-FP7 project RECARE (www.recare-project.eu), the ESP team of the University of Aveiro set up an experiment to quantify the hydrological and erosion impacts of post-fire logging, at the scale of both 0.25 m2 micro-plots and 16 m2 plots. A eucalypt slope burnt in August 2015 by a moderate intensity fire and logged in September 2015 was selected for this study. The burned trees were harvested with a chainsaw, while the logs were piled with a rubber wheeled forwarder tractor. Following logging, two distinct sub-areas were identified within the logged slope based on soil disturbance: an area where the forwarder wheels had left marked trails ("trail"), and an area where such trails were absent ("control"). Three micro-plots and three plots were installed in the control area, while three micro-plots and six plots were installed in the trail area. Generally, the trail area showed greater soil compaction and larger soil surface roughness than the control area. Between October 2015 and September 2016, mean runoff was 500 mm in the control micro-plots and 50% higher in the trail micro-plots. At the plot scale, however, no differences in runoff generation were observed between the two subareas. Sediment production over the same period, however, was twice as high in the trail area than the control area, at both plot scales. In the control area, mean sediment production was 8 Mg ha-1 yr-1 at the micro-plot scale and 6 Mg ha-1 yr-1at the plot scale; in the trail area, these figures were 21 Mg ha-1 yr

  10. Predicting the delivery of sediment and associated nutrients from post-fire debris flows in small upland catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Petter; Sheridan, Gary; Smith, Hugh; Lane, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Post-fire debris flows are extreme erosion events that can dominate the long term supply of sediment from headwaters to streams in upland catchments. Predicting the location, frequency and magnitude of debris flows is therefore important for understanding sediment dynamics in upland catchments and providing a basis on which to manage hydro-geomorphic risk in burned areas. In this study we survey 10 post-fire debris flow events in southeast Australia with aims to i) identify rainfall conditions underlying the debris flow response, ii) quantify erosion rates in hillslope and channel source areas, and iii) estimate the delivery of sediment and water quality constituents to receiving waterways. Rainfall events that triggered debris flows had an annual exceedance probability ranging from 0.1 to 0.6, and 30-minute intensities, I30, ranging from 17-60 mm h-1. Sediment delivery by debris flows (100-200 t ha-1) is similar to that which has been reported for similar events in the western US and Spain. In terms of eroded volume, there was on average an equal contribution from hillslopes and channels to debris flows, which is in agreement with the calculations of surface and subsurface source contributions obtained from radionuclide concentrations. In terms of the potential water quality impacts from post-fire debris flows, the hillslopes had much higher concentration of constituents such as fine clay and silt, plant available phosphorous and total carbon. The data on debris flow magnitude was used to evaluate two different approaches for predicting sediment delivery from debris flows. A statistical debris flow model developed by the US Geological Surveys and parameterized for catchments in western US performed well (R2 = 0.92) in terms of predicting the overall volume of material delivered at the catchment outlet. An alternative modeling approach, using local slope and contributing area as predictors of erosion, also produced good results, and could be used to obtain more

  11. Mapping Live Fuel Moisture and the relation to drought and post fire events for Southern California region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzopoulos, N.; Kim, S. H.; Kafatos, M.; Nghiem, S. V.; Myoung, B.

    2016-12-01

    Live Fuel Moisture is a dryness measure used by the fire departments to determine how dry is the current situation of the fuels from the forest areas. In order to map Live Fuel Moisture we conducted an analysis with a standardized regressional approach from various vegetation indices derived from remote sensing data of MODIS. After analyzing the results we concluded mapping Live Fuel Moisture using a standardized NDVI product. From the mapped remote sensed product we observed the appearance of extremely high dry fuels to be highly correlated with very dry years based on the overall yearly precipitation. The appearances of the extremely dry mapped fuels tend to have a direct association with fire events and observed to be a post fire indicator. In addition we studied the appearance of extreme dry fuels during critical months when season changes from spring to summer as well as the relation to fire events.

  12. Updated logistic regression equations for the calculation of post-fire debris-flow likelihood in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis M.; Negri, Jacquelyn A.; Kean, Jason W.; Laber, Jayme L.; Tillery, Anne C.; Youberg, Ann M.

    2016-06-30

    Wildfire can significantly alter the hydrologic response of a watershed to the extent that even modest rainstorms can generate dangerous flash floods and debris flows. To reduce public exposure to hazard, the U.S. Geological Survey produces post-fire debris-flow hazard assessments for select fires in the western United States. We use publicly available geospatial data describing basin morphology, burn severity, soil properties, and rainfall characteristics to estimate the statistical likelihood that debris flows will occur in response to a storm of a given rainfall intensity. Using an empirical database and refined geospatial analysis methods, we defined new equations for the prediction of debris-flow likelihood using logistic regression methods. We showed that the new logistic regression model outperformed previous models used to predict debris-flow likelihood.

  13. Salvage Logging Versus the Use of Burnt Wood as a Nurse Object to Promote Post-Fire Tree Seedling Establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J.; Allen, C.D.; Molina-Morales, M.; Maranon-Jimenez, Sara; Sanchez-Miranda, A.; Zamora, R.

    2011-01-01

    Intense debate surrounds the effects of post-fire salvage logging (SL) versus nonintervention policies on forest regeneration, but scant support is available from experimental studies. We analyze the effect of three post-fire management treatments on the recruitment of a serotinous pine (Pinus pinaster) at a Mediterranean mountain. Treatments were applied 7 months after the fire and differ in the degree of intervention, ranging from "no intervention" (NI, all trees left standing) to "partial cut plus lopping" (PCL, felling most of the trees, cutting the main branches, and leaving all the biomass in situ without mastication), and "SL" (felling and piling the logs, and masticating the woody debris). Seedling survival after 3 years was the highest in PCL (47.3% versus 38.7% in SL). This was associated with the amelioration of microclimatic conditions under the scattered branches, which reduced radiation and soil temperature while increasing soil moisture. Seedling density after 2 years was approximately 5.5 times higher in PCL than in SL, as in SL a large fraction of seedlings was lost as a consequence of mechanized mastication. The NI treatment showed the lowest seedling survival (17.3%). Nevertheless, seedling density was similar to SL. Seedling growth scarcely differed among treatments. Our results show that branches left onsite acted as nurse objects that improved key microclimatic conditions for seedling recruitment. This creates a facilitative interaction ideal for seedling establishment in moisture-deficient ecosystems, as it provides the benefit of a shading overstory but without underground competition. ?? 2010 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  14. Post-fire salvage logging alters species composition and reduces cover, richness, and diversity in Mediterranean plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverkus, Alexandro B; Lorite, Juan; Navarro, Francisco B; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P; Castro, Jorge

    2014-01-15

    An intense debate exists on the effects of post-fire salvage logging on plant community regeneration, but scant data are available derived from experimental studies. We analyzed the effects of salvage logging on plant community regeneration in terms of species richness, diversity, cover, and composition by experimentally managing a burnt forest on a Mediterranean mountain (Sierra Nevada, S Spain). In each of three plots located at different elevations, three replicates of three treatments were implemented seven months after the fire, differing in the degree of intervention: "Non-Intervention" (all trees left standing), "Partial Cut plus Lopping" (felling 90% of the trees, cutting the main branches, and leaving all the biomass in situ), and "Salvage Logging" (felling and piling the logs, and masticating the woody debris). Plant composition in each treatment was monitored two years after the fire in linear point transects. Post-fire salvage logging was associated with reduced species richness, Shannon diversity, and total plant cover. Moreover, salvaged sites hosted different species assemblages and 25% lower cover of seeder species (but equal cover of resprouters) compared to the other treatments. Cover of trees and shrubs was also lowest in Salvage Logging, which could suggest a potential slow-down of forest regeneration. Most of these results were consistent among the three plots despite plots hosting different plant communities. Concluding, our study suggests that salvage logging may reduce species richness and diversity, as well as the recruitment of woody species, which could delay the natural regeneration of the ecosystem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Objective definition of rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for the initiation of post-fire debris flows in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis; Kean, Jason W.; Cannon, Susan H.; Schmidt, Kevin M.; Laber, Jayme L.

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall intensity–duration (ID) thresholds are commonly used to predict the temporal occurrence of debris flows and shallow landslides. Typically, thresholds are subjectively defined as the upper limit of peak rainstorm intensities that do not produce debris flows and landslides, or as the lower limit of peak rainstorm intensities that initiate debris flows and landslides. In addition, peak rainstorm intensities are often used to define thresholds, as data regarding the precise timing of debris flows and associated rainfall intensities are usually not available, and rainfall characteristics are often estimated from distant gauging locations. Here, we attempt to improve the performance of existing threshold-based predictions of post-fire debris-flow occurrence by utilizing data on the precise timing of debris flows relative to rainfall intensity, and develop an objective method to define the threshold intensities. We objectively defined the thresholds by maximizing the number of correct predictions of debris flow occurrence while minimizing the rate of both Type I (false positive) and Type II (false negative) errors. We identified that (1) there were statistically significant differences between peak storm and triggering intensities, (2) the objectively defined threshold model presents a better balance between predictive success, false alarms and failed alarms than previous subjectively defined thresholds, (3) thresholds based on measurements of rainfall intensity over shorter duration (≤60 min) are better predictors of post-fire debris-flow initiation than longer duration thresholds, and (4) the objectively defined thresholds were exceeded prior to the recorded time of debris flow at frequencies similar to or better than subjective thresholds. Our findings highlight the need to better constrain the timing and processes of initiation of landslides and debris flows for future threshold studies. In addition, the methods used to define rainfall thresholds in this

  16. Early parental death and risk of hospitalization for affective disorder in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, Charlotte Welling; Johansen, Christoffer; Deltour, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Early parental death is one of the most stressful childhood life events and may influence subsequent psychological health. We investigated the association between early parental loss and risk of hospitalization for an affective disorder in adulthood.......Early parental death is one of the most stressful childhood life events and may influence subsequent psychological health. We investigated the association between early parental loss and risk of hospitalization for an affective disorder in adulthood....

  17. Can Retention Harvest Maintain Natural Structural Complexity? A Comparison of Post-Harvest and Post-Fire Residual Patches in Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louiza Moussaoui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Variable retention harvest promotes biodiversity conservation in managed boreal forests by ensuring forest continuity and structural complexity. However, do post-harvest and post-fire patches maintain the same structural complexity? This study compares post-harvest and post-fire residual patches and proposes retention modalities that can maintain the same structural complexity as in natural forests, here considering both continuous forest stands and post-fire residual patches. In boreal black spruce forests, 41 post-fire residual patches, and 45 post-harvest retention patches of varying size and ages (exposure time to disturbed matrix and 37 continuous forest stands were classified into six diameter structure types. Types 1 (inverted-J and 2 (trunked-unimodal characterized stands dominated by small trees. The abundance of small trees decreased and the abundance of large trees increased from Type 1 to Type 6. Type 6 had the most irregular structure with a wide range of diameters. This study indicates that: (1 old post-harvest residual retentions maintained the range of structural complexity found in natural stands; (2 Types 1 and 2 were generally associated with young post-fire patches and post-harvest retention clumps; (3 the structure of residual patches containing only small trees was usually younger (in terms of the age of the original forest from which residual patches were formed than those with larger trees. To avoid the risk of simplifying the structure, retention patches should be intentionally oriented towards Types 3–6, dominated by intermediate and large trees.

  18. Detecting post-fire burn severity and vegetation recovery using multitemporal remote sensing spectral indices and field-collected composite burn index data in a ponderosa pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Vogelmann, J.E.; Rollins, M.; Ohlen, D.; Key, C.H.; Yang, L.; Huang, C.; Shi, H.

    2011-01-01

    It is challenging to detect burn severity and vegetation recovery because of the relatively long time period required to capture the ecosystem characteristics. Multitemporal remote sensing data can providemultitemporal observations before, during and after a wildfire, and can improve the change detection accuracy. The goal of this study is to examine the correlations between multitemporal spectral indices and field-observed burn severity, and to provide a practical method to estimate burn severity and vegetation recovery. The study site is the Jasper Fire area in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota, that burned during August and September 2000. Six multitemporal Landsat images acquired from 2000 (pre-fire), 2001 (post-fire), 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2007 were used to assess burn severity. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized burn ratio (NBR), integrated forest index (IFI) and the differences of these indices between the pre-fire and post-fire years were computed and analysed with 66 field-based composite burn index (CBI) plots collected in 2002. Results showed that differences of NDVI and differences of EVI between the pre-fire year and the first two years post-fire were highly correlated with the CBI scores. The correlations were low beyond the second year post-fire. Differences of NBR had good correlation with CBI scores in all study years. Differences of IFI had low correlation with CBI in the first year post-fire and had good correlation in later years. A CBI map of the burnt area was produced using regression tree models and the multitemporal images. The dynamics of four spectral indices from 2000 to 2007 indicated that both NBR and IFI are valuable for monitoring long-term vegetation recovery. The high burn severity areas had a much slower recovery than the moderate and low burn areas. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  19. Early embryogenesis in zebrafish is affected by bisphenol A exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William K. F. Tse

    2013-03-01

    Exposure of a developing embryo or fetus to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs has been hypothesized to increase the propensity of an individual to develop a disease or dysfunction in his/her later life. Although it is important to understand the effects of EDCs on early development in animals, sufficient information about these effects is not available thus far. This is probably because of the technical difficulties in tracing the continuous developmental changes at different stages of mammalian embryos. The zebrafish, an excellent model currently used in developmental biology, provides new insights to the field of toxicological studies. We used the standard whole-mount in situ hybridization screening protocol to determine the early developmental defects in zebrafish embryos exposed to the ubiquitous pollutant, bisphenol A (BPA. Three stages (60–75% epiboly, 8–10 somite, and prim-5 were selected for in situ screening of different molecular markers, whereas BPA exposure altered early dorsoventral (DV patterning, segmentation, and brain development in zebrafish embryos within 24 hours of exposure.

  20. Livestock grazing impact on soil wettability and erosion risk in post-fire agricultural lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavi, Ilan; Barkai, Daniel; Knoll, Yaakov M; Zaady, Eli

    2016-12-15

    Fires in agricultural areas are common, modifying the functioning of agro-ecosystems. Such fires have been extensively studied, and reported to considerably affect soil properties. Yet, understanding of the impact of livestock grazing, or more precisely, trampling, in fire-affected lands is limited. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of low- to moderate-fire severity and livestock trampling (hoof action) on the solid soil's wettability and related properties, and on soil detachment, in burnt vs. non-burnt croplands. The study was implemented by allowing livestock to access plots under high, medium, and low stocking rates in (unintentionally) burnt and non-burnt lands. Also, livestock exclusion plots were assigned as a control treatment. Results showed that fire slightly decreased the soil wettability. At the same time, water drop penetration time (WDPT) was negatively related to the stocking rate, and critical surface tension (CST) was ~13% smaller in the control plots than in the livestock-presence treatments. Also, the results showed that following burning, the resistance of soil to shear decreased by ~70%. Mass of detached material was similar in the control plots of the burnt and non-burnt plots. At the same time, it was three-, eight-, and nine-fold greater in the plots of the burnt×low, burnt×medium, and burnt×high stocking rates, respectively, than in the corresponding non-burnt ones. This study shows that livestock trampling in low- to moderate-intensity fire-affected lands increased the shearing of the ground surface layer. On the one hand, this slightly increased soil wettability. On the other hand, this impact considerably increased risks of soil erosion and land degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Karrikins Identified in Biochars Indicate Post-Fire Chemical Cues Can Influence Community Diversity and Plant Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Jitka; Flematti, Gavin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Karrikins are smoke-derived compounds that provide strong chemical cues to stimulate seed germination and seedling growth. The recent discovery in Arabidopsis that the karrikin perception system may be present throughout angiosperms implies a fundamental plant function. Here, we identify the most potent karrikin, karrikinolide (KAR1), in biochars and determine its role in species unique plant responses. Methods Biochars were prepared by three distinct commercial-scale pyrolysis technologies using systematically selected source material and their chemical properties, including karrikinolide, were quantified. Dose-response assays determined the effects of biochar on seed germination for two model species that require karrikinolide to break dormancy (Solanum orbiculatum, Brassica tourneforttii) and on seedling growth using two species that display plasticity to karrikins, biochar and phytotoxins (Lactuca sativa, Lycopersicon esculentum). Multivariate analysis examined relationships between biochar properties and the plant phenotype. Findings and Conclusions Results showed that karrikin abundant biochars stimulated dormant seed germination and seedling growth via mechanisms analogous to post-fire chemical cues. The individual species response was associated with its sensitivity to karrikinolide and inhibitory compounds within the biochars. These findings are critical for understanding why biochar influences community composition and plant physiology uniquely for different species and reaffirms that future pyrolysis technologies promise by-products that concomitantly sequester carbon and enhance plant growth for ecological and broader plant related applications. PMID:27536995

  2. Facing drought in a Mediterranean post-fire community: tissue water relations in species with different life traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, Marco; Magnani, F.; Fabrizio, A.; Saracino, A.

    2004-03-01

    Bulk shoot water potential, the osmotic component and the bulk modulus of elasticity were measured throughout one growing season in four species co-occurring in a post-fire Mediterranean community in southern Italy: Pinus halepensis, Phillyrea latifolia, Cistus salvifolius and Rosmarinus officinalis. A severe drought occurred throughout the measurement period. Large seasonal fluctuations have been observed for both predawn and afternoon water potential in all species. Although minimum values down to -4 MPa have been measured, plant water potential always recovered to less negative values after drought. Daily amplitude of water potential decreased with increasing plant water stress in all species. In Cistus and Rosmarinus less ability for short-term control of plant water status has been assessed. Osmotic potential at full turgor did not display clear seasonal patterns, with no consistent ranking of species by their osmotic values. In most cases, no osmotic adjustment (lowering of osmotic potentials) and no change in tissue elastic properties were observed in response to increasing summer drought and intensity of water stress.

  3. Post-fire reproduction of herbs at a savanna-gallery forest boundary in Distrito Federal, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, K G; Eugênio, C U O; Franco, A C

    2017-11-01

    In Cerrado, studies of post-fire vegetation recovery show that some herbaceous species are able to flower shortly after fires. However, these were mainly short-term studies that focused on grasslands and savannas. Little is known about the effects of fire on ground layer of forests that border the savannas in Central Brazil. Thus, an accidental burning gave us the opportunity to describe the reproductive activity of the ground layer vegetation after a fire event along a savanna-forest boundary at the IBGE Ecological Reserve, Brasília, Brazil. During the 16-month of the inventory, we registered 170 herbaceous species flowering or fruiting, of which 52 species (31%) may have been influenced by fire that changed their times of reproduction. In the savanna plots reproduction peaked at the end of the rainy season. Of the total number of reproducing species, 90 species occurred only in the savanna and four in the forest. Five herbs were recorded in the forest, savanna and border environments. Late dry season fire probably lead the majority of herbaceous species to have their reproduction spread throughout the study time.

  4. A data-driven approach for modeling post-fire debris-flow volumes and their uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the novel application of genetic programming to evolve nonlinear post-fire debris-flow volume equations from variables associated with a data-driven conceptual model of the western United States. The search space is constrained using a multi-component objective function that simultaneously minimizes root-mean squared and unit errors for the evolution of fittest equations. An optimization technique is then used to estimate the limits of nonlinear prediction uncertainty associated with the debris-flow equations. In contrast to a published multiple linear regression three-variable equation, linking basin area with slopes greater or equal to 30 percent, burn severity characterized as area burned moderate plus high, and total storm rainfall, the data-driven approach discovers many nonlinear and several dimensionally consistent equations that are unbiased and have less prediction uncertainty. Of the nonlinear equations, the best performance (lowest prediction uncertainty) is achieved when using three variables: average basin slope, total burned area, and total storm rainfall. Further reduction in uncertainty is possible for the nonlinear equations when dimensional consistency is not a priority and by subsequently applying a gradient solver to the fittest solutions. The data-driven modeling approach can be applied to nonlinear multivariate problems in all fields of study. ?? 2011.

  5. Emergency assessment of post-fire debris-flow hazards for the 2013 Powerhouse fire, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis M.; Smoczyk, Gregory M.; Reeves, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire dramatically alters the hydrologic response of a watershed such that even modest rainstorms can produce dangerous flash floods and debris flows. Existing empirical models were used to predict the probability and magnitude of debris-flow occurrence in response to a 10-year recurrence interval rainstorm for the 2013 Powerhouse fire near Lancaster, California. Overall, the models predict a relatively low probability for debris-flow occurrence in response to the design storm. However, volumetric predictions suggest that debris flows that occur may entrain a significant volume of material, with 44 of the 73 basins identified as having potential debris-flow volumes between 10,000 and 100,000 cubic meters. These results suggest that even though the likelihood of debris flow is relatively low, the consequences of post-fire debris-flow initiation within the burn area may be significant for downstream populations, infrastructure, and wildlife and water resources. Given these findings, we recommend that residents, emergency managers, and public works departments pay close attention to weather forecasts and National-Weather-Service-issued Debris Flow and Flash Flood Outlooks, Watches, and Warnings and that residents adhere to any evacuation orders.

  6. Contributions of microbial activity and ash deposition to post-fire nitrogen availability in a pine savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficken, Cari D.; Wright, Justin P.

    2017-01-01

    Many ecosystems experience drastic changes to soil nutrient availability associated with fire, but the magnitude and duration of these changes are highly variable among vegetation and fire types. In pyrogenic pine savannas across the southeastern United States, pulses of soil inorganic nitrogen (N) occur in tandem with ecosystem-scale nutrient losses from prescribed burns. Despite the importance of this management tool for restoring and maintaining fire-dependent plant communities, the contributions of different mechanisms underlying fire-associated changes to soil N availability remain unclear. Pulses of N availability following fire have been hypothesized to occur through (1) changes to microbial cycling rates and (2) direct ash deposition. Here, we document fire-associated changes to N availability across the growing season in a longleaf pine savanna in North Carolina. To differentiate between possible mechanisms driving soil N pulses, we measured net microbial cycling rates and changes to soil δ15N before and after a burn. Our findings refute both proposed mechanisms: we found no evidence for changes in microbial activity, and limited evidence that ash deposition could account for the increase in ammonium availability to more than 5-25 times background levels. Consequently, we propose a third mechanism to explain post-fire patterns of soil N availability, namely that (3) changes to plant sink strength may contribute to ephemeral increases in soil N availability, and encourage future studies to explicitly test this mechanism.

  7. How can Early Life Flavor Experiences Affect Food Preferences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seray Kabaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early experiences with food flavors lead up to children’s food preferences and develop long-lasting flavor preferences and healthy eating habits. The process of flavor learning begins during pregnancy by the foods eaten by mothers which pass to the amniotic fluid. Some flavors coming from the mother’s diet that pass to the amniotic fluid are detected by the fetus. This flavor learning continues after birth with breastfeeding, since the human milk is composed of flavors which reflect the foods consumed by the mother. Flavor composition in human milk which changes during the course of lactation due to the transmission of flavors into human milk enables the baby to get used to new flavors. Therefore, breastfed infants are likely to accept flavor changes and novel flavors more than formula fed infants. Flavor learning continues with starting complementary foods and eating the foods directly. Exposure to a specific flavor and repeated exposures in different times may facilitate the acceptance of this flavor. Furthermore, infants exposed to a variety of foods accept new flavors than infants following a monotonous diet. This underlines the importance of promoting the access to a variety of foods in early childhood. In conclusion, pregnant and lactating women should have variety of healthy foods in their diets with a variety of flavors and they should be encouraged to breastfeed their babies. In addition, starting complementary foods and early repeated exposure to a wide variety of healthy foods, the infants should get familiar with the flavor of healthy and various food. These factors may influence the development of healthy food preferences and healthy eating habits in later periods.

  8. Clinical factors adversely affecting early outcome after brain infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles André

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE AND METHODS: One-hundred-and-nine consecutive patients admitted during the acute phase of a CT-confirmed brain infarction (BI were studied. Putative adverse influence of demographic and stroke risk factors, previous medical history, clinical presentation, initial and follow-up neurological examination, initial general evaluation, laboratory findings, chest X-ray and electrocardiographic findings, treatment, and topography and etiology of the ischemic insult was analysed. The end-point for assessment was early death (within 30 days. Statistical analysis was performed with univariate analysis and multiple regression. RESULTS: The main adverse factors related to an increased death risk during the first 30 days were, in decreasing order of importance: coma 48-72 hours after admission; stroke occuring in already hospitalized patients; Babinski sign on admission; minor degrees of impairment of consciousness 48-72 hours after admission; stroke related to large artery atherothrombosis and to embolism; a history of early impairment of consciousness; cardiac failure on admission. In 53 lucid patients on admission, only a history of congestive heart failure (CHF was associated with a reduced survival rate. In 56 patients with impaired consciousness, the presence of a Babinski sign increased death risk, but the main factor predicting a high case-fatality rate was the persistence of consciousness disturbances after48-72 hours. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of impairment of consciousness, especially coma, 2-3 days after disease onset, and a history of CHF greatly increase the early case fatality rate in patients with acute BI presenting with or without consciousness disturbances at admission, respectively. The use of a prognostic algorythm considering these few variables seems to predict the approximate 30-day fatality rates.

  9. Atmospheric Rivers as a Trigger for Landslides and Post-Fire Debris Flows in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, N.; Lancaster, J.; Stock, J. D.; Cerovski-Darriau, C.; Kaplan, M.; Ralph, F. M.

    2016-12-01

    Episodic storms strike the steeplands of Southern California, triggering shallow landslides and post-wildfire debris flows. These hazards have killed and injured people and destroyed property and infrastructure, in some cases with little warning. In the absence of more evolved monitoring networks, the National Weather Service, working with USGS, has proposed rainfall intensity-duration threshold values to forecast the risk of such mass-wasting events. Absent from this procedure, however, is an understanding of what kinds of storms have exceeded these thresholds and generated historic mass-wasting events. With the goal of testing what atmospheric conditions are associated with historic mass wasting episodes, we explored the instrumental record for mass-wasting events spanning several decades. We summarized meteorological conditions for 19 storm events associated with post-wildfire debris flows and 24 storm events associated with shallow landslides. In these catalogs, we found that 74% of post-wildfire debris flow events and 75% of shallow landslide events occurred during atmospheric river (AR) conditions. ARs are narrow corridors of high water vapor transport, typically in the lowest 2-3 km of the atmosphere. Previous work has attributed ARs to many of California's heavy precipitation events. Our analysis shows that AR conditions favor precipitation intensities and durations that trigger landsliding. These results suggest that AR-specific forecasting tools may provide Southern California communities with some level of early warning for widespread landsliding. An improved understanding of AR events can help preparedness and hazard mitigation related to landslides, post-wildfire debris flows, and flooding in southern California.

  10. Patch to landscape patterns in post fire recruitment of a serotinous conifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ne'eman, G.; Fotheringham, C.J.; Keeley, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Obligate seeding species are highly specialized to fire disturbance and many conifers such as cypress, which are adapted to high intensity stand-replacing fires, have canopy seed banks stored in serotinous cones. Resilience of these trees to fire disturbance is a function of disturbance frequency and one focus of this study was to determine the effect of patch age on postfire recruitment. A second focus was to determine the extent to which fire induced a landscape level change in the location of the forest boundary. Prior to a fire in 1994, a large Cupressus sargentii forest was a mosaic landscape of different aged patches of nearly pure cypress bordered by chaparral. Patches less than 60 years of age were relatively dense with roughly one tree every 1-2 m2 but older patches had thinned to one tree every 3-15 m2. Older trees had substantially greater canopy cone crops but the stand level seed bank size was not significantly correlated with stand age. Fire-dependent obligate seeding species are sensitive to fire return interval because of potential changes in the size of seed banks - facing both a potential 'immaturity risk' and a 'senescence risk'. At our site, C. sargentii regeneration was substantial in stands as young as 20 years, suggesting that fire return interval would need to be shorter than this to pose any significant risk. Reduced seedling recruitment in stands nearly 100 years of age may indicate risk from senescence is greater, however, even the lowest density seedling recruitment was many times greater than the density of mature forests - thus this cypress would appear to be resilient to a wide range of fire return intervals. Changes in landscape patterning of forest and chaparral are unlikely except after fire. Factors that inhibit tree establishment within the shrubland, as well as factors that affect shrub establishment within the forest border likely affect the 'permeability' of this ecotone. After the 1994 fire this boundary appeared to be stable

  11. Post-fire management and recovery of a pine forest in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Spanos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of management after fire in Pinus halepensis forests were assessed in northern Greece. Seeding, logging and building of log barriers were applied in burned sites and compared to a control site. Two years after treatment application, 70–80% of the ground in all sites was covered with vegetation. Seeding with herbaceous plants did not increase plant cover. Logging and building of log barriers negatively affected herbaceous species but increased woody species. During the first spring after fire, the highest numbers of P. halepensis seedlings were observed in the control site and the lowest number in the logged site. Logging and log barrier building had a negative effect on pine regeneration compared to control and seeding treatments. Woody plant composition was similar in control and seeding sites, with dominance of P. halepensis and Cistus species. A different pattern was observed in the logging and log-barrier sites with a low number of seeders and a high number of resprouter species.

  12. Topographic Controls on Southern California Ecosystem Function and Post-fire Recovery: a Satellite and Near-surface Remote Sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, George

    Southern Californian wildfires can influence climate in a variety of ways, including changes in surface albedo, emission of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the production of tropospheric ozone. Ecosystem post-fire recovery plays a key role in determining the strength, duration, and relative importance of these climate forcing agents. Southern California's ecosystems vary markedly with topography, creating sharp transitions with elevation, aspect, and slope. Little is known about the ways topography influences ecosystem properties and function, particularly in the context of post-fire recovery. We combined images from the USGS satellite Landsat 5 with flux tower measurements to analyze pre- and post-fire albedo and carbon exchanged by Southern California's ecosystems in the Santa Ana Mountains. We reduced the sources of external variability in Landsat images using several correction methods for topographic and bidirectional effects. We used time series of corrected images to infer the Net Ecosystem Exchange and surface albedo, and calculated the radiative forcing due to CO2 emissions and albedo changes. We analyzed the patterns of recovery and radiative forcing on north- and south-facing slopes, stratified by vegetation classes including grassland, coastal sage scrub, chaparral, and evergreen oak forest. We found that topography strongly influenced post-fire recovery and radiative forcing. Field observations are often limited by the difficulty of collecting ground validation data. Current instrumentation networks do not provide adequate spatial resolution for landscape-level analysis. The deployment of consumer-market technology could reduce the cost of near-surface measurements, allowing the installation of finer-scale instrument networks. We tested the performance of the Microsoft Kinect sensor for measuring vegetation structure. We used Kinect to acquire 3D vegetation point clouds in the field, and used these data to compute plant height, crown diameter, and

  13. Formation of post-fire water-repellent layers in Monterrey pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) plantations in south-central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Garcia-Chevesich; R. Pizarro; C. L. Stropki; P. Ramirez de Arellano; P. F. Ffolliott; L. F. DeBano; Dan Neary; D. C. Slack

    2010-01-01

    A wildfire burned about 15,000 ha of Monterrey Pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) plantations near Yungay, Chile, in January of 2007. Post-fire water repellency (hydrophobicity) was measured using the water-drop-penetration-time (WDPT) method at depths of 0, 5, and 10 mm from the soil surface. These measurements were collected on burned sites of both young (4-years old) and...

  14. Vulnerability and Resilience of Temperate Forest Landscapes to Broad-Scale Deforestation in Response to Changing Fire Regimes and Altered Post-Fire Vegetation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepley, A. J.; Veblen, T. T.; Perry, G.; Anderson-Teixeira, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    In the face of on-going climatic warming and land-use change, there is growing concern that temperate forest landscapes could be near a tipping point where relatively small changes to the fire regime or altered post-fire vegetation dynamics could lead to extensive conversion to shrublands or savannas. To evaluate vulnerability and resilience to such conversion, we develop a simple model based on three factors we hypothesize to be key in predicting temperate forest responses to changing fire regimes: (1) the hazard rate (i.e., the probability of burning in the next year given the time since the last fire) in closed-canopy forests, (2) the hazard rate for recently-burned, open-canopy vegetation, and (3) the time to redevelop canopy closure following fire. We generate a response surface representing the proportions of the landscape potentially supporting closed-canopy forest and non-forest vegetation under nearly all combinations of these three factors. We then place real landscapes on this response surface to assess the type and magnitude of changes to the fire regime that would drive extensive forest loss. We show that the deforestation of much of New Zealand that followed initial human colonization and the introduction of a new ignition source ca. 750 years ago was essentially inevitable due to the slow rate of forest recovery after fire and the high flammability of post-fire vegetation. In North America's Pacific Northwest, by contrast, a predominantly forested landscape persisted despite two periods of widespread burning in the recent past due in large part to faster post-fire forest recovery and less pronounced differences in flammability between forests and the post-fire vegetation. We also assess the factors that could drive extensive deforestation in other regions to identify where management could reduce this potential and to guide field and modeling work to better understand the responses and ecological feedbacks to changing fire regimes.

  15. Factors affecting retention of early pregnancy in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, Melanie J; Dailey, Robert A; Inskeep, E Keith

    2004-08-01

    Potential factors affecting retention of pregnancy during weeks 5-9 of gestation were studied in dairy cows and heifers (N = 211) on two farms. Cows were examined by ultrasonography for presence of a viable embryo, and sizes of the corpus luteum (CL) and of follicles > or = 5mm were recorded. Blood samples were taken at each examination and assayed for progesterone and estradiol. Overall pregnancy loss was 11.4%. Cows with two CL did not have greater concentrations of progesterone than cows with one CL and they retained fewer pregnancies (P Embryos that were lost apparently died before CL regression. Retention of pregnancy declined in cows with high body condition and as age of the cow increased. Pregnancy retention was lower in cows bred to one of four frequently-used service sires (P body condition and service sire.

  16. Affective motives for smoking among early stage smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Amanda R; Wahlquist, Amy E; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Gray, Kevin M; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    As most smokers initiate smoking during adolescence, assessment of smoking motives that underlie trajectories of dependence is critical for both prevention and cessation efforts. In the current study, we expected participants with higher nicotine dependence would smoke (a) less for positive reinforcement (PR) and (b) more for negative reinforcement (NR) motives. We secondarily assessed the relative contribution of PR to NR motives across levels of dependence. Data were drawn from a study on cue-elicited craving among occasional versus daily adolescent smokers aged 16-20 years (N = 111). Smoking motives were assessed in relation to 3 commonly used measures of nicotine dependence: (a) Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), (b) Autonomy over Smoking Scale (AUTOS), and (c) Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale (NDSS). Compared to occasional smokers, daily smokers had significantly higher scores on each dependence measure and endorsed more prominent NR smoking motives. Each measure of nicotine dependence was strongly associated with NR motives for smoking, although measures differed in their association with PR motives. As expected, the FTND, AUTOS, and NDSS each significantly predicted smoking motive difference score (PR - NR), such that higher dependence was associated with more prominent NR motives for smoking. Results are consistent with our understanding of dependence and provide further support for 3 common measures of nicotine dependence among early stage smokers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Evaluating post-fire forest resilience using GIS and multi-criteria analysis: an example from Cape Sounion National Park, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianoutsou, Margarita; Koukoulas, Sotirios; Kazanis, Dimitrios

    2011-03-01

    Forest fires are one of the major causes of ecological disturbance in the mediterranean climate ecosystems of the world. Despite the fact that a lot of resources have been invested in fire prevention and suppression, the number of fires occurring in the Mediterranean Basin in the recent decades has continued to markedly increase. The understanding of the relationship between landscape and fire lies, among others, in the identification of the system's post-fire resilience. In our study, ecological and landscape data are integrated with decision-support techniques in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) framework to evaluate the risk of losing post-fire resilience in Pinus halepensis forests, using Cape Sounion National Park, Central Greece, as a pilot case. The multi-criteria decision support approach has been used to synthesize both bio-indicators (woody cover, pine density, legume cover and relative species richness and annual colonizers) and geo-indicators (fire history, parent material, and slope inclination) in order to rank the landscape components. Judgments related to the significance of each factor were incorporated within the weights coefficients and then integrated into the multicriteria rule to map the risk index. Sensitivity analysis was very critical for assessing the contribution of each factor and the sensitivity to subjective weight judgments to the final output. The results of this study include a final ranking map of the risk of losing resilience, which is very useful in identifying the "risk hotspots", where post-fire management measures should be applied in priority.

  18. Towards improved quantification of post-fire conifer mortality and recovery: Impacts of fire radiative flux on seedling and mature tree mortality, physiology, and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, A. M.; Kolden, C.; Smith, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Fire activity, in terms of intensity, frequency, and total area burned, is expected to increase with changing climate. A challenge for landscape level assessment of fire effects, termed burn severity, is that current assessments provide very little information regarding vegetation physiological performance and recovery, limiting our understanding of fire effects on ecosystem services such as carbon storage/cycling. To address these limitations, we evaluated an alternative dose-response methodology for quantifying fire effects that attempts to bridge fire combustion dynamics and ecophysiology. Specifically, we conducted a highly controlled, laboratory assessment of seedling response to increasing doses of fire radiative energy applied through surface fires, for two western U.S. conifer species. Seedling physiology and spectral reflectance were acquired pre- and up to 1 year post-fire. Post-fire mortality, physiological performance, and spectral reflectance were strongly related with fire radiative energy density (FRED: J m-2) dose. To examine how these relationships change with tree size and age, we conducted small prescribed fires at the tree scale (35 m2) in a mature conifer stand. Radial growth and resin duct defenses were assessed on the mature conifer trees following the prescribed fires. Differences in dose-response relationships between seedlings and mature trees indicate the importance of fire behavior (e.g., flaming-dominated versus smoldering-dominated combustion) in characterizing these relationships. Ultimately, these results suggest that post-fire impacts on growth of surviving seedlings and mature trees require modes of heat transfer to impact tree canopies.

  19. Environmental and climatic variables as potential drivers of post-fire cover of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) in seeded and unseeded semiarid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinneman, D.J.; Baker, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    Cheatgrass, a non-native annual grass, dominates millions of hectares in semiarid ecosystems of the Intermountain West (USA). Post-fire invasions can reduce native species diversity and alter ecological processes. To curb cheatgrass invasion, land managers often seed recently burned areas with perennial competitor species. We sampled vegetation within burned (19 years post-fire) and nearby unburned (representing pre-fire) pionjuniper (Pinus edulisJuniperus osteosperma) woodland and sagebrush (Artemisia sp.) in western Colorado to analyze variables that might explain cheatgrass cover after fire. A multiple regression model suggests higher cheatgrass cover after fire with: (1) sagebrush v. pionjuniper; (2) higher pre-fire cover of annual forbs; (3) increased time since fire; (4) lower pre-fire cover of biological soil crust; and (5) lower precipitation the year before fire. Time since fire, which coincided with higher precipitation, accounts for most of the variability in cheatgrass cover. No significant difference was found in mean cheatgrass cover between seeded and unseeded plots over time. However, negative relationships with pre-fire biological soil crust cover and native species richness suggest livestock-degraded areas are more susceptible to post-fire invasion. Proactive strategies for combating cheatgrass should include finding effective native competitors and restoring livestock-degraded areas. ?? 2009 IAWF.

  20. A participatory assessment of post-fire management alternatives in eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llovet, Joan

    2015-04-01

    Transformational socio-economic changes during the last decades of the 20th century led to the abandonment of mountainous areas in western Mediterranean countries (Puigdefábregas and Mendizábal, 1998). This process was accelerated in the Ayora Valley (inland Valencia province, E Spain) by a major forest fire in 1979. Restoration and management actions were implemented through the 1990's to promote the recovery of the area affected by this fire. In 2010 these past actions were assessed using an integrated and participatory evaluation protocol (IAPro). The selected actions were shrubland regenerated after the fire (no-action); pine plantation over the shrubland; pine forest regenerated after the fire (no-action); and thinning of densely regenerated pines. The assessment involved the identification and engagement of a comprehensive and representative set of local and regional stakeholders who provided a baseline assessment, identified and prioritized essential indicators, considered data collected against those indicators, and participated in re-assessment of actions after an outranking multi-criteria decision aiding integration (MCDA) conducted by the expert team (Roy and Bertier, 1973). This process facilitated a collaborative integration of biophysical indicators (i.e. carbon sequestration, water and soil conservation, soil quality, biodiversity, fire risk and forest health) and socio-economic indicators (i.e. productive, recreational and touristic, aesthetic, and cultural values, cost of the actions, and impact on family finances). It was completed with activities for exchanging experiences and sharing knowledge with the platform of stakeholders. Stakeholder platform suggested that fire risk was the most important indicator, followed by water conservation and soil conservation. Least important indicators were cost of actions, aesthetic value, and recreational and touristic value. Data collected on each action showed the thinned pine forest action with the lowest

  1. Perception of affective prosody in patients at an early stage of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Markus; Herold, Michele; Uekermann, Jennifer; Kis, Bernhard; Daum, Irene; Wiltfang, Jens; Berlit, Peter; Diehl, Rolf R; Abdel-Hamid, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is well known in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) and has been described for many years. Cognitive impairment, memory, and attention deficits seem to be features of advanced MS stages, whereas depression and emotional instability already occur in early stages of the disease. However, little is known about processing of affective prosody in patients in early stages of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). In this study, tests assessing attention, memory, and processing of affective prosody were administered to 25 adult patients with a diagnosis of RRMS at an early stage and to 25 healthy controls (HC). Early stages of the disease were defined as being diagnosed with RRMS in the last 2 years and having an Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) of 2 or lower. Patients and HC were comparable in intelligence quotient (IQ), educational level, age, handedness, and gender. Patients with early stages of RRMS performed below the control group with respect to the subtests 'discrimination of affective prosody' and 'matching of affective prosody to facial expression' for the emotion 'angry' of the 'Tübingen Affect Battery'. These deficits were not related to executive performance. Our findings suggest that emotional prosody comprehension is deficient in young patients with early stages of RRMS. Deficits in discriminating affective prosody early in the disease may make misunderstandings and poor communication more likely. This might negatively influence interpersonal relationships and quality of life in patients with RRMS.

  2. Spectral Indices Accurately Quantify Changes in Seedling Physiology Following Fire: Towards Mechanistic Assessments of Post-Fire Carbon Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Sparks

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fire activity, in terms of intensity, frequency, and total area burned, is expected to increase with a changing climate. A challenge for landscape-level assessment of fire effects, often termed burn severity, is that current remote sensing assessments provide very little information regarding tree/vegetation physiological performance and recovery, limiting our understanding of fire effects on ecosystem services such as carbon storage/cycling. In this paper, we evaluated whether spectral indices common in vegetation stress and burn severity assessments could accurately quantify post-fire physiological performance (indicated by net photosynthesis and crown scorch of two seedling species, Larix occidentalis and Pinus contorta. Seedlings were subjected to increasing fire radiative energy density (FRED doses through a series of controlled laboratory surface fires. Mortality, physiology, and spectral reflectance were assessed for a month following the fires, and then again at one year post-fire. The differenced Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (dNDVI spectral index outperformed other spectral indices used for vegetation stress and burn severity characterization in regard to leaf net photosynthesis quantification, indicating that landscape-level quantification of tree physiology may be possible. Additionally, the survival of the majority of seedlings in the low and moderate FRED doses indicates that fire-induced mortality is more complex than the currently accepted binary scenario, where trees survive with no impacts below a certain temperature and duration threshold, and mortality occurs above the threshold.

  3. Timing of examinations affects school performance differently in early and late chronotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Zerbini, Giulia; Siersema, Anne; Pieper, Amy; Merrow, Martha; Hut, Roelof A.; Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas

    Circadian clocks of adolescents typically run lateincluding sleep timesyet adolescents generally are expected at school early in the morning. Due to this mismatch between internal (circadian) and external (social) times, adolescents suffer from chronic sleep deficiency, which, in turn, affects

  4. Amygdala reactivity to sad faces in preschool children: An early neural marker of persistent negative affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Gaffrey

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: The current findings provide preliminary evidence for amygdala activity as a potential biomarker of persistent negative affect during early childhood and suggest future work examining the origins and long-term implications of this relationship is necessary.

  5. A Preliminary Investigation of Factors Affecting Appraisal of the Decision to Take Early Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowan, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines why individuals elect to take the early retirement package offered by their employer, as well as factors affecting their appraisal of that decision. Results suggest that all early retirement decisions are not voluntary. Individuals who do not wish to retire and who had lower self-esteem, fewer financial resources, and plans to continue…

  6. BALANCING ON THE BORDERLINE OF EARLY AFFECT-CONFUSION - PART 2 OF A CASE STUDY TRILOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Erskine

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Part 2 of a case study trilogy on early affect-confusion describes the psychotherapy relationship between an angry/helpless client and the psychotherapist’s skill in balancing the “borderline” between behavioral management and affect attunement, historical inquiry and normalization, validation and shame. The therapeutic use of bifurcated questions and juxtaposition reactions is illustrated.

  7. Quantifying Post-Fire Forest Biomass Recovery in Northeastern Siberia using Hierarchical Multi-Sensor Satellite Imagery and Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, L.; Beck, P. S.; Loranty, M. M.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Goetz, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Russian forests are the largest vegetation carbon pool outside of the tropics, with larch dominating northeastern Siberia where extreme temperatures, permafrost and wildfire currently limit persistence of other tree species. These ecosystems have experienced rapid climate warming over the past century and model simulations suggest that they will undergo profound changes by the end of the century if warming continues. Understanding the responses of these unique deciduous-conifer ecosystems to current and future climate is important given the potential changes in disturbance regimes and other climate feedbacks. The climate implications of changes in fire severity and return interval, as predicted under a warmer and drier climate, are not well understood given the trade-off between storage of C in forest biomass and post-fire surface albedo. We examined forest biomass recovery across a burn chronosequence near Cherskii, Sakha Republic, in far northeastern Siberia. We used high-quality Landsat imagery to date and map fires that occurred between 1972 and 2009, then complemented this data set using tree ring measurements to map older fires. A three stage approach was taken to map current biomass distribution. First, tree shadows were mapped from 50 cm panchromatic WorldView 1 imagery covering a portion of the region. Secondly, the tree shadow map was aggregated to 30 m resolution and used to train a regression-tree model that ingested mosaiced Landsat data. The model output correlated with allometry-based field estimates of biomass, allowing us to transform the model output to a map of regional aboveground biomass using a regression model. When combined with the fire history data, the new biomass map revealed a chronosequence of forest regrowth and carbon sequestration in aboveground biomass after fire. We discuss the potential for future carbon emissions from fires in northeastern Siberia, as well as carbon sequestration during recovery based on the observed biomass

  8. Biogeochemistry and plant physiological traits interact to reinforce patterns of post-fire dominance in boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, A.; Kielland, K.; Johnstone, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Increases in the frequency, extent, and severity of fire in the North American boreal region are projected to continue under a warming climate and are likely to be associated with changes in future vegetation composition. In interior Alaska, fire severity is linked to the relative dominance of deciduous versus coniferous canopy species. Severely burned areas have high levels of deciduous recruitment and subsequent stand dominance, while lightly burned areas exhibit black spruce self-replacement. To elucidate potential mechanisms by which differential fire severity results in differential post-fire vegetation development, we examined changes in soil nitrogen (N) supply (NO3- and NH4+) and in situ 15N uptake by young aspen (Populus tremuloides) and black spruce (Picea mariana) trees growing in lightly and severely burned areas. We hypothesized that (a) soil nitrate supply would be higher in severely burned sites and (b) since conifers have been shown to have a reduced physiological capacity for NO3- uptake, aspen would display greater rates of NO3- uptake than spruce in severely burned sites. Our results suggested that the composition and magnitude of inorganic N supply 14 years after the fire was nearly identical in high-severity and low-severity sites, and nitrate represented nearly 50% of the supply. However, both aspen and spruce took up substantially more NH4+-N than NO3- -N regardless of fire severity. Surprisingly, spruce exhibited only a moderately lower rate of NO3- uptake (μg N/g root-1h-1) than aspen. At the stand level, aspen took up nearly an order-of-magnitude more N per hectare in severely burned sites compared to lightly burned sites, while spruce exhibited the opposite pattern of N uptake with respect to fire severity. Whereas ammonium appeared to be preferred by both species, nitrate represented a larger component of N uptake (based on the NO3-:NH4+ uptake ratio) in aspen (0.7) than in spruce (0.4). We suggest that these species

  9. Maternal and fetal risk factors affecting perinatal mortality in early and late fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Oya; Selçuk, Selçuk; Kumru, Pınar; Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Mahmutoğlu, Didar; Boza, Barış; Türkyılmaz, Gürcan; Bütün, Zafer; Arısoy, Resul; Tandoğan, Bülent

    2015-12-01

    To determine the factors which affect the perinatal deaths in early and late fetal growth restriction (FGR) fetuses using threshold of estimated fetal weight (EFW) fetuses, defined as an EFW fetuses considered as growth restrictions were confirmed by birth weight. Fetuses with multiple pregnancy, congenital malformation, chromosomal abnormality, and premature rupture of membrane were excluded. Samples were grouped in early and late FGR. Early FGR fetuses was classified as gestational age at birth ≤ 34 weeks and late FGR was classified as gestational age at birth > 34 weeks. Factors which affect the perinatal deaths were analyzed descriptively in early and late FGR. The perinatal mortality was calculated by adding the number of stillbirths and neonatal deaths. The study included 86 early and 185 late FGR fetuses, 31 resulted in perinatal deaths, 28 perinatal deaths were in early FGR, and three perinatal deaths were in late FGR. Perinatal deaths occurred more commonly in early FGR fetuses with an EFW death in early FGR. All three perinatal deaths in late FGR occurred in fetuses with EFW death was found significantly higher in increased vascular impedance of UtAs whatever the umbilical artery Doppler. Only EFW death in late FGR in comparison with early FGR. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Assessment of Fire Severity and Post-Fire Regeneration Based on Topographical Features Using Multitemporal Landsat Imagery: a Case Study in Mersin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonbul, H.; Kavzoglu, T.; Kaya, S.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite based remote sensing technologies and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) present operable and cost-effective solutions for mapping fires and observing post-fire regeneration. Mersin-Gülnar wildfire, which occurred in August 2008 in Turkey, selected as study site. The fire was devastating and continued 55 days. According to Turkish General Directorate of Forestry reports, it caused two deaths and left hundreds of people homeless. The aim of this study is to determine the fire severity and monitor vegetation recovery with using multitemporal spectral indices together with topographical factors. Pre-fire and post-fire Landsat ETM+ images were obtained to assess the related fire severity with using the widely-used differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) algorithm. Also, the Normalized Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI) were used to determine vegetation regeneration dynamics for a period of six consecutive years. In addition, aspect image derived from Aster Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) were used to determine vegetation regeneration regime of the study area. Results showed that 5388 ha of area burned with moderate to high severity damage. As expected, NDVI and SAVI values distinctly declined post-fire and then began to increase in the coming years. Mean NDVI value of burned area changed from 0.48 to 0.17 due to wildfire, whilst mean SAVI value changed from 0.61 to 0.26. Re-growth rates calculated for NDVI and SAVI 57% and 63% respectively, six years after the fire. Moreover, NDVI and SAVI were estimated six consecutive year period by taking into consideration east, south, north and west facing slopes. Analysis showed that north-facing and east-facing slopes have higher regeneration rates in compared to other aspects. This study serves as a window to an understanding of the process of fire severity and vegetation regeneration that is vital in wildfire management systems.

  11. A low-cost method to measure the timing of post-fire flash floods and debris flows relative to rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Jason W.; Staley, Dennis M.; Leeper, Robert J.; Schmidt, Kevin Michael; Gartner, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    Data on the specific timing of post-fire flash floods and debris flows are very limited. We describe a method to measure the response times of small burned watersheds to rainfall using a low-cost pressure transducer, which can be installed quickly after a fire. Although the pressure transducer is not designed for sustained sampling at the fast rates ({less than or equal to}2 sec) used at more advanced debris-flow monitoring sites, comparisons with high-data rate stage data show that measured spikes in pressure sampled at 1-min intervals are sufficient to detect the passage of most debris flows and floods. Post-event site visits are used to measure the peak stage and identify flow type based on deposit characteristics. The basin response timescale (tb) to generate flow at each site was determined from an analysis of the cross correlation between time series of flow pressure and 5-min rainfall intensity. This timescale was found to be less than 30 minutes for 40 post-fire floods and 11 post-fire debris flows recorded in 15 southern California watersheds ({less than or equal to} 1.4 km2). Including data from 24 other debris flows recorded at 5 more instrumentally advanced monitoring stations, we find there is not a substantial difference in the median tb for floods and debris flows (11 and 9 minutes, respectively); however, there are slight, statistically significant differences in the trends of flood and debris-flow tb with basin area, which are presumably related to differences in flow speed between floods and debris flows.

  12. Assessment of post-fire changes in land surface temperature and surface albedo, and their relation with fire-burn severity using multitemporal MODIS imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Veraverbeke, Sander; Verstraeten, Willem W.; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Van De Kerchove, Ruben; Goossens, Rudi

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of the large 2007 Peloponnese (Greece) wildfires on changes in broadband surface albedo (a), daytime land surface temperature (LSTd) and night-time LST (LSTn) using a 2-year post-fire time series of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data. In addition, it assesses the potential of remotely sensed a and LST as indicators for fire-burn severity. Immediately after the fire event, mean a dropped up to 0.039 (standard deviation = 0.012) (P < 0....

  13. Early trauma, negative affect, and anxious attachment: the role of metacognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Samuel G; Wells, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Metacognition is linked to the etiology and maintenance of negative emotions and psychological disorder in the Self-Regulatory Executive Function Model. Although there is significant evidence supporting the model, little is currently known about the situational factors for developing dysfunctional metacognitions. The current study explored the hypothesis that early aversive experiences might be important and also tested if metacognitions could mediate the relationship between such experiences and psychological symptoms. Three hundred and fifty non-clinical adults completed a retrospective early trauma measure, as well as measures of current metacognitive beliefs, negative affect, and anxious attachment. Early emotional abuse positively and significantly correlated with several metacognitive belief dimensions but other forms of early trauma did not. Metacognition fully mediated the relationship between emotional abuse and negative affect. Anxious attachment was also positively and significantly associated with metacognitive beliefs and specific relationships remained after controlling for early emotional abuse and current negative affect. Findings are consistent with the ideas that: (i) early negative experiences, and emotional abuse in particular, could be a factor in the formation of problematic metacognitions and (ii) these metacognitions may be important in determining the effects of abuse on subsequent psychological symptoms.

  14. Using Rare Earth Element (REE) tracers to identify preferential micro-sites of post-fire aeolian erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pelt, R.; Zobeck, T. M.; Barnes, M. A.; Baddock, M.; D'Odorico, P.

    2011-12-01

    abrader was added to the wind tunnel flow and a second test of 10 minutes with abrader added to the flow. At the end of the first four tests, the wind tunnel cooling system broke and due to the extent of necessary repairs, the last two plots were tested two weeks later. Three paired aeolian sediment samples were collected for each plot tested. The results indicated that in desert grassland, a disproportionate amount of the post-fire sediment is entrained from areas under grass clumps and in grassland-shrubland ecotones, the soil under shrubs is the primary source of entrained sediment followed by areas under grass clumps. The bare surfaces between vegetation produced the least sediment. REEs appear to be a powerful tool for investigating spatial patterns of aeolian processes.

  15. The influence of fire history, plant species and post-fire management on soil water repellency in a Mediterranean catchment: the Mount Carmel range, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Wittenberg, Lea; Maroulis, Jerry; Malkinson, Dan; Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo

    2016-04-01

    Fire is a key factor impacting soil hydrology in many Mediterranean catchments. Soil water repellency (SWR) can stimulate land degradation processes by reducing the affinity of soil and water thereby triggering a reduction in soil fertility and increasing soil and water losses (. The effects of two consequent fires (1989 and 2005) on SWR were assessed in the Carmel Mountains, Israel. Fire history, plant recovery and post-fire management were investigated as determining factors in a time dependent system. SWR was highest in the >50 years unburnt plots, where soil under Pinus halepensis is most hydrophobic. In the most disturbed soils (twice burnt), many sites have a low to absent SWR even if the soil is very dry. The dynamics and fluctuations in SWR differ in magnitude under different plant species. The areas treated with CC (chipping of charred trees) showed a much higher SWR than areas left untreated. From these insights, a conceptual model of the reaction of SWR on multiple fires was developed. KEYWORDS: Soil water repellency, WDPT, Wildfires, Vegetation recovery, post-fire management, Mediterranean.

  16. Post-fire dynamics of the woody vegetation of a savanna forest (Cerradão in the Cerrado-Amazon transition zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Matias Reis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTFire can change the species composition, diversity, and structure of savanna vegetation, thus altering growth and mortality rates. Such changes in the woody vegetation of burned savanna forest were evaluated over four years in comparison to unburned savanna forest. All woody plants with a diameter at breast height > 10 cm were measured in 100 permanent plots. Six months later, 38 of these plots were burned. Three and a half years later, all surviving individuals were re-sampled. Species richness, diversity, and the number of individuals did not change in the burned plots, although they had significantly higher (p < 0.05 increases in basal area and mortality rates (5.1% year-1 than the unburned plots (3.0% year-1.Tachigali vulgarishad the greatest post-fire increase in basal area (53%. The results indicate that fire alters the dynamics and structure of the savanna forest, excluding the less fire-tolerant species and smaller individuals (? 15cm. Tachigali vulgaris is a key species for the recovery of savanna forest biomass due to its considerable post-fire gains in basal area, at least over the short term due to its short life cycle. It follows that frequent burning of savanna forest would result in a marked change in the species composition and structure of its woody vegetation.

  17. Effectiveness of Polyacrylamide, Wood Shred Mulch, and Pine Needle Mulch as Post-Fire Hillslope Stabilization Treatments in Two Contrasting Volcanic Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonay Neris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Post-fire hillslope stabilization treatments aim to reduce runoff-erosion risks following forest fires by counteracting the impact of fire on key soil and hillslope properties. Here we evaluate the effectiveness of wood shred mulch, long-leaved pine needle mulch, and polyacrylamide (PAM in reducing post-fire runoff and erosion in two volcanic soil types of contrasting wettability using rainfall simulations (55 mm h−1 for 30 min at the microplot (0.25 m2 scale. The cover provided by the wood shreds and pine needles led to a reduction of runoff and erosion in both the wettable—(62% and 92%, respectively, for wood shreds, and 55% and 87%, respectively, for needle mulch and the extremely water-repellent soils (44% and 61%, respectively, for wood shreds. In contrast to what might be expected, PAM did not reduce runoff or erosion when applied to the extremely water-repellent soils, suggesting that PAM should not be applied in this terrain type. Although more research is needed to determine whether the high effectiveness of pine needle mulch and wood shred mulch fully translates to coarser scales, the results are encouraging in terms of these materials’ ability to provide effective and relatively economic mitigation treatments for fire-induced runoff-erosion risks in volcanic soils.

  18. Experimental evidence for heat plume-induced cavitation and xylem deformation as a mechanism of rapid post-fire tree mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Adam G; Nel, Jacques A; Bond, William J; Midgley, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Recent work suggests that hydraulic mechanisms, rather than cambium necrosis, may account for rapid post-fire tree mortality. We experimentally tested for xylem cavitation, as a result of exposure to high-vapour-deficit (D) heat plumes, and permanent xylem deformation, as a result of thermal softening of lignin, in two tree species differing in fire tolerance. We measured percentage loss of conductance (PLC) in distal branches that had been exposed to high-D heat plumes or immersed in hot water baths (high temperature, but not D). Results were compared with predictions from a parameterized hydraulic model. Physical damage to the xylem was examined microscopically. Both species suffered c. 80% PLC when exposed to a 100°C plume. However, at 70°C, the fire-sensitive Kiggelaria africana suffered lower PLC (49%) than the fire-resistant Eucalytpus cladocalyx (80%). Model simulations suggested that differences in PLC between species were a result of greater hydraulic segmentation in E. cladocalyx. Kiggelaria africana suffered considerable PLC (59%), as a result of heat-induced xylem deformation, in the water bath treatments, but E. cladocalyx did not. We suggest that a suite of 'pyrohydraulic' traits, including hydraulic segmentation and heat sensitivity of the xylem, may help to explain why some tree species experience rapid post-fire mortality after low-intensity fires and others do not.

  19. Early experience affects adult personality in the red junglefowl: A role for cognitive stimulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidar, Josefina; Sorato, Enrico; Malmqvist, Ann-Marie; Jansson, Emelie; Rosher, Charlotte; Jensen, Per; Favati, Anna; Løvlie, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Despite intense research efforts, biologists are still puzzled by the existence of animal personality. While recent studies support a link between cognition and personality, the directionality of this relationship still needs to be clarified. Early-life experiences can affect adult behaviour, and among these, cognitive stimulation has been suggested theoretically to influence personality. Yet, the influence of early cognitive stimulation has rarely been explored in empirical investigations of animal behaviour and personality. We investigated the effect of early cognitive stimulation on adult personality in the red junglefowl (Gallus gallus). To this end, we assessed adult behaviour across a number of personality assays and compared behaviour of individuals previously exposed to a series of learning tasks as chicks, with that of control individuals lacking this experience. We found that individuals exposed to early stimulation were, as adults, more vigilant and performed fewer escape attempts in personality assays. Other behaviours describing personality traits in the fowl were not affected. We conclude that our results support the hypothesis that early stimulation can affect aspects of adult behaviour and personality, suggesting a hitherto underappreciated causality link between cognition and personality. Future research should aim to confirm these findings and resolve their underlying dynamics and proximate mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The factors affecting early death after the initial therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Yayar, Okan; Aydin, Seda; Demiroglu, Haluk; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Goker, Hakan; Aksu, Salih; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    There are some improvements in management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, induction-induced deaths still remain as a major problem. The aim of this study is to assess clinical parameters affecting early death in patients with AML. 199 AML patients, who were treated with intensive, non-intensive or supportive treatment between 2002 and 2014 in Hacettepe Hematology Department, were analyzed retrospectively. In our study early death rate for elderly was found to be lower than previous reports whereas it was similar for those who were under age of 60. Better ECOG performance (ECOG performance score 0 and 1) and non-intensive treatment associated with lower early death rates, however APL-type disease associated with higher early death rates. ECOG performance score at diagnosis was found to be the most related independent factor with higher rate of early death in 15 days after treatment (P<0.001). Therefore we decided to understand the factors which were related with ECOG. WBC count at diagnosis was found to be the only related parameter with ECOG performance score. Leucocyte count at diagnosis appears like to have an indirect effect on early death in AML patients. It maybe suggested that in recent years there is an improvement in early death rates of elderly AML patients. The currently reported findings require prospective validation and would encourage the incorporation of other next generation genomics for the prediction of early death and overall risk status of AML. PMID:26885243

  1. How does early detection by screening affect disease progression?: Modeling estimated benefits in prostate cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Wever (Elisabeth); G. Draisma (Gerrit); E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Simulation models are essential tools for estimating benefits of cancer screening programs. Such models include a screening-effect model that represents how early detection by screening followed by treatment affects disease-specific survival. Two commonly used screening-effec

  2. Timing of examinations affects school performance differently in early and late chronotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Zerbini, Giulia; Siersema, Anne; Pieper, Amy; Merrow, Martha; Hut, Roelof A.; Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks of adolescents typically run lateincluding sleep timesyet adolescents generally are expected at school early in the morning. Due to this mismatch between internal (circadian) and external (social) times, adolescents suffer from chronic sleep deficiency, which, in turn, affects acade

  3. Early Negative Affect Predicts Anxiety, Not Autism, in Preschool Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnsen, Bridgette L.; Malone, Patrick S.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Roberts, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) face high risk for anxiety disorders, yet no studies have explored FXS as a high-risk sample for investigating early manifestations of anxiety outcomes. Negative affect is one of the most salient predictors of problem behaviors and has been associated with both anxiety and autistic outcomes in clinical and…

  4. Factors Affecting Early Services for Children Who Are Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melody; Page, Thomas A.; Oleson, Jacob; Spratford, Meredith; Berry, Lauren Unflat; Peterson, Barbara; Welhaven, Anne; Arenas, Richard M.; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe factors affecting early intervention (EI) for children who are hard of hearing, we analyzed (a) service setting(s) and the relationship of setting to families' frequency of participation, and (b) provider preparation, caseload composition, and experience in relation to comfort with skills that support spoken language for…

  5. Early Negative Affect Predicts Anxiety, Not Autism, in Preschool Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnsen, Bridgette L.; Malone, Patrick S.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Roberts, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) face high risk for anxiety disorders, yet no studies have explored FXS as a high-risk sample for investigating early manifestations of anxiety outcomes. Negative affect is one of the most salient predictors of problem behaviors and has been associated with both anxiety and autistic outcomes in clinical and…

  6. Rapid Response Tools and Datasets for Post-fire Erosion Modeling: Lessons Learned from the Rock House and High Park Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary Ellen; Elliot, William E.; MacDonald, Lee H.

    2013-04-01

    Once the danger posed by an active wildfire has passed, land managers must rapidly assess the threat from post-fire runoff and erosion due to the loss of surface cover and fire-induced changes in soil properties. Increased runoff and sediment delivery are of great concern to both the pubic and resource managers. Post-fire assessments and proposals to mitigate these threats are typically undertaken by interdisciplinary Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams. These teams are under very tight deadlines, so they often begin their analysis while the fire is still burning and typically must complete their plans within a couple of weeks. Many modeling tools and datasets have been developed over the years to assist BAER teams, but process-based, spatially explicit models are currently under-utilized relative to simpler, lumped models because they are more difficult to set up and require the preparation of spatially-explicit data layers such as digital elevation models, soils, and land cover. The difficulty of acquiring and utilizing these data layers in spatially-explicit models increases with increasing fire size. Spatially-explicit post-fire erosion modeling was attempted for a small watershed in the 1270 km2 Rock House fire in Texas, but the erosion modeling work could not be completed in time. The biggest limitation was the time required to extract the spatially explicit soils data needed to run the preferred post-fire erosion model (GeoWEPP with Disturbed WEPP parameters). The solution is to have the spatial soil, land cover, and DEM data layers prepared ahead of time, and to have a clear methodology for the BAER teams to incorporate these layers in spatially-explicit modeling interfaces like GeoWEPP. After a fire occurs the data layers can quickly be clipped to the fire perimeter. The soil and land cover parameters can then be adjusted according to the burn severity map, which is one of the first products generated for the BAER teams. Under a previous project

  7. 大兴安岭不同植被火后NDVI恢复过程%NDVI Recovery Process for Post-Fire Vegetation in Daxing’anling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗庆林; 田晓瑞; 赵凤君

    2015-01-01

    . 22%,and 59. 49%,respectively. The proportion of high severity burned areas increased with the ascending slope.[Conclusion]The post-fire NDVI showed a increasing trend generally. NDVI value of each vegetation type in the area with high-burning severity was significantly lower than the low and moderate burning severity areas, except for the grassland. But there was no significant difference in NDVI between the areas with low and moderate burning severity. In the second year,the vegetation coverage in high burning severity areas reached the minimum. The NDVI of these vegetation types in low burning severity areas recovered to pre-fire level in 6 years after fire. The coverage of broadleaf and conifer mixed forests recovered faster than other forest types. Fire severity affected forest vertical structure. The burned forests had greater shrub coverage than un-burned ones,and this phenomenon was more obvious in the forests with high fire severity. The natural restoration of brushwood,grassland and marsh was faster than that of forests,thus these areas don’t need artificial aids to update. Natural restoration of the tree layer in forests with high-burning severity is very slow, the artificial update will speed up the succession process of forest communities. Periodic drought has an influence on NDVI,especially for the post-fire grassland. The two-factor ANOVA showed that vegetation type and fire severity had a significant influence on the vegetation index. dNDVI can reflect the changes of the vegetation well,which has a good temporal and spatial availability and plays an important role in monitoring the post-fire vegetation restoration.

  8. Early-life environmental variation affects intestinal microbiota and immune development in new-born piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirkjan Schokker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early-life environmental variation affects gut microbial colonization and immune competence development; however, the timing and additional specifics of these processes are unknown. The impact of early-life environmental variations, as experienced under real life circumstances, on gut microbial colonization and immune development has not been studied extensively so far. We designed a study to investigate environmental variation, experienced early after birth, to gut microbial colonization and intestinal immune development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate effects of early-life environmental changes, the piglets of 16 piglet litters were divided into 3 groups per litter and experimentally treated on day 4 after birth. During the course of the experiment, the piglets were kept with their mother sow. Group 1 was not treated, group 2 was treated with an antibiotic, and group 3 was treated with an antibiotic and simultaneously exposed to several routine, but stressful management procedures, including docking, clipping and weighing. Thereafter, treatment effects were measured at day 8 after birth in 16 piglets per treatment group by community-scale analysis of gut microbiota and genome-wide intestinal transcriptome profiling. We observed that the applied antibiotic treatment affected the composition and diversity of gut microbiota and reduced the expression of a large number of immune-related processes. The effect of management procedures on top of the use of an antibiotic was limited. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide direct evidence that different early-life conditions, specifically focusing on antibiotic treatment and exposure to stress, affect gut microbial colonization and intestinal immune development. This reinforces the notion that the early phase of life is critical for intestinal immune development, also under regular production circumstances.

  9. Post-Fire Seedling Recruitment and Morpho-Ecophysiological Responses to Induced Drought and Salvage Logging in Pinus halepensis Mill. Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Salvage logging is the commonest post-fire emergency action, but has unclear ecological effects. In the Mediterranean Basin, drought periods and fire regimes are changing and forest management should be adapted. In summer 2009, a mid-high severity fire burned 968 ha of Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill. forest in southeast Spain, which was submitted to salvage logging six months later. In spring 2010, plots were set in untreated and logged areas to monitor the recruitment and survival of the main tree species and three companion species: Stipa tenacissima L. (resprouter, Cistus clusii Dunal and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (obligate seeders. We evaluated responses to different scenarios in relation to intensification of summer droughts and forest management to obtain differences in water stress, growth, and gas exchange to cope with summer drought. Drought was induced by using rain-exclusion shelters and recorded ecophysiological characteristics were obtained with a portable gas exchange system. The main tree species recruitment was poor, but companion species showed a high survival ratio. Lower water stress was found for obligate seeder seedlings, which was higher in logged areas with induced drought. The initial post-fire stage was similar for the studied areas. However, after two drought periods (2010 and 2011, significant differences were found in the morphological and ecophysiological responses. In the unmanaged area, the biggest size of individuals due to the most marked increases in height and coverage were observed mainly in resprouter S. tenacissima. In the area submitted to salvage logging, the growth ratios in plots with induced drought were lower, mainly for seeders. Greater productivity was related to higher transpiration, stomatal conductance, and net photosynthetic ratio, but lower water use efficiency was found in obligate seeders with no drought induction, and S. tenacissima obtained higher values in untreated areas. Our results

  10. Early Negative Affect Predicts Anxiety, not Autism, in Preschool Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tonnsen, Bridgette L.; Malone, Patrick S.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Roberts, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) face high risk for anxiety disorders, yet no studies have explored FXS as a high-risk sample for investigating early manifestations of anxiety outcomes. Negative affect is one of the most salient predictors of problem behaviors and has been associated with both anxiety and autistic outcomes in clinical and non-clinical pediatric samples. In light of the high comorbidity between autism and anxiety within FXS, the present study investigates the relationshi...

  11. Frontal lobe changes occur early in the course of affective disorders in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagopoulos Jim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More severe and persistent forms of affective disorders are accompanied by grey matter loss in key frontal and temporal structures. It is unclear whether such changes precede the onset of illness, occur early in the course or develop gradually with persistence or recurrence of illness. A total of 47 young people presenting with admixtures of depressive and psychotic symptoms were recruited from specialist early intervention services along with 33 age matched healthy control subjects. All participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging and patients were rated clinically as to current stage of illness. Twenty-three patients were identified as being at an early 'attenuated syndrome' stage, while the remaining were rated as having already reached the 'discrete disorder' or 'persistent or recurrent illness' stage. Contrasts were carried out between controls subjects and patients cohorts with attenuated syndromes and discrete disorders, separately. Results The patients that were identified as having a discrete or persisting disorder demonstrated decreased grey matter volumes within distributed frontal brain regions when contrasted to both the control subjects as well as those patients in the attenuated syndrome stage. Overall, patients who were diagnosed as more advanced in terms of the clinical stage of their illness, exhibited the greatest grey matter volume loss of all groups. Conclusions This study suggests that, in terms of frontal grey matter changes, a major transition point may occur in the course of affective illness between early attenuated syndromes and later discrete illness stages.

  12. Pre-fire and post-fire surface fuel and cover measurements collected in the southeastern United States for model evaluation and development - RxCADRE 2008, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Ottmar; Andrew T. Hudak; Susan J. Prichard; Clinton S. Wright; Joseph C. Restaino; Maureen C. Kennedy; Robert E. Vihnanek

    2016-01-01

    A lack of independent, quality-assured data prevents scientists from effectively evaluating predictions and uncertainties in fire models used by land managers. This paper presents a summary of pre-fire and post-fire fuel, fuel moisture and surface cover fraction data that can be used for fire model evaluation and development. The data were collected in the...

  13. Do early life factors affect the development of knee osteoarthritis in later life: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Benny; Jones, Graeme; Jin, Xingzhong; Ding, Changhai

    2016-09-13

    Osteoarthritis (OA) mainly affects older populations; however, it is possible that early life factors contribute to the development of OA in later life. The aim of this review is to describe the association between childhood or early adulthood risk factors and knee pain, structural imaging markers and development of knee OA in later life. A narrative overview of the literature synthesising the findings of literature retrieved from searches of computerised databases and manual searches was conducted. We found that only a few studies have explored the long-term effect of childhood or early adulthood risk factors on the markers of joint health that predispose people to OA or joint symptoms. High body mass index (BMI) and/or overweight status from childhood to adulthood were independently related to knee pain and OA in later life. The findings regarding the association between strenuous physical activity and knee structures in young adults are still conflicting. However, a favourable effect of moderate physical activity and fitness on knee structures is reported. Childhood physical activity and performance measures had independent beneficial effects on knee structures including knee cartilage in children and young adults. Anterior knee pain syndrome in adolescence could lead to the development of patellofemoral knee OA in the late 40s. Furthermore, weak evidence suggests that childhood malalignment, socioeconomic status and physical abuse are associated with OA in later life. The available evidence suggests that early life intervention may prevent OA in later life.

  14. Early life antibiotic exposure affects pancreatic islet development and metabolic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaying; Yang, Kaiyuan; Ju, Tingting; Ho, Tracy; McKay, Catharine A.; Gao, Yanhua; Forget, Shay K.; Gartner, Stephanie R.; Field, Catherine J.; Chan, Catherine B.; Willing, Benjamin P.

    2017-01-01

    Childhood antibiotic exposure has been recently linked with increased risk of metabolic disease later in life. A better understanding of this association would potentially provide strategies to reduce the childhood chronic disease epidemic. Therefore, we explored the underlying mechanisms using a swine model that better mimics human infants than rodents, and demonstrated that early life antibiotic exposure affects glucose metabolism 5 weeks after antibiotic withdrawal, which was associated with changes in pancreatic development. Antibiotics exerted a transient impact on postnatal gut microbiota colonization and microbial metabolite production, yet changes in the expression of key genes involved in short-chain fatty acid signaling and pancreatic development were detected in later life. These findings suggest a programming effect of early life antibiotic exposure that merits further investigation. PMID:28150721

  15. Early life trauma is associated with altered white matter integrity and affective control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Vincent; Amick, Melissa A; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H

    2016-08-01

    Early life trauma (ELT) has been shown to impair affective control and attention well into adulthood. Neuroimaging studies have further shown that ELT was associated with decreased white matter integrity in the prefrontal areas in children and adults. However, no study to date has looked at the relationship between white matter integrity and affective control in individuals with and without a history of ELT. To examine this, we tested 240 Veterans with (ELT N = 80) and without (NoELT N = 160) a history of childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse or family violence. Affective control was measured with the Affective Go/No-Go (AGN) and attention was indexed with the Test of Variable Attention (TOVA). White matter integrity was measured using fractional anisotropy (FA). Results showed greater number of errors on the AGN in ELT compared to NoELT. There was no difference on the TOVA. While there were no mean differences in FA, there was an interaction between FA and reaction time to positive stimuli on the AGN where the ELT group showed a positive relationship between FA and reaction time in right frontal and prefrontal areas, whereas the NoELT group showed a negative or no association between FA and reaction time. This suggests that ELT may be associated with a distinct brain-behavior relationship that could be related to other determinants of FA than those present in healthy adults.

  16. Assessment of post-fire forest structural diversity using neighborhood parameter in the Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana Yemilet Avila Flores; Marco Aurelio González Tagle; Javier Jiménez Pérez; Oscar Aguirre Calderón; Eduardo Treviño Garza

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to characterize the spatial structure patterns of a Pinus hartwegii forest in the Sierra Madre Oriental, affected by a fire in 1998. Sampling was stratified by fire severity. A total of three fire severity classes (low, medium and high) were defined. Three sample plots of 40m x 40m were established for each...

  17. Does classroom separation affect twins' reading ability in the early years of school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, William L; Byrne, Brian; Coleman, Marreta; Olson, Richard K; Corley, Robin; Willcutt, Eric; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    In this article we report on reading ability of twin children in kindergarten to Grade 2 as a function of whether members of the pairs are assigned to the same or different classrooms. All analyses were run using mixed model regressions to account for the interdependence between twin pairs. The samples, total N = 1505, are from Australia and the United States. We found a close-to-significant difference in favor of same-class children in kindergarten and Grade 1. However, when results were adjusted to take account of pre-existing differences in disruptive behavior and in preliteracy ability, the class assignment effects disappeared. We suggest that these pre-existing differences, particularly disruptive behavior, are influencing decisions about whether to separate twins or not and also affecting early reading performance, a conclusion supported by significant correlations between the behavioral measures, preliteracy, and school-based reading. We conclude that, on average, early literacy in twins is not directly affected by their assignment to the same or different classrooms.

  18. Early developmental conditions affect stress response in juvenile but not in adult house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvai, Adám Z; Loiseau, Claire; Sorci, Gabriele; Chastel, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    The short- and long-term consequences of developmental conditions on fitness have received growing attention because the environmental conditions during early life may influence growth, condition at independence, recruitment, reproductive success or survival. We tested here, in a natural house sparrow population, if early conditions during nestling stage affected the stress response of the birds (i) shortly after fledging and (ii) next year, during their first breeding. We experimentally manipulated brood size to mimic different rearing conditions, creating reduced (-2 chicks) and enlarged broods (+2 chicks), while in a third group brood size was not manipulated. Nestling nutrition state decreased with post-manipulation brood sizes as indicated by lower body mass. Fledglings with higher body mass at the age of ten days showed lower stress response than birds that were leaner at the same age. Fledglings reared in large broods showed a higher response to stress protocol than chicks from small broods, and this effect was in significant interaction with the age of fledglings at capture. This interaction indicates that the effects of the brood size became gradually smaller as the fledglings grew older and were further from their nestling period. The effects of early conditions vanished by the next year: the stress response of adult first time breeders was unrelated to the brood size they fledged from. These results suggest that stress response may reflect the actual state of an individual, rather than its developmental history.

  19. The early social environment affects social competence in a cooperative breeder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborsky, Barbara; Arnold, Cornelia; Junker, Julian; Tschopp, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Social competence is defined as the ability of an animal to optimize the expression of social behaviour as a function of the available social information. The social environment encountered early in life can affect the expression of various social behaviours later in life. We investigated whether early social experience can affect social competence. In the cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher, we tested whether individuals reared with older brood-caring conspecifics persistently perform better in a series of tasks (1) simulating different social contexts, (2) assigning individuals different social roles and (3) exposing them to an unknown social situation. Fish that had been reared together with older conspecifics showed more appropriate behaviours both as winners (more aggressive displays) and as losers (more submissive displays) when aggressively competing with peers over a resource, and when trying to be accepted as subordinate group member and prospective brood care helper by an unfamiliar dominant pair (more submissive displays near shelters), a situation they had never encountered before. In both tasks fish that had grown up with older fish were tolerated better by conspecifics than fish reared with same-age siblings only. We detected effects of the early environment on social behaviour in the juvenile and adult stages of the test fish. Our results suggest that growing up in more complex social groups fosters a general social ability (i.e. social competence) in N. pulcher that improves their performance across different social roles and contexts, and which may provide fitness benefits. PMID:22536004

  20. Moderate recurrent hypoglycemia during early development leads to persistent changes in affective behavior in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Holly; Craft, Tara K S; Grimaldi, Lisa M; Babic, Bruna; Brunelli, Susan A; Vannucci, Susan J

    2010-07-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia is a common problem among infants and children that is associated with several metabolic disorders and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Although studies have reported a relationship between a history of juvenile hypoglycemia and psychological health problems, the direct effects of recurrent moderate hypoglycemia have not been fully determined. Thus, in this study, we used an animal model to examine the effects of recurrent hypoglycemia during the juvenile period on affective, social, and motor function (assessed under euglycemic conditions) across development. To model recurrent hypoglycemia, rats were administered 5 U/kg of insulin or saline twice per day from postnatal day (P)10 to P19. Body weight gain was retarded in insulin-treated rats during the treatment period, but recovered by the end of treatment. However, insulin-treated rats displayed increases in affective reactivity that emerged early during treatment and persisted after treatment into early adulthood. Specifically, insulin-treated pups showed increased maternal separation-induced vocalizations as infants, and an exaggerated acoustic startle reflex as juveniles and young adults. Moreover, young adult rats with a history of recurrent juvenile hypoglycemia exhibited increased fear-potentiated startle and increases in behavioral and hormonal responses to restraint stress. Some of these effects were sex-dependent. The changes in affective behavior in insulin-exposed pups were accompanied by decreases in adolescent social play behavior. These results provide evidence that recurrent, transient hypoglycemia during juvenile development can lead to increases in fear-related behavior and stress reactivity. Importantly, these phenotypes are not reversed with normalization of blood glucose and may persist into adulthood.

  1. Parents and early life environment affect behavioral development of laying hen chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Elske N; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Kemp, Bas; Groothuis, Ton G G; Rodenburg, T Bas

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (SFP) in commercial laying hens is a maladaptive behavior which is associated with anxiety traits. Many experimental studies have shown that stress in the parents can affect anxiety in the offspring, but until now these effects have been neglected in addressing the problem of SFP in commercially kept laying hens. We therefore studied whether parental stock (PS) affected the development of SFP and anxiety in their offspring. We used flocks from a brown and white genetic hybrid because genetic background can affect SFP and anxiety. As SFP can also be influenced by housing conditions on the rearing farm, we included effects of housing system and litter availability in the analysis. Forty-seven rearing flocks, originating from ten PS flocks were followed. Behavioral and physiological parameters related to anxiety and SFP were studied in the PS at 40 weeks of age and in the rearing flocks at one, five, ten and fifteen weeks of age. We found that PS had an effect on SFP at one week of age and on anxiety at one and five weeks of age. In the white hybrid, but not in the brown hybrid, high levels of maternal corticosterone, maternal feather damage and maternal whole-blood serotonin levels showed positive relations with offsprings' SFP at one week and offsprings' anxiety at one and five weeks of age. Disruption and limitation of litter supply at an early age on the rearing farms increased SFP, feather damage and fearfulness. These effects were most prominent in the brown hybrid. It appeared that hens from a brown hybrid are more affected by environmental conditions, while hens from a white hybrid were more strongly affected by parental effects. These results are important for designing measures to prevent the development of SFP, which may require a different approach in brown and white flocks.

  2. Application and analysis of debris-flow early warning system in Wenchuan earthquake-affected area

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    Liu, D. L.; Zhang, S. J.; Yang, H. J.; Zhao, L. Q.; Jiang, Y. H.; Tang, D.; Leng, X. P.

    2016-02-01

    The activities of debris flow (DF) in the Wenchuan earthquake-affected area significantly increased after the earthquake on 12 May 2008. The safety of the lives and property of local people is threatened by DFs. A physics-based early warning system (EWS) for DF forecasting was developed and applied in this earthquake area. This paper introduces an application of the system in the Wenchuan earthquake-affected area and analyzes the prediction results via a comparison to the DF events triggered by the strong rainfall events reported by the local government. The prediction accuracy and efficiency was first compared with a contribution-factor-based system currently used by the weather bureau of Sichuan province. The storm on 17 August 2012 was used as a case study for this comparison. The comparison shows that the false negative rate and false positive rate of the new system is, respectively, 19 and 21 % lower than the system based on the contribution factors. Consequently, the prediction accuracy is obviously higher than the system based on the contribution factors with a higher operational efficiency. On the invitation of the weather bureau of Sichuan province, the authors upgraded their prediction system of DF by using this new system before the monsoon of Wenchuan earthquake-affected area in 2013. Two prediction cases on 9 July 2013 and 10 July 2014 were chosen to further demonstrate that the new EWS has high stability, efficiency, and prediction accuracy.

  3. Elevated Nitrogen Deposition Enhances the Net CO2 Sink Strength in Alberta Bogs along a Post-fire Chronosequence

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    Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.; Albright, C. M.; Scott, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    About 30% of the landscape of northern Alberta, Canada is occupied by peatlands, which persist at the low end range of both mean annual precipitation (moss, was not affected by N addition, suggesting that the overall response of NEE to N addition is the result of enhanced growth of ericaceous shrubs. These findings suggest that while elevated N deposition in the AOSR may enhance the strength of the overall CO2 sink of bogs in the short term, in the longer term, increased shrub growth has the potential to shade Sphagnum mosses, compromising the future bog CO2sink strength across the region.

  4. Post-fire interactions between soil water repellency, soil fertility and plant growth in soil collected from a burned piñon-juniper woodland

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    Fernelius, Kaitlynn J.; Madsen, Matthew D.; Hopkins, Bryan G.; Bansal, Sheel; Anderson, Val J.; Eggett, Dennis L.; Roundy, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Woody plant encroachment can increase nutrient resources in the plant-mound zone. After a fire, this zone is often found to be water repellent. This study aimed to understand the effects of post-fire water repellency on soil water and inorganic nitrogen and their effects on plant growth of the introduced annual Bromus tectorum and native bunchgrass Pseudoroegneria spicata. Plots centered on burned Juniperus osteosperma trees were either left untreated or treated with surfactant to ameliorate water repellency. After two years, we excavated soil from the untreated and treated plots and placed it in zerotension lysimeter pots. In the greenhouse, half of the pots received an additional surfactant treatment. Pots were seeded separately with B. tectorum or P. spicata. Untreated soils had high runoff, decreased soilwater content, and elevated NO3eN in comparison to surfactant treated soils. The two plant species typically responded similar to the treatments. Above-ground biomass and microbial activity (estimated through soil CO2 gas emissions) was 16.8-fold and 9.5-fold higher in the surfactant-treated soils than repellent soils, respectably. This study demonstrates that water repellency can influence site recovery by decreasing soil water content, promoting inorganic N retention, and impairing plant growth and microbial activity.

  5. Low-power laser-based carbon monoxide sensor for fire and post-fire detection using a compact Herriott multipass cell

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    Thomazy, David; So, Stephen; Kosterev, Anatoliy; Lewicki, Rafal; Dong, Lei; Sani, Ardalan A.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2010-01-01

    With the anticipated retirement of Space Shuttles in the next few years, the re-supplying of short-lifetime sensors on the International Space Station (ISS) will be logistically more difficult. Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a well-known combustion product and its absence in a fire and post-fire environment is a reliable indicator for mission specialists that the air quality is at a safe to breathe level. We report on the development and performance of a prototype compact CO sensor, based on the PHOTONS platform [1], developed for the ISS based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). A CO absorption line at ~4285 cm-1 is targeted using a distributed-feedback (DFB) laser diode operating at room temperature. A custom designed Herriott multipass cell 16cm long, with an effective path length of 3.7 m is employed. Mechanical, optical and electronics systems are integrated into a compact package of dimensions measuring 12.4"x 3.4"x 5". Power consumption is less than 1 W, enabling prolonged battery life. A detection limit of 3 ppm is achieved when performing 40 second long temperature scans. A recent initial test at NASA-JSC was successful. Future improvements include the reduction of the sampling volume, scan time and an improved CO minimum detection limit.

  6. Early life socioeconomic status and metabolic outcomes in adolescents: The role of implicit affect about one's family.

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    Chan, Meanne; Miller, Gregory E; Chen, Edith

    2016-04-01

    Previous research suggests that the quality of early family relationships may moderate the association between lower socioeconomic status (SES) and cardiovascular and other health outcomes. In this study, we investigated how implicit measures of early childhood environments (implicit anger, fear, or warmth about one's family) interacted with early life SES to predict metabolic outcomes in a sample of healthy adolescents. Adolescents (N = 259) age 13 to 16 participated with 1 parent. Implicit family affect was measured with a computer-based implicit affect assessment tool. Early life SES was indexed by home crowding (e.g., number of people per bedroom) during the first 5 years of life. Metabolic indicators included resting blood pressure, total cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin, and waist circumference. Early life SES significantly interacted with implicit negative family affect in resting systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure levels, such that among those participants with higher early life SES, as implicit negative family affect increased, resting blood pressure also increased. Similarly, early life SES interacted with implicit family warmth to predict total cholesterol levels, such that among those participants with higher early life SES, as implicit family warmth decreased, total cholesterol increased. These patterns were not observed with current SES or with explicit measures of family relationships. These findings provide evidence that implicit family affect moderates the association between early life SES and adolescent metabolic outcomes in a way that suggests that implicit family affect may be more relevant among higher SES adolescents. The utility of implicit psychosocial measures in cardiovascular health studies, particularly for higher SES samples, is discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Distraction by emotion in early adolescence: affective facilitation and interference during the attentional blink

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    Sabine eHeim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the extent to which early adolescents (aged 10 to 13 years differ from adults in their sensitivity to attention capture by affective stimuli during rapid processing. A rapid serial visual presentation paradigm (RSVP was implemented as a dual task, requiring the report of two green target stimuli embedded in a stream of distractors. Known as the attentional blink (AB, task performance is typically impaired when the first and second targets (T1 and T2, respectively are separated by at least one distractor and about 200 ms of time. Here we used written verbs of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant content as T1 items, while affectively neutral exemplars served as T2 and distractor events. The temporal distance between T1 and T2 was manipulated to contain either one distractor (intertarget interval 232 ms or five distractors (intertarget interval 696 ms. Students reported pleasant T1 words more accurately, compared to neutral and unpleasant words, indicating facilitation of appetitive content on performance during RSVP. Emotional relevance of T1 was at the expense of T2 accuracy: At an intertarget interval of 232 ms (i.e., during the AB period, identification of (neutral T2 words was impaired when preceded by pleasant and unpleasant T1s. No interference across targets was observed, however, beyond the blink period, in which T1 and T2 were separated by 696 ms. Thus, emotionally relevant events capture and hold attentional resources, at the cost of attentive processing in subsequent episodes. Contrary to our findings in adults, these capture effects were most obvious when the available capacity was limited, i.e., during the critical interval of the AB. The findings are discussed in light of the use of alternative cognitive strategies as development proceeds beyond early adolescence into adulthood.

  8. Early life in a barren environment adversely affects spatial cognition in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus

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    Fernanda Machado Tahamtani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial cognition in vertebrates is adversely affected by a lack of environmental complexity during early life. However, to our knowledge no previous studies have tested the effect of early exposure to varying degrees of environmental complexity on specific components of spatial cognition in chickens. There are two main rearing systems for laying hens in the EU: aviaries and cages. These two systems differ from one another in environmental complexity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that rearing in a barren cage environment relative to a complex aviary environment causes long-lasting deficits in the ability to perform spatial tasks. For this purpose, 24 white Dekalb laying hens, half of which had been reared in an aviary system and the other half in a conventional cage system, were tested in a holeboard task. Birds from both treatment groups learnt the task, however the cage-reared hens required more time to locate rewards and had poorer levels of working memory. The latter finding supports the hypothesis that rearing in a barren environment causes long-term impairment of short-term memory in chickens.

  9. Early-life exposure to caffeine affects the construction and activity of cortical networks in mice.

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    Fazeli, Walid; Zappettini, Stefania; Marguet, Stephan Lawrence; Grendel, Jasper; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe; Isbrandt, Dirk

    2017-09-01

    The consumption of psychoactive drugs during pregnancy can have deleterious effects on newborns. It remains unclear whether early-life exposure to caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance, alters brain development. We hypothesized that maternal caffeine ingestion during pregnancy and the early postnatal period in mice affects the construction and activity of cortical networks in offspring. To test this hypothesis, we focused on primary visual cortex (V1) as a model neocortical region. In a study design mimicking the daily consumption of approximately three cups of coffee during pregnancy in humans, caffeine was added to the drinking water of female mice and their offspring were compared to control offspring. Caffeine altered the construction of GABAergic neuronal networks in V1, as reflected by a reduced number of somatostatin-containing GABA neurons at postnatal days 6-7, with the remaining ones showing poorly developed dendritic arbors. These findings were accompanied by increased synaptic activity in vitro and elevated network activity in vivo in V1. Similarly, in vivo hippocampal network activity was altered from the neonatal period until adulthood. Finally, caffeine-exposed offspring showed increased seizure susceptibility in a hyperthermia-induced seizure model. In summary, our results indicate detrimental effects of developmental caffeine exposure on mouse brain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Do childhood social circumstances affect overweight and obesity in early adulthood?

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    Kestilä, Laura; Rahkonen, Ossi; Martelin, Tuija; Lahti-Koski, Marjaana; Koskinen, Seppo

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association of childhood circumstances with overweight and obesity in early adulthood, to analyse whether the respondent's education and current circumstances mediate these associations, and to explore whether the respondent's health behaviour affects these associations. This was a cross-sectional study with retrospective inquiries. The study was based on a representative two-stage cluster sample (N= 1894, participation rate 79%) of young adults aged 18-29 years in Finland in 2000. The outcome measure was three-class body mass index (BMI) (normal weight, overweight, and obesity). Multinomial logistic regression was used as the main statistical tool. In women, childhood circumstances (low parental education (relative risk ratio (RRR) = 2.43), parental unemployment (RRR= 2.09) and single-parent family (RRR= 1.99)) increased the risk of overweight (25 childhood factors and early adult circumstances. In men, no significant childhood predictors of overweight were found. Single-parent family (RRR=2.32), parental alcohol problem (RRR= 2.71), parental mental health problems (RRR=2.28) and being bullied at school (RRR=3.13) predicted obesity (BMI > or = 30) in women in the age-adjusted models, and being bullied at school remained a significant predictor after adjusting for all childhood and current determinants. In both genders, the strong association between parental education and obesity remained significant after adjusting for all other determinants (for the lowest educational category, RRR= 3.56 in women, and RRR= 6.55 in men). Childhood factors predict overweight and obesity in early adulthood. This effect is stronger on obesity than on overweight and in women than in men, and it seems to be partly mediated by adult circumstances. The results emphasize the lasting effect of childhood socioeconomic position on adult obesity. When preventive policies are being planned, social circumstances in childhood should be addressed.

  11. Post-fire phenological behavior and breeding biology of the Spiranthera odoratissima A. St.-Hil. (Rutaceae

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    Mirley Luciene dos Santos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The phenological behavior of species in response to cerrado stricken by fire is little known. A phenological and reproductive biological study of Spiranthera odoratissima was carried out in an anthropized area of cerrado sensu stricto affected by fire in Goiânia County, Goiás, Brazil. Phenolocial observations indicated that the individuals bloomed in synchrony three months after the fire. The phenological rhythms were associated with the seasonal pluviometric effects, a characteristic pattern of shrublet species of the cerrado. Theflowers are white with a sweet odor and are grouped in panicle inflorescences. The blossoming occurs during dusk and begins at around 16h. It offers pollen and nectar to its visitors. The species produces 32.8μl (± 3.4 of nectar with an average concentration of 16.4% (± 0.43 in equivalents of sucrose. The pollination system (phalenophily was proposed based on an analysis of the fl ower’s characteristics. Observed visitors were bees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus, flies, wasps, ants and beetles, but due to the inflorescence behavior, they were considered to be merely resource thieves. It was observed that Trigona spinipes Fabr. can act as a secondary pollinator during the pilling of pollen. The results of manual pollination and the incompatibility index (ISI indicate that the species is xenogamous and self-compatible.

  12. Cation concentrations in post-fire runoff at the hill slope versus catchment scale in north-central Portugal

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    A.I. Machado

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires are well known for promoting overland flow and erosion on forest areas largely as a result of heat-induced changes in soil properties as well as of vegetation combustion, which leaves the soil without a protective cover against the kinetic energy of rain. Increased overland flow and erosion rates strongly affect nutrients mobilization. The present study compares cations mobilization at contrasting spatial scales, i.e. slope versus catchment scale, for the two most representative forest types in north-central Portugal, i.e. Maritime Pine and eucalypt plantations, in contrasting bedrock types, schist and granite. Total cation concentrations were evaluated through digestion of runoff samples, in order to quantify cation availability in solution and adsorbed to eroded sediments. At hill slope, there was a clear trend for a decrease in cation concentrations during the first 2-3 months after fire, particularly for eucalyptus plantations over granite, however concentration peaks were identified for extreme rainfall events. At catchment scale, a different behavior pattern was identified for cations, since concentrations remained low all through the monitoring period.

  13. Early developmental gene enhancers affect subcortical volumes in the adult human brain.

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    Becker, Martin; Guadalupe, Tulio; Franke, Barbara; Hibar, Derrek P; Renteria, Miguel E; Stein, Jason L; Thompson, Paul M; Francks, Clyde; Vernes, Sonja C; Fisher, Simon E

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association screens aim to identify common genetic variants contributing to the phenotypic variability of complex traits, such as human height or brain morphology. The identified genetic variants are mostly within noncoding genomic regions and the biology of the genotype-phenotype association typically remains unclear. In this article, we propose a complementary targeted strategy to reveal the genetic underpinnings of variability in subcortical brain volumes, by specifically selecting genomic loci that are experimentally validated forebrain enhancers, active in early embryonic development. We hypothesized that genetic variation within these enhancers may affect the development and ultimately the structure of subcortical brain regions in adults. We tested whether variants in forebrain enhancer regions showed an overall enrichment of association with volumetric variation in subcortical structures of >13,000 healthy adults. We observed significant enrichment of genomic loci that affect the volume of the hippocampus within forebrain enhancers (empirical P = 0.0015), a finding which robustly passed the adjusted threshold for testing of multiple brain phenotypes (cutoff of P Brain Mapp 37:1788-1800, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Understanding the "personological" basis of employee withdrawal: the influence of affective disposition on employee tardiness, early departure, and absenteeism.

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    Iverson, R D; Deery, S J

    2001-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of positive affectivity (PA) and negative affectivity (NA) on employee tardiness, early departure, and absenteeism, controlling for demographic, job-related, and environmental variables. The 3 temporary withdrawal measures were collected from organizational records in the 12 months following the survey. The LISREL analysis was based on a sample of 362 blue-collar employees from a multinational automotive manufacturer. The results indicate that individuals high in PA were associated with increased tardiness and early departure but decreased absenteeism. Individuals high in NA were associated with increased early departure. In terms of moderator effects, job satisfaction had a significant negative impact for individuals low in PA in predicting tardiness and early departure, whereas job satisfaction displayed a significant negative relationship with early departure for individuals high in NA. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  15. Characterizing the primary material sources and dominant erosional processes for post-fire debris-flow initiation in a headwater basin using multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis M.; Waslewicz, Thad A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire dramatically alters the hydrologic response of a watershed such that even modest rainstorms can produce hazardous debris flows. Relative to shallow landslides, the primary sources of material and dominant erosional processes that contribute to post-fire debris-flow initiation are poorly constrained. Improving our understanding of how and where material is eroded from a watershed during a post-fire debris-flow requires (1) precise measurements of topographic change to calculate volumetric measurements of erosion and deposition, and (2) the identification of relevant morphometrically defined process domains to spatially constrain these measurements of erosion and deposition. In this study, we combine the morphometric analysis of a steep, small (0.01 km2) headwater drainage basin with measurements of topographic change using high-resolution (2.5 cm) multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning data made before and after a post-fire debris flow. The results of the morphometric analysis are used to define four process domains: hillslope-divergent, hillslope-convergent, transitional, and channelized incision. We determine that hillslope-divergent and hillslope-convergent process domains represent the primary sources of material over the period of analysis in the study basin. From these results we conclude that raindrop-impact induced erosion, ravel, surface wash, and rilling are the primary erosional processes contributing to post-fire debris-flow initiation in the small, steep headwater basin. Further work is needed to determine (1) how these results vary with increasing drainage basin size, (2) how these data might scale upward for use with coarser resolution measurements of topography, and (3) how these results change with evolving sediment supply conditions and vegetation recovery.

  16. Characterizing the primary material sources and dominant erosional processes for post-fire debris-flow initiation in a headwater basin using multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis M.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2014-06-01

    Wildfire dramatically alters the hydrologic response of a watershed such that even modest rainstorms can produce hazardous debris flows. Relative to shallow landslides, the primary sources of material and dominant erosional processes that contribute to post-fire debris-flow initiation are poorly constrained. Improving our understanding of how and where material is eroded from a watershed during a post-fire debris-flow requires (1) precise measurements of topographic change to calculate volumetric measurements of erosion and deposition, and (2) the identification of relevant morphometrically defined process domains to spatially constrain these measurements of erosion and deposition. In this study, we combine the morphometric analysis of a steep, small (0.01 km2) headwater drainage basin with measurements of topographic change using high-resolution (2.5 cm) multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning data made before and after a post-fire debris flow. The results of the morphometric analysis are used to define four process domains: hillslope-divergent, hillslope-convergent, transitional, and channelized incision. We determine that hillslope-divergent and hillslope-convergent process domains represent the primary sources of material over the period of analysis in the study basin. From these results we conclude that raindrop-impact induced erosion, ravel, surface wash, and rilling are the primary erosional processes contributing to post-fire debris-flow initiation in the small, steep headwater basin. Further work is needed to determine (1) how these results vary with increasing drainage basin size, (2) how these data might scale upward for use with coarser resolution measurements of topography, and (3) how these results change with evolving sediment supply conditions and vegetation recovery.

  17. Post-fire erosion risk mapping using Landsat TM: results from the case of 2007 fire in Mt. Parnitha Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakakis, G.; Petropoulos, G. P.; Papanikolaou, I.; Kairis, O.

    2012-04-01

    Wildfires have significant geomorphological and hydrological impacts, such as the increasing of soil erosion and instability phenomena to fire-affected environment. In comparison to traditional methods, such as field inventories, remote sensing provides a cost-effective and rapid option in mapping the spatial and temporal variability of wildfires. The influence of the wildfires to soil erosion / sediment transport and their impact to the erosional and depositional environment and equilibrium and overall to the longer-term geological framework is often neglected in these studies. In this study, we examine whether the absence of vegetation due to the wildfires is indeed the main triggering mechanism for high erosional rates and try to quantify these parameters. In particular, the objective of the present study has been to assess the changes in soil erosion risk in Mediterranean setting as a result of a wildfire using remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). As a case study is selected an area located close to the capital of Greece, in which a destructive wildland fire occurred in the summer of 2007, a year of the most catastrophic fires occurred in Greece in recent times. Landsat TM satellite imagery available before and shortly after the firebreak was utilised. Erosion risk maps before and after the fire event were estimated on the basis of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model. Ancillary data used in RUSLE implementation included the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model, a geology map and field inventory conducted in the studied region. A soil erosion risk map with five classes (very low, low, medium, high) before and after the fire event was eventually developed from RUSLE within a GIS environment. In overall, areas having a minimal soil erosion risk before the fire showed a considerable increase in erosion risk after the fire, as a result of natural environment destruction occurred from the fire outbreak. Soil erosion risk

  18. In situ measurements of post-fire debris flows in southern California: Comparisons of the timing and magnitude of 24 debris-flow events with rainfall and soil moisture conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, J.W.; Staley, D.M.; Cannon, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Debris flows often occur in burned steeplands of southern California, sometimes causing property damage and loss of life. In an effort to better understand the hydrologic controls on post-fire debris-flow initiation, timing and magnitude, we measured the flow stage, rainfall, channel bed pore fluid pressure and hillslope soil-moisture accompanying 24 debris flows recorded in five different watersheds burned in the 2009 Station and Jesusita Fires (San Gabriel and Santa Ynez Mountains). The measurements show substantial differences in debris-flow dynamics between sites and between sequential events at the same site. Despite these differences, the timing and magnitude of all events were consistently associated with local peaks in short duration (debris-flow stage was best cross-correlated with time series of 5-min rainfall intensity, and lagged the rainfall by an average of just 5 min. An index of debris-flow volume was also best correlated with short-duration rainfall intensity, but found to be poorly correlated with storm cumulative rainfall and hillslope soil water content. Post-event observations of erosion and slope stability modeling suggest that the debris flows initiated primarily by processes related to surface water runoff, rather than shallow landslides. By identifying the storm characteristics most closely associated with post-fire debris flows, these measurements provide valuable guidance for warning operations and important constraints for developing and testing models of post-fire debris flows. copyright. 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. In situ measurements of post-fire debris flows in southern California: Comparisons of the timing and magnitude of 24 debris-flow events with rainfall and soil moisture conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Jason W.; Staley, Dennis M.; Cannon, Susan H.

    2011-12-01

    Debris flows often occur in burned steeplands of southern California, sometimes causing property damage and loss of life. In an effort to better understand the hydrologic controls on post-fire debris-flow initiation, timing and magnitude, we measured the flow stage, rainfall, channel bed pore fluid pressure and hillslope soil-moisture accompanying 24 debris flows recorded in five different watersheds burned in the 2009 Station and Jesusita Fires (San Gabriel and Santa Ynez Mountains). The measurements show substantial differences in debris-flow dynamics between sites and between sequential events at the same site. Despite these differences, the timing and magnitude of all events were consistently associated with local peaks in short duration (debris-flow stage was best cross-correlated with time series of 5-min rainfall intensity, and lagged the rainfall by an average of just 5 min. An index of debris-flow volume was also best correlated with short-duration rainfall intensity, but found to be poorly correlated with storm cumulative rainfall and hillslope soil water content. Post-event observations of erosion and slope stability modeling suggest that the debris flows initiated primarily by processes related to surface water runoff, rather than shallow landslides. By identifying the storm characteristics most closely associated with post-fire debris flows, these measurements provide valuable guidance for warning operations and important constraints for developing and testing models of post-fire debris flows.

  20. Application of thermal analysis to measure the spatial heterogeneity of organic matter degradation after wildfire: implications for post-fire rehabilitation treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Agustin; Fonturbel, M. Teresa; Vega, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    Severe wildfires can cause drastic changes in SOM content and quality with important implications for soil conservation and global C balance. Soil heating usually leads to loss of the most labile SOM compounds (e.g. carbohydrates, lipids and peptides) and to generation of aromatic substances. However, these fire-related damages are not uniform over large areas, because of the spatial heterogeneity of different factors such as fire type and environmental conditions. Rapid diagnosis of soil burn severity is required to enable the design of emergency post-fire rehabilitation treatments. The study was conducted in soils from NW Spain, an Atlantic-climate zone that is particularly prone to wildfires. Intact soil cores (forest floor and uppermost mineral soil layer) were taken from a soil developed under granitic rock and subjected to experimental burning (in a bench positioned at the outlet of a wind tunnel). Soil temperature during fire was monitorised and five visual levels of soil burn severity (SBS) were recorded immediately after fire. Solid-state 13C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy analyses were performed in an Agilent (Varian) VNMRS-500-WB spectrometer. The samples were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry (TGA/DSC, Mettler-Toledo Intl. Inc.). The analyses were performed with 4 mg of samples placed in open aluminium pans under dry air (flow rate, 50 mL-1) and at a scanning rate of 10 °C min-1. The temperature ranged between 50 and 600 °C. In the organic layer, the temperature reached during fire influenced the formation and characteristics of charred material. These materials showed an increasing degree of carbonization/aromatization in relation to the increase of temperature during burning. Burning also led to compounds of higher thermal recalcitrance (increases in T50 values -the temperature at which 50% of the energy stored in SOM is released-). However, values recorded in some samples were lower than those measured in highly

  1. Plant Spacing and Cultivar Affects Yield Components, Qualitative Traits and Early Ripening of Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum

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    Ebrahim MAMNOIE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-year field trial was set up on sandy clay soil in the Jiroft and Kahnouj Agricultural Research Center with the objective to determine the effect of plant spacing and different cultivars on the yield and qualitative characteristics of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum. This experiment was performed as split plot based on complete randomized block design with 3 replications. The main plots were in – row spacing in 4 levels include 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 m and the subplots were cultivars naming ‘Shef ’, ‘Peto Early CH’ and ‘FDT 202’. The results showed that, fruit length to diameter ratio, total acidity, fruit number per plant, mean fruit weight, yield per plant, total yield and first harvest to total harvests ratio were significantly affected by plant spacing. In addition, cultivars showed significant effect on all traits evaluated (p<0.01. In this experiment, fruit length to diameter ratio and total acidity increased as plant spacing increased, however it had no effect on total soluble solids. In this study, total fruit yield is being increased while the yield per plant, number of fruit per plant and fruit weight is being reduced by increased number of plants per unit area. Although among tomato cultivar, ‘Peto Early CH’ had a higher yield over other cultivars, but cultivar ‘Shef ’ showed higher yield in the first harvest. Generally it seems according to the results collected that plant spacing 0.3 m and ‘Shef ’ cultivar owing to better adaptation and higher commercial yield for production in Jiroft city is suggested.

  2. Chinese primiparous women's experiences of early motherhood: factors affecting maternal role competence.

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    Ngai, Fei-Wan; Chan, Sally W C; Holroyd, Eleanor

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore Chinese women's perceptions of maternal role competence and factors contributing to maternal role competence during early motherhood. Developing a sense of competence and satisfaction in the maternal role are considered critical components in maternal adaptation, which have a significant impact on parenting behaviours and the psychosocial development of the child. However, qualitative studies that address maternal role competence are limited in the Chinese population. This was an exploratory descriptive study. A purposive sample of 26 Chinese primiparous mothers participated in a childbirth psychoeducation programme and was interviewed at six weeks postpartum. Data were analysed using content analysis. Women perceived a competent mother as being able to make a commitment to caring for the physical and emotional well-being of child, while cultivating appropriate values for childhood. Personal knowledge and experience of infant care, success in breastfeeding, infant's well-being, availability of social support and contradictory information from various sources were major factors affecting maternal role competency. The findings highlight the importance of understanding Chinese cultural attitudes to childrearing and maternal role competence. New Chinese mothers need information on child care, positive experiences of infant care, social support and consistent information to enhance their maternal role competency. Recommendations are made for Chinese culturally specific guidelines and healthcare delivery interventions to enhance maternal role competence in early motherhood. Nursing and midwifery care should always take into account the cultural beliefs and enable adaptation of traditional postpartum practices. Providing consistent information and positive experience on parenting skills and infant behaviour as well as enhancing effective coping strategies could strengthen Chinese women's maternal role competency. © 2011 Blackwell

  3. Early and Midterm Results Following Interventional Coarctoplasty: Evaluation of Variables that Can Affect the Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, Hossein Ali; Shafe, Omid; Sarpooshi, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Stent coarctoplasty has been approved as the treatment of choice for adult patients with coarctation of the aorta. We have evaluated the early and midterm clinical and procedural results after interventional coarctoplasty. Also, variables that can affect these results were evaluated. Subjects and Methods Gathering clinical, angiographic and procedural data, we evaluated the pre-specified outcomes, including procedural success, complications, the incidence of hypertension after coarctoplasty etc., after the procedure. The effect of pre-specified variables including aortic arch shape, coarctation type and etc. on the procedural result was evaluated. Results Between February 2005 through March 2014, 133 stent coarctoplasty procedures were performed. Median age was 23.5 years old (interquartile range [IQR]:19-28), and 105 (71.9%) were male. Nearly all of the patients were undergone stent coarctoplasty, mostly with cheatham platinum (CP) stents. There was no association between aortic arch morphology and acute procedural complications. Balloon length more than 40 mm (p=0.028), aorta diameter at the site of Coarctation larger than 2.35 mm (p=0.008) was associated with higher rate of restenosis during follow-up. Comparison between the prevalence of hypertension (HTN) before and after coarctoplasty showed a significant reduction in the prevalence of HTN (117 [91.4%] vs. 95 [74.2%] p<0.001). Conclusion Stent coarctoplasty is a low-risk procedure with favorable early and delayed outcomes. Most mortality is related to the patient's comorbid conditions and not to the procedure. PMID:28154597

  4. Post-fire changes in sediment transport connectivity from pedon to watershed scale. The Navalón wildfire in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Bodí, Merche B.; González, Óscar; Mataix Solera, Jorge; Doerr, Stefan Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Wildfire are present in the Earth System since vegetation was present in the continents (Doerr and Cerdà, 2005; Kaiho et al., 2013). Forest fire cause damage in the soil and the vegetation cover (Guénon et al., 2013). The years after a forest fire there is a sudden increase in the soil erosion rates that contribute to connect the pedon, slope tram, tram and watershed with surface flows that results in high erosion rates (Cerdà and Lasanta, 2005; Lasanta and Cerdà, 2005; Cawson et al., 2012; Pérez Cabello et al., 2012; Prats et al., 2015). Although the research on soil erosion after forest fire was carried out at different scales by different authors, there is not information about soil erosion at different scales at the same research site and during the post fire period. After the forest fire of April 2008 in Navalón, Eastern Spain, the Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group from the University of Valencia initiated the measurement of the soil losses at pedon scale (microplots of 0.30 m2), at slope tram (silt fences of 1.8 m width), at slope scale (abandoned terraces) and at watershed scale, at the bottom of the valley (abandoned terraces). The results show that there is a reduction in the sediment yield from pedon to watershed scale and that the soil erosion took place in the first year after the fire. Acknowledgements To the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of Spanish Government for finance the POSTFIRE project (CGL2013- 47862-C2-1-R). The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Carreiras, M., Ferreira, A.J.D., Valente, S., Fleskens, L., Gonzales-Pelayo, Ó., Rubio, J.L., Stoof, C.R., Coelho, C.O.A., Ferreira, C.S.S., Ritsema, C.J. 2014. Comparative analysis of policies to deal with the wildfire risk. Land Degradation & Development, 25, 92-103. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ldr.2274 Cawson, J. G

  5. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in early stages of forest litter decomposition as affected by nitrogen addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xiao-wen; LIU Ying; HAN Shi-jie

    2009-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) availability and tree species on the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen at early stage of decomposition of forest litter were studied in a 13-week laboratory incubation experiment. Fresh litter samples including needle litter (Pinus koraiensis) and two types of broadleaf litters (Quercus mongolica and Tilia amurensis) were collected from a broadleaf-korean pine mixed forest in the northern slope of Changbai Mountain (China). Different doses of N (equal to 0, 30 and 50 kg·ha-1yr-1, respectively, as NH4NO3) were added to litter during the experiment period. The litter decomposition rate expressed as mass loss and respiration rate increased significantly with increasing N availability. The mass loss and cumulative CO2-C emission were higher in leaf litter compared to that in needle litter. The dissolved organic Carbon (DOC) concentrations in litter leachate varied widely between the species, but were not greatly affected by N treatments. Regardless of the N addition rate, both N treatments and species had no significant effect on dissolved organic N (DON) concentrations in litter leachate. About 52·78% of added N was retained in the litter. The percentage of N retention was positively correlated (R2=0.91, p<0.05) with the litter mass loss. This suggested that a forest floor with easily decomposed litter might have higher potential N sink strength than that with more slowly decomposed litter.

  6. Tadpoles of Early Breeding Amphibians are Negatively Affected by Leaf Litter From Invasive Chinese Tallow Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, N. E.

    2005-05-01

    As wetlands are invaded by Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera), native trees are displaced and detrital inputs to amphibian breeding ponds are altered. I used a mesocosm experiment to examine the effect of Chinese tallow leaf litter on the survival to, size at, and time to metamorphosis of amphibian larvae. Fifty 1000-L cattle watering tanks were treated with 1500 g dry weight of one of five leaf litter treatments: Chinese tallow, laurel oak (Quercus laurifolia), water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica), slash pine (Pinus elliottii), or a 3:1:1:1 mixture. Each tank received 45 tadpoles of Pseudacris feriarum, Bufo terrestris, and Hyla cinerea in sequence according to their natural breeding phonologies. Every Pseudacris feriarum and Bufo terrestris tadpole exposed to Chinese tallow died prior to metamorphosis. Hyla cinerea survival in tanks with tallow-only was significantly lower than that observed for all other leaf treatments. Hyla cinerea tadpoles from tallow-only and mixed-leaf treatments were larger at metamorphosis and transformed faster than those in tanks with native leaves only. These results suggest that Chinese tallow leaf litter may negatively affect tadpoles of early breeding frogs and that Chinese tallow invasion may change the structure of amphibian communities in temporary ponds.

  7. Prospective associations between forms and functions of aggression and social and affective processes during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, Jamie M; Murray-Close, Dianna; Godleski, Stephanie A; Hart, Emily J

    2013-09-01

    The central goal of this study was to examine the prospective associations between forms (i.e., physical and relational) and functions (i.e., proactive and reactive) of aggressive behavior with social (i.e., peer rejection) and affective (i.e., anger, emotion regulation skills) processes during early childhood (N = 96, mean age = 42.80 months, SD = 7.57). A cross-lagged path analysis revealed that proactive relational aggression was uniquely associated with decreases in peer rejection, whereas reactive relational aggression was associated with increases in peer rejection over time. Proactive relational aggression predicted decreases in anger, whereas reactive relational aggression tended to be associated with increases in anger. Proactive relational aggression uniquely predicted increases in emotion regulation skills, whereas reactive relational aggression tended to be associated with decreases in emotion regulation skills over time. Finally, anger was significantly associated with increases in several subtypes of aggressive behavior. In sum, the findings provide further support for the distinction between subtypes of aggressive behavior in young children.

  8. Transplacental and early life exposure to inorganic arsenic affected development and behavior in offspring rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Shuhua; Jin, Yaping; Sun, Guifan [China Medical University, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, College of Public Health, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Sun, Wenjuan; Wang, Fengzhi [Shenyang Medical College, Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenyang, Liaoning (China)

    2009-06-15

    To evaluate the developmental neurotoxicity of arsenic in offspring rats by transplacental and early life exposure to sodium arsenite in drinking water, the pregnant rats or lactating dams, and weaned pups were given free access to drinking water, which contained arsenic at concentrations of 0, 10, 50, 100 mg/L from GD 6 until PND 42. A battery of physical and behavioral tests was applied to evaluate the functional outcome of pups. Pups in arsenic exposed groups weighed less than controls throughout lactation and weaning. Body weight of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L arsenic exposed groups decreased significantly on PND 42, 16 and 12, respectively. Physical development (pinna unfolding, fur appearance, incisor eruption, or eye opening) in pups displayed no significant differences between control and arsenic treated groups. The number of incidences within the 100 mg/L arsenic treated group, in tail hung, auditory startle and visual placing showed significant decrease compared to the control group (p<0.05). In square water maze test, the trained numbers to finish the trials successfully in 50 and 100 mg/L arsenic exposed groups increased remarkably compared to control group, and there was a dose-related increase (p<0.01) observed. Taken together, these data show that exposure of inorganic arsenite to pregnant dams and offspring pups at levels up to 100 mg/L in drinking water may affect their learning and memory functions and neuromotor reflex. (orig.)

  9. How does the quantification of uncertainties affect the quality and value of flood early warning systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiboult, A.; Anctil, F.; Ramos, M. H.

    2017-08-01

    In an operational context, efficient decision-making is usually the ultimate objective of hydrometeorological forecasts. Because of the uncertainties that lay within the forecasting process, decisions are subject to uncertainty. A better quantification of uncertainties should provide better decisions, which often translate into optimal use and economic value of the forecasts. Six Early Warning Systems (EWS) based on contrasted forecasting systems are constructed to investigate how the quantification of uncertainties affects the quality of a decision. These systems differ by the location of the sources of uncertainty, and the total amount of uncertainty they take into account in the forecasting process. They are assessed with the Relative Economic Value (REV), which is a flexible measure to quantify the potential economic benefits of an EWS. The results show that all systems provide a gain over the case where no EWS is used. The most complex systems, i.e. those that consider more sources of uncertainty in the forecasting process, are those that showed the most reduced expected damages. Systems with better accuracy and reliability are generally the ones with higher REV, even though our analysis did not show a clear-cut relationship between overall forecast quality and REV in the context investigated.

  10. Early infancy microbial and metabolic alterations affect risk of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Stiemsma, Leah T; Dimitriu, Pedro A; Thorson, Lisa; Russell, Shannon; Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Kuzeljevic, Boris; Gold, Matthew J; Britton, Heidi M; Lefebvre, Diana L; Subbarao, Padmaja; Mandhane, Piush; Becker, Allan; McNagny, Kelly M; Sears, Malcolm R; Kollmann, Tobias; Mohn, William W; Turvey, Stuart E; Finlay, B Brett

    2015-09-30

    Asthma is the most prevalent pediatric chronic disease and affects more than 300 million people worldwide. Recent evidence in mice has identified a "critical window" early in life where gut microbial changes (dysbiosis) are most influential in experimental asthma. However, current research has yet to establish whether these changes precede or are involved in human asthma. We compared the gut microbiota of 319 subjects enrolled in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study, and show that infants at risk of asthma exhibited transient gut microbial dysbiosis during the first 100 days of life. The relative abundance of the bacterial genera Lachnospira, Veillonella, Faecalibacterium, and Rothia was significantly decreased in children at risk of asthma. This reduction in bacterial taxa was accompanied by reduced levels of fecal acetate and dysregulation of enterohepatic metabolites. Inoculation of germ-free mice with these four bacterial taxa ameliorated airway inflammation in their adult progeny, demonstrating a causal role of these bacterial taxa in averting asthma development. These results enhance the potential for future microbe-based diagnostics and therapies, potentially in the form of probiotics, to prevent the development of asthma and other related allergic diseases in children.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism and early life adversity affect hippocampal volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballedo, Angela; Morris, Derek; Zill, Peter; Fahey, Ciara; Reinhold, Elena; Meisenzahl, Eva; Bondy, Brigitta; Gill, Michael; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Frodl, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The interaction between adverse life events during childhood and genetic factors is associated with a higher risk to develop major depressive disorder (MDD). One of the polymorphisms found to be associated with MDD is the Val66MET polymorphism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The aim of our two-center study was to determine how the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and childhood adversity affect the volumetric measures of the hippocampus in healthy individuals and people with MDD. In this two-center study, 62 adult patients with MDD and 71 healthy matched controls underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. We used manual tracing of the bilateral hippocampal structure with help of the software BRAINS2, assessed childhood adversity using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and genotyped Val66Met BDNF SNP (rs6265). MDD patients had smaller hippocampal volumes, both in the left and right hemispheres (F = 5.4, P = 0.022). We also found a significant interaction between BDNF allele and history of childhood adversity (F = 6.1, P = 0.015): Met allele carriers in our samples showed significantly smaller hippocampal volumes when they did have a history of childhood adversity, both in patients and controls. Our results highlight how relevant stress-gene interactions are for hippocampal volume reductions. Subjects exposed to early life adversity developed smaller hippocampal volumes when they carry the Met-allele of the BDNF polymorphism.

  12. The recruitment of early retirees: a vignette study of the factors that affect managers' decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpinska, K.; Henkens, C.J.I.M.; Schippers, J.

    2011-01-01

    Retirement is characterised as a dynamic process that has several different outcomes, from early retirement to re-entry to the labour force. Recent studies of the Dutch population show that a substantial number of early retirees re-enter the workforce after early retirement, but others do not succee

  13. The Roles of Motivation, Affective Attitudes, and Willingness to Communicate among Chinese Students in Early English Immersion Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knell, Ellen; Chi, Yanping

    2012-01-01

    Early English immersion in China has been studied from many angles, but no research to date has investigated affective variables, which may have a profound relevance to successful English acquisition. The present study examines the roles of motivation, attitudes towards learning English, willingness to communicate, perceived competence, language…

  14. The Roles of Motivation, Affective Attitudes, and Willingness to Communicate among Chinese Students in Early English Immersion Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knell, Ellen; Chi, Yanping

    2012-01-01

    Early English immersion in China has been studied from many angles, but no research to date has investigated affective variables, which may have a profound relevance to successful English acquisition. The present study examines the roles of motivation, attitudes towards learning English, willingness to communicate, perceived competence, language…

  15. Components of Negative Affect as Moderators of the Relationship between Early Drinking Onset and Binge-Drinking Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Robert S.; Swaim, Randall C.; Rosen, Lee A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the moderating effects of negative affect on the relationship between early drinking onset and binge-drinking behavior. Six hundred and thirty-five eleventh- and twelfth-grade students completed the American Drug and Alcohol Survey and reported on a variety of measures, including items assessing anxiety, anger, depression, age…

  16. RESPONSE TO THE RICHARD ERSKINES ARTICLE RELATIONAL HEALING OF EARLY AFFECT-CONFUSION - PART 3 OF A CASE STUDY TRILOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Žvelc

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides four responses from senior psychotherapists and supervisors to Erskine’s articleRelational Healing of Early Affect-Confusion. The authors approach the third part of case study trilogy from their particular perspective and provide both challenge and respect for the author’s work.

  17. Acidic infusion in early reperfusion affects the activity of antioxidant enzymes in postischemic isolated rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Claudia; Perrelli, Maria-Giulia; Tullio, Francesca; Angotti, Carmelina; Pagliaro, Pasquale

    2013-07-01

    Acidic perfusion (AP) performed at the onset of reperfusion (i.e., acid postconditioning) is cardioprotective. We investigated the effect of AP on postischemic cardiac function and on the activity of endogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase. The role of exogenous CAT or SOD on AP cardioprotection was also investigated. Phosphorylation of redox-sensitive survival kinases (protein kinase C [PKC] ε and extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK] 1/2) was also checked. Isolated rat hearts underwent ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) for 30 and 120 min, respectively. AP was obtained by lowering [HCO3(-)] in the perfusion buffer. Infarct size and left ventricular pressure were measured. Protocols include I/R only, I/R plus acidic perfusion in early reperfusion (I/R + AP), and I/R plus AP and CAT (I/R + AP + CAT) or SOD (I/R + AP + SOD). I/R + SOD and I/R + CAT additional hearts served as controls. AP and/or antioxidants were given in the initial 3 min of reperfusion. Enzyme activities were studied in postischemic phase (seventh minute of reperfusion) in I/R or I/R + AP and Sham (buffer-perfused) hearts. AP with (I/R + AP + CAT or I/R + AP + SOD) or without (I/R + AP) antioxidant enzymes resulted in a larger reduction of infarct size compared with I/R, I/R + SOD, or I/R + CAT. Compared with I/R, the postischemic systolic and diastolic recoveries of the cardiac function were markedly improved by the addition of AP and a lesser extent by AP + SOD or AP + CAT. AP increased the postischemic activity of CAT and lowered that of SOD and glutathione peroxidase compared with I/R only. Also, the phosphorylation and activity of ERK1/2 and PKCε were increased by AP. Acid postconditioning affects the activity of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, activates ERK1/2-PKCε pathways, and protects against myocardial I/R injury. The combination of AP and exogenous SOD or CAT still provides cardioprotection. It is likely that intracellular (not

  18. Resuscitation fluid composition affects hepatic inflammation in a murine model of early sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Amanda L; Grin, Peter M; Kraus, Nicole; Gold, Michelle; Berardocco, Matthew; Liaw, Patricia C; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E

    2017-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation is a crucial therapy for sepsis, and the use of balanced fluids and/or isotonic albumin may improve patient survival. We have previously demonstrated that resuscitation with normal saline results in increased hepatic leukocyte recruitment in a murine model of sepsis. Given that clinical formulations of albumin are in saline, our objectives were to develop a novel balanced electrolyte solution specifically for sepsis and to determine if supplementing this solution with albumin would improve the inflammatory response in sepsis. We developed two novel buffered electrolyte solutions that contain different concentrations of acetate and gluconate, named Seplyte L and Seplyte H, and administered these solutions with or without 5% albumin. Normal saline with or without albumin and Ringer's lactate served as controls. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and the liver microvasculature was imaged in vivo at 6 h after CLP to quantify leukocyte recruitment. Hepatic cytokine expression and plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) concentrations were also measured. Septic mice receiving either Seplyte fluid showed significant reductions in hepatic post-sinusoidal leukocyte rolling and adhesion compared to normal saline. Hepatic cytokine concentrations varied in response to different concentrations of acetate and gluconate in the novel resuscitation fluids but were unaffected by albumin. All Seplyte fluids significantly increased hepatic TNF-α levels at 6 h compared to control fluids. However, Seplyte H exhibited a similar cytokine profile to the control fluids for all other cytokines, whereas mice given Seplyte L had significantly elevated IL-6, IL-10, KC (CXCL1), and MCP-1 (CCL2). Plasma cfDNA was generally increased during sepsis, but resuscitation fluid composition did not significantly affect cfDNA concentrations. Electrolyte concentrations and buffer constituents of resuscitation fluids can modulate hepatic cytokine production and leukocyte

  19. Age of acquisition affects early orthographic processing during Chinese character recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baoguo; Dent, Kevin; You, Wenping; Wu, Guolai

    2009-03-01

    Three experiments investigated age of acquisition (AoA) effects on early orthographic processing during Chinese character recognition. In Experiment 1, we measured the accuracy of identification of brief masked characters, accuracy was higher for early compared to late acquired characters. In Experiment 2, the visual duration threshold (VDT) was measured for both early and late acquired Chinese characters. The results showed that early acquired characters were successfully identified at shorter display durations than late acquired characters. Significant AoA effects were also found in Experiment 3, using a lexical decision task requiring mainly orthographic processing (discriminating real Chinese characters from orthographically illegal and unpronounceable characters). In summary, three experiments provide converging empirical evidence, for AoA effects on the early orthographic processing stages of Chinese character recognition. These results suggest that AoA effects during word identification go beyond the phonological or semantic processing stages. These results aslo provide cross-linguistic evidence for an AoA effect on early perceptual processing during identification.

  20. Negative Affective Spillover from Daily Events Predicts Early Response to Cognitive Therapy for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lawrence H.; Gunthert, Kathleen C.; Butler, Andrew C.; Parrish, Brendt P.; Wenze, Susan J.; Beck, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive role of depressed outpatients' (N = 62) affective reactivity to daily stressors in their rates of improvement in cognitive therapy (CT). For 1 week before treatment, patients completed nightly electronic diaries that assessed daily stressors and negative affect (NA). The authors used multilevel modeling to…

  1. Lessons learned from an emergency release of a post-fire debris-flow hazard assessment for the 2009 Station fire, San Gabriel Mountains, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, S. H.; Perry, S. C.; Staley, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The 2009 Station fire burned through portions of the steep, rugged terrain of the San Gabriel Mountains in southern California with a known history of producing large magnitude debris flows following fires. In response to the emergency, the U.S. Geological Survey released an assessment of debris-flow hazards as maps showing estimates of the probability and volume of debris-flow production from 678 burned drainage basins, and the areas that may be inundated by debris flows. The assessment was based on statistical-empirical models developed from post-fire hydrologic-response monitoring data throughout southern California steeplands. The intent of the assessment was to provide state-of-the-art information about potential debris-flow impacts to the public, and quantitative data critical for mitigation, resource-deployment and evacuation decisions by land-management, city and county public-works and flood-control, and emergency-response agencies. Here, we describe a research scientist perspective of the hits and misses associated with the release of this information. Release of the assessment was accompanied by an extensive multi-agency public information campaign. Hazards information was provided to the media and presented at numerous well-attended public meetings organized by local politicians, homeowner and religious associations, city councils, and a multi-agency response team. Meetings targeted to specific ethnic and religious groups resulted in increased attendance by members of these groups. Even with the extensive information campaign, the public response to both mandatory and voluntary evacuation orders was low, and decreased with each sequential winter storm. Interviews with local residents indicated that the low compliance could be attributed to: 1) a lack of a personal understanding of just how dangerous and destructive debris flows can be, 2) inconsistent messaging from different agencies regarding potential magnitudes of a debris-flow response, 3) a poor

  2. Differences on post-fire regeneration of the pioneer trees Cecropia glazioui and Trema micrantha in a lowland Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva M Silva-Matos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A study of natural post-fire succession was carried out in a disturbed vegetation around fragments of the Atlantic Rain Forest (National Biological Reserve of Poço das Antas (22 °30 ’-22 °33 ’S,42 °15 ’-42 °19 ’W, Rio de Janeiro State.All the pre-fire individuals of Cecropia and Trema in the area were numbered with plastic labels.In order to check for the presence of new sprouts and mortality,two other censuses were carried out,at 3 and 12 months after the fire.The dominant species were:Pteridium aquilinum,Panicum maximum,Trema micrantha and Cecropia glazioui. Few days after the passage of fire, grasses and ferns spread their area,while the stands of Trema and Cecropia were completely burned. Most of individuals of Cecropia produced some sprouts while most of individuals of Trema died.However,a great number of seedlings of Trema were recruited while only one single seedling of Cecropia were observed during a period of one year.Most of these seedlings died through the year while the sprouts were already reproducing.The uses of Cecropia in places where fire is recurrent could be more appropriate because of its higher chance of survival and faster recovering ability after fire.Rev.Biol.Trop.53(1-2:1-4.Epub 2005 Jun 24Se realizó un estudio sobre la sucesión natural después del fuego en una vegetación alrededor de fragmentos de la selva lluviosa atlántica (Reserva Biológica Nacional de Poço das Antas (22° 30 ’-22° 33 ’ S, 42° 15’- 42° 19’ W, Estado de Río de Janeiro.Todos los individuos de Cecropia y Trema previos del fuego en el área fueron numerados con marcas plásticas. Se realizaron otros dos censos, 3 y 12 meses después del fuego con el objetivo de detectar mortalidad y buscar la presencia de nuevos brotes. Las especies dominantes fueron: Pteridium aquilinum, Panicum maximum, Trema micrantha y Cecropia glazioui. Pocos días después del paso del fuego,los pastos y helechos se dispersaron por el área, mientras

  3. Post-fire debris-flow hazard assessment of the area burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near Hailey, central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary hazard assessment was developed for debris-flow hazards in the 465 square-kilometer (115,000 acres) area burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek fire near Hailey in central Idaho. The burn area covers all or part of six watersheds and selected basins draining to the Big Wood River and is at risk of substantial post-fire erosion, such as that caused by debris flows. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the Intermountain Region in Western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence, potential volume of debris flows, and the combined debris-flow hazard ranking along the drainage network within the burn area and to estimate the same for analyzed drainage basins within the burn area. Input data for the empirical models included topographic parameters, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 2-year storm (13 mm); (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 10-year storm (19 mm); and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 25-year storm (22 mm). Estimated debris-flow probabilities for drainage basins upstream of 130 selected basin outlets ranged from less than 1 to 78 percent with the probabilities increasing with each increase in storm magnitude. Probabilities were high in three of the six watersheds. For the 25-year storm, probabilities were greater than 60 percent for 11 basin outlets and ranged from 50 to 60 percent for an additional 12 basin outlets. Probability estimates for stream segments within the drainage network can vary within a basin. For the 25-year storm, probabilities for stream segments within 33 basins were higher than the basin outlet, emphasizing the importance of evaluating the drainage network as well as basin outlets. Estimated debris-flow volumes for the three modeled storms range

  4. Climate adaption and post-fire restoration of a foundational perennial in cold desert: Insights from intraspecific variation in response to weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Martha M.; Germino, Matthew; Richardson, Bryce A.

    2017-01-01

    1.The loss of foundational but fire-intolerant perennials such as sagebrush due to increases in fire size and frequency in semiarid regions has motivated efforts to restore them, often with mixed or even no success. Seeds of sagebrush Artemisia tridentata and related species must be moved considerable distances from seed source to planting sites, but such transfers have not been guided by an understanding of local climate adaptation. Initial seedling establishment and its response to weather are a key demographic bottleneck that likely varies among subspecies and populations of sagebrush. 2.We assessed differences in survival, growth, and physiological responses of sagebrush to weather among eleven seed sources that varied in subspecies, cytotype, and climates-of-origin over 18 months following outplanting. Diploid or polyploid populations of mountain, Wyoming, and basin big sagebrush (A.tridentata ssp. vaseyana, A.tridentata ssp. wyomingensis, and A.tridentata ssp. tridentata, respectively) were planted onto five burned sites that normally support A.t.wyomingensis with some A.t.tridentata. 3.A.t.wyomingensis had the most growth and survival, and tetraploid populations had greater survival and height than diploids. Seasonal timing of mortality varied among the subspecies/cytotypes and was more closely related to minimum temperatures than water deficit. 4.Temperatures required to induce ice formation were up to 6°C more negative in 4n-A.t.tridentata and A.t.wyomingensis than other subspecies/cytotypes, indicating greater freezing avoidance. In contrast, freezing resistance of photosynthesis varied only 1°C among subspecies/cytotypes, being greatest in A.t.wyomingensis and least in the subspecies normally considered most cold-adapted,A.t.vaseyana. A large spectrum of reliance on freezing-avoidance vs. freezing-tolerance was observed and corresponded to differences in post-fire survivorship among subspecies/cytotypes. Differences in water deficit

  5. Coral ontogeny affects early symbiont acquisition in laboratory-reared recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Shelby E.; Coffroth, Mary Alice

    2017-09-01

    In most coral species, the critical association with a subset of genetically diverse algal endosymbionts, Symbiodinium, is re-established anew each generation in early coral ontogeny. Yet little is known about the window during which these associations are established or the potential for altering symbiont associations through early exposure to non-native, and/or ecologically beneficial (e.g., stress tolerant), symbiont strains. This study examined the ontogenetic window of symbiont uptake in a restoration target species. Orbicella faveolata recruits, maintained aposymbiotic in laboratory tanks for 4 months, showed a significant decrease in symbiont acquisition upon exposure to natural seawater. Recruits initially inoculated with cultured Symbiodinium readily acquired additional strains from environmental symbiont populations upon exposure, but exogenous uptake also decreased in frequency after 4 months of laboratory rearing. Early exposure to Symbiodinium may benefit laboratory-reared recruits (e.g., enhance growth), but the potential for establishing long-term novel symbiotic associations may be limited.

  6. Long-term post-fire effects on spatial ecology and reproductive output of female Agassiz’s desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) at a wind energy facility near Palm Springs, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Madrak, Sheila V.; Loughran, Caleb L.; Meyer, Katherin P.; Arundel, Terence R.; Bjurlin, Curtis D.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the long-term response of a cohort of eight female Agassiz’s desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) during the first 15 years following a large fire at a wind energy generation facility near Palm Springs, California, USA. The fire burned a significant portion of the study site in 1995. Tortoise activity areas were mapped using minimum convex polygons for a proximate post-fire interval from 1997 to 2000, and a long-term post-fire interval from 2009 to 2010. In addition, we measured the annual reproductive output of eggs each year and monitored the body condition of tortoises over time. One adult female tortoise was killed by the fire and five tortoises bore exposure scars that were not fatal. Despite predictions that tortoises would make the short-distance movements from burned to nearby unburned habitats, most activity areas and their centroids remained in burned areas for the duration of the study. The percentage of activity area burned did not differ significantly between the two monitoring periods. Annual reproductive output and measures of body condition remained statistically similar throughout the monitoring period. Despite changes in plant composition, conditions at this site appeared to be suitable for survival of tortoises following a major fire. High productivity at the site may have buffered tortoises from the adverse impacts of fire if they were not killed outright. Tortoise populations at less productive desert sites may not have adequate resources to sustain normal activity areas, reproductive output, and body conditions following fire.

  7. Basic Abnormalities in Visual Processing Affect Face Processing at an Early Age in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlamings, Petra Hendrika Johanna Maria; Jonkman, Lisa Marthe; van Daalen, Emma; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Kemner, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Background: A detailed visual processing style has been noted in autism spectrum disorder (ASD); this contributes to problems in face processing and has been directly related to abnormal processing of spatial frequencies (SFs). Little is known about the early development of face processing in ASD an

  8. Early maternal deprivation affects dentate gyrus structure and emotional learning in adult female rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, C.A.; Soeters, H.; Audureau, N.; Vermunt, L.; van Hasselt, F.N.; Manders, E.M.M.; Joëls, M.; Krugers, H.; Lucassen, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Stress elicits functional and structural changes in the hippocampus. Early life stress is one of the major risk factors for stress-related pathologies like depression. Patients suffering from depression show a reduced hippocampal volume, and in women, this occurs more often when depressio

  9. Novel developmental analyses identify longitudinal patterns of early gut microbiota that affect infant growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A White

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that some obesity trajectories are set early in life, and that rapid weight gain in infancy is a risk factor for later development of obesity. Identifying modifiable factors associated with early rapid weight gain is a prerequisite for curtailing the growing worldwide obesity epidemic. Recently, much attention has been given to findings indicating that gut microbiota may play a role in obesity development. We aim at identifying how the development of early gut microbiota is associated with expected infant growth. We developed a novel procedure that allows for the identification of longitudinal gut microbiota patterns (corresponding to the gut ecosystem developing, which are associated with an outcome of interest, while appropriately controlling for the false discovery rate. Our method identified developmental pathways of Staphylococcus species and Escherichia coli that were associated with expected growth, and traditional methods indicated that the detection of Bacteroides species at day 30 was associated with growth. Our method should have wide future applicability for studying gut microbiota, and is particularly important for translational considerations, as it is critical to understand the timing of microbiome transitions prior to attempting to manipulate gut microbiota in early life.

  10. Early life experiences affect the adaptive capacity of rearing hens during infectious challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walstra, I.; Napel, ten J.; Kemp, B.; Schipper, H.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether pre- and early postnatal experiences of rearing hens contribute to the ability to cope with infectious challenges at an older age. In a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, 352 Lohmann Brown chicks were exposed to either suboptimal or optimized incubation plus hatch c

  11. Bias to pollen odors is affected by early exposure and foraging experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, A; Farina, W M

    2014-07-01

    In many pollinating insects, foraging preferences are adjusted on the basis of floral cues learned at the foraging site. In addition, olfactory experiences gained at early adult stages might also help them to initially choose food sources. To understand pollen search behavior of honeybees, we studied how responses elicited by pollen-based odors are biased in foraging-age workers according to (i) their genetic predisposition to collect pollen, (ii) pollen related information gained during foraging and (iii) different experiences with pollen gained at early adult ages. Bees returning to the hive carrying pollen loads, were strongly biased to unfamiliar pollen bouquets when tested in a food choice device against pure odors. Moreover, pollen foragers' orientation response was specific to the odors emitted by the pollen type they were carrying on their baskets, which suggests that foragers retrieve pollen odor information to recognize rewarding flowers outside the hive. We observed that attraction to pollen odor was mediated by the exposure to a pollen diet during the first week of life. We did not observe the same attraction in foraging-age bees early exposed to an artificial diet that did not contain pollen. Contrary to the specific response observed to cues acquired during foraging, early exposure to single-pollen diets did not bias orientation response towards a specific pollen odor in foraging-age bees (i.e. bees chose equally between the exposed and the novel monofloral pollen odors). Our results show that pollen exposure at early ages together with olfactory experiences gained in a foraging context are both relevant to bias honeybees' pollen search behavior.

  12. Early experience affects the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestripieri, Dario

    2005-07-01

    Maternal abuse of offspring in macaque monkeys shares some similarities with child maltreatment in humans, including its transmission across generations. This study used a longitudinal design and a cross-fostering experiment to investigate whether abusive parenting in rhesus macaques is transmitted from mothers to daughters and whether transmission occurs through genetic or experiential factors. Nine of 16 females who were abused by their mothers in their first month of life, regardless of whether they were reared by their biological mothers or by foster mothers, exhibited abusive parenting with their firstborn offspring, whereas none of the females reared by nonabusive mothers did. These results suggest that the intergenerational transmission of infant abuse in rhesus monkeys is the result of early experience and not genetic inheritance. The extent to which the effects of early experience on the intergenerational transmission of abusive parenting are mediated by social learning or experience-induced physiological alterations remains to be established.

  13. Maternal early-life trauma and affective parenting style: the mediating role of HPA-axis function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Sarah H; Hendrix, Cassandra; Robinson, Brittany; Stowe, Zachary N; Newport, D Jeffrey; Brennan, Patricia A; Johnson, Katrina C

    2016-02-01

    A history of childhood trauma is associated with increased risk for psychopathology and interpersonal difficulties in adulthood and, for those who have children, impairments in parenting and increased risk of negative outcomes in offspring. Physiological and behavioral mechanisms are poorly understood. In the current study, maternal history of childhood trauma was hypothesized to predict differences in maternal affect and HPA axis functioning. Mother-infant dyads (N = 255) were assessed at 6 months postpartum. Mothers were videotaped during a 3-min naturalistic interaction, and their behavior was coded for positive, neutral, and negative affect. Maternal salivary cortisol was measured six times across the study visit, which also included an infant stressor paradigm. Results showed that childhood trauma history predicted increased neutral affect and decreased mean cortisol in the mothers and that cortisol mediated the association between trauma history and maternal affect. Maternal depression was not associated with affective measures or cortisol. Results suggest that early childhood trauma may disrupt the development of the HPA axis, which in turn impairs affective expression during mother-infant interactions in postpartum women. Interventions aimed at treating psychiatric illness in postpartum women may benefit from specific components to assess and treat trauma-related symptoms and prevent secondary effects on parenting.

  14. Early social environment affects the endogenous oxytocin system: a review and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eAlves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous oxytocin plays an important role in a wide range of human functions including birth, milk ejection during lactation and facilitation of social interaction. There is increasing evidence that both variations in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR and concentrations of oxytocin are associated with differences in these functions. The causes for the differences that have been observed in tonic and stimulated oxytocin release remain unclear. Previous reviews have suggested that across the life course, these differences may be due to individual factors, e.g. genetic variation (of the OXTR, age or sex, or be the result of early environmental influences such as social experiences, stress or trauma partly by inducing epigenetic changes. This review has three aims. First, we briefly discuss the endogenous oxytocin system, including physiology, development, individual differences and function. Secondly, current models describing the relationship between the early life environment and the development of the oxytocin system in humans and animals are discussed. Finally, we describe research designs that can be used to investigate the effects of the early environment on the oxytocin system, identifying specific areas of research that need further attention.

  15. Medical conditions affect the outcome of early intervention in preschool children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Mats Anders; Westerlund, Joakim; Hedvall, Åsa; Åmark, Per; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to explore the frequency of genetic and other medical conditions, including epilepsy, in a population-based group of 208 preschool children with early diagnosis of Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and to relate outcome at a 2-year follow-up to the co-existing medical findings. They had all received early intervention. The Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS-II) composite score served as the primary outcome measure. In the total group, 38/208 children (18 %) had a significant medical or genetic condition. Epilepsy was present in 6.3 % at the first assessment and in 8.6 % at follow-up and was associated with more severe intellectual impairment. A history of regression was reported in 22 %. Children with any medical/genetic condition, including epilepsy, as well as children with a history of regression had significantly lower VABS-II scores at the 2-year follow-up. Children with a medical/genetic condition, including epilepsy, had been diagnosed with ASD at an earlier age than those without such conditions, and early age at diagnosis also correlated negatively with adaptive functioning outcome. The results underscore the importance of considering medical/genetic aspects in all young children with ASD and the requirement to individualize and tailor interventions according to their specific needs.

  16. Does dietary protein in early life affect the development of adiposity in mammals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metges, C C

    2001-07-01

    This article examines the proposition that dietary protein in pre- and early postnatal life influences the development of adiposity in later life. In rodents, low protein intake during gestation can result in low birth weight and subsequently leads to various metabolic disturbances in adulthood, such as high blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. The few controlled studies conducted in animals suggest that high protein or energy intake during gestation leads to low birth weights. Observational studies in humans have been inconclusive in establishing a relationship between dietary protein intake in pregnancy and effects on birth weight and adiposity of the offspring later in life. There is only weak epidemiological evidence linking high protein intake during early childhood and the development of obesity. By contrast, studies in domestic animals have found that higher levels of protein intake are often associated with lower rates of fat accretion. Additional studies are proposed to explore claims linking protein nutrition in early life to the postnatal development of obesity and disease in humans.

  17. Institutional factors that affect black South African students' perceptions of early childhood teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M G Steyn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Black students account for over 72% of enrolments in higher education, but only a small percentage of them choose Early Childhood Education (ECE as a field of study and complete the qualification. The purpose of this study was to examine, from the perspective of black ECE students, why so few of them enrol in this particular programme at a historically white university. Through a qualitative, case study approach the reasons for the low enrolment and completion rates were investigated. Participants mentioned that recruitment for this programme, particularly in rural areas should be improved. They also pointed out the higher prestige of other career options, the linguistic challenges they face, the cost of university education and early teacher education in particular, as well as access to transport and resources as barriers to recruitment and retention. Their recommendations for higher enrolment rates included the use of black students to recruit in rural and in township areas, increased funding for bursaries, and more culturally sensitive pedagogies in early childhood teacher education.

  18. Nonsurgical scar management of the face: does early versus late intervention affect outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Ingrid; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina; Greenhalgh, David

    2013-01-01

    Special emphasis is placed on the clinical management of facial scarring because of the profound physical and psychological impact of facial burns. Noninvasive methods of facial scar management include pressure therapy, silicone, massage, and facial exercises. Early implementation of these scar management techniques after a burn injury is typically accepted as standard burn rehabilitation practice, however, little data exist to support this practice. This study evaluated the timing of common noninvasive scar management interventions after facial skin grafting in children and the impact on outcome, as measured by scar assessment and need for facial reconstructive surgery. A retrospective review of 138 patients who underwent excision and grafting of the face and subsequent noninvasive scar management during a 10-year time frame was conducted. Regression analyses were used to show that earlier application of silicone was significantly related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale scores, specifically in the subscales of vascularity and pigmentation. Early use of pressure therapy and implementation of facial exercises were also related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale vascularity scores. No relationship was found between timing of the interventions and facial reconstructive outcome. Early use of silicone, pressure therapy, and exercise may improve scar outcome and accelerate time to scar maturity.

  19. Early organ dysfunction affects long-term survival in acute pancreatitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Christos; Hayes, Alastair J; Williams, Linda; Garden, O James; Parks, Rowan W; Mole, Damian J

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of early organ dysfunction on long-term survival in acute pancreatitis (AP) patients is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to ascertain whether early organ dysfunction impacts on long-term survival after an episode of AP. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed using survival data sourced from a prospectively maintained database of patients with AP admitted to the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh during a 5-year period commencing January 2000. A multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) score of ≥ 2 during the first week of admission was used to define early organ dysfunction. After accounting for in-hospital deaths, long-term survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier test. The prognostic significance of patient characteristics was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using Cox's proportional hazards methods. Results A total of 694 patients were studied (median follow-up: 8.8 years). Patients with early organ dysfunction (MODS group) were found to have died prematurely [mean survival: 10.0 years, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.4–10.6 years] in comparison with the non-MODS group (mean survival: 11.6 years, 95% CI 11.2–11.9 years) (log-rank test, P = 0.001) after the exclusion of in-hospital deaths. Multivariate analysis confirmed MODS as an independent predictor of long-term survival [hazard ratio (HR): 1.528, 95% CI 1.72–2.176; P = 0.019] along with age (HR: 1.062; P < 0.001), alcohol-related aetiology (HR: 2.027; P = 0.001) and idiopathic aetiology (HR: 1.548; P = 0.048). Conclusions Early organ dysfunction in AP is an independent predictor of long-term survival even when in-hospital deaths are accounted for. Negative predictors also include age, and idiopathic and alcohol-related aetiologies. PMID:24712663

  20. Happy babies, chatty toddlers: infant positive affect facilitates early expressive, but not receptive language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laake, Lauren M; Bridgett, David J

    2014-02-01

    Eighty-three mother-infant dyads participated in this study. Positive affect (PA) broadly, along with fine-grained aspects of PA, was measured at 10 months of age. Language was measured at 14 months. Infant PA predicted expressive, but not receptive, language. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Parents and Early Life Environment Affect Behavioral Development of Laying Hen Chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.; Bolhuis, J.E.; Kemp, B.; Groothuis, T.G.G.; Rodenburg, T.B.

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (SFP) in commercial laying hens is a maladaptive behavior which is associated with anxiety traits. Many experimental studies have shown that stress in the parents can affect anxiety in the offspring, but until now these effects have been neglected in addressing the problem of

  2. Parents and early life environment affect behavioral development of laying hen chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Elske N. de; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Kemp, Bas; Groothuis, Ton G.G.; Rodenburg, T. Bas

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (SFP) in commercial laying hens is a maladaptive behavior which is associated with anxiety traits. Many experimental studies have shown that stress in the parents can affect anxiety in the offspring, but until now these effects have been neglected in addressing the problem of

  3. Factors that affect early recurrence after prolapse repair by a nonanchored vaginal mesh procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Pei Tsai

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Prosima seems to have limitations when used to manage severe anterior vaginal wall prolapse and concomitant surgery may further affect its effectiveness. The information obtained from this study's DSMP will contribute to developing a strategy to improve the use of nonanchored vaginal mesh for POP repair.

  4. Severity of lung fibrosis affects early surgical outcomes of lung cancer among patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimae, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norihiko; Takamochi, Kazuya; Aokage, Keiju; Shimada, Yoshihisa; Miyata, Yoshihiro; Okada, Morihito

    2016-07-01

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) is defined as upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe fibrosis, which are representative lung disorders that increase the prevalence of lung cancer. This unique disorder may affect the morbidity and mortality during the early period after surgery. The present study aimed to identify which clinicopathological features significantly affect early surgical outcomes after lung resection in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and in those with CPFE.We retrospectively assessed 2295 patients with NSCLC and found that 151 (6.6%) had CPFE. All were surgically treated between January 2008 and December 2010 at 4 institutions.The postoperative complication rates for patients with and without CPFE were 39% and 17%, respectively. The 90-day mortality rates were higher among patients with than without CPFE (7.9% vs 1%). Acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was the main cause of death among 12 patients with CPFE who died within 90 days after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis selected CPFE, gender, age, and clinical stage as independent predictive factors for postoperative complications, and CPFE, clinical stage, and sex for 90-day mortality. The severity of lung fibrosis on preoperative CT images was an independent predictive factor for 90-day mortality among patients with CPFE.The key predictive factor for postoperative mortality and complications of lung resection for NSCLC was CPFE. The severity of lung fibrosis was the principal predictor of early outcomes after lung surgery among patients with CPFE and NSCLC.

  5. Affective facilitation of early visual cortex during rapid picture presentation at 6 and 15 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhtereva, Valeria; Müller, Matthias M

    2015-12-01

    The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), a neurophysiological marker of attentional resource allocation with its generators in early visual cortex, exhibits enhanced amplitude for emotional compared to neutral complex pictures. Emotional cue extraction for complex images is linked to the N1-EPN complex with a peak latency of ∼140-160 ms. We tested whether neural facilitation in early visual cortex with affective pictures requires emotional cue extraction of individual images, even when a stream of images of the same valence category is presented. Images were shown at either 6 Hz (167 ms, allowing for extraction) or 15 Hz (67 ms per image, causing disruption of processing by the following image). Results showed SSVEP amplitude enhancement for emotional compared to neutral images at a presentation rate of 6 Hz but no differences at 15 Hz. This was not due to featural differences between the two valence categories. Results strongly suggest that individual images need to be displayed for sufficient time allowing for emotional cue extraction to drive affective neural modulation in early visual cortex.

  6. Abnormal early brain responses during visual search are evident in schizophrenia but not bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanMeerten, Nicolaas J; Dubke, Rachel E; Stanwyck, John J; Kang, Seung Suk; Sponheim, Scott R

    2016-01-01

    People with schizophrenia show deficits in processing visual stimuli but neural abnormalities underlying the deficits are unclear and it is unknown whether such functional brain abnormalities are present in other severe mental disorders or in individuals who carry genetic liability for schizophrenia. To better characterize brain responses underlying visual search deficits and test their specificity to schizophrenia we gathered behavioral and electrophysiological responses during visual search (i.e., Span of Apprehension [SOA] task) from 38 people with schizophrenia, 31 people with bipolar disorder, 58 biological relatives of people with schizophrenia, 37 biological relatives of people with bipolar disorder, and 65 non-psychiatric control participants. Through subtracting neural responses associated with purely sensory aspects of the stimuli we found that people with schizophrenia exhibited reduced early posterior task-related neural responses (i.e., Span Endogenous Negativity [SEN]) while other groups showed normative responses. People with schizophrenia exhibited longer reaction times than controls during visual search but nearly identical accuracy. Those individuals with schizophrenia who had larger SENs performed more efficiently (i.e., shorter reaction times) on the SOA task suggesting that modulation of early visual cortical responses facilitated their visual search. People with schizophrenia also exhibited a diminished P300 response compared to other groups. Unaffected first-degree relatives of people with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed an amplified N1 response over posterior brain regions in comparison to other groups. Diminished early posterior brain responses are associated with impaired visual search in schizophrenia and appear to be specifically associated with the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Hyaluronate degradation affects ventricular function of the early postlooped embryonic rat heart in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, H S; Lloyd, T R; Solursh, M

    1994-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid is the major glycosaminoglycan of the early cardiac extracellular matrix or "cardiac jelly," yet little is known about its role in the ontogeny of early ventricular performance. To investigate the in situ effect of hyaluronate degradation on ventricular function, whole rat embryos were cultured in rat serum alone (control embryos) or rat serum plus 20 TRU/mL of Streptomyces hyaluronidase (treatment embryos) from gestational day 9.5 (before formation of the heart tube) through initial looping of the heart. Cardiac function was measured before looping (24 hours in culture) and immediately after looping (36 hours in culture) by video motion analysis of the external wall motion of the bulbus cordis and primitive ventricle. Degradation of hyaluronic acid in the treated embryos was confirmed by Alcian blue staining at pH 2.5. Significant increases in heart rate, circumferential shortening fraction, maximum velocity of circumferential contraction, and maximum velocity of circumferential relaxation were observed with looping in both control and treatment embryos. Although there was minimal difference in ventricular performance between control and treatment embryos before looping, there was a significant increase in all parameters of ventricular performance in the hyaluronidase-treated embryos immediately after looping of the heart. Endocardial cushions were absent in hyaluronidase-treated embryos, and an additional group of embryos cultured in the presence of Streptomyces hyaluronidase for 48 to 72 hours failed to develop endocardial cushions. These experiments are the first to (1) document a quantifiable increase in ventricular performance during early cardiac looping and (2) demonstrate that hyaluronate degradation results in abnormal endocardial cushion formation and altered ventricular performance of the postlooped heart.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Early Cardiac Affection in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Othman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the early preclinical alterations in cardiac autonomic control as well as altered cardiac function in systemic sclerosis (SSc patients and their relevance to the clinical features of the disease using noninvasive methods. Methods: 30 SSc patients and 15 healthy controls matched for age and sex underwent clinical examination, serological analysis, and echocardiographic assessment including Doppler flow imaging to evaluate cardiac function, and 24-hour Holter monitoring analyzed for arrhythmia and heart rate variability (HRV in the time and frequency domains. Results: The trans-mitral Doppler of early to atrial wave (E/A ratio was reversed in five patients (16.6% and the tricuspid E/A ratio was reversed in 10 patients (33.3%. Holter analysis for SSc patients revealed an increased prevalence of premature ventricular contractions (PVC $ 10/h (P = 0.02, supra-ventricular tachycardias (SVTs (P = 0.2, and total PVC count (P = 0.0000. Highly significant (P = 0.000 impairment in all HRV parameters was demonstrated in the SSc patients. Total skin thickness score (TSS, Raynaud’s phenomenon and anti-scleroderma 70 (anti-SCL70 showed significant positive correlations with all arrhythmia parameters, while showing a significant negative correlation with the impaired ventricular diastolic function and various HRV parameters. No correlation was found between arrhythmia and HRV parameters and disease duration, disease type, or presence of anti-centromere antibodies. Conclusion: Low heart rate variability, increased TSS and the presence of anti-SCL70 are correlated with preclinical cardiac involvement in SSc patients and may predict the likelihood of malignant arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Therefore, noninvasive HRV evaluation before clinical cardiac involvement in these patients might be beneficial when added to the clinical and laboratory assessments in detecting high-risk patients, and may allow for implementation of preventive

  9. Affect of surgical approaches on functional results of total hip arthroplasty in early postoperative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Andreyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive approaches implies a less soft tissue damage and, therefore, more rapid recovery of the patient in the early postoperative period. The present study is a comparison of minimally invasive and standard approaches using biomechanical analysis of standing and walking patients before and after total hip arthroplasty, as well as an analysis of clinical outcomes in the early postoperative period. Fifty patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty using a minimally invasive and conventional techniques were divided into three groups. The first group consisted of patients operated on using the MIS AL (modified minimally invasive approach Watson-Jones (n = 17, the second - MDM (minimally invasive approach to the modified Mueller (n = 16 and in the third - with the use of transgluteal conventional approach by Harding (n = 17. The estimation of biomechanical parameters in static and dynamic patients before surgery and at 8-10 days after surgery. Also assessed clinical outcome postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS and Harris scale on day 10, 6 and 12 weeks and 1 year. When comparing the three groups of patients stabilometry best results were observed in groups of minimally invasive approaches MIS AL and MDM. When comparing the three groups significantly better (a moderate increase in the duration of the step, rolling the contralateral limb and a slight increase in the duration of the step the operated limb by increasing the duration of the roll-over were identified in the minimally invasive group MIS AL and MDM. In assessing the scale of Harris in the early postoperative period, higher rates were observed in groups of minimally invasive approaches. A year after the operation functional results become similar in all groups.

  10. Changes in muscle force-length properties affect the early rise of force in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blazevich, Anthony J; Cannavan, Dale; Horne, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Changes in contractile rate of force development (RFD), measured within a short time interval from contraction initiation, were measured after a period of strength training that led to increases in muscle fascicle length but no measurable change in neuromuscular activity. The relationship between...... training-induced shifts in the moment-angle relation and changes in RFD measured to 30 ms (i.e., early) and 200 ms (i.e., late) from the onset of isometric knee extension force were examined; shifts in the moment-angle relation were used as an overall measure of changes in quadriceps muscle fascicle length...

  11. Early trauma and affect: the importance of the body for the development of the capacity to symbolize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Hessel

    2014-11-01

    In this paper I aim to outline the importance of working clinically with affect when treating severely traumatized patients who have a limited capacity to symbolize. These patients, who suffer the loss of maternal care early in life, require the analyst to be closely attuned to the patient's distress through use of the countertransference and with significantly less attention paid to the transference. It is questionable whether we can speak of transference when there is limited capacity to form internal representations. The analyst's relationship with the patient is not necessarily used to make interpretations but, instead, the analyst's reverie functions therapeutically to develop awareness and containment of affect, first in the analyst's mind and, later, in the patient's, so that, in time, a relationship between the patient's mind and the body, as the first object, is made. In contrast to general object-relations theories, in which the first object is considered to be the breast or the mother, Ferrari (2004) proposes that the body is the first object in the emerging mind. Once a relationship between mind and body is established, symbolization becomes possible following the formation of internal representations of affective states in the mind, where previously there were few. Using Ferrari's body-mind model, two clinical case vignettes underline the need to use the countertransference with patients who suffered chronic developmental trauma in early childhood. © 2014, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  12. Specific Language Impairment affects the early spelling process quantitatively but not qualitatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordewener, Kim A H; Bosman, Anna M T; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) need a special spelling education program, by examining whether the early spelling of children with SLI is quantitatively and qualitatively different from the spelling of typically developing children. Two groups of first grade children participated: 39 children with a typical language development between the age of 73 and 88 months, and 59 children with SLI between the age of 71 and 97 months. The results indicated that children with SLI do have a quantitative delay in both grapheme knowledge and spelling during first grade. However, there was no qualitative difference between the early spelling of children with SLI and typically developing children. This indicated that children with SLI have the same spelling processes as typically developing children, although they develop slower. For clinical practice, this means that teachers of children with SLI can practice the same skills as with typically developing children, but they have to practice substantially more than typically developing children.

  13. Warming affects hatching time and early season survival of eastern tent caterpillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, Mariana; Lill, John T

    2015-11-01

    Climate change is disrupting species interactions by altering the timing of phenological events such as budburst for plants and hatching for insects. We combined field observations with laboratory manipulations to investigate the consequences of climate warming on the phenology and performance of the eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum). We evaluated the effects of warmer winter and spring regimes on caterpillar hatching patterns and starvation endurance, traits likely to be under selection in populations experiencing phenological asynchrony, using individuals from two different populations (Washington, DC, and Roswell, GA). We also quantified the proximate and extended fitness effects of early food deprivation and recorded spring phenology of local caterpillars and their host plants. In addition, we conducted laboratory assays to determine if caterpillars are using plant chemical cues to fine-tune their hatching times. Warmer winter temperatures induced earlier hatching and caterpillars from GA survived starvation for periods that were 30% longer than caterpillars from DC. Warmer spring regimes reduced the starvation endurance of caterpillars overwintering in the wild but not in the laboratory. Early starvation dramatically reduced hatchling survival; however, surviving caterpillars did not show detrimental effects on pupal mass or development time. In the field, hatching preceded budburst in both 2013 and 2014 and the period of optimal foliage quality was 2 weeks shorter in 2013. Hatching time was unaffected by exposure to plant volatiles. Overall, we found that warmer temperatures can trigger late-season asynchrony by accelerating plant phenology and caterpillars from different populations exhibit differential abilities to cope with environmental unreliability.

  14. Early ERP modulation during mood adjectives processing in patients with affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Szczepan J; Wyczesany, Miroslaw

    2016-10-06

    Attentional bias is considered a key feature in mood disorders, and yet little is known of its neural correlates within the early stream of information processing in manic and depressed patients. The study aimed to capture and detail attentional bias during emotional word processing in patients within the first 500ms of stimulus exposition. 28 mood adjectives (14 positive and 14 negative) were used as stimuli. We expected differences in adjective encoding between groups during lexico-semantic analysis based on varying attentional resource allocation. Differences were evidenced within the first 100ms after stimulus onset with higher amplitudes for both patient groups than controls, possibly indicating more automatic attention allocation to stimuli during sensory analysis stages. Between 200-290ms after the words' onset, a specific valence mood-word mismatch was registered which approached significance, with higher responses evoked to negative than positive words in manic patients, and the opposite pattern of activity observed in depressed patients, suggesting cognitive bias based on mood incongruence during the lexico-semantic analysis stage. There was also a lateralized pattern of activity, with higher amplitudes over the right hemisphere posteriorly, and higher over the left frontally in the patient groups, especially in the manic individuals. The study points to attentional bias based on mood incongruence processing during crucial stages of meaning encoding within the early stream of information processing.

  15. Production performance and plasma metabolites of dairy ewes in early lactation as affected by chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, A.; Arranz, J.; Mandaluniz, N.; Beltrán-de-Heredia, I.; Ruiz, R.; Goiri, I.

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of chitosan (CHI) supplementation on production performance and blood parameters in dairy ewes. Twenty-four multiparous Latxa dairy ewes at d 16 of lactation were divided into two groups of 12 ewes each. Ewes were fed one of two experimental concentrates (0.840 kg dry matter/d), control or supplemented with 1.2% CHI, on a dry matter basis. Ewes also had free access to tall fescue hay, water, and mineral salts. The experimental period lasted for 25 d, of which the first 14 d were for treatment adaptation and the last 11 d for measurements and samplings. Supplementation with CHI decreased total (p=0.043) and fescue (p=0.035) dry matter intake (DMI), but did not affect concentrate DMI. Supplementation with CHI, moreover, increased plasma glucose (p=0.013) and BUN concentrations (p=0.035), but did not affect those of non-esterified fatty acids. Dietary supplementation with CHI, however, did not affect milk yield, 6.5% FCM, milk composition, or BW, but it improved dietary apparent efficiency by increasing the milk yield-to-DMI (p=0.055) and 6.5% FCM-to-DMI (p=0.045) ratios. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of chitosan maintained ewe performance while reducing feed intake and improving dietary apparent efficiency. (Author)

  16. Calcium Addition Affects Germination and Early Seedling Growth of Sweet Sorghum under Saline Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to determine the interactive effects of supple- mental Ca amendment and salinity on germination of sweet sorghum seeds in saline solution culture medium, and investigate the effects of different combinations of Na/Ca ratio in saline soils on the early growth of sweet sorghum plants. [Method] A germi- nation test and a greenhouse pot experiment were conducted to assess the interac- tive effects of calcium addition to culture medium on the germination and seedling growth of sweet sorghum (Sorghum saccharatum Moench) in saline soils with a range of NaYCa ratios. In the germination test, seeds were treated with different combinations of five calcium levels [0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mmol/L Ca(NO3)2] and five salinity levels (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 mmol/L NaCI). In the greenhouse experi- ment, seeds were sown in potting soils containing 3 salinity levels (2.3, 4.7 and 7.0 dS/m) and three Na:Ca ratios (10:0, 10:1, and 5:1). [Result] In the germination test, Ca addition at 5 mmol/L promoted germination by 5.5%, 9.9%, and 17.0% at the 3.4, 6.7 and 10.1 dS/m salinity levels. The higher Ca level (10 mmol/L) also in- creased germination by 9.1% and 7.8% at the 3.4 and 6.7 dS/m salinity levels. Then even higher Ca addition at 15 and 20 mmol/L appeared to promote germina- tion when culture media had high salinity (10.1 and 13.4 dS/m). In the greenhouse pot experiment, saline soil amended with supplemental Ca at the 2.3 and 4.7 dS/m salinity levels significantly promoted early seedling growth, with an increase of 6.8% to 28.2% in plant height and 14.3% to 67.9% in whole plant weight. From 28 to 42 d after seeding, the relative growth of seedling was increased by Ca addition, with a reduction of 49.5% to 66.0% in plant height and 4.8% to 61.9% in whole plant weight. From 42 to 56 d after seeding, however, the relative growth of seedling was significantly inhibited by Ca amendment. [Conclusion] Results of this study indicate that appropriate supplemental

  17. Early Exercise Affects Mitochondrial Transcription Factors Expression after Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshan Hu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that exercise training is neuroprotective after stroke, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To clarify this critical issue, the current study investigated the effects of early treadmill exercise on the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors. Adult rats were subjected to ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Expression of two genes critical for transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1 and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1, were examined by RT-PCR after five days of exercise starting at 24 h after ischemia. Mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COX IV was detected by Western blot. Neurological status and cerebral infarct volume were evaluated as indices of brain damage. Treadmill training increased levels of PGC-1 and NRF-1 mRNA, indicating that exercise promotes rehabilitation after ischemia via regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

  18. Properties of early photolysis intermediates of rhodopsin are affected by glycine 121 and phenylalanine 261.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, S; Han, M; Lewis, J W; Szundi, I; Sakmar, T P; Kliger, D S

    1997-09-30

    Glycine 121 in transmembrane (TM) helix 3 and phenylalanine 261 in TM helix 6 of bovine rhodopsin have been shown to be critical residues for creating an appropriate chromophore binding pocket for 11-cis-retinal [Han, M., Lin, S. W., Smith, S. O., and Sakmar, T. P. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 32330-32336; Han, M., Lin, S. W., Minkova, M., Smith, S. O., and Sakmar, T. P. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 32337-32342]. To further explore structure-function relationships in the vicinity of receptor helices 3 and 6, time-resolved absorption difference spectra of rhodopsin mutants G121A, G121V, and G121L/F261A were obtained at 20 degrees C. Data were collected from 30 ns to 690 ms after laser photolysis with 7 ns pulses (lambdamax = 477 nm) and analyzed using a global exponential fitting procedure after singular value decomposition (SVD). For each mutant, the decay of its bathorhodopsin photoproduct (batho) into an equilibrium with its blue-shifted intermediate (bsi) was too fast to resolve ( lumirhodopsin (lumi) --> metarhodopsin I (MI) --> metarhodopsin II (MII). For G121V, an additional early 380 nm absorber, with a back-reaction to lumi, had to be included in the above scheme. For the three Gly121 mutants, the main pathway to reach the active MII state is via lumi and MI. This is in contrast to rhodopsin where the main pathway in detergent samples is via lumi and an early 380 nm absorber, MI380. From the accelerated batho decay present in all three mutants, we conclude that Gly121 is likely to participate in the earliest chromophore-protein interactions. In addition, bsi decay is further accelerated in mutant G121L/F261A, suggesting that Phe261 is an essential determinant of the protein processes involved in bsi decay.

  19. Nitric Oxide Chemical Donor Affects the Early Phases of In Vitro Wound Healing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Cristina; Cinque, Benedetta; Lombardi, Francesca; Miconi, Gianfranca; Palumbo, Paola; Evtoski, Zoran; Placidi, Giuseppe; Fanini, Donatella; Cimini, Anna Maria; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Giuliani, Maurizio; Cifone, Maria Grazia

    2016-10-01

    An artificial wound in a confluent monolayer of human keratinocyte HaCaT cells or mouse embryo fibroblast Swiss NIH 3T3 cells was used to analyze the effects of the nitric oxide (NO) chemical donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). SNAP exposure promoted an enhanced rate of wound closure and accelerated motility of both keratinocytes and fibroblasts compared to control cells. The wounded monolayer cultures of HaCaT and NIH 3T3 cells, treated with or without SNAP, were monitored under a phase contrast microscope. Structural and ultrastructural modifications were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The images were captured by a digital camera at different time points (0-28 h) and the wound area was analyzed through software included in Matlab®. As early as 15 min, SNAP induced significant cytoskeletal remodeling, as shown by immunostaining (phalloidin-labelling), which in turn was associated with increased filopodium number and length rise. NO donor treatment also induced overexpression of Ki-67 protein, a typical marker of cell proliferation, as shown by immunostaining. Both SNAP-induced migration and proliferation were antagonized by the NO-sensitive GC inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[-4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), which suggests activation of the NO/cGMP signalling cascade in the observed SNAP-induced effects in the early stages of the healing process. Moreover, we provide evidence that PPAR-β antagonist (GSK0660) may interfere with NO-mediated wound healing process. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2185-2195, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Zebrafish foxo3b negatively regulates canonical Wnt signaling to affect early embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun-wei Xie

    Full Text Available FOXO genes are involved in many aspects of development and vascular homeostasis by regulating cell apoptosis, proliferation, and the control of oxidative stress. In addition, FOXO genes have been showed to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling by competing with T cell factor to bind to β-catenin. However, how important of this inhibition in vivo, particularly in embryogenesis is still unknown. To demonstrate the roles of FOXO genes in embryogenesis will help us to further understand their relevant physiological functions. Zebrafish foxo3b gene, an orthologue of mammalian FOXO3, was expressed maternally and distributed ubiquitously during early embryogenesis and later restricted to brain. After morpholino-mediated knockdown of foxo3b, the zebrafish embryos exhibited defects in axis and neuroectoderm formation, suggesting its critical role in early embryogenesis. The embryo-developmental marker gene staining at different stages, phenotype analysis and rescue assays revealed that foxo3b acted its role through negatively regulating both maternal and zygotic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, we found that foxo3b could interact with zebrafish β-catenin1 and β-catenin2 to suppress their transactivation in vitro and in vivo, further confirming its role relevant to the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, we revealed that foxo3b played a very important role in embryogenesis and negatively regulated maternal and zygotic Wnt/β-catenin signaling by directly interacting with both β-catenin1 and β-catenin2. Our studies provide an in vivo model for illustrating function of FOXO transcription factors in embryogenesis.

  1. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, Ester; Ayora, Carlos; Canovas, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage (AMD) into a reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. To investigate the metal transfer between the water and the sediment, three cores were collected from the Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) during different seasons: turnover event...... in the water column and was redissolved in the organic-rich sediment, after which iron and arsenic diffused upwards again to the water column. The flux of precipitates was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the aqueous one, and therefore the sediment acted as a sink for As and Fe. Trace metals (Cu...

  2. EARLY AFFECT-CONFUSION: THE BORDERLINE BETWEEN DESPAIR AND RAGE - PART 1 OF A CASE STUDY TRILOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Erskine

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This three part case study illustrates the principles, theoretical concepts, and relational methods of Integrative Psychotherapy in the treatment of a client who continually experienced early affect-confusion and lived on a “borderline” between intense neediness and rage, despair and self-reliance, impulsivity and manipulation. Part 1 describes the behavioral dynamics of a 38 year old female client who required a two-part treatment approach that emphasized an inter-subjective relationship, consistency, and respect while helping her to acknowledge and value her relational-needs and to engage in a relationally contactful form of anger.

  3. Whether superficial abdominal reflex is affected by subcostal transverse abdominal incisions? A prospective, observational early experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitin Bajaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Superficial abdominal reflex (SAR is an important part of the neurologic assessment. It is normally present and may be present or absent in various physiological as well as pathological conditions. The presence of an abdominal incision creates a dilemma in the mind of the clinician for it affecting this reflex. As there is no literature on this, we decided to study the effect of abdominal incisions on SAR. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective, observational study. We evaluated the patients requiring transverse subcostal incision (range 3–12 cm both preoperatively and postoperatively, for their abdominal reflexes. Patients with preoperative normal and symmetrical abdominal reflexes were included in the study. Postoperatively, we compared the change of SAR with the preoperative status and analyzed the data. Results: A total of 94 patients underwent surgeries, out of which 54 patients came under inclusion criteria, comprising 36 males and 18 females. Subcostal transverse abdominal incisions were made for surgeries including both gastrointestinal and ventriculoperitoneal shunts. SAR was found unaffected by the incisions in all patients. Conclusions: Although the study was small, subcostal transverse abdominal incisions were not found to affect SAR.

  4. Early- versus Late-Onset Fetal Growth Restriction Differentially Affects the Development of the Fetal Sheep Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Alencar Rocha, Anna Karynna; Allison, Beth J; Yawno, Tamara; Polglase, Graeme R; Sutherland, Amy E; Malhotra, Atul; Jenkin, Graham; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Miller, Suzanne L

    2017-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a common complication of pregnancy, principally caused by suboptimal placental function, and is associated with high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Clinical studies suggest that the time of onset of placental insufficiency is an important contributor towards the neurodevelopmental impairments that are evident in children who had FGR. It is however currently unknown how early-onset and late-onset FGR differentially affect brain development. The aim of this study was to examine neuropathology in early-onset and late-onset FGR fetal sheep and to determine whether they differentially alter brain development. We induced placental insufficiency and FGR via single umbilical artery ligation at either 88 days (early-onset) or 105 days (late-onset) of fetal sheep gestation (term is approx. 147 days), reflecting a period of rapid white matter brain development. Fetal blood samples were collected for the first 10 days after surgery, and all fetuses were sacrificed at 125 days' gestation for brain collection and subsequent histopathology. Our results show that early-onset FGR fetuses became progressively hypoxic over the first 10 days after onset of placental insufficiency, whereas late-onset FGR fetuses were significantly hypoxic compared to controls from day 1 after onset of placental insufficiency (SaO2 46.7 ± 7.4 vs. 65.7 ± 3.9%, respectively, p = 0.03). Compared to control brains, early-onset FGR brains showed widespread white matter injury, with a reduction in both CNPase-positive and MBP-positive density of staining in the periventricular white matter (PVWM), subcortical white matter, intragyral white matter (IGWM), subventricular zone (SVZ), and external capsule (p development that principally mediates altered brain development associated with FGR. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Deiodinase knockdown during early zebrafish development affects growth, development, energy metabolism, motility and phototransduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enise Bagci

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH balance is essential for vertebrate development. Deiodinase type 1 (D1 and type 2 (D2 increase and deiodinase type 3 (D3 decreases local intracellular levels of T3, the most important active TH. The role of deiodinase-mediated TH effects in early vertebrate development is only partially understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of deiodinases during early development of zebrafish until 96 hours post fertilization at the level of the transcriptome (microarray, biochemistry, morphology and physiology using morpholino (MO knockdown. Knockdown of D1+D2 (D1D2MO and knockdown of D3 (D3MO both resulted in transcriptional regulation of energy metabolism and (muscle development in abdomen and tail, together with reduced growth, impaired swim bladder inflation, reduced protein content and reduced motility. The reduced growth and impaired swim bladder inflation in D1D2MO could be due to lower levels of T3 which is known to drive growth and development. The pronounced upregulation of a large number of transcripts coding for key proteins in ATP-producing pathways in D1D2MO could reflect a compensatory response to a decreased metabolic rate, also typically linked to hypothyroidism. Compared to D1D2MO, the effects were more pronounced or more frequent in D3MO, in which hyperthyroidism is expected. More specifically, increased heart rate, delayed hatching and increased carbohydrate content were observed only in D3MO. An increase of the metabolic rate, a decrease of the metabolic efficiency and a stimulation of gluconeogenesis using amino acids as substrates may have been involved in the observed reduced protein content, growth and motility in D3MO larvae. Furthermore, expression of transcripts involved in purine metabolism coupled to vision was decreased in both knockdown conditions, suggesting that both may impair vision. This study provides new insights, not only into the role of deiodinases, but also into the importance of a correct

  6. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  7. Dynamic cerebral autoregulatory capacity is affected early in Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Y.S.; Immink, R.V.; Stok, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of endothelial dysfunction and microvascular complications with impaired autoregulation of tissue perfusion. Both microvascular disease and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy may affect cerebral autoregulation. In the present study, we tested...... the hypothesis that, in the absence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, cerebral autoregulation is impaired in subjects with DM+ (Type 2 diabetes with microvascular complications) but intact in subjects with DM- (Type 2 diabetes without microvascular complications). Dynamic cerebral autoregulation......, -15+/-6% in subjects with DM- and -15+/-7% in subjects with DM+). HbA(1c) (glycated haemoglobin) and the duration of diabetes, but not blood pressure, were determinants of transfer function phase. In conclusion, dysfunction of dynamic cerebral autoregulation in subjects with Type 2 diabetes appears...

  8. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, Ester; Ayora, Carlos; Canovas, C. R.;

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage (AMD) into a reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. To investigate the metal transfer between the water and the sediment, three cores were collected from the Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) during different seasons: turnover event......; oxic, stratified period; anoxic and under shallow perennially oxic conditions. The cores were sliced in an oxygen-free atmosphere, after which pore water was extracted by centrifugation and analyzed. A sequential extraction was then applied to the sediments to extract the water-soluble, monosulfide......, low crystallinity Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, crystalline Fe(III)-oxide, organic, pyrite and residual phases. The results showed that, despite the acidic chemistry of the water column (pH

  9. Inactivation of Tor proteins affects the dynamics of endocytic proteins in early stage of endocytosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brandon Tenay; Evin Kimberlin; Michelle Williams; Juliette Denise; Joshua Fakilahyel; Kyoungtae Kim

    2013-06-01

    Tor2 is an activator of the Rom2/Rho1 pathway that regulates -factor internalization. Since the recruitment of endocytic proteins such as actin-binding proteins and the amphiphysins precedes the internalization of -factor, we hypothesized that loss of Tor function leads to an alteration in the dynamics of the endocytic proteins. We report here that endocytic proteins, Abp1 and Rvs167, are less recruited to endocytic sites not only in tor2 but also tor1 mutants. Furthermore, we found that the endocytic proteins Rvs167 and Sjl2 are completely mistargeted to the cytoplasm in tor1tor2ts double mutant cells. We also demonstrate here that the efficiency of endocytic internalization or scission in all tor mutants was drastically decreased. In agreement with the Sjl2 mislocalization, we found that in tor1tor2ts double mutant cells, as well as other tor mutant cells, the overall PIP2 level was dramatically increased. Finally, the cell wall chitin content in tor2ts and tor1tor2ts mutant cells was also significantly increased. Taken together, both functional Tor proteins, Tor1 and Tor2, are essentially required for proper endocytic protein dynamics at the early stage of endocytosis.

  10. Surrogate mobility and orientation affect the early neurobehavioral development of infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Amanda M; Ruggiero, Angela M; Novak, Melinda A; Meyer, Jerrold S; Suomi, Stephen J

    2008-05-01

    A biological mother's movement appears necessary for optimal development in infant monkeys. However, nursery-reared monkeys are typically provided with inanimate surrogate mothers that move very little. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel, highly mobile surrogate mother on motor development, exploration, and reactions to novelty. Six infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were reared on mobile hanging surrogates (MS) and compared to six infants reared on standard stationary rocking surrogates (RS) and to 9-15 infants reared with their biological mothers (MR) for early developmental outcome. We predicted that MS infants would develop more similarly to MR infants than RS infants. In neonatal assessments conducted at Day 30, both MS and MR infants showed more highly developed motor activity than RS infants on measures of grasping (p = .009), coordination (p = .038), spontaneous crawl (p = .009), and balance (p = .003). At 2-3 months of age, both MS and MR infants displayed higher levels of exploration in the home cage than RS infants (p = .016). In a novel situation in which only MS and RS infants were tested, MS infants spent less time near their surrogates in the first five minutes of the test session than RS infants (p = .05), indicating a higher level of comfort. Collectively, these results suggest that when nursery-rearing of infant monkeys is necessary, a mobile hanging surrogate may encourage more normative development of gross motor skills and exploratory behavior and may serve as a useful alternative to stationary or rocking surrogates.

  11. Early efficacy of the ketogenic diet is not affected by initial body mass index percentile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Shastin; Diaz-Medina, Gloria; Wong-Kisiel, Lily; Nickels, Katherine; Eckert, Susan; Wirrell, Elaine

    2014-05-01

    Predictors of the ketogenic diet's success in treating pediatric intractable epilepsy are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether initial body mass index and weight percentile impact early efficacy of the traditional ketogenic diet in children initiating therapy for intractable epilepsy. This retrospective study included all children initiating the ketogenic diet at Mayo Clinic, Rochester from January 2001 to December 2010 who had body mass index (children ≥2 years of age) or weight percentile (those diet initiation and seizure frequency recorded at diet initiation and one month. Responders were defined as achieving a >50% seizure reduction from baseline. Our cohort consisted of 48 patients (20 male) with a median age of 3.1 years. There was no significant correlation between initial body mass index or weight percentile and seizure frequency reduction at one month (P = 0.72, r = 0.26 and P = 0.91, r = 0.03). There was no significant association between body mass index or weight percentile quartile and responder rates (P = 0.21 and P = 0.57). Children considered overweight or obese at diet initiation (body mass index or weight percentile ≥85) did not have lower responder rates than those with body mass index or weight percentiles ketogenic diet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Does Self-Efficacy Affect Cognitive Performance in Persons with Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Early Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Joseph Jongen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In persons with multiple sclerosis (MS a lowered self-efficacy negatively affects physical activities. Against this background we studied the relationship between self-efficacy and cognitive performance in the early stages of MS. Thirty-three patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS and early Relapsing Remitting MS (eRRMS were assessed for self-efficacy (MSSES-18, cognition (CDR System, fatigue (MFIS-5, depressive symptoms (BDI, disease impact (MSIS-29, and disability (EDSS. Correlative analyses were performed between self-efficacy and cognitive scores, and stepwise regression analyses identified predictors of cognition and self-efficacy. Good correlations existed between total self-efficacy and Power of Attention (r= 0.65; P< 0.001, Reaction Time Variability (r= 0.57; P< 0.001, and Speed of Memory (r= 0.53; P< 0.01, and between control self-efficacy and Reaction Time Variability (r= 0.55; P< 0.01. Total self-efficacy predicted 40% of Power of Attention, 34% of Reaction Time Variability, and 40% of Speed of Memory variabilities. Disease impact predicted 65% of total self-efficacy and 58% of control self-efficacy variabilities. The findings may suggest that in persons with CIS and eRRMS self-efficacy may positively affect cognitive performance and that prevention of disease activity may preserve self-efficacy.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide exposure during the early postnatal period adversely affects the structure and function of the developing rat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Zankhana R; Porzionato, Andrea; Kesavan, Kalpashri; Mason, Ariel; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Shirahata, Machiko; Gauda, Estelle B

    2016-09-01

    The carotid body (CB) substantially influences breathing in premature infants by affecting the frequency of apnea and periodic breathing. In adult animals, inflammation alters the structure and chemosensitivity of the CB, yet it is not known if this pertains to neonates. We hypothesized that early postnatal inflammation leads to morphological and functional changes in the developing rat CB, which persists for 1 wk after the initial provoking insult. To test our hypothesis, we exposed rat pups at postnatal day 2 (P2) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) or saline (SAL) intraperitoneally. At P9-10 (1 wk after treatment), LPS-exposed animals had significantly more spontaneous intermittent hypoxic (IH) events, attenuated ventilatory responses to changes in oxygen tension (measured by whole body plethysmography), and attenuated hypoxic chemosensitivity of the carotid sinus nerve (measured in vitro), compared with SAL-exposed controls. These functional changes were associated with the following: 1) increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels; 2) decreased volume of supportive type II cells; and 3) elevated dopamine levels (a major inhibitory neuromodulator) within the CB. These findings suggest that early postnatal inflammation in newborn rats adversely affects the structure and function of the CB and is associated with increased frequency of intermittent desaturations, similar to the phenomenon observed in premature infants. Furthermore, this is the first newborn model of spontaneous intermittent desaturations that may be used to understand the mechanisms contributing to IH events in newborns.

  14. Gender and age interact to affect early outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odera Umeano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a common and devastating form of cerebrovascular disease. In ICH, gender differences in outcomes remain relatively understudied but have been examined in other neurological emergencies. Further, a potential effect of age and gender on outcomes after ICH has not been explored. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that age and gender interact to modify neurological outcomes after ICH. METHODS: Adult patients admitted with spontaneous primary supratentorial ICH from July 2007 through April 2010 were assessed via retrospective analysis of an existing stroke database at Duke University. Univariate analysis of collected variables was used to compare gender and outcome. Unfavorable outcome was defined as discharge to hospice or death. Using multivariate regression, the combined effect of age and gender on outcome after ICH was analyzed. RESULTS: In this study population, women were younger (61.1+14.5 versus 65.8+17.3 years, p=0.03 and more likely to have a history of substance abuse (35% versus 8.9%, p<0.0001 compared to men. Multivariable models demonstrated that advancing age had a greater effect on predicting discharge outcome in women compared to men (p=0.02. For younger patients, female sex was protective; however, at ages greater than 60 years, female sex was a risk factor for discharge to hospice or death. CONCLUSION: While independently associated with discharge to hospice or death after ICH, the interaction effect between gender and age demonstrated significantly stronger correlation with early outcome after ICH in a single center cohort. Prospective study is required to verify these findings.

  15. The interaction of early life experiences with COMT val158met affects anxiety sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, C; Klauke, B; Weber, H; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P; Pauli, P; Deckert, J; Reif, A

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenesis of anxiety disorders is considered to be multifactorial with a complex interaction of genetic factors and individual environmental factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine gene-by-environment interactions of the genes coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) with life events on measures related to anxiety. A sample of healthy subjects (N = 782; thereof 531 women; mean age M = 24.79, SD = 6.02) was genotyped for COMT rs4680 and MAOA-uVNTR (upstream variable number of tandem repeats), and was assessed for childhood adversities [Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ)], anxiety sensitivity [Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI)] and anxious apprehension [Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ)]. Main and interaction effects of genotype, environment and gender on measures related to anxiety were assessed by means of regression analyses. Association analysis showed no main gene effect on either questionnaire score. A significant interactive effect of childhood adversities and COMT genotype was observed: Homozygosity for the low-active met allele and high CTQ scores was associated with a significant increment of explained ASI variance [R(2) = 0.040, false discovery rate (FDR) corrected P = 0.04]. A borderline interactive effect with respect to MAOA-uVNTR was restricted to the male subgroup. Carriers of the low-active MAOA allele who reported more aversive experiences in childhood exhibited a trend for enhanced anxious apprehension (R(2) = 0.077, FDR corrected P = 0.10). Early aversive life experiences therefore might increase the vulnerability to anxiety disorders in the presence of homozygosity for the COMT 158met allele or low-active MAOA-uVNTR alleles.

  16. Cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of an early experience on cognitive abilities and affective states

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    Philippidis Eleni

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study we investigated the effects of neonatal handling, an animal model of early experience, on spatial learning and memory, on hippocampal glucocorticoid (GR, mineralocorticoid (MR and type 1A serotonin (5-HT1A receptors, as well as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and on circulating leptin levels, of male rats. Method Spatial learning and memory following an acute restraint stress (30 min were assessed in the Morris water maze. Hippocampal GR, MR and BDNF levels were determined immunocytochemically. 5-HT1A receptors were quantified by in vitro binding autoradiography. Circulating leptin levels, following a chronic forced swimming stress, were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA. Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Neonatal handling increased the ability of male rats for spatial learning and memory. It also resulted in increased GR/MR ratio, BDNF and 5-HT1A receptor levels in the hippocampus. Furthermore, leptin levels, body weight and food consumption during chronic forced swimming stress were reduced as a result of handling. Conclusion Neonatal handling is shown to have a beneficial effect in the males, improving their cognitive abilities. This effect on behavior could be mediated by the handling-induced increase in hippocampal GR/MR ratio and BDNF levels. The handling-induced changes in BDNF and 5-HT1A receptors could underlie the previously documented effect of handling in preventing "depression". Furthermore, handling is shown to prevent other maladaptive states such as stress-induced hyperphagia, obesity and resistance to leptin.

  17. Atmospheric oxygen levels affect mudskipper terrestrial performance: implications for early tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, Corey J; Wegner, Nicholas C; Yanagitsuru, Yuzo; Tresguerres, Martin; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2013-08-01

    The Japanese mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus), an amphibious fish that possesses many respiratory and locomotive specializations for sojourns onto land, was used as a model to study how changing atmospheric oxygen concentrations during the middle and late Paleozoic Era (400-250 million years ago) may have influenced the emergence and subsequent radiation of the first tetrapods. The effects of different atmospheric oxygen concentrations (hyperoxia = 35%, normoxia = 21%, and hypoxia = 7% O2) on terrestrial performance were tested during exercise on a terrestrial treadmill and during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Endurance and elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC; the immediate O2 debt repaid post-exercise) correlated with atmospheric oxygen concentration indicating that when additional oxygen is available P. modestus can increase oxygen utilization both during and following exercise. The time required post-exercise for mudskippers to return to a resting metabolic rate did not differ between treatments. However, in normoxia, oxygen consumption increased above hyperoxic values 13-20 h post-exercise suggesting a delayed repayment of the incurred oxygen debt. Finally, following exercise, ventilatory movements associated with buccopharyngeal aerial respiration returned to their rest-like pattern more quickly at higher concentrations of oxygen. Taken together, the results of this study show that P. modestus can exercise longer and recover quicker under higher oxygen concentrations. Similarities between P. modestus and early tetrapods suggest that increasing atmospheric oxygen levels during the middle and late Paleozoic allowed for elevated aerobic capacity and improved terrestrial performance, and likely led to an accelerated diversification and expansion of vertebrate life into the terrestrial biosphere.

  18. Folate deficiency during early-mid pregnancy affects the skeletal muscle transcriptome of piglets from a reciprocal cross.

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    Yi Li

    Full Text Available Folate deficiency (FD during pregnancy can cause fetal intrauterine growth restriction in pigs, of which the skeletal dysplasia is a major manifestation. Factors influencing muscle development are very important in the formation of porcine meat quality trait. However, the effect of folate deficiency on skeletal muscle development and its molecular mechanisms are unknown. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of maternal folate deficiency on the skeletal muscle transcriptome of piglets from a reciprocal cross, in which full-sibling Landrace (LR and full-sibling Chinese local breed Laiwu (LW pigs were used for reciprocal cross matings, and sows were fed either a folate deficient or a normal diet during early-mid gestation. In addition, the difference in the responsiveness of the piglets to folate deficiency during early-mid pregnancy between reciprocal cross groups was investigated. Longissimus dorsi (LD muscle samples were collected from newborn piglets and a 4 × 44K Agilent porcine oligo microarray was used for transcriptome analysis of porcine LD muscle. The results showed that folate deficiency during early-mid pregnancy affected piglet body weight, LD muscle fiber number and content of intramuscular triglyceride. The microarray results indicated that 3154 genes were differentially expressed between folate deficient and normal piglets from the LR♂ × LW♀ cross, and 3885 differentially expressed genes (DEGs in the ones from the LW♂ × LR♀ cross. From functional analyses, sow folate deficiency affected almost all biological processes in the progeny. Lipid metabolism-related genes and associated metabolic pathways were regulated extensively by folate deficiency, especially in LR♂ × LW♀ cross piglets. Most of the genes that are regulated by folate deficiency in the LD muscle of piglets were different between LR♂ × LW♀ and LW♂ × LR♀ crosses, suggesting some epigenetic effects of FD exist in genes underlying

  19. Early, but not late visual distractors affect movement synchronization to a temporal-spatial visual cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Ashley J; Elliott, Mark T

    2015-01-01

    The ease of synchronizing movements to a rhythmic cue is dependent on the modality of the cue presentation: timing accuracy is much higher when synchronizing with discrete auditory rhythms than an equivalent visual stimulus presented through flashes. However, timing accuracy is improved if the visual cue presents spatial as well as temporal information (e.g., a dot following an oscillatory trajectory). Similarly, when synchronizing with an auditory target metronome in the presence of a second visual distracting metronome, the distraction is stronger when the visual cue contains spatial-temporal information rather than temporal only. The present study investigates individuals' ability to synchronize movements to a temporal-spatial visual cue in the presence of same-modality temporal-spatial distractors. Moreover, we investigated how increasing the number of distractor stimuli impacted on maintaining synchrony with the target cue. Participants made oscillatory vertical arm movements in time with a vertically oscillating white target dot centered on a large projection screen. The target dot was surrounded by 2, 8, or 14 distractor dots, which had an identical trajectory to the target but at a phase lead or lag of 0, 100, or 200 ms. We found participants' timing performance was only affected in the phase-lead conditions and when there were large numbers of distractors present (8 and 14). This asymmetry suggests participants still rely on salient events in the stimulus trajectory to synchronize movements. Subsequently, distractions occurring in the window of attention surrounding those events have the maximum impact on timing performance.

  20. Dietary energy density affects fat mass in early adolescence and is not modified by FTO variants.

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    Laura Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dietary energy density (DED does not have a simple linear relationship to fat mass in children, which suggests that some children are more susceptible than others to the effects of DED. Children with the FTO (rs9939609 variant that increases the risk of obesity may have a higher susceptibility to the effects of DED because their internal appetite control system is compromised. We tested the relationship between DED and fat mass in early adolescence and its interaction with FTO variants. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We carried out a prospective analysis on 2,275 children enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC. Diet was assessed at age 10 y using 3-day diet diaries. DED (kJ/g was calculated excluding drinks. Children were genotyped for the FTO (rs9939609 variant. Fat mass was estimated at age 13 y using the Lunar Prodigy Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry scanner. There was no evidence of interaction between DED at age 10 y and the high risk A allele of the FTO gene in relation to fat mass at age 13 y (beta = 0.005, p = 0.51, suggesting that the FTO gene has no effect on the relation between DED at 10 y and fat mass at 13 y. When DED at 10 y and the A allele of FTO were in the same model they were independently related to fat mass at 13 y. Each A allele of FTO was associated with 0.35+/-0.13 kg more fat mass at 13 y and each 1 kJ/g DED at 10 y was associated with 0.16+/-0.06 kg more fat mass at age 13 y, after controlling for misreporting of energy intake, gender, puberty, overweight status at 10 y, maternal education, TV watching, and physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals the multi-factorial origin of obesity and indicates that although FTO may put some children at greater risk of obesity, encouraging a low dietary energy density may be an effective strategy to help all children avoid excessive fat gain.

  1. Dietary energy density affects fat mass in early adolescence and is not modified by FTO variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laura; van Jaarsveld, Cornelia H M; Emmett, Pauline M; Rogers, Imogen S; Ness, Andy R; Hattersley, Andrew T; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Jebb, Susan A

    2009-01-01

    Dietary energy density (DED) does not have a simple linear relationship to fat mass in children, which suggests that some children are more susceptible than others to the effects of DED. Children with the FTO (rs9939609) variant that increases the risk of obesity may have a higher susceptibility to the effects of DED because their internal appetite control system is compromised. We tested the relationship between DED and fat mass in early adolescence and its interaction with FTO variants. We carried out a prospective analysis on 2,275 children enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Diet was assessed at age 10 y using 3-day diet diaries. DED (kJ/g) was calculated excluding drinks. Children were genotyped for the FTO (rs9939609) variant. Fat mass was estimated at age 13 y using the Lunar Prodigy Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry scanner. There was no evidence of interaction between DED at age 10 y and the high risk A allele of the FTO gene in relation to fat mass at age 13 y (beta = 0.005, p = 0.51), suggesting that the FTO gene has no effect on the relation between DED at 10 y and fat mass at 13 y. When DED at 10 y and the A allele of FTO were in the same model they were independently related to fat mass at 13 y. Each A allele of FTO was associated with 0.35+/-0.13 kg more fat mass at 13 y and each 1 kJ/g DED at 10 y was associated with 0.16+/-0.06 kg more fat mass at age 13 y, after controlling for misreporting of energy intake, gender, puberty, overweight status at 10 y, maternal education, TV watching, and physical activity. This study reveals the multi-factorial origin of obesity and indicates that although FTO may put some children at greater risk of obesity, encouraging a low dietary energy density may be an effective strategy to help all children avoid excessive fat gain.

  2. Age affects joint space narrowing in patients with early active rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijssen, X M E; Akdemir, G; Markusse, I M; Stijnen, T; Riyazi, N; Han, K H; Bijkerk, C; Kerstens, P J S M; Lems, W F; Huizinga, T W J; Allaart, C F

    2016-01-01

    Joint space narrowing (JSN) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be a manifestation of (primary) osteoarthritis becoming more prominent with age. We investigated the severity and predictors of JSN progression among different age groups. 10-year follow-up data of the BeSt study, a randomised controlled treat-to-target trial in early RA were used. Annual X-rays of hands and feet were scored using the Sharp/van der Heijde score (SHS). Subgroups were defined by age at baseline: ≥55, ≥40<55 and <40 years. JSN progression predictors were assessed by Poisson regression. Baseline JSN scores (median (IQR)) were higher in patients ≥55 (2.0 (0.0-6.0)) compared with the other age groups: 1.0 (0.0-3.0) ≥40<55 and 0.3 (0.0-3.0) <40, p<0.001. After 10 years, total JSN and SHS were similar in all age groups. In patients ≥55 the mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) over time (relative risk 1.02 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.03)) and the combined presence of rheumatoid factor and anticitrullinated protein antibodies (RF+/ACPA+) (3.27 (1.25-8.53)) were significantly correlated with JSN progression. In patients <40 the baseline swollen joint count (SJC; 1.09 (1.01-1.18)) and ESR over time (1.04 (1.02-1.06)) were significantly associated. At baseline, patients with RA ≥55 years had more JSN than younger patients but after 10 years JSN scores were similar between age groups. Independent risk factors for JSN progression were baseline SJC and ESR over time in patients <40, RF+/ACPA+ and ESR over time in patients ≥55 years. This suggests that mechanisms leading to JSN progression are related to (residual) rheumatoid inflammation and vary between age groups. These mechanisms remain to be elucidated. NTR262, NTR265.

  3. Does lighting manipulation during incubation affect hatching rhythms and early development of sole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Vives, B; Aliaga-Guerrero, M; Cañavate, J P; Muñoz-Cueto, J A; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2011-05-01

    Light plays a key role in the development of biological rhythms in fish. Previous research on Senegal sole has revealed that both spawning rhythms and larval development are strongly influenced by lighting conditions. However, hatching rhythms and the effect of light during incubation are as yet unexplored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the light spectrum and photoperiod on Solea senegalensis eggs and larvae until day 7 post hatching (dph). To this end, eggs were collected immediately after spawning during the night and exposed to continuous light (LL), continuous darkness (DD), or light-dark (LD) 12L:12D cycles of white light (LD(W)), blue light (LD(B); λ(peak) = 463 nm), or red light (LD(R); λ(peak) = 685 nm). Eggs exposed to LD(B) had the highest hatching rate (94.5% ± 1.9%), whereas LD(R) and DD showed the lowest hatching rate (54.4% ± 3.9% and 48.4% ± 4.2%, respectively). Under LD conditions, the hatching rhythm peaked by the end of the dark phase, but was advanced in LD(B) (zeitgeber time 8 [ZT8]; ZT0 representing the onset of darkness) in relation to LD(W) and LD(R) (ZT11). Under DD conditions, the same rhythm persisted, although with lower amplitude, whereas under LL the hatching rhythm split into two peaks (ZT8 and ZT13). From dph 4 onwards, larvae under LD(B) showed the best growth and quickest development (advanced eye pigmentation, mouth opening, and pectoral fins), whereas larvae under LD(R) and DD had the poorest performance. These results reveal that developmental rhythms at the egg stage are tightly controlled by light characteristics, underlining the importance of reproducing their natural underwater photoenvironment (LD cycles of blue wavelengths) during incubation and early larvae development of fish.

  4. Factors affecting early elementary (K--4) teachers' introduction of the nature of science: A national survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Sophia Jean

    A researcher-developed questionnaire regarding the importance and developmental appropriateness of 12 specific elements of the nature of science (Alshamrani, 2008) for early elementary (kindergarten through fourth grade [K-4]) science instruction was mailed to a random sample of U.S. K-4 teachers. At least half (N = 377) of the respondents reported introducing the inferential, empirical, creative, collaborative, tentative, and cultural aspects of the nature of science (NOS) during the current school year, as well as the idea that no single step-by-step scientific method exists. Over 90% of respondents identified the inferential, empirical, and creative aspects of the NOS as developmentally appropriate for the grade level taught. Based on a 5 point scale (0=not at all important and 4 =very important), the mean scores of eight NOS elements were above a value of three, which corresponded with the descriptor somewhat important to include in K-4 science instruction: the inferential, empirical, creative, collaborative, cultural, and tentative NOS, along with the ideas that replication is an important aspect of experimental research and that no single stepwise scientific method exists. A series of binary logistic regression analyses were used to explore the impact of three predictor variables (developmental appropriateness, importance, and presence in state standards) on teachers' self-reported introduction of each of the NOS elements during the 2009-2010 school year. The data for the presence of the NOS elements in state standards were extracted from a previous study (McComas, Lee, & Sweeney, 2009). Developmental appropriateness was a significant predictor of teachers' introduction of the NOS element for all except the collaborative, empirical and inferential aspects of NOS. Importance was a significant predictor for all 12 NOS elements of interest. A NOS element's presence in the state standards significantly predicted teachers' introduction of that NOS element for only

  5. Factors affecting early compressive strength of alkali activated fly ash (OPC-free concrete

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    Palomo, A.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of experimental research into the chief characteristics of a new type of concrete made solely with alkali activated fly ash (AAFA: i.e., free of ordinary Portland cement (OPC. The results of testing to determine specific properties of the fresh concrete and the development of its mechanical strength showed that most of the factors that affect the manufacture and final properties of Portland cement concrete (water/cement ratio, curing conditions, etc. also impact the preparation and final quality of this new material. A number of parameters specific to AAFA concrete (nature and concentration of alkali present in the system were also explored to determine their role in the setting and hardening process.Este trabajo presenta los resultados de una investigación experimental llevada a cabo para evaluar las principales características de un nuevo tipo de hormigón fabricado solamente con ceniza volante activada alcalinamente (AAFA; es decir, sin cemento Portland comercial (OPC. Los resultados de los ensayos realizados para determinar las propiedades específicas del hormigón fresco y el desarrollo de resistencias mecánicas mostraron que la mayoría de los factores que afectan al proceso de fabricación y a las propiedades finales de los hormigones de cemento Portland (relación agua/cemento, condiciones de curado, etc. también afectan a la preparación y calidad final de estos nuevos materiales. También fueron estudiados otros parámetros específicos de los hormigones de AAFA (la naturaleza y concentración del álcali presente en el sistema para determinar su papel en el proceso de fraguado y endurecimiento.

  6. Early, but not late visual distractors affect movement synchronization to a temporal-spatial visual cue

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    Ashley J Booth

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ease of synchronising movements to a rhythmic cue is dependent on the modality of the cue presentation: timing accuracy is much higher when synchronising with discrete auditory rhythms than an equivalent visual stimulus presented through flashes. However, timing accuracy is improved if the visual cue presents spatial as well as temporal information (e.g. a dot following an oscillatory trajectory. Similarly, when synchronising with an auditory target metronome in the presence of a second visual distracting metronome, the distraction is stronger when the visual cue contains spatial-temporal information rather than temporal only. The present study investigates individuals’ ability to synchronise movements to a temporal-spatial visual cue in the presence of same-modality temporal-spatial distractors. Moreover, we investigated how increasing the number of distractor stimuli impacted on maintaining synchrony with the target cue. Participants made oscillatory vertical arm movements in time with a vertically oscillating white target dot centred on a large projection screen. The target dot was surrounded by 2, 8 or 14 distractor dots, which had an identical trajectory to the target but at a phase lead or lag of 0, 100 or 200ms. We found participants’ timing performance was only affected in the phase-lead conditions and when there were large numbers of distractors present (8 and 14. This asymmetry suggests participants still rely on salient events in the stimulus trajectory to synchronise movements. Subsequently, distractions occurring in the window of attention surrounding those events have the maximum impact on timing performance.

  7. Early-Life Sugar Consumption Affects the Rat Microbiome Independently of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Emily E; Hsu, Ted M; Jones, Roshonda B; Fodor, Anthony A; Goran, Michael I; Kanoski, Scott E

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiome has been implicated in various metabolic and neurocognitive disorders and is heavily influenced by dietary factors, but there is a paucity of research on the effects of added sugars on the gut microbiome. With the use of a rodent model, our goal was to determine how added-sugar consumption during the juvenile and adolescent phase of development affects the gut microbiome. Forty-two juvenile male Sprague-Dawley rats [postnatal day (PND) 26; 50-70 g] were given access to 1 of 3 different 11%-carbohydrate solutions designed to model a range of monosaccharide ratios commonly consumed in sugar-sweetened beverages: 1) 35% fructose:65% glucose, 2) 50% fructose:50% glucose, 3) 65% fructose:35% glucose, and 4) control (no sugar). After ad libitum access to the respective solutions for the juvenile and adolescent period (PND 26-80), fecal samples were collected for next-generation 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing and multivariate microbial composition analyses. Energy intake, weight change, and adiposity index were analyzed in relation to sugar consumption and the microbiota. Body weight, adiposity index, and total caloric intake did not differ as a result of sugar consumption. However, sugar consumption altered the gut microbiome independently of anthropometric measures and caloric intake. At the genus level, Prevotella [linear discriminant analysis (LDA) score = -4.62; P Bacteroides (LDA score = 4.19; P gut microbiome in rats independently of caloric intake, body weight, or adiposity index; these effects are robust across a range of fructose-to-glucose ratios. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Impulsivity is associated with early sensory inhibition in neurophysiological processing of affective sounds

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    Takahiro eSoshi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is widely related to socially problematic behaviors and psychiatric illness. Previous studies have investigated the relationship between response inhibition and impulsivity. However, no study has intensively examined how impulsivity correlates with automatic sensory processing before the drive for response inhibition to sensory inputs. Sensory gating is an automatic inhibitory function that attenuates the neural response to redundant sensory information and protects higher cognitive functions from the burst of information processing. Although sensory gating functions abnormally in several clinical populations, there is very little evidence supporting sensory gating changes in conjunction with impulsivity traits in non-clinical populations. The present study recruited healthy adults (n = 23 to conduct a neurophysiological experiment using a paired click paradigm and self-report scales assessing impulsive behavioral traits. Auditory stimuli included not only a pure tone, but also white noise, to explore the differences in auditory evoked potential responses between the two stimuli. White noise is more affective than pure tones; therefore, we predicted that the sensory gating of auditory evoked potentials (P50, N100, P200 for white noise would correlate more with self-reported impulsivity than with those for pure tones. Our main findings showed that sensory gating of the P50 and P200 amplitudes significantly correlated with self-reported reward responsiveness and fun-seeking, respectively, only for white noise stimuli, demonstrating that higher-scoring impulsivity subcomponents were related to greater sensory gating. Frequency-domain analyses also revealed that greater desynchronization of the beta band for the second white noise stimulus was associated with higher motor impulsivity scores, suggesting that an impulsivity-related change of sensory gating was associated with attentional modulation. These findings indicate that the

  9. Neonatal stress-induced affective changes in adolescent Wistar rats: early signs of schizophrenia-like behavior

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    Carlos Eduardo Neves Girardi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are multifactorial diseases with etiology that may involve genetic factors, early life environment and stressful life events. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia is based on a wealth of data on increased vulnerability in individuals exposed to insults during the perinatal period. Maternal deprivation disinhibits the adrenocortical response to stress in neonatal rats and has been used as an animal model of schizophrenia. To test if long-term affective consequences of early life stress were influenced by maternal presence, we submitted 10-day old rats, either deprived (for 22 h or not from their dams, to a stress challenge (i.p. saline injection. Corticosterone plasma levels were measured 2 h after the challenge, whereas another subgroup was assessed for behavior in the open field, elevated plus maze, social investigation and the negative contrast sucrose consumption test in adolescence (postnatal day 45. Maternally deprived rats exhibited increased plasma corticosterone levels which were higher in maternally deprived and stress challenged pups. Social investigation was impaired in maternally deprived rats only, while saline injection, independently of maternal deprivation, was associated with increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and an impaired intake decrement in the negative sucrose contrast. In the open field, center exploration was reduced in all maternally-deprived adolescents and in control rats challenged with saline injection. The most striking finding was that exposure to a stressful stimulus per se, regardless of maternal deprivation, was linked to differential emotional consequences. We therefore propose that besides being a well-known and validated model of schizophrenia in adult rats, the maternal deprivation paradigm could be extended to model early signs of psychiatric dysfunction, and would particularly be a useful tool to detect early signs that resemble schizophrenia.

  10. Neonatal stress-induced affective changes in adolescent Wistar rats: early signs of schizophrenia-like behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Carlos Eduardo Neves; Zanta, Natália Cristina; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are multifactorial diseases with etiology that may involve genetic factors, early life environment and stressful life events. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia is based on a wealth of data on increased vulnerability in individuals exposed to insults during the perinatal period. Maternal deprivation (MD) disinhibits the adrenocortical response to stress in neonatal rats and has been used as an animal model of schizophrenia. To test if long-term affective consequences of early life stress were influenced by maternal presence, we submitted 10-day old rats, either deprived (for 22 h) or not from their dams, to a stress challenge (i.p. saline injection). Corticosterone plasma levels were measured 2 h after the challenge, whereas another subgroup was assessed for behavior in the open field, elevated plus maze (EPM), social investigation and the negative contrast sucrose consumption test in adolescence (postnatal day 45). Maternally deprived rats exhibited increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels which were higher in maternally deprived and stress challenged pups. Social investigation was impaired in maternally deprived rats only, while saline injection, independently of MD, was associated with increased anxiety-like behavior in the EPM and an impaired intake decrement in the negative sucrose contrast. In the open field, center exploration was reduced in all maternally-deprived adolescents and in control rats challenged with saline injection. The most striking finding was that exposure to a stressful stimulus per se, regardless of MD, was linked to differential emotional consequences. We therefore propose that besides being a well-known and validated model of schizophrenia in adult rats, the MD paradigm could be extended to model early signs of psychiatric dysfunction, and would particularly be a useful tool to detect early signs that resemble schizophrenia. PMID:25309370

  11. Early application of nerve growth factor affects serum inflammatory cytokine levels in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been demonstrated that there are changes of various cytokines, chemokines and adhesion factors in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). What are the changes of interleukin-6 and interleukin-18 in serum of HIE neonates.OBJECTIVE: To observe the dynamic changes of interleukin-6 and interleukin-18 in peripheral serum at different time after HIE in neonates, and analyze the possible therapeutic efficacy of early application of NGF.DESIGN: A non-randomized controlled observation synchronically.SETTING: Department of Neonatology, Sun Yat-sen Hospital affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University.PARTICIPANTS: Sixty neonates with HIE were selected from the Department of Neonatology, Sun Yat-sen Hospital affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University from January 2004 to October 2006, including 32 boys and 28 girls, who were all accorded with the diagnostic standards for moderate to severe HIE. The neonates were divided into two groups NGF-treated group (n =30), HIE group (n =30). The HIE neonates in the NGF-treated group were given routine treatment and intramuscular injection of NGF within 24 hours after birth. Those in the HIE group were given routine treatments. Meanwhile, 30 apneic normal neonates (17 boys and 13 girls) at the same period were selected as the control group. The gestational age was 37 - 42 weeks in all the three groups, the body mass at birth was 2 500 - 4 000 g. Informed contents were obtained from the relatives of all the enrolled neonates.METHODS: The HIE neonates in the NGF-treated group were given routine treatment and intramuscular injection of NGF (2 000 U) within 24 hours after birth, once a day, 10 days as a course. Those in the HIE group were given routine treatments. Blood samples (3 mL) were drawn from femoral vein in all the neonates 1, 3 and 7 days after birth. The levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-18 in serum were detected with enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum levels of interlenkin

  12. A longitudinal investigation of the affective environment in families with young children: from infancy to early school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Robin A; Kochanska, Grazyna

    2010-04-01

    We examined the affective environment in 102 families studied longitudinally when children were 7, 15, 25, 38, 52, and 67 months of age. At each assessment, every mother-child and father-child dyad was observed in typical daily contexts. Each person's emotions of affection, joy, and anger were coded. Both parents rated marital satisfaction when children were 15, 52, and 67 months. Growth curve analyses, using Actor-Partner Interdependence Modeling, examined (a) developmental changes in emotions, (b) within-relationship influences of the partner's emotions, (c) across-relationship influences of emotions in other parent's interactions with the child, and (d) associations between marital quality and emotions over time. Parents' emotional expressiveness was highest early in the child's development, and declined thereafter. Children's anger was highest at 15 months of age, and declined thereafter, and their positive emotions, particularly with mothers, increased over time. Generally, one's positive emotions and better marital quality were associated with greater positive emotion within- and across-relationships, whereas one's anger was associated with greater anger within- and across-relationships. However, any emotion expression elicited greater affection in the interaction partner. Parents' neuroticism did not account for the convergence of emotions across relationships.

  13. Inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates early affective processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanzger, Peter; Steinberg, Christian; Rehbein, Maimu Alissa; Bröckelmann, Ann-Kathrin; Dobel, Christian; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Domschke, Katharina; Junghöfer, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) has often been suggested as a key modulator of emotional stimulus appraisal and regulation. Therefore, in clinical trials, it is one of the most frequently targeted regions for non-invasive brain stimulation such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). In spite of various encouraging reports that demonstrate beneficial effects of rTMS in anxiety disorders, psychophysiological studies exploring the underlying neural mechanisms are sparse. Here we investigated how inhibitory rTMS influences early affective processing when applied over the right dlPFC. Before and after rTMS or sham stimulation, subjects viewed faces with fearful or neutral expressions while whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded. Due to the disrupted functioning of the right dlPFC, visual processing in bilateral parietal, temporal, and occipital areas was amplified starting at around 90 ms after stimulus onset. Moreover, increased fear-specific activation was found in the right TPJ area in a time-interval between 110 and 170 ms. These neurophysiological effects were reflected in slowed reaction times for fearful, but not for neutral faces in a facial expression identification task while there was no such effect on a gender discrimination control task. Our study confirms the specific and important role of the dlPFC in regulation of early emotional attention and encourages future clinical research to use minimal invasive methods such as transcranial magnetic (TMS) or direct current stimulation (tDCS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early malnourished rats are not affected by anorexia induced by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto Medeiros, J M; Cabral Filho, J E; De Souza, S L; Freitas Silva, S R; Mendes Da Silva, C; Deiró, T C B J; Monteiro, J M; Guedes, R C A; De Castro, C M M B; Manhães De Castro, R

    2002-06-01

    The effect of early postnatal malnutrition upon food intake and its modulation by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, was investigated in adult rats. Sixty four Wistar rats were allocated to two groups, according to their mother's diet during lactation. Mothers receiving a 23% protein diet fed the well-nourished group; mothers receiving 8% protein diet fed the malnourished. After weaning, all rats received the 23% protein diet ad libitum. On the 120th day after birth, each nutritional group was divided in two subgroups (each one, n = 16) which received a single daily injection of citalopram (10 mg/kg) or saline (0.9% NaCl) for 14 days. Chronic treatment with citalopram decreased both the food intake and weight gain in the well-nourished rats, but not in the malnourished ones. These data are consistent with findings concerning the nutritional manipulation of the nervous system during its higher vulnerable phase, suggesting that early malnutrition alters the effect of treatment of SSRI in adult rats, and that malnutrition during the critical period of brain development affects the serotoninergic system.

  15. High levels of inorganic nutrients affect fertilization kinetics, early development and settlement of the scleractinian coral Platygyra acuta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, E. K. Y.; Chui, A. P. Y.; Kwok, C. K.; Ip, A. H. P.; Chan, S. W.; Leung, H. N.; Yeung, L. C.; Ang, P. O.

    2015-09-01

    Dose-response experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of ammonia nitrogen (NH3/NH4 +) and orthophosphate (PO4 3-) on four stages of larval development in Platygyra acuta, including fertilization, embryonic development and the survival, motility, and settlement of planula larvae. Fertilization success was reduced significantly under 200 μM NH3/NH4 + or PO4 3-. These high doses of NH3/NH4 + and PO4 - affected egg viability (or sperm viability and polyspermic block simultaneously) and polyspermic block, respectively. These results provide the first evidence to indicate the mechanisms of how inorganic nutrients might affect coral fertilization processes. For embryonic development, NH3/NH4 + at 25-200 μM caused delay in cell division after 2-h exposure and NH3/NH4 + at 100-200 μM resulted in larval death after 72 h. However, no significant differences were observed in the mobility and survivorship of either planula or competent larvae under different levels of NH3/NH4 + or PO4 3-. There was a significant (~30 %) drop in the settlement of competent larvae under the combined effect of 100 μM NH3/NH4 + and PO4 3-. The effects of elevated nutrients appeared to become more significant only on gametes or larvae undergoing active cellular activities at fertilization, early development, and settlement.

  16. CaMKII knockdown affects both early and late phases of olfactory long-term memory in the honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Christina; Kübert, Natalie; Muenz, Thomas S; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Honeybees are able to solve complex learning tasks and memorize learned information for long time periods. The molecular mechanisms mediating long-term memory (LTM) in the honeybee Apis mellifera are, to a large part, still unknown. We approached this question by investigating the potential function of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an enzyme known as a 'molecular memory switch' in vertebrates. CaMKII is able to switch to a calcium-independent constitutively active state, providing a mechanism for a molecular memory and has further been shown to play an essential role in structural synaptic plasticity. Using a combination of knockdown by RNA interference and pharmacological manipulation, we disrupted the function of CaMKII during olfactory learning and memory formation. We found that learning, memory acquisition and mid-term memory were not affected, but all manipulations consistently resulted in an impaired LTM. Both early LTM (24 h after learning) and late LTM (72 h after learning) were significantly disrupted, indicating the necessity of CaMKII in two successive stages of LTM formation in the honeybee. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Tacrolimus does not affect early wound healing in a rodent model of bowel anastomoses and abdominal wall closure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine C M Willems

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Use of immunosuppressant drugs has been associated with complications in wound healing. The calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus is thought to have a relatively low complication rate, but preclinical research has yielded contradictory data, prompting the current comprehensive study. METHODS: Three groups of 33 male Wistar rats received a daily subcutaneous dose of 0,5, 2 or 5 mg/kg tacrolimus. A control group received saline. On day 0 a resection of 1 cm ileum and 1 cm colon was performed, and end-to-end anastomoses were constructed. Ten rats of each group were killed on day 3 and day 5 and the remaining animals on day 7. Both anastomoses and the wound in the abdominal wall were analyzed. Wound strength was the primary outcome parameter. RESULTS: Mean strength of the abdominal wall increased significantly over time in all groups (p<0.0001. Both the breaking strength and the bursting pressure of the ileum and colon anastomoses followed the same pattern. No differences were observed between control and experimental groups. In addition, no consistent differences were found between groups regarding wound hydroxyproline content and the activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9. CONCLUSION: Tacrolimus does not affect early wound healing.

  18. Maternal high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation affects hepatic lipid metabolism in early life of offspring rat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YANHONG HUANG; TINGTING YE; CHONGXIAO LIU; FANG FANG; YUANWEN CHEN; YAN DONG

    2017-06-01

    We investigated whether maternal over-nutrition during pregnancy and lactation affects the offspring’s lipidmetabolism at weaning by assessing liver lipid metabolic gene expressions and analysing its mechanisms on thedevelopment of metabolic abnormalities. Female Sprague–Dawley rats were fed with standard chow diet (CON)or high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks, and then continued feeding during gestation and lactation. The offspringwhose dams were fed with HFD had a lower birth weight but an increased body weight with impaired glucosetolerance, higher serum cholesterol, and hepatic steatosis at weaning. Microarray analyses showed that there were120 genes differently expressed between the two groups. We further verified the results by qRT-PCR. Significantincrease of the lipogenesis (Me1, Scd1) gene expression was found in HFD (P<0.05), and up-regulated expressionof genes (PPAR-α, Cpt1α, Ehhadh) involved in β-oxidation was also observed (P<0.05), but the Acsl3 gene wasdown-regulated (P<0.05). Maternal over-nutrition could not only primarily induce lipogenesis, but also promotelipolysis through an oxidation pathway as compensation, eventually leading to an increased body weight,impaired glucose tolerance, elevated serum cholesterol and hepatic steatosis at weaning. This finding may providesome evidence for a healthy maternal diet in order to reduce the risk of metabolic diseases in the early life of theoffspring.

  19. DOES FATHER INVOLVEMENT INFLUENCE THE AFFECT, LANGUAGE ACQUISITION, SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG AUTISTIC CHILDREN? AN EARLY INTERVENTION STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Tabitha LOUIS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study adopts a randomized experimental design to evaluate the impact of a father-mediated therapy to improve the play skills, affect, language, social skills and behavior among 30 clinically diagnosed autistic children at the age of 3-5 years. Standardized inventories such as, The Play Based Observation (PBO, The Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS, The Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS and the Rendel Shorts Questionnaire were administered pre and post intervention. A special program that involved fathers in the caregiving and nurturing processes of these children was designed and implemented for 6 months after which the children were reassessed. Prior to the intervention, deficits in play skills and developmental delays across expressive and receptive language were observed Scores on the Vineland Social Maturity Scale and the Rendel Shorts revealed behavioral markers. Post intervention, we noticed significant differences in the play, language acquisition, social engagement and behavior in the treatment group in comparison to the control group. The results suggested that father-mediated therapeutic involvement significantly has proven to positively foster development in young autistic children and this is an important implication for practitioners in developing early intervention programs.

  20. Development of a model to predict ash transport and water pollution risk in fire-affected environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neris, Jonay; Elliot, William J.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Robichaud, Peter R.

    2017-04-01

    An estimated that 15% of the world's population lives in volcanic areas. Recent catastrophic erosion events following wildfires in volcanic terrain have highlighted the geomorphological instability of this soil type under disturbed conditions and steep slopes. Predicting the hydrological and erosional response of this soils in the post-fire period is the first step to design and develop adequate actions to minimize risks in the post-fire period. In this work we apply, for the first time, the Water Erosion Prediction Project model for predicting erosion and runoff events in fire-affected volcanic soils in Europe. Two areas affected by wildfires in 2015 were selected in Tenerife (Spain) representative of different fire behaviour (downhill surface fire with long residence time vs uphill crown fire with short residence time), severity (moderate soil burn severity vs light soil burn severity) and climatic conditions (average annual precipitation of 750 and 210 mm respectively). The actual erosion processes were monitored in the field using silt fences. Rainfall and rill simulations were conducted to determine hydrologic, interrill and rill erosion parameters. The soils were sampled and key properties used as model input, evaluated. During the first 18 months after the fire 7 storms produced runoff and erosion in the selected areas. Sediment delivery reached 5.4 and 2.5 Mg ha-1 respectively in the first rainfall event monitored after the fire, figures comparable to those reported for fire-affected areas of the western USA with similar climatic conditions but lower than those showed by wetter environments. The validation of the WEPP model using field data showed reasonable estimates of hillslope sediment delivery in the post-fire period and, therefore, it is suggested that this model can support land managers in volcanic areas in Europe in predicting post-fire hydrological and erosional risks and designing suitable mitigation treatments.

  1. Does Early Childhood Teacher Education Affect Students' Cognitive Orientations? The Effect of Different Education Tracks in Teacher Education on Prospective Early Childhood Teachers' Cognitive Orientations in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischo, Christoph; Wahl, Stefan; Strohmer, Janina; Wolf, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood teachers may differ regarding the knowledge base they use when making professional decisions. In this study two orientations are distinguished: the orientation towards scientific knowledge vs. the orientation towards intuition and subjective experience. As different tracks in early childhood teacher education qualify for…

  2. Design of the health examination survey on early childhood physical growth in the Great East Japan Earthquake affected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hiroko; Ishikuro, Mami; Kikuya, Masahiro; Chida, Shoichi; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Ono, Atsushi; Kato, Noriko; Yokoya, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Yamagata, Zentaro; Tanaka, Soichiro; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Kure, Shigeo

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake on preschool children's physical growth in the disaster-affected areas, the three medical universities in Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima Prefectures conducted a health examination survey on early childhood physical growth. The survey was conducted over a 3-year period to acquire data on children who were born in different years. Our targets were as follows: 1) children who were born between March 1, 2007 and August 31, 2007 and experienced the disaster at 43-48 months of age, 2) children who were born between March 1, 2009 and August 31, 2009 and experienced the disaster at 19-24 months of age, and 3) children who were born between June 1, 2010 and April 30, 2011 and were under 10 months of age or not born yet when the disaster occurred. We collected their health examination data from local governments in Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima Prefectures. We also collected data from Aomori, Akita, and Yamagata Prefectures to use as a control group. The survey items included birth information, anthropometric measurements, and methods of nutrition during infancy. Eighty municipalities from Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima Prefectures and 21 from the control prefectures participated in the survey. As a result, we established three retrospective cohorts consisting of 13,886, 15,474, and 32,202 preschool children. The large datasets acquired for the present survey will provide valuable epidemiological evidence that should shed light on preschool children's physical growth in relation to the disaster. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Attentional bias to affective faces and complex IAPS images in early visual cortex follows emotional cue extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhtereva, Valeria; Craddock, Matt; Müller, Matthias M

    2015-05-15

    Emotionally arousing stimuli are known to rapidly draw the brain's processing resources, even when they are task-irrelevant. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) response, a neural response to a flickering stimulus which effectively allows measurement of the processing resources devoted to that stimulus, has been used to examine this process of attentional shifting. Previous studies have used a task in which participants detected periods of coherent motion in flickering random dot kinematograms (RDKs) which generate an SSVEP, and found that task-irrelevant emotional stimuli withdraw more attentional resources from the task-relevant RDKs than task-irrelevant neutral stimuli. However, it is not clear whether the emotion-related differences in the SSVEP response are conditional on higher-level extraction of emotional cues as indexed by well-known event-related potential (ERPs) components (N170, early posterior negativity, EPN), or if affective bias in competition for visual attention resources is a consequence of a time-invariant shifting process. In the present study, we used two different types of emotional distractors - IAPS pictures and facial expressions - for which emotional cue extraction occurs at different speeds, being typically earlier for faces (at ~170ms, as indexed by the N170) than for IAPS images (~220-280ms, EPN). We found that emotional modulation of attentional resources as measured by the SSVEP occurred earlier for faces (around 180ms) than for IAPS pictures (around 550ms), after the extraction of emotional cues as indexed by visual ERP components. This is consistent with emotion related re-allocation of attentional resources occurring after emotional cue extraction rather than being linked to a time-fixed shifting process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Do social disadvantage and early family adversity affect the diurnal cortisol rhythm in infants? The Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saridjan, N.S.; Huizink, A.C.; Koetsier, J.A.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Mackenbach, J.P.; Hofman, A.; Kirschbaum, C.; Verhulst, F.C.; Tiemeier, H.

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of diurnal cortisol secretion patterns may explain the link between adversities early in life and later mental health problems. However, few studies have investigated the influence of social disadvantage and family adversity on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis early in

  5. Pulmonary exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes does not affect the early immune response against Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swedin Linda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT trigger pronounced inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs of mice following administration via pharyngeal aspiration or inhalation. Human exposure to SWCNT in an occupational setting may occur in conjunction with infections and this could yield enhanced or suppressed responses to the offending agent. Here, we studied whether the sequential exposure to SWCNT via pharyngeal aspiration and infection of mice with the ubiquitous intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii would impact on the immune response of the host against the parasite. Methods C57BL/6 mice were pre-exposed by pharyngeal administration of SWCNT (80 + 80 μg/mouse for two consecutive days followed by intravenous injection with either 1x103 or 1x104 green fluorescence protein and luciferase-expressing T. gondii tachyzoites. The dissemination of T. gondii was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging in real time for 7 days and by plaque formation. The inflammatory response was analysed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and by assessment of morphological changes and immune responses in lung and spleen. Results There were no differences in parasite distribution between mice only inoculated with T. gondii or those mice pre-exposed for 2 days to SWCNT before parasite inoculum. Lung and spleen histology and inflammation markers in BAL fluid reflected the effects of SWCNT exposure and T. gondii injection, respectively. We also noted that CD11c positive dendritic cells but not F4/80 positive macrophages retained SWCNT in the lungs 9 days after pharyngeal aspiration. However, co-localization of T. gondii with CD11c or F4/80 positive cells could not be observed in lungs or spleen. Pre-exposure to SWCNT did not affect the splenocyte response to T. gondii. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that pre-exposure to SWCNT does not enhance or suppress the early immune response to T. gondii in mice.

  6. Rapid Shifts in Soil Nutrients and Decomposition Enzyme Activity in Early Succession Following Forest Fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knelman, Joseph; Graham, Emily B.; Ferrenberg, Scott; Lecoeuvre, Aurelien; Labrado, Amanda; Darcy, John; Nemergut, Diana R.; Schmidt, Steven K.

    2017-09-15

    In post-disturbance landscapes nutrient availability has proven a major control on ecological succession. In this study, we examined variation in connections between soil nutrient availability and decomposition extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across post fire secondary succession in forest soils as well as after a secondary flood disturbance. We also examined possible linkages between edaphic properties and bacterial communities based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. We found that with advancing succession in a post-fire landscape, the relationship between soil nutrients and EEA became stronger over time. In general, late successional soils showed stronger connections between EEA and soil nutrient status, while early successional soils were marked by a complete decoupling of nutrients and EEA. We also found that soil moisture and bacterial communities of post-fire disturbance soils were susceptible to change following the secondary flood disturbance, while undisturbed, reference forest soils were not. Our results demonstrate that nutrient pools correlating with EEA change over time. While past work has largely focused on ecosystem succession on decadal timescales, our work suggests that nutrients shift in their relative importance as a control of decomposition EEA in the earliest stages of secondary succession. Thus, this work emphasizes the relevance of successional stage, even on short timescales, in predicting rates of carbon and nitrogen cycling, especially as disturbances become more frequent in a rapidly changing world.

  7. Early life exposure to artificial light at night affects the physiological condition: An experimental study on the ecophysiology of free-living nestling songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Thomas; Casasole, Giulia; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2016-11-01

    Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasingly recognised to be an important anthropogenic environmental pressure on wildlife, affecting animal behaviour and physiology. Early life experiences are extremely important for the development, physiological status and health of organisms, and as such, early exposure to artificial light may have detrimental consequences for organism fitness. We experimentally manipulated the light environment of free-living great tit nestlings (Parus major), an important model species in evolutionary and environmental research. Haptoglobin (Hp) and nitric oxide (NOx), as important indicators of immunity, health, and physiological condition, were quantified in nestlings at baseline (13 days after hatching) and after a two night exposure to ALAN. We found that ALAN increased Hp and decreased NOx. ALAN may increase stress and oxidative stress and reduce melatonin which could subsequently lead to increased Hp and decreased NOx. Haptoglobin is part of the immune response and mounting an immune response is costly in energy and resources and, trade-offs are likely to occur with other energetically demanding tasks, such as survival or reproduction. Acute inhibition of NOx may have a cascading effect as it also affects other physiological aspects and may negatively affect immunocompetence. The consequences of the observed effects on Hp and NOx remain to be examined. Our study provides experimental field evidence that ALAN affects nestlings' physiology during development and early life exposure to ALAN could therefore have long lasting effects throughout adulthood.

  8. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  9. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 04

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  10. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 32

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  11. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 35

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  12. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  13. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  14. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 20

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  15. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  16. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  17. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 01

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  18. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 31

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  19. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 03

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  20. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  1. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 34

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  2. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 02

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  3. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  4. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 34

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  5. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  6. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  7. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  8. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 36

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  9. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 23

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  10. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  11. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 13

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  12. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  13. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 29

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  14. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  15. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  16. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 12

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  17. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 09

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  18. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  19. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  20. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 35

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  1. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 07

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  2. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  3. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 28

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  4. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  5. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 28

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  6. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  7. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 15

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  8. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 18

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  9. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  10. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  11. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 33

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  12. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 05

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  13. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 32

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  14. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  15. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  16. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  17. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 14

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  18. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 30

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  19. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 22

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  20. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 33

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  1. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  2. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 19

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  3. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  4. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 26

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  5. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 30

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  6. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 23

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  7. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 36

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  8. POST-FIRE REVEGETATION AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROOS RC; JOHNSON AR; CAUDILL JG; RODRIGUEZ JM; WILDE JW

    2010-01-05

    Range fires on the Hanford Site can have a long lasting effect on native plant communities. Wind erosion following removal of protective vegetation from fragile soils compound the damaging effect of fires. Dust storms caused by erosion create health and safety hazards to personnel, and damage facilities and equipment. The Integrated Biological Control Program (IBC) revegetates burned areas to control erosion and consequent dust. Use of native, perennial vegetation in revegetation moves the resulting plant community away from fire-prone annual weeds, and toward the native shrub-steppe that is much less likely to burn in the future. Over the past 10 years, IBC has revegetated major fire areas with good success. IBC staff is monitoring the success of these efforts, and using lessons learned to improve future efforts.

  9. 2011 Las Conchas Post Fire Tile Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set consists of an orthophotography tile index based on multi-spectral (red, green, blue, near-infrared) digital aerial imagery, collected and processed by...

  10. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 29

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  11. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  12. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 06

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  13. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 17

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  14. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  15. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  16. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  17. 2013 Jaroso Post Fire Imagery, 08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, JAROSO FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project Coordinate...

  18. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  19. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  20. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  1. 2011 Las Conchas Post Fire Center Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set consists of photo centers of raw aerial images representing multi-spectral (red, green, blue, near-infrared) digital aerial imagery of the Las Conchas...

  2. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  3. 2013 Tres Lagunas Post Fire, 27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — USDA USFS Southwestern Region Contract # AG-8371-C-10-0011 Delivery # AG-8371-D-13-0056 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ACQUISITION, TRES LAGUNAS FIRE, NEW MEXICO Project...

  4. A single early postnatal estradiol injection affects morphology and gene expression of the ovary and parametrial adipose tissue in adult female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexanderson, Camilla; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Kullberg, Joel

    2010-01-01

    of estrogen receptor a was decreased, and expression of leptin, lipoprotein lipase, and hormone-sensitive lipase was unaffected. These findings suggest that early postnatal estradiol exposure of female rats result in long-lasting effects on the ovary and parametrial adipose tissue at adult age.......Events during early life can affect reproductive and metabolic functions in adulthood. We evaluated the programming effects of a single early postnatal estradiol injection (within 3h after birth) in female rats. We assessed ovarian and parametrial adipose tissue morphology, evaluated gene...... expression related to follicular development and adipose tissue metabolism, and developed a non-invasive volumetric estimation of parametrial adipose tissue by magnetic resonance imaging. Estradiol reduced ovarian weight, increased antral follicle size and number of atretic antral follicles, and decreased...

  5. A Longitudinal Investigation of the Affective Environment in Families with Young Children: From Infancy to Early School Age

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Robin A.; Kochanska, Grazyna

    2010-01-01

    We examined the affective environment in 102 families studied longitudinally when children were 7, 15, 25, 38, 52, and 67 months. At each assessment, every mother-child and father-child dyad was observed in typical daily contexts. Each person’s emotions of affection, joy, and anger were coded. Both parents rated marital quality when children were 15, 52, and 67 months. Growth curve analyses, using Actor-Partner Interdependence Modeling, examined (a) developmental changes in emotions, (b) with...

  6. Some Ways in Which Neighborhoods, Nuclear Families, Friendship Groups, and Schools Jointly Affect Changes in Early Adolescent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Thomas D.; Herman, Melissa R.; Phillips, Meredith; Settersten, Richard A., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed how schools, neighborhoods, nuclear families, and friendship groups jointly contribute to positive change during early adolescence. Analyses showed that the four context indices modestly intercorrelated at the individual student level, but clustered more tightly at the school and neighborhood levels. Joint influence of all four…

  7. In vitro zygotic embryo culture of Pinus peuce Gris.: Optimization of culture conditions affecting germination and early seedling growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojičić Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a protocol for the germination and early seedling growth of Pinus peuce Gris. using zygotic embryo culture. In order to overcome seed dormancy and optimize organogenesis, the effect of nutritional, plant growth regulatory and physical factors on in vitro germination and growth of isolated mature zygotic embryos of P. peuce were investigated.

  8. Recommendations for Implementing the New Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards to Affect Classroom Practices for Social and Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinsser, Katherine M.; Dusenbury, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The state of Illinois in the central United States has long been a trendsetter both in the development of learning standards and in addressing social and emotional learning in education settings. With a recent revision to the state's early learning standards, published in 2013, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) fully aligned its…

  9. Early corticosteroid treatment does not affect severity of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in extreme low birth weight preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, Christian V.; Bos, Arend F.; Anttila, Eija; Hallman, Mikko; Verkade, Henkjan J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the relationship between early postnatal dexamethasone (DXM) treatment and the severity of hyperbilirubinemia in extreme low birth weight (ELBW) preterm infants. Methods: In 54 ELBW preterm infants, total serum bilirubin concentrations (TSB) and phototherapy (PT) data during the fi

  10. Does the Early Social Environment Affect Structure and Consistency of Personality in Wild-Type Male Rats?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gracceva, Giulia; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2011-01-01

    Animal personality has been extensively studied from a functional and evolutionary point of view. Less attention has been paid to the development of personality, its phenotypic plasticity, and the influence of manipulation of early environmental factors. Here we describe the effects of manipulating

  11. Is the efficacy of hormonal therapy affected by lymph node status? data from the bicalutamide (Casodex) Early Prostate Cancer program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Wirth, Manfred P; See, William A;

    2004-01-01

    To report an exploratory subgroup analysis assessing the extent to which the overall benefit found in the Early Prostate Cancer program is dependent on lymph node status at randomization. The program is ongoing, and the overall survival data are immature. The first combined analysis of the bicalu...

  12. How age and sex affect the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemons, L.; Klooster, P.M. ten; Vonkeman, H.E.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Glas, C.A.; Laar, M.A. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are two commonly used measures of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As current RA treatment guidelines strongly emphasize early and aggressive treatment aiming at fast remission, optimal measurement of inflamm

  13. Difficulty in disengaging from threat and temperamental negative affectivity in early life: A longitudinal study of infants aged 12–36 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa Atsuko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention disengagement is reportedly influenced by perceiving a fearful facial expression even in the first year of life. In the present study, we examined whether individual differences in disengaging from fearful expressions predict temperamental negative affectivity. Method Twenty-six infants were studied longitudinally at 12, 18, 24, and 36 months, using an overlap paradigm and two temperament questionnaires: the Japanese versions of the revised Infant Behavior Questionnaire and Early Childhood Behavior Questionnaire. Results The infants fixated significantly more frequently to fearful than to happy or neutral faces. The attentional bias to threat (i.e., the number of fixed responses on fearful faces divided by the total number of fixed responses on faces at 12 months was significantly positively correlated with negative affect at 12 months, and its relations with negative affect measured later in development was in the expected positive direction at each age. In addition, a moderation analysis indicates that the orienting network and not the executive network marginally moderated the relation between early attentional bias and later fear. Conclusions The results suggest that at 12 months, infants with more negative affectivity exhibit greater difficulty in disengaging their attention from fearful faces. We also found evidence that the association between parent-reported fear and disengagement might be modulated in the second year, perhaps because of the differences in temperamental control networks.

  14. Early weight regain after gastric bypass does not affect insulin sensitivity but is associated with higher ghrelin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Robyn A.; Breitman, Igal; Marks-Shulman, Pam A.; Jabbour, Kareem; Melvin, Willie; Williams, Brandon; Clements, Ronald H.; Feurer, Irene D.; Abumrad, Naji N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine: 1) if early weight regain between one and two years after RYGB is associated with worsened hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, and 2) if preoperative levels of ghrelin and leptin are associated with early weight regain after RYGB. Design and Methods Hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity and ghrelin and leptin plasma levels were assessed longitudinally in 45 subjects before RYGB and at one month, six months, one year, and two years post operatively. Weight regain was defined as ≥ 5% increase in body weight between one and two years after RYGB. Results Weight regain occurred in 33% of subjects, with an average increase in body weight of 10 ± 5 % (8.5 ± 3.3 kg). Weight regain was not associated with worsening of peripheral or hepatic insulin sensitivity. Subjects with weight regain after RYGB had higher preoperative and postoperative levels of ghrelin compared to those who maintained or lost weight during this time. Conversely, the trajectories of leptin levels corresponded with the trajectories of fat mass in both groups. Conclusions Early weight regain after RYGB is not associated with a reversal of improvements in insulin sensitivity. Higher preoperative ghrelin levels might identify patients that are more susceptible to weight regain after RYGB. PMID:24777992

  15. Early weight regain after gastric bypass does not affect insulin sensitivity but is associated with elevated ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Robyn A; Breitman, Igal; Marks-Shulman, Pam A; Jabbour, Kareem; Melvin, Willie; Williams, Brandon; Clements, Ronald H; Feurer, Irene D; Abumrad, Naji N

    2014-07-01

    We sought to determine: (1) if early weight regain between 1 and 2 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is associated with worsened hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, and (2) if preoperative levels of ghrelin and leptin are associated with early weight regain after RYGB. Hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity and ghrelin and leptin plasma levels were assessed longitudinally in 45 subjects before RYGB and at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively. Weight regain was defined as ≥5% increase in body weight between 1 and 2 years after RYGB. Weight regain occurred in 33% of subjects, with an average increase in body weight of 10 ± 5% (8.5 ± 3.3 kg). Weight regain was not associated with worsening of peripheral or hepatic insulin sensitivity. Subjects with weight regain after RYGB had higher preoperative and postoperative levels of ghrelin compared to those who maintained or lost weight during this time. Conversely, the trajectories of leptin levels corresponded with the trajectories of fat mass in both groups. Early weight regain after RYGB is not associated with a reversal of improvements in insulin sensitivity. Higher preoperative ghrelin levels might identify patients that are more susceptible to weight regain after RYGB. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  16. Early versus Late Admission to Labor Affects Labor Progression and Risk of Cesarean Section in Nulliparous Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczyk, Rafael T; Zhang, Jun; Grewal, Jagteshwar; Chan, Linda C; Petersen, Antje; Gross, Mechthild M

    2016-01-01

    Rates of cesarean section increase worldwide, and the components of this increase are partially unknown. A strong role is prescribed to dystocia, and at the same time, the diagnosis of dystocia is highly subjective. Previous studies indicated that risk of cesarean is higher when women are admitted to the hospital early in the labor. We examined data on 1,202 nulliparous women with singleton, vertex pregnancies and spontaneous labor onset. We selected three groups based on cervical dilatation at admission: early (0.5-1.5 cm, N = 178), intermediate (2.5-3.5 cm, N = 320), and late (4.5-5.5 cm, N = 175). The Kaplan-Meier estimator was used to analyze the risk of delivery by cesarean section at a given dilatation, and thin-plate spline regression with a binary outcome (R library gam) to assess the form of the associations between the cesarean section in either the first or second stage versus vaginal delivery and dilatation at admission. Women who were admitted to labor early had a higher risk of delivery by cesarean section (18 versus 4% in the late admission group), while the risk of instrumental delivery did not differ (24 versus 24%). Before 4 cm dilatation, the earlier a woman was admitted to labor, the higher was her risk of delivery by cesarean section. After 4 cm dilatation, however, the relationship disappeared. These patterns were true for both first and second stage cesarean deliveries. Oxytocin use was associated with a higher risk of cesarean section only in the middle group (2.5-3.5 cm dilatation at admission). Early admission to labor was associated with a significantly higher risk of delivery by cesarean section during the first and second stages. Differential effects of oxytocin augmentation depending on dilation at admission may suggest that admission at the early stage of labor is an indicator rather than a risk factor itself, but admission at the intermediate stage (2.5-3.5 cm) becomes a risk factor itself. Further research is

  17. Family Routines and Parental Monitoring as Protective Factors among Early and Middle Adolescents Affected by Maternal HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Debra A.; Marelich, William D.; Herbeck, Diane M.; Payne, Diana L.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of parenting skills on adolescent outcomes among children affected by maternal HIV/AIDS (N = 118, M age = 13) was investigated. Among families with more frequent family routines, over time adolescents showed lower rates of aggression, anxiety, worry, depression, conduct disorder, binge drinking, and increased self-concept. Among…

  18. Disturbance of the gut microbiota in early-life selectively affects visceral pain in adulthood without impacting cognitive or anxiety-related behaviors in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, S M; Felice, V D; Nally, K; Savignac, H M; Claesson, M J; Scully, P; Woznicki, J; Hyland, N P; Shanahan, F; Quigley, E M; Marchesi, J R; O'Toole, P W; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2014-09-26

    Disruption of bacterial colonization during the early postnatal period is increasingly being linked to adverse health outcomes. Indeed, there is a growing appreciation that the gut microbiota plays a role in neurodevelopment. However, there is a paucity of information on the consequences of early-life manipulations of the gut microbiota on behavior. To this end we administered an antibiotic (vancomycin) from postnatal days 4-13 to male rat pups and assessed behavioral and physiological measures across all aspects of the brain-gut axis. In addition, we sought to confirm and expand the effects of early-life antibiotic treatment using a different antibiotic strategy (a cocktail of pimaricin, bacitracin, neomycin; orally) during the same time period in both female and male rat pups. Vancomycin significantly altered the microbiota, which was restored to control levels by 8 weeks of age. Notably, vancomycin-treated animals displayed visceral hypersensitivity in adulthood without any significant effect on anxiety responses as assessed in the elevated plus maze or open field tests. Moreover, cognitive performance in the Morris water maze was not affected by early-life dysbiosis. Immune and stress-related physiological responses were equally unaffected. The early-life antibiotic-induced visceral hypersensitivity was also observed in male rats given the antibiotic cocktail. Both treatments did not alter visceral pain perception in female rats. Changes in visceral pain perception in males were paralleled by distinct decreases in the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1, the α-2A adrenergic receptor and cholecystokinin B receptor. In conclusion, a temporary disruption of the gut microbiota in early-life results in very specific and long-lasting changes in visceral sensitivity in male rats, a hallmark of stress-related functional disorders of the brain-gut axis such as irritable bowel disorder. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Pollen production in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is affected by air temperature and relative humidity during early reproductive growth

    OpenAIRE

    Astiz, V.; Hernández, Luis Francisco

    2013-01-01

    During microsporogenesis, sunflower florets might be exposed to episodes of day- and night-time temperatures exceeding 30 and 20 °C, respectively, that can affect pollen availability and consequently plant’s yield. The relationship between air temperature and relative humidity during the meiotic phase of microsporogenesis, and the quantity and quality of pollen produced by the flowers, were studied in two sunflower hybrids during two years. The hybrids were grown on irrigated plots in Bahía B...

  20. TGF-β1 expression in wound healing is acutely affected by experimental malnutrition and early enteral feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Claudia Cristina; Torrinhas, Raquel Susana; Giorgi, Ricardo; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Logullo, Angela Flavia; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2014-10-01

    Malnutrition is associated with the delay or failure of healing. We assessed the effect of experimental malnutrition and early enteral feeding with standard diet or diet supplemented with arginine and antioxidants on the levels of mRNA encoding growth factors in acute, open wound healing. Standardised cutaneous dorsal wounds and gastrostomies for enteral feeding were created in malnourished (M, n = 27) and eutrophic control (E, n = 30) Lewis male adult rats. Both M and E rats received isocaloric and isonitrogenous regimens with oral chow and saline (C), standard (S) or supplemented (A) enteral diets. On post-trauma day 7, mRNA levels of growth factor genes were analysed in wound granulation tissue by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). M(C) rats had significantly lower transforming growth factor β(TGF-β1 ) mRNA levels than E(C) rats (2·58 ± 0·83 versus 3·53 ± 0·57, P malnutrition decreased local mRNA levels of TGF-β1 genes, which was minimised by early enteral feeding with standard or supplemented diets.

  1. Does the early social environment affect structure and consistency of personality in wild-type male's rat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracceva, Giulia; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2011-09-01

    Animal personality has been extensively studied from a functional and evolutionary point of view. Less attention has been paid to the development of personality, its phenotypic plasticity, and the influence of manipulation of early environmental factors. Here we describe the effects of manipulating the sex ratio of the litter, at postnatal day (pnd) 3, in wild-type rats, on personality traits in adulthood. We measured the treatment effects on aggression, defensive burying, and open field behavior at pnd 90 and 120, as well as on their contextual generality, and stability over time (differential and structural consistency). Main effects of litter composition were found on open field behavior at pnd 120 but not on the other behaviors. Since correlations between behaviors changed over time irrespective of the specific treatment, whereas in previous studies on unmanipulated litters this was not the case we suggest that early handling may disrupt adult personality traits. Overall the data indicate that personality is less stable over time that often assumed, having both proximate and ultimate implications.

  2. Early environmental enrichment affects neurobehavioral development and prevents brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Clarissa Pedrini; Diaz, Ramiro; Deckmann, Iohanna; Rojas, Joseane Jiménez; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-03-23

    Our previous results demonstrated improved cognition in adolescent rats housed in environmental enrichment (EE) that underwent neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early EE on neurobehavioral development and brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal HI. Wistar rats were submitted to the HI procedure on the 7th postnatal day (PND) and housed in an enriched environment (8th-20th PND). The maturation of physical characteristics and the neurological reflexes were evaluated and the volume of striatum, corpus callosum and neocortex was measured. Data analysis demonstrated a clear effect of EE on neurobehavioral development; also, daily performance was improved in enriched rats on righting, negative geotaxis and cliff aversion reflex. HI caused a transient motor deficit on gait latency. Brain atrophy was found in HI animals and this damage was partially prevented by the EE. In conclusion, early EE stimulated neurobehavioral development in neonate rats and also protects the neocortex and the corpus callosum from atrophy following HI. These findings reinforce the potential of EE as a strategy for rehabilitation following neonatal HI and provide scientific support to the use of this therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neonatal brain injuries in humans.

  3. Energy intake in late gestation affects blood metabolites in early lactation independently of milk production in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nicolaj Ingemann; Hameleers, A; Young, F J

    2010-01-01

    calving; the H TMR was fed ad libitum whereas the L TMR was restricted to 10 kg dry matter/day during late lactation, and to approximately 75% of energy requirements from drying off until calving. Both diets were offered ad libitum post-calving. Feeding diet H compared to L pre-calving led to higher BCS...... at calving (2.68 v. 2.34, P Changes in BCS and blood concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids, beta-hydroxybutyrate and glucose in early lactation showed that cows offered diet H pre......-calving generally mobilised more body reserves compared to cows offered diet L pre-calving. An interaction between pre- and post-calving diets showed that cows offered diet H pre-calving had lower body tissue mobilisation when offered diet H post-calving compared to diet L. Cows offered diet L pre-calving, did...

  4. Administration of two probiotic strains during early childhood does not affect the endogenous gut microbiota composition despite probiotic proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Laursen, Rikke Pilmann; Larnkjær, Anni

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics are increasingly applied to prevent and treat a range of infectious, immune related and gastrointestinal diseases. Despite this, the mechanisms behind the putative effects of probiotics are poorly understood. One of the suggested modes of probiotic action is modulation of the endogenous...... gut microbiota, however probiotic intervention studies in adults have failed to show significant effects on gut microbiota composition. The gut microbiota of young children is known to be unstable and more responsive to external factors than that of adults. Therefore, potential effects of probiotic...... intervention on gut microbiota may be easier detectable in early life. We thus investigated the effects of a 6 month placebo-controlled probiotic intervention with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BB-12®) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG®) on gut microbiota composition and diversity in more than 200...

  5. Prevalence and duration of breastfeeding during the first six months of life: factors affecting an early cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Garbarino

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to assess the mean duration, prevalence and reasons that lead to an early cessation of breastfeeding in a group of healthy term infants in the first six months of life. METHODS: prospective, observational study. One-hundred Caucasian, non smoking mothers, that intended to breastfeed for at least 12 weeks, were enrolled. Information on anthropometric parameters, type of delivery, socio-demographic characteristics, mode of feeding and reasons for stopping breastfeeding have been obtained through three different questionnaires (submitted at enrollment, on the 7th day, at 1, 2, 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: exclusive breastfeeding gradually decreased from the 7th day to the 6th month of life. Most of the mothers stopped breastfeeding during the first month and a half or after 3 months and a half. Two percent of the mothers stopped on the 7th day whereas at 6 months the percentage of cessation was 14%. The cumulative percentage of interruption at 6th month was 45%. Maternal factors, like sore nipples or delayed onset of lactation, were the most frequent reasons that led to an early cessation, while during the following months inadequate breast milk and latch-on problems were predominant. On the other hand, attending a pre-natal course or having a previous successful breastfeeding experience were significantly associated with a long-lasting breastfeeding. CONCLUSIONS: promotion of breastfeeding during the prenatal course and a better support for lactation management during the first months seem to be the areas where more efforts are needed to implement breastfeeding rates.

  6. Metabolic induction and early responses of mouse blastocyst developmental programming following maternal low protein diet affecting life-long health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith J Eckert

    Full Text Available Previously, we have shown that a maternal low protein diet, fed exclusively during the preimplantation period of mouse development (Emb-LPD, is sufficient to induce by the blastocyst stage a compensatory growth phenotype in late gestation and postnatally, correlating with increased risk of adult onset cardiovascular disease and behavioural dysfunction. Here, we examine mechanisms of induction of maternal Emb-LPD programming and early compensatory responses by the embryo. Emb-LPD induced changes in maternal serum metabolites at the time of blastocyst formation (E3.5, notably reduced insulin and increased glucose, together with reduced levels of free amino acids (AAs including branched chain AAs leucine, isoleucine and valine. Emb-LPD also caused reduction in the branched chain AAs within uterine fluid at the blastocyst stage. These maternal changes coincided with an altered content of blastocyst AAs and reduced mTORC1 signalling within blastocysts evident in reduced phosphorylation of effector S6 ribosomal protein and its ratio to total S6 protein but no change in effector 4E-BP1 phosphorylated and total pools. These changes were accompanied by increased proliferation of blastocyst trophectoderm and total cells and subsequent increased spreading of trophoblast cells in blastocyst outgrowths. We propose that induction of metabolic programming following Emb-LPD is achieved through mTORC1signalling which acts as a sensor for preimplantation embryos to detect maternal nutrient levels via branched chain AAs and/or insulin availability. Moreover, this induction step associates with changes in extra-embryonic trophectoderm behaviour occurring as early compensatory responses leading to later nutrient recovery.

  7. Ischemia in tumors induces early and sustained phosphorylation changes in stress kinase pathways but does not affect global protein levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertins, Philipp; Yang, Feng; Liu, Tao; Mani, DR; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gillette, Michael; Clauser, Karl; Qiao, Jana; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Davies, Sherri; Ruggles, Kelly; Fenyo, David; Kitchens, R. T.; Li, Shunqiang; Olvera, Narcisco; Dao, Fanny; Rodriguez, Henry; Chan, Daniel W.; Liebler, Daniel; White, Forest; Rodland, Karin D.; Mills, Gordon; Smith, Richard D.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.

    2014-07-01

    Advances in quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics have sparked efforts to characterize the proteomes of tumor samples to provide complementary and unique information inaccessible by genomics. Tumor samples are usually not accrued with proteomic characterization in mind, raising concerns regarding effects of undocumented sample ischemia on protein abundance and phosphosite stoichiometry. Here we report the effects of cold ischemia time on clinical ovarian cancer samples and patient-derived basal and luminal breast cancer xenografts. Tumor tissues were excised and collected prior to vascular ligation, subjected to accurately defined ischemia times up to 60 min, and analyzed by quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics using isobaric tags and high-performance, multidimensional LC-MS/MS. No significant changes were detected at the protein level in each tumor type after 60 minutes of ischemia, and the majority of the >25,000 phosphosites detected were also stable. However, large, reproducible increases and decreases in protein phosphorylation at specific sites were observed in up to 24% of the phosphoproteome starting as early as 5 minutes post-excision. Early and sustained activation of stress response, transcriptional regulation and cell death pathways were observed in common across tumor types. Tissue-specific changes in phosphosite stability were also observed suggesting idiosyncratic effects of ischemia in particular lineages. Our study provides insights into the information that may be obtained by proteomic characterization of tumor samples after undocumented periods of ischemia, and suggests caution especially in interpreting activation of stress pathways in such samples as they may reflect sample handling rather than tumor physiology.

  8. Early-Life Stress Affects Stress-Related Prefrontal Dopamine Activity in Healthy Adults, but Not in Individuals with Psychotic Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Kasanova

    Full Text Available Early life stress may have a lasting impact on the developmental programming of the dopamine (DA system implicated in psychosis. Early adversity could promote resilience by calibrating the prefrontal stress-regulatory dopaminergic neurotransmission to improve the individual's fit with the predicted stressful environment. Aberrant reactivity to such match between proximal and distal environments may, however, enhance psychosis disease risk. We explored the combined effects of childhood adversity and adult stress by exposing 12 unmedicated individuals with a diagnosis of non-affective psychotic disorder (NAPD and 12 healthy controls (HC to psychosocial stress during an [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography. Childhood trauma divided into early (ages 0-11 years and late (12-18 years was assessed retrospectively using a questionnaire. A significant group x childhood trauma interaction on the spatial extent of stress-related [18F]fallypride displacement was observed in the mPFC for early (b = -8.45, t(1,23 = -3.35, p = .004 and late childhood trauma (b = -7.86, t(1,23 = -2.48, p = .023. In healthy individuals, the spatial extent of mPFC DA activity under acute psychosocial stress was positively associated with the severity of early (b = 7.23, t(11 = 3.06, p = .016 as well as late childhood trauma (b = -7.86, t(1,23 = -2.48, p = .023. Additionally, a trend-level main effect of early childhood trauma on subjective stress response emerged within this group (b = -.7, t(11 = -2, p = .07, where higher early trauma correlated with lower subjective stress response to the task. In the NAPD group, childhood trauma was not associated with the spatial extent of the tracer displacement in mPFC (b = -1.22, t(11 = -0.67, nor was there a main effect of trauma on the subjective perception of stress within this group (b = .004, t(11 = .01, p = .99. These findings reveal a potential mechanism of neuroadaptation of prefrontal DA transmission to early life stress

  9. Strontium and neodymium isotopic variations in early Archean gneisses affected by middle to late Archean high-grade metamorphic processes: West Greenland and Labrador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collerson, K. D.; Mcculloch, M. T.; Bridgwater, D.; Mcgregor, V. R.; Nutman, A. P.

    1986-01-01

    Relicts of continental crust formed more than 3400 Ma ago are preserved fortuitously in most cratons. The cratons provide the most direct information about crust and mantle evolutionary processes during the first billion years of Earth history. In view of their polymetamorphic character, these terrains are commonly affected by subsequent tectonothermal events. Hence, their isotope systematics may be severely disturbed as a result of bulk chemical change or local isotopic homogenization. This leads to equivocal age and source information for different components within these terrains. The Sr and Nd isotopic data are presented for early Archean gneisses from the North Atlantic Craton in west Greenland and northern Labrador which were affected by younger metamorphic events.

  10. Is that a belt or a snake? object attentional selection affects the early stages of visual sensory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zani Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is at present crescent empirical evidence deriving from different lines of ERPs research that, unlike previously observed, the earliest sensory visual response, known as C1 component or P/N80, generated within the striate cortex, might be modulated by selective attention to visual stimulus features. Up to now, evidence of this modulation has been related to space location, and simple features such as spatial frequency, luminance, and texture. Additionally, neurophysiological conditions, such as emotion, vigilance, the reflexive or voluntary nature of input attentional selection, and workload have also been related to C1 modulations, although at least the workload status has received controversial indications. No information is instead available, at present, for objects attentional selection. Methods In this study object- and space-based attention mechanisms were conjointly investigated by presenting complex, familiar shapes of artefacts and animals, intermixed with distracters, in different tasks requiring the selection of a relevant target-category within a relevant spatial location, while ignoring the other shape categories within this location, and, overall, all the categories at an irrelevant location. EEG was recorded from 30 scalp electrode sites in 21 right-handed participants. Results and Conclusions ERP findings showed that visual processing was modulated by both shape- and location-relevance per se, beginning separately at the latency of the early phase of a precocious negativity (60-80 ms at mesial scalp sites consistent with the C1 component, and a positivity at more lateral sites. The data also showed that the attentional modulation progressed conjointly at the latency of the subsequent P1 (100-120 ms and N1 (120-180 ms, as well as later-latency components. These findings support the views that (1 V1 may be precociously modulated by direct top-down influences, and participates to object, besides simple

  11. Administration of two probiotic strains during early childhood does not affect the endogenous gut microbiota composition despite probiotic proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Laursen, Rikke Pilmann; Larnkjær, Anni; Michaelsen, Kim F; Bahl, Martin Iain; Licht, Tine Rask

    2017-08-17

    Probiotics are increasingly applied to prevent and treat a range of infectious, immune related and gastrointestinal diseases. Despite this, the mechanisms behind the putative effects of probiotics are poorly understood. One of the suggested modes of probiotic action is modulation of the endogenous gut microbiota, however probiotic intervention studies in adults have failed to show significant effects on gut microbiota composition. The gut microbiota of young children is known to be unstable and more responsive to external factors than that of adults. Therefore, potential effects of probiotic intervention on gut microbiota may be easier detectable in early life. We thus investigated the effects of a 6 month placebo-controlled probiotic intervention with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BB-12®) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG®) on gut microbiota composition and diversity in more than 200 Danish infants (N = 290 enrolled; N = 201 all samples analyzed), as assessed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Further, we evaluated probiotic presence and proliferation by use of specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Probiotic administration did not significantly alter gut microbiota community structure or diversity as compared to placebo. The probiotic strains were detected in 91.3% of the fecal samples from children receiving probiotics and in 1% of the placebo treated children. Baseline gut microbiota was not found to predict the ability of probiotics to establish in the gut after the 6 month intervention. Within the probiotics group, proliferation of the strains LGG® and BB-12® in the gut was detected in 44.7% and 83.5% of the participants, respectively. A sub-analysis of the gut microbiota including only individuals with detected growth of the probiotics LGG® or BB-12® and comparing these to placebo revealed no differences in community structure or diversity. Six months of probiotic administration during early life did not change gut

  12. High intensity interval training favourably affects antioxidant and inflammation mRNA expression in early-stage chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patrick S; Briskey, David R; Scanlan, Aaron T; Coombes, Jeff S; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    Increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation have been linked to the progression of chronic kidney disease. To reduce oxidative stress and inflammation related to chronic kidney disease, chronic aerobic exercise is often recommended. Data suggests high intensity interval training may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of differing modes of exercise, along with explanations of mechanisms responsible for observed effects, are lacking. This study assessed effects of eight weeks of high intensity interval training (85% VO2max), versus low intensity exercise (45-50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour, in an animal model of early-stage chronic kidney disease. We examined kidney-specific mRNA expression of genes related to endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidase 1; Gpx1, superoxide dismutase 1; Sod1, and catalase; Cat) and inflammation (kidney injury molecule 1; Kim1 and tumour necrosis factor receptor super family 1b; Tnfrsf1b), as well as plasma F2-isoprostanes, a marker of lipid peroxidation. Compared to sedentary behaviour, high intensity interval training resulted in increased mRNA expression of Sod1 (p=0.01) and Cat (pinflammation.

  13. Rare Variants in PLD3 Do Not Affect Risk for Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease in a European Consortium Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Rita; Van den Bossche, Tobi; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Geerts, Nathalie; Laureys, Annelies; Dillen, Lubina; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Tsolaki, Magda; Koutroumani, Maria; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Matej, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; van der Zee, Julie; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Rare variants in the phospholipase D3 gene (PLD3) were associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We identified a missense mutation in PLD3 in whole-genome sequence data of a patient with autopsy confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) and onset age of 50 years. Subsequently, we sequenced PLD3 in a Belgian early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) patient (N = 261) and control (N = 319) cohort, as well as in European EOAD patients (N = 946) and control individuals (N = 1,209) ascertained in different European countries. Overall, we identified 22 rare variants with a minor allele frequency <1%, 20 missense and two splicing mutations. Burden analysis did not provide significant evidence for an enrichment of rare PLD3 variants in EOAD patients in any of the patient/control cohorts. Also, meta-analysis of the PLD3 data, including a published dataset of a German EOAD cohort, was not significant (P = 0.43; OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.60-3.31). Consequently, our data do not support a role for PLD3 rare variants in the genetic etiology of EOAD in European EOAD patients. Our data corroborate the negative replication data obtained in LOAD studies and therefore a genetic role of PLD3 in AD remains to be demonstrated.

  14. Early visual processing is affected by clinical subtype in patients with unilateral spatial neglect: A magnetoencephalography study.

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    Katsuhiro eMizuno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether visual evoked fields (VEFs elicited by right and left hemifield stimulation differ in patients with unilateral spatial neglect that results from cerebrovascular accident.METHODS: Pattern-reversal stimulation of the right and left hemifield was performed in three patients with left unilateral spatial neglect. Magnetoencephalography was recorded using a 160-channel system, and VEFs were quantified in the 400 ms after each stimulus. The presence or absence of VEF components at around 100 ms (P100m component and 145 ms (N145m component after stimulus onset was determined. The source of the VEF was determined using a single equivalent current dipole model for spherical volume conduction. All patients were evaluated using the behavioral inattention test (BIT.RESULTS: In response to right hemifield stimulation, the P100m and N145m components of the VEF were evident in all three patients. In response to left hemifield stimulation, both components were evident in Patient 3, whereas only the P100m component was evident in Patient 1 and only the N145m component was evident in Patient 2. Patient 1 exhibited impairments on the line bisection and cancellation tasks of the BIT, Patient 2 exhibited impairments on the copying, drawing and cancellation tasks of the BIT, and Patient 3 exhibited impairments on the cancellation task of the BIT.CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that early VEFs are disrupted in patients with unilateral spatial neglect and support the concept that deficits in visual processing differ according to the clinical subtype of unilateral spatial neglect and the lesion location. This study also demonstrates the feasibility of using magnetoencephalography to explore subtypes of neglect.

  15. Mutations altering the gammaretrovirus endoproteolytic motif affect glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein and early events of the virus life cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A., E-mail: carolyn.wilson@fda.hhs.gov

    2015-01-15

    Previously, we found that mutation of glutamine to proline in the endoproteolytic cleavage signal of the PERV-C envelope (RQKK to RPKK) resulted in non-infectious vectors. Here, we show that RPKK results in a non-infectious vector when placed in not only a PERV envelope, but also the envelope of a related gammaretrovirus, FeLV-B. The amino acid substitutions do not prevent envelope precursor cleavage, viral core and genome assembly, or receptor binding. Rather, the mutations result in the formation of hyperglycosylated glycoprotein and a reduction in the reverse transcribed minus strand synthesis and undetectable 2-LTR circular DNA in cells exposed to vectors with these mutated envelopes. Our findings suggest novel functions associated with the cleavage signal sequence that may affect trafficking through the glycosylation machinery of the cell. Further, the glycosylation status of the envelope appears to impact post-binding events of the viral life cycle, either membrane fusion, internalization, or reverse transcription. - Highlights: • Env cleavage signal impacts infectivity of gammaretroviruses. • Non-infectious mutants have hyper-glycosylated envelope that bind target cells. • Non-infectious mutants have defects in the formation of the double-stranded DNA. • Env cleavage motif has functions beyond cleavage of the env precursor.

  16. Negative affectivity and EEG asymmetry interact to predict emotional interference on attention in early school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Beylul; O'Toole, Laura; Hong, Melanie; Dennis, Tracy A

    2014-06-01

    Negative affectivity (NA) is a broad construct that has been associated with the development of psychopathologies, such as anxiety, and with exaggerated attention to threatening stimuli. EEG asymmetry reflects biological individual differences in emotional reactivity that may underlie the association between NA and attention to threat. The present study included a sample of 31 five-seven year olds (M age in months=74.39, SD=6.57) to test the hypothesis that greater NA, combined with greater right anterior and posterior asymmetries, predicts increased attention interference following threat stimuli. Children completed an executive attention task which presented task-irrelevant threat (angry) and non-threat (neutral) faces prior to each trial. EEG asymmetry was measured at baseline for anterior, anterior-temporal and posterior scalp regions and child NA was measured via maternal report. As predicted, children showing greater NA and greater right anterior-temporal asymmetry showed more attention interference following angry faces. Additionally, two trend-level effects emerged: children showing greater NA and greater left anterior-temporal asymmetry showed less attention interference following angry faces, and children showing greater NA and greater left posterior asymmetry showed less attention interference, but only following neutral faces. Discussion focuses on the utility of using EEG asymmetry in the study of temperament, attentional biases, and the biological processes by which temperament confers risk for psychopathology.

  17. 2011 and 2012 Early Careers Achievement Awards: farm and pig factors affecting welfare during the marketing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A K; Gesing, L M; Ellis, M; McGlone, J J; Berg, E; Lonergan, S M; Fitzgerald, R; Karriker, L A; Ramirez, A; Stalder, K J; Sapkota, A; Kephart, R; Selsby, J T; Sadler, L J; Ritter, M J

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the scientific literature to identify on-farm factors that contribute to market weight pig transportation losses. Transportation of market weight pigs is an essential element to the multisite pork production model used in the United States. In 2011 alone, approximately 111 million market weight pigs were transported from the finishing site to the abattoir. For pigs, the marketing process can present a combination of potentially novel, physical, and/or unfamiliar experiences that can be stressful. If the pig cannot cope with these sequential and additive stressors, then an increased rate of transportation losses could occur with a detrimental effect on pork carcass value. Current yearly estimates for transport losses are 1 million pigs (1%). A variety of market weight pig and farm factors have been reported to detrimentally affect transportation losses. By understanding how pigs interact with their environment during marketing, researchers, producers, and personnel at the abattoir may begin to identify, prioritize, and attempt to minimize or eliminate these stressors. This process will ultimately decrease transportation losses, improve pork quality, and increase profitability.

  18. Does hormonal therapy for fertility preservation affect the survival of young women with early-stage endometrial cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Zoë R; Huang, Lina N; Wissing, Michel D; Franco, Eduardo L; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2017-05-01

    The incidence of endometrial cancer among young women is increasing. Some patients with low-grade endometrial cancer receive hormone therapy (HT) before surgery to preserve fertility. It is unclear whether this adversely affects survival. Patients with localized, low-grade endometrial cancer who were aged Cancer-specific and overall survival were measured using Kaplan-Meier methods. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox models adjusted for age, period of diagnosis, marital status, race, tumor grade, morphology, and previous radiotherapy. A total of 6339 women were included in the current study cohort, 161 of whom initially received HT and 6178 of whom received primary surgery. After 15 years of follow-up, all-cause mortality did not differ between the groups (HT group: 14.1% [95% CI, 6.7%-28.4%] and propensity score-matched primary surgery group: 9.3% [95% CI, 4.1%-20.5%]). Cancer-specific mortality appeared higher in patients treated with HT compared with those treated with primary surgery (9.2% [95% CI, 3.4%-24.0%] vs 2.1% [95% CI, 1.5%-2.8%]). However, this difference was driven by 3 late deaths in the HT group. Sensitivity analyses using a broader definition of cancer-specific mortality provided no statistical evidence of a survival difference between the treatment groups. The hazard ratio for the overall risk of death was 1.45 (95% CI, 0.44-4.74). Based on this population-based cohort, young patients with low-grade endometrial cancer appear to have excellent survival, regardless of the primary therapy chosen (HT vs primary surgery). The current selection of patients for HT to preserve fertility, which is managed carefully by experienced clinicians, does not appear to significantly worsen clinical outcomes. Cancer 2017;123:1545-1554. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  19. Unstable Expression of Commonly Used Reference Genes in Rat Pancreatic Islets Early after Isolation Affects Results of Gene Expression Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Kosinová

    Full Text Available The use of RT-qPCR provides a powerful tool for gene expression studies; however, the proper interpretation of the obtained data is crucially dependent on accurate normalization based on stable reference genes. Recently, strong evidence has been shown indicating that the expression of many commonly used reference genes may vary significantly due to diverse experimental conditions. The isolation of pancreatic islets is a complicated procedure which creates severe mechanical and metabolic stress leading possibly to cellular damage and alteration of gene expression. Despite of this, freshly isolated islets frequently serve as a control in various gene expression and intervention studies. The aim of our study was to determine expression of 16 candidate reference genes and one gene of interest (F3 in isolated rat pancreatic islets during short-term cultivation in order to find a suitable endogenous control for gene expression studies. We compared the expression stability of the most commonly used reference genes and evaluated the reliability of relative and absolute quantification using RT-qPCR during 0-120 hrs after isolation. In freshly isolated islets, the expression of all tested genes was markedly depressed and it increased several times throughout the first 48 hrs of cultivation. We observed significant variability among samples at 0 and 24 hrs but substantial stabilization from 48 hrs onwards. During the first 48 hrs, relative quantification failed to reflect the real changes in respective mRNA concentrations while in the interval 48-120 hrs, the relative expression generally paralleled the results determined by absolute quantification. Thus, our data call into question the suitability of relative quantification for gene expression analysis in pancreatic islets during the first 48 hrs of cultivation, as the results may be significantly affected by unstable expression of reference genes. However, this method could provide reliable information

  20. Rationale and design of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) and the KEEPS Cognitive and Affective sub study (KEEPS Cog).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Whitney; Gleason, Carey E; Miller, Virginia M; Asthana, Sanjay

    2013-06-13

    This manuscript describes the study design and rationalle for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) and the KEEPS Cognitive and Affective ancillary study (KEEPS Cog). KEEPS is a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, designed to test the hypothesis that low-dose hormone therapy (HT) initiated in recently postmenopausal women will reduce the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis as measured by carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) over four years. The KEEPS Cog ancillary study was designed to assess potential estrogenic treatment effects on cognition and mood. We present the KEEPS trial in the context of issues raised by the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS). Here we also describe the most recent results and ongoing HT-related research studies designed to address similar issues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Hormone Therapy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Exposure time to caffeine affects heartbeat and cell damage-related gene expression of zebrafish Danio rerio embryos at early developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Tamer Said; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Song, Juha; Kim, Dong Su; Park, Jae-Hak

    2013-11-01

    Caffeine is white crystalline xanthine alkaloid that is naturally found in some plants and can be produced synthetically. It has various biological effects, especially during pregnancy and lactation. We studied the effect of caffeine on heartbeat, survival and the expression of cell damage related genes, including oxidative stress (HSP70), mitochondrial metabolism (Cyclin G1) and apoptosis (Bax and Bcl2), at early developmental stages of zebrafish embryos. We used 100 µm concentration based on the absence of locomotor effects. Neither significant mortality nor morphological changes were detected. We monitored hatching at 48 h post-fertilization (hpf) to 96 hpf. At 60 and 72 hpf, hatching decreased significantly (P caffeine treatment with no significant difference (P > 0.05). Heartbeats per minute were 110, 110 and 112 in control at 48, 72 and 96 hpf, respectively. Caffeine significantly increased heartbeat - 122 and 136 at 72 and 96 hpf, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR showed significant up-regulation after caffeine exposure in HSP70 at 72 hpf; in Cyclin G1 at 24, 48 and 72 hpf; and in Bax at 48 and 72 hpf. Significant down-regulation was found in Bcl2 at 48 and 72 hpf. The Bax/Bcl2 ratio increased significantly at 48 and 72 hpf. We conclude that increasing exposure time to caffeine stimulates oxidative stress and may trigger apoptosis via a mitochondrial-dependent pathway. Also caffeine increases heartbeat from early phases of development without affecting the morphology and survival but delays hatching. Use of caffeine during pregnancy and lactation may harm the fetus by affecting the expression of cell-damage related genes.

  2. Early sensory-perceptual processing deficits for affectively valenced inputs are more pronounced in schizophrenia patients with a history of violence than in their non-violent peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Pierfilippo; Foxe, John J; Czobor, Pal; Wylie, Glenn R; Kamiel, Stephanie M; Huening, Jessica; Nair-Collins, Mike; Krakowski, Menahem I

    2013-08-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia are more prone to violent behaviors than the general population. It is increasingly recognized that processing of emotionally valenced stimuli is impaired in schizophrenia, a deficit that may play a role in aggressive behavior. Our goal was to establish whether patients with a history of violence would show more severe deficits in processing emotionally valenced inputs than non-violent patients. Using event-related potentials, we measured how early during processing of emotional valence, evidence of aberrant function was observed. A total of 42 schizophrenia patients (21 with history of violence; 21 without) and 28 healthy controls were tested. Participants performed an inhibitory control task, making speeded responses to pictorial stimuli. Pictures occasionally repeated twice and participants withheld responses to these repeats. Valenced pictures from the International Affective Picture System were presented. Results in controls showed modulations during the earliest phases of sensory processing (schizophrenia group showed early differentiation. Non-violent patients showed earliest modulations beginning ∼150 ms. For violent patients, however, earliest modulations were further delayed and highly attenuated. The current study reveals sensory-perceptual processing dysfunction for negatively valenced inputs, which is particularly pronounced in aggressive patients.

  3. Early and aggressive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients affects the association of HLA class II antigens with progression of joint damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lard, L R; Boers, M; Verhoeven, A; Vos, K; Visser, H; Hazes, J M W; Zwinderman, A H; Schreuder, G M T; Breedveld, F C; De Vries, R R P; van der Linden, S; Zanelli, E; Huizinga, T W J

    2002-04-01

    The presence of certain HLA class II antigens is strongly associated with the progression of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Such antigens may be more effective than other class II antigens in inducing the formation of autoreactive T cells after presentation of (auto)antigens. We investigated whether early and aggressive treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs could modify this relationship. We analyzed data from 2 studies of patients with early RA treated according to different strategies. The first study consisted of 2 cohorts, one (n = 109; median disease duration before treatment 4 months) was treated according to the pyramid strategy (initial nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, followed by chloroquine [CQ] or sulfasalazine [SSZ] when necessary), and the other (n = 97; median disease duration before treatment 2 weeks) was immediately treated with CQ or SSZ. The second study comprised 155 patients (median disease duration 4 months) from the Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial, in which patients were randomly assigned to combination treatment with step-down prednisolone, methotrexate (MTX), and SSZ (n = 76) or with SSZ alone (n = 79). Prednisolone and MTX dosages were tapered and stopped after 28 and 40 weeks, respectively. The extent of joint damage was measured by the modified Sharp method. In the pyramid treatment cohort, the median increase in Sharp score after 2 years was 12 in patients positive for the shared epitope (SE) and 1 in SE- patients. In the immediate treatment cohort, the median increase was 3 in SE+ patients and 2 in SE- patients. In the SSZ group of the COBRA study, the median increase in Sharp score after 1 year was 11 in DR4+ patients and 3 in DR4- patients. In the combination treatment group, the median increase was 4 in DR4+ patients and 2 in DR4- patients. Significance was confirmed by multiple regression using log-transformed scores. Early and aggressive antirheumatic drug treatment

  4. Dietary patterns in pregnancy and effects on nutrient intake in the Mid-South: the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völgyi, Eszter; Carroll, Kecia N; Hare, Marion E; Ringwald-Smith, Karen; Piyathilake, Chandrika; Yoo, Wonsuk; Tylavsky, Frances A

    2013-05-03

    Dietary patterns are sensitive to differences across socio-economic strata or cultural habits and may impact programing of diseases in later life. The purpose of this study was to identify distinct dietary patterns during pregnancy in the Mid-South using factor analysis. Furthermore, we aimed to analyze the differences in the food groups and in macro- and micronutrients among the different food patterns. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 1155 pregnant women (mean age 26.5 ± 5.4 years; 62% African American, 35% Caucasian, 3% Other; and pre-pregnancy BMI 27.6 ± 7.5 kg/m(2)). Using food frequency questionnaire data collected from participants in the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study between 16 and 28 weeks of gestation, dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis. Three major dietary patterns, namely, Healthy, Processed, and US Southern were identified among pregnant women from the Mid-South. Further analysis of the three main patterns revealed four mixed dietary patterns, i.e., Healthy-Processed, Healthy-US Southern, Processed-US Southern, and overall Mixed. These dietary patterns were different (p food items, macro- and micro nutrients and aligned across socioeconomic and racial groups. Our study describes unique dietary patterns in the Mid-South, consumed by a cohort of women enrolled in a prospective study examining the association of maternal nutritional factors during pregnancy that are known to affect brain and cognitive development by age 3.

  5. Isobaric Tagging-Based Quantification for Proteomic Analysis: A Comparative Study of Spared and Affected Muscles from mdx Mice at the Early Phase of Dystrophy.

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    Cintia Yuri Matsumura

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common childhood myopathy, characterized by muscle loss and cardiorespiratory failure. While the genetic basis of DMD is well established, secondary mechanisms associated with dystrophic pathophysiology are not fully clarified yet. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of muscle dystrophy during earlier stages of the disease, we performed a comparative proteomic profile of the spared extraocular muscles (EOM vs. affected diaphragm from the mdx mice, using a label based shotgun proteomic approach. Out of the 857 identified proteins, 42 to 62 proteins had differential abundance of peptide ions. The calcium-handling proteins sarcalumenin and calsequestrin-1 were increased in control EOM compared with control DIA, reinforcing the view that constitutional properties of EOM are important for their protection against myonecrosis. The finding that galectin-1 (muscle regeneration, annexin A1 (anti-inflammatory and HSP 47 (fibrosis were increased in dystrophic diaphragm provides novel insights into the mechanisms through which mdx affected muscles are able to counteract dystrophy, during the early stage of the disease. Overall, the shotgun technique proved to be suitable to perform quantitative comparisons between distinct dystrophic muscles and allowed the suggestion of new potential biomarkers and drug targets for dystrophinopaties.

  6. The street children of Manila are affected by early-in-life periodontal infection: description of a treatment modality: sea salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, J F; Michel, M G; Nadan, J; Nowzari, H

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of street children of Manila are affected by early-in-life oral infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a sea-salt mouthrinse solution in street children of Manila affected by mild to severe forms of periodontal disease. These children were all in need of special protection: abandoned, abused, exploited, neglected, orphaned, poor. During 3 oral-health missions in 2003, 2004 and 2005, 617 abandoned children (5 to 13 year-old), received oral examination at a non-sectarian child-caring institution in Metro Manila (Virlanie Foundation) by calibrated examiners. A treatment based on what could be done was proposed: 1. Teaching of a precise tooth brushing technique with sea-salt, controlled and reinforced every two days for one week by calibrated health educators, 2. The application of sea-salt water mouthrinse (2.5 gram in 20 ml). Periodontal measurements were repeated at the end of each mission. All children returned to child-caring institution for the followup examinations. In 2003, 10 male and 11 female (n=21) were diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis. In 2009 and 2010, none was affected by aggressive periodontitis. For all patients, the gingival index decreased from 1.08 at the first mission to 1.04 at the end of the second mission and 0.98 at the end of the third mission. The periodontal index decreased from 1.33 at the first mission to 0.98 at the second mission and 0.92 at the last mission. The present investigation confirms that prevention and early diagnosis can result in success with minimum cost. The provided oral health program empowered street children in the most desperate circumstances to be educated and become self-reliant, independent, and responsible. We propose here an antimicrobial approach which has a high degree of efficacy and tolerability, and can be implemented in virtually all parts of the world using low-cost resources.

  7. The Autophagic Process Occurs in Human Bone Metastasis and Implicates Molecular Mechanisms Differently Affected by Rab5a in the Early and Late Stages

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    Paola Maroni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy favours metastatic growth through fuelling energy and nutrients and resistance to anoikis, typical of disseminated-tumour cells. The autophagic process, mediated by a unique organelle, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes, is divided into three steps. Several stages, especially early omegasome formation and isolation-membrane initiation, remain controversial; molecular mechanisms involve the small-GTPase Rab5a, which regulates vesicle traffic for autophagosome formation. We examined Rab5a involvement in the function of key members of ubiquitin-conjugation systems, Atg7 and LC3-lipidated, interacting with the scaffold-protein p62. Immunohistochemistry of Rab5a was performed in human specimens of bone metastasis and pair-matched breast carcinoma; the autophagic-molecular mechanisms affected by Rab5a were evaluated in human 1833 bone metastatic cells, derived from breast-carcinoma MDA-MB231 cells. To clarify the role of Rab5a, 1833 cells were transfected transiently with Rab5a-dominant negative, and/or stably with the short-hairpin RNA Atg7, were exposed to two inhibitors of autolysosome function, and LC3II and p62 expression was measured. We showed basal autophagy in bone-metastatic cells and the pivotal role of Rab5a together with Beclin 1 between the early stages, elongation of isolation membrane/closed autophagosome mediated by Atg7, and the late-degradative stages. This regulatory network might occur in bone-metastasis and in high-grade dysplastic lesions, preceding invasive-breast carcinoma and conferring phenotypic characteristics for dissemination.

  8. Factors affecting spontaneous reduction of corpora lutea and twin embryos during the late embryonic/early fetal period in multiple-ovulating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gatius, F; García-Ispierto, I; Hunter, R H F

    2010-02-01

    Spontaneous reduction of advanced twin embryos has been described in high-producing, Holstein-Fresian (Bos taurus) dairy herds. The first objective of the current study was to determine whether management and cow factors could have an effect on such a reduction in twin pregnancies during the early fetal period. Because loss of a corpus luteum was noted in cows suffering twin reduction, we expanded our study to include multiple-ovulating cows carrying singletons. Pregnancy was diagnosed and confirmed from Days 28 to 34 and 56 to 62 postinsemination. Sixty-nine (23.5%) of 293 pregnant cows with two corpora lutea carrying singletons and 132 (28.4%) of 464 twin pregnancies recorded on first pregnancy diagnosis subsequently lost one of the corpora lutea or one of the embryos, respectively. Thirty-four (25.8%) of the 132 twin pregnancies suffering embryo reduction lost one corpus luteum along with the embryo. Corpus luteum reduction always occurred in the ovary ipsilateral to the gravid horn suffering embryo reduction. Binary logistic regressions were performed considering corpus luteum and embryo reduction as dependent variables in single and twin pregnancies, respectively, and several management- and cow-related factors as independent variables. In cows carrying singletons, the risk of corpus luteum reduction was 14.3 (1/0.07) times lower for a given herd, whereas the interaction season by laterality significantly affected corpus luteum reduction such that in cows with two corpora lutea ipsilateral to the horn of pregnancy, the risk of reduction decreased during the winter period. In cows carrying twins, ipsilateral twin pregnancies were 3.45 (1/0.29) times more likely to undergo the loss of one embryo than bilateral twin pregnancies. As an overall conclusion, both corpora lutea and embryos were vulnerable to the effects of stress factors during the early fetal period in cows maintaining their pregnancies. A strong unilateral relationship between the corpus luteum and

  9. The Autophagic Process Occurs in Human Bone Metastasis and Implicates Molecular Mechanisms Differently Affected by Rab5a in the Early and Late Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, Paola; Bendinelli, Paola; Resnati, Massimo; Matteucci, Emanuela; Milan, Enrico; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy favours metastatic growth through fuelling energy and nutrients and resistance to anoikis, typical of disseminated-tumour cells. The autophagic process, mediated by a unique organelle, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes, is divided into three steps. Several stages, especially early omegasome formation and isolation-membrane initiation, remain controversial; molecular mechanisms involve the small-GTPase Rab5a, which regulates vesicle traffic for autophagosome formation. We examined Rab5a involvement in the function of key members of ubiquitin-conjugation systems, Atg7 and LC3-lipidated, interacting with the scaffold-protein p62. Immunohistochemistry of Rab5a was performed in human specimens of bone metastasis and pair-matched breast carcinoma; the autophagic-molecular mechanisms affected by Rab5a were evaluated in human 1833 bone metastatic cells, derived from breast-carcinoma MDA-MB231 cells. To clarify the role of Rab5a, 1833 cells were transfected transiently with Rab5a-dominant negative, and/or stably with the short-hairpin RNA Atg7, were exposed to two inhibitors of autolysosome function, and LC3II and p62 expression was measured. We showed basal autophagy in bone-metastatic cells and the pivotal role of Rab5a together with Beclin 1 between the early stages, elongation of isolation membrane/closed autophagosome mediated by Atg7, and the late-degradative stages. This regulatory network might occur in bone-metastasis and in high-grade dysplastic lesions, preceding invasive-breast carcinoma and conferring phenotypic characteristics for dissemination. PMID:27023526

  10. Early social instability affects plasma testosterone during adolescence but does not alter reproductive capacity or measures of stress later in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegeler, Katja; Wistuba, Joachim; Damm, Oliver S; von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Sachser, Norbert; Kaiser, Sylvia

    2013-08-15

    The social environment plays an important role in modulating processes of the hormonal and behavioural profile of an animal in a variety of group-living species. In wild cavies for instance, unstable social environmental conditions during pregnancy and lactation lead to an infantilised biobehavioural profile of the male offspring. In the present study, the influence of the social environment during pregnancy and lactation on the male wild cavy offsprings' plasma testosterone development, reproductive capacity and stress system activity was investigated. To this purpose, 12 sons whose mothers had lived in an unstable social environment during pregnancy and lactation were compared with 12 sons whose mothers had lived in a stable social environment during the same time. Plasma testosterone (T) and plasma cortisol (C) concentrations were determined from days 20 to 107 of age. Adrenal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and different parameters of reproductive capacity (weights of testes, epididymides and accessory sex glands, cellular composition of the testes, DNA fragmentation indices and sperm motility parameters) were analysed at day 107 of age. TH activity and plasma C were unaffected by different social environmental conditions early in life. The developmental time course of T concentrations, however, was significantly different: Sons whose mothers had lived in an unstable social environment during pregnancy and lactation showed a delayed increase in T concentrations around adolescence compared to controls. In contrast, no reproduction-related parameters measured within this study differed significantly between the two groups. Thus, early social instability affects plasma testosterone development during adolescence in a significant way but does not alter reproductive capacity or measures of stress later in life.

  11. Low pH affects survival, growth, size distribution, and carapace quality of the postlarvae and early juveniles of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Gunzo; Bagarinao, Teodora; Yong, Annita Seok Kian; Chen, Chiau Yu; Noor, Siti Norasidah Mat; Lim, Leong Seng

    2015-06-01

    Acidification of rain water caused by air pollutants is now recognized as a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems. We examined the effects of low pH (control pH 7.5, pH 6, pH 5, pH 4) on the survival, growth, and shell quality of Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae and early juveniles in the laboratory. Hatcheryproduced postlarvae (PL 5) were stocked at 250 PL per aquarium, acclimated over 7 d to experimental pH adjusted with hydrochloric acid, and reared for 30 d. Dead specimens were removed and counted twice a day. After 27 d rearing, all specimens were measured for total length and body weight. Carapace quality was assessed by spectrophotometry. Survival of juveniles was highest at pH 6 (binomial 95% confidence interval 79 - 89%) followed by control pH 7.5 (56 - 68%) and pH 5 (50 - 60%) and was lowest for unmetamorphosed postlarvae and juveniles at pH 4 (43 - 49%). The final median total length and body weight of juveniles were similar at control pH 7.5 (18.2 TL, 50.2 mg BW) and pH 6 (17.7 mm TL, 45.0 mg BW) but significantly less at pH 5 (16.7 mm TL, 38.2 mg BW); at pH 4, the postlarvae did not metamorphose and measured only 9.8 mm TL, 29.3 mg BW. Length frequency distribution showed homogeneous growth at pH 6, positive skew at control pH 7.5 and pH 5, and extreme heterogeneity at pH 4. The carapace showed different transmittance spectra and lower total transmittance (i.e. thicker carapace) in juveniles at pH 7.5, pH 6, and pH 5 than in unmetamorphosed postlarvae and juveniles with thinner carapace at pH 4. Thus, survival, growth, size distribution, and carapace quality of M. rosenbergii postlarvae and early juveniles were negatively affected by pH 5 and especially pH 4. The thinner carapace of the survivors at pH 4 was mostly due to their small size and failure to metamorphose. Natural waters affected by acid rain could decimate M. rosenbergii populations in the wild.

  12. Dietary Patterns in Pregnancy and Effects on Nutrient Intake in the Mid-South: The Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances A. Tylavsky

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary patterns are sensitive to differences across socio-economic strata or cultural habits and may impact programing of diseases in later life. The purpose of this study was to identify distinct dietary patterns during pregnancy in the Mid-South using factor analysis. Furthermore, we aimed to analyze the differences in the food groups and in macro- and micronutrients among the different food patterns. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 1155 pregnant women (mean age 26.5 ± 5.4 years; 62% African American, 35% Caucasian, 3% Other; and pre-pregnancy BMI 27.6 ± 7.5 kg/m2. Using food frequency questionnaire data collected from participants in the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE study between 16 and 28 weeks of gestation, dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis. Three major dietary patterns, namely, Healthy, Processed, and US Southern were identified among pregnant women from the Mid-South. Further analysis of the three main patterns revealed four mixed dietary patterns, i.e., Healthy-Processed, Healthy-US Southern, Processed-US Southern, and overall Mixed. These dietary patterns were different (p < 0.001 from each other in almost all the food items, macro- and micro nutrients and aligned across socioeconomic and racial groups. Our study describes unique dietary patterns in the Mid-South, consumed by a cohort of women enrolled in a prospective study examining the association of maternal nutritional factors during pregnancy that are known to affect brain and cognitive development by age 3.

  13. Suppression of microRNA-31 increases sensitivity to 5-FU at an early stage, and affects cell migration and invasion in HCT-116 colon cancer cells

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    Sun Xiao-Feng

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs with important biological and pathological functions. Although several studies have shown that microRNA-31 (miR-31 is obviously up-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC, there is no study on the functional roles of miR-31 in CRC. Methods Anti-miR™ miRNA 31 inhibitor (anti-miR-31 is a sequence-specific and chemically modified oligonucleotide to specifically target and knockdown miR-31 molecule. The effect of anti-miR-31 transfection was investigated by real-time PCR. HCT-116p53+/+ and HCT-116p53-/-colon cancer cells were treated by anti-miR-31 with or without 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay; apoptosis was detected by DAPI staining; cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry; colony formation, migration and invasion assays were performed to investigate the effect of suppression of miR-31 on the cell lines. Results Real-time PCR results showed that anti-miR-31 was efficiently introduced into the cells and reduced miR-31 levels to 44.1% in HCT-116p53+/+ and 67.8% in HCT-116p53-/-cell line (p = 0.042 and 0.046. MTT results showed that anti-miR-31 alone had no effect on the proliferation of HCT-116p53+/+ or HCT-116p53-/-. However, when combined with 5-FU, anti-miR-31 inhibited the proliferation of the two cell lines as early as 24 h after exposure to 5-FU (p = 0.038 and 0.044. Suppression of miR-31 caused a reduction of the migratory cells by nearly 50% compared with the negative control in both HCT-116p53+/+ and HCT-116p53-/-(p = 0.040 and 0.001. The invasive ability of the cells were increased by 8-fold in HCT-116p53+/+ and 2-fold in HCT-116p53-/- (p = 0.045 and 0.009. Suppression of miR-31 had no effect on cell cycle and colony formation (p > 0.05. Conclusions Suppression of miR-31 increases sensitivity to 5-FU at an early stage, and affects cell migration and invasion in HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

  14. Patrones de dispersión de semillas y colonización de Misodendrum punctulatum (Misodendraceae en un matorral postfuego de Nothofagus antarctica (Nothofagaceae del noroeste de la Patagonia Misodendrum punctulatum (Misodendraceae seed dispersal and colonization patterns on a Nothofagus antarctica (Nothofagaceae post-fire shrubland from Northwestern Patagonia

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    NORLAN TERCERO-BUCARDO

    2010-01-01

    resultados de este trabajo podrían ser útiles en proyectos de restauración ecológica, por ejemplo para la reintroducción de M. puctulatum sobre ejemplares de N. antárctica que rebrotan en matorrales postfuegos. Estos aspectos estudiados también aportan al conocimiento de esta interacción ecológica que ocurre frecuentemente en los bosques de Nothofagus de Argentina y Chile.Spatial dispersal pattern could determine the spatial pattern of establishment affecting the vegetation structure. Our work, analyze dispersion and colonization attribute of the hemiparasitic plant Misodendrum punctulatum (Misodendraceae. Our hypothesis outline that the wind dispersal pattern of M. punctulatum seeds determine the infection pattern (colonization on Nothofagus antárctica, and both processes (dispersión and colonization are asymmetric in accordance with the predominant wind direction. This study was carry out in a N. antárctica (host post-fire shrubland. We assessed the seed dispersal estimating number of seed on host branches supplied from infected-survivals hosts (focal host toward each cardinal direction. Colonization was assessed estimating number of infections on each host, through transects, at every cardinal direction from the focal host. We observed that seeds dispersed decline with distances from the seed source, and dispersion fitted to a negative exponential model. The longest distance of primary dispersion observed was 10 m toward east. About colonization, longest distance from the focal host was 22.5 m toward south. Furthermore, ratio of infected host was lesser on west, one infected by 10 uninfected (1:10 than other compass aspects (1:6. Both process, dispersion and colonization, showed a similar and asymmetric pattern of distribution, which could be result of wind direction predominant from northwest. In addition, a high spatial correlation was observed among number of seed dispersed and recruitment of infection in distances from the sources of seeds. Our results

  15. High incidence of severe cyclosporine neurotoxicity in children affected by haemoglobinopaties undergoing myeloablative haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: early diagnosis and prompt intervention ameliorates neurological outcome

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    Minicucci Fabio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotoxicity is a recognized complication of cyclosporine A (CSA treatment. The incidence of severe CSA-related neurological complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is 4-11%. Methods We describe 6 cases of CSA related neurotoxicity out of 67 matched related HSCT performed in paediatric Middle East patients affected by haemoglobinopaties (5 beta thalassemia major, 1 sickle cell disease-SCD. Conditioning regimen consisted of iv busulphan, cyclophosphamide and graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD prophylaxis with CSA, methylprednisolone, methotrexate and ATG. Results All 6 patients presented prodromes such as arterial hypertension, headache, visual disturbances and vomiting, one to two days before overt CSA neurotoxicity. CSA neurotoxicity consisted of generalized seizures, signs of endocranial hypertension and visual disturbances at a median day of onset of 11 days after HSCT (range +1 to +40. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI performed in all subjects showed reversible leukoencephalopathy predominantly in the posterior regions of the brain (PRES in 5/6 patients. EEG performed in 5/6 patients was always abnormal. Neurotoxicity was not explainable by high CSA blood levels, as all patients had CSA in the therapeutic range with a median of 178 ng/ml (range 69-250. CSA was promptly stopped and switched to tacrolimus with disappearance of clinical and radiological findings. All patients are symptoms-free at a median follow up of 882 days (range 60-1065. Conclusions Our experience suggests that paediatric patients with haemoglobinopaties have a high incidence of CSA related neurological events with no correlation between serum CSA levels and neurotoxicity. Prognosis is good following CSA removal. Specific prodromes such as arterial hypertension, headache or visual disturbances occurring in the early post-transplant period should be carefully evaluated with electrophysiological and MRI-based imaging in

  16. The Varicella-Zoster Virus Immediate-Early 63 protein affects chromatin controlled gene transcription in a cell-type dependent manner

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    Bontems Sébastien

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Varicella Zoster Virus Immediate Early 63 protein (IE63 has been shown to be essential for VZV replication, and critical for latency establishment. The activity of the protein as a transcriptional regulator is not fully clear yet. Using transient transfection assays, IE63 has been shown to repress viral and cellular promoters containing typical TATA boxes by interacting with general transcription factors. Results In this paper, IE63 regulation properties on endogenous gene expression were evaluated using an oligonucleotide-based micro-array approach. We found that IE63 modulates the transcription of only a few genes in HeLa cells including genes implicated in transcription or immunity. Furthermore, we showed that this effect is mediated by a modification of RNA POL II binding on the promoters tested and that IE63 phosphorylation was essential for these effects. In MeWo cells, the number of genes whose transcription was modified by IE63 was somewhat higher, including genes implicated in signal transduction, transcription, immunity, and heat-shock signalling. While IE63 did not modify the basal expression of several NF-κB dependent genes such as IL-8, ICAM-1, and IκBα, it modulates transcription of these genes upon TNFα induction. This effect was obviously correlated with the amount of p65 binding to the promoter of these genes and with histone H3 acetylation and HDAC-3 removal. Conclusion While IE63 only affected transcription of a small number of cellular genes, it interfered with the TNF-inducibility of several NF-κB dependent genes by the accelerated resynthesis of the inhibitor IκBα.

  17. The tuberculin skin test (TST is affected by recent BCG vaccination but not by exposure to non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM during early life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Burl

    Full Text Available The tuberculin skin test (TST is widely used in TB clinics to aid Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb diagnosis, but the definition and the significance of a positive test in very young children is still unclear. This study compared the TST in Gambian children at 4(1/2 months of age who either received BCG vaccination at birth (Group 1 or were BCG naïve (Group 2 in order to examine the role of BCG vaccination and/or exposure to environmental mycobacteria in TST reactivity at this age. Nearly half of the BCG vaccinated children had a positive TST (>or=5 mm whereas all the BCG naïve children were non-reactive, confirming that recent BCG vaccination affects TST reactivity. The BCG naïve children demonstrated in vitro PPD responses in peripheral blood in the absence of TST reactivity, supporting exposure to and priming by environmental mycobacterial antigens. Group 2 were then vaccinated at 4(1/2 months of age and a repeat TST was performed at 20-28 months of age. Positive reactivity (>or=5 mm was evident in 11.1% and 12.5% infants from Group 1 and Group 2 respectively suggesting that the timing of BCG vaccination had little effect by this age. We further assessed for immune correlates in peripheral blood at 4(1/2 months of age. Mycobacterial specific IFNgamma responses were greater in TST responders than in non-responders, although the size of induration did not correlate with IFNgamma. However the IFNgamma: IL-10 ratio positively correlated with TST induration suggesting that the relationship between PPD induced IFNgamma and IL-10 in the peripheral blood may be important in controlling TST reactivity. Collectively these data provide further insights into how the TST is regulated in early life, and how a positive response might be interpreted.

  18. 压型钢板-陶粒混凝土组合楼板火灾响应及火灾后受力性能试验研究%Experimental study of fire response and post-fire mechanical performance of profiled sheet-ceramsite concrete composite floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新堂; 周明; 王万祯

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the fire behavior of profiled sheet-ceramsite concrete composite floors ( abbreviated as PCCF) ,the fire response and structural response of two simply supported PCCF under static load were first obtained through fire experiment. Then experimental study of the post-fire mechanical performance of two composite floors after exposure to fire were carried out, and the static test of the profiled sheet-ceramsite concrete composite floor which had the same construction and dimension as the floor subjected to fire load presented here was conducted. The experimental results show that the fire-resistant ability and the post-fire bearing capacity of the composite floor can be weakened by the welding studs set in the floor. Compared with the composite floor with the same construction and dimension as the floor subjected to fire load, the failure pattern of the profiled sheet-ceramsite concrete composite floor after exposure to fire has great variation, but still has higher post-fire bearing capacity and better mechanical behavior. It is shown that the composite floor after exposure to fire exhibits the failure pattern of bending failure and the composite floor which is not subjected to fire load exhibits the failure pattern of shearing failure.%为了分析压型钢板-陶粒混凝土组合楼板的火灾响应,首先对受荷条件下的2块简支陶粒混凝土组合楼板进行了火灾行为试验,得到了其火灾温度响应及位移响应。在此基础上,进一步对2块受火后的压型钢板-陶粒混凝土组合楼板进行了火灾后受力性能试验研究,并对1块具有相同参数的组合楼板开展了常温下静载试验。结果表明:在楼板内部设置焊接栓钉将减弱组合楼板的抗火性能、降低组合楼板火灾后的承载力;与未受火作用的同样规格的组合楼板相比,火灾后压型钢板一陶粒混凝土组合楼板的破坏形式发生较大变化,但仍具有较高的承

  19. Small Variations in Early-Life Environment Can Affect Coping Behaviour in Response to Foraging Challenge in the Three-Spined Stickleback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rohaa Langenhof

    Full Text Available An increasing concern in the face of human expansion throughout natural habitats is whether animal populations can respond adaptively when confronted with challenges like environmental change and novelty. Behavioural flexibility is an important factor in estimating the adaptive potential of both individuals and populations, and predicting the degree to which they can cope with change.This study on the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus is an empiric illustration of the degree of behavioural variation that can emerge between semi-natural systems within only a single generation. Wild-caught adult sticklebacks (P, N = 400 were randomly distributed in equal densities over 20 standardized semi-natural environments (ponds, and one year later offspring (F1, N = 652 were presented with repeated behavioural assays. Individuals were challenged to reach a food source through a novel transparent obstacle, during which exploration, activity, foraging, sociability and wall-biting behaviours were recorded through video observation. We found that coping responses of individuals from the first generation to this unfamiliar foraging challenge were related to even relatively small, naturally diversified variation in developmental environment. All measured behaviours were correlated with each other. Especially exploration, sociability and wall-biting were found to differ significantly between ponds. These differences could not be explained by stickleback density or the turbidity of the water.Our findings show that a differences in early-life environment appear to affect stickleback feeding behaviour later in life; b this is the case even when the environmental differences are only small, within natural parameters and diversified gradually; and c effects are present despite semi-natural conditions that fluctuate during the year. Therefore, in behaviourally plastic animals like the stickleback, the adaptive response to human-induced habitat disturbance

  20. Changes in rumen microbiota composition and in situ degradation kinetics during the dry period and early lactation as affected by rate of increase of concentrate allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieho, K; van den Bogert, B; Henderson, G; Bannink, A; Ramiro-Garcia, J; Smidt, H; Dijkstra, J

    2017-04-01

    Changes in rumen microbiota and in situ degradation kinetics were studied in 12 rumen-cannulated Holstein Friesian dairy cows during the dry period and early lactation. The effect of a rapid (RAP) or gradual (GRAD) postpartum (pp) rate of increase of concentrate allowance was also investigated. Cows were fed for ad libitum intake and had free access to a mixed ration consisting of chopped wheat straw (dry period only), grass silage, corn silage, and soybean meal. Treatment consisted of either a rapid (1.0 kg of dry matter/d; n = 6) or gradual (0.25 kg of dry matter/d; n = 6) increase of concentrate allowance (up to 10.9 kg of dry matter/d), starting at 4 d pp. In whole rumen contents, bacterial community composition was assessed using samples from 50, 30, and 10 d antepartum (ap), and 3, 9, 16, 30, 44, 60, and 80 d pp, and protozoal and archaeal community composition using samples from 10 d ap, and 16 and 44 d pp. Intake of fermentable organic matter, starch, and sugar was temporarily greater in RAP than GRAD at 16 d pp. Bacterial community richness was higher during the dry period than during the lactation. A rapid increase in concentrate allowance decreased bacterial community richness at 9 and 16 d pp compared with a gradual increase in concentrate allowance, whereas from 30 d pp onward richness of RAP and GRAD was similar. In general, the relative abundances of Bacteroidales and Aeromonadales were greater, and those of Clostridiales, Fibrobacterales, and Spirochaetales were smaller, during the lactation compared with the dry period. An interaction between treatment and sampling day was observed for some bacterial community members, and most of the protozoal and archaeal community members. Transition to lactation increased the relative abundance of Epidinium and Entodinium, but reduced the relative abundance of Ostracodinium. Archaea from genus Methanobrevibacter dominated during both the dry period and lactation. However, during lactation the abundance of the

  1. Early Paleogene Arctic terrestrial ecosystems affected by the change of polar hydrology under global warming:Implications for modern climate change at high latitudes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaytha; A.; LANGLOIS

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of both the role and impact of Arctic environmental changes under the current global warming climate is rather limited despite efforts of improved monitoring and wider assessment through remote sensing technology. Changes of Arctic ecosystems under early Paleogene warming climate provide an analogue to evaluate long-term responses of Arctic environmental alteration to global warming. This study reviews Arctic terrestrial ecosystems and their transformation under marked change of hydrological conditions during the warmest period in early Cenozoic, the Paleocene and Eocene. We describe a new approach to quantitatively reconstruct high latitudinal paleohydrology using compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis which applies empirically derived genus-specific hydrogen isotope fractionations to in situ biomolecules from fossil plants. We propose a moisture recycling model at the Arctic to explain the reconstructed hydrogen isotope signals of ancient high latitude precipitation during early Paleogene, which bears implications to the likely change of modern Arctic ecosystems under the projected accelerated global warming.

  2. The effects of centralised and specialised combined pharmacological and psychological intervention compared with decentralised and non-specialised treatment in the early course of severe unipolar and bipolar affective disorders--design of two randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Christensen, Ellen Margrethe

    2011-01-01

    In unipolar, and bipolar affective disorders, there is a high risk of relapse that increases as the number of episodes increases. Naturalistic follow-up studies suggest that the progressive development of the diseases is not prevented with the present treatment modalities. It is not known whether...... centralised and specialised secondary care intervention initiated early after the onset of the diseases can prevent the progression and thereby improve the prognosis....

  3. Early Onset Inflammation in Pre-Insulin-Resistant Diet-Induced Obese Rats Does Not Affect the Vasoreactivity of Isolated Small Mesenteric Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blædel, Martin; Raun, Kirsten; Boonen, Harrie C M;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obesity is an increasing burden affecting developed and emerging societies since it is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and consequent cardiovascular complications. Increasing evidence points towards a pivotal role of inflammation in the etiology of vascular dysfunction...

  4. "We Don't Allow Children to Climb Trees": How a Focus on Safety Affects Norwegian Children's Play in Early-Childhood Education and Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Sando, Ole Johan

    2016-01-01

    The authors point out a basic contradiction: On one hand, we want to keep children as safe as possible; On the other, they suggest, learning to take risks is a normal part of childhood and child development. In Norway, research has shown that early-childhood education and care (ECEC) practitioners have, in the past, taken a permissive approach to…

  5. Does an Early and Aggressive Combined Wrapping and Dangling Procedure Affect the Clinical Outcome of Lower Extremity Free Flaps?-A Randomized Controlled Prospective Study Using Microdialysis Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Nils; Vogt, P M; May, M; Boyce, M; Koenneker, S; Budde, E; Jokuszies, A

    2016-05-01

    Background The ideal starting point for flap training (FT) with the combined wrapping and dangling procedure is still a question of debate. Most units follow their own established protocols and currently evidence of flap compromise due to FT is still lacking. The aim of this study was to prove if an early and "aggressive" wrapping and dangling protocol could lead to metabolic changes, measured by microdialysis, indicating ischemia resulting in compromised flap perfusion. Methods Between 2010 and 2014, 49 patients with microvascular free flap reconstruction of the lower limb were included in this study. Patients were randomized into two groups. Group I started FT on the 7th postoperative day, and group II started on day 3. FT consisted of a combined wrapping and dangling procedure doubling its duration daily and ending at day 5. Flaps were monitored clinically and by microdialysis for ischemia-induced changes and metabolic parameters in the flap tissue in respect to different starting points of FT. Results All 49 patients in both groups were able to complete the postoperative FT without complications. Noninferiority of the early group could be proven and microdialysis results showed no differences between both groups. Conclusion We could prove by microdialysis that an early start of FT does not lead to compromised flap perfusion. Moreover, an early start of FT can lead to a reduced length of hospital stay. Furthermore, a reduced risk for deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonia due to earlier mobilization might be an appreciated side effect.

  6. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  7. Early brain loss in circuits affected by Alzheimer’s disease is predicted by fornix microstructure but may be independent of gray matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan eFletcher

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a cohort of community-recruited elderly subjects with normal cognition at initial evaluation, we found that baseline fornix white matter microstructure was significantly correlated with early volumetric longitudinal tissue change across a region of interest (called fSROI, which overlaps circuits known to be selectively vulnerable to AD pathology. Other white matter and gray matter regions had much weaker or non-existent associations with longitudinal tissue change. Tissue loss in fSROI was in turn a significant factor in a survival model of cognitive decline, as was baseline fornix microstructure. These findings suggest that WM deterioration in the fornix and tissue loss in fSROI may be the early beginnings of posterior limbic circuit and default mode network degeneration. We also found that gray matter baseline volumes in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus predicted cognitive decline in survival models. But since GM regions did not also significantly predict brain tissue loss, our results may imply a view in which early, prodromal deterioration appears as two quasi independent processes in white and gray matter regions of the limbic circuit crucial to memory.

  8. How has early testicular cancer affected your life? A study of sexual function in men attending active surveillance for stage one testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sue; Williams, Hilary; Braybrooke, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in young men, it is frequently diagnosed at key times in relationship formation. In early stage disease the vast majority of tumours will be cured by surgery alone with patients being offered active surveillance rather than adjuvant therapies. To date, research has not evaluated how surveillance alone impacts on sexual function. The aim of this quantitative longitudinal study was to ascertain the sexual function of men with stage one disease at 3 and 12 months post diagnosis and to compare with normative data. Additional data was collected on the information men sought regarding sexual function and media they used to access this. This study shows that men's sexual function is altered at diagnosis and improves by 3 months. At 12 months, whilst not statistically significant, sexual function improves but not to the same level as normative data comparison. Men appear to find verbal information useful at 3 months, however men appear to be seeking written and online information at 12 months. The intricacies of sexual function together with the low number of participants may have been best met with a qualitative approach. However, the information data indicates the importance of further research into the effects of early stage testicular cancer on sexual function. Therefore, further qualitative research is recommended to explore the effects of early stage testicular cancer in relation to sexual function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Silencing of the Rac1 GTPase MtROP9 in Medicago truncatula stimulates early mycorrhizal and oomycete root colonizations but negatively affects rhizobial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiirika, Leonard Muriithi; Bergmann, Hannah Friederike; Schikowsky, Christine; Wimmer, Diana; Korte, Joschka; Schmitz, Udo; Niehaus, Karsten; Colditz, Frank

    2012-05-01

    RAC/ROP proteins (ρ-related GTPases of plants) are plant-specific small G proteins that function as molecular switches within elementary signal transduction pathways, including the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during early microbial infection via the activation of NADPH oxidase homologs of plants termed RBOH (for respiratory burst oxidase homolog). We investigated the role of Medicago truncatula Jemalong A17 small GTPase MtROP9, orthologous to Medicago sativa Rac1, via an RNA interference silencing approach. Composite M. truncatula plants (MtROP9i) whose roots have been transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes carrying the RNA interference vector were generated and infected with the symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus Glomus intraradices and the rhizobial bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti as well as with the pathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches. MtROP9i transgenic lines showed a clear growth-reduced phenotype and revealed neither ROS generation nor MtROP9 and MtRBOH gene expression after microbial infection. Coincidently, antioxidative compounds were not induced in infected MtROP9i roots, as documented by differential proteomics (two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis). Furthermore, MtROP9 knockdown clearly promoted mycorrhizal and A. euteiches early hyphal root colonization, while rhizobial infection was clearly impaired. Infected MtROP9i roots showed, in part, extremely swollen noninfected root hairs and reduced numbers of deformed nodules. S. meliloti nodulation factor treatments of MtROP9i led to deformed root hairs showing progressed swelling of its upper regions or even of the entire root hair and spontaneous constrictions but reduced branching effects occurring only at swollen root hairs. These results suggest a key role of Rac1 GTPase MtROP9 in ROS-mediated early infection signaling.

  10. Oxford Lithium Trial (OxLith) of the early affective, cognitive, neural and biochemical effects of lithium carbonate in bipolar disorder: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Kate E A; Cipriani, Andrea; Rendell, Jennifer; Attenburrow, Mary-Jane; Nelissen, Natalie; Bilderbeck, Amy C; Vasudevan, Sridhar R; Churchill, Grant; Goodwin, Guy M; Nobre, Anna C; Harmer, Catherine J; Harrison, Paul J; Geddes, John R

    2016-03-02

    Despite lithium's being the most effective drug for bipolar disorder and in clinical use for decades, we still know very little about its early effects relevant to its mode of action. The Oxford Lithium Trial is a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of 6-week lithium treatment in participants with bipolar disorder and mood instability. Its aim is to identify early clinical, neurocognitive and biological effects. Participants (n = 40) will undergo an intensive battery of multi-modal investigations, including remote monitoring of mood, activity and physiology, as well as cognitive testing, fMRI and magnetoencephalography, together with biochemical and gene expression measurements to assess renal, inflammatory and circadian effects. The findings derived from this trial may be of value in predicting subsequent therapeutic response or side effects, not only relevant to the use of lithium but also providing a potential signature to help in more rapid evaluation of novel mood stabilisers. In this respect, OxLith is a step towards the development of a valid experimental medicine model for bipolar disorder. ISRCTN91624955 . Registered on 22 January 2015.

  11. 2012 Whitewater Baldy Post Fire, Canyon Hill NW SW, RGB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains imagery for the Gila National Forest, Catron and Grant County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012...

  12. 2012 Whitewater Baldy Post Fire, Negrito Mountain SE SW, RGB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains imagery for the Gila National Forest, Catron and Grant County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012...

  13. 2012 Little Bear Post Fire, Ruidoso NW NW, CIR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains imagery for the Lincoln National Forest, Otero County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012 Little Bear Fire.

  14. 2012 Whitewater Baldy Post Fire, Rice Ranch SW NW, RGB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains imagery for the Gila National Forest, Catron and Grant County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012...

  15. 2012 Whitewater Baldy Post Fire, Diablo Range SE NW, RGB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains imagery for the Gila National Forest, Catron and Grant County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012...

  16. 2012 Whitewater Baldy Post Fire, Lilley Mountain SW SW, RGB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains imagery for the Gila National Forest, Catron and Grant County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012...

  17. 2012 Little Bear Post Fire, Nogal SW SW, RGB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains imagery for the Lincoln National Forest, Otero County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012 Little Bear Fire.

  18. Post-fire mulching and soil hydrological response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.; Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Keesstra, Saskia; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    In general, one of the major threats after a forest fire is the increased erosion. This can occur due to the erosive impact of rainfall after a drastic reduction of vegetation cover or to changes in soil surface properties that contribute to enhanced runoff flow. There is a consensus among researchers that one of the best ways to reduce this risk is to apply a mulch cover (straw, shredded wood or other materials) immediately after fire. In this study, we studied the effectiveness of various types of mulch materials for the reduction of runoff and soil loss during the first 3 years after a forest fire, in plots of different sizes, with special attention to water repellency and physical properties of the soil surface. In general, straw mulch reduced both runoff and erosion rate more than other treatments. However, the effect was much more important on larger plots. This may be due to specific processes and impacts on sediment connectivity and surface water flow. Therefore, the effect of the scale seems to be an important factor in the management of burnt soils.

  19. 2012 Whitewater Baldy Post Fire, Negrito Mountain SW NE, CIR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains imagery for the Gila National Forest, Catron and Grant County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012...

  20. 2012 Whitewater Baldy Post Fire, Woodland Park SW SW, RGB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains imagery for the Gila National Forest, Catron and Grant County, New Mexico. The imagery was flown to provide coverage after the 2012...