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Sample records for aff sellowiana clusiaceae

  1. Cockroaches as pollinators of Clusia aff. sellowiana (Clusiaceae) on inselbergs in French Guiana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasáková, B.; Kalinová, Blanka; Gustafsson, M. H. G.; Teichert, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 3 (2008), s. 295-304 ISSN 0305-7364 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD206/03/H137 Program:GD Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : insect-plant pollination * plant volatiles * cochroach sex pheromones Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.755, year: 2008

  2. Dicty_cDB: AFF341 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFF341 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15579-1 AFF341P (Link... to Original site) AFF341F 158 AFF341Z 283 AFF341P 441 - - Show AFF341 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFF341 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U15579-1 Original site URL http://dict...GCYYDKFDNCDACNAVDXCITNDLCFPRECNPRGNPPCLINPINCTSTDP CIFSYCENGVCIPTYICTPTPSVTPTVTPXVTXTVT Translated Amino Aci...*fliikkk--- ---DHCDPAIGCYYDKFDNCDACNAVDXCITNDLCFPRECNPRGNPPCLINPINCTSTDP CIFSYCENGVCIPTYICT

  3. Calophyllum inophyllum L. of Clusiaceae is a handsome medium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Calophyllum inophyllum L. of Clusiaceae is a handsome medium-sized evergreen tree. The leaves are shiny with many fine parallel lateral veins. Flowers in clusters are white, fragrant and bear many stamens. Fruit is hard, subglobose and little smaller than a golf ball. Bark astringent, sweet and diuretic. Seed oil is used ...

  4. Population dynamics of Garcinia lucida (Clusiaceae) in Cameroonian Atlantic forests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guedje, N.M.; Lejoly, J.; Nkongmeneck, B.A.; Jonkers, W.B.J.

    2003-01-01

    Garcinia lucida Vesque (Clusiaceae) is a highly valued non-timber forest tree. The bark and the seeds are exploited and commercialised for medicinal purposes and palm wine processing in Cameroon, Gabon and Equatorial Guinea. The bark is often removed over almost the entire circumference of the stem,

  5. Occurrence of biflavonoids in Clusiaceae: chemical and pharmacological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rafaela Oliveira; Carvalho, Mario Geraldo de; Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento da

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the biflavonoids found in species of Clusiaceae, particularly the genera Garcinia and Calophyllum, emphasizing the importance of these metabolites as chemical markers of this family, their contribution to the pharmacological potential of these species, besides the promising potential of these compounds in the search for new drugs. (author)

  6. Occurrence of biflavonoids in Clusiaceae: chemical and pharmacological aspects; Ocorrencia de biflavonoides em Clusiaceae: aspectos quimicos e farmacologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rafaela Oliveira [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Carvalho, Mario Geraldo de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NPPN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais; Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento da, E-mail: mgeraldo@ufrrj.br [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Moleculares

    2012-07-01

    This work describes the biflavonoids found in species of Clusiaceae, particularly the genera Garcinia and Calophyllum, emphasizing the importance of these metabolites as chemical markers of this family, their contribution to the pharmacological potential of these species, besides the promising potential of these compounds in the search for new drugs. (author)

  7. sellowiana (Myrtaceae y Casearia lasiophylla (Flacourtiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Keller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se citan por primera vez para la flora argentina las especies Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae y Casearia lasiophylla (Flacourtiaceae, las cuales se destacan en otros países por sus múltiples usos. El género Acca no había sido citado anteriormente para Argentina. Se detallan los caracteres distintivos de las especies, se las ilustra mediante fotografías y se brinda información acerca de su distribución, nombres vernáculos, usos y observaciones ecológicas.

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFF681 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFF681 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFF681P (Link to Original s...ite) AFF681F 592 AFF681Z 173 AFF681P 765 - - Show AFF681 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFF681 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.ts....0 own update 2004.12.25 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N U36937 |U36937.1 Dict... 36 7e-04 3 AY342298 |AY342298.1 Ictalurus punctatus ER-resident chaperone calreticulin mRNA, complete cds.

  9. Micropropagation systems of Feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Miguel Pedro; Cangahuala-Inocente, Gabriela Claudia; Vesco, Lirio Luiz Dal; Pescador, Rosete; Caprestano, Clarissa Alves

    2013-01-01

    Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret sin. Feijoa sellowiana (Myrtaceae) is a semiwoody fruit species native to South Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina; edible fruits are tasty. The naturally occurring populations in Santa Catarina State show high variability in fruit size, color, and other features. A breeding program launched in 1990 resulted in the release of four Brazilian commercial varieties. The conventional clonal propagation methods of this species, such as cutting and grafting, have shown low efficiency. Therefore, tissue culture techniques were developed for mass propagation. This chapter describes several protocols based on organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. Additional techniques including synthetic seed technology and temporary immersion system are also described.

  10. Dicty_cDB: AFF235 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFF235 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFF235F (Link to Original s...ite) AFF235F 602 - - - - - - Show AFF235 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFF235 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dict...yBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/...date 2001.11.24 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N U36937 |U36937.1 Dict... 3 CK420742 |CK420742.1 AUF_IpTrk_27_j08 Trunk kidney cDNA library Ictalurus punctatus cDNA 5' similar to ER

  11. Antimicrobial activity of Aegiphila sellowiana Cham., Lamiaceae, against oral pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcele A. Ferreira

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of Aegiphila sellowiana Cham., Lamiaceae, against oral pathogens is reported. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs for inhibiting the microorganisms growth were determined using the broth microdilution method from the CLSI M7-A7 protocol. Chlorhexidine was used as the positive control. The ethanol crude extract of the aerial parts of A. sellowiana exhibited activity against the microorganisms tested in this work; however, the activity decreased after partition with n-hexane, dichloromethane, and ethyl acetate. Among the tested fractions, the n-hexane fraction was found to be the most effective against the evaluated oral pathogens. GC-MS analysis of this latter fraction revealed that fatty acids esters, steroids, and aliphatic sesquiterpene hydrocarbons are its major constituents. These compounds may be responsible for the activity of the n-hexane fraction, but other chemical constituents of the dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and hydroalcoholic fraction may potentialize their activities in the crude extract.

  12. Estrutura populacional de Dicksonia Sellowiana Hook (Dicksoniaceae) no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Jaqueline dos

    2011-01-01

    Resumo: Dicksonia sellowiana é uma pteridófita característica de Floresta Ombrófila Mista, ameaçada de extinção devido à exploração excessiva pela indústria extrativa e artesanal. Desta forma, os objetivos deste trabalho foram: determinar se há estruturação populacional de D. sellowiana Hook. no Brasil; avaliar o impacto de fragmentações para a manutenção da variabilidade genética das populações estudadas; e gerar subsídios para conservação da espécie. Análises moleculares foram baseadas em m...

  13. Inventory of Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. in Santa Catarina

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper, André Luís de; Sevegnani, Lucia; Vibrans, Alexander Christian; Uhlmann, Alexandre; Lingner, Débora Vanessa; Verdi, Marcio; Dreveck, Susana; Stival-Santos, Anita; Brogni, Eduardo; Schmitt, Ronnie; Klemz, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    A intensa exploração comercial de Dicksonia sellowiana a deixaram na categoria de ameaçada de extinção, sendo incluída na lista brasileira de espécies da flora ameaçada de extinção. Por isso, o presente trabalho visa apresentar o estudo da distribuição das populações de D. sellowiana para apontar os locais de maior ocorrência da espécie em Santa Catarina, e avaliar a relação da densidade populacional com fatores ambientais, como altitude e clima. Foram instaladas 225 unidades amostrais, com 4...

  14. A New Xeromorphic Species of Clusia em>(Clusiaceae) from Dry Valleys of Northern Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Clusia magnoliiflora M. H. G. Gust. is described as new for the Clusiaceae. It grows in dry scrub in the river valleys of the Marañón and its tributaries in northern Peru, a kind of habitat that harbors very few Clusia species. The species is distinct on account of its extremely thick, obovate le...

  15. Inventário de Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. em Santa Catarina Inventory of Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. in Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís de Gasper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A intensa exploração comercial de Dicksonia sellowiana a deixaram na categoria de ameaçada de extinção, sendo incluída na lista brasileira de espécies da flora ameaçada de extinção. Por isso, o presente trabalho visa apresentar o estudo da distribuição das populações de D. sellowiana para apontar os locais de maior ocorrência da espécie em Santa Catarina, e avaliar a relação da densidade populacional com fatores ambientais, como altitude e clima. Foram instaladas 225 unidades amostrais, com 4.000 m² nas regiões do planalto e oeste catarinense, baseadas na grade de 10 km x 10 km conforme procedimento do Inventário Florístico Florestal de Santa Catarina. Nestas 225 unidades amostrais, D. sellowiana foi encontrada em 94, com variação de um a 391 indivíduos. A grande densidade da espécie em áreas mais elevadas (superiores a 1.000 m está relacionada com os dados climáticos que influenciam a população diretamente, apontados pelo Critério de Informação de Akaike corrigido, ou seja, a altitude e a variação de temperatura que ela provoca. Observou-se também, que a espécie apresenta maior concentração da população nos menores intervalos de altura e diâmetro, chegando a elevadas densidades com até 977 indivíduos/ha em algumas áreas. As informações obtidas pelo inventário sobre esta espécie possibilitam indicar medidas de conservação para a espécie, como área a serem conservadas e apoio a produtores rurais.The intense exploitation of Dicksonia sellowiana has led this species to become endangered and to be included on the red list of threatened species. Therefore, this paper presents a study of D. sellowiana populations in Santa Catarina State, and points out the places where it occurs the most, the status of these populations and also evaluates the relationship between density, climatic variables and elevation. Two hundred and twenty-five sample plots, which were 4.000 m² each, were located within the

  16. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Berg) Burret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, K L; Santos, M O; Laborda, P R; Souza, A P; Peroni, N; Nodari, R O

    2008-11-01

    Acca sellowiana has commercial potential because of the quality and the unique flavor of its fruit. Conservation of natural populations and management of breeding programmes would benefit from the availability of molecular markers that could be used to characterize levels and distribution of genetic variability. Thus, 13 microsatellite markers were developed from an enriched genomic library of A. sellowiana. They were characterized using 40 samples. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.513 to 0.913 and from 0.200 to 0.889, respectively. These are the first microsatellite loci characterized from A. sellowiana that will contribute to improve researches on the genetic conservation, characterization and breeding. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  17. New Polyprenylated Phloroglucinol and Other Compounds Isolated from the Fruits of Clusia nemorosa (Clusiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Oliveira Ferreira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Clusia nemorosa has been widely used in folk medicine to treat various ailments, including headaches and inflammation. Investigation of the fruits of Clusia nemorosa (Clusiaceae led to the isolation and characterization of a new phloroglucinol derivative, named 6S,8S,28S-nemorosic acid (1, together with seven known compounds: friedelin (2, β-sitosterol (3, stigmasterol (4, β-sitosterol glycoside (5, kaempferol (6, quercetin (7 and dimethyl citrate (8. The structures were determined by extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR, CD and MS spectroscopic analyses.

  18. New Polyprenylated Phloroglucinol and Other Compounds Isolated from the Fruits of Clusia nemorosa (Clusiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rafaela Oliveira; da Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento; de Carvalho, Mário Geraldo

    2015-08-06

    Clusia nemorosa has been widely used in folk medicine to treat various ailments, including headaches and inflammation. Investigation of the fruits of Clusia nemorosa (Clusiaceae) led to the isolation and characterization of a new phloroglucinol derivative, named 6S,8S,28S-nemorosic acid (1), together with seven known compounds: friedelin (2), β-sitosterol (3), stigmasterol (4), β-sitosterol glycoside (5), kaempferol (6), quercetin (7) and dimethyl citrate (8). The structures were determined by extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR, CD and MS spectroscopic analyses.

  19. Ocorrência de biflavonoides em Clusiaceae: aspectos químicos e farmacológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Oliveira Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the biflavonoids found in species of Clusiaceae, particularly the genera Garcinia and Calophyllum, emphasizing the importance of these metabolites as chemical markers of this family, their contribution to the pharmacological potential of these species, besides the promising potential of these compounds in the search for new drugs.

  20. Ocorrência de biflavonoides em Clusiaceae: aspectos químicos e farmacológicos

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira,Rafaela Oliveira; Carvalho,Mário Geraldo de; Silva,Tania Maria Sarmento da

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the biflavonoids found in species of Clusiaceae, particularly the genera Garcinia and Calophyllum, emphasizing the importance of these metabolites as chemical markers of this family, their contribution to the pharmacological potential of these species, besides the promising potential of these compounds in the search for new drugs.

  1. flexZhouse : New business model for aff ordable housing in Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin Mohd Noor, M.Z.

    2017-01-01

    Central to this PhD research was the problem of the lack of aff ordable housing for young starters in Malaysia. The solutions for aff ordable housing that are available in the market do not truly solve the problem from the customer’s point of view. Hence, it was important to analyse the contributing

  2. Morphology Of The Dispersion Unit And Germination Of Cordia Sellowiana Cham. And Cordia Myxa L. [morfologia Da Unidade De Dispersão E Germinação De Cordia Sellowiana Cham. E Cordia Myxa L.

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso I.C.E.; De Oliveira F.; Ciarelli D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Cordia sellowiana Cham, and Cordia myxa L. (Boraginaceae Jussieu) had their dispersion units studied, with emphasis on their morphology and seed germination process. The fruits from both Cordia sellowiana and Cordia myxa are of the drupoid nuculanium type. The protrusion of the primary root in the former species occurs through a pyrene longitudinal fissure; in the latter it is one through an opening in the operculum. In both species, seed germination is of the epigel phanerocotylar type. The ...

  3. Anti-Toxoplasma Effects of Methanol Extracts of Feijoa sellowiana, Quercus castaneifolia, and Allium paradoxum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ebrahimzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The currently available agents for use against toxoplasmosis have serious limitations. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii activities of methanol extracts of Feijoa sellowiana (F. sellowiana (leaves and fruits, Quercus castaneifolia (Q. castaneifolia (fruits, and Allium paradoxum (A. paradoxum (leaves in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Vero cells were treated with different concentrations (from 0 to 400 μg/mL of the above extracts or with pyrimethamine at a dose of 50 mg/mL (positive control. Then, the viabilities of the T. gondii-infected cells were measured by using colorimetric MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl 2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. In addition, the survival rates of mice acutely infected with 2 × 104 RH strain tachyzoites of T. gondii were examined in vivo after intraperitoneal injection of the extracts at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg/day for 5 days. Results: In the in vitro anti- T. gondii assay, the IC50 values were 12.77, 180.2, 74.73, 213.2 and 163.8 μg/mL, and the selectivity indices were 6.05, 1.31, 0.35, 0.69 and 1.30 for the F. sellowiana (leaves and fruits, Q. castaneifolia, and A. paradoxum extracts and pyrimethamine, respectively. Moreover, the mice treated with F. sellowiana (leaves and fruits achieved better results in terms of survival than the others (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The results of the current study indicate that methanol extract of F. sellowiana has significant anti-Toxoplasma activity. Further study should be conducted to investigate the potential bioactivity of this extract through bioactivity-guided fractionation.

  4. CLUSIACEAE LINDL. E HYPERICACEAE JUSS. NAS RESTINGAS DO ESTADO DO PARÁ, AMAZÔNIA ORIENTAL, BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Teixeira de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve como objetivo o tratamento florístico-taxonômico de Clusiaceae e Hypericaceae para as restingas do Estado do Pará. O material foi obtido nos acervos dos Herbários do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi (MG, Embrapa Amazônia Oriental (IAN e coletas realizadas na praia do Crispim, Marapanim-PA. As descrições das espécies foram fundamentadas nas características morfológicas e em suas respectivas variações para a flora, foi elaborada uma chave para identificação das mesmas. As famílias encontram-se representadas por quatro táxons, onde Clusiaceae é composta por Clusia fockeana Miq., C. hoffmannseggiana Schltdl., e C. panapanari (Aubl. Choisy., e Hypericaceae apenas por Vismia guianensis (Aubl. Choisy. C. panapanari apresenta-se restrita à formação de mata de restinga. C. hoffmannseggiana e V. guianensis apresentaram distribuição mais ampla nas restingas paraenses. No levantamento feito na coleção nos herbários, constatou-se que coletas, das famílias nas restingas paraenses, ainda são escassas e o esforço de coletas poderá trazer mais informações sobre período de floração e frutificação, além de um provável incremento de novos registros para a área de estudo. Palavras-chave: Cebola brava, Litoral paraense, Taxonomia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18561/2179-5746/biotaamazonia.v5n4p15-21

  5. Characterization of 10 New Nuclear Microsatellite Markers in Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo H. F. Klabunde

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were identified and characterized in Acca sellowiana in order to expand the limited number of pre-existing polymorphic markers for use in population genetic studies for conservation, phylogeography, breeding, and domestication. Methods and Results: A total of 10 polymorphic microsatellite primers were designed from clones obtained from a simple sequence repeat (SSR–enriched genomic library. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with four to 27 alleles per locus. In all tested populations, the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.269 to 1.0. Conclusions: These new polymorphic SSR markers will allow future genetic studies to be denser, either for genetic structure characterization of natural populations or for studies involving genetic breeding and domestication process in A. sellowiana.

  6. Characterization of 10 new nuclear microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Gustavo H. F.; Olkoski, Denise; Vilperte, Vinicius; Zucchi, Maria I.; Nodari, Rubens O.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were identified and characterized in Acca sellowiana in order to expand the limited number of pre-existing polymorphic markers for use in population genetic studies for conservation, phylogeography, breeding, and domestication. • Methods and Results: A total of 10 polymorphic microsatellite primers were designed from clones obtained from a simple sequence repeat (SSR)–enriched genomic library. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with four to 27 alleles per locus. In all tested populations, the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.269 to 1.0. • Conclusions: These new polymorphic SSR markers will allow future genetic studies to be denser, either for genetic structure characterization of natural populations or for studies involving genetic breeding and domestication process in A. sellowiana. PMID:25202632

  7. Characterization of 10 new nuclear microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Gustavo H F; Olkoski, Denise; Vilperte, Vinicius; Zucchi, Maria I; Nodari, Rubens O

    2014-06-01

    Microsatellite primers were identified and characterized in Acca sellowiana in order to expand the limited number of pre-existing polymorphic markers for use in population genetic studies for conservation, phylogeography, breeding, and domestication. • A total of 10 polymorphic microsatellite primers were designed from clones obtained from a simple sequence repeat (SSR)-enriched genomic library. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with four to 27 alleles per locus. In all tested populations, the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.269 to 1.0. • These new polymorphic SSR markers will allow future genetic studies to be denser, either for genetic structure characterization of natural populations or for studies involving genetic breeding and domestication process in A. sellowiana.

  8. Cryopreservation of spores of Dicksonia sellowiana: an endangered tree fern indigenous to South and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, G D; Viana, A M; Randi, A M

    2000-01-01

    Spores of Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl.) Hook., an endangered tree fern, were stored in liquid nitrogen. Surface sterilized spores were placed in 1 ml sterile polypropylene cryotubes and were plunged into liquid nitrogen cryo-cans for 15 minutes, 15 days, 1 month and 3 months. In all, of the treatments the percentage of germination was higher than the control (fresh spores). Germination in Dyer and MS media supplement with 10 (-7) M and 5 x 10(-7) M BA was also promoted as comparing to control. There was no difference between the germination of spores thawed rapidly in a water bath at 45 degree C during 5 minutes or slowly at room temperature. Cryopreservation seems to promote germination of some dormant spores of D. sellowiana. The pre-treatment in cryoprotective solution of dimethyl sulphoxide 15%(v/v) in 1 M glycerol inhibited the germination of cryopreserved spores

  9. Inventário de Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. em Santa Catarina

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper,André Luís de; Sevegnani,Lucia; Vibrans,Alexander Christian; Uhlmann,Alexandre; Lingner,Débora Vanessa; Verdi,Marcio; Dreveck,Susana; Stival-Santos,Anita; Brogni,Eduardo; Schmitt,Ronnie; Klemz,Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    A intensa exploração comercial de Dicksonia sellowiana a deixaram na categoria de ameaçada de extinção, sendo incluída na lista brasileira de espécies da flora ameaçada de extinção. Por isso, o presente trabalho visa apresentar o estudo da distribuição das populações de D. sellowiana para apontar os locais de maior ocorrência da espécie em Santa Catarina, e avaliar a relação da densidade populacional com fatores ambientais, como altitude e clima. Foram instaladas 225 unidades amostrais, com 4...

  10. Caudex growth and fenology of Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. (Dicksoniaceae) in Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Jairo Lizandro; Schneider, Paulo Henrique; Windisch, Paulo Günter

    2009-01-01

    No sul e sudeste do Brasil, a samambaia arborescente Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. é ainda extraída ilegalmente de remanescentes florestais para uso da capa fibrosa do seu cáudice, bem como para cultivo como planta ornamental. No presente trabalho, o crescimento do cáudice, a produção, expansão e senescência de frondes, bem como a formação e liberação de esporos de D. sellowiana foram estudados com base na observação de 37 plantas. Durante um período de um ano de observação, os cáudices crescera...

  11. Fruit ontogeny of Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. & Triana Zappi (Clusiaceae Ontogênese do fruto de Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. & Triana Zappi (Clusiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eglaé Camargo Asinelli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia gardneriana (Clusiaceae is a small to medium-sized tree that usually occurs on the floodplains of the Paraná River and it is an important food source for the local inhabitants. The fruit itself is consumed in natura, and juices and sweets are made from it. The purpose of this study was to describe morphological and structural aspects of fruits and seeds of this species in order to classify the fruit type and the pulpy layer which involves the seeds. The material analyzed consisted of ovary and fruits in different stages of development, collected from five plants from Aurélio Island, Baía River (MS, BR and the description was done according to standard procedures in anatomy. The fruit is a yellowish-orange spherical berry ("bacóide" type. The smooth, coriaceous skin consists of the lignified exocarp. The endocarp cell layers are derived from the activity of an adaxial meristem that undergoes radial elongation. The edible sweet white pulp is formed by the endocarp, as well as the spongy mesocarp, in which the secretory ducts lose their function. The unitegmic anatropous ovules develop into anatropous exalbuminous seeds with a collapsed and undifferentiated testa. The embryo is hypocotylar. The features here described generally occur in Clusioideae-Garcinieae and Symphonieae.Garcinia gardneriana (Clusiaceae é árvore de pequeno a médio porte frequente na Planície de Inundação do Alto Rio Paraná e de importância na alimentação das populações ribeirinhas, sendo consumida in natura e na forma de sucos e doces. O objetivo do presente estudo foi descrever aspectos morfológicos e estruturais dos frutos e sementes dessa espécie como contribuição à classificação do tipo de fruto e da porção carnosa e comestível que envolve as sementes. Ovários e frutos, em diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento foram coletados de cinco espécimes de uma população localizada na ilha do Aurélio, rio Baía (MS, BR e processados segundo t

  12. Propuesta de descriptores para Acca sellowiana (Berg. Burret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Puppo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Guayabo del país o goiaba serrana [Acca sellowiana (Berg. Burret] es uno de los recursos fitogenéticos subutilizados más valiosos de Uruguay y Brasil. Este árbol de fruto comestible, es endémico de una estrecha región sudamericana que abarca el noreste uruguayo y sur de Brasil, donde su cultivo se limita al uso doméstico o a pequeños huertos comerciales. El uso de los materiales de la especie se ve limitado por el desconocimiento de la diversidad presente tanto en poblaciones naturales como en materiales cultivados. El objetivo de este trabajo fue la elaboración de una lista de descriptores que permita la caracterización y evaluación de los materiales para la conservación, uso sostenible e incorporación de diversidad en los programas de mejoramiento genético. Se elaboró una lista preliminar de 41 descriptores morfo-fenológicos de hoja, flor y fruto, que se aplicó in situ a 204 individuos pertenecientes a cuatro poblaciones silvestres del noreste del Uruguay. Con el método de Máxima Verosimilitud Restringida se estimaron los componentes de la varianza entre poblaciones (s²P, entre individuos dentro de poblaciones (s²I(P, entre muestras dentro de individuo (s²M(IP y sus intervalos de confianza utilizando un Modelo Lineal Mixto. Para la determinación del poder discriminante de las variables cuantitativas se adoptó como criterio estadístico la comparación de IC (límite inferior ICs²I(P>límite superior ICs²M(IP y se calculó la razón entre s²I(P/s²M(IP. Para las variables cualitativas se calculó el estadístico F para la determinación de las diferencias significativas entre individuos con el objetivo de identificar descriptores discriminantes de individuos. También se determinaron las variables que discriminan poblaciones. Se validaron siete descriptores cualitativos (forma de fruto, posición de los sépalos, color de pulpa, color interno de la cáscara, dureza de cáscara, clases de distancia estigma-estambres y

  13. Reversal of fluconazole resistance induced by a synergistic effect with Acca sellowiana in Candida glabrata strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R M Machado, Gabriella da; Pippi, Bruna; Dalla Lana, Daiane Flores; Amaral, Ana Paula S; Teixeira, Mário Lettieri; Souza, Kellen C B de; Fuentefria, Alexandre M

    2016-11-01

    The increased incidence of non-albicans Candida (NAC) resistant to fluconazole (FLZ) makes it necessary to use new therapeutic alternatives. Acca sellowiana (O.berg) Burret (Myrtaceae) is a guava with several proven biological activities. The interaction with fluconazole can be a feasible alternative to overcome this resistance. This study evaluates the in vitro antifungal activity of fractions obtained from the lyophilized aqueous extract of the leaves of A. sellowiana against resistant strains of NAC. The antifungal activity of the fractions was evaluated at 500 μg/mL by microdilution method. Checkerboard assay was performed to determine the effect of the combination of the F2 fraction and antifungal at concentrations: MIC/4, MIC/2, MIC, MIC × 2 and MIC × 4. Candida glabrata showed the lowest MIC values (500-3.90 μg/mL) and the F2 active fraction was the most effective. The association of F2 with FLZ showed a strong synergistic effect (FICI ≤ 0.5) against 100% of C. glabrata resistant isolates. Moreover, the F2 active fraction has demonstrated that probably acts in the cell wall of these yeasts. There was no observed acute dermal toxicity of lyophilized aqueous extract of leaves of A. sellowiana on pig ear skin cells. The interaction between substances present in the F2 active fraction is possibly responsible for the antifungal activity presented by this fraction. This study is unprecedented and suggests that the combination of F2 active fraction and FLZ might be used as an alternative treatment for mucocutaneus infections caused by C. glabrata resistant.

  14. Transference of microsatellite markers from Eucalyptus spp to Acca sellowiana and the successful use of this technique in genetic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Louise dos Santos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana, known in portuguese as the goiabeira-serrana or "Feijoa", is a native fruit tree from southern Brazil and northern Uruguay that has commercial potential due to the quality and unique flavor of its fruits. Knowledge of genetic variability is an important tool in various steps of a breeding program, which can be facilitated by the use of molecular markers. The conservation of repeated sequences among related species permits the transferability of microsatellite markers from Eucalyptus spp. to A. sellowiana for testing. We used primers developed for Eucalyptus to characterize A. sellowiana accessions. Out of 404 primers tested, 180 amplified visible products and 38 were polymorphic. A total of 48 alleles were detected with ten Eucalyptus primer pairs against DNA from 119 A. sellowiana accessions. The mean expected heterozygosity among accessions was 0.64 and the mean observed heterozygosity 0.55. A high level of genetic diversity was also observed in the dendrogram, where the degree of genetic dissimilarity ranged from 0 to 65% among the 119 genotypes tested. This study demonstrates the possibility of transferring microsatellite markers between species of different genera in addition to evaluating the extent of genetic variability among plant accessions.

  15. Bees visitors of three species of Clusia (Clusiaceae flowers in Central Amazonia Abelhas visitantes de flores de três espécies de Clusia (Clusiacea na Amazônia Central

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    Ana Claudia Kaminski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations on bees visitors to three species of Clusia (Clusiaceae flowers in the Reserva Adolpho Ducke, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil were made during three two-week periods. The three species of Clusia, namely C. grandiflora, C. panapanari and C. insignis, presented variations regarding the species of bee visitors. A total of 23 bee species visited the three species of Clusia. The Euglossini and Meliponinae bees were the most frequent visitors of the Clusia flowers. Bee collecting behavior of floral resources is described.Durante seis semanas foram realizadas observações das abelhas visitantes de flores de três espécies de Clusia (Clusiaceae, na Reserva Florestal Adolpho Ducke, em Manaus. As três espécies de Clusia: C. grandiflora Splitg., C. panapanari (Aubl. e C. insignis Mart. apresentaram diferenças com relação às visitas de espécies de abelhas, tendo sido visitadas por 23 espécies. Abelhas Euglossini e Meliponinae foram os visitantes mais freqüentes em flores de Clusia. O comportamento de coleta de recursos florais é descrito.

  16. Genetic characterization of natural populations of pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana, with heterologous microsatellites markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Louise dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana is a native species from south Brazil and northeast Uruguay, and due to the unique flavor of its fruits, it is an income-generating alternative to small farmers. Knowledge on genetic diversity is an important tool for genetic improvement and conservation. Aiming to increase the knowledge with regarde to the species genetic diversity, fi ve natural populations of A. sellowiana were analyzed through microsatellites markers developed from Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden x E. urophylla S.T. Blake complex. Using 10 pairs of selected markers, 122 plants were characterized. The mean values for expected and observed heterozigosity were 0.42 and 0.47, respectively. The fˆ estimates did not differ from zero to four out of the five populations evaluated, suggesting a small inbreeding effect. In addition, private alleles and high genetic divergence was observed. the average genetic divergence among the populations was st Fˆ = 0,13 e st Rˆ = 0,14, mostly due to the incidenceof rare or exclusive alleles among some populations.

  17. Evidência da atuação do sistema de auto-incompatibilidade tardia em Acca Sellowiana (berg burret. (Myrtaceae Evidence of the late-acting self-incompatibility system in Acca Sellowiana (berg burret. (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Louise dos Santos

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae é uma frutífera nativa da região Sul do Brasil e nordeste do Uruguai, que vem despertando grande interesse devido ao alto potencial organoléptico de seus frutos. Neste trabalho, teve-se como objetivo a caracterização do tipo de sistema de incompatibilidade atuante em A. sellowiana, através da avaliação do desenvolvimento dos tubos polínicos. Utilizaram-se dois acessos: 458, sendo autocompatível, e 101, auto-incompatível. A maior porcentagem de germinação de grãos de pólen foi observada no acesso 101, com 68,8% de grãos de pólen germinados. Não foram observadas diferenças no crescimento dos tubos polínicos em pistilos autopolinizados ou de polinização cruzada, em ambos os acessos. O crescimento completo do tubo polínico até o ovário ocorreu em pistilos coletados 96 horas após a polinização, independentemente do tratamento aplicado. Sugere-se a ocorrência de auto-esterilidade ou auto-incompatibilidade tardia ou pós-zigótica, considerando que o abortamento dos frutos de A. sellowiana é uniforme e ocorre num prazo curto, por volta de 20 a 30 dias após a fertilização das flores.Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae is a native fruit species from the South Brazil and northeast Uruguay which is attracting great interest due to the high organoleptic potential of its fruits. In this study we aimed to characterize the type of incompatibility system which occurs in A. sellowiana, through the evaluation of the polinic tube development. Two accesses were used: being 458 self-compatible and 101 self- incompatible. The highest percentage of pollen grains germination, 68,8%, was observed in the access 101. It was not observed differences in the growth of the polinic tubes between self-pollinated pistils and cross-pollinated ones in both accesses. The complete growth of the polinic tube until reaching the ovary occurred only in pistils collected 96 hours after the polinization, independent of the treatment. The

  18. Kritiska framgångsfaktorer vid implementering av affärssystem : beaktas de i e-handelsföretag?

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, Nafiz

    2010-01-01

    Syfte: Analysera och diskutera huruvida teori om kritiska framgångsfaktorer vid implementering av affärssystem för fysiska företag beaktas i e-handelsföretag. Identifiera framgångsfaktorer för implementeringen av affärssystem i e-handelsföretag. Forskningsfråga: Beaktas samma kritiska framgångsfaktorer vid implementering av ett affärssystem i stora fysiska företag som små e-handelsföretag? Metod: En kvalitativ metod antogs vilket innebar att en fallstudie genomförts som omfattat två responden...

  19. Morfologia da unidade de dispersão e germinação de Cordia sellowiana cham. e Cordia myxa l Morphology of the dispersion unit nd germination of Cordia sellowiana cham. and Cordia myxa l

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Cristina Ercolini Barroso; Fernando de Oliveira; Deborah Maria Ciarelli

    2009-01-01

    As unidades de dispersão das espécies Cordia sellowiana Cham. e Cordia myxa L. (Boraginaceae Jussieu) foram estudadas com ênfase em sua morfologia e no processo de germinação. Os frutos de Cordia sellowiana e de Cordia myxa são do tipo drupóide nuculânio. A protrusão da raiz primária, na primeira espécie, ocorre através de fenda longitudinal do pirênio, e na segunda, através de abertura do opérculo. A germinação, nas duas espécies, é do tipo fanerocotiledonar epígea. As plântulas apresentam c...

  20. Reproductive biology of a population of Gymnotus aff.carapo (Teleostei: Gymnotidae from southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego de Paula Cognato

    Full Text Available The reproductive period and its relation with somatic and abiotic factors, the relative and absolute fecundity, spawning type, length of first maturation and sex ratio is describe for Gymnotus aff.carapo from a small lake at Itapuã State Park, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Gymnotus aff. carapo presents a relatively long reproductive cycle extending from November/2003 to March/2004. Decreases in water conductivity and increases in dissolved oxygen are correlated with increased gonadal development in males. In females, seasonal increases in temperature and photoperiod and decreases in dissolved oxygen are correlated with increased gonadal development. The mean absolute fecundity was 915.3 oocytes, and mean relative fecundity 0.20 oocytes/mg body weight. Egg size distributions indicate multiple spawning. The size of first maturation was 141 mm in females and 146 mm in males. The sex ratio was 1:1, with a male bias only in smaller size classes.

  1. Asymbiotic germination, seedling development and plantlet propagation of Encyclia aff. oncidioides - an endangered orchid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Łojkowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the best germination conditions of Encyclia aff. oncidioides seeds, five different media (Fast, Knudson C modified by Vajrabhaya, Murashige and Skoog, PB2 and modified Vacin and Went with different concentrations of plant growth regulators such as benzyladenine (BA, naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA and gibberellic acid (GA3 were tested. No beneficial effect was observed when BA and NAA were applied to the germination medium and GA3 inhibited germination. The effect of light, activated charcoal, coconut water and casein hydrolysate on seed germination was also studied. The growth rate of seedlings on three different media supplemented with activated charcoal and plant growth regulators was checked. The applied plant growth regulators had no beneficial effect on the further growth of seedlings. Fast and PB2 media with 0.2% activated charcoal proved to be the best for E. aff. oncidioides seed germination, seedling development and plantlet propagation.

  2. Interações entre Platonia insignis (Clusiaceae) e a avifauna visitante floral no cerrado do Maranhão

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano Kid Azambuja

    2008-01-01

    Resumo: O bacurizeiro, Platonia insignis Mart. (Clusiaceae), é uma espécie arbórea amazônica que se dispersou nos cerrados marginais da região Nordeste do Brasil, localizados nos estados do Maranhão e do Piauí. Foram estudadas a biologia e morfologia floral, o sistema reprodutivo, a relação entre densidade de flores e exposição solar, a sobreposição da floração e a atividade dos visitantes florais. A presença das aves visitantes foi constatada através de observação direta de um ponto fixo, to...

  3. Neoparamoeba branchiphila infections in moribund sea urchins Diadema aff. antillarum in Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyková, Iva; Lorenzo-Morales, J.; Kostka, Martin; Valladares, B.; Pecková, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 3 (2011), 225-231 ISSN 0177-5103 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/09/0137; GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Neoparamoeba * Diadema aff. antillarum * SSU rDNA phylogeny * Tenerife Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.201, year: 2011

  4. The effect of different growth regimes on the endophytic bacterial communities of the fern, Dicksonia sellowiana hook (Dicksoniaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Irene de Araújo Barros; Welington Luiz Araújo; João Lúcio Azevedo

    2010-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria associated with the fern Dicksonia sellowiana were investigated. The bacterial communities from the surface-sterilized pinnae and rachis segments of the plants from the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest that grew in native field conditions were compared with the bacterial communities from plants grown in greenhouses and plants that were initially grown in greenhouses and then transferred to the forest. From 540 pinnae and 540 rachis segments, 163 (30.2%) and 346 (64.2%) were c...

  5. Standardized extract of Dicksonia sellowiana Presl. Hook (Dicksoniaceae) decreases oxidative damage in cultured endothelial cells and in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattmann, Yanna D; Mendéz-Sánchez, Stelia C; Furian, Ana F; Paludo, Katia S; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Dartora, Nessana; Oliveira, Mauro S; Costa, Elisangela Martins da S; Miguel, Obdúlio G; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; Iacomini, Marcello; Mello, Carlos F; Franco, Célia R C; da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo; Cadena, Silvia M S C; Marques, Maria C A; Santos, Adair R S

    2011-02-16

    Aging and a variety of pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases have been associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion (O₂·⁻), hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) generation. Plant polyphenols bear radical scavenging/antioxidant activity. A phytomedicinal preparation obtained from aerial parts of Dicksonia sellowiana (Dicksoniaceae), a native plant from Central and South America, has been widely used in Brazil against asthma and presents beneficial effects in several other diseases, including cardiovascular disturbance. In this work, we investigated whether Dicksonia sellowiana, which is also known to contain high levels of polyphenols, presents antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from Dicksonia sellowiana leaves (HEDS) was investigated by in vitro and in vivo tests. HEDS (0.1-100 μg/mL) exhibited a strong scavenging activity against all reactive species tested (DPPH, O₂·⁻,·OH and H₂O₂; IC₅₀=6.83±2.05, 11.6±5.4, 2.03±0.4, and 4.8±0.4 μg/mL, respectively). HEDS strongly protected endothelial cells against H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress by mechanisms other than increasing catalase activity. In addition, HEDS protected cell membrane from oxidative damage. HEDS, (20 and 40 mg/kg) inhibited lipid peroxidation in vivo (29.8% and 24.5%, respectively). According to our results, we can speculate that the traditional uses of Dicksonia sellowiana for cardiovascular diseases, asthma and skin diseases could be, at least in part, related to the potent antioxidant and endothelial protective activities of the plant. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Caracterização dendrométrica de Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. em povoamento de Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Biondi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its history of exploitation and intensive use in landscaping, the Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. (Dicksoniaceae is currently one of the Brazilian flora endangered species. The Paraná State laws prohibit its extraction; however, there is no research to support future management plans. This work characterized the natural occurrence of D. Sellowiana in an Araucaria angustifolia stand in the municipality of Rio Negro, Paraná State, using dendrometric variables after silvicultural intervention (clipping. D. sellowiana individuals (714 taller than the commercial height of 0.50 m were randomly sampled and assigned to the following treatments: plots with unclipped plants (T0, plots with plants clipped in the measurement (T1, and plots with plants clipped two years before in the measurement (T2. The variables analyzed were: density of the individuals/ha and plots, total and commercial caudex height (m, crown height (m, base diameter, crown (cm and frond (m, diameters, individual and total commercial volume. It was found significant difference between T1 and T2 for total height; between T2 and T0 and between T2 of T1 for crown and from diameters, individual commercial volume; between T0 and T1 and between TO and T2 for total commercial volume. The variables that characterized better the silvicultural interventions were the density of individuals and the total height. The occurred interventions revealed its importance for the management of the D. sellowiana because it favors the regeneration of the young plants for the conservation of the species, and benefits the development of the adult plants for its commercial exploitation.

  7. Morfoanatomia de órgãos vegetativos de plantas juvenis de Aegiphila sellowiana Cham. (Lamiaceae submetidas ao alagamento do substrato Morpho-anatomy of vegetative organs in seedlings of Aegiphila sellowiana Cham. (Lamiaceae subject to flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Medri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Visando contribuir para o conhecimento das respostas morfoanatômicas de espécies arbóreas à hipoxia, efeitos do alagamento em órgãos vegetativos de Aegiphila sellowiana foram estudados. Indivíduos jovens foram mantidos em substrato drenado e alagado por 50 e 80 dias. Houve mortalidade de 40% das plantas alagadas. As sobreviventes produziram fissuras peridérmicas na base do hipocótilo, raízes diageotrópicas e lenticelas hipertrofiadas em hipocótilos e raízes. Em plantas alagadas: (1 as raízes secundárias apresentaram maior diâmetro, córtex mais espesso, células corticais maiores, espaços intercelulares maiores, cilindro vascular e elementos de vaso menores; (2 as raízes primárias em estrutura secundária e hipocótilos apresentaram súber e feloderme mais espessos; (3 as folhas apresentaram nervura mediana e mesofilo mais espesso, tricomas mais abundantes e estômatos menores. Constatou-se que A. sellowiana é intolerante ao alagamento do solo, fato evidenciado pela morte de parte das plantas. Entretanto, as sobreviventes apresentaram modificações morfoanatômicas que conferem tolerância. Sugere-se que a capacidade diferencial de tolerância apresentada entre os indivíduos pode ser resultado da presença de diferentes genótipos dentro do conjunto de plantas utilizado neste estudo.In order to uncover the morpho-anatomical responses of tree species to hypoxia, we studied the effects of flooding on vegetative organs of Aegiphila sellowiana. Young individuals were kept in drained and flooded soil for 50 and 80 days. Under flooding, there was a mortality rate of 40%. The surviving plants produced peridermic fissures, superficial roots and hypertrophied lenticels. Secondary roots of flooded plants presented greater diameter, thicker cortex, greater diameter of the cortical cells, larger intercellular spaces, and thinner vessel elements and vascular tissues. In the main roots under secondary growth and hypocotyls, cork and

  8. Protocolo de micropropagação da goiabeira serrana (Acca sellowiana (Berg Burret Feijoa (Acca sellowiana (Berg Burret micropropagation protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carla Oltramari

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Visando ao desenvolvimento de um novo protocolo para a micropropagação da goiabeira serrana (Acca sellowiana (Berg Burret foram estabelecidos experimentos com segmentos nodais e microestacas. As citocininas 6-Benzilaminopurina (BAP, Cinetina (Kin e 2-Isopenteniladenina (2-iP foram adicionadas ao meio de cultura Woody Plant Midium-WPM, visando à proliferação de brotações múltiplas dos genótipos 53B-7, 101, 529 e 152-12 x 458. As microestacas obtidas in vitro foram submetidas a diferentes períodos de indução, em 20 miM de ácido indolbutírico (AIB e, posteriormente, transferidas para meio de cultura isento desse fitorregulador para a indução de raízes ou, alternativamente, submetidas a diferentes concentrações e tempos de exposição em AIB e transferidas para substrato. As citocininas empregadas não promoveram aumento na taxa de proliferação de brotos em relação à testemunha. O meio de cultura basal WPM, adicionado de Kin (5 miM, proporcionou maior altura média dos brotos. Segmentos nodais do acesso 101 cultivados em meio de cultura WPM, isento de fitorreguladores, apresentaram maiores taxas médias de proliferação. Pulsos de seis dias com AIB (20 miM induziram uma maior taxa de enraizamento (68,9%, um maior número médio de raízes (1,3 raízes e raízes com maior comprimento médio (5,6miM. Microestacas enraizadas ex vitro, pela imersão em AIB (100 miM por 60 minutos, resultaram em maior altura das plantas (45,3mm, número de raízes secundárias (11,3 raízes, massa fresca (1069mg e seca das raízes (282mg.The objective of this study was to establish a micropropagation protocol for Acca sellowiana (Berg Burret. Nodal segments of in vitro cultivated plantlets of the genotypes 53B-7, 101, 529 and 152-12 x 458 were inoculated in test tubes containing 15ml of Woody Plant Medium-WPM solid medium supplemented with the cytokinins BAP, Kin, and 2-iP. For rooting purpose the microcuttings were submitted to different

  9. THERMAL TIME FOR REPRODUCTIVE PHENOLOGICAL STAGES OF PINEAPPLE GUAVA (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso PARRA-CORONADO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crop development of feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret is mainly stimulated by temperature, but is also affected by other climatic factors. The determination of the development in terms of thermal time or growing degree days (GDD is more precise than calendar days. The aim of this study was to propose a phenological model for feijoa cv. Quimba, in which the base temperature (Tb for four different phenological stages and its duration in terms of GDD is estimated to predict the timing of anthesis, fruit setting and harvesting. During the years 2012 to 2014, in two localities of the department of Cundinamarca, Colombia, twenty trees per farm were labeled, dates of occurrence of phenological stages, starting from floral button were recorded. Tb was estimated using the method of minimum coefficient of variation, as well as duration of the four reproductive phenological stages in terms of GDD. The results showed that Tb and GDD vary depending on the stage of development of the crop; in general, an average of 2651 GDD and 189 days is required to reach the flower bud to the fruit harvest. The parameters of the regression analysis showed that the model successfully predicted phenological stages when estimated Tb for each of them was used, with high determination coefficient. Cross-validation showed good statistical fit between predicted and observed values; intercept was not significantly different from zero (p <0.05 and the slope was statistically equal to one TIEMPO TÉRMICO PARA ESTADOS FENOLÓGICOS REPRODUCTIVOS DE LA FEIJOA (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret El desarrollo del cultivo de feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret es principalmente estimulado por la temperatura, pero también es afectado por otros factores climáticos. La determinación del desarrollo en términos de tiempo térmico o grados día de crecimiento (GDC es más precisa que en días calendario. El objetivo de este estudio fue proponer un modelo fenológico para la feijoa

  10. Propagação da goiabeira serrana Feijoa sellowiana Berg, através da mergulhia de cepa Vegetative propagation of Feijoa sellowiana Berg through stool layring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Fachinello

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo verificar a influência de três tipos de mergulhia de cepa na obtenção de novas plantas de Feijoa sellowiana Berg. Para isso, foi conduzido experimento na EMBRAPA-CNPFT, Pelotas-RS, durante o período de agosto de 90 a julho de 91. Foram utilizados como tratamentos: T1 -corte total da planta a l0cm do nível do solo, seguido de amontoa; T2 - Sem corte da planta, seguido de amontoa a 20 cm de altura e T3 - corte total da planta a 10 cm do nível do solo e amontoa com terra a 20 cm de altura, 2 meses depois do corte. Os parâmetros avaliados foram: número de brotos emitidos por planta; número de brotos enraizados por plantas; número de raízes por broto e vigor dos brotos, representado pelas medidas do comprimento total e diâmetro da base. De acordo com o resultados obtidos o tratamento T3 foi o que proporcionou um maior número de brotos emitidos e enraizados. Para as demais variáveis não houve diferença significativa entre os tratamentos.An experiment to evaluate the effect of stool layring of feijoa was carried out in EMBR APA/CNPFT, Pelotas-RS, from August 90 to July 91. Three treatments of layring propagation were used: T1 - plant cutting 10 cm above the ground and covered with soil; T2 - No plant cutting and covered with soil up to 10 cm above the ground; and T3 - Plant cutting 10 cm above the ground and covered with soil two months later. The results obtained showed that the number of shoots and rooted shoots were more significant in T3. There was no diference between number of roots, diameter and length of shoots among treatments.

  11. In Vitro Inhibitory Activity of Acca sellowiana Fruit Extract on End Products of Advanced Glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Alethia; Garcia, Abraham H; Pérez, Rosa M; García, Efren V; González, Daphne E

    2018-02-01

    Hyperglycemia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, as it increases protein glycation, as well as the progressive accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are complex structures that produce fluorescence. The glycation reaction raises the levels of protein carbonyl, N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and fructosamine and decreases the level of thiol groups. In the present study, the antiglycation activity was determined by fluorescence intensity using the bovine serum albumin (BSA)/glucose, CML method, and the level of fructosamine. The oxidation of proteins was determined by the carbonyl protein content and thiol groups. The results show that the hexane extract of Acca sellowiana (FOH) at different concentrations (0.30-5 mg/ml) significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs in the BSA/glucose model during the 4 weeks of the study. FOH reduced the levels of fructosamine and CML. Our results showed a significant effect of FOH in the prevention of oxidative damage of proteins, as well as an effect on the oxidation of thiol groups and carbonyl proteins. The present study indicates that FOH is effective in inhibiting the glycation of proteins in vitro, so it can prevent or ameliorate the chronic conditions of diabetes associated with the formation of AGEs.

  12. Characterization of somatic embryo attached structures in Feijoa sellowiana Berg. (Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Sandra M; Canhoto, Jorge M

    2010-06-01

    The presence of an attached organ to somatic embryos of angiosperms connecting the embryo to the supporting tissue has been a subject of controversy. This study shows that 67% of the morphologically normal somatic embryos of Feijoa sellowiana possess this type of organ and that its formation was not affected by culture media composition. Histological and ultrastructural analysis indicated that the attached structures of somatic embryos displayed a great morphological diversity ranging from a few cells to massive and columnar structures. This contrast with the simple suspensors observed in zygotic embryos which were only formed by five cells. As well as the suspensor of zygotic embryos, somatic embryo attached structures undergo a process of degeneration in later stages of embryo development. Other characteristic shared by zygotic suspensors and somatic embryo attached structures was the presence of thick cell walls surrounding the cells. Elongated thin filaments were often associated with the structures attached to somatic embryos, whereas in other cases, tubular cells containing starch grains connected the embryo to the supporting tissue. These characteristics associated with the presence of plasmodesmata in the cells of the attached structures seem to indicate a role on embryo nutrition. However, cell proliferation in the attached structures resulting into new somatic embryos may also suggest a more complex relationship between the embryo and the structures connecting it to the supporting tissue.

  13. Detecção de Fungos em Sementes de Acca sellowiana (Berg Burret

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    Vinícius Spolaor Fantinel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Acca sellowiana é uma espécie frutífera nativa da Região Sul do Brasil que está despertando grande interesse econômico devido ao alto potencial organoléptico de seus frutos. A principal forma de propagação da espécie é via sexuada. Objetivando determinar a qualidade sanitária das sementes, foram comparadas três formas de detecção de fungos, com ou sem a assepsia superficial, em sementes oriundas de quatro municípios do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul e de três municípios do Estado de Santa Catarina. Foram testados os meios de cultura Batata-Dextrose-Ágar (BDA, V8 (suco de tomate e o método Blotter Test. Foram identificados os seguintes fungos: Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium sp., Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium sp., Curvularia sp., Alternaria sp., Trichoderma sp., Epicoccum sp. e Phomopsis sp. Os meios agarizados são mais sensíveis na detecção de fungos em sementes de goiaba serrana. A assepsia das sementes reduz a incidência de fungos infestantes.

  14. Efecto de extractos de la esponja calcarea Leucetta aff. floridana sobre el ciclo de líneas celulares leucemoides

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Margarita Márquez Fernández; Mariano Eliecer Acosta Lobo; María Elena Márquez Fernández; Alejandro Martínez Martínez; Edna Judith Márquez Fernández; Mauricio Camargo Guerrero

    2012-01-01

    Introducción: la esponja Leucetta aff. floridana produce compuestos con actividad antiproliferativa diferencial en células tumorales de pulmón y mama, la cual no ha sido explorada en otras líneas tumorales y se desconoce si su potencial antiproliferativo está relacionado con la progresión de células a través del ciclo celular. Objetivo: evaluar el potencial antiproliferativo, anticlonogénico y el efecto sobre el ciclo celular de los extractos hexánico y metanólico de la esponja Leucetta aff. ...

  15. Curcuma longa as additive in the diet for Astyanax aff. bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes França Ferreira, Pollyanna; Martins, Maria Tatiana Soares; Caldas, Débora Werneck; Gomes, Juliana Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Jerusa Maria; Salaro, Ana Lucia; Rocha, Juliana Silva; Zuanon, Jener Alexandre Sampaio

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of turmeric (Curcuma longa) as additive in the diet for Astyanax aff. bimaculatus. Fish (0.83 ± 0.04 g) were fed, for 60 days, with six diets containing 0.0, 20.0, 40.0, 60.0, 80.0, and 100.0 g turmeric kg -1 feed. There was an increasing linear effect of turmeric on the thickness of the muscular layer, and height and width of the folds of the intestine. In the liver, a quadratic effect was observed of turmeric on the percentage of hepatocyte cytoplasm and a decreasing linear effect on the percentage of sinusoid capillaries. A quadratic effect was also observed of turmeric on the liver glycogen. There was no effect of turmeric on the antioxidant activity in the liver, carcass composition or productive performance of the fish. Thus, we concluded that Curcuma longa has trophic effects on the epithelium and the muscular layer of the intestine of A. aff. bimaculatus. Additionally, low levels of Curcuma longa cause increased deposition of liver glycogen and high levels cause reduction.

  16. Estudo anatômico do crescimento do fruto em Acca sellowiana Berg. Anatomic study of Acca sellowiana Berg. fruit growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Esemann-Quadros

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A Acca sellowiana Berg. (Myrtaceae é uma frutífera nativa dos planaltos meridionais do Sul do Brasil e que se encontra em processo de domesticação. Seus frutos são doce-acidulados e podem ser consumidos in natura ou empregados para a produção de sucos e doces. Assim, informações sobre o desenvolvimento, morfologia e anatomia de seus frutos são de grande interesse e foram objetos do presente trabalho. O fruto (ovário mais hipanto, no tempo zero (plena floração, tem, em média, 0,6 cm de altura e 0,4 cm de diâmetro, sendo cerca de dez vezes menor que o fruto maduro. Longitudinalmente, identificam-se três regiões distintas: locular, sublocular e prolongamento. Transversalmente, na região mediana, estão delimitadas três regiões: 1 epiderme (casca: com tricomas unicelulares e simples; 2 região parenquimática: rica em braquiesclereídes, isoladas ou em pequenos grupos (2-3 células, com oito feixes vasculares concêntricos perifloemáticos distribuídos radialmente e muitas glândulas esféricas subepidérmicas; 3 região interna (polpa: com células pequenas, cúbicas, nitidamente dispostas em 3-4 camadas ao redor dos lóculos, várias contendo drusa. Quatro lóculos são separados pelos septos e vários óvulos nascem de placentas axiais, com duas fileiras por lóculo. Não ocorrem nectários. À medida que o fruto se desenvolve, surgem, na região intermediária, grupos de células de paredes finas, que crescem muito e diferenciam-se em braquiesclereídes. As placentas crescem, ocupando todo o espaço interior dos lóculos à medida que estes aumentam de tamanho e as sementes se desenvolvem. Assim, o fruto maduro apresenta uma região periférica de consistência firme e gosto adstringente, e uma região central macia e adocicada.Acca sellowiana Berg. (Myrtaceae is a fruit-bearing treelet or shrub native from the highlands of South Brazil. The plant is currently in the domestication process. Its fruit is sweet-acidified and

  17. Avaliação da morfologia interna de sementes de Acca sellowiana O. Berg por meio de análise de imagens

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    Vanessa Neumann Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acca sellowiana O. (Berg Burret é uma fruteira nativa da região Sul do Brasil e do Uruguai, que apresenta grande potencial de uso na recuperação de áreas degradadas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a morfologia interna de sementes de Acca sellowiana O. Berg por meio da análise de imagens de raios X e relacionar os resultados com a germinação das sementes. Sementes de Acca sellowiana O. Berg, representadas por três lotes, foram analisadas pelo teste de raios X e, posteriormente, conduzidas ao teste de germinação, com avaliação aos 44 dias após a semeadura. As imagens de raios X foram analisadas com o software ImageJ. A análise das imagens radiográficas de sementes de Acca sellowiana permite a mensuração das áreas internas livres, assim como a determinação da relação entre estas e a germinação. Danos internos detectados por meio de raios X afetam a germinação das sementes.

  18. Contribuição ao estudo químico e avaliação da atividade antioxidante dos frutos verdes de Clusia paralicola (Clusiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Rafaela Oliveira Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Clusia paralicola (Clusiaceae) têm ocorrência nas florestas nordestinas, especialmente do semi-árido e dos brejos de altitude, é conhecida popularmente como pororoca. Este trabalho descreve o estudo químico e a avaliação da atividade antioxidante dos frutos verdes de Clusia paralicola. O estudo químico resultou no isolamento e identificação de dois biflavonóides (GB-1-7-O-glicosídeo e 3,8-binaringenina-7-O-β-glicosídeo), uma catequina (epicatequina), dois esteróides (β-sitosterol...

  19. Estrutura populacional de Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae no Parque Nacional Serra de Itabaiana, Estado do Sergipe =Population structure of Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae at Serra de Itabaiana National Park, Sergipe State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio Vinicius Paes Dantas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudos de estrutura de tamanho e de estágios ontogênicos são importantes para se compreender quais fatores influenciam os processos populacionais, a regeneração e a resposta a perturbações de uma população. Este estudo analisou a estrutura de uma população de Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae no hábitat de Areias Brancas do Parque Nacional Serra de Itabaiana, Estado de Sergipe. Amostraram-se aleatoriamente 30 parcelas de 20 x 25 m, nas quais se determinou a abundância de indivíduos jovens e adultos, a circunferência do tronco, a altura da copa e o número de caules por planta. A distribuição espacial de jovens e adultos na população é agregada, causada por sua predisposição em formar grupos em locais onde há maiordisponibilidade de recursos e condições favoráveis. Outro fator que contribui com a agregação é a dispersão anemocórica da espécie. A população estudada apresentou o maior número de indivíduos nas categorias menores de altura e de DAS, indicando que a população está em crescimento ou em processo de autorregeneração. Há maior número de indivíduos de 2-3 m de altura, o que se deve ao fogo ou corte, eventos que não foram capazes de interromper o processo de recrutamento ou reprodução da espécie na área, pois não ocorreram lacunas nas classes de diâmetro de caule.Studies on structure, size and ontogenic stages are important to understand which factors influence population processes, regeneration and response to disturbances of a population. This study examined thestructure of a population of Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae in white sands habitat of Serra de Itabaiana, Sergipe State. Thirty 20 x 25 m plots were selected randomly selected, and their abundance of young and adult plants was recorded, as well as trunk circumference, crown height and number of stems per plant. The spatial distribution of young and adult population is aggregated, caused by their predisposition to form

  20. A genome-wide association study identified AFF1 as a susceptibility locus for systemic lupus eyrthematosus in Japanese.

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    Yukinori Okada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease that causes multiple organ damage. Although recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS have contributed to discovery of SLE susceptibility genes, few studies has been performed in Asian populations. Here, we report a GWAS for SLE examining 891 SLE cases and 3,384 controls and multi-stage replication studies examining 1,387 SLE cases and 28,564 controls in Japanese subjects. Considering that expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs have been implicated in genetic risks for autoimmune diseases, we integrated an eQTL study into the results of the GWAS. We observed enrichments of cis-eQTL positive loci among the known SLE susceptibility loci (30.8% compared to the genome-wide SNPs (6.9%. In addition, we identified a novel association of a variant in the AF4/FMR2 family, member 1 (AFF1 gene at 4q21 with SLE susceptibility (rs340630; P = 8.3×10(-9, odds ratio = 1.21. The risk A allele of rs340630 demonstrated a cis-eQTL effect on the AFF1 transcript with enhanced expression levels (P<0.05. As AFF1 transcripts were prominently expressed in CD4(+ and CD19(+ peripheral blood lymphocytes, up-regulation of AFF1 may cause the abnormality in these lymphocytes, leading to disease onset.

  1. The effect of different growth regimes on the endophytic bacterial communities of the fern, Dicksonia sellowiana hook (Dicksoniaceae

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    Irene de Araújo Barros

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic bacteria associated with the fern Dicksonia sellowiana were investigated. The bacterial communities from the surface-sterilized pinnae and rachis segments of the plants from the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest that grew in native field conditions were compared with the bacterial communities from plants grown in greenhouses and plants that were initially grown in greenhouses and then transferred to the forest. From 540 pinnae and 540 rachis segments, 163 (30.2% and 346 (64.2% were colonized by bacteria, respectively. The main bacterial genera and species that were isolated included Bacillus spp. (B. cereus, B. megaterium, B. pumilus and B. subtilis, Paenibacillus sp., Amphibacillus sp., Gracilibacillus sp., Micrococcus sp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. (S. maltophilia and S. nitroreducens. B. pumilus was the most frequently isolated bacterial species. Amphibacillus and Gracilibacillus were reported as endophytes for the first time. Other commonly found bacterial genera were not observed in D. sellowiana, which may reflect preferences of specific bacterial communities inside this fern or detection limitations due to the isolation procedures. Plants that were grown in greenhouses and plants that were reintroduced into the forest displayed more bacterial genera and species diversity than native field plants, suggesting that reintroduction shifts the bacterial diversity. Endophytic bacteria that displayed antagonistic properties against different microorganisms were detected, but no obvious correlation was found between their frequencies with plant tissues or with plants from different growth regimes. This paper reports the first isolation of endophytic bacteria from a fern.

  2. The effect of different growth regimes on the endophytic bacterial communities of the fern, Dicksonia sellowiana hook (Dicksoniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Barros, Irene; Luiz Araújo, Welington; Lúcio Azevedo, João

    2010-10-01

    Endophytic bacteria associated with the fern Dicksonia sellowiana were investigated. The bacterial communities from the surface-sterilized pinnae and rachis segments of the plants from the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest that grew in native field conditions were compared with the bacterial communities from plants grown in greenhouses and plants that were initially grown in greenhouses and then transferred to the forest. From 540 pinnae and 540 rachis segments, 163 (30.2%) and 346 (64.2%) were colonized by bacteria, respectively. The main bacterial genera and species that were isolated included Bacillus spp. ( B. cereus, B. megaterium, B. pumilus and B. subtilis ) , Paenibacillus sp. , Amphibacillus sp. , Gracilibacillus sp. , Micrococcus sp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. ( S. maltophilia and S. nitroreducens ). B. pumilus was the most frequently isolated bacterial species . Amphibacillus and Gracilibacillus were reported as endophytes for the first time. Other commonly found bacterial genera were not observed in D. sellowiana , which may reflect preferences of specific bacterial communities inside this fern or detection limitations due to the isolation procedures. Plants that were grown in greenhouses and plants that were reintroduced into the forest displayed more bacterial genera and species diversity than native field plants, suggesting that reintroduction shifts the bacterial diversity. Endophytic bacteria that displayed antagonistic properties against different microorganisms were detected, but no obvious correlation was found between their frequencies with plant tissues or with plants from different growth regimes. This paper reports the first isolation of endophytic bacteria from a fern.

  3. Ciclo vital de Pegoscapus aff. silvestrii (Hymenoptera:Agaonidae, polinizador de Ficus andicola (Moraceae

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    Sergio Jansen G.

    2006-07-01

    de sexo en las poblaciones de avispas que emergen de los frutos de cada especie de Ficus. A pesar de esto, son pocos los estudios que tratan la biología básica de las avispas, especialmente para el Neotrópico. El presente trabajo describe el ciclo vital de la avispa agaónida Pegoscapus aff. silvestrii, polinizadora de Ficus andicola, a partir de un seguimiento intensivo a los frutos de un árbol. La especie tiene cinco estadíos larvales que juntos abarcaron 80 días desde la postura, con presencia de aparato bucal en los últimos dos. A éstos les sigue una pupa del tipo exarata y finalmente el adulto.

  4. An Apple Fruit Fermentation (AFF) Treatment Improves the Composition of the Rhizosphere Microbial Community and Growth of Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch ‘Benihoppe’) Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yufen; Shao, Wei; Huang, Weijing; Ji, Qianlong; Yao, Yuncong

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth can be promoted by the application of apple fruit fermentation (AFF), despite unclear of the underlying mechanisms, the effects involved in AFF on rhizosphere microorganisms have been hypothesized. We investigated the consequences of applying AFF alone or in combination with Bacillus licheniformis to strawberry tissue culture seedlings in vitro, the analyses of Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA were performed to determine AFF effects on rhizosphere. Moreover, the growth index and antioxidant enzyme activities were determined 30 days after treatments. We identified five dominant bacteria in AFF: Coprinus atramentarius, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus licheniformis, Weissella and B. subtilis. The greatest number of bacterial species were observed in the rhizosphere of control matrix (water treated), and the lowest diversity appeared in the rhizosphere soil treated with 108 cfu/mL B. licheniformis alone. Combining AFF plus B. licheniformis in one treatment resulted in the largest leaf area, plant height, root length, plant weight, and the markedly higher activities of antioxidant enzymes. We conclude that a combination of AFF plus B. licheniformis treatment to matrix can increase antioxidant enzymes activities in strawberry seedlings, optimize the status of rhizosphere microbial, and promote plant growth. PMID:27755580

  5. Crescimento do cáudice e fenologia de Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. (Dicksoniaceae no sul do Brasil Caudex growth and fenology of Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. (Dicksoniaceae in Southern Brazil

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    Jairo Lizandro Schmitt

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available No sul e sudeste do Brasil, a samambaia arborescente Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. é ainda extraída ilegalmente de remanescentes florestais para uso da capa fibrosa do seu cáudice, bem como para cultivo como planta ornamental. No presente trabalho, o crescimento do cáudice, a produção, expansão e senescência de frondes, bem como a formação e liberação de esporos de D. sellowiana foram estudados com base na observação de 37 plantas. Durante um período de um ano de observação, os cáudices cresceram, em média, 5,65 cm ano-1, sendo que a taxa de crescimento se correlacionou fortemente com a altura das plantas. As taxas de produção de frondes novas (10,86 frondes ano-1 e de senescência (10,54 frondes ano-1, similares, evidenciaram capacidade de manter um número de frondes estável, no ano. Apenas 14 indivíduos desenvolveram frondes férteis, sendo que a maioria das plantas produziu esporos no verão, liberando-os no inverno. A produção e liberação de esporos foram mais influenciadas pela temperatura e fotoperíodo do que pela precipitação.In Southern and Southeastern Brazil, the tree fern Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. still is illegally extracted from remnants forests for the use of its fibrous caudex cover, as well as for cultivation as an ornamental plant. In the present study the caudex growth, frond production, expansion and senescence as well as the formation and release of spores have been studied based on the observation of 37 plants. During an observation period of one year, the caudexes grew at an average of 5.65 cm year-1 and the growth rate presented a strong correlation with the height of the plants. Similar frond production rate (10.86 fronds year-1 and senescence (10.54 fronds year-1 evidenced the capacity of maintaining a stable number of fronds throughout the year. Only 14 individuals developed fertile fronds, most of them producing spores during the summer and liberating them during the winter. Production and

  6. Structural aspects of the zygotic embryogenesis of Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret (Myrtaceae Aspectos estruturais da embriogênese zigótica em Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret (Myrtaceae

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    Rosete Pescador

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Acca sellowiana has anatropous, bitegmic and crassinucellate ovules. The outer and inner integuments are double-layered except in the micropyle, where they are composed of more layers; the micropyle is zig-zag shaped. The egg apparatus lies at the micropylar pole, and the zynergids present a conspicuous filiform apparatus. The antipodal cells are present in the chalazal region, persisting before the occurrence of double fertilization. The zygote is visible 21 days after pollination; nuclear endosperm is already present. The first mitotic division of the zygote occurs at 24th day. The globular, cordiform and torpedo embryo stages can be seen at 30, 45 and 60 days after pollination, respectively. The mature embryo characterized by the presence of a well-developed hypocotyl-radicular axis with two fleshy and folded cotyledons was observed 120 days after pollination. Endosperm is absent in the seeds, and the embryo has spiral form, characteristic of Myrtinae. The zygotic embryology studies of A. sellowiana indicate that this species has embryological characteristics which are in agreement with those reported for Myrtaceae (Myrteae, Myrtinae, and also broaden the knowledge about the sexual reproduction of this native species, whose commercial cultivation has been growing.Acca sellowiana apresenta óvulos anátropos, bitegumentados e crassinucelados. Os tegumentos externo e interno são constituídos por duas camadas de células, exceto na região da micrópila em que têm maior número de camadas; a micrópila apresenta-se em ziguezague. O aparelho oosférico ocupa a região micropilar com sinérgides apresentando aparato fibrilar conspícuo. Na região calazal, as três antípodas estão presentes antes da ocorrência da dupla fecundação. O zigoto é formado 21 dias após a polinização controlada, e o endosperma do tipo nuclear já está presente. O zigoto sofre a primeira divisão mitótica no 24º dia. Embriões nas fases globular, cordiforme

  7. Patterns of protein and carbohydrate accumulation during somatic embryogenesis of Acca sellowiana Padrões de acúmulo de proteínas e carboidratos durante a embriogênese somática de Acca sellowiana

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    Gabriela Claudia Cangahuala-Inocente

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to quantify the protein, starch and total sugars levels during histodifferentiation and development of somatic embryos of Acca sellowiana Berg. For histological observations, the samples were dehydrated in a battery of ethanol, embedded in historesin and stained with toluidine blue (morphology, coomassie blue (protein bodies and periodic acid-Schiff (starch. Proteins were extracted using a buffer solution, precipitated using ethanol and quantified using the Bradford reagent. Total sugars were extracted using a methanol-chloroform-water (12:5:3 solution and quantified by a reaction with anthrone at 0.2%. Starch was extracted using a 30% perchloric acid solution and quantified by a reaction with anthrone at 0.2%. During the somatic embryogenesis' in vitro morphogenesis and differentiation processes, the total protein levels decreased and the soluble sugars levels increased during the first 30 days in culture and remained stable until the 120th day. On the other hand, total protein levels increased according to the progression in the developmental stages of the somatic embryos. The levels of total sugars and starch increased in the heart and cotyledonary stages, and decreased in the torpedo and pre-cotyledonary stages. These compounds play a central role in the development of somatic embryos of Acca sellowiana.O objetivo deste trabalho foi quantificar os teores de proteína, amido e açúcares totais durante a histodiferenciação e desenvolvimento dos embriões somáticos em Acca sellowiana Berg. Para as observações histológicas, as amostras foram desidratadas em uma bateria de etanol, emblocadas em historesina e coradas com azul de toluidina (morfologia, azul de coomassie (corpos proteicos e reativo ácido periódico de Schiff (amido. As proteínas foram extraídas usando uma solução tampão, precipitadas usando etanol e quantificadas por meio do reativo de Bradford. Os açúcares totais foram extraídos usando uma

  8. Morphological development of Corydoras aff. paleatus (Siluriformes, Callichthyidae) and correlation with the emergence of motor and social behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Ithurralde, Daniel; del Puerto, Gabriela; Fernández-Bornia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Here we examine major anatomical characteristics of Corydoras aff. paleatus (Jenyns, 1842) post-hatching development, in parallel with its neurobehavioral evolution. Eleutheroembryonic phase, 4.3-8.8 days post-fertilization (dpf); 4.3-6.4 mm standard length (SL) encompasses from hatching to transition to exogenous feeding. Protopterygiolarval phase (8.9-10.9 dpf; 6.5-6.7 mm SL) goes from feeding transition to the commencement of unpaired fin differentiation, which marks the start of pterygiol...

  9. Morfologia da unidade de dispersão e germinação de Cordia sellowiana cham. e Cordia myxa l

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso,Isabel Cristina Ercolini; Oliveira,Fernando de; Ciarelli,Deborah Maria

    2009-01-01

    As unidades de dispersão das espécies Cordia sellowiana Cham. e Cordia myxa L. (Boraginaceae Jussieu) foram estudadas com ênfase em sua morfologia e no processo de germinação. Os frutos de Cordia sellowiana e de Cordia myxa são do tipo drupóide nuculânio. A protrusão da raiz primária, na primeira espécie, ocorre através de fenda longitudinal do pirênio, e na segunda, através de abertura do opérculo. A germinação, nas duas espécies, é do tipo fanerocotiledonar epígea. As plântulas apresentam c...

  10. Germination of Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Griseb. (Bromeliaceae) in different substracts as alternatives to Dicksonia sellowiana Hook - DOI: 10.4025/actasciagron.v30i1.1134

    OpenAIRE

    Anacleto, Adilson; UFPR; Negrelle, Raquel Rejane Bonato; UFPR; Koehler, Henrique Soares; UFPR

    2008-01-01

    For this study, the germination of Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Griseb. (Bromeliaceae) was evaluated. Production attempts from seeds for this species have taken place in an empirical form, using substrate based on xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook.) powder, the use of which is currently restricted, as it is an endangered species. Five easily accessible alternative substratum were tested: worm humus, sand, coconut shell fiber, forest litter, and Plantmax®. The experiment was conducted using a comple...

  11. Activation of muscarinic receptors by a hydroalcoholic extract of Dicksonia sellowiana Presl. HooK (Dicksoniaceae) induces vascular relaxation and hypotension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattmann, Yanna D; Crestani, Sandra; Lapa, Fernanda R; Miguel, Obdúlio G; Marques, Maria C A; da Silva-Santos, J Eduardo; Santos, Adair R S

    2009-01-01

    Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl.) Hook is a native plant from the Central and South Americas that contain high levels of polyphenols, antioxidant compounds involved in protection against inflammation, cancer and cardiovascular risk. A phytomedicinal preparation obtained from aerial parts of D. sellowiana is currently under clinical evaluation in Brazil against asthma, and has been associated with several other beneficial effects. This study demonstrates that a hydroalcoholic extract obtained from D. sellowiana leaves (HEDS) fully relax, in a concentration-dependent manner, rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine. Moreover, administration of HEDS (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.v.) in anaesthetized rats resulted in a strong but reversible hypotension. Aortic relaxation induced by HEDS was abolished by endothelium removal, by incubation of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, or the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ. In addition, this effect was partially inhibited by indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and KT 5730 (a PKA inhibitor). The potassium channels blockade by either tetraethylammonium or charybdotoxin also resulted in a potent inhibition of HEDS-induced aortic relaxation, whereas apamine only slightly reduced it. In addition HEDS-induced relaxation was unchanged by 4-amynopiridine and glibenclamide. The selective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine counteracted both aortic relaxation and blood pressure reduction generated by HEDS. Experiments using HPLC revealed the presence of high amounts of phenolic compounds in this extract. Taken together, our results reveal that the D. sellowiana possess substances with both in vivo and in vitro activities and that the vascular effect of HEDS involves activation of muscarinic receptors, stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway and opening of calcium-activated potassium channels.

  12. Modeling natural photic entrainment in a subterranean rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti, the Tuco-Tuco.

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    Danilo E F L Flôres

    Full Text Available Subterranean rodents spend most of the day inside underground tunnels, where there is little daily change in environmental variables. Our observations of tuco-tucos (Ctenomys aff. knighti in a field enclosure indicated that these animals perceive the aboveground light-dark cycle by several bouts of light-exposure at irregular times during the light hours of the day. To assess whether such light-dark pattern acts as an entraining agent of the circadian clock, we first constructed in laboratory the Phase Response Curve for 1 h light-pulses (1000lux. Its shape is qualitatively similar to other curves reported in the literature and to our knowledge it is the first Phase Response Curve of a subterranean rodent. Computer simulations were performed with a non-linear limit-cycle oscillator subjected to a simple model of the light regimen experienced by tuco-tucos. Results showed that synchronization is achieved even by a simple regimen of a single daily light pulse scattered uniformly along the light hours of the day. Natural entrainment studies benefit from integrated laboratory, field and computational approaches.

  13. Large scale artificial rearing of Anastrepha sp.1 aff. fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae in Brazil

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    Julio Marcos Melges Walder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Some species of the genus Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae are successfully managed by matching the sterile insect technique with parasitoid releases. Such strategies used in integrated pest management can be implemented only where insect mass-rearing programs are feasible. In this study, we show the process of domestication, rearing technology and quality control data obtained from 54 generations of Anastrepha sp.1 aff. fraterculus (Wiedemann, 1830 kept under fully artificial conditions. Eggs were collected by an artificial oviposition panel consisting of one side of the cage made of blue voile fabric externally covered with a thin layer of silicon rubber. They were then air-bubbled in water at 25 ºC for 48 h before seeding. Larvae were reared on the regular laboratory artificial diet with 66 % of agar reduction turning over a semi-liquid diet, which reduced costs and improved insect quality. The adult and larval diets were composed of local ingredients including hydrolyzed yeast. When large-scale production of this fly is contemplated, the critical stage is larval development. This system of artificial rearing for A. fraterculus sp.1 developed in Brazil, allows for the production of a large number of insects of excellent quality using local ingredients and less agar in diet composition than the original medium used for this species. By reducing the interval of egg collection, the system might be optimized in terms of insect yield and, therefore, meet the demands of A. fraterculus sp.1 with regard to integrated pest management purposes.

  14. Tolerancia de plantas de feijoa (Acca sellowiana [Berg] Burret a la salinidad por NaCl

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    Casierra-Posada Fánor Ernesto

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Los efectos de la salinidad por NaCl sobre la producción y la distribución de la biomasa, la toma de agua y el área foliar total fueron investigados en plantas de feijoa (Acca sellowiana [Berg] Burret cultivadas en materas con suelo bajo condiciones de invernadero, durante ocho meses. Los tratamientos con la sal comenzaron 60 d después del transplante. El NaCl fue agregado en diferentes concentraciones: 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 mM de NaCl en el suelo. Estas concentraciones correspondieron a conductividades eléctricas de 2,8; 4,6; 6,1; 8,4 y 11,1 dS· m-1, respectivamente. Para evitar el choque osmótico, el tratamiento salino fue impuesto progresivamente, aumentando la concentración de sal cada semana hasta alcanzar la

  15. Extraction and partial characterization of venom from the Colombian spider Pamphobeteus aff. nigricolor (Aranae:Theraphosidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Gomez, Sebastian; Vargas Muñoz, Leidy Johana; Quintana Castillo, Juan C

    2013-12-15

    We report the first studies of characterization and extraction of the Pamphobeteus aff. nigricolor (Pocock, 1901) (Aranae:Theraphosidae) venom done in Colombia using the electro-stimulation technique previous anesthesia with isofluorane. After each extraction process, a low viscosity, colorless venom was obtained. This venom showed a 1.01 mg/μl density and a pH of 5. The humidity percentage did not show a significance difference between males and females (P > 0.05) with a general media of 77.49 ± 1.74%. In all cases the venom yielded was variable between males and females, with a media of 22.45 ± 5.17 mg (wet weight) and 4.58 ± 0.94 mg (dry weigh), obtaining larger amounts in females, 28.34 ± 7.49 mg and 5.69 ± 1.36 (wet and dry weight respectively). Venom showed a hemolytic activity dependent of enzymatic active phospholipase and neither coagulant nor proteolytic activities were observed. Electrophoretic profile showed a main protein content with a molecular mass below 14 kDa. RP-HPLC venom profile revealed a difference among male and female venom's content where 17 and 21 main fractions were obtained respectively. Three peptides, Theraphotoxin-Pn1a, Theraphotoxin-Pn1b and Theraphotoxin-Pn2a, were identified using HPLC-nESI-MS/MS. These peptides showed a high identity with other peptides found on Theraphosides which are proved to affect voltage-gated calcium channels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of growth, cell size and biomass of Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO with two LED regimes

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    Miguel Victor Cordoba-Matson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to crops, there are fewer studies using LED-based light with green microalgae and none cultivating the microalga Isochrysis aff. galbana (T-ISO even though of its importance in marine aquaculture. The objective was to evaluate of white and red LEDs as an alternative source of light to cultivate I. aff. galbana (T-ISO. In order to carry this out white and red LEDs were used with a laboratory built Erlenmeyer-type photobioreactor to determine productivity, cell number and size and biomass composition. Results were compared with standard fluorescent lights of the same light intensity. The culture system consisted of 3 flasks for applying red LEDs and three for white LEDs and 3 control group flasks illuminated with the normal fluorescent lighting at the similar light intensity of ~60 mM m–2 s–1. It was found that the population cell density did not significantly increase with either red LEDs or white LEDs (p > 0.05, if at all. Standard fluorescent lighting (control group showed significant increases in population cell number (p < 0.05. Through microscopic observation cell size was found to be smaller for white LEDS and even smaller for red LEDs compared to fluorescent lighting. Biochemical composition of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids was similar for all light regimes. The authors suggest that the unexpected non-growth I. aff. galbana (T-ISO, a haptophyte microalga, with white and red LEDs is possibly due to fact that to initiate cell growth this microalgae requires other wavelengths (possibly green besides red and blue, to allow other pigments, probably fucoxanthin, to capture light

  17. Biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae in crop succession at central Brazil

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    Alex Furquim Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae in crop succession at central Brazil. Beetles of the family Melolonthidae make up a large group and some species are considered pests of planted crops. Little information is available on the basic biological aspects of the genus Leucothyreus, such as association with cultivated crops and their occurrence periods. Therefore studies were developed in soybean and corn crops in Tangará da Serra, Mato Grosso, Brazil, with the objective of studying the occurrence and biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus. For acquisition of immature specimens of both species, in April 2011 sampling was performed in corn fields, in July and October in the fallow area, and in soybeans fields planted in December; in 2012 sampling was performed in January and February in soybean fields and in March in corn fields. In 2011 the total number of larvae obtained in April, July, October and December were 100, 6, 30 and 27, and in January, February and March of 2012 these quantities were 32, 52 and 65 larvae, respectively. In all sampling events the larvae of L. alvarengai were collected in greater quantity. At the beginning of the reproductive period of L. alvarengai and L. aff. semipruinosus, it was observed that the adults began to fly and soon after started oviposition in the field in September. The appearance of larvae coincides with the time of soybean planting in the field, thus the larvae feed on roots of soybean plants at the beginning of their development and the cycle from egg to adult of the two species was completed in one year.

  18. Feeding of Hoplias aff. malabaricus (Bloch, 1794 and Oligosarcus robustus Menezes, 1969 in a lagoon under estuarine influence, Pelotas, RS

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    Fabiano Corrêa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper was to study the diets of Hoplias aff. malabaricus and Oligosarcus robust in “Pequena Lagoon” and evaluate the importance of estuarine organisms in the feeding of freshwater fish. A total of twelve food categories were identified and it was established that the fish resource was the most frequent in the diet of both species. Euryhaline fish such as Mugil platanus mullets and Odontesthes argentinensis silversides were common items in the diets of these two species, which included not only freshwater fish but also euryhaline fish from the adjacent estuarine zone, integrating both resources in the food chain.

  19. Variability in the germination of spores among and within natural populations of the endangered tree fern Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. (Xaxim

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    Gabriela Schmitz Gomes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the existing variability in the germination of individuals' spores collected from two natural populations of Dicksonia sellowiana in southern Brazil. The largest intrapopulational variation was observed for the spores germination. These results suggested the existence of adaptative strategies that favored the gradual and continuous entrance of new individuals into the gametophytic population. The behavior of the individuals of the species within each population followed a similar pattern of initial development, in spite of conspicuous differences in the population structure. This showed a low differentiation between the populations and the existence of adaptative strategies which were common to both communities.O Xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. (Dicksoniaceae é uma samambaia arborescente que se encontra principalmente sob o domínio da Floresta Ombrófila Mista. A exploração intensiva de seus indivíduos para retirada do caule, empregado na fabricação de vasos e substrato para o cultivo de plantas ornamentais, e a crescente antropização das áreas florestadas, tem degradado suas populações naturais. Este estudo teve como objetivo analisar a variabilidade existente na germinação de esporos de Xaxim. Os esporos foram coletados das frondes de indivíduos de Xaxim procedentes de duas populações naturais do Sul do Brasil. Foi observada uma maior variação intrapopulacional para a germinação e porcentagem de esporos inviáveis. Estes resultados sugerem a existência de estratégias adaptativas que favorecem a entrada gradual e contínua de novos indivíduos na população de gametófitos. O comportamento dos indivíduos da espécie dentro de cada população segue padrão semelhante de velocidade de desenvolvimento inicial, a despeito das diferenças conspícuas na estrutura populacional, sugerindo baixa diferenciação entre as populações e a existência de estratégias adaptativas comuns

  20. Phylogenomic relationship of feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O.Berg) Burret) with other Myrtaceae based on complete chloroplast genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Lilian de Oliveira; Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Stefenon, Valdir Marcos; Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio de; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi de; Guerra, Miguel Pedro; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-04-01

    Given their distribution, importance, and richness, Myrtaceae species comprise a model system for studying the evolution of tropical plant diversity. In addition, chloroplast (cp) genome sequencing is an efficient tool for phylogenetic relationship studies. Feijoa [Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret; CN: pineapple-guava] is a Myrtaceae species that occurs naturally in southern Brazil and northern Uruguay. Feijoa is known for its exquisite perfume and flavorful fruits, pharmacological properties, ornamental value and increasing economic relevance. In the present work, we reported the complete cp genome of feijoa. The feijoa cp genome is a circular molecule of 159,370 bp with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a Large Single Copy region (LSC 88,028 bp) and a Small Single Copy region (SSC 18,598 bp) separated by Inverted Repeat regions (IRs 26,372 bp). The genome structure, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to those of typical angiosperm cp genomes. When compared to other cp genome sequences of Myrtaceae, feijoa showed closest relationship with pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L.). Furthermore, a comparison of pitanga synonymous (Ks) and nonsynonymous (Ka) substitution rates revealed extremely low values. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference analyses produced phylogenomic trees identical in topology. These trees supported monophyly of three Myrtoideae clades.

  1. 5-Azacytidine combined with 2,4-D improves somatic embryogenesis of Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret by means of changes in global DNA methylation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Hugo P F; Vieira, Leila N; Caprestano, Clarissa A; Steinmacher, Douglas A; Micke, Gustavo A; Spudeit, Daniel A; Pescador, Rosete; Guerra, Miguel P

    2012-12-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic regulatory mechanism of gene expression which can be associated with developmental phases and in vitro morphogenetic competence in plants. The present work evaluated the effects of 5-azacytidine (AzaC) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on Acca sellowiana somatic embryogenesis (SE) and global DNA methylation levels by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). 2,4-D-free treatments revealed no somatic embryo formation in both accessions tested. Treatments supplemented with 2,4-D pulse plus AzaC in the culture medium resulted in increased embryo formation. In AzaC-free treatment, HPLC/MS/MS analysis showed a gradual increase in methylation levels in cultures of both accessions tested during SE induction. Treatment with AzaC and 2,4-D-free resulted in a marked decrease in methylation for both accessions, ranging from 37.6 to 20.8 %. In treatment with 2,4-D and AzaC combined, the 85 accession showed increasing global methylation levels. Otherwise, the 101X458 accession, in the same treatment, showed a decrease between 10 and 20 days, followed by an increase after 30 days (39.5, 36.2 and 41.6 %). These results indicate that 2,4-D pulse combined with AzaC improves SE induction. However, the conversion phase showed that although positively influencing SE induction, AzaC had a dysregulatory effect on the stage of autotrophic plant formation, resulting in significantly lower conversion rates. The results suggest that DNA methylation dramatically influences SE in Acca sellowiana, and global DNA methylation dynamics are related to morphogenetic response. 5-Azacytidine combined with 2,4-D increases the number of Acca sellowiana somatic embryos. Global DNA methylation is directly affected by these compounds.

  2. Caracterização farmacognóstica dos frutos de Cordia sellowiana Cham. e de Cordia myxa L. (Boraginaceae Jussieu)

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso,Isabel Cristina Ercolini; Oliveira,Fernando de

    2009-01-01

    Os frutos de Cordia sellowiana Cham. e Cordia myxa L. utilizados como emolientes demulcentes, béquicos e expectorantes foram estudados morfológico-anatomicamente, visando sua caracterização farmacognóstica. Foram fornecidos subsídios à identificação destes órgãos vegetais no estado natural e quando transformados em droga. A abordagem fitoquímica realizada permitiu por em evidência a presença de alcalóides, flavonóides, taninos e mucilagens. Em decorrência da presença de mucilagens, foi determ...

  3. Secagem e classificação de Sementes de Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret - Myrtaceae quanto à tolerância à dessecação e ao armazenamento

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    Juliano Pereira Gomes

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste estudo, verificar a influência de diferentes métodos de secagem na qualidade de sementes de Acca sellowiana e realizar a classificação fisiológica destas sementes quanto à tolerância à dessecação e ao armazenamento. Para testar o comportamento das sementes em relação a diferentes métodos de secagem, foram utilizados três tratamentos - Controle, Secagem Lenta e Secagem Rápida. Nestes tratamentos, para ambas as secagens, o teor de água foi de 20% de base úmida. Para a classificação fisiológica, sementes de A. sellowiana foram submetidas à secagem até 12% e 5% de teor de água, e ao armazenamento durante 90 dias, em refrigerador a 8 ºC. Para sementes recém-colhidas e armazenadas por 30 e 90 dias, o tipo de secagem não influenciou na qualidade de sementes de A. sellowiana. Em sementes armazenadas por 60 dias, o tratamento controle apresentou germinação superior aos demais. Sementes de A. sellowiana podem ser fisiologicamente classificadas como intermediárias.

  4. Neuritogenic activity-guided isolation of a free base form manzamine A from a marine sponge, Acanthostrongylophora aff. ingens (Thiele, 1899)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, B.; Miyamoto, T.; van Soest, R.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Two manzamine-class alkaloids, manzamine A (1) and 8-hydroxymanzamine (2) were isolated from a Japanese marine sponge Acanthostrongylophora aff. ingens, together with three known alkaloids manzamine E (3), manzamine F (4), and manzamine X (5). The spectral features of 1 and 2 were different from the

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of off-type and normal phenotype somatic plantlets derived from somatic embryos of Feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Caprestano, Clarissa Alves; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Morphological disorders in a relevant portion of emerged somatic embryos have been a limiting factor in the true-to-type plantlet formation in Acca sellowiana. In this sense, the present study undertook a comparison between normal phenotype and off-type somatic plantlets protein profiles by means of the 2-D DIGE proteomics approach. Off-type and normal phenotype somatic plantlets obtained at 10 and 20 days conversion were evaluated. Results indicated 12 exclusive spots between normal and off-type plantlets at 10 days conversion, and 17 exclusive spots at 20 days conversion. Also at 20 days conversion, 4 spots were differentially expressed, up- or down-regulated. Two proteins related to carbohydrate metabolism were only expressed in off-types at 10 days conversion, suggesting a more active respiratory pathway. A vicilin-like storage protein was only found in off-types at 20 days conversion, indicating that plantlets may present an abnormality in the mobilization of storage compounds, causing reduced vigor in the development of derived plantlets. The presence of heat shock proteins were only observed during formation of normal phenotype somatic plantlets, indicating that these proteins may be involved in normal morphogenesis of plantlets formed. These new findings shed light on possible genetic or epigenetic mechanisms governing A. sellowiana morphogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CARACTERIZAÇÃO MORFOLÓGICA DE PLÂNTULAS DURANTE A GERMINAÇÃO DE SEMENTES DE Psidium cattleianum E Acca sellowiana (MYRTACEAE

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    Juliano Pereira Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the morphological characterization during seedling development of Psidium cattleianum Sabine e Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret. To describe germination and seedling morphology, 100 seeds were allowed to germinate on germitest paper as substrate at a temperature of 25 °C. Were analyzed: type, shape and color of the root, hairiness, shape and coloration of hypocotyl and epicotyl, consistency, texture, shape, venation, color, type of board, apex and base of the cotyledons and protophilus. The germination is epigeous phanerocotyledonal for both species, forming seedlings with an axial root system, long pivoting main root with paracotyledons and simple eophylls, opposites. Glands and secreting cells were observed in all organs except in the root system for both species. The germination of the Psidium cattleianum seed begins approximately 10 days after sowing, when the operculum opens followed immediately by the root protrusion. Acca sellowiana shows a long, cylindrical, erect, brownish- red and glabrous hypocotyl after 28 days. When the paracotyledons are totally exposed, they immediately show an intense green color, demonstrating the photosynthetic potential of the seedling growth. The germination process description alongside the morphology of seedlings constitutes an important element for recognition of species.

  7. The ancient tropical rainforest tree Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae) was not restricted to postulated Pleistocene refugia in Atlantic Equatorial Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, K B; González-Martínez, S C; Hardy, O J; Heuertz, M

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the history of forests and their species' demographic responses to past disturbances is important for predicting impacts of future environmental changes. Tropical rainforests of the Guineo-Congolian region in Central Africa are believed to have survived the Pleistocene glacial periods in a few major refugia, essentially centred on mountainous regions close to the Atlantic Ocean. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the phylogeographic structure of a widespread, ancient rainforest tree species, Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae), using plastid DNA sequences (chloroplast DNA [cpDNA], psbA-trnH intergenic spacer) and nuclear microsatellites (simple sequence repeats, SSRs). SSRs identified four gene pools located in Benin, West Cameroon, South Cameroon and Gabon, and São Tomé. This structure was also apparent at cpDNA. Approximate Bayesian Computation detected recent bottlenecks approximately dated to the last glacial maximum in Benin, West Cameroon and São Tomé, and an older bottleneck in South Cameroon and Gabon, suggesting a genetic effect of Pleistocene cycles of forest contraction. CpDNA haplotype distribution indicated wide-ranging long-term persistence of S. globulifera both inside and outside of postulated forest refugia. Pollen flow was four times greater than that of seed in South Cameroon and Gabon, which probably enabled rapid population recovery after bottlenecks. Furthermore, our study suggested ecotypic differentiation-coastal or swamp vs terra firme-in S. globulifera. Comparison with other tree phylogeographic studies in Central Africa highlighted the relevance of species-specific responses to environmental change in forest trees.

  8. Efeito dos conservantes sobre a densidade calórica em músculos de Hoplias aff. malabaricus (Bloch, 1794 (Osteichthyes, Erythrinidae Effect of preservatives on caloric density in the muscles of Hoplias aff. malabaricus (Bloch, 1794 (Osteichthyes, Erythrinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Morimoto

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available A conservação de amostras para a determinação dos valores calóricos em estudos de bioenergética de peixes tem se apresentado, na literatura, com uma variedade de métodos. Com o intuito de identificar o efeito de conservantes sobre os resultados obtidos com as diferentes técnicas de conservação, foram coletados exemplares adultos de Hoplias aff. malabaricus (Osteichthyes, Erythrinidae na planície de inundação do rio Paraná. De cada exemplar, foram retiradas 5 amostras da musculatura, as quais foram submetidas aos seguintes tratamentos: formol (4%, álcool (70%, congelamento (-10oC, nitrogênio líquido (-180oC e estufa à 60oC (amostra controle. Depois de 30 dias, todas as amostras foram secas em estufa à 60oC e posteriormente procedeu-se à determinação calórica de cada uma das amostras em bomba calorimétrica. Detectaram-se diferenças significativas entre os tratamentos (ANOVA: N=206; F=50,28; pThe preservation of samples for caloric values determination in bioenergetic studies of fish has been presented literature with a variety of methods. To identify the effect of preservatives over the results obtained with different preservation techniques, adult individuals of Hoplias aff. malabaricus (Osteichthyes, Erythrinidae were collected in Paraná river floodplain. From each fish, five samples were extracted from its dorsal muscle and submitted each sample for a different treatment: ice (-10ºC, formaldehyde (4%, alcohol (70%, liquid nitrogen (-180oC and a control sample immediately oven dried (60oC. After 30 days, the treatments were oven dried (60oC and caloric values of each sample were determined in a caloric bomb. Significant differences among the treatments were found (ANOVA: n = 206; F = 50.28; p < 0.001. Some evaluations of the effects of each treatment were presented for further comparisons with the results published in literature.

  9. Morfologia do trato digestório e dieta de larvas de Bryconamericus aff. iheringii (Boulenger, 1887 (Osteichthyes, Characidae = Morphology of Digestive tract and diet of Bryconamericus aff. iheringii larvae (Boulenger, 1887 (Osteichthyes, Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ziliani Borges

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar alguns aspectos da alimentação de larvas de Bryconamericus aff. iheringii, capturadas nos meses de julho e novembro de 2001, nas regiões limnética e litorânea do reservatório de Santa Maria, rio Piquiri, Estado do Paraná. As larvas apresentaram boca subterminal durante todo o seu desenvolvimento. O tubo digestório se diferenciou em estômago e intestino apenas no estágio de pós-flexão. As larvas consumiram, principalmente, algas e microcrustáceos, o que permitiu caracterizá-las como planctófagas. A intensa modificação morfológica no trato digestório nos indivíduos em pósflexão coincidiu com o aumento na abundância de algas em relação aos itens de origemanimal; porém, de forma geral, a ocorrência aumentou para todos os itens. A análise do grau de digestão dos itens alimentares sugeriu que indivíduos em pré-flexão alimentaram-se, possivelmente, durante o dia, e os mais desenvolvidos, durante o entardecer e no períodonoturno.The aim of this study was to analyze some feeding treats of Bryconamericus aff. iheringii larvae, sampled in both the limnetic and littoral regions of the Piquiri River, in Santa Maria reservoir, between July and November 2001. The larvae presented sub-terminal mouth in larval period. The digestive tract differentiated in terms of stomach and intestine only in the postflexion larvae. The larvae fed mainly on algae and microcrustacea allowing to characterize them as planktivorous. The intense morphologic shift in the digestive tract in the postflexion larvae coincided with an increase in the abundance of algae in relation to animals items; however, in general, all the items had their occurrence increased. Analysis of the digestion stage suggested that preflexion larvae, possibly, fed themselves during the day, and those more developed, at dusk and night.

  10. The ecological footprint of Acca sellowiana domestication maintains the residual vertebrate diversity in threatened highlands of Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoni, Juliano André; Graipel, Maurício Eduardo; Peroni, Nivaldo

    2018-01-01

    Past and contemporary human actions are causing numerous changes in patterns and processes at various ecosystem scales and trophic levels, including unintended downstream changes, such as species interactions. In its native range Acca sellowiana (Feijoa) combines some characteristics of human interactions: incipient domestication, restricted to subtropical Atlantic Forest highlands, associated with the threatened conifer Araucaria angustifolia (Araucaria), within a domesticated landscape with anthropogenic forest patches, and provides fruit at a time of resource shortage (Araucaria seeds-pinhão). We quantify the trophic relationships between Feijoa and vertebrates, and evaluate the influences on interactions caused by environmental variations, Feijoa domestication evidences, spatial distance and fruit availability. In four sites within protected areas, we selected 28 focal individuals of Feijoa (seven/site) and collected three temporal replicas between 2015 and 2016, when we measured productivity and frugivory via 45-second videos taken with camera traps. Using ecological network, rarefaction curves and variation partitioning analyses, we evaluate the frugivory network topology, the spatiotemporal structure of communities in relation to fruit availability and the influence of predictive variables on frugivory. We found a large spatiotemporal variation in productivity of Feijoa and that 20 species consumed Feijoa fruits, with a species degree of 2.8 (±5.7) and average Feijoa degree of 14.4 (±10.1), in a modular network with intermediary connectance. Rarefaction curves showed that richness and the independent records are congruent with the fruit amount. Variation partitioning showed that, for the focal individuals, canopy area, green coverage, patch size and distance to water influenced frugivory, and the Feijoa domestication influenced significantly the mammalian frugivory. Feijoa is an important resource that provides food during the time of year when Pinhão is

  11. The ecological footprint of Acca sellowiana domestication maintains the residual vertebrate diversity in threatened highlands of Atlantic Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Past and contemporary human actions are causing numerous changes in patterns and processes at various ecosystem scales and trophic levels, including unintended downstream changes, such as species interactions. In its native range Acca sellowiana (Feijoa) combines some characteristics of human interactions: incipient domestication, restricted to subtropical Atlantic Forest highlands, associated with the threatened conifer Araucaria angustifolia (Araucaria), within a domesticated landscape with anthropogenic forest patches, and provides fruit at a time of resource shortage (Araucaria seeds—pinhão). We quantify the trophic relationships between Feijoa and vertebrates, and evaluate the influences on interactions caused by environmental variations, Feijoa domestication evidences, spatial distance and fruit availability. In four sites within protected areas, we selected 28 focal individuals of Feijoa (seven/site) and collected three temporal replicas between 2015 and 2016, when we measured productivity and frugivory via 45-second videos taken with camera traps. Using ecological network, rarefaction curves and variation partitioning analyses, we evaluate the frugivory network topology, the spatiotemporal structure of communities in relation to fruit availability and the influence of predictive variables on frugivory. We found a large spatiotemporal variation in productivity of Feijoa and that 20 species consumed Feijoa fruits, with a species degree of 2.8 (±5.7) and average Feijoa degree of 14.4 (±10.1), in a modular network with intermediary connectance. Rarefaction curves showed that richness and the independent records are congruent with the fruit amount. Variation partitioning showed that, for the focal individuals, canopy area, green coverage, patch size and distance to water influenced frugivory, and the Feijoa domestication influenced significantly the mammalian frugivory. Feijoa is an important resource that provides food during the time of year when Pinh

  12. Efecto de extractos de la esponja calcarea Leucetta aff. floridana sobre el ciclo de líneas celulares leucemoides Effect of extracts from the calcareous sponge Leucetta aff. floridana on the cell cycle of leukemoid cell lines

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    Diana Margarita Márquez Fernández

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la esponja Leucetta aff. floridana produce compuestos con actividad antiproliferativa diferencial en células tumorales de pulmón y mama, la cual no ha sido explorada en otras líneas tumorales y se desconoce si su potencial antiproliferativo está relacionado con la progresión de células a través del ciclo celular. Objetivo: evaluar el potencial antiproliferativo, anticlonogénico y el efecto sobre el ciclo celular de los extractos hexánico y metanólico de la esponja Leucetta aff. floridana del Caribe colombiano en las líneas celulares leucemoides Jurkat y K562. Métodos: la viabilidad y proliferación celular se determinaron mediante el ensayo de azul de tripano a 0, 24, 48, 72 y 96 h. La eficiencia de clonación y el efecto sobre el ciclo celular se evaluaron a 10 y 100 µg/mL. Los datos se analizaron usando ANOVA multifactorial y la prueba Tukey. Resultados: el extracto hexánico presentó actividad antiproliferativa en ambas líneas celulares siendo Jurkat más sensible que K562, lo cual se corroboró con los ensayos de clonogenicidad. Este extracto también mostró un efecto de acumulación de células Sub-G1 dependiente de la dosis, el cual fue diferencial entre las dos líneas celulares. La duración del tratamiento con el extracto hexánico no fue significativa para las células K562 pero sí para la línea celular Jurkat. Además, el porcentaje de acumulación de las células Sub-G1 fue mayor para células K562 comparado con Jurkat. El extracto metanólico presentó un efecto antiproliferativo similar al hexánico, pero fue más potente con la menor concentración (10 µg/mL en la clonogenicidad de K562. El efecto sobre el ciclo celular, también fue similar al hexánico, pero la duración del tratamiento no fue significativa en la acumulación de células en Sub-G1. Conclusiones: los resultados muestran el potencial diferencial de los extractos sobre el ciclo celular de las líneas leucemoides evaluadas

  13. Spatial, seasonal and ontogenetic variation in the diet of Astyanax aff. fasciatus (Ostariophysi: Characidae in an Atlantic Forest river, Southern Brazil

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    Luciano Lazzarini Wolff

    Full Text Available This study described the feeding habits of the characin Astyanax aff. fasciatus. The diet compositions of specimens from two sites (A and B on a river in Southern Brazil were compared according to the size of individuals and seasonal period. The collections were performed monthly from March 2005 to February 2006, where the stomach contents of 290 specimens were assessed. Food items for A. aff. fasciatus were basically composed of plants and insects, especially leaf fragments, seeds, fruits, filamentous algae, aquatic and terrestrial insects and insect fragments. At site A, the most common items were insect and plant fragments. Conversely at site B, plant fragments were more representative. In general, all items of animal origin showed the highest feeding index values at site A, whereas at site B detritus and grass items were more abundant. The composition of items varied seasonally, with higher diversity of items being recorded during the spring at both sites. Smaller individuals preferred items of animal origin, while the larger ones consumed mainly items of plant origin. According to its size, A. aff. fasciatus in this study may be considered a species with insectivorous tendencies when immature or herbivorous tendencies when adult. Nevertheless, its feeding habits may be flexible according to resource availability, showing wide ontogenetic, besides spatial and temporal variation.

  14. Species of the Hoplias aff malabaricus complex (Characiformes: Erythrinidae: An investigation of coexistence in a Neotropical floodplain

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    Marília Hauser

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the coexistence of three species of thraira present in the Upper Paraná River floodplain, using population structure as an investigation tool. The species were designated as: Hoplias sp. 1, introduced after the construction of the Itaipu reservoir, and Hoplias sp. 2 and Hoplias sp. 3, native species that have been identified as Hoplias aff. malabaricus. We tested the hypothesis that those species in fact differ from each other in respect of population abundance, sex ratio, relative frequency of adults and juveniles, length structure and weight-length relationship. Additionally, possible effects of the flood pulse on the first four of these parameters were investigated. Samples were collected quarterly from March 2006 to December 2007 from nine collection sites on the floodplain. Hoplias sp. 1 presented a greater balance of sex ratio and length structures over the seasons, as well as a higher allometric coefficient. The population attributes of Hoplias sp. 2 and Hoplias sp. 3 showed a high responsiveness to hydrological seasonality, indicating that these species exploit available resources in a conspicuous flood period with greater efficiency. These differences, beyond reflecting possible mechanisms that allow closely related species to coexist, indicate the importance of understanding the life strategies adopted by each species which, as part of a complex system, are considered key elements of the aquatic community structure in the region, providing important information for habitat management and biodiversity conservation.

  15. Simultaneous production of intracellular triacylglycerols and extracellular polyol esters of fatty acids by Rhodotorula babjevae and Rhodotorula aff. paludigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Cajka, Tomas; Cathcart, Erin; Fiehn, Oliver; German, J Bruce; Block, David E; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2017-10-01

    Microbial oils have been analyzed as alternatives to petroleum. However, just a handful of microbes have been successfully adapted to produce chemicals that can compete with their petroleum counterparts. One of the reasons behind the low success rate is the overall economic inefficiency of valorizing a single product. This study presents a lab-scale analysis of two yeast species that simultaneously produce multiple high-value bioproducts: intracellular triacylglycerols (TG) and extracellular polyol esters of fatty acids (PEFA), two lipid classes with immediate applications in the biofuels and surfactant industries. At harvest, the yeast strain Rhodotorula aff. paludigena UCDFST 81-84 secreted 20.9 ± 0.2 g L -1 PEFA and produced 8.8 ± 1.0 g L -1 TG, while the yeast strain Rhodotorula babjevae UCDFST 04-877 secreted 11.2 ± 1.6 g L -1 PEFA and 18.5 ± 1.7 g L -1 TG. The overall glucose conversion was 0.24 and 0.22 g (total lipid) g (glucose) -1 , respectively. The results present a stable and scalable microbial growth platform yielding multiple co-products.

  16. Morphological development of Corydoras aff. paleatus (Siluriformes, Callichthyidae and correlation with the emergence of motor and social behaviors

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    Daniel Rodríguez-Ithurralde

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we examine major anatomical characteristics of Corydoras aff. paleatus (Jenyns, 1842 post-hatching development, in parallel with its neurobehavioral evolution. Eleutheroembryonic phase, 4.3-8.8 days post-fertilization (dpf; 4.3-6.4 mm standard length (SL encompasses from hatching to transition to exogenous feeding. Protopterygiolarval phase (8.9-10.9 dpf; 6.5-6.7 mm SL goes from feeding transition to the commencement of unpaired fin differentiation, which marks the start of pterygiolarval phase (11-33 dpf; 6.8-10.7 mm SL defined by appearance of lepidotrichia in the dorsal part of the median finfold. This phase ends with the full detachment and differentiation of unpaired fins, events signaling the commencement of the juvenile period (34-60 dpf; 10.8-18.0 mm SL. Eleutheroembryonic phase focuses on hiding and differentiation of mechanosensory, chemosensory and central neural systems, crucial for supplying the larval period with efficient escape and nutrient detection-capture neurocircuits. Protopterygiolarval priorities include visual development and respiratory, digestive and hydrodynamic efficiencies. Pterygiolarval priorities change towards higher swimming efficacy, including carangiform and vertical swimming, necessary for the high social interaction typical of this species. At the end of the protopterygiolarval phase, simple resting and foraging aggregations are seen. Resting and foraging shoals grow in complexity and participant number during pterygiolarval phase, but particularly during juvenile period.

  17. Caracterização morfológica da semente e da plântula de bacurizinho (Rheedia acuminata (Ruiz et Pav. Plachon et Triana - Clusiaceae

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    NASCIMENTO WALNICE MARIA OLIVEIRA DO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O bacurizinho é uma espécie frutífera do gênero Rheedia, nativa da Amazônia, e raramente cultivada, pois seus frutos, embora comestíveis, apresentam polpa escassa. Os estudos com o bacurizinho visam a sua utilização como porta-enxerto, redutor de porte para outras espécies do gênero Rheedia e Garcinia que apresentam altura elevada, como o bacuripari (Rheedia macrophylla Planchon et Triana- Clusiaceae e o mangostão (Garcinia mangostana L.. Este trabalho teve como objetivo caracterizar, morfologicamente, a semente e a plântula dessa espécie. A semente é exalbuminosa, bitegumentada, com a testa de coloração marrom, apresentando vários feixes vasculares bem visíveis, distinguindo-se por sua coloração um pouco mais clara. O hilo é arredondado, de coloração escura, com pequena região mais clara ao centro, correspondendo no ponto de entrada de feixe vascular. A micrópila situa-se próxima ao hilo, sobre uma pequena protuberância triangular. O embrião é anômalo, hipocotilar e é representado unicamente por um longo eixo hipocótilo-radícula, sendo os cotilédones diminutos, aparecendo apenas na extremidade superior no lado oposto da micrópila. Durante a germinação, ocorre primeiramente a emergência de delgada raiz primária, no pólo oposto onde será originado o epicótilo. Essa raiz cresce aproximadamente 5-7cm e cessa, fenecendo posteriormente. Por ocasião da emergência do epicótilo, ocorre ao mesmo tempo a formação de uma raiz adventícia, na base do epicótilo, bem mais robusta que a anterior e que se constituirá no sistema radicular da planta. Precedendo a abertura do primeiro par de metáfilos, desenvolvem-se no epicótilo três pares de catafilos opostos e de coloração esverdeada. A germinação é hipógea e a plântula do tipo criptocotiledonar.

  18. Efecto de la práctica de embolsado sobre la calidad del fruto en feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg tander

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    Fánor Casierra-Posada

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available El  cultivo de  feijoa  (Acca  sellowiana Berg.  se ha  extendido  durante  los últimos  años  en  el territorio colombiano, debido a que  la  fruta es muy apetecida en el mercado por las excelentes propiedades  organolépticas.  Sin  embargo,  la cal idad  y  sanidad  exigidas  para  la comercialización  se  ven  afectadas  por  varios factores,  entre  los  que  se  encuentra  el  daño causado  por  la mosca de  la  fruta  (Anastrepha spp..  Por  tanto,  la  evaluación  del  efecto  de embolsado sobre la calidad de la fruta de feijoa es un tema de gran interés. Además, esta técnica es comúnmente usada en guayaba que pertenecea la misma familia que la feijoa (Mirtáceae. Para el estudio, se embolsaron flores en el momento de  la caída de pétalos, y cada semana después hasta  cuat ro  semanas.   Los  frutos  que  se embolsaron a la caída de pétalos detuvieron su crecimiento; aquellos embolsados una, dos y tres semanas  después  de  la  caída  de  pétalos  no reportaron diferencias significativas en cuanto los parámetros  evaluados  (peso  fresco,  peso  seco, diámetro transversal y  longitudinal, intensidad de infestación,  sólidos  solubles  totales  y  acidez titulable Los frutos embolsados cuatro semanas después de la caída de pétalos fueron de mayor peso,  tamaño y más dulces con  respecto a  los demás. La efectividad en el control de mosca de la  fruta  fue evidente. El embolsado, además de mejorar la sanidad del fruto,  influyó en su calidad y permitió obtener un producto con características adecuadas para el mercado.

  19. Estrutura populacional de Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae no Parque Nacional Serra de Itabaiana, Estado do Sergipe - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i2.5127 Population structure of Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae at Serra de Itabaiana National Park, Sergipe State - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i2.5127

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    Túlio Vinicius Paes Dantas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Estudos de estrutura de tamanho e de estágios ontogênicos são importantes para se compreender quais fatores influenciam os processos populacionais, a regeneração e a resposta a perturbações de uma população. Este estudo analisou a estrutura de uma população de Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae no hábitat de Areias Brancas do Parque Nacional Serra de Itabaiana, Estado de Sergipe. Amostraram-se aleatoriamente 30 parcelas de 20 x 25 m, nas quais se determinou a abundância de indivíduos jovens e adultos, a circunferência do tronco, a altura da copa e o número de caules por planta. A distribuição espacial de jovens e adultos na população é agregada, causada por sua predisposição em formar grupos em locais onde há maior disponibilidade de recursos e condições favoráveis. Outro fator que contribui com a agregação é a dispersão anemocórica da espécie. A população estudada apresentou o maior número de indivíduos nas categorias menores de altura e de DAS, indicando que a população está em crescimento ou em processo de autorregeneração. Há maior número de indivíduos de 2-3 m de altura, o que se deve ao fogo ou corte, eventos que não foram capazes de interromper o processo de recrutamento ou reprodução da espécie na área, pois não ocorreram lacunas nas classes de diâmetro de caule.Studies on structure, size and ontogenic stages are important to understand which factors influence population processes, regeneration and response to disturbances of a population. This study examined the structure of a population of Kielmeyera rugosa Choisy (Clusiaceae in white sands habitat of Serra de Itabaiana, Sergipe State. Thirty 20 x 25 m plots were selected randomly selected, and their abundance of young and adult plants was recorded, as well as trunk circumference, crown height and number of stems per plant. The spatial distribution of young and adult population is aggregated, caused by their predisposition to form

  20. Mass production in liquid diet and radiosterilization of South American fruit fly Anastrepha sp.1 aff. fraterculus (Wied., 1830) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Aline Cristiane

    2010-01-01

    Both the biological control techniques as the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), are used in many countries to control, suppress and even eradicate fruit flies and other pests in agriculture and public health. The use of such techniques minimizes the continuous employment of insecticides, protects the environment and conforms to standards for food safety. However, it is necessary to implement such programs, technology to produce millions of parasitoids and the pest in its own laboratory with biological quality similar to the insects found in nature and cost competitive with chemical control. The objectives of this study was to establish protocols for artificial rearing of A. sp. 1 aff. fraterculus in liquid larval diet that will achieve levels of mass production for a possible reduction in the cost of establishing and determining the dose of radiation sterilization of adult A. sp. 1 aff. fraterculus meeting the quality parameters required by the Sterile Insect Technique with insects from the creation of Radioentomology Laboratory of CENA/USP. Seven experimental diets compared to the conventional diet used in Radioentomology Lab. of CENA/USP, which was used as control. All seven diets have in common the exclusion of agar in its formulation. Only two of the diets tested were suitable for larval development of the fly, they compared with the standard diet, showed inferior results with respect to the volume of recovered larvae, pupae and weight of emergency, however, no significant differences regarding the periods of development , pupal recovery, sex ratio and longevity under stress. It is possible to replace the diet with agar for liquid diets for artificial creation of A. sp. 1 aff. fraterculus, reduced cost and greater convenience of handling, but due to their quality standards lower than the standard diet, more tests are needed especially regarding the adaptability of the insect to the new environment. To determine the sterilizing dose this study examined the

  1. MORFOLOGIA FLORAL DA GOIABEIRA SERRANA (Feijoa sellowiana E SUAS IMPLICAÇÕES NA POLINIZAÇÃO FLOWER MORPHOLOGY OF FEIJOA (Feijoa sellowiana AND IT'S IMPLICATIONS ON POLLINATION

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    JULIANA DEGENHARDT

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo teve por objetivo caracterizar variações na arquitetura floral da Feijoa sellowiana e determinar sua influência sobre a polinização. Foram avaliados o comprimento do pistilo, a distância entre estigma e estames, o diâmetro de abertura e a distribuição dos estames na flor, com base em 7 flores de 15 acessos do Banco de Germoplasma da espécie. Distinguiram-se 3 classes de distâncias médias entre estigma e estames: 0,2 (C1, 0,7 (C2 e 1,2 cm (C3, e duas classes de distribuição de estames na flor (radial e aleatória. Sorteou-se uma planta por classe de distância entre estigma e estames, a qual teve 50 flores marcadas para cada um dos seguintes tratamentos: T1-polinização aberta; T2-tela contra pássaros e T3-tela contra pássaros e insetos. A frutificação foi de 47% em T1 para C2 e de 22% para C3, diferença que pode ser devida ao genótipo e/ou alternância de produção. No T2, a frutificação foi 31% em C2, 15,4% em C1 e 3% em C3. A superioridade de T1 sobre T2 pode ser devida à polinização por pássaros. Essa superioridade foi mais expressiva em C3 do que em C2, o que sugere que C3 é mais dependente de pássaros. A frutificação em T2 pode ainda evidenciar a polinização por insetos e foi menor para C3, o que pode estar sendo causado pelo maior afastamento do estigma. A frutificação em T3 para C1 (7% e C2 (15% sugere que o vento ou a autopolinização também possam efetuar a polinização.The objective of our research was to evaluate distance between the stigma and the stamens, opening diameter and stamens distribution on the flower. We evaluated these variables on 7 flowers of each one of the 15 plant accessions from the Germplasm Bank. The flowers were classified according to distance between the stigma and the stamens into three classes: 0.2 (C1, 0.7 (C2 and 1,2 (C3 cm, in which 2, 9, and 4 accessions were included, respectively. The radial and random stamens distributions were verified in 6 and 9

  2. The occurence of black spot disease in Astyanax aff. fasciatus(characiformes: characidae in the Guaíba Lake basin, RS, Brazil

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    F Flores-Lopes

    Full Text Available Black spot disease is common in freshwater fish and is usually caused by the metacercaria stage of digenetic trematodes, normally from the Diplostomidae family. The present study evaluated the prevalence and intensity of this disease in Astyanax aff. fasciatus(Teleostei: Characiformes in the Guaíba Lake basin (RS, Brazil, including body parts assessment and the points of sampling with higher occurrence of black spots. Fish samples were taken seasonally from December 2002 until October 2004. The samples were collected with the use of a seine net at eleven points. The specimens were fixed in 10% formalin and stored in 70% ethanol. Black spot disease showed a low frequency in the Guaíba lake basin (2.07% and no specificity to the species Astyanax aff. fasciatus was observed. A high prevalence among the individuals and high intensity of infection levels was found in the ventral and dorsal regions in relation to other body parts (e.g., pectoral, pelvic and anal regions. Among the sampling points studied, we observed a higher prevalence on samples collected at points Gasômetro, Saco da Alemoa and Sinos, located in open areas with less occurrence of mollusks.

  3. PHENOTYPIC VARIABILITY IN FEIJOA FRUITS [Acca sellowiana (O. Berg. Burret] ON INDIGENOUS LANDS,QUILOMBOLAS COMMUNITIES AND PROTECTED AREAS IN THE SOUTH OF BRAZIL

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    LIDO JOSÉ BORSUK

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Phenotypic studies with native fruits are important sources of information for understanding the status of conservation of plant species, especially populations in protected areas (PAs. Fruits of 18 populations of feijoa [Acca sellowiana (O. Berg. Burret] present in three kind of PAs, Quilombolas Communities (QLs, Indigenous Lands (ILs and Conservation Units (CUs were evaluated with the aim to characterize the phenotypic variability. Fruits were harvested at maturity and eight morphological descriptors were measured: diameter, length, total weight, pericarp weight, pulp weight, pericarp thickness, pulp yield and solid soluble contents (°Brix. The results revealed the existence of large morphological variability for all traits, with significant differences among all populations and among those populations grouped in QLs, TIs and UCs, particularly to the total weight and peel thickness. There was a clear formation of five major clusters of genetic dissimilarity. In addition, two Uruguayan type populations and 16 Brazilian type populations showed contrast means for most of the evaluated traits. The lower variability on fruit characters found in plants collected in areas of traditional people but not in CUs suggests the existence of selection processes of feijoa genotypes on those areas.

  4. Desenvolvimento gametofítico e estudo de diferentes níveis de luz no crescimento de plântulas de Dicksonia sellowiana (PRESL) Hook. (pteridófita-dicksoniaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Cláudia Cristina Leite Fiori

    2003-01-01

    Dissertação ( mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciências Biológicas. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Vegetal. Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl.) Hook (Dicksoniaceae), popularmente conhecida como xaxim, é uma importante espécie de pteridófita arbórea que pode ser encontrada na Floresta Ombrófila Densa e que há anos vem sendo explorada para fins comerciais. A exploração aliada a seu desenvolvimento lento tem sido um agravante para esta espécie

  5. Avaliação do potencial antioxidante frente à oxidação lipídica e da toxicidade preliminar do extrato e frações obtidas das frondes de Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl.) Hook

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA,V. B.; ZUCHETTO,M.; PAULA,C. S.; VERDAM,M. C. S.; CAMPOS,R.; DUARTE,A. F. S.; MIGUEL,M. D.; MIGUEL,O. G.

    2015-01-01

    RESUMOA espécie Dicksonia sellowiana, conhecida popularmente como xaxim, é uma samambaia natural do continente americano e encontrada no Brasil na Mata Atlântica. Em 2001 foi inserida na lista do IBAMA como espécie ameaçada de extinção em decorrência da exploração para a confecção de vasos para a jardinagem. O presente trabalho descreve o potencial antioxidante lipídico (TBARS e Sistema β-caroteno/ácido linoleico) do extrato bruto e frações obtidos através de aparato de Soxhlet de fronde...

  6. Determinação de danos do gorgulho, Conotrachelus Psidii Marshall e captura de mosca-das-frutas, Anastrepha fFaterculus Wiedemann, com óleo de andiroba, Carapa Guianensis em goiabeira serrana Acca Sellowiana

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Joatan Machado da

    2011-01-01

    A goiabeira-serrana (Acca sellowiana (Berg) Burret) pertencente a família Myrtaceae, é uma espécie nativa com ampla dispersão nos planaltos meridionais do sul do Brasil. Além de espécie nativa e produzir frutos de odor e sabor diferenciado, razão pela qual seu cultivo comercial é incentivado pelo Departamento de Conservação da Biodiversidade do Ministério do Meio Ambiente. A goiabeira serrana tem sido cultivada sob os sistemas orgânico, convencional, ou ainda, os frutos coletad...

  7. Determinação de danos do gorgulho, Conotrachelus psidii Marshall e captura de mosca-das-frutas, Anastrepha fraterculus Wiedemann, com óleo de andiroba, Carapa guianensis em goiabeira serrana Acca sellowiana. Lages-SC 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Joatan Machado da

    2011-01-01

    A goiabeira-serrana (Acca sellowiana (Berg) Burret) pertencente a família Myrtaceae, é uma espécie nativa com ampla dispersão nos planaltos meridionais do sul do Brasil. Além de espécie nativa e produzir frutos de odor e sabor diferenciado, razão pela qual seu cultivo comercial é incentivado pelo Departamento de Conservação da Biodiversidade do Ministério do Meio Ambiente. A goiabeira serrana tem sido cultivada sob os sistemas orgânico, convencional, ou ainda, os frutos coletad...

  8. Raíz secundaria embrional asociada a la germinación de Garcinia intermedia (Clusiaceae y su posible papel en la supervivencia de las plántulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fco Di Stefano

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available En pruebas preliminares de germinación con semillas de Garcinia intermedia (Clusiaceae se observó que ésta producía dos tipos de raíces: la primaria y una secundaria embrional que atraviesa longitudinalmente la semilla. Para determinar su posible papel en la supervivencia y crecimiento de esta especie, se analizaron 90 plántulas con al menos seis meses de germinadas en bolsas plásticas con suelo orgánico ubicadas en un invernadero, a las que se les aplicó uno de los siguientes tratamientos: corte de la raíz primaria o la secundaria embrional, además de un grupo control con ambas raíces (30 repeticiones de cada uno. Luego de tres meses se empezaron a extraer 10 plántulas/mes/tratamiento a los que se les midió la altura total, diámetro basal, longitud de la raíz primaria y secundaria, y la biomasa del vástago, raíz y semilla sin la cubierta seminal. Las plántulas que obtuvieron el mayor crecimiento fueron las del control, seguidas por aquéllas sin la raíz secundaria. Sin embargo, más del 90% de las plántulas a las que se les cortó la raíz primaria, sobrevivieron después de cinco meses de haberse aplicado el tratamiento, en parte debido a una muy alta capacidad de recuperación de su sistema radical, ya sea produciendo rebrotes de la principal (20%, aumentando el crecimiento de la raíz secundaria (13.3%, o ambos (26.7%, y a las reservas de la semilla. La longitud de los rebrotes de la raíz principal fue estadísticamente significativa en las primeras dos extracciones mensuales de plantas, comparado con las del control (F6= 18.6, F7= 16.0, pSecondary embryonary root associated with seed germination in Garcinia intermedia (Clusiaceae and its possible role in seedling survival. Germination tests on Garcinia intermedia (Clusiaceae seeds showed the growth of two types of roots: additionally to the primary root, a secondary root crosses the seed lengthwise. To determine its possible role on the survival and growth of this

  9. Mass production in liquid diet and radiosterilization of South American fruit fly Anastrepha sp.1 aff. fraterculus (Wied., 1830) (Diptera: Tephritidae); Criacao massal em dieta liquida e radioesterilizacao da mosca-sulamericana Anastrepha sp.1 aff. fraterculus (Wied., 1830) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Aline Cristiane

    2010-07-01

    Both the biological control techniques as the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), are used in many countries to control, suppress and even eradicate fruit flies and other pests in agriculture and public health. The use of such techniques minimizes the continuous employment of insecticides, protects the environment and conforms to standards for food safety. However, it is necessary to implement such programs, technology to produce millions of parasitoids and the pest in its own laboratory with biological quality similar to the insects found in nature and cost competitive with chemical control. The objectives of this study was to establish protocols for artificial rearing of A. sp. 1 aff. fraterculus in liquid larval diet that will achieve levels of mass production for a possible reduction in the cost of establishing and determining the dose of radiation sterilization of adult A. sp. 1 aff. fraterculus meeting the quality parameters required by the Sterile Insect Technique with insects from the creation of Radioentomology Laboratory of CENA/USP. Seven experimental diets compared to the conventional diet used in Radioentomology Lab. of CENA/USP, which was used as control. All seven diets have in common the exclusion of agar in its formulation. Only two of the diets tested were suitable for larval development of the fly, they compared with the standard diet, showed inferior results with respect to the volume of recovered larvae, pupae and weight of emergency, however, no significant differences regarding the periods of development , pupal recovery, sex ratio and longevity under stress. It is possible to replace the diet with agar for liquid diets for artificial creation of A. sp. 1 aff. fraterculus, reduced cost and greater convenience of handling, but due to their quality standards lower than the standard diet, more tests are needed especially regarding the adaptability of the insect to the new environment. To determine the sterilizing dose this study examined the

  10. Redução de incertezas em análise de vulnerabilidade às mudanças climáticas para Dicksonia sellowiana

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    Marcelo Brilhante de Medeiros

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo estabelecer predições do impacto das mudanças climáticas em cenários futuros sobre Dicksonia sellowiana (Pres. Hook, por meio de modelos de distribuição de espécies e uso de técnicas que diminuam o grau de incerteza nesse tipo de modelagem. Para a geração dos modelos foram utilizados cinco algoritmos disponíveis no programa Openmodeller. A modelagem incluiu o modelo climático HadCM3, com projeções para o ano 2050, em dois cenários de emissão de CO2: pessimista (A2 e otimista (B2. Todos os algoritmos apresentaram eficiência nas projeções para o clima atual, o que foi validado pelos valores da área sobre a curva ROC e pelo índice de Kappa. Considerando os remanescentes de habitats disponíveis para a espécie, os resultados apresentaram diferenças significativas entre as projeções de área com o clima atual e em relação às áreas em cenários climáticos futuros. Esses modelos indicaram reduções de área potencial superiores a 50% para a espécie. Mesmo considerando os valores bons e excelentes de acurácia com os dados de clima atual, a variabilidade das projeções de distribuição para o clima no futuro indica a necessidade do uso de técnicas de consenso para a redução das incertezas associadas a este tipo de modelagem.

  11. Efeito de diferentes técnicas extrativas no rendimento, atividade antioxidante, doseamentos totais e no perfil por clae-dad de dicksonia sellowiana (presl.. Hook, dicksoniaceae

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    V.B. OLIVEIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO A espécie Dicksonia sellowiana, conhecida popularmente como xaxim, é uma samambaia natural do continente americano e encontrada no Brasil na Mata Atlântica. Em 2001 sua utilização para confecção de vasos para jardinagem foi proibida, e a mesma foi inserida na lista do IBAMA como espécie ameaçada de extinção. O presente trabalho descreve o efeito de diferentes técnicas de extração, incluindo ultra-som, turbólise, maceração, infusão, decocto e soxhlet utilizando etanol e solvente hidroalcoólico 70%, sob aspectos físicos e químicos. Foi avaliado o rendimento de cada extração, o perfil por CLAE-DAD, o conteúdo de polifenóis, flavonoides, proantocianidinas e esteroides além das atividades antioxidantes pelos métodos DPPH e redução do complexo fosfomolibdênio. Os dados foram avaliados estatisticamente através de desvio padrão, Tuckey e PCA. Os resultados demonstraram que a extração por Soxhlet utilizando ambos os solventes é a que possui maior rendimento final, porém o rendimento não está diretamente relacionado com o aumento nos teores de bioativos totais e atividades antioxidantes. As extrações por decocção e turbólise utilizando solvente hidroalcoólico foram as que apresentaram melhores resultados nos teores totais e na atividade antioxidante, resultados que ficam evidentes quando avaliados por PCA, demonstrando que este solvente e estas extrações são mais seletivas no estudo proposto.

  12. Osteology of a new specimen of Macrocnemus aff. M. fuyuanensis (Archosauromorpha, Protorosauria) from the Middle Triassic of Europe: potential implications for species recognition and paleogeography of tanystropheid protorosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquier, Vivien P.; Fraser, Nicholas C.; Furrer, Heinz; Scheyer, Torsten M.

    2017-11-01

    Over the past two decades, a wealth of marine and terrestrial reptiles, including protorosaurian archosauromorphs, has been described from Triassic shales and limestone layers in southern China. Recovered from the eastern margin of the Tethys Ocean, these forms often show remarkable similarities to taxa that were previously known and described from Europe, i.e., the western Tethyan margin. One protorosaurian that is known from the western and the eastern Tethyan province is the genus Macrocnemus, with currently three recognized species: 1) M. bassanii from the Middle Triassic Besano Formation and Meride Limestone (late Anisian – early Ladinian), UNESCO World Heritage Site Monte San Giorgio, Ticino, Switzerland; 2) M. obristi from the Prosanto Formation (early Ladinian) of the Ducan area, Grisons, Switzerland; and 3) M. fuyuanensis from the Falang Formation (Ladinian), Yunnan Province, southern China. Recently a new specimen, PIMUZ T 1559, from the upper Besano Formation at Meride, Ticino, Switzerland, was prepared, revealing a disarticulated skeleton which includes most of the cranium and lower jaw, pre-caudal vertebral column and ribs, the forelimbs, and girdle elements. Unambiguously assignable to the genus Macrocnemus, it evinces particularly gracile elongated cervical ribs, as well as a humerus/radius ratio that is comparable only to that of M. fuyuanensis from southern China. Based on this feature we tentatively recognize the new specimen as M. aff. fuyuanensis from Europe. The position and exquisite preservation of the clavicle and interclavicle in this specimen allows a revision of the shoulder girdle of Macrocnemus when articulated, which also has implications for closely related protorosaurian taxa, such as the long-necked Tanystropheus. Furthermore, differences in the shape and morphology of the interclavicle including pointed wing-like lateral processes and a short, fusiform caudal process represent rare discrete characters that allow separation of the

  13. Osteology of a New Specimen of Macrocnemus aff. M. fuyuanensis (Archosauromorpha, Protorosauria from the Middle Triassic of Europe: Potential Implications for Species Recognition and Paleogeography of Tanystropheid Protorosaurs

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    Vivien P. Jaquier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, a wealth of marine and terrestrial reptiles, including protorosaurian archosauromorphs, has been described from Triassic shales and limestone layers in southern China. Recovered from the eastern margin of the Tethys Ocean, these forms often show remarkable similarities to taxa that were previously known and described from Europe, i.e., the western Tethyan margin. One protorosaurian that is known from the western and the eastern Tethyan province is the genus Macrocnemus, with currently three recognized species: (1 Macrocnemus bassanii from the Middle Triassic Besano Formation and Meride Limestone (late Anisian–early Ladinian, UNESCO World Heritage Site Monte San Giorgio, Ticino, Switzerland; (2 Macrocnemus obristi from the Prosanto Formation (early Ladinian of the Ducan area, Grisons, Switzerland; and (3 Macrocnemus fuyuanensis from the Falang Formation (Ladinian, Yunnan Province, southern China. Recently a new specimen, PIMUZ T 1559, from the upper Besano Formation at Meride, Ticino, Switzerland, was prepared, revealing a disarticulated skeleton which includes most of the cranium and lower jaw, pre-caudal vertebral column and ribs, the forelimbs, and girdle elements. Unambiguously assignable to the genus Macrocnemus, it evinces particularly gracile elongated cervical ribs, as well as a humerus/radius ratio that is comparable only to that of M. fuyuanensis from southern China. Based on this feature we tentatively recognize the new specimen as M. aff. fuyuanensis from Europe. The position and exquisite preservation of the clavicle and interclavicle in this specimen allows a revision of the shoulder girdle of Macrocnemus when articulated, which also has implications for closely related protorosaurian taxa, such as the long-necked Tanystropheus. Furthermore, differences in the shape and morphology of the interclavicle including pointed wing-like lateral processes and a short, fusiform caudal process represent rare

  14. Spongicoloides sp. aff. a Spongicoloides galapagensis (Decapoda: Stenopodidea: Spongicolidae: una nueva especie para la carcinofauna chilena y primer registro de un estenopodido en aguas del margen continental de Chile Spongicoloides sp. aff. to Spongicoloides galapagensis (Decapoda: Stenopodidea: Spongicolidae: a new species for Chilean carcinofauna and the first record of aStenopodid for the Chilean margin

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    Guillermo L Guzmán

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Se cita por primera vez para el margen continental de Chile una especie de camarón Stenopodidae, asociado a una esponja hexactinelida. Los especímenes fueron recolectados en dos sitios de Chile central (31°12'S, 71°52'W y 36°00'S, 73°38'W; 922 a 1000 m de profundidad. Las esponjas estaban adheridas al sustrato con probable origen en emanaciones de metano. Spongicoloides sp. aff. a S. gala-pagensis, es el primer registro de la familia en aguas del margen continental del Pacífico suroriental. Los ejemplares coinciden con los rangos de la variación morfológica de S. galapagensis, no obstante difieren en el número de branquias descrito.This is the first record of a species of Stenopodid shrimp along the Chilean margin, associated with a hexactinellid sponge. The specimens were collected at two sites in central Chile (31°12'S, 71°52'W and 36°00'S, 73°38'W; 922 to 1000 m depth. The sponges were attached to the substrate with probable origins in methane seepage. Spongicoloides sp. aff. to S. galapagensis constitutes the first record of the family for the eastern south Pacific continental margin. The specimens coincide with the ranges of morphological variation of S. galapagensis, although they differ in the number of brachia described.

  15. Ciclo de vida y aspectos poblacionales de Edessa aff. aulacosterna Stal, 1872 (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae chinche del fruto del camu camu (Myrtaceae en zona de restinga, Ucayali, Perú Life cycle and population aspects of camu camu fruit stink bug Edessa aff. aulacosterna Stal, 1872 (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae in restinga zone, Ucayali, Peru

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    José Iannacone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El camu camu es uno de los frutales nativos con gran potencial económico para la agroindustria y agro exportación. Edessa es una de las plagas del camu camu que provoca sequedad en los brotes, y en los frutos una mancha decolorada con círculos concéntricos bien marcados y un punto central al alimentarse. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue determinar el ciclo biológico bajo condiciones de laboratorio y la fluctuación poblacional de Edessa aff. aulacosterna "Chinche del fruto del camu camu" durante enero a noviembre del 2004 en el cultivo de camu camu, en parcelas en desarrollo y producción ubicadas en áreas de restinga inundables en Pucallpa, Ucayali, Perú. Se colectaron huevos, ninfas y adultos procedentes del distrito de Yarinacocha, Pucallpa, Ucayali, Perú para iniciar la crianza artificial. El tiempo de duración del huevo al I estadio ninfal fue 5,1 días. Se encontró un 94,6% de eclosión de los huevos, variando entre 12 hasta 14 huevos por postura. El tiempo transcurrido desde el huevo hasta II estadío fue de 37,3 días y del III al V estadío ninfal fue de 81,9 días. El porcentaje de mortalidad del primer estadio ninfal a adulto fue de 98,1%. Los adultos colectados se localizaron preferentemente sobre las ramas y el tallo de la planta, mientras que las ninfas se encontraron en los brotes tiernos. Con relación a su fluctuación poblacional, solo se registró posturas a lo largo del año en parcelas en producción. No se encontraron diferencias entre ninfas I a V, y adultos de Edessa aff. aulacosterna, entre plantaciones en producción y desarrollo de camu camu. Solo se encontró diferencias entre la época seca y lluviosa en las ninfas de III a V estadio en las plantas de camu camu en desarrollo. Edessa aff. aulacosterna presentó mayormente una distribución contagiosa. El adecuado conocimiento de la bioecología nos permite mejorar la estrategia de control de esta plaga.Camu camu is one of the native fruits with a great

  16. Maduración poscosecha de la feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg tratada con CaCl2 en tres temperaturas de almacenamiento

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    Ramírez Juan Manuel

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Con la finalidad de comprobar los efectos retardantes del calcio en la maduración de los frutos de feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg, cultivar Quimba, se realizó un estudio sobre la aplicación poscosecha, mediante inmersiones de tres soluciones distintas de cloruro de calcio (5%, 10% y 15% y un testigo. La aplicación de CaCl2 prolongó la vida de almacenamiento de los fru­tos, ya que los tratamientos permitieron a los frutos so­portar las condiciones de almacenamiento. Se observó un efecto importante en la disminución de las pérdidas de peso; los frutos tratados con el porcentaje de calcio más alto (15% presentaron las menores pérdidas de peso en cada temperatura. En las fejioas almacenadas a temperatura ambiente (18° C, se observó que la in­cidencia de enfermedades fue más pequeña en los fru­tos tratados con CaCl2. La velocidad de pérdida de la firmeza de los frutos también se vio fortalecida por la adición de calcio. Con relación a las propiedades quí­micas de los frutos, no se presentaron diferencias sig­nificativas entre los tratamientos con cloruro de calcio para cada temperatura de almacenamiento; las feijoas tratadas con CaCl presentaron niveles superiores de sólidos solubles totales, a pesar de no ser significativos estadísticamente.

  17. Molecular variants in populations of Bryconamericus aff. iheringii (Characiformes, Characidae in the upper Paraná river basin - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v35i2.11451

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto José Prioli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There are evidences that Bryconamericus aff. iheringii represents a species complex. DNA molecular markers have been effective in studies on phylogeny, taxonomy, and identification of cryptic species. In this study, partial sequences of genes of ATPase 6 and 8 were used to assess genetic diversity within and among populations of B. aff. iheringii of sub-basins of Tibagi, Pirapó and Ivaí rivers, belonging to the Upper Paraná river basin. The analysis of the sequences of genes pointed out high genetic diversity in B. aff. iheringii from the sub-basins studied with genetic distance values comparable to those found among different species. There was a division of the individuals into five groups. The comparison with other species of Bryconamericus that have sequences available in GenBank confirmed that the individuals studied have relevant values of genetic distance, found among different species. Nevertheless, with the available data it is not possible to refute the hypothesis that the populations correspond to a group resulting from hybridization or that there might have been introgression of mitochondrial DNA among different species.

  18. Dinámica del daño foliar en plántulas de Drimys granadensis (Winteraceae y Clusia multiflora (Clusiaceae en el bosque altoandino de la Cordillera Oriental colombiana

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    Carolina Ramos

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Además de las estrategias fitoquímicas especializadas, las plantas pueden usar la producción sincrónica de hojas como un método de saciado de patógenos y herbívoros. Con el fin de determinar si las especies del bosque altoandino colombiano Clusia multiflora (Clusiaceae y Drimys granadensis (Winteraceae recurren a la producción sincrónica de hojas para controlar los efectos de la herbivoría y el ataque microbiano, y establecer que relación existe entre el estado de salud, el crecimiento y la mortalidad de plántulas, se evaluó la dinámica del daño foliar sobre diferentes cohortes. Dado que una plántula tolerante a la sombra recientemente emergida no puede suplir los costos fisiológicos de una estrategia especializada, se esperaba una alta sincronía en la producción de hojas en las plántulas más jóvenes, y diferencias en el daño foliar entre cohortes. Se midieron cuatro variables que evaluaban el estado de salud a lo largo del tiempo, en tres cohortes de plántulas: Proporción de hojas predadas, proporción de hojas sanas, proporción de hojas enfermas o con daño puntual y crecimiento. Ambas especies mostraron diferencias significativas entre épocas, en la proporción de hojas sanas; pero no hubo un efecto de la interacción tiempo-cohorte, por lo tanto la producción sincrónica de hojas no fue una estrategia más usada por alguna cohorte en particular. El daño foliar osciló a través del tiempo, lo cual puede ser explicado por los pulsos en la producción de hojas. Sin embargo, ésta estrategia tuvo poca eficiencia para controlar el ataque por patógenos. En general, el comportamiento unificado de todas las variables fue afectado por la cohorte, el tiempo, la especie y todas las diferentes interacciones. La relación entre crecimiento y daño foliar fue condicionado por el clima. La mayor mortalidad se dio durante la estación seca, y un cuarto de las muertes en D. granadensis fueron causadas por la acción conjunta de

  19. Caracterização genética de populações naturais de goiabeira serrana (Acca sellowiana com marcadores microssatélites heterólogos

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    Karine Louise dos Santos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2011v24n4p75 A goiabeira serra Acca sellowiana é uma espécie nativa do sul do Brasil e nordestete do Uruguai e devido ao sabor único de seus frutos apresenta-se como alternativa de renda para pequenos agricultores. O conhecimento da diversidade genética se constitui em uma importante ferramenta para o melhoramento genético e conservação. Com intuito de ampliar o conhecimento a respeito da diversidade genética da espécie, foi caracterizada a diversidade genética de cinco populações naturais de A. sellowiana, com o uso de iniciadores microssatélites desenvolvidos para o complexo Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden x E. urophylla S.T. Blake. Com a utilização de 10 pares de iniciadores selecionados, 122 plantas foram caracterizadas. Os valores médios para heterozigosidade esperada e observada foram de 0,42 e 0,47, respectivamente. Os valores estimados para  não diferiram de zero para quatro das cinco populações avaliadas, sugerindo baixo efeito de endogamia. Adicionalmente, foi observada incidência de alelos raros e divergência genética, sugerindo que estratégias de conservação considerem a manutenção de diferentes populações com objetivo de conservar a espécie.

  20. Avaliação do potencial antioxidante frente à oxidação lipídica e da toxicidade preliminar do extrato e frações obtidas das frondes de Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl. Hook

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    V. B. OLIVEIRA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOA espécie Dicksonia sellowiana, conhecida popularmente como xaxim, é uma samambaia natural do continente americano e encontrada no Brasil na Mata Atlântica. Em 2001 foi inserida na lista do IBAMA como espécie ameaçada de extinção em decorrência da exploração para a confecção de vasos para a jardinagem. O presente trabalho descreve o potencial antioxidante lipídico (TBARS e Sistema β-caroteno/ácido linoleico do extrato bruto e frações obtidos através de aparato de Soxhlet de frondes de Dicksonia sellowiana, além da atividade citotóxica e hemolítica in vitro. Pelo método TBARS, todas as amostras testadas apresentaram atividade, destacando a fração acetato de etila e extrato bruto cuja atividade foi comparável ao padrão ácido ascórbico. No sistema β-caroteno/ácido linoleico, a fração acetato de etila e extrato bruto apresentaram inibição da oxidação do ácido linoleico, destaque para a fração acetato de etila que não se diferenciou estatisticamente do padrão BHT. Na avaliação da toxicidade preliminar, não fora observado atividade citotóxica e hemolítica do extrato bruto e frações nos modelos testados. Os resultados demonstram o potencial antioxidante da espécie vegetal nos modelos de inibição da oxidação lipídica sem apresentar toxicidade.

  1. New Host Record for Camponotophilus delvarei (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae, a Parasitoid of Microdontine Larvae (Diptera: Syrphidae, Associated with the Ant Camponotus sp. aff. textor

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    Gabriela Pérez-Lachaud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microdontine syrphid flies are obligate social parasites of ants. Larvae prey on ant brood whereas adults live outside the nests. Knowledge of their interaction with their host is often scarce, as it is information about their natural enemies. Here we report the first case of parasitism of a species of microdontine fly by a myrmecophilous eurytomid wasp. This is also the first host record for Camponotophilus delvarei Gates, a recently described parasitic wasp discovered in Chiapas, Mexico, within the nests of the weaver ant, Camponotus sp. aff. textor Forel. Eleven pupal cases of a microdontine fly were found within a single nest of this ant, five of them being parasitized. Five adult C. delvarei females were reared from a puparium and 29 female and 2 male pupae were obtained from another one. The eurytomid is a gregarious, primary ectoparasitoid of larvae and pupae of Microdontinae, its immature stages developing within the protective puparium of the fly. The species is synovigenic. Adult females likely locate and parasitize their hosts within the ant nest. As some species of Microdontinae are considered endangered, their parasitoids are likewise threatened and in need of accurate and urgent surveys in the future.

  2. Field and laboratory studies provide insights into the meaning of day-time activity in a subterranean rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti, the tuco-tuco.

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    Barbara M Tomotani

    Full Text Available South American subterranean rodents (Ctenomys aff. knighti, commonly known as tuco-tucos, display nocturnal, wheel-running behavior under light-dark (LD conditions, and free-running periods >24 h in constant darkness (DD. However, several reports in the field suggested that a substantial amount of activity occurs during daylight hours, leading us to question whether circadian entrainment in the laboratory accurately reflects behavior in natural conditions. We compared circadian patterns of locomotor activity in DD of animals previously entrained to full laboratory LD cycles (LD12:12 with those of animals that were trapped directly from the field. In both cases, activity onsets in DD immediately reflected the previous dark onset or sundown. Furthermore, freerunning periods upon release into DD were close to 24 h indicating aftereffects of prior entrainment, similarly in both conditions. No difference was detected in the phase of activity measured with and without access to a running wheel. However, when individuals were observed continuously during daylight hours in a semi-natural enclosure, they emerged above-ground on a daily basis. These day-time activities consisted of foraging and burrow maintenance, suggesting that the designation of this species as nocturnal might be inaccurate in the field. Our study of a solitary subterranean species suggests that the circadian clock is entrained similarly under field and laboratory conditions and that day-time activity expressed only in the field is required for foraging and may not be time-dictated by the circadian pacemaker.

  3. Rhythmic 24 h variation of core body temperature and locomotor activity in a subterranean rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti, the tuco-tuco.

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    Patricia Tachinardi

    Full Text Available The tuco-tuco Ctenomys aff. knighti is a subterranean rodent which inhabits a semi-arid area in Northwestern Argentina. Although they live in underground burrows where environmental cycles are attenuated, they display robust, 24 h locomotor activity rhythms that are synchronized by light/dark cycles, both in laboratory and field conditions. The underground environment also poses energetic challenges (e.g. high-energy demands of digging, hypoxia, high humidity, low food availability that have motivated thermoregulation studies in several subterranean rodent species. By using chronobiological protocols, the present work aims to contribute towards these studies by exploring day-night variations of thermoregulatory functions in tuco-tucos, starting with body temperature and its temporal relationship to locomotor activity. Animals showed daily, 24 h body temperature rhythms that persisted even in constant darkness and temperature, synchronizing to a daily light/dark cycle, with highest values occurring during darkness hours. The range of oscillation of body temperature was slightly lower than those reported for similar-sized and dark-active rodents. Most rhythmic parameters, such as period and phase, did not change upon removal of the running wheel. Body temperature and locomotor activity rhythms were robustly associated in time. The former persisted even after removal of the acute effects of intense activity on body temperature by a statistical method. Finally, regression gradients between body temperature and activity were higher in the beginning of the night, suggesting day-night variation in thermal conductance and heat production. Consideration of these day-night variations in thermoregulatory processes is beneficial for further studies on thermoregulation and energetics of subterranean rodents.

  4. Gametogenesis and reproductive cycle of Melanorivulus aff. punctatus (Boulenger, 1895 (Cyprinodontiformes, Rivulidae in Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso, Brazil

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    Monica Cassel

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the reproductive cycle allows to understand which are the morphological changes that develop in the gonad during this interval. Thus, many studies have been undertaken in order to describe and classify the stages of gonadal development and reproductive status of Neotropical fishes. For this purpose, specimens of Melanorivulus aff. punctatus were collected in a permanent dam in Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The gonads were prepared for analysis by light microscopy. The oogenesis and spermatogenesis have been described, characterizing the stages of gonadal development, together with assessments of the gonadosomatic ratio, germ cell count and verification of variation of mature oocytes in females. Throughout the year the male gonads presented themselves as capable of reproducing, characterized by the presence of undifferentiated and differentiated spermatogonia, spermatocytes organized into cysts, spermatids in cysts whose wall was thicker and the spermatozoa was free in the lumen and the duct. This can indicate a continuous reproductive cycle with split spermiation. The females had gonads in the development stage from May to September with undifferentiated and differentiated oogonias and early oocytes always facing the lumen, abundant pre-vitellogenic and vitellogenic oocytes and some atresias. In the phase capable of spawning, observed from October to March, the mature oocytes are abundant, there are many post-ovulatory complexes and some atresia in advanced stage. The regression, observed in some individuals from February to April, is characterized by ovaries with many atresias and post-ovulatory complexes. The same results were found in the quantitative assessments. Therefore, it may be characterized as discontinuous cycle with split spawning. Thus, the reproductive cycle of this species can be characterized as continuous for males and discontinuous for females, which have a most intense phase of reproduction

  5. Morfologia do trato digestório e dieta de larvas de Bryconamericus aff. iheringii (Boulenger, 1887 (Osteichthyes, Characidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i1.1059 Morphology of Digestive tract and diet of Bryconamericus aff. iheringii larvae (Boulenger, 1887 (Osteichthyes, Characidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i1.1059

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshiyu Nakatani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar alguns aspectos da alimentação de larvas de Bryconamericus aff. iheringii, capturadas nos meses de julho e novembro de 2001, nas regiões limnética e litorânea do reservatório de Santa Maria, rio Piquiri, Estado do Paraná. As larvas apresentaram boca subterminal durante todo o seu desenvolvimento. O tubo digestório se diferenciou em estômago e intestino apenas no estágio de pós-flexão. As larvas consumiram, principalmente, algas e microcrustáceos, o que permitiu caracterizá-las como planctófagas. A intensa modificação morfológica no trato digestório nos indivíduos em pós-flexão coincidiu com o aumento na abundância de algas em relação aos itens de origem animal; porém, de forma geral, a ocorrência aumentou para todos os itens. A análise do grau de digestão dos itens alimentares sugeriu que indivíduos em pré-flexão alimentaram-se, possivelmente, durante o dia, e os mais desenvolvidos, durante o entardecer e no período noturnoThe aim of this study was to analyze some feeding treats of Bryconamericus aff. iheringii larvae, sampled in both the limnetic and littoral regions of the Piquiri River, in Santa Maria reservoir, between July and November 2001. The larvae presented sub-terminal mouth in larval period. The digestive tract differentiated in terms of stomach and intestine only in the postflexion larvae. The larvae fed mainly on algae and microcrustacea allowing to characterize them as planktivorous. The intense morphologic shift in the digestive tract in the postflexion larvae coincided with an increase in the abundance of algae in relation to animals items; however, in general, all the items had their occurrence increased. Analysis of the digestion stage suggested that preflexion larvae, possibly, fed themselves during the day, and those more developed, at dusk and night

  6. Germinação de Aechmea nudicaulis (L. Griseb. (Bromeliaceae em diferentes substratos alternativos ao pó de xaxim = Germination of Aechmea nudicaulis (L. Griseb. (Bromeliaceae in different substracts as alternatives to Dicksonia sellowiana Hook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Anacleto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a germinação das sementes de Aechmea nudicaulis (L. Griseb. (Bromeliaceae. As tentativas de produção desta espécie, a partir de sementes, têm ocorrido de forma empírica, utilizando-se substrato à base de pó de xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook., que tem restrições de uso, por estar ameaçada de extinção. Foram testados cinco tipos alternativos de substratos de fácil acessibilidade: húmus de minhoca, areia, fibra de casca de coco, serapilheira e Plantmax®. O experimento foi realizado em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições e 50 sementes por unidade experimental, àtemperatura ambiente, em viveiro rústico, coberto com sombrite (70%. Leituras semanais foram efetuadas, durante 70 dias. A melhor performance, como substituto alternativo, foi a da serapilheira, que apresentou valores de germinação de 79,5% e sobrevivência de 97%,estatisticamente similares aos obtidos com xaxim (78%; 94,75%; Tukey, p For this study, the germination of Aechmea nudicaulis (L. Griseb. (Bromeliaceae was evaluated. Production attempts from seeds for this species have taken place in an empirical form, using substratebased on xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. powder, the use of which is currently restricted, as it is an endangered species. Five easily accessible alternative substratum were tested: worm humus, sand, coconut shell fiber, forest litter, and Plantmax®. The experiment wasconducted using a completely randomized design, with four replications and 50 seeds per experimental unit, at room temperature in a rustic nursery covered with 70% shade cloth. Weekly readings were performed during 70 days. The best alternative as a substitute toxaxim was forest litter, due to its germinability of 79.5% and survival rates of 97%, significantly similar to xaxim (78%; 94.75%; Tukey p < 0,05. Additionally, this product features positive characteristics such as high availability, low cost, and easy recycling.

  7. Variação fenotípica em plantas de duas famílias de meios-irmãos de goiabeira-serrana (Acca sellowiana Berg. em um pomar comercial em São Joaquim-SC Plant phenotypic variation of two half sib families of feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg. from an orchard in São Joaquim, SC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Degenhardt

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A goiabeira-serrana (Acca sellowiana Berg. é uma mirtácea nativa do planalto meridional brasileiro, com dispersão secundária no Uruguai, e produz um fruto de sabor único. Plantas de um pomar comercial composto por duas famílias de meios-irmãos (FMI1 e FMI2 foram avaliadas, com o objetivo principal de analisar a variabilidade fenotípica de várias características. As médias (± desvio-padrão obtidas para as características avaliadas, no ano de 2000, foram: produtividade (29,2±35,0 e 55,1±53,4 frutos por planta; altura (2,2±0,7 m e 2,7±0,8 m; diâmetro de copa (1,9±0,7 m e 2,1±0,7 m; número de ramificações a 20 cm do solo (2,4±1,5 e 1,6±1,2 e distância entre o estigma e as anteras na flor (0,5±0,2 cm e 0,2±0,2 cm, para as plantas da FMI1 e da FMI2, respectivamente. As avaliações revelaram diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre as duas famílias para as características avaliadas, com exceção de diâmetro de copa. As correlações entre características vegetativas não foram estatisticamente significativas, com exceção da correlação entre a altura e a distância entre estigma e anteras (r=-0,53 para a FMI1, no ano de 2000. As regressões não foram significativas, com exceção da regressão entre altura e produtividade na FMI1, em 1998, e entre a produtividade e a distância entre estigma e anteras na FMI2, em 2000. Porém, todas apresentaram coeficientes de determinação inferiores a 0,15.Feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg. is a native Myrtaceae of the Brazilian Southern plateau with secondary dispersion in Uruguay and its fruit has a unique flavor. Plants of a commercial orchard of this species originated by two half-sib families (FMI1 and FMI2 were evaluated, with the objective to characterize the phenotypic variation of several traits. The means (±standard deviation of the evaluated traits, obtained in 2000 were: productivity (29.2±35.0 and 55.1±53.4 fruits per plant; height (2.2±0.7 m and 2.7±0

  8. Developmental plasticity and biomechanics of treelets and lianas in Manihot aff. quinquepartita (Euphorbiaceae): a branch-angle climber of French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Léa; McKey, Doyle; Rowe, Nick

    2009-06-01

    Most tropical lianas have specialized organs of attachment such as twining stems, hooks or tendrils but some do not. Many climbers also have an early self-supporting phase of growth and in some species this can produce treelet-sized individuals. This study focuses on how a liana can climb without specialized attachment organs and how biomechanical properties of the stem are modulated between self-supporting treelets and canopy-climbing lianas. Biomechanics and stem development were investigated in self-supporting to climbing individuals of Manihot aff. quinquepartita (Euphorbiaceae) from tropical rain forest at Saül, central French Guiana. Bending tests were carried out close to the site of growth. Mechanical properties, including Young's elastic modulus, were observed with reference to habit type and changes in stem anatomy during development. This liana species can show a remarkably long phase of self-supporting growth as treelets with stiff, juvenile wood characterizing the branches and main stem. During the early phase of climbing, stiff but unstable stem segments are loosely held in a vertical position to host plants via petiole bases. The stiffest stems--those having the highest values of Young's modulus measured in bending--belonged to young, leaning and climbing stems. Only when climbing stems are securely anchored into the surrounding vegetation by a system of wide-angled branches, does the plant develop highly flexible stem properties. As in many specialized lianas, the change in stiffness is linked to the development of wood with numerous large vessels and thin-walled fibres. Some angiosperms can develop highly effective climbing behaviour and specialized flexible stems without highly specialized organs of attachment. This is linked to a high degree of developmental plasticity in early stages of growth. Young individuals in either open or closed marginal forest conditions can grow as substantial treelets or as leaning/climbing plants, depending on the

  9. Effects of sucrose and irradiance on germination and early gametophyte growth of the endangered tree fern Dicksonia sellowiana Hook (Dicksoniaceae Efeito da sacarose e irradiância na germinação e crescimento inicial do gametófito da samambaia arbórea Dicksonia sellowiana Hook (Dicksoniaceae em perigo de extinção

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Daniela Rogge Renner

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available It is an endangered tree fern that grows in mixed umbrophylus forests in the tropics. Sterilized spores were germinated at 25 ± 2ºC under a 16-hour photoperiod, in Dyer and MS medium supplemented with 0 to 5% sucrose. The germination was lower with the addition of sucrose. Dry mass was higher in 30-day-old gametophytes cultivated in Dyer medium with the addition of 3 to 5% of sucrose. The dry mass decreased in 30-day-old gametophytes cultivated in Dyer and MS media without sucrose and in MS medium with the addition of 4 or 5% of sucrose. The effect of different irradiance on the germination and early gametophyte development of D. sellowiana was analyzed in the autumn of 1998 (May until July. Conical flasks containing spores were kept over a period of 49 days in 50cm³ boxes covered with black shade netting, which gave 5, 20, 36 and 50% of irradiance. The lower mean germination time was observed for spores cultivated under 5% and 20% of irradiance. The highest chlorophyll content was recorded in gametophytes cultivated for 49 days under 20% and 5% of irradiance .The highest soluble sugar content was recorded in gametophytes cultivated under 5% and 20% of irradiance.Esta samambaia arbórea ameaçada de extinção ocorre na floresta ombrófila mista, nos trópicos. Esporos esterilizados germinaram a 25 ± 2ºC em fotoperíodo de 16 horas, em meios de Dyer e MS, acrescidos de 0 a 5% de sacarose. A massa seca foi maior em gametófitos de 30 dias de idade, cultivados em meio Dyer com adição de 3% a 5% de sacarose e em meio MS com adição de 2% de sacarose. A massa seca diminuiu em gametófitos crescidos em meios Dyer e MS na ausência de sacarose e em meio MS acrescido de 5% de sacarose. O efeito de diferentes irradiâncias na germinação e desenvolvimento inicial de gametófitos foi analisado no outono de 1998 (de maio a julho. Frascos cônicos contendo esporos foram mantidos durante 49 dias dentro de caixas de 50cm³ revestidas por telas que

  10. Feeding and morphological analysis of the digestive tract of four species of fish (Astyanax altiparanae, Parauchenipterus galeatus, Serrasalmus marginatus and Hoplias aff. malabaricus from the upper Paraná River floodplain, Brazil

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    D. Peretti

    Full Text Available The present study is inspired by the great wealth of species exhibited by the ichthiofauna. Not only concepts and techniques of ecology deserve attention, but also knowledge in other biological areas, such as zoology and anatomy, are necessary. The intention of the present work is to discover the morphology of fish through the study of the digestive tract morphology, associating it to diet data, in order to better understand the biology of four fish species of the upper Paraná River floodplain. The samples were collected quarterly in the year 2000 with gillnets of different meshes. The stomach content was analyzed under a stereoscopic microscope and the frequencies of occurrence (FO and volumetric (FV and the alimentary index (IAi were calculated. Various morphologic characteristics were analyzed and schematized using a light chamber. The species were grouped into two trophic guilds - insectivores (Astyanax altiparanae and Parauchenipterus galeatus and piscivores (Serrasalmus marginatus and Hoplias aff. malabaricus. The first two, although consumers of insects, preyed on different alimentary groups, notably Hymenoptera in the case of A. altiparanae and Coleoptera in the case of P. galeatus. Serrasalmus marginatus and H. aff. malabaricus consumed mainly fishes. However, only pieces of prey were usually found in the stomach content of the first species, whereas whole fishes were found in the stomach content of the second. Astyanax altiparanae exhibited characteristics that allowed it to obtain food in several compartments of the water column. Similarly P. galeatus consumed food resources that were available in all aquatic compartments, although the abilities to capture, to manipulate and to absorb food differed, as shown by the importance of teeth plates and pharyngeal teeth. Serrasalmus marginatus and H. aff. malabaricus, although resembling each other in many aspects of the digestive tract morphology, differed in the strategies used to capture

  11. Isolation and biological activities of secondary metabolites from the sponges monanchora aff. arbuscula, aplysina sp. petromica ciocalyptoides and topsentia ophiraphidies, from the ascidian didemnum ligulum and from the octocoral carijoa riisei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossuga, Miriam H.; Lira, Simone P. de; Nascimento, Andrea M.; Gambardella, Maria Teresa P.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S.; Torres, Yohandra R.; Nascimento, Gislene G.F.; Pimenta, Eli F.; Silva, Marcio; Thiemann, Otavio H.; Oliva, Glaucius; Tempone, Andre G.; Melhem, Marcia S.C.; Souza, Ana O. de; Galetti, Fabio C.S.; Silva, Celio L.; Cavalcanti, Bruno; Pessoa, Claudia O.; Moraes, Manoel O.; Hajdu, Eduardo; Peixinho, Solange; Rocha, Rosana M.

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of extracts from six species of marine invertebrates yielded one new and several known natural products. Isoptilocaulin from the sponge Monanchora aff. arbuscula displayed antimicrobial activity at 1.3 mg/mL against an oxacillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Five inactive known dibromotyrosine derivatives, 2 6, were isolated from a new species of marine sponge, Aplysina sp. The sponges Petromica ciocalyptoides and Topsentia ophiraphidites yielded the known halistanol sulfate A (7) as an inhibitor of the antileishmanial target adenosine phosphoribosyl transferase. The ascidian Didemnum ligulum yielded asterubin (10) and the new N,N-dimethyl-O-methylethanolamine (11). The octocoral Carijoa riisei yielded the known 18-acetoxypregna-1,4,20-trien-3-one (12), which displayed cytotoxic activity against the cancer cell lines SF295, MDA-MB435, HCT8 and HL60. (author)

  12. Finansiell Bootstrapping i SME : en kvantitativ studie om hur ett starkt socialt och affärsmässigt nätverk påverkar valet av bootstrappingmetoder

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Ida; Sacic, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Syftet med denna kandidatuppsats är se hur ett starkt socialt och affärsmässigt nätverk påverkar valet av bootstrappingmetoder i små och medelstora företag (SME). Detta eftersom SME står för 99,9 procent av samtliga företag på den svenska marknaden och därmed är betydelsefulla för landets ekonomiska tillväxt och sysselsättning. Däremot möter SME svårigheter vid extern finansiering av sin verksamhet. SME kompenserar detta genom att engagera sig i olika ”bootstrappingaktiviteter”. Bootstrapping...

  13. Gyrodactylus aff. mugili Zhukov, 1970 (Monogenoidea: Gyrodactylidae) from the gills of mullets (Mugiliformes: Mugilidae) collected from the inland waters of southern Iraq, with an evalutation of previous records of Gyrodactylus spp. on mullets in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsky, Delane C; Ali, Atheer H; Khamees, Najim R

    2013-11-01

    Gyrodactylus aff. mugili Zhukov, 1970 (Monogenoidea: Gyrodactylidae) is recorded and described from the gill lamellae of 11 of 35 greenback mullet, Chelon subviridis (Valenciennes) (minimum prevalence 31%), from the brackish waters of the Shatt Al-Arab Estuary in southern Iraq. The gyrodactylid was also found on the gill lamellae of one of eight Speigler's mullet, Valamugil speigleri (Bleeker), from the brackish waters of the Shatt Al-Basrah Canal (minimum prevalence 13%). Fifteen Klunzinger's mullet, Liza klunzingeri (Day), and 13 keeled mullet, Liza carinata (Valenciennes), collected and examined from southern Iraqi waters, were apparently uninfected. The gyrodactylids from the greenback mullet and Speigler's mullet were considered to have affinity to G. mugili Zhukov, 1970, and along with G. mugili may represent members of a species complex occurring on mullets in the Indo-Pacific Region. A single damaged gyrodactylid from the external surfaces of the abu mullet, Liza abu (Heckel), was insufficient for species identification. Previously identified species of Gyrodactylus recorded on L. abu in Iraq by various authors were considered possible misidentifications or accidental infections.

  14. The clinical characteristics, therapy and outcome of 85 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AFF1 prospectively treated in the UKALLXII/ECOG2993 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David I.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Chilton, Lucy; Paietta, Elisabeth; Enshaie, Amir; DeWald, Gordon; Harrison, Christine J.; Fielding, Adele K.; Foroni, Letizia; Goldstone, Anthony H.; Litzow, Mark R.; Luger, Selina M.; McMillan, Andrew K.; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M.; Tallman, Martin S.; Wiernik, Peter; Lazarus, Hillard M.

    2013-01-01

    The biology and outcome of adult t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AFF1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia are poorly understood. We describe the outcome and delineate prognostic factors and optimal post-remission therapy in 85 consecutive patients (median age 38 years) treated uniformly in the prospective trial UKALLXII/ECOG2993. The immunophenotype of this leukemia was pro-B (CD10NEG). Immaturity was further suggested by high expression of the stem-cell antigens, CD133 and CD135, although CD34 expression was significantly lower than in t(4;11)-negative patients. Complete remission was achieved in 77 (93%) patients but only 35% survived 5 years (95% CI: 25–45%); the relapse rate was 45% (95% CI: 33–58%). Thirty-one patients underwent allogeneic transplantation in first remission (15 sibling donors and 16 unrelated donors): with 5-year survival rates of 56% and 67% respectively, only 2/31 patients relapsed. This compares with a 24% survival rate and 59% relapse rate in 46 patients who received post-remission chemotherapy. A major determinant of outcome was age with 71% of patients aged <25 years surviving. Younger patients had lower relapse rates (19%) but most received allografts in first complete remission. In conclusion, multivariate analysis did not demonstrate an advantage of allografting over chemotherapy but only five younger patients received chemotherapy. Prospective trials are required to determine whether poor outcomes in older patients can be improved by reduced-intensity conditioning allografts. NCT00002514 www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:23349309

  15. Kapitalstruktur och Affärsrisk

    OpenAIRE

    Eckerhall, Marc; Karlsson, Mårten

    2001-01-01

    During the past year it has been made possible to buy back a company’s outstanding stock. This is done in order to change the capital structure towards a situation with less equity. A change in capital structure means a change in the cost of capital for a company and by that a change in the value for the stockholder. This Master Thesis studies the relation between capital structure and business risk. Studying the debt to equity ratio in a company captures capital structure. Studying the volat...

  16. Isolation and biological activities of secondary metabolites from the sponges monanchora aff. arbuscula, aplysina sp. petromica ciocalyptoides and topsentia ophiraphidies, from the ascidian didemnum ligulum and from the octocoral carijoa riisei; Isolamento e atividades biologicas de produtos naturais das esponjas monanchora arbuscula, aplysina sp., petromica ciocalyptoides e topsentia ophiraphidites, da ascidia didemnum ligulum e do octocoral carijoa riisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossuga, Miriam H.; Lira, Simone P. de; Nascimento, Andrea M.; Gambardella, Maria Teresa P.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: rgsberlinck@iqsc.usp.br; Torres, Yohandra R. [Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Guarapuava, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Nascimento, Gislene G.F. [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude; Pimenta, Eli F.; Silva, Marcio; Thiemann, Otavio H.; Oliva, Glaucius [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Tempone, Andre G.; Melhem, Marcia S.C. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Biologia Medica; Souza, Ana O. de; Galetti, Fabio C.S.; Silva, Celio L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Cavalcanti, Bruno; Pessoa, Claudia O.; Moraes, Manoel O. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Fisiologia e Farmacologia; Hajdu, Eduardo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Museu Nacional; Peixinho, Solange [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia; Rocha, Rosana M. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Setor de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Zoologia

    2007-09-15

    The investigation of extracts from six species of marine invertebrates yielded one new and several known natural products. Isoptilocaulin from the sponge Monanchora aff. arbuscula displayed antimicrobial activity at 1.3 mg/mL against an oxacillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Five inactive known dibromotyrosine derivatives, 2 6, were isolated from a new species of marine sponge, Aplysina sp. The sponges Petromica ciocalyptoides and Topsentia ophiraphidites yielded the known halistanol sulfate A (7) as an inhibitor of the antileishmanial target adenosine phosphoribosyl transferase. The ascidian Didemnum ligulum yielded asterubin (10) and the new N,N-dimethyl-O-methylethanolamine (11). The octocoral Carijoa riisei yielded the known 18-acetoxypregna-1,4,20-trien-3-one (12), which displayed cytotoxic activity against the cancer cell lines SF295, MDA-MB435, HCT8 and HL60. (author)

  17. MORPHOANATOMY OF Garcinia madruno (KUNTH HAMMEL (CLUSIACEAE UNDER WATERLOGGED CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATÁLIA DO COUTO ABREU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Garcinia madruno (Kunth Hammel is a neotropical tree that naturally occurs in terra firme forests and is important as a source of income and medicine for Amazonian populations. This study describes and compares the morphoanatomical responses of plants under conditions of stress and normoxia. Young plants of Garcinia madruno were subjected to two water regimes: daily controlled irrigation and waterlogged for 84 days. Hypertrophic lenticels, adventitious roots and anatomical characteristics of the roots and leaves were evaluated on days 0, 21, 42, 63 and 84. There were no changes in leaf structure, but cracks and hypertrophic lenticels appeared on the stems, there was an increase in blackness of the roots and the plants formed adventitious roots to adapt to the flooded environment. The anatomical changes in the roots of the flooded plants were thickening of the exodermis in the main root and of the pericycle in the lateral roots, and a large increase in the amount of aerenchyma. Histochemical tests detected starch in the midrib, mesophyll, stem and root of flooded plants, and in the petiole of control plants. In the waterlogged plants, phenolic compounds were found in the petiole and alkaloids were found in the midrib, petiole and root.

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Garcinia kola Heckel (Clusiacea) Seed Extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of the bioactive constituents of the extracts using TLC analysis revealed the presence of steroids/triterpenes and phenolic compounds with phenolic compounds appearing in all extracts irrespective of the solvent polarity used for extraction. Anthraquinone and alkaloids were confirmed absent on TLC.

  19. Fukugetina y fukogisida, biflavonoides de clusia guaviarensis cuatr. (clusiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Martínez O.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available De los frutos de la especie nativa Clusia guaviarensis (Cuatr. se aislaron e identificaron los bifiavonoides fukugetina i y fukugisida 2. Este es el primer estudio fitoquímico de esta especie así como el primer reporte de bifiavonoides en el género Clusia. La identificación se realizó por técnicas espectroscópicas tales como IR, UV Y RMN de 'H y "C así como por comparación con muestras auténticas. Se reporta además la presencia de dos atropoisómeros la cual es evidente en el espectro de "C-RMN a temperatura ambiente.

  20. Fukugetina y fukogisida, biflavonoides de clusia guaviarensis cuatr. (clusiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez O., Eduardo; Moreno-Murillo, Bárbara; Delle Monache, Franco

    2010-01-01

    De los frutos de la especie nativa Clusia guaviarensis (Cuatr.) se aislaron e identificaron los bifiavonoides fukugetina i y fukugisida 2. Este es el primer estudio fitoquímico de esta especie así como el primer reporte de bifiavonoides en el género Clusia. La identificación se realizó por técnicas espectroscópicas tales como IR, UV Y RMN de 'H y "C así como por comparación con muestras auténticas. Se reporta además la presencia de dos atropoisómeros la cual es evidente en el espectro de "...

  1. Biologia floral e heterostilia em Vismia guianensis (Aubl. Choisy (Clusiaceae Floral biology and heterostyly in Vismia guianensis (Aubl. Choisy (Clusiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Janice Lima dos Santos

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos da biologia floral e reprodutiva e a caracterização da heterostilia em Vismia guianensis realizaram-se na Reserva Ecológica de Dois Irmãos, Recife, PE, entre novembro/1997 e fevereiro/ 1998. V. guianensis é arbustiva, apresenta flores heterostílicas, distílicas, dispostas em panículas terminais. A antese é diurna e as flores têm duração de um dia. O volume de néctar das flores foi ca. 2,0ul e a concentração de açúcares variou entre 46% e 68% nas duas formas florais. A viabilidade polínica foi aproximadamente de 93% nos dois tipos de flores. Com relação ao sistema reprodutivo, os testes de polinização controlada demonstraram que V. guianensis é autoincompatível, só produzindo frutos (55-65% a partir da polinização interformas. Foram observadas visitas de Polybia sp. (Vespidae e de diferentes espécies de abelhas, das quais Hylaeus sp. (Colletidae e Augochloropsis sp. (Halictidae foram as mais frequentes, sendo considerados, juntamente com Polybia sp., como os polinizadores efetivos. Devido ao sistema de reprodução do tipo xenogâmico, associado à heterostilia, o papel dos polinizadores é de fundamental importância para promover a reprodução sexuada da espécie.The floral and reproductive biology of Vistnia guianensis was studied in the Ecological Reserve of "Dois Irmãos", in Recife (PE, northeastern Brazil, from November/1997 to February/1998. V guianensis is a shrubby species, wherein the flowers, heterostyled of the dimorphic type, are arranged in terminal panicles. The anthesis is diurnal and the flowers last for one day. Nectar volume was about 2,0}il, the sugar concentration varying from 46% to 68% in the two types of flowers. Pollen viability was ca. 93% for both long and short styled-flowers. V guianensis is a self-incompatible species. Only the intermorph pollinations produced fruits (55-65%. Visits by Polybia sp. (Vespidae and several species of bees were observed to flowers of V. guianensis. Hylaeus sp. (Colletidae, and Augochloropsis sp. (Halictidae were the most frequent visitors, and were considered, together with Polybia sp., the effective pollinators. Due to the xenogamic reproductive system associated to the heterostylous mechanism, the pollinators have a fundamental role in promoting sexual reproduction in this plant species.

  2. Maduración del fruto de feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg en los clones 41 (Quimba y 8-4 a temperatura ambiente en condiciones de la Sabana de Bogotá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Mariela

    2006-06-01

    Hidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis" />

    Con el propósito de seleccionar los mejores frutos de feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg para exportación, se realizó un estudio de maduración con los frutos de los clones 41 (Quimba y 8-4, mantenidos a temperatura promedio de 16,3 oC y HR promedio de 65,1%. El clon 8-4 fue evaluado por 14 d y el clon 41 (Quimba por 18 d. Diariamente se registraron las variables intensidad

  3. Caracterización fisicoquímica del crecimiento y desarrollo de los frutos de feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg en los clones 41 (Quimba y 8-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Mariela

    2006-06-01

    Hidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis" />

    La feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg se cultiva en la region andina colombiana, sin embargo, no se tiene reportes del crecimiento y desarrollo de los frutos de clones importantes como el clon 41 (Quimba y el clon 8-4. En este estudio se evaluaron los cambios fisicos desde la antesis hasta la madurez fisiologica, mientras que los cambios bioquimicos se evaluaron en la ultima etapa

  4. Defining obstructive ventilatory defect in 2015 | Affes | Libyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % vs. 78+17%) and FVC (71+15% vs. 93+19%). Conclusion: The frequency of OVD much depends on the criteria used for its definition. Keywords: obstructive ventilatory defect; FEV1/FVC; fixed threshold; lower limit of normal; spirometry; ...

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFF743 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N AF305060 |AF305060.1 Dictyostelium discoideum Wiscott...oducing significant alignments: (bits) Value AF305060_1( AF305060 |pid:none) Dictyostelium discoideum Wiscott

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFF294 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available map 14, *** SEQUENCING IN PROGRESS ***, 18 unordered pieces. 46 0.60 1 U92221 |U92221.1 Legionella shakes...pearei macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) gene, complete cds. 46 0.60 1 AF022

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFF321 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available *illwikyvncicrcsiyfgyshylfigksrkkvylc*ncifpkmvg*tk ynnakyc*gfg*kwsigihkwwvlye**gyyll*ryy*pndigpsiplgefrsyakdrla hrsiwp*cnts...kwsigihkwwvlye**gyyll*ryy*pndigpsiplgefrsyakdrla hrsiwp*cntssylwsirircihyrsyglsryrssfre*angvhveidpkytressfhi

  8. Automated Aerial Refueling Hitches a Ride on AFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer L.; Murray, James E.; Bever, Glenn; Campos, Norma V.; Schkolnik, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    The recent introduction of uninhabited aerial vehicles [UAVs (basically, remotely piloted or autonomous aircraft)] has spawned new developments in autonomous operation and posed new challenges. Automated aerial refueling (AAR) is a capability that will enable UAVs to travel greater distances and loiter longer over targets. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), the Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet, and the Air Force Research Laboratory, rapidly conceived and accomplished an AAR flight research project focused on collecting a unique, high-quality database on the dynamics of the hose and drogue of an aerial refueling system. This flight-derived database would be used to validate mathematical models of the dynamics in support of design and analysis of AAR systems for future UAVs. The project involved the use of two Dryden F/A-18 airplanes and an S-3 hose-drogue refueling store on loan from the Navy. In this year-long project, which was started on October 1, 2002, 583 research maneuvers were completed during 23 flights.

  9. Dicty_cDB: AFF372 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ll*tra*r clsfeilfrfpfpylfiresip*lsigfpnhl*kypfkik*kfnwlfrnyklsngis Frame C: tnntn...lsk*vwsklchfnplgq**wsk*yggfpsi*sst*igenrrippnst*snqm*ik itsf*rrh*nyqcryllfhryrsiegkrr*ihl*hlfpsgk*ntckyplgfg

  10. Effect of seed coat on the seed germination and seedling development of Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess. (Clusiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria Aparecida Mendes de Jesus

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to study the effect of the Calophyllum brasiliense seed coat on the seed germination process. To this end, three experiments were conducted in laboratory, greenhouse and screenhouse. From a total of six treatments, five are related to the seed coat (mechanical scarification; mechanical scarification followed by 2 hours in water, chemical scarification, hot water immersion and complete seed coat removal and one control. Laboratory and greenhouse experiments were conducted in a completely randomized design (CRD. Screenhouse experiment was conducted in a completely randomized block design (RBD. We evaluated the total percentage, the speed index and the average time of germination or emergence. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and means compared by LSD test, at 5%. Under the conditions of this work, it was possible to infer that, in laboratory, mechanical scarification followed by 2 hours in water increases the proportion and germination speed index (GSI, in the greenhouse, the complete seed coat removal increases the percentage and emergence speed index (ESI, and in the screenhouse, mechanical scarification followed by 2 hours in water and chemical scarification presented the best results. The average germination time was not significantly different in the three experiments evaluated.

  11. Prenylated Polyphenols from Clusiaceae and Calophyllaceae with Immunomodulatory Activity on Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, Caroline; Pagie, Sylvain; Derbré, Séverine; Le Ray, Anne-Marie; Richomme, Pascal; Charreau, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are key players in inflammation and immune responses involved in numerous pathologies. Although attempts were experimentally undertaken to prevent and control EC activation, drug leads and probes still remain necessary. Natural products (NPs) from Clusiaceous and Calophyllaceous plants were previously reported as potential candidates to prevent endothelial dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify more precisely the molecular scaffolds that could limit EC activation. Here, 13 polyphenols belonging to 5 different chemical types of secondary metabolites (i.e., mammea coumarins, a biflavonoid, a pyranochromanone acid, a polyprenylated polycyclic acylphloroglucinol (PPAP) and two xanthones) were tested on resting and cytokine-activated EC cultures. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the expression of both adhesion molecules (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules have been used to measure their pharmaceutical potential. As a result, we identified 3 mammea coumarins that efficiently reduce (up to >90% at 10 μM) both basal and cytokine-regulated levels of MHC class I, class II, MICA and HLA-E on EC surface. They also prevented VCAM-1 induction upon inflammation. From a structural point of view, our results associate the loss of the free prenyl group substituting mammea coumarins with a reduced cellular cytotoxicity but also an abrogation of their anti-inflammatory potential and a reduction of their immunosuppressive effects. A PPAP, guttiferone J, also triggers a strong immunomodulation but restricted to HLA-E and MHC class II molecules. In conclusion, mammea coumarins with a free prenyl group and the PPAP guttiferone J emerge as NPs able to drastically decrease both VCAM-1 and a set of MHC molecules and to potentially reduce the immunogenicity of the endothelium.

  12. Prenylated Polyphenols from Clusiaceae and Calophyllaceae with Immunomodulatory Activity on Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Rouger

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (ECs are key players in inflammation and immune responses involved in numerous pathologies. Although attempts were experimentally undertaken to prevent and control EC activation, drug leads and probes still remain necessary. Natural products (NPs from Clusiaceous and Calophyllaceous plants were previously reported as potential candidates to prevent endothelial dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify more precisely the molecular scaffolds that could limit EC activation. Here, 13 polyphenols belonging to 5 different chemical types of secondary metabolites (i.e., mammea coumarins, a biflavonoid, a pyranochromanone acid, a polyprenylated polycyclic acylphloroglucinol (PPAP and two xanthones were tested on resting and cytokine-activated EC cultures. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the expression of both adhesion molecules (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin and major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules have been used to measure their pharmaceutical potential. As a result, we identified 3 mammea coumarins that efficiently reduce (up to >90% at 10 μM both basal and cytokine-regulated levels of MHC class I, class II, MICA and HLA-E on EC surface. They also prevented VCAM-1 induction upon inflammation. From a structural point of view, our results associate the loss of the free prenyl group substituting mammea coumarins with a reduced cellular cytotoxicity but also an abrogation of their anti-inflammatory potential and a reduction of their immunosuppressive effects. A PPAP, guttiferone J, also triggers a strong immunomodulation but restricted to HLA-E and MHC class II molecules. In conclusion, mammea coumarins with a free prenyl group and the PPAP guttiferone J emerge as NPs able to drastically decrease both VCAM-1 and a set of MHC molecules and to potentially reduce the immunogenicity of the endothelium.

  13. Morphology and anatomy of the seedling and the tirodendro of Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess. (Clusiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria Aparecida Mendes de Jesus

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess. is a tree species that is presented as an alternative to replace endangered species of hardwood. The morphology and anatomy of the seedling of this species is the object of the present study. Seedlings at different stages of development were obtained in greenhouse and analyzed fresh and fixed in FAA (Formalin-Acetic-Alcohol 50. The anatomical analysis was done by the freehand and microtome sections, according to standard techniques in plant anatomy. The seedling and/or tirodendro is cryptocotylar and hypogeal, has cataphylls, and presents eophylls and metaphylls simple with venation pinnate craspedodromous simple. The root is polyarch, the hypocotyl is very short, the cotyledons have an oily and starchy reserve, the epicotyl has stem structure, and eophylls and metaphylls are dorsiventral. The seedling may be classified in the Horsfieldia type/subtype.

  14. Benzophenone guttiferone A from Garcinia achachairu Rusby (Clusiaceae presents genotoxic effects in different cells of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Menezes Terrazas

    Full Text Available Benzophenones from natural sources and those of synthetic analogues present several reports of potent biological properties, and Guttiferone A represents a promising medicinal natural compound with analgesic and gastroprotective profiles. Considering that there are no reports that assess the genetic toxicity of Guttiferone A, the present study was undertaken to investigate the genotoxic potential of this benzophenone isolated from seeds of Garcinia achachairu in terms of DNA damage in different cells of Swiss albino mice using the comet assay, and its clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow cells in vivo by the micronucleus test. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring polychromatic (PCE and normochromatic (NCE erythrocytes ratio. Guttiferone A was administered by oral gavage at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg. The results showed that Guttiferone A produced genotoxic effects in leukocytes, liver, bone marrow, brain and testicle cells and clastogenic/aneugenic effects in bone marrow erythrocytes of mice. The PCE/NCE ratio indicated no cytotoxicity. Since guttiferone A is harmful to the genetic material we suggest caution in its use by humans.

  15. Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Garcinia nervosa (Clusiaceae

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    N. M. U. Seruji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In our continuing interest on Sarawak Garcinia species, we carried out the evaluation of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities on the methanolic extracts of Garcinia nervosa. The extracts were prepared from its air-dried grounded leaves and barks. The evaluation of antioxidant activities was done using the (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl DPPH radical scavenging assay and the result showed high radical scavenging activities. Meanwhile, the anti-inflammatory evaluation was performed using the lipoxygenase assay, hyaluronidase assay, and xanthine oxidase assay which showed, both of these extracts exhibited high anti-inflammatory properties. The lipoxygenase assay showed a high inhibition of enzyme activity for the barks extracts and a moderate enzyme activity for the leaves extracts. However, there were low inhibitions for both extracts in the hyaluronidase assay and only the barks extracts exhibited moderate antigout properties in the xanthine oxidase assay. For the cytotoxic assay, the extracts exhibited positive responses against the three cancer cell lines, the HeLa cell lines, MCF-7 cell lines, and HT-29 cell lines. Thus, Garcinia nervosa contains high antioxidativeand anti-inflammation properties, which have great potential in the development of pharmaceutical and dermatological products.

  16. Clusia blattophila sp. nov. (Clusiaceae) from an inselberg in French Guiana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasáková, Blanka; Gustafsson, M. H. G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2011), s. 178-181 ISSN 0107-055X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Clusia * inselberg * French Guayana Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.551, year: 2011

  17. Mesua beccariana (Clusiaceae, A Source of Potential Anti-cancer Lead Compounds in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soek Sin Teh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on biologically active secondary metabolites from the stem bark of Mesua beccariana was carried out. A new cyclodione, mesuadione (1, along with several known constituents which are beccamarin (2, 2,5-dihydroxy-1,3,4-trimethoxy anthraquinone (3, 4-methoxy-1,3,5-trihydroxyanthraquinone (4, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 were obtained from this ongoing research. Structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, GC-MS, IR and UV techniques. Preliminary tests of the in vitro cytotoxic activities of all the isolated metabolites against a panel of human cancer cell lines Raji (lymphoma, SNU-1 (gastric carcinoma, K562 (erythroleukemia cells, LS-174T (colorectal adenocarcinoma, HeLa (cervical cells, SK-MEL-28 (malignant melanoma cells, NCI-H23 (lung adenocarcinoma, IMR-32 (neuroblastoma and Hep-G2 (hepatocellular liver carcinoma were carried out using an MTT assay. Mesuadione (1, beccamarin (2, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 displayed strong inhibition of Raji cell proliferation, while the proliferation rate of SK-MEL-28 and HeLa were strongly inhibited by stigmasterol (6 and beccamarin (2, indicating these secondary metabolites could be anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

  18. Clusia nubium (Clusiaceae): a new species from cloud-forests of southwestern Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Mats; Borchsenius, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Clusia nubium from southwestern Ecuador is described as a species new to science. It grows as a hemiepiphyte in lower montane cloud forest. The species belongs to Clusia sect. Retinostemon, a largely Andean group characterized by male flowers with a resin-secreting synandrium of completely fused...

  19. Chemical composition of fruits of a feijoa (F. sellowiana in the conditions of subtropics of russia

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    Oksana Belous

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The feijoa is culture quite widespread on the Black Sea coast of Russia. Difficulties are connected with absence in Russia of grades. All gardens have only the mix of grades, which is grown up from seeds. At institute are going of work on creation of productive varieties, with good quality parameters. Data on chemical and biochemical composition of fruits of high-yielding forms of a feijoa are provided in article. After carried-out selection work we selected a large number of perspective forms of a feijoa (more than 50. However not all of them was repeated by the results on productivity and were excluded from works on further studying. For today after rejection there were no more than two tens perspective forms.  They differ from each other on productivity, terms of maturing and quality of fruits. On efficiency the D-1 forms (Dagomys, 0-01 (Country and 10-22 are allocated - productivity of fruits (on the average in 7 years made respectively 33.3, 20.1 and 12.4 kg from a bush. The plants are sorted out according to the productivity, ripening terms and fruit quality. It is defined that early ripe grades are characterized by higher activity of oxidizing enzymes (263.1 mL.O2.g-1. In a zone of damp subtropics the grades containing increased quantity of carotinoids are steadier (0.31 mg.g-1. The contents in fruits of a feijoa of such substances, as vitamin P, Р-active and pectin substances, ascorbic acid, macro and microelements are revealed. Fruits of a feijoa are differed the increased accumulation of sugars, at some forms the content of sucrose prevails over amount of monosaccharide. High accumulation of vitamin C (41.89 - 78.68 mg.dL-1 is noted. But we don't confirm the high content of iodine in fruits. Fruits of a feijoa can be considered as potential raw materials for production of canned products with a functional purpose.

  20. Germinación in vitro de polen de feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavel Hernández

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente no existen estudios de viabilidad y caracterización del grano de polen de Feijoa, ante lo cual la cantidad y calidad del polen producidos por una flor, son aspectos importantes en estudios evolutivos y de adaptación de genotipos. Así, se determinó la solución germinativa adecuada para realizar pruebas de germinación in vitro, mediante pruebas de las siguientes soluciones:agua, agar, agua + sacarosa 5%, agua + sacarosa 10%, agar +sacarosa 5% ý agar + sacarosa 10%, ante lo cual, en la solución germinativa compuesta por agar y sacarosa al 5% se registró el mayor porcentaje de germinación de granos de polen en el tiempo. Se efectuó la prueba de fertilidad del polen para los dos clones por medio del método de tinción con azul de lactofenol en tres estados de apertura floral E1 (pétalos visibles, E2 (sépalos desplegados y E3 (pétalos maduros, presentando 100% de tinción del total de granos observados por estado de apertura floral. Se realizaron pruebas de germinación para los dos clones en los tres estados de apertura floral y se observó germinación en el clon 8-4 a las 10 horas después de la siembra para el estado E3, alcanzando un alto porcentaje de germinación (80%, mientras que los otros dos estados no germinaron en el tiempo de medición establecido. En el clon 41, la germinación inició a las 10 horas después de la siembra para el estado E2 ý a las 12 horas para el E3, mientras que el E1 no germinó. Los estados E2 y E3 alcanzaron 80% de germinación aproximada 16 horas después de siembra.

  1. Determinação da atividade antifúngica de Acca sellowiana

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriella da Rosa Monte Machado

    2015-01-01

    Infecções fúngicas causadas por leveduras oportunistas de Candida não – albicans (CNA) têm aumentado drasticamente nas últimas décadas, podendo estar relacionadas com o elevado número de pacientes imunocomprometidos, mais susceptíveis a essas infecções. CNA possuem maior resistência aos antifúngicos tradicionais como o fluconazol (FLZ), fármaco de escolha para o tratamento de infecções por Candida spp. A resistência antifúngica conduz a falhas na terapia clínica podendo levar ao aumento das t...

  2. Larvas de insetos associadas a Clusia hilariana Schltdl. (Clusiaceae na Restinga de Jurubatiba, RJ, Brasil Insect larvae associated with Clusia hilariana Schltdl. (Clusiaceae in the Restinga de Jurubatiba, RJ, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Reis da Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusia hilariana é uma das espécies de plantas mais abundantes no Parque Nacional, desempenhando um papel importante na dinâmica sucessional desse ecossistema de restinga. Esse trabalho apresenta a composição e aspectos ecológicos das espécies de larvas de mariposas encontradas em C. hilariana. Em 40 plantas, mensalmente vistoriadas, foram obtidas quatorze espécies de lepidópteros. Chloropaschia granitalis foi a espécie de larva mais abundante alimentando-se nessa espécie de planta.Clusia hilariana is one of the most abundant plant species in the National Park playing important role at the sucessional dynamic of the restinga ecosystem. This paper presents the composition and ecological aspects of caterpillars species found on C. hilariana. From 40 plants monthy inspected, fourteen species of Lepidoptera were obtained. Chloropaschia granitalis (Pyralidae was the most abundant species feeding on this plant species.

  3. Morphologically uniform bats Hipposideros aff. ruber (Hipposideridae) exhibit high mitochondrial genetic diversity in southeastern Senegal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vallo, Peter; Benda, P.; Martínková, Natália; Kaňuch, Peter; Kalko, E. K. V.; Červený, Jaroslav; Koubek, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2011), s. 79-88 ISSN 1508-1109 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6093404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : cytochrome b * Hipposideros caffer complex * cryptic species * phylogeny Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.116, year: 2011

  4. Skandalisierung korpuslinguistisch. Ein empirisch-linguistischer Blick auf die Berichterstattung zur "Wulff-Affäre"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bubenhofer, Noah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract What kind of language is typical of the mass media coverage of a scandal? Which linguistic means have the effect of scandalizing a public person like a politician? The study presented in this paper uses corpus linguistic methods to investigate a specific scandal in recent German politics: Federal President Christian Wulff was accused by the media of not having informed transparently about a private loan he had taken out. Further allegations of corruption presented by the media resulted in his resignation after only two months. The paper shows how automatic language pattern analyses of a corpus of articles about Wulff in two leading German newspapers reveal the typical patterns used in a discourse of scandalization. Additionally, also characteristic grammar features like tempus forms are incorporated in the analysis. The texts scandalizing a person use more patterned language than other news texts on politics. The patterns reflect the characteristic speech acts of scandalizing like accusing, informing, or speculating on the political future of the scandalized person, but also speech acts like defending and regretting. The use of tempus shows that scandalizing texts are more dynamic and vivid compared to other political coverage.

  5. Factors that aff ect the learning process of a foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Vula

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Learning as a complicated process and very significant one is followed by different influencers that cause different problems due to students’ performance in learning a foreign language. In order to work and try to eliminate such factors we have to detect which are the factors that we as teachers, professors, assistants, have to carry on during the process of teaching. This theoretical research paper will provide scientific data due to different factors that affect learning process of foreign language that were conducted in different places among the world. The researches that are selected are coherently linked with the aim of this scientific c paper and have ensured results from cases studies, quantitative research, and empirical research.

  6. Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA to Assess Genetic Diversity and Structure of Natural Calophyllum brasiliense (Clusiaceae Populations in Riparian Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evânia Galvão Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the genetic variability in two natural populations of Calophyllum brasiliense located along two different rivers in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using RAPD molecular markers. Eighty-two polymorphic fragments were amplified using 27 primers. The values obtained for Shannon index (I were 0.513 and 0.530 for the populations located on the margins of the Rio Grande and Rio das Mortes, respectively, demonstrating the high genetic diversity in the studied populations. Nei’s genetic diversity (He was 0.341 for the Rio Grande population and 0.357 for the Rio das Mortes population. These results were not significantly different between populations and suggest a large proportion of heterozygote individuals within both populations. AMOVA showed that 70.42% of the genetic variability is found within populations and 29.58% is found among populations (ФST=0.2958. The analysis of kinship coefficients detected the existence of family structures in both populations. Average kinship coefficients between neighboring individuals were 0.053 (P<0.001 in Rio das Mortes and 0.040 (P<0.001 in Rio Grande. This could be due to restricted pollen and seed dispersal and the history of anthropogenic disturbance in the area. These factors are likely to contribute to the relatedness observed among these genotypes.

  7. Early detection of injuries in leaves of Clusia hilariana Schltdl. (Clusiaceae caused by particulate deposition of iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ismael Rocha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the prognostic value of microscopic parameters of asymptomatic leaves of Clusia hilariana Schltdl. subjected to particulate deposition of iron (2.14 mg cm-2 day-1 for 45 consecutive days. Samples of young and expanded leaves without symptoms were collected and subjected to light and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The height of the epidermal cells on both surfaces of the leaf and the thickness of the hypodermis, the chlorophyll parenchyma, and the leaf blade were measured. Micromorphological injury occurred in the abaxial surface of young leaves and on both surfaces of expanded leaves. Erosion of the epicuticular wax and cuticle rupture were frequent on the adaxial surface, while on the abaxial surface of both leaves there was a loss of sinuosity on the anticlinal wall of the epidermal cells, stomatal deformity and obstruction. Micromorphometric alterations were seen in all leaf tissues except in the height of epidermic cells, probably due to the thick cuticle and prominent cuticular flanges. The highest difference in thickness of the leaf blade was seen in young leaves of plants subjected to SPMFe, indicating greater sensibility to particulate iron in comparison to the expanded leaves. The micromorphological and micromorphometric alterations in the leaf blade of Clusia hilariana Schltdl. showed the prognostic potential of these tools on the evaluation of impacts caused by the deposition of particulate matter, especially in the 'Restinga' natural vegetation, where the exposure is increasing due to the presence of iron ore industry in their surroundings.

  8. Acción vaso-periférica del extracto acuoso de las hojas de Clusia coclensis (Clusiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildred García-González

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Se inyectó extracto acuoso de hojas de Clusia coclensis en dosis de 40 mg/kg por vía endovenosa en el tren posterior aislado de 6 ratas normotensas (SDN y 6 ratas hipertensas (SHR. El extracto provocó en ambas cepas de ratas una reducción significativa del retorno venoso. Se concluye que el extracto de Clusia provoca un efecto vasoconstrictor periférico, por lo que el efecto hipotensor y anti-hipertensivo encontrado anteriormente, podría ser atribuido a un efecto directo sobre el miocardio, mediante una disminución en la fuerza de la contracción cardíaca (efecto inotrópico negativo.Aqueous leaf extract of Clusia coclensis was applied at a dose of 40 mg/kg intravenously to isolated posterior extremities of six normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats and six Spontaneously Hipertensive rats anaesthetized with sodium nembutal. The perfusion was done in the abdominal artery using as carrier Krebs bicarbonate ringer at 37 °C and keeping constant perfusion pressures of 100 mmHg in normotensive rats and 150 mmHg in hipertensive ratas. The venous return was measured in the inferior vena cava. The extract induced a significant reduction of the venous return begining 2 min after application, in both rat types. This may reflect a peripheral vasoconstriction that, in whole organism,would have an hipertensive effect. Therefore, the mechanism of the alledgedly systemic hipotensive effect of the aqueous extract of Clusia coclensis leafs resides probably at a central level, probably acting by a reduction of the contractibility of the myocardium.

  9. A highly diverse trilobite fauna with Avalonian affinities from the Middle Cambrian Acidusus atavus Zone (Drumian Stage) of Bornholm, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidner, Thomas; Nielsen, Arne Thorshøj

    2014-01-01

    ? applanata, Acadagnostus aff. bulkurensis and Phalagnostus ovalis. A few faunal elements originally described from Bohemia and Australia are also present, viz. Hydrocephalus aff. carens, Phalagnostus nudus, Skryjagnostus pompeckji, Hypagnostus aff. clipeus, Euagnostus aff. interstrictus and Euagnostus? aff...

  10. ANATOMICAL ASPECTS OF DEVELOPMENT OF PINEAPPLE GUAVA FRUIT [ACCA SELLOWIANA (O.BERG BURRET] ASPECTOS ANATÓMICOS DEL DESARROLLO DEL FRUTO DE FEIJOA [ACCA SELLOWIANA (O.BERG BURRET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Rodríguez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An anatomical study of feijoa fruits was carried out with the purpose to describe the anatomical changes in the fruit starting from floral bud until the physiological maturity. In order to realize the description, fruit samples of different sizes from clones 41 (Quimba and 8-4 were taken and histological techniques were applied. The samples were fixed in FAA, after which it was made the inclusion process, it has stages of dehydration, infiltration and inclusion, finally, was made the cut and assembly of the samples with fast- green and safranin. The observations showed that cells of the exocarp and endocarp presented cellular multiplication until advanced stages of development. The mesocarp had an important increment in volume, mainly due to the cellular multiplication at the first and second stages of development and cellular expansion at the last stage of development. One important conclusion was that feijoa fruit is stable anatomically because the tissues observed in the floral bud maintain its identity until when the fruit reaches the physiologic maturity. From the anatomical point of view, the final size of the fruit depends on the continuous cellular multiplications that suffer these tissues and to the cellular expansion in the stage of fruit filling. By microscopic observations it was concluded that the exocarp of the fruit is composed of the outer epidermis and hypodermis, the mesocarp is composed of many layers of parenchyma, the endocarp is formed by the inner epidermis and three or four layers of subepidermal cells in both clones .Se realizó un estudio anatómico de los frutos de feijoa con el propósito de describir los cambios anatómicos desde capullo floral hasta la madurez fisiológica. Para realizar la descripción, se tomaron muestras de los frutos de diferentes tamaños de los clones 41 (Quimba y 8-4 las cuales se trataron con técnicas histológicas. Las muestras se fijaron en FAA, después de lo cual se realizó el proceso de inclusión que tiene las etapas de deshidratación, infiltración e inclusión, finalmente, se realizó el corte y montaje con safranina fast-green. Las observaciones mostraron que las células del exocarpio y el endocarpio presentaron multiplicación celular hasta avanzadas etapas del desarrollo. El mesocarpio tuvo un incremento importante en el volumen, debido principalmente a la multiplicación celular en la primera y segunda etapa del desarrollo y, a la expansión celular en la última etapa del desarrollo. Se concluyó que el fruto de feijoa es estable anatómicamente porque los tejidos observados en el capullo floral mantienen su identidad hasta cuando el fruto alcanza la madurez fisiológica. Desde el punto de vista anatómico, el tamaño final del fruto depende de las continuas divisiones celulares que sufren estos tejidos y a la expansión celular en la etapa de llenado del fruto. Con las observaciones microscópicas se concluyó que el exocarpio del fruto está conformado por la epidermis externa y la hipodermis; el mesocarpio está constituido por numerosas capas de parénquima; el endocarpio está constituido por la epidermis interna y tres o cuatro capas de células subepidérmicas en ambos clones.

  11. Nephroprotective effects of Feijoa Sellowiana leaves extract on renal injury induced by acute dose of ecstasy (MDMA in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Karami

    2014-01-01

    : Both extracts at 40 mg/kg resulted in a significant reversal in the raised serum creatinine levels (P 0.05. A decrease in urea/ creatinine ratio was observed following aqueous extract treatment. Methanolic extract showed higher activity in increasing kidney glutathione (P

  12. Isolation and characterization of 11 novel microsatellite loci in a West African leaf-nosed bat, Hipposideros aff. ruber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldwin, H. J.; Vallo, Peter; Gardner, M. G.; Drosten, C.; Tschapka, M.; Stow, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 607 (2014), s. 607 ISSN 1756-0500 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Bat * Hipposideridae * Hipposideros caffer * Hipposideros ruber * Microchiroptera * Microsatellites * Population genetics Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  13. Home range of Noack's round-leaf bat (Hipposideros aff. ruber) in an agricultural landscape of central Ghana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nkrumah, E. E.; Vallo, Peter; Klose, S. M.; Ripperger, S.; Badu, E. K.; Drosten, C.; Kalko, E. K. V.; Tschapka, M.; Oppong, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), s. 239-247 ISSN 1508-1109 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : core area * foraging area * local convex hull * maximum foraging distance * radio-tracking Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.040, year: 2016

  14. Foraging behavior and habitat selection of Noack’s round-leaf bat (Hipposideros aff. ruber) and conservation implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nkrumah, E. E.; Vallo, Peter; Klose, S. M.; Ripperger, S.; Badu, E. K.; Gloza-Rausch, F.; Drosten, C.; Kalko, E. K. V.; Tschapka, M.; Oppong, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 1-11 ISSN 1940-0829 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : agro-environment * cocoa farms * fallow lands * seminatural habitats * sub-Saharan Africa Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.238, year: 2016

  15. Fungos conidiais associados ao folhedo de Clusia melchiorii Gleason e C. nemorosa G. Mey. (Clusiaceae em fragmento de Mata Atlântica, BA, Brasil Conidial fungi associated to leaf litter of Clusia melchiorii Gleason and C. nemorosa G. Mey (Clusiaceae in a fragment of Atlantic rainforest, Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Rodrigues Barbosa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Visando ampliar o conhecimento sobre diversidade de fungos conidiais, 10 folhas mortas de três indivíduos de C. melchiorii e de C. nemorosa foram coletadas bimestralmente na Serra da Jibóia, Bahia, no período de outubro/2005 a junho/2006. As folhas foram lavadas em água corrente e mantidas em câmara-úmida durante 30 dias. As estruturas fúngicas foram retiradas para estudo morfológico. Foram identificados 79 táxons de Ascomycota na forma anamórfica. Destes, 78 são hifomicetos e um celomiceto. Do total, 87% ocorreram sobre C. melchiorii e 55% sobre C. nemorosa. A maioria dos fungos apresentou freqüência esporádica e constância acidental. As espécies mais freqüentes foram: Beltrania rhombica Penz., Chaetopsina fulva Rambelli, Dactylaria ficusicola Paulus, Gadek & Hyde, Verticillium theobromae (Turconi Mason & Hughes e Volutella sp. 1 (sobre C. melchiorii e Atroseptaphiale flagelliformis Matsush., Pseudobeltrania sp., Zygosporium gibbum (Sacc., Rousseau & Bommer Hughes, Verticillium theobromae (Turconi Mason & Hughes e Volutella sp. 1 (sobre C. nemorosa. A similaridade de fungos entre as duas espécies de Clusia atingiu 60% e 11 táxons foram constantes nos dois hospedeiros: Atrosetaphiale flagelliformis, Beltraniella portoricensis (Stevens Piroz. & Patil, Chalara alabamensis Jones & Ingram., Cryptophiale kakombensis Piroz., Parasympodiella laxa (Subram. & Vittal, Speiropsis scopiformis Kuthub. & Nawawi, Thozetella cristata Piroz. & Hodges, Umbellidion radulans Sutton & Hodges, Verticillium theobromae, Volutella sp. 2 e Zygosporium gibbum. Os dados mostram que o folhedo produzido por C. melchiorii e C. nemorosa, na Serra da Jibóia, é rico em fungos conidiais. Esses fungos, como decompositores, são importantes para a dinâmica do ecossistema estudado.In order to increase the diversity knowledge of conidial fungi, 10 dead leaves from three individuals of C. nemorosa and C. melchiorii were bimonthly collected at the "Serra da Jibóia", State of Bahia, from October/2005 to June/2006. The leaves were washed with tap water and maintained in moist chamber during 30 days. The fungal structures were collected for morphological studies. Seventy nine taxa of Ascomycota, in the anamorphic state were registered: 78 hyphomycete and one Coelomycete. Most of the species occurred on Clusia melchiorii (87% and 55% on C. nemorosa. The majority of the fungi presented sporadical frequency and accidental constancy. The most frequent species were: Beltrania rhombica Penz., Chaetopsina fulva Rambelli, Dactylaria ficusicola Paulus, Gadek & Hyde, Verticillium theobromae (Turconi Mason & Hughes e Volutella sp. 1 (on C. melchiorii and Atroseptaphiale flagelliformis Matsush., Pseudobeltrania sp., Zygosporium gibbum (Sacc., Rousseau & Bommer Hughes, Verticillium theobromae (Turconi Mason & Hughes and Volutella sp. 1 (on C. nemorosa. The similarity of fungi between the two species of Clusia reached 60% and 11 taxa were constant in both hosts: Atrosetaphiale flagelliformis, Beltraniella portoricensis (Stevens Piroz. & Patil, Chalara alabamensisJones & Ingram., Cryptophiale kakombensis Piroz., Parasympodiella laxa (Subram. & Vittal, Speiropsis scopiformis Kuthub. & Nawawi, Thozetella cristata Piroz. & Hodges, Umbellidion radulans Sutton & Hodges, Verticillium theobromae, Volutella sp. 2 and Zygosporium gibbum. The data show that the litter produced by C. melchiorii and C. nemorosa, at the Serra da Jibóia, is rich in conidial fungi. These fungi, as decomposers, are important for the dinamic of the studied ecosystem.

  16. El cuajamiento de frutos de feijoa (Acca sellowiana [O. Berg] Burret en respuesta a nitrato de potasio, fosfato de potasio y ethephon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Oskar Javier

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available

    En la finca El Cortijo, municipio La Vega (Cundinamarca, ubicada a 2.350 msnm de altitud, con temperatura de 17 °C, humedad relativa de 85%, precipitación de 1.423 mm·año-1, se estudió el efecto de tres productos químicos en árboles de feijoa, Clon 41 ('Quimba', de 6 años de edad, sobre el cuajamiento de los frutos. Los productos fueron los fertilizantes foliares KNO3 (nitrato de potasio 13-0-46® al 1,0%, 1,5% y 2,0% y KH2PO4 (fosfato de potasio; Cosmofoliar al 0-32-43®; 0,5%, 0,75% y 1,0% y la fitohormona ethephon (Ethrel® 48SL, a 100, 150 y 200 mg·L-1, aplicados 4 veces, cada 15 días, a partir de 50 días después de la poda. Se evaluaron el número de flores formadas, el número y el porcentaje de frutos cuajados y el nivel de eficacia de los productos aplicados. El KH2PO4 al 0,5% presentó los valores significativamente más altos (P≤0,05 en las cuatro variables evaluadas y obtuvo, en su diferencia frente al testigo (0 aplicaciones, aumentos de 447,6% en el número de las flores formadas y de 465,4% en el número de frutos cuajados, destacando la importancia del P en el proceso reproductivo de la feijoa. El segundo mejor tratamiento, con una eficacia positiva (96,55% en el cuajamiento de frutos, fue el ethephon a 100 mg·L-1. El número de frutos cuajados en las diferentes concentraciones de KNO3 no pudo superar el del testigo, presentándose una eficacia negativa y así mismo, fitotoxicidad cuando se emplearon concentraciones al 2%. El porcentaje de cuajamiento en feijoa (66% del testigo fue relativamente alto comparado con el de otros frutales.

  17. Model of pre-harvest quality of pineapple guava fruits (Acca sellowiana (O. berg burret as a function of weather conditions of the crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Parra-Coronado

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Weather conditions influence the quality parameters of pineapple guava fruit during growth and development. The aim of this study was to propose a model of pre-harvest fruit quality as a function of weather conditions in the cultivation area. Twenty trees were flagged per farm in 2 localities of the Department of Cundinamarca, Colombia: Tenjo (2,580 m.a.s.l.; 12.5 °C; relative humidity between 74 and 86%; mean annual precipitation 765 mm and San Francisco de Sales (1,800 m.a.s.l.; 20.6 °C; relative humidity between 63 and 97%; mean annual precipitation 1,493 mm. Measurements were performed every 7 days during 2 harvest periods starting on days 96 (Tenjo and 99 (San Francisco de Sales after anthesis and until harvest. The models were obtained using Excel® Solver, and a set of data was obtained for the 2 different cultivar periods and each study site. The results showed that altitude, growing degree days, and accumulated precipitation are the weather variables with the highest influence on the physicochemical characteristics of the fruit during growth. The models of fresh weight, total titratable acidity, and skin firmness better predict the development of fruit quality during growth and development. Equations were obtained for increases of length and diameter as a function of fruit weight and for days from anthesis as a function of growing degree days and altitude. The regression analysis parameters showed that the models adequately predicted the fruit characteristics during growth for both localities, and a cross-validation analysis showed a good statistical fit between the estimated and observed values.

  18. Fungos associados às sementes de Acca sellowiana: efeitos na qualidade fisiológica das sementes e transmissão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Spolaor Fantinel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se analisar o efeito de fungos na qualidade fisiológica de sementes de goiaba-serrana, e determinar os possíveis prejuízos no desenvolvimento inicial de mudas dessa espécie. Para análise fisiológica das sementes, foi realizado teste de germinação, a 25 ºC e fotoperíodo de 12 h, por 30 dias; sendo avaliadas a porcentagem e a velocidade de germinação. Inicialmente, as sementes foram subdivididas, sendo uma parte submetida à assepsia superficial com álcool 70%, hipoclorito de sódio 1% com posterior lavagem em água destilada e outra não. Para a avaliação das plântulas foi realizado teste de emergência de plântulas em viveiro, por 60 dias. Foram avaliadas a porcentagem de emergência, a massa verde e a massa seca de plântulas, e identificados os fungos. Os fungos interferiram na porcentagem de plântulas normais. Aspergillus sp., Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium sp., Penicillium sp. e Phomopsis sp. associam-se com sementes não germinadas de goiaba-serrana, sendo prejudiciais à sua qualidade fisiológica. C. gloeosporioides e Fusarium sp. são transmitidos de sementes para plântulas, causando lesões necróticas nos cotilédones e má formação de raízes respectivamente.

  19. Fisiología poscosecha en frutos de dos cultivares de feijoa (Acca sellowiana O. Berg Burret sometidos a un tratamiento cuarentenario de frío

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valderrama J. Katerine

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Se evaluó el tratamiento cuarentenario T-107-b (1,67 ºC por 22 d sobre la calidad y vida poscosecha de dos cultivares de feijoa. Se utilizaron los cultivares ‘Cenaf 41’ y ‘Cenaf 8-4’. Los frutos sometidos al tratamiento se compararon con frutos almacenados a 19,0 ºC, simulando transporte y comercialización. Durante el tratamiento se registró la temperatura interna de frutos. Se evaluó el comportamiento fisiológico y químico antes y después del tratamiento. La tasa respiratoria mostró la tendencia de un fruto climatérico. El contenido de sólidos solubles y el pH aumentaron y la acidez titulable disminuyó a través del tiempo. Los frutos con y sin el tratamiento tuvieron un comportamiento poscosecha muy similar en el proceso de comercialización y vida de anaquel.

  20. Bioactivity-Guided Metabolite Profiling of Feijoa ( Acca sellowiana) Cultivars Identifies 4-Cyclopentene-1,3-dione as a Potent Antifungal Inhibitor of Chitin Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Mona; Jackson, Michael D; Brown, Alistair S; Ackerley, David F; Ritson, Nigel J; Keyzers, Robert A; Munkacsi, Andrew B

    2018-06-06

    Pathogenic fungi continue to develop resistance against current antifungal drugs. To explore the potential of agricultural waste products as a source of novel antifungal compounds, we obtained an unbiased GC-MS profile of 151 compounds from 16 commercial and experimental cultivars of feijoa peels. Multivariate analysis correlated 93% of the compound profiles with antifungal bioactivities. Of the 18 compounds that significantly correlated with antifungal activity, 5 had not previously been described from feijoa. Two novel cultivars were the most bioactive, and the compound 4-cyclopentene-1,3-dione, detected in these cultivars, was potently antifungal (IC 50 = 1-2 μM) against human-pathogenic Candida species. Haploinsufficiency and fluorescence microscopy analyses determined that the synthesis of chitin, a fungal-cell-wall polysaccharide, was the target of 4-cyclopentene-1,3-dione. This fungal-specific mechanism was consistent with a 22-70-fold reduction in antibacterial activity. Overall, we identified the agricultural waste product of specific cultivars of feijoa peels as a source of potential high-value antifungal compounds.

  1. Environ: E00410 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00410 Homalomena rhizome Homalonemae rhizoma Crude drug ... Homalomena aff. Sagittaefolia, Homalomena... [TAX:174172] ... Araceae (arum family) Homalomena aff. sagittaefolia or assortative plants rhizome (dried) ...

  2. Arboreal ant colonies as 'hot-points' of cryptic diversity for myrmecophiles: the weaver ant Camponotus sp. aff. textor and its interaction network with its associates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Pérez-Lachaud

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Systematic surveys of macrofaunal diversity within ant colonies are lacking, particularly for ants nesting in microhabitats that are difficult to sample. Species associated with ants are generally small and rarely collected organisms, which makes them more likely to be unnoticed. We assumed that this tendency is greater for arthropod communities in microhabitats with low accessibility, such as those found in the nests of arboreal ants that may constitute a source of cryptic biodiversity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the invertebrate diversity associated with an undescribed, but already threatened, Neotropical Camponotus weaver ant. As most of the common sampling methods used in studies of ant diversity are not suited for evaluating myrmecophile diversity within ant nests, we evaluated the macrofauna within ant nests through exhaustive colony sampling of three nests and examination of more than 80,000 individuals. RESULTS: We identified invertebrates from three classes belonging to 18 taxa, some of which were new to science, and recorded the first instance of the co-occurrence of two brood parasitoid wasp families attacking the same ant host colony. This diversity of ant associates corresponded to a highly complex interaction network. Agonistic interactions prevailed, but the prevalence of myrmecophiles was remarkably low. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis of the evolution of low virulence in a variety of symbionts associated with large insect societies. Because most myrmecophiles found in this work are rare, strictly specific, and exhibit highly specialized biology, the risk of extinction for these hitherto unknown invertebrates and their natural enemies is high. The cryptic, far unappreciated diversity within arboreal ant nests in areas at high risk of habitat loss qualifies these nests as 'hot-points' of biodiversity that urgently require special attention as a component of conservation and management programs.

  3. Arboreal ant colonies as 'hot-points' of cryptic diversity for myrmecophiles: the weaver ant Camponotus sp. aff. textor and its interaction network with its associates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lachaud, Gabriela; Lachaud, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Systematic surveys of macrofaunal diversity within ant colonies are lacking, particularly for ants nesting in microhabitats that are difficult to sample. Species associated with ants are generally small and rarely collected organisms, which makes them more likely to be unnoticed. We assumed that this tendency is greater for arthropod communities in microhabitats with low accessibility, such as those found in the nests of arboreal ants that may constitute a source of cryptic biodiversity. We investigated the invertebrate diversity associated with an undescribed, but already threatened, Neotropical Camponotus weaver ant. As most of the common sampling methods used in studies of ant diversity are not suited for evaluating myrmecophile diversity within ant nests, we evaluated the macrofauna within ant nests through exhaustive colony sampling of three nests and examination of more than 80,000 individuals. We identified invertebrates from three classes belonging to 18 taxa, some of which were new to science, and recorded the first instance of the co-occurrence of two brood parasitoid wasp families attacking the same ant host colony. This diversity of ant associates corresponded to a highly complex interaction network. Agonistic interactions prevailed, but the prevalence of myrmecophiles was remarkably low. Our data support the hypothesis of the evolution of low virulence in a variety of symbionts associated with large insect societies. Because most myrmecophiles found in this work are rare, strictly specific, and exhibit highly specialized biology, the risk of extinction for these hitherto unknown invertebrates and their natural enemies is high. The cryptic, far unappreciated diversity within arboreal ant nests in areas at high risk of habitat loss qualifies these nests as 'hot-points' of biodiversity that urgently require special attention as a component of conservation and management programs.

  4. Arboreal Ant Colonies as ‘Hot-Points’ of Cryptic Diversity for Myrmecophiles: The Weaver Ant Camponotus sp. aff. textor and Its Interaction Network with Its Associates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lachaud, Gabriela; Lachaud, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Systematic surveys of macrofaunal diversity within ant colonies are lacking, particularly for ants nesting in microhabitats that are difficult to sample. Species associated with ants are generally small and rarely collected organisms, which makes them more likely to be unnoticed. We assumed that this tendency is greater for arthropod communities in microhabitats with low accessibility, such as those found in the nests of arboreal ants that may constitute a source of cryptic biodiversity. Materials and Methods We investigated the invertebrate diversity associated with an undescribed, but already threatened, Neotropical Camponotus weaver ant. As most of the common sampling methods used in studies of ant diversity are not suited for evaluating myrmecophile diversity within ant nests, we evaluated the macrofauna within ant nests through exhaustive colony sampling of three nests and examination of more than 80,000 individuals. Results We identified invertebrates from three classes belonging to 18 taxa, some of which were new to science, and recorded the first instance of the co-occurrence of two brood parasitoid wasp families attacking the same ant host colony. This diversity of ant associates corresponded to a highly complex interaction network. Agonistic interactions prevailed, but the prevalence of myrmecophiles was remarkably low. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis of the evolution of low virulence in a variety of symbionts associated with large insect societies. Because most myrmecophiles found in this work are rare, strictly specific, and exhibit highly specialized biology, the risk of extinction for these hitherto unknown invertebrates and their natural enemies is high. The cryptic, far unappreciated diversity within arboreal ant nests in areas at high risk of habitat loss qualifies these nests as ‘hot-points’ of biodiversity that urgently require special attention as a component of conservation and management programs. PMID:24941047

  5. Dialoge in Online-Leserforen – Struktur und Gegenstand : Untersuchungen zur Markenidentifikation am Beispiel der „Locationgate“-Affäre

    OpenAIRE

    Rosumek, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Mit der Entwicklung des Social Web, also einem Internet, in dem sich immer mehr Nutzer untereinander auf Kommunikationsplattformen wie Facebook, in Foren und Bewertungsplattformen und auf Microblogging-Diensten wie Twitter austauschen, überschlagen sich Kommunikationsspezialisten mit Ratschlägen für Unternehmen, wie sie die Kommunikation im Internet insbesondere in kritischen Situationen zu gestalten hätten, und diverse Dienstleister bieten die Beobachtung (Monitoring) der Kommunikation über ...

  6. Luxemburg locuta, causa finita? – Eine Nachbetrachtung der juristischen Behandlung der sogenannten PIP-Affäre in Deutschland / Gert Brüggemeier

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Brüggemeier, Gert

    2018-01-01

    Prantsusmaa toodetud defektsete rinnaimplantaatidega seotud Euroopa Kohtu otsusest (C-2019/15) ja selle otsuse mõjust Saksamaal rinnaimplantaatidega seotud kohtuasjale (22.06.2017) kahjude hüvitamise nõudes ning tehtud otsuse kriitika

  7. Simultaneous determinations of U-Pb age and REE abundances for zircons using AfF excimer laser ablation-ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Takafumi

    2004-01-01

    Using a laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICPMS), U-Pb age and rare earth element (REE) abundances have been determined simultaneously from a single 20 μm ablation pit of zircon. The laser ablation system utilizing 193 nm wave-length ArF excimer laser produces stable and reproducible signal intensities resulted in good precisions on measurements of element concentrations and isotopic ratios. Because of the higher energy density of the deep ultra-violet laser beam, ablation fractionation between Pb and U were reduced even with the prolonged ablation, and thus accuracy of Pb-U age was improved significantly. A chicane-type ion lens system was applied to a quadrupole-based ICPMS instrument. With the chicane ion lens, higher elemental sensitivity (4 times or light mass range and 3 times for mid to heavy mass range) and lower white background ( 238 U- 206 Pb ages for Nancy standard zircon (Nancy 91500), SHRIMP calibration standard zircon (SL13) and Antarctic zircon (PMA7) obtained in this study were 1064 ± 24 Ma, 569 ± 78 Ma and 2438 ± 101 Ma (2-sigma), respectively. Relative age differences from previous reports were 0.2%, 0.4% and 3.2% respectively, demonstrative of high reliability of the method. The REE abundances in zircon samples were calibrated using a NIST 610 glass standard reference material. The resulting REE abundance data for zircons (Nancy 91500 and SL13) show good agreement with those for literature values within the analytical precision of ∼20%. The matrix effect that may occur between the synthetic glass standard and zircon crystals is obviously smaller than the precision and thus negligible for this precision levels. The data presented here demonstrate clearly that the combination of ArF excimer laser an ICPMS equipped with the chicane ion lens has a potential to become a significant tool for zircon geochemistry. (author)

  8. Efecto del nitrato de potasio, fosfato de potasio y ethephon en la inducción floral de la feijoa o goiabeira serrana (Acca sellowiana [O. Berg] Burret Effect of potassium nitrate, potassium phosphate and ethephon in floral induction of pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana [O. Berg] Burret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Javier Garcia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available El ensayo se llevó a cabo en la finca El Cortijo (La Vega, Cundinamarca, Colombia [04°55'N y 74°18'W], 2350 m altitud, 17°C temperatura media, 1423 mm precipitación anual, 85% humedad relativa, 1377 horas brillo solar/año. Se utilizaron árboles de feijoa o goiabeira serrana de seis años, Clon 41 ('Quimba', evaluando fertilizantes foliares KNO3 (Nitrato de Potasio 13-0-46® 1%, 1,5% y 2% y KH2PO4 (fosfato de potasio; Cosmofoliar 0-32-43®; 0,5%, 0,75% y 1,0% y la fitohormona ethephon (Ethrel® 48 SL; 100, 150 y 200 mg L-1. Se determinaron el número de botones florales inducidos, flores formadas, además, el porcentaje de flores formadas y nivel de eficacia de los productos inductores. El KH2PO4 al 0,5% obtuvo resultados favorables en cada una de las variables evaluadas, comparado con el 0,75% y 1% del mismo producto y, sin embargo hubo un alto número de flores inducidas y formadas, no se presentaron diferencias significativas con el testigo. Ethephon a 150 mg L-1 en la inducción de botones florales y a 100 mg L-1 en la de formación de flores mostró resultados favorables, pero tampoco pudo superar el testigo por falta de significancia. La respuesta generada por KNO3 mostró una baja inducción de botones florales, y una eficacia negativa en la proporción de flores formadas; asimismo fitotoxicidad, cuando se emplearon concentraciones al 2% de este producto.The experiment was carried out in El Cortijo farm (La Vega, Cundinamarca, Colombia [ 04° 55' N and 74° 18' W ], 2350 m above sea level, 17° C average temperature, 1423 mm of annual precipitation, 85% of relative humidity, and 1.377 of sunshine hours/year. In the study, evaluation of foliar fertilizers KNO3 (potassium nitrate 13-0-46® 1%, 1.5%, and 2%, KH2PO4 (potassium phosphate; Cosmofoliar 0-32-43®; 0.5%, 0.75%, and 1.0%, and ethephon phytohormone (Ethrel® 48 SL; 100, 150, and 200 mg L-1 was done on six year old pineapple guava trees of Clone 41 ('Quimba'. The number of induced floral buds and formed flowers were evaluated, as well as the percentage of formed flowers, and the efficacy levels of inducting products. Application of KH2PO4 at 0.5% produced favorable results in each of the proposed variables; compared to 0,75% and 1% of the same product and, however there were a high number of induced and formed flowers, no significant differences with the control were found. With ethephon at 150 mg L-1 in floral induction and at 100 mg L-1 in flower formation good responses was obtained, but no differences with the control. The plant response to KNO3 was a low induction of floral buds and a negative efficacy in the proportion of flowers formed, and also phytotoxicity when KNO3 concentration was 2%.

  9. Teste de tetrazólio para avaliação da qualidade fisiológica em sementes de Goiabeira-serrana (Acca sellowiana O. Berg Burret Tetrazolium test to evaluate physiological quality of Brazilian Guava seeds (Acca sellowiana O. Berg Burret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Benevenga Sarmento

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A goiabeira-serrana, espécie frutífera nativa do Sul do Brasil, vem mostrando- se promissora em termos ecológicos e comerciais. O trabalho objetivou avaliar a qualidade fisiológica de dois lotes de sementes de goiabeira-serrana por meio do teste de tetrazólio. O experimento foi dividido em duas etapas. Na primeira, os lotes foram submetidos aos testes de germinação, índice de velocidade de germinação, tempo médio de germinação, emergência em casa de vegetação, índice de velocidade de emergência de plântulas em casa de vegetação, tempo médio de emergência e comprimento de parte aérea. Na segunda, foi realizado o teste de tetrazólio nas concentrações de 0,5 e 1,0, e tempos de embebição (2 h e 4 h. O tratamento 0,5 TZ 4h obteve 73% de sementes viáveis (lote 2007. Para o lote 2008, não houve diferenças entre os tratamentos. O teste de germinação apresentou correlação positiva para os tratamentos 0,5 TZ 2 h e 1 TZ 2 h. Para a emergência de plântulas em casa de vegetação, houve correlação positiva para o tratamento 0,5 TZ 2 h. O teste de tetrazólio permitiu a classificação dos lotes em quatro níveis de viabilidade, confirmando a eficiência do teste na avaliação da viabilidade de sementes de goiabeira-serrana.Brazilian guava, native fruit tree from Southern Brazil, has become relevant due to its potencial use as ecological and comercial. This article aims evaluate the physiological quality of Brazilian guava seeds by tetrazolium test. The work was divided in two parts. In the first, both lots were submitted to the germination test, index of speed germination, mean time of germination, emergency of seedlings in greenhouse, mean time of emergency and shoot length of seedlings. In the second part it was performed the tetrazolium test. Two concentrations of tetrazolium were used (0,5 e 1,0 and two times of imbibition (2 h e 4 h. To the lot 2007, the treatment 0,5 TZ 4 h obtained 73% of viable seeds, otherwise, to the lot 2008, the was no significant differences among treatments. For the germination test there has been positive correlation for 0,5 TZ 2 h and 1 TZ 2 h treatments. Emergency of seedlings in greenhouse was correlated only to 0,5 TZ 2 h. The Tetrazolium Test has allowed to rank the lots in four classes of viability, confirming the eficiency of the test to evaluate the viability of Brazilian Guava seeds.

  10. Identifying Incomplete Atypical Femoral Fractures With Single-Energy Absorptiometry: Declining Prevalence

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenna, Malachi

    2017-03-01

    Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) are associated with long-term bisphosphonate (BP) therapy. Early identification of AFF prior to their completion provides an opportunity to intervene, potentially reducing morbidity associated with these fractures. Single-energy X-ray absorptiometry (SE) is an imaging method recently shown to detect incomplete AFF (iAFF) prior to fracture completion.

  11. Esker Ri Nursing Home, Kilnabinnia, Clara, Offaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenna, Malachi

    2017-03-01

    Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) are associated with long-term bisphosphonate (BP) therapy. Early identification of AFF prior to their completion provides an opportunity to intervene, potentially reducing morbidity associated with these fractures. Single-energy X-ray absorptiometry (SE) is an imaging method recently shown to detect incomplete AFF (iAFF) prior to fracture completion.

  12. Teste de tetrazólio para avaliação da qualidade fisiológica em sementes de Goiabeira-serrana (Acca sellowiana O. Berg Burret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Benevenga Sarmento

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A goiabeira-serrana, espécie frutífera nativa do Sul do Brasil, vem mostrando- se promissora em termos ecológicos e comerciais. O trabalho objetivou avaliar a qualidade fisiológica de dois lotes de sementes de goiabeira-serrana por meio do teste de tetrazólio. O experimento foi dividido em duas etapas. Na primeira, os lotes foram submetidos aos testes de germinação, índice de velocidade de germinação, tempo médio de germinação, emergência em casa de vegetação, índice de velocidade de emergência de plântulas em casa de vegetação, tempo médio de emergência e comprimento de parte aérea. Na segunda, foi realizado o teste de tetrazólio nas concentrações de 0,5 e 1,0, e tempos de embebição (2 h e 4 h. O tratamento 0,5 TZ 4h obteve 73% de sementes viáveis (lote 2007. Para o lote 2008, não houve diferenças entre os tratamentos. O teste de germinação apresentou correlação positiva para os tratamentos 0,5 TZ 2 h e 1 TZ 2 h. Para a emergência de plântulas em casa de vegetação, houve correlação positiva para o tratamento 0,5 TZ 2 h. O teste de tetrazólio permitiu a classificação dos lotes em quatro níveis de viabilidade, confirmando a eficiência do teste na avaliação da viabilidade de sementes de goiabeira-serrana.

  13. Avaliação fenotípica de características de frutos em duas famílias de meios-irmãos de goiabeira-serrana (Acca sellowiana Berg. de um pomar comercial em São Joaquim, SC Phenotypic evaluation of fruit traits of two half sib families of feijoa (Acca sellowiana Berg. from an orchard in São Joaquim, Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Degenhardt

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Frutos de um pomar comercial composto por progênies de duas plantas matrizes foram avaliados, com o objetivo de caracterizar a variabilidade fenotípica. As características peso de fruto, diâmetro e sólidos solúveis totais apresentaram diferenças estatísticas significativas entre as médias de famílias em pelo menos dois dos anos avaliados, enquanto para comprimento e rendimento de polpa a diferença não foi significativa. Houve diferença significativa entre médias de anos, dentro de cada família, para todas as características, com exceção das médias de peso de fruto entre 1998 e 1999 nas duas famílias e as médias de sólidos solúveis totais entre 1998 e 1999 em uma família e entre 1999 e 2000 na outra família. As correlações e regressões entre características produtivas mais relevantes foram obtidas entre peso de fruto e peso de casca, peso de fruto e comprimento, peso de fruto e diâmetro, peso de casca e comprimento, peso de casca e diâmetro e comprimento e diâmetro.Fruits of a commercial orchard originated by seedlings from two plants were evaluated, with the objective to characterize the phenotypic variation. Statistical differences were found among family means in at least two years for fruit diameter and solids soluble contents, but not for fruit length and pulp revenue. There were statistically significant differences in means among year means, within each family, for all the fruits traits, except for fruit weight between 1998 and 1999 in both families, and for soluble solids contents between 1998 and 1999 for family 1 and between 1999 and 2000 for the other family. The most important correlations and regressions among productive traits were obtained among fruit weight and peel weight, fruit weight and length, fruit weight and diameter, peel weight and length, peel weight and diameter and length and diameter.

  14. Affärsmöjligheter med Smarta Elnät : En studie som undersöker möjligheter och hinder i utvecklingen av det svenska elsystemet

    OpenAIRE

    Ewing, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Distributed, renewable generation-units and more efficient use of electric power,demands a developed electric grid. This grid is often referred to as the “Smart Grid”. This future electric system rise expectations among actors in the existing electricmarket. International organizations share visions of opportunities for electricityconsumers and new actors, ready to enter the market. At the same time, electricutility companies may question the need for some of these upcoming changes, as theyar...

  15. Nigeria’s Quest to Recover Looted Assets: The Abacha Affair Die Bemühungen Nigerias um Rückgabe geraubter Vermögenswerte: die Abacha-Affäre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David U. Enweremadu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After a successful transition to democratic rule in 1999, Nigeria launched a high-profile campaign aimed at securing the repatriation of looted public funds being held in foreign banks. This campaign was championed by President Olusegun Obasanjo, a long-standing critic of corrupt military regimes and co-founder of the global anti-corruption NGO Transparency International, throughout his eight-year tenure. By the time Obasanjo left office in May 2007, he had secured the recovery of approximately 2 billion USD in assets and triggered some vital international initiatives against money laundering. However, his efforts were hampered by a combination of local and external obstacles. Externally, the campaign was marked by the absence of sufficient international political will. While at the domestic level, it was undermined by a lack of transparency, the excessive fixation with the Abacha loot, inadequate legal and accounting skills, the uncooperative attitude of accused persons and limited domestic political will. This paper illustrates how these issues have combined to frustrate moves to recover Nigeria’s stolen billions sitting in the West.Nach dem erfolgreichen Übergang zur Demokratie im Jahr 1999 wurde in Nigeria eine hochkarätige Kampagne zur Repatriierung geraubten und bei ausländischen Banken angelegten öffentlichen Vermögens ins Leben gerufen. Präsident Olusegun Obasanjo selbst – langjähriger Kritiker korrupter Militärregime und Mitgründer von Transparency International – setzte sich während seiner achtjährigen Amtszeit dafür ein. Als Obasanjo im Mai 2007 sein Amt aufgab, war die Rückgabe von Anlagevermögen in Höhe von etwa 2 Milliarden USD gesichert und es waren einige wichtige internationale Initiativen gegen Geldwäsche auf den Weg gebracht worden. Doch der Erfolg seiner Bemühungen war durch ein Zusammenwirken interner und externer Hindernisse erheblich eingeschränkt: Im Ausland erfuhr seine Kampagne keine ausreichende politische Unterstützung. Und innerhalb Nigerias scheiterte sie an mangelnder Transparenz, der Konzentration auf das von Abacha geraubte Vermögen, ungenügenden juristischen und finanztechnischen Kenntnissen, mangelnder Kooperation beschuldigter Personen und unzureichendem politischem Willen. Der Autor dieses Beitrags zeigt auf, wie die Bemühungen um Rückgabe nigerianischen Vermögens in Milliardenhöhe, das bei westlichen Banken angelegt worden war, durch die Kombination all dieser Faktoren ins Leere liefen.

  16. "Stendum, feg och impotent är Turkiets president" : En kvalitativ innehållsanalys av den tyska mediedebatten om Jan Böhmermann-affären utifrån olika argument för yttrandefrihet.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Malin

    2017-01-01

    Den här uppsatsen undersöker argument för yttrandefrihet som framkommit i den så kallade Böhmermannaffären som inträffade våren 2016 i Tyskland, då den tyska satirikern Jan Böhmermann läste upp en niddikt om Turkiets president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. Erdoğan kände sig kränkt och anmälde Böhmermann enligt ett tyskt lagrum. Undersökningen syftar till att utröna vilka typargument för yttrandefrihet som framkommit i debatten om Böhmermannaffären från olika aktörer och utifrån vilket intresse dessa ...

  17. "en este aff ösel" in Visby : Ösel and Estland in the Gotlandic account books of Ivar Axelsson Tott 1585-87 and Sören Norby 1524-25 / Jan-Christian Schlüter

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Schlüter, Jan-Christian, 1979-

    2008-01-01

    Ojamaa ja Saaremaa kontaktidest on vähe teada perioodist Saksa ordu ja Rootsi kuningate valitsemisaja vahel. Ivar Axelsson Totti ja Sören Nörby arveraamatutes mainitud kohanimede seas on Eestiga seotud nimedel küllalt suur osakaal. Ka esineb kaptenite palgaarvetel Eestist pärit isikute nimesid

  18. Enhance performance of micro direct methanol fuel cell by in situ CO2 removal using novel anode flow field with superhydrophobic degassing channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junsheng; Luo, Ying; Zheng, Sheng; Wang, Dazhi

    2017-05-01

    Capillary blocking caused by CO2 bubbles in anode flow field (AFF) is one of the bottlenecks for performance improvement of a micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC). In this work, we present a novel AFF structure with nested layout of hydrophilic fuel channels and superhydrophobic degassing channels which can remove most of CO2 from AFF before it is released to the fuel channels. The new AFFs are fabricated on Ti substrates by using micro photochemical etching combined with anodization and fluorination treatments. Performance of the μDMFCs with and without superhydrophobic degassing channels in their AFF is comparatively studied. Results show that the superhydrophobic degassing channels can significantly speed up the exhaust of CO2 from the AFF. CO2 clogging is not observed in the new AFFs even when their comparison AFFs have been seriously blocked by CO2 slugs under the same operating conditions. 55% and 60% of total CO2 produced in μDMFCs with N-serpentine and N-spiral AFF can be respectively removed by the superhydrophobic degassing channels. The power densities of the μDMFCs equipped with new serpentine and spiral AFFs are respectively improved by 30% and 90% compared with those using conventional AFFs. This means that the new AFFs developed in this work can effectively prevent CO2-induced capillary blocking in the fuel channels, and finally significantly improve the performance of the μDMFCs.

  19. Decomposition and nutrient release in leaves of Atlantic Rainforest tree species used in agroforestry systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, E.M.G.; Cardoso, I.M.; Stijnen, T.; Mendonça, M.A.F.C.; Coelho, M.S.; Cantarutti, R.B.; Kuyper, T.W.; Villani, E.M.A.; Mendonça, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to support the use of native species from the Atlantic Rainforest in local agroforestry systems, we analysed chemical and biochemical components related to leaf decomposition of Inga subnuda, Senna macranthera, Erythrina verna, Luehea grandiflora, Zeyheria tuberculosa, Aegiphila sellowiana,

  20. Chemical composition of essential oil from Psidium cattleianum var.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rajuc

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... accounting for 61% of the essential oil. The major component was ... recently been increased because of great economic costs of deterioration and ..... Identification of isoflavones in Acca sellowiana and two Psidium species ...

  1. The Incidence of Atypical Femoral Fractures in Patients with Rheumatic Disease: Yamagata Prefectural Committee of Atypical Femoral Fractures (YamaCAFe) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakubo, Yuya; Ohta, Daichi; Ishi, Masaji; Ito, Juji; Oki, Hiroharu; Naganuma, Yasushi; Uno, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akiko; Akabane, Takeru; Dairaku, Katsuyuki; Goto, Shinichi; Goto, Yasuo; Kanauchi, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Shinji; Nakajima, Taku; Masuda, Keiji; Matsuda, Michiharu; Mura, Nariyuki; Takenouchi, Kenji; Tsuchida, Hiroyuki; Onuma, Yasushi; Shibuya, Junichirou; Seino, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Hiragami, Ken; Urayama, Yasuhiro; Furukawa, Takashi; Okuda, Shouta; Ogura, Ken; Nakamura, Takeshi; Sasaki, Kan; Konta, Tsuneo; Takagi, Michiaki

    2017-08-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) have been reported to occur with minimal or spontaneous subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures with a characteristic transverse pattern, compared with typical femoral fractures in young patients with high-energy trauma. AFFs are related to long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs), glucocorticoids and rheumatic diseases. We have estimated a blind analysis of AFFs in rheumatic patients receiving BPs and glucocorticoids ordinary over a long time in all Yamagata prefectural area through radiographic examination. The 123 AFFs including suspected cases over six years were collected and reviewed by two independent orthopedic surgeons. We found 86 patients with a total of 99 AFFs between 2009 and 2014 (1.43 cases/100,000 person/year). Of these 99 AFFs, 11 were in 8 rheumatic patients including three patients with bilateral AFFs. The incidence of AFFs in rheumatic patients had trend to increase from 2012. The mean age of all 8 patients was 54.9 years. All 8 patients received BPs and 7/8 received prednisolone (PSL). The mean dose of PSL was 14 mg/day. Compared to patients with unilateral AFFs, those with bilateral AFFs in rheumatic patients were on a higher dose of PSL (20 mg/day vs. 7 mg/day) and had less femoral neck-shaft angle (129° vs. 136°, p rheumatic patients showed a trend to increase from 2012 to 2014 in Yamagata prefecture. Careful management of AFFs is of particular importance in rheumatic patients who have taken high doses of PSL and have small femoral neck-shaft angle.

  2. DNA barcoding survey of Trichoderma diversity in soil and litter of the Colombian lowland Amazonian rainforest reveals Trichoderma strigosellum sp. nov. and other species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Quintero, C.A.; Atanasova, L.; Franco-Molano, A.E.; Gams, W.; Komon-Zelazowska, M.; Theelen, B.; Muller, W.H.; Boekhout, T.; Druzhinina, I.

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of Trichoderma (Hypocreales, Ascomycota) colonizing leaf litter as well as the rhizosphere of Garcinia macrophylla (Clusiaceae) was investigated in primary and secondary rain forests in Colombian Amazonia. DNA barcoding of 107 strains based on the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2

  3. Challenges Associated with Technological Aspects for Modernization of Alkaline-Fermented Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnemann, A.R.; Hansen, E.B.; Lelieveld, H.L.M.; Heising, J.K.; Dekker, M.

    2014-01-01

    Among the new generations, the awareness and appreciation of indigenous healthy foods including alkaline-fermented foods (AFFs) needs to be enhanced. AFFs are considered to be old-fashioned. In fact, some of the food processing techniques are outdated with low hygiene and quality standards. Some

  4. Experiment list: SRX573031 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available INTS11 || antibody=non-commercial rabbit anti-AFF4 Ref PMID 20159561 || source=IP with non-commercial... || cell line=HeLa || treatment=AFF4 was profiled in a Hela cell clone upon EGF stimulation and depletion of

  5. Experiment list: SRX573029 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available INTS11 || antibody=non-commercial rabbit anti-AFF4 Ref PMID 20159561 || source=IP with non-commercial... || cell line=HeLa || treatment=AFF4 was profiled in a Hela cell clone upon EGF stimulation and depletion of

  6. Experiment list: SRX573033 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available INTS11 || antibody=non-commercial rabbit anti-AFF4 Ref PMID 20159561 || source=IP with non-commercial...|| cell line=HeLa || treatment=AFF4 was profiled in a Hela cell clone upon EGF stimulation and depletion of

  7. Experiment list: SRX573028 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion of INTS11 || antibody=non-commercial rabbit anti-AFF4 Ref PMID 20159561 || source=IP with non-commerci...al rabbit anti-AFF4 Ref PMID 20159561 || sample type=ChIP-seq http://dbarchive.bios

  8. Prebiotic Potential of Agave angustifolia Haw Fructans with Different Degrees of Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodolfo Velázquez-Martínez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Inulin-type fructans are the most studied prebiotic compounds because of their broad range of health benefits. In particular, plants of the Agave genus are rich in fructans. Agave-derived fructans have a branched structure with both β-(2→1 and β-(2→6 linked fructosyl chains attached to the sucrose start unit with a degree of polymerization (DP of up to 80 fructose units. The objective of this work was to assess the prebiotic potential of three Agave angustifolia Haw fructan fractions (AFF with different degrees of polymerization. The three fructan fractions were extracted from the agave stem by lixiviation and then purified by ultrafiltration and ion exchange chromatography: AFF1, AFF2 and AFF3 with high (3–60 fructose units, medium (2–40 and low (2–22 DP, respectively. The fructan profile was determined with high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD, which confirmed a branched fructan structure. Structural elucidation was performed by Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy. The AFF spectrum shows characteristic fructan bands. The prebiotic effect of these fractions was assessed in vitro through fermentation by Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains. Four growth patterns were observed. Some bacteria did not grow with any of the AFF, while other strains grew with only AFF3. Some bacteria grew according to the molecular weight of the AFF and some grew indistinctly with the three fructan fractions.

  9. Atypical femoral fracture in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient successfully treated with teriparatide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jakob; Eiken, Pia; Hyldstrup, Lars

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We report a case of a successfully healed atypical femoral fracture (AFF) following treatment with teriparatide in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). To our knowledge, no successful treatment of AFFs with teriparatide in this subpopulation has ever been described. METHODS...

  10. in vitro production of virus free sweet potato [ipomoea batatas (l

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    ABSTRACT: The phylogeny of the East African Hippopotamidae is problematic. A particularly controversial relationship is that between aff. Hippopotamus protamphibius and aff. .... ficient reconstruction of the symphysis, corpora, and canine processes has been completed to warrant a preliminary description of the fossil.

  11. The relation between attitudes toward functional foods and satisfaction with food-related life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnettler, Berta; Adasme-Berríos, Cristian; Grunert, Klaus G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of attitudes towards functional foods (AFF) on university students’ satisfaction with food-related life (SWFL) and to distinguish student typologies, considering that the AFF are not homogeneous among consumers. Design/methodology/approach...

  12. Lantana montevidensis Essential Oil: Chemical Composition and Mosquito Repellent Activity against Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essential oil (EO) of Lantana montevidensis (Spreng.) Briq. (L. sellowiana Link & Otto) was investigated for its chemical composition and mosquito repellent activity. The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of aerial plant parts was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major constituents we...

  13. Comparative histology in the liver and spleen of three species of freshwater teleost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila F. Sales

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We describe and compare the histology of liver and spleen ofGeophagus brasiliensis (Perciformes, Hypostomus francisci (Siluriformes and Hoplias aff. malabaricus (Characiformes, tropical freshwater fishes. InG. brasiliensisandH. aff. malabaricusthe hepatocytes were arranged in tubular form whereas in H. franciscithey cord-like. In all species, hepatocytes presented glycogen, but in G. brasiliensis and H. aff. malabaricus they showed strong stained for hemossiderin in the cytoplasm. InG. brasiliensis and H. aff. malabaricus, melanomacrophage centres (MMCs were associated to hepatic structures and only in G. brasiliensis was observed intrahepatic exocrine pancreas. The spleen, in all species, was characterized by red and white pulp without boundary between the two regions, but only in H. francisci was recorded nodular organization in splenic parenchyma. The G. brasiliensisandH. aff. malabaricuspresented in the white pulp MMCs linked mainly to ellipsoids. Besides, we observed large MMCs in the spleen in relation to liver of G. brasiliensis and H. aff. malabaricus. In liver, highest values of reticular fibers and collagen were observed inG. brasiliensis. In spleen, highest values of reticular fibers and collagen were recorded inH. aff. malabaricusandH. francisci, respectively. Histological differences confirm the hypothesis that the phylogenetic distance is reflected in liver and spleen.

  14. Comparison of two synthetic food-odor lures for captures of feral Mexican fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Mexico and implications regarding use of irradiated flies to assess lure efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robacker, David C; Thomas, Donald B

    2007-08-01

    Feral Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), were trapped in a citrus orchard in Mexico by using two types of synthetic food-odor lures, the AFF lure (Anastrepha fruit fly lure, APTIV, Inc., Portland, OR) and the BioLure (two-component MFF lure, Suterra LLC, Inc., Bend, OR). In Multilure traps (Better World Manufacturing, Inc., Miami, FL) containing water, BioLures captured about the same numbers of flies as AFF lures. In Multilure traps containing antifreeze solution, BioLures captured 2 and 5 times more flies than AFF lures in two experiments. BioLures, and AFF lures did not differ in attractiveness when used on sticky traps (Intercept trap, APTIV, Inc.; and sticky cylinder trap). Multilure traps captured >4 times as many flies as sticky traps with the exception that captures of females did not differ between Multilure and sticky traps baited with AFF lures. The percentage of females captured in Multilure traps was greater when traps were baited with BioLures compared with AFF lures, but the reverse was true for sticky traps. Sticky cylinder traps captured a higher percentage of females than Multilure traps. The most effective trap/lure combination was the Multilure trap baited with BioLure and antifreeze. In comparison with tests of these two lures in Texas, results were similar for Multilure traps, but they differed for sticky cylinder traps in that AFF lures were consistently more attractive than BioLures in Texas, but not in Mexico.

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP000387 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ent Phone: +81-75-256-8582, Fax: +81-75-256-6211, E-mail: このメールアドレスはスパムボットから保護されています。閲覧するにはJavaScriptを有効にする必要があります。 document.getElementById('cloak201790aff74261cafbb0c6a4917fdbf9').innerHTML = ''; var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy201790aff74261cafbb0c6a4917fdbf9 = 'license' + '@'; addy201790aff74261cafbb0c6a4917fdbf9 = addy201790aff74261cafbb0c6a4917fdbf9 + 'ips-ac' + '.' + 'co' + '.' + 'jp'; var addy_text201790aff74261cafbb0c6a4917fdbf9 = 'license' + '@' + 'ips-ac' + '.' + 'co' + '.' + 'jp';document.getElementById('cloak201790aff74261cafbb0c6a4917fdbf9').innerHTML += ''+addy_text201790aff74261cafbb0c6a4917fdbf9+''; 非営利機関以外の利用者は事前にiPSアカデミアジャパン株式

  16. The fracture sites of atypical femoral fractures are associated with the weight-bearing lower limb alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Yoshitomo; Ishijima, Muneaki; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Kubota, Mitsuaki; Baba, Tomonori; Kaketa, Takefumi; Nagao, Masashi; Sakamoto, Yuko; Sakai, Kensuke; Kato, Rui; Nagura, Nana; Miyagawa, Kei; Wada, Tomoki; Liu, Lizu; Obayashi, Osamu; Shitoto, Katsuo; Nozawa, Masahiko; Kajihara, Hajime; Gen, Hogaku; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2014-09-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) are stress-related fractures that are speculated to associate with long-term treatment with bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. A history of AFF is a high risk factor for the development of a subsequent AFF in the same location of the contralateral femur, suggesting that a patient's individual anatomical factor(s) are related to the fracture site of AFFs. In this study, we investigated the radiographs of fourteen AFFs (four bilateral fractures among ten patients) treated at six hospitals associated with our university between 2005 and 2010. The fracture site and standing femorotibial angle (FTA), which reflects the mechanical axis of the lower limb, were measured on weight-bearing lower limb radiographs. The fracture site and FTA of patients with typical femoral fractures (TFF) were compared to those of patients with AFFs. The correlations were examined using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The fracture locations in the femora were almost the same in the patients with bilateral AFFs. There was a positive correlation between the fracture site and the standing FTA in the patients with AFFs (r=0.82, 95% confidence interval; 0.49 to 0.94), indicating that the larger the standing FTA (varus alignment), the more distal the site of the fracture in the femur. The FTA of the patients with atypical diaphyseal femoral fracture were significantly larger compared to that of those with not only atypical subtrochanteric fractures but also TFFs. In conclusion, the fracture sites of AFFs are associated with the standing lower limb alignment, while those of TFFs are not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of modified homotopy perturbation method and amplitude frequency formulation to strongly nonlinear oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyd ghasem enayati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two powerful analytical methods known as modified homotopy perturbation method and Amplitude Frequency Formulation called respectively MHPM and AFF, are introduced to derive approximate solutions of a system of ordinary differential equations appear in mechanical applications. These methods convert a difficult problem into a simple one, which can be easily handled. The obtained solutions are compared with numerical fourth order runge-kutta method to show the applicability and accuracy of both MHPM and AFF in solving this sample problem. The results attained in this paper confirm the idea that MHPM and AFF are powerful mathematical tools and they can be applied to linear and nonlinear problems.

  18. Versatile Manipulation for Assistive Free-Flyers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Assistive Free-Flyers (AFFs) are flying robots designed to share the living space with human astronauts in orbit. These robots have shown the potential to assist...

  19. Affinity flow fractionation of cells via transient interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Suman; Singh, Rishi; Hanewich-Hollatz, Mikhail; Shen, Chong; Lee, Chia-Hua; Dorfman, David M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-07-01

    Flow fractionation of cells using physical fields to achieve lateral displacement finds wide applications, but its extension to surface molecule-specific separation requires labeling. Here we demonstrate affinity flow fractionation (AFF) where weak, short-range interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns laterally displace cells in a continuous, label-free process. We show that AFF can directly draw neutrophils out of a continuously flowing stream of blood with an unprecedented 400,000-fold depletion of red blood cells, with the sorted cells being highly viable, unactivated, and functionally intact. The lack of background erythrocytes enabled the use of AFF for direct enumeration of neutrophils by a downstream detector, which could distinguish the activation state of neutrophils in blood. The compatibility of AFF with capillary microfluidics and its ability to directly separate cells with high purity and minimal sample preparation will facilitate the design of simple and portable devices for point-of-care diagnostics and quick, cost-effective laboratory analysis.

  20. NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR BLOCKADE ATTENUATES DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE MATTER (DEP) ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC RESPONSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT BODY:Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including NGF, NT-3, and BDNF to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance associated with allergic airway responses in mice. Mice administered an antibody against the low aff...

  1. Distracted Driving and Associated Crash Risks : Research Project Capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Factors aff ecting the : cognitive tasks : associated with : driving are becoming : increasingly critical to : the overall roadway : safety performance. : Therefore, more research is needed in order to understand the complexity and : impact of distra...

  2. On the Geological Age of the Sundyr Faunal Assemblage of Permian Tetrapods from the East European Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubev V.K.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A new Sundyr faunal assemblage of Permian tetrapods was discovered in Eastern Europe. It includes dinocephalians Titanosuchia fam. indet., tapinocephalians aff. Ulemosauridae, anomodontians aff. Suminia, therocephalians, gorgonopians Burnetioidea fam. indet., diapsids ? Eosuchia, chroniosuchians Suchonica vladimiri Golubev, enosuchids aff. Enosuchus, seymouriamorphs Microphon exiguus Ivachnenko and Leptoropha aff. talonophora, batrachomorphs Dvinosaurus sp. The Sundyr assemblage is a transitional one from the Isheevo to Sokolki assemblages. It is described as the last stage of evolution undergone by the dinocephalian community of tetrapods in Eastern Europe. Based on the bio- and magnetostratigraphic data, the beds with Sundyr tetrapod fauna pertain to the lower part of the Upper Severodvinian (= Putyatinian regional stage. These strata were distinguished into a new Suchonica vladimiri tetrapod assemblage zone. In the Sukhona River basin, the beds with Sundyr tetrapod fossils were distinguished into a new Ustpoldarsa Member of the Poldarsa Formation.

  3. Bisphenol A activates EGFR and ERK promoting proliferation, tumor spheroid formation and resistance to EGFR pathway inhibition in estrogen receptor negative inflammatory breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a distinct and the deadliest breast cancer variant, which shows a rapid rate of progression and acquired therapeutic resistance. Epidemiological studies suggest that chemical exposure in the environment and consumer products can aff...

  4. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Atypical femoral fractures: risks and benefits of long-term treatment of osteoporosis with anti-resorptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert A

    2018-03-01

    Modern osteoporosis treatment began in the mid-1990s with the approval of amino-bisphosphonates, anti-resorptive agents that have been shown to decrease osteoporotic fracture risk by about half. In 2005, the first cases of atypical femoral fractures (AFF), occurring in the shaft of the femur, were reported. Since then, more cases have been found, leading to great concern among patients and a dramatic decrease in bisphosphonate prescribing. The pathogenesis and incidence of AFF are reviewed herein. Management and an approach to prevention or early detection of AFF are also provided. Denosumab, a more recently approved anti-resorptive medication has also been associated with AFF. Long-term management of osteoporosis and prevention of fracture are challenging in light of this serious but uncommon side effect, yet with an aging population osteoporotic fracture is destined to increase in frequency. © 2018 European Society of Endocrinology.

  5. Assistive Free-Flyers with Gecko-Inspired Adhesive Appendages for Automated Logistics in Space

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gecko-inspired adhesives provide a new capability for assistive free fliers (AFF) in space. In comparison with conventional grippers, they make it possible to attach...

  6. Caracterización fitoquímica de una fracción de biflavonoides de garcinia madruno: su inhibición de la oxidación de ldl humana y su mecanismo de estabilización de especies radicalarias

    OpenAIRE

    Leon, Montoya Pelaez Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    A una fracción biflavonoide (FB) caracterizada fitoquímicamente de Garcinia madruno (Clusiaceae), se le evalúa su potencial inhibitorio de la oxidación de LDL y su capacidad estabilizadora de especies radicalarias, correlacionando dichas actividades con su contenido en biflavonoides. Los biflavonoides morelloflavona, volkensiflavona y amentoflavona se identifican a partir de la FB. El extracto que contiene la FB (extracto AcOEt) se determina como el principal factor involucrado en la activida...

  7. Critical differences between subtrochanteric and diaphyseal atypical femoral fractures: analyses of 51 cases at a single institution in Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon-Je; Kang, Kyung-Chung; Chun, Young-Soo; Rhyu, Kee Hyung; Kim, Sang-Jun; Jang, Tae-Su

    2018-05-03

    There still remains controversy on the pathomechanism of atypical femoral fracture (AFF). The angle of lateral bowing and bone mineral density showed significant differences between subtrochanteric and diaphyseal atypical fracture groups. In addition to the use of bisphosphonate, mechanical factors might play important roles in the occurrence of AFFs. Although AFF could be divided into subtrochanteric and diaphyseal fracture according to the location of fractures, there is a lack of evidence regarding differences between two fractures and etiology of the occurrence. The aim of study is to determine differences between atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal fracture in Korean population. Between February 2010 and March 2015, 51 AFFs in 40 patients were included in this study. Their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. The AFF patients satisfied all the diagnostic criteria of the 2014 revised edition of the ASMBR. To analyze the differences according to the location of fracture, the AFFs were divided into subtrochanteric (n = 16) and diaphyseal (n = 35) fracture groups. The following factors were compared between two groups: patients' demographics, underlying diseases, laboratory findings (serum-25(OH) VitD3, osteocalcin, c-telopeptide, ALP, Ca, and P), bone mineral density (BMD), duration of bisphosphonate (BP) usage, and lateral bowing of the femur at time of the fracture. All AFFs happened in female patients (mean age, 73.8 years) who have received bisphosphonate treatments except three patients. The mean duration of bisphosphonate usage was 95.3 months. Between the two groups, demographic data (age, height, weight, and BMI), underlying diseases, laboratory findings, hip BMD, and duration of BP treatment were comparable to each other (p > 0.05). However, the subtrochanteric fracture group showed higher FNSBA (femoral neck shaft bowing angle, p group. Angle of lateral bowing (FNSBA) and spine BMD showed significant differences between

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15795-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 60 2e-07 EF527414_1( EF527414 |pid:none) Aspergillus tubingensis strain V-0.....yces hygroscopicus strain... 59 5e-07 EF527413_1( EF527413 |pid:none) Aspergillus aff. tubingensis V-04-... ...00113_4409( CP000113 |pid:none) Myxococcus xanthus DK 1622, com... 59 7e-07 EF527412_1( EF527412 |pid:none) Aspergillus aff. tubing

  9. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 20, Number 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    5. Sanderson WC, DiNardo PA, Rapee RM, Barlow DH. Syndrome comorbidity in patients diagnosed with DSM-III-R anxiety disorder. J Abnorm Psychol...anxiety becomes chronic and exaggerated, and aff ects the physi- cal and psychological health of the individual. Th e main types of anxiety dis- orders are...aff ect both physical and psychological health. Individuals with anxiety disorders commonly suff er from other mental disorders such as mood disor

  10. Efficacy of two synthetic food-odor lures for Mexican fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) is determined by trap type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robacker, David C; Czokajlo, Darek

    2005-10-01

    Sterile mass-reared Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), were trapped in a citrus orchard by using multilure traps and cylindrical sticky traps baited with Advanced Pheromone Technologies Anastrepha fruit fly (AFF) lures or Suterra BioLure two-component (ammonium acetate and putrescine) MFF lures (BioLures). The cylinder trap/AFF lure combination was the best trap over the first 6 wk, the multilure trap/BioLure combination was best during weeks 6-12, and the multilure trap/AFF lure combination was best during the last 6 wk. The multilure trap/BioLure combination was best overall by 36% over the cylinder trap/AFF lure combination, and 57% over the multilure trap/AFF lure combination. Cylinder traps with BioLures were the least effective trap/lure combination throughout the experiment, capturing only half as many flies as cylinder traps with AFF lures. Captures with cylinder traps baited with either lure and multilure traps with BioLures were female biased. For the most part, both lures remained highly attractive and emitted detectable amounts of attractive components under hot field conditions for the duration of the 18-wk experiment. Total emission of ammonia was 4 times greater and 1-pyrroline at least 10 times greater from AFF lures compared with BioLures. Correlations of trap and lure performance with ammonia emission and weather were determined, but no conclusions were possible. Results indicate that BioLures would be the lure of choice in multilure or other McPhail-type traps and AFF lures would be superior with most sticky traps or kill stations that attract flies to outer (not enclosed) surfaces.

  11. FLORÍSTICA E ESTRUTURA DO COMPONENTE ARBÓREO E ANÁLISE AMBIENTAL DE UM FRAGMENTO DE FLORESTA OMBRÓFILA MISTA ALTO-MONTANA NO MUNICÍPIO DE PAINEL, SC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Higuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The highland Araucaria Forest is a little-studied forest formation, occurring in altitudes above 1,000 m. The objectives of this study were to understand the structural and floristic patterns of the tree component of a remaining of this forest in the southern plateau region of Santa Catarina State and to determine the environmental variables that influence these patterns. The tree component survey and the environmental data collection were conducted in 50 plots of 200 m2. Within these plots, all living trees with circumference at breast height (CBH ≥ 15,7 cm were measured (CBH and height and identified. In each plot, environmental variables related to soils physical and chemical traits, topography and canopy cover were collected. Phytosociological parameters and the diameter structure (whole tree community and tree populations with the importance value above 5 % were calculated. The floristic-structural similarities among plots were analyzed by NMDS (Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling and vectors of environmental variables (p < 0.05 were plotted a posteriori. A total of 50 tree species were identified, distributed in 33 genera and 20 families. The species with the highest VI were Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze (17.32 %, Myrceugenia euosma (O. Berg D. Legrand (15.24 % and Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret (7.84 % . The diameter structure of the whole community and of the study populations (except Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. showed a distribution close to the “inverted J”. The NMDS analysis showed a higher percentage of clay in the plots with the highest density of Acca sellowiana and lowest percentage in the plots with high density of Dicksonia sellowiana, Inga lentiscifolia Benth. and Ocotea pulchella Mart. Plots with higher declivity had a higher density of Drimys brasiliensis Miers and those of lower declivity, higher elevation and greater canopy closure, had a higher occurrence of Drimys angustifolia Miers, Prunus myrtifolia (L

  12. Atypische niedrig-traumatische Femurfrakturen – Zusammenhang mit Komorbiditäten, internistischen und knochenspezifischen Therapien // Atypical femoral fractures – comorbidities and association with bone-specific therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muschitz Ch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available iIntroduction:/i Although atypical femoral fractures (AFF are generally rare events, several studies have indicated a potential link between AFF and long-term bone specific therapies (BST. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of AFF and potential associations with prior or ongoing BST. iMethods:/i 8.851 caucasian female and male patients with de novo hip fractures treated in the largest Austrian level 1 trauma center from 2000–2013 were selected. iResults:/i 194 patients with a de novo lowtraumatic subtrochanteric/shaft fractures were identified: 35 atypical and 159 typical fractures. Of these patients, concomitant diseases, medication, previous fractures and survival were retrieved and analyzed. Female patients in both groups were significantly older. The median survival was significantly shorter in patients with AFF (9 vs. 18 months; p 0.0001. Cardiovascular disease, sarcopenia, chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes, smoking (past or current history and prevalent fragility fractures were more frequent in AFF patients, as well as the concomitant use of phenprocoumon, furosemide, and sulfonylurea. Though the number of patients with current BST was low in (14.5% both groups, more patients in the AFF group were previously treated with BST (71% vs 49%; p = 0.016, and they received these therapies for a longer time period. iDiscussion:/i A combination of severe comorbidities, long-term pharmaceutical therapies and a history of previous or ongoing BST were associated with an increased individual risk for AFF. p bKurzfassung:/b iEinleitung:/i Atypische Femurfrakturen (AFF sind in der Regel seltene Ereignisse; mehrere Studien haben einen möglichen Zusammenhang zwischen AFF und langfristigen knochenspezifischen Therapien (KST angegeben. Das Ziel dieser Studie war es, die Häufigkeit der AFF und potentielle Assoziationen mit früheren oder laufenden KST zu analysieren. iMethoden:/i Analyse von 8.851 kaukasischen weiblichen und m

  13. OBTENCIÓN DE CEPAS Y PRODUCCIÓN DE INÓCULO DE CINCO ESPECIES DE HONGOS SILVESTRES COMESTIBLES DE ALTA MONTAÑA EN EL CENTRO DE MÉXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Arana-Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Se obtuvieron cepas de Psathyrella spadicea , Floccularia aff. luteovirens , Clitocybe squamulosa , Flammulina mexicana y Lyophyllum aff. shimeji , cuyos esporomas son recolectados y consumi - dos por habitantes del Nevado de Toluca, México. Las cepas se estudiaron in vitro en seis medios de cultivo (ACP: Agar croquetas de perro, AM: Agar maíz, PDA-PL: Agar papa dextrosa-pepto - na y levadura, EMA-PL: Agar extracto de malta-peptona y levadura, PDA y EMA a 18 °C y 25 °C. Las especies se desarrollaron satisfactoriamente a 18 °C , siendo F. mexicana y L . aff. shimeji las que tuvieron mayor velocidad de crecimiento y producción de biomasa. Flammulina mexicana solo se desarrolló a 18 °C, presentando mayor crecimiento y producción de biomasa en ACP. La cepa de L. aff. shimeji creció a 18 y 25 °C, la mayor velocidad de crecimiento se registró en medio PDA a 18 °C y la mayor producción de biomasa en EMA-PL a 18 °C. Considerando las mejores condiciones para el desarrollo de micelio in vitro, se produjo inóculo primario de F. mexicana y L . aff. shimeji en trigo y sorgo. La mayor densidad del micelio y porcentaje de grano cubierto se obtuvieron con el sustrato de trigo.

  14. Study of the optimal production process and application of apple fruit (malus domestica (l.) borkh) fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Shao, W.; Ziang, R.

    2015-01-01

    In orchard production, fruit abscission is common due to insect damage, disease, crop thinning and natural dropping. However, the utilization of these discarded plant resources has received little research attention. In this study, we used apple fruit from such plant resources, mainly young and mature dropped fruit, as materials and mixed them with a fermentation agent, brown sugar and water. The effects of the proportion of fermentation agent and the fermentation conditions (O2, temperature, fermenting time and fruit crushing degree) were studied using an orthogonal experimental design. We discovered a novel fermented fertilizer, apple fruit fermentation nutrient solution (AFF), for which the optimal fermentation formula and conditions were comminuted young apples: fermentation agent: brown sugar: water weight ratio of 5:0.1:1:4 and 45 days of aerobic fermentation. Analysis of the fermentation solutions showed that the supernatant obtained using these optimized parameters had the highest mineral element content among the fermentation formulas and conditions studied. The results of a spraying experiment with 200-, 500- and 800-fold dilutions showed that AFF significantly promoted the net photosynthetic rate, leaf area and thickness, specific leaf weight, and chlorophyll and mineral element content in the leaves of young apple trees relative to the control treatment. The effects of 200-fold diluted AFF on the photosynthetic rate, the developmental quality and mineral element contents were greater than those of the 500- and 800-fold dilutions. The results of the spraying of adult trees with 200-fold diluted AFF compared to a water control demonstrated that AFF significantly enhanced the average weight of a single fruit, the shape index, hardness, content of soluble solids, titratable acid content, vitamin C content, and aroma compound content of the fruit of the adult trees. This evidence suggests that the AFF obtained using the optimal production process could

  15. Auditory Vigilance and Working Memory in Youth at Familial Risk for Schizophrenia or Affective Psychosis in the Harvard Adolescent Family High Risk Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Larry J; Pousada-Casal, Andrea; Scala, Silvia; Meyer, Eric C; Stone, William S; Thermenos, Heidi W; Molokotos, Elena; Agnew-Blais, Jessica; Tsuang, Ming T; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-11-01

    The degree of overlap between schizophrenia (SCZ) and affective psychosis (AFF) has been a recurring question since Kraepelin's subdivision of the major psychoses. Studying nonpsychotic relatives allows a comparison of disorder-associated phenotypes, without potential confounds that can obscure distinctive features of the disorder. Because attention and working memory have been proposed as potential endophenotypes for SCZ and AFF, we compared these cognitive features in individuals at familial high-risk (FHR) for the disorders. Young, unmedicated, first-degree relatives (ages, 13-25 years) at FHR-SCZ (n=41) and FHR-AFF (n=24) and community controls (CCs, n=54) were tested using attention and working memory versions of the Auditory Continuous Performance Test. To determine if schizotypal traits or current psychopathology accounted for cognitive deficits, we evaluated psychosis proneness using three Chapman Scales, Revised Physical Anhedonia, Perceptual Aberration, and Magical Ideation, and assessed psychopathology using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist -90 Revised. Compared to controls, the FHR-AFF sample was significantly impaired in auditory vigilance, while the FHR-SCZ sample was significantly worse in working memory. Both FHR groups showed significantly higher levels of physical anhedonia and some psychopathological dimensions than controls. Adjusting for physical anhedonia, phobic anxiety, depression, psychoticism, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms eliminated the FHR-AFF vigilance effects but not the working memory deficits in FHR-SCZ. The working memory deficit in FHR-SZ was the more robust of the cognitive impairments after accounting for psychopathological confounds and is supported as an endophenotype. Examination of larger samples of people at familial risk for different psychoses remains necessary to confirm these findings and to clarify the role of vigilance in FHR-AFF. (JINS, 2016, 22, 1026-1037).

  16. Extrinsic Repair of Injured Dendrites as a Paradigm for Regeneration by Fusion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren-Suissa, Meital; Gattegno, Tamar; Kravtsov, Veronika; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Injury triggers regeneration of axons and dendrites. Research has identified factors required for axonal regeneration outside the CNS, but little is known about regeneration triggered by dendrotomy. Here, we study neuronal plasticity triggered by dendrotomy and determine the fate of complex PVD arbors following laser surgery of dendrites. We find that severed primary dendrites grow toward each other and reconnect via branch fusion. Simultaneously, terminal branches lose self-avoidance and grow toward each other, meeting and fusing at the tips via an AFF-1-mediated process. Ectopic branch growth is identified as a step in the regeneration process required for bypassing the lesion site. Failure of reconnection to the severed dendrites results in degeneration of the distal end of the neuron. We discover pruning of excess branches via EFF-1 that acts to recover the original wild-type arborization pattern in a late stage of the process. In contrast, AFF-1 activity during dendritic auto-fusion is derived from the lateral seam cells and not autonomously from the PVD neuron. We propose a model in which AFF-1-vesicles derived from the epidermal seam cells fuse neuronal dendrites. Thus, EFF-1 and AFF-1 fusion proteins emerge as new players in neuronal arborization and maintenance of arbor connectivity following injury in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results demonstrate that there is a genetically determined multi-step pathway to repair broken dendrites in which EFF-1 and AFF-1 act on different steps of the pathway. EFF-1 is essential for dendritic pruning after injury and extrinsic AFF-1 mediates dendrite fusion to bypass injuries. PMID:28283540

  17. Gênero Calophyllum: importância química e farmacológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noldin Vânia Floriani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Calophyllum genus (Clusiaceae is composed of about 200 species, with a pantropical distribution. Some species are medicinal and are used against several diseases, including gastric ulcers, infectious pathologies, painful, inflammatory processes and as molluscicidal. A search in the literature regarding the chemical and biological aspects of these plants indicates cytotoxic activity against several cell lines, inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, antisecretory and cytoprotective properties, antinociceptive, molluscicidal and antimicrobial effects, among others, related particularly to the presence of coumarins, xanthones, flavonoids, and triterpenes.

  18. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 18, Number 08, August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    continue, and STI preven- tion eff orts should be reinforced. R E F E R E N C E S 1. Kuper H, Ye W, Broome U, et al. The risk of liver and bile duct ...hepatitis A virus (HAV) causes infl ammatory liver disease (hepatitis) in aff ected individu- als. Th e virus is spread through fecal-oral...ammatory liver disease (hepatitis B) in aff ected individ- uals. Th e virus is spread by percutaneous or mucous membrane exposure to infected blood or

  19. Aerial organ anatomy of Smilax syphilitica (Smilacaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marcelo Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Smilax L. in Brazil is represented by 32 taxa and it is a taxonomically difficult genus because the plants are dioecious and show wide phenotypic variation. The analysis and use of leaf anatomy characters is recognized as a frequently successful taxonomic method to distinguish between individual taxon, when floral material is absent or minute differences in flowers and foliage exist such as in Smilax. The aim of this study was to characterize the anatomical features of the aerial organs in Smilax syphilitica collected from the Atlantic Rainforest, in Santa Teresa-ES and the Smilax aff. syphilitica from the Amazon Rainforest, in Manaus, Brazil. For this, a total of three samples of Smilax were collected per site. Sample leaves and stems were fixed with FAA 50, embedded in historesin, sectioned on a rotary microtome, stained and mounted in synthetic resin. Additionally, histochemical tests were performed and cuticle ornamentation was analyzed with standard scanning electron microscopy. S. syphilitica and S. aff. syphilitica differed in cuticle ornamentation, epidermal cell arrangement and wall thickness, stomata type and orientation, calcium oxalate crystal type, and position of stem thorns. Leaf blades of S. syphilitica from the Amazon Rainforest have a network of rounded ridges on both sides, while in S. aff. syphilitica, these ridges are parallel and the spaces between them are filled with numerous membranous platelets. Viewed from the front, the epidermal cells of S. syphilitica have sinuous walls (even more pronounced in samples from the Amazon; while in S. aff. syphilitica, these cells are also sinuous but elongated in the cross-section of the blade and arranged in parallel. Stomata of S. syphilitica are paracytic, whereas in S. aff. syphilitica, are both paracytic and anisocytic, and their polar axes are directed towards the mid-vein. Calcium oxalate crystals in S. syphilitica are prisms, whereas in S. aff. syphilitica, crystal sand. Thorns

  20. A case of incomplete atypical femoral fracture with histomorphometrical evidence of osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchie, Hiroyuki; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Nishi, Tomio; Abe, Hidekazu; Segawa, Toyohito; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Roughly half of the femoral fracture patients diagnosed with AFF according to the criteria suggested by a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) have not undergone bisphosphonate (BP) therapy. One suspected cause of such fractures is severe bone loss due to osteomalacia, but the pathogenesis remains unknown. We report a case of an 84-year-old woman with AFF not treated by BP therapy, in whom underlying osteomalacia was histologically diagnosed. The involvement of femoral curvature and spino-pelvic malaligment in the fracture in the present case was considered.

  1. Germinação de Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Griseb. (Bromeliaceae) em diferentes substratos alternativos ao pó de xaxim

    OpenAIRE

    Anacleto,Adilson; Negrelle,Raquel Rejane Bonato; Koehler,Henrique Soares

    2008-01-01

    Avaliou-se a germinação das sementes de Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Griseb. (Bromeliaceae). As tentativas de produção desta espécie, a partir de sementes, têm ocorrido de forma empírica, utilizando-se substrato à base de pó de xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook.), que tem restrições de uso, por estar ameaçada de extinção. Foram testados cinco tipos alternativos de substratos de fácil acessibilidade: húmus de minhoca, areia, fibra de casca de coco, serapilheira e Plantmax®. O experimento foi realiza...

  2. Growth, mineral composition, fruit yield, and mycorrhizal colonization of feijoa in response to lime and phosphorus application

    OpenAIRE

    Nava, Gilberto; Santos, Karine Louise dos; Costa, Murilo Dalla; Ciotta, Marlise Nara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of liming and phosphorus fertilization on the growth, mineral composition of the leaves, fruit yield, and mycorrhizal colonization of young feijoa (Acca sellowiana) plants. Treatments consisted of four liming levels - 0, 25, 50, and 100% of the dose required to raise the soil pH to 6.5 - and of five levels of P - 0, 60, 120, 180, and 240 kg ha-1 P2O5 -, placed in a randomized complete block design, in a split-plot arrangement,...

  3. Aktivitas Insektisida Ekstrak Kulit Batang Empat Famili Tumbuhan terhadap Ulat Krop Kubis Crocidolomia pavonana (F.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Syahputra

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the insecticidal activity of bark extracts of 35 plant species belonging to four families (Clusiaceae, Lecythidaceae Meliaceae, and Sapindaceae against the cabbage head caterpillar Crocidolomia pavonana. Extraction of the test plant materials were performed with maceration method using ethanol and methanol continued by counter-current distribution separation in ethylacetate and water. Bark extract preparation of each plant species was tested against C. pavonana larvae by leaf-feeding method at concentration of 0.25% and 0.5%. Second-instar C. pavonana larvae were fed extract-treated broccoli leaves for 48 hours, then were presented with untreated leaves until the surviving larvae reached the fourth-instar larvae. The number of dead larvae was recorded. The phytochemical test of bark extract of Calophyllum soulattri was done by qualitative method. The results showed that the bark extracts of C. soulattri (Clusiaceae, Barringtonia sarcostachys (Lecythidaceae, and Aglaia tomentosa (Meliaceae exhibited good insecticidal activity. Methanol extract of C. soulattri barks possessed strong insecticidal activity against C. pavonana larvae with LC95 of 0.21%. This extract showed positive response in alkaloid and triterpenoid qualitative tests. Further studies are needed to identify insecticidal compounds in those active extracts.

  4. Polen de las Mieles de la Patagonia Andina (Chubut-Argentina Pollen of honeys from the Andean Patagonia (Chubut-Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Forcone

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Se describen e ilustran mediante fotomicrografías tomadas con MO y MEB, 30 tipos polínicos, determinados en las mieles producidas en la región andina de Chubut (Patagonia Argentina. Los tipos morfológicos descriptos pertenecen a las siguientes familias: Alstroemeriaceae, Apiaceae, Buddlejaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Celastraceae, Clusiaceae, Convolvulaceae, Ericaceae, Elaeocarpaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae, Lamiaceae, Papaveraceae, Polemoniaceae, Polygalaceae, Proteaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, Saxifragaceae, Solanaceae, Thymelaceae y Verbenaceae. La mayoría de los tipos polínicos descriptos fueron hallados en las mieles como polen de menor importancia o traza con excepción de Aristotelia chilensis y Escallonia sp., que alcanzaron la categoría de polen dominante, y de Lomatia hirsuta, hallada como polen secundario.Thirty pollen types identified in the honeys from the Andean region of Chubut are described and illustrated by means of LM and SEM photomicrographs. Pollen types belong to the following families: Alstroemeriaceae, Apiaceae, Buddlejaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Celastraceae, Clusiaceae, Convolvulaceae, Ericaceae, Elaeocarpaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae, Lamiaceae, Papaveraceae, Polemoniaceae, Polygalaceae, Proteaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, Saxifragaceae, Solanaceae, Thymelaceae, and Verbenaceae. Most pollen types described were found in the honeys as minor important pollen or traces, except Aristotelia chilensis, Escallonia sp., which reached the category of dominant pollen, and Lomatia hirsuta, which was found as secondary pollen.

  5. Stability of merons in gravitational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, K.G.; Hacinliyan, A.; Kalayci, J.

    1982-11-01

    The stability properties of merons are investigated in gravitational models by taking the DeAFF model as a theoretical laboratory. We find that in gravitational models containing Yang-Mills fields merons are unstable. Stability might be possible in N=4 supergravity models with Asub(μ)=0. (author)

  6. Integrated watershed analysis: adapting to changing times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon H. Reeves

    2013-01-01

    Resource managers are increasingly required to conduct integrated analyses of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems before undertaking any activities. Th ere are a number of research studies on the impacts of management actions on these ecosystems, as well as a growing body of knowledge about ecological processes that aff ect them, particularly aquatic ecosystems, which...

  7. The Cova des Pas de Vallgornera (Llucmajor, Mallorca: a singular deposit bearing an exceptional well preserved Early Pleistocene vertebrate fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere Bover

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cova des Pas de Vallgornera is the longest cave of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Western Mediterranean and one of the 30 longest caves in the world. The exploration of one of the galleries allowed the discovery of a fossiliferous deposit of vertebrate remains in a remarkable preservation state. The fossil faunal complex found in this gallery is composed of up to 5 mammalian species (Myotragus aff. kopperi, Hypnomys onicensis, Nesiotites aff. ponsi, Rhinolophus aff. mehelyi and Pipistrellus sp., at least 14 bird species (among them two Mallorcan endemic taxa: Pica mourerae and Athene vallgornerensis, one reptile (Podarcis aff. lilfordi and one amphibian (Discoglossus sp.. This faunal composition is similar to the one recorded in the Pedrera de s’Ònix, a well known deposit from the Early Pleistocene of Mallorca, and shared morphological characteristics between taxa of both deposits suggest that the chronology of the Cova des Pas de Vallgornera should be considered Early Pleistocene as well. Both taxonomical analysis and chronology of this fauna furnished information on some speleological aspects of the cave.

  8. 76 FR 58716 - Interpretation of Transmission Planning Reliability Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ..., Western Public Agencies Group, Western Montana Electric G&T Cooperative, Inc., Oregon Municipal Electric... Enforcement of Electric Reliability Standards, Order No. 672, FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 31,204, order on reh'g... FERC ] 61,062, order on reh'g & compliance, 117 FERC ] 61,126 (2006), aff'd sub nom. Alcoa, Inc. v...

  9. 75 FR 81152 - Interpretation of Protection System Reliability Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ..., generation and transmission (G&T) cooperative or similar organization to accept compliance responsibility on... Reliability Standards, Order No. 672, FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 31,204, order on reh'g, Order No. 672-A, FERC... reh'g & compliance, 117 FERC ] 61,126 (2006), aff'd sub nom. Alcoa, Inc. v. FERC, 564 F.3d 1342 (DC...

  10. Resten i Vesten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Bergur Rønne

    på formelle elementer ved ikke at privilegere det radikalt nye efter et vestligt-avantgardistisk mønster. Forskellen bliver tydelig i kraft af den ballast af geografi, kultur, historie og politik som de færøske forfattere tænker med, og som afføder en anden udviklings- og originalitetsopfattelse end...

  11. The Antiaircraft Journal. Volume 92, Number 5, September-October 1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-10-01

    philosophical reflections on the subject of po’werand those to whom it should be entrusted. Recall the words of much-studied Machiavelli , than whom...Leavenworth. Kan. Rauch. A. R, Comm. of Basic Phys. Sc.• Res. & Dev. Board, Pentagon. \\Vash. 25. D. C. Rawls . J. W., Jr.. AFF Liaison Off.. Boeing Aircraft

  12. Accelerating our Second Transformation. 2010 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    a global learning environment to support a mission-ready Defense Acquisition Workforce that develops, delivers, and sustains eff ective and aff...Procurement Conference • International eLearning Conference • Knowledge Advisors Conference • NAVAIR Strategic Planning Conference • Naval Postgraduate...Ogden, UT Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ Strayer University, Woodbridge, VA* Thunderbird School of Global Management, Glendale, AZ

  13. The presence of Ursus ex gr. minimus-thibetanus in the late villányian and its position among the Pliocene and Pleistocene black bears in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Jan; Čermák, Stanislav; Horáček, I.

    -, č. 4 (2011), s. 39-58 ISSN 1771-1150 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0184 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Black bear * MN17 * Ursus aff. thibetanus * Villány 3 * Central Europe - Hungary * Ursus * Pleistocene * Pliocene Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  14. OSMAN BİN AFFÂN (RA)’IN MUSHAFİ’L-İMÂM’ININ TANITIMI

    OpenAIRE

    Şahin, Şamil

    2015-01-01

    Bu makale, Raşit Halife Osman b. Affân (ra)’ınönemli şehirlere (Emsâr’a) gönderdiği Mushaflarile “mushafu’l-imâm” olarak bilinen Hz. Osman’ın özel mushafı incelemektedir.Makale şu dört bölümden oluşmaktadır. Birinci bölüm, Osman b. Affân (ra)’ınİslam merkezlerinegönderdiği Mushaflarla ilgilidir. İkinci bölüm, Osman b. Affân (ra)’ın “mushafu’l-imâm” olarakbilinen özel mushafıyla ilgilidir. Üçüncü bölüm, Kurtuba Mushafıyla ilgilidir. Dördüncü bölüm,Osman b. Affân (ra)’ın özel mushafı “Mushafu’l...

  15. Salt damage and RH changes: The case of the Waag Building in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Lubelli, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the air MM can cause damage to building materials contaminated with hygroscopic saus, even in the absence of any other moishwe source. This phenomenon has been observed in the case of the iflag build ing in Amsterdam, affècted by severe salt decay. The investigation, canied out by means

  16. Erratum to

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Shuangyan; He, Mingxia; Fischer, Jürgen; Yuan, Dongliang; Xu, Peng; Xu, Tengfei; Yang, Xianping; Sokoletsky, Leonid; Wei, Xiaodao; Shen, Fang; Zou, Juhong; Guo, Maohua; Cui, Songxue; Zhou, Wu; Gao, Dalu; Jin, Guangzhen; Lü, Xianqing; Qiu, Fuwen; Fang, Wendong; Pan, Aijun; Cha, Jing; Zhang, Shanwu; Huang, Jiang; Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yongzhou; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhaopu; Long, Xiaohua; Hou, Zhishuai; Wen, Haishen; Li, Jifang; He, Feng; Liu, Qun; Wang, Jinhuan; Guan, Biao; Wang, Qinglong; Shahjahan, Md; Kabir, Md Farajul; Sumon, Kizar Ahmed; Bhowmik, Lipi Rani; Rashid, Harunur; Li, Shu; Yu, Kefu; Zhao, Jianxin; Feng, Yuexing; Chen, Tianran; Zhou, Shun; Ren, Yichao; Pearce, Christopher M.; Dong, Shuanglin; Tian, Xiangli; Gao, Qinfeng; Wang, Fang; Liu, Liming; Du, Rongbin; Zhang, Xiaoling; Dong, Shuanglin; Sun, Shichun; Feng, Song; Lin, Jianing; Sun, Song; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Zhipeng; Tang, Xuexi; Tang, Haitian; Song, Jingjing; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Qixiang; Qian, Kuimei; Liu, Xia; Chen, Yuwei; Sun, Chengjun; Jiang, Fenghua; Gao, Wei; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Yanzhen; Yin, Xiaofei; Wang, Yong; Ding, Haibing; Sun, Zhongmin; Wang, Yongqiang; Yan, Pengcheng; Guo, Hui; Yao, Jianting; Tanaka, Jiro; Kawai, Hiroshi; Song, Na; Chen, Muyan; Gao, Tianxiang; Yanagimoto, Takashi; Lu, Xia; Luan, Sheng; Kong, Jie; Hu, Longyang; Mao, Yong; Zhong, Shengping; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Li, Caiyan; Miao, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Unfortunately for all articles of Vol. 35 No. 1 the future journal title “Journal of Oceanology and Limnology” was used instead of the current journal title “Chinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnology”. All articles in the issue are aff ected. Please make sure to cite the articles with the

  17. Localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis captured on an X-ray before alendronate therapy in two cases of atypical femoral fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Yoichi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Shibukawa General Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shibukawa, Gunma (Japan); Takechi, Rumi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma Cardiovascular Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Iizuka, Haku; Takagishi, Kenji [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Omodaka, Takuya [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    We herein report two cases of atypical femoral fracture (AFF). X-ray examinations at the first visit of these two female patients showed a complete fracture of the femoral diaphysis diagnosed as an atypical femoral fracture (AFF). X-rays of these two cases also showed localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis. Both patients had been taking alendronate for more than 3 years because of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We assumed that both of the fractures were associated with the long-term use of alendronate. However, we retrospectively identified localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis on an X-ray taken before the alendronate therapy in both of these cases. Therefore, we suspected a pathogenesis of AFFs in which preexisting stress or an insufficient fracture unrelated to bisphosphonate (BP) therapy and subsequent suppression of bone turnover due to BP administration led to the occurrence of an AFF. The patient underwent surgery using intramedullary nails in both of these cases, followed by the administration of teriparatide, and they were able to walk without any support at the final follow-up examination. (orig.)

  18. 75 FR 24828 - Promoting a Competitive Market for Capacity Reassignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... part and remanded in part sub nom. Interstate Natural Gas Ass'n of America v. FERC, 285 F.3d 18, 350 U... ] 61,088 (2004), aff'd sub nom. American Gas Ass'n v. FERC, 428 F.3d 255, 368 U.S. App. DC 176 (DC Cir...

  19. 75 FR 42134 - United States v. Keyspan Corporation; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... rewards of discounting (selling a greater volume of capacity) while simultaneously mitigating the price... its remedy. See generally United States v. Microsoft Corp., 56 F.3d 1448, 1458-62 (D.C. Cir. 1995... (S.D.N.Y. 1997) (quoting Microsoft, 56 F.3d at 1460) (emphasis in original), aff'd sub nom, United...

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy - a molecular service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1987 a carrier detection and prenatal diagnostic service for. Duchenne muscular dystrophy using molecular technology was instituted at the Department of Human Genetics, Uni- versity of Cape Town, to serve affe.cted families in southern. Africa. DNA samples from 100 affected male subjects and. 350 of their relatives ...

  1. 78 FR 59093 - Quarterly Rail Cost Adjustment Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... (ICC) outlined the procedures for calculating the all-inclusive index of railroad input prices and the... American Railroads (AAR) is required to calculate the index on a quarterly basis and submit it to the...--Productivity Adjustment, 5 I.C.C. 2d 434 (1989), aff'd sub nom. Edison Electric Institute v. ICC, 969 F.2d 1221...

  2. 78 FR 78508 - Quarterly Rail Cost Adjustment Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... (ICC) outlined the procedures for calculating the all-inclusive index of railroad input prices [[Page... Association of American Railroads (AAR) is required to calculate the index on a quarterly basis and submit it... Procedures--Productivity Adjustment, 5 I.C.C.2d 434 (1989), aff'd sub nom. Edison Electric Institute v. ICC...

  3. Pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis: a review | Biomdo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatoid arthritis can aff ect the lung parenchyma, airways and pleura. Pulmonary complications are directly responsible for 10-20% of all mortality in RA patients. Objective: To highlight the common and important manifestations of rheumatoid lung disease and discuss the recent studies on each.Data source: Articles on ...

  4. Loss of Meaning Seen from Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Søren Harnow

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen argumenter for at man kan tale om ét fælles "meningsproblem" som optog filosoffer og intellektuelle omkring år 1900, selv om problemet med at sikre den videnskabelig praksis' og det videnskabelige sprogs meningsfuldhed (og de deraf affødte sprogfilosofiske og meningsteoretiske problemsti...

  5. Rural Utopi i Urban Tidsalder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2015-01-01

    Den kinesiske filmskaber, redaktør, kurator og kunstner Ou Ning udformede i 2010 notesbogen Hvordan man laver sin egen utopi; en forestilling om en intellektuel genoplivning af et tabt, ruralt fællesskab i landsbyen Bishan i den østlige del af Centralkina. Notesbogen er et montageværk, som afføde...

  6. Effect of forage on the content of phyto-oestrogens in bovine milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Hansen-Møller, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Phyto-oestrogens are believed to have a range of beneficial effects on predominant Western diseases. A few studies on phyto-oestrogens in milk exist and show that the composition can be affected by feeding. Therefore, the aim was to study how feeding of lucerne and grass/clover silages (GCSs) aff...

  7. Defense Acquisition Research Journal. Volume 23, Number 3, Issue 78, July 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Gansler University of Maryland RADM James Greene, USN (Ret.) Naval Postgraduate School Dr. Mike Kotzian Defense Acquisition University Dr. Craig Lush...environment included Taliban attacks that killed or injured workers and destroyed equipment (Aff leck, Seman, Deegan , Freeman, & Sargand, 2011...transaction cost analysis dimensions: Do contract types differ? Journal of Applied Business Research, 15, 65–80. Affleck, R., Seman, P., Deegan , M

  8. Original Researc Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    Practices. Problems. Supervision. Primary School. *Corresponding Author: Asrat Dagnew. E-mail: asratboza@yahoo.com tructional support. The relevant and ... vision is one of indispensable system pment. Supervision is a system of that directly concerned on the aff members in a school or other. Original Research ...

  9. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) and denosumab reduce the risk of spine and nonspine fractures. Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) located in the subtrochanteric region and diaphysis of the femur have been reported in patients taking BPs and in patients on denosumab, but they also occur in patients with no exp......Bisphosphonates (BPs) and denosumab reduce the risk of spine and nonspine fractures. Atypical femur fractures (AFFs) located in the subtrochanteric region and diaphysis of the femur have been reported in patients taking BPs and in patients on denosumab, but they also occur in patients...... with no exposure to these drugs. In this report, we review studies on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and medical management of AFFs, published since 2010. This newer evidence suggests that AFFs are stress or insufficiency fractures. The original case definition was revised to highlight radiographic features...... a minor to a major feature. The association with specific diseases and drug exposures was removed from the minor features, because it was considered that these associations should be sought rather than be included in the case definition. Studies with radiographic review consistently report significant...

  10. ELEMENTI DI GEOMETRIE FINITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Ferri

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Si fa vedere come si può costruire la geometria analitica su un piano affìne finito. Vengono riportati risultati classici che però sono stati esposti in modo da essere compresi dagli alunni delle Scuole Medie Secondarie.

  11. Nuevos datos paleontológicos del Pleistoceno en el Valle del Manzanares (Madrid, España: Los micromamíferos del yacimiento del Arenero de Arriaga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sesé, Carmen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The micromammals from the archaeological site of the Arenero de Arriaga from the Manzanares Valley are here described. They are the Soricomorpha: Crocidura sp. and Talpa sp., the Rodentia: Eliomys quercinus quercinus, Apodemus sp., Microtus brecciensis, Microtus arvalis, Microtus duodecimcostatus and Arvicola aff. sapidus, and the Lagomorpha: Oryctolagus cuniculus. The faunal association and the evolutionary state of Microtus brecciensis and Arvicola aff. sapidus, suggest an age of the end of the Middle Pleistocene. It also indicates the existence of different biotopes: riparian, moist and dry meadows, and forest, and a temperate climate similar to the present-day climate of the Meseta.Se describe la asociación de micromamíferos del yacimiento achelense del Arenero de Arriaga del valle del Manzanares constituida por los soricomorfos: Crocidura sp. y Talpa sp., los roedores: Eliomys quercinus quercinus, Apodemus sp., Microtus brecciensis, Microtus arvalis, Microtus duodecimcostatus y Arvicola aff. sapidus, y el lagomorfo: Oryctolagus cuniculus. La asociación faunística y el estadio evolutivo de Microtus brecciensis y Arvicola aff. sapidus, indican una edad del final del Pleistoceno Medio. La asociación de micromamíferos sugiere la existencia de varios biotopos representados: ripícola, praderas húmedas y secas, y bosque, y un clima templado similar al actual de la Meseta.

  12. Nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms: Transcriptional profiling of secretory proteins and the implication for the protein corona

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Engelmann, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Previously we have identified lysenin as a key protein constituent of the secretome from Eisenia fetida coelomocytes and revealed its critical importance in priming interactions between the cells and the protein corona around nanosilver. As alterations of the protein environment can directly affe...

  13. Migraine Trainers as Models: the effectiveness of Lay trainerswith migraine for behavioural attack prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.Y.M. Mérelle (Saskia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMigraine is a chronic brain disorder, characterized by attacks of severe headache accompanied by nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light, sound and smell. Attacks can be preceded by premonitory symptoms such as fatigue, muscular stiff ness or negative aff ect. It has been shown that

  14. Remote management and programmable automata; Telegestion et automate programmable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This document is the proceedings of the meeting organized by the French association of refrigeration (AFF) during the ELEC 2000 exhibition about the measurement, recording, data transmission, automation, diagnosis and management of refrigeration systems. An example of the energy saving made in a supermarket context thanks to the operation control of a refrigerating machinery is presented. (J.S.)

  15. What is the importance of open habitat in a predominantly closed forest area to the dung beetle (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae assemblage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio C. Costa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available What is the importance of open habitat in a predominantly closed forest to the dung beetle assemblage? The Atlantic Forest in Brazil is one of the most highly disturbed ecosystems and is mainly represented by fragmented areas. However, in places where human disturbances have ceased, certain areas are showing a natural regeneration pattern. The aim of the present study was to determine how the dung beetle assemblage responds to distinct habitat structures in a fragment of Atlantic Forest. For such, open and closed forest areas were sampled in a fragment of the Atlantic Forest in the northeastern region of Brazil. Pitfall traps baited with excrement and carrion were used to collect the beetles. A total of 7,267 individuals belonging to 35 species were captured. Canthon chalybaeus and C. mutabilis were restricted to open areas. Nearly 90% of the individuals of C. aff. simulans and Deltochilum aff. irroratum were identified in these areas. A higher percentage (> 50% of Canthon staigi, Dichotomius aff. depressicolis and D. aff. sericeus occurred in closed areas. Abundance differed between areas, with higher values in closed areas. Richness was not influenced by the habitat structure. NMDS ordination exhibited the segregation of areas and ANOSIM confirmed that this variable explained the assemblage of dung beetle species. The findings of the present study validate that open areas are associated to more restrictive conditions, limiting a higher abundance of dung beetle. Although situated near preserved fragments, the studied open areas increase the heterogeneity of the general landscape.

  16. Revisorlovgivningens Uafhængighedsregler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Lars Bo

    Papiret beskriver uafhængighedskravet til revisor, de grundliggende betingelser herfor, samt den gældende danske regulering. Herefter beskrives de problemer, det gældende regelsæt afføder i forhold til brugere, samfundet og revisorerhvervet selv. Notatet beskriver herefter en række reguleringsmod...

  17. Entering behavior of Gasteruption brachychaetum Schrottky (Hymenoptera, Gasteruptiidae into a nest of Hylaeus Fabricius (Hymenoptera, Colletidae Comportamento de entrada de Gasteruption brachychaetum Schrottky (Hymenoptera, Gasteruptiidae em um ninho de Hylaeus Fabricius (Hymenoptera, Colletidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Cruz Macedo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nests of Hylaeus aff. guaraniticus (Schrottky, 1906 were parasited by females of Gasteruption brachychaetum Schrottky, 1906 in trap nests in São Paulo (Brazil. This is thefirst host record of a Gasteruptiidae in the Neotropical Region. The behavior of a G.brachychaetum female entering a host's nest is described as follows: an inquiline female hovered near the host's nest, landed and detected that a female of H. aff. guaraniticus was inside the nest, waited for the host female to fly out, entered backwards into the nest, remained there for almost six minutes, and then went out the nest. The development time of immature stages of G.brachychaetum varied between 16 and 299 days.Ninhos de Hylaeus aff. guaraniticus (Schrottky, 1906foram parasitados por fêmeas de Gasteruption brachychaetum Schrottky, 1906 em ninhos-armadilha em São Paulo (Brasil. Este é o primeiro registro de hospedeiro de um Gasteruptiidae na região Neotropical. O comportamento de uma fêmea entrando no ninho do hospedeiro é descrito: a fêmea inquilina pairou sobre o ninho do hospedeiro, pousou e detectou que a fêmea de H. aff. guaraniticus estava dentro do ninho, esperou a fêmea hospedeira voar para fora do ninho, entrou de costas no ninho, permanecendo no local por quase seis minutos, em seguida, partiu voando. O tempo de desenvolvimento dos imaturos de G.brachychaetum variou entre 16 e 229 dias.

  18. Growth and yield considerations and implications for alternative density management objectives and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    David. Marshall

    2013-01-01

    Density management through thinning is the most important tool foresters have to aff ect stand development and stand structure of existing stands. Reducing stand density by thinning increases the growing space and resource availability (e.g., light, water, and nutrients) for the remaining trees. Th is can result in increased average tree growth. More available site...

  19. Food-resource partitioning among fish species from a first-order stream in northwestern Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jislaine Cristina da Silva

    Full Text Available This study addressed the feeding ecology of fish fauna from a first-order stream located in a rural area. The purposes were to evaluate the influence of interspecific, seasonal and spatial factors on the diet, examine the dietary overlap, and determine the predominant food sources. Sampling was conducted in December 2007, September 2008, and March 2009, in three 50-m stretches of Itiz stream (upstream, intermediate, and downstream, through electrofishing. A total of 1,102 stomach contents were analyzed from 14 species, by the volumetric method. In general, allochthonous resources were predominant in the diets. Astyanax aff. fasciatus, Astyanax aff. paranae, Astyanax bockmanni, and Bryconamericus aff. iheringi consumed a higher proportion of plant remains, and Bryconamericus stramineus consumed predominantly Hymenoptera. The diets of Cetopsorhamdia iheringi, Characidium aff. zebra, Imparfinis schubarti, and Trichomycterus sp. consisted of aquatic insects, especially immature forms of Trichoptera, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Diptera. Hypostomus ancistroides, Hisonotus sp., Poecilia reticulata, and Rineloricaria aff. pentamaculata exploited mainly detritus, while Rhamdia quelen used a variety of items, predominantly terrestrial insects. Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA showed a clear distinction among the species, with different morphology and feeding tactics. The Multi-Response Permutation Procedure (MRPP supported this differentiation, and also indicated significant spatial and temporal variations in the dietary composition; the Indicator Value Method (IndVal indicated the main items that contributed to these differences. The diet overlap among species was low (< 0.4 to around 78% of pairs, and the mean value did not vary significantly among the sites or between hydrological periods within each site. According to the null model of Pianka’s index, the values for dietary overlap were significantly higher than expected at random, showing

  20. LEAF RESIDUE DECOMPOSITION OF SELECTED ATLANTIC FOREST TREE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Dias Arato

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Biogeochemical cycling is essential to establish and maintain plant and animal communities. Litter is one of main compartments of this cycle, and the kinetics of leaf decomposition in forest litter depend on the chemical composition and environmental conditions. This study evaluated the effect of leaf composition and environmental conditions on leaf decomposition of native Atlantic Forest trees. The following species were analyzed: Mabea fistulifera Mart., Bauhinia forficata Link., Aegiphila sellowiana Cham., Zeyheria tuberculosa (Vell, Luehea grandiflora Mart. et. Zucc., Croton floribundus Spreng., Trema micrantha (L Blume, Cassia ferruginea (Schrad Schrad ex DC, Senna macranthera (DC ex Collad. H. S. Irwin and Barney and Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardiaceae. For each species, litter bags were distributed on and fixed to the soil surface of soil-filled pots (in a greenhouse, or directly to the surface of the same soil type in a natural forest (field. Every 30 days, the dry weight and soil basal respiration in both environments were determined. The cumulative decomposition of leaves varied according to the species, leaf nutrient content and environment. In general, the decomposition rate was lowest for Aegiphila sellowiana and fastest for Bauhinia forficate and Schinus terebinthifolius. This trend was similar under the controlled conditions of a greenhouse and in the field. The selection of species with a differentiated decomposition pattern, suited for different stages of the recovery process, can help improve soil restoration.

  1. SUBSTRATOS E TEMPERATURAS PARA TESTE DE GERMINAÇÃO EM SEMENTES DE MYRTACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Pereira Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian species of the Myrtaceae comprises several arborescent and shrubby plants that are used to produce fruit for fresh consumption or industrialization. Information about the seed quality evaluations for these species are scarce in the literature, mainly related to the adequacy of the germination tests. This study tests different substrates and temperatures to test the germination of Acca sellowiana (O. Berg Burret. (goiaba-serrana, Campomanesia xanthocarpa O. Berg (guabiroba, Eugenia involucrata DC. (cereja-do- mato and Eugenia pyriformis Camb. (uvaia seeds. Two seed lots were collected at different locations, one for each species, according to the requirements of the selection matrices. Sand and germitest paper towel rolls substrates were used, moistened with distilled water, and submitted to temperatures of 15 °C, 25 °C, 30 °C, 35 °C and 20-30 °C under constant light, on P.D.A. germinators. The experimental delineation was entirely randomized with four repetitions of 25 seeds/treatment/lot/specie, and treatment means were compared using the Tukey test (P < 0.01. The germination tests can be conducted at 25 °C using paper roll substrate for Eugenia pyriformis and E. involucrate . Both substrates can be used to Acca sellowiana germination test at 25 °C. The temperature of 25 °C and alternating 20-30 °C are indicated for Campomanesia xanthocarpa , as well as sand and paper roll substrates.

  2. Características de frutos e germinação de sementes de seis espécies de Myrtaceae nativas do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Santos Magalhães Ribas dos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Myrtaceae family is well represented in the flora of Rio Grande do Sul, in the Southern region of Brazil. The seed and the fruits from six trees species of this family were examined concerning their size, color, mass and water content. The species were the following: Acca sellowiana (Berg. Burnet; Campomanesia guazumifolia (Camb. Berg.; Campomanesia xanthocarpa Berg.; Eugenia rostrifolia Legr.; Myrcianthes pungens (Berg. Legr and Psidium cattleyanum Sabine. The germinative behavior of the seeds was evaluated and the substratum used was autoclaved, which was placed in gerbox (11 x 11cm, at constant temperatures 15, 20, 25 or 30°C or in alternate ones 15°C/ 30°C, with fourteen hours period, in the highest temperature. The experiments were also carried out in the dark. The seeds of Acca sellowiana, Myrcianthes pungens, Psidium cattleyanum showed positive photoblastic behavior. All species germinated in 90 days except Campomanesia guazumifolia which took around 150 days to germinate. The water content ranged from 9% in Campomanesia guazumifolia to 68% in Myrcianthes pungens and the seeds varied from intermediate to recalcitrant ones. The eugenoid embryos had a cryptocotylar germination, however the myrciod and the pimentoid had a fanerocotylar germination.

  3. Avaliação da atividade tóxica em Artemia salina e Biomphalaria glabrata de extratos de quatro espécies do gênero Eleocharis (Cyperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L.T.G. Ruiz

    Full Text Available O gênero Eleocharis R. Br. compreende cerca de 200 espécies, ocorrendo em ambientes úmidos tais como brejos e margens de rios e lagos. Procurando novos agentes moluscicidas, os extratos de Eleocharis acutangula (Roxb. Schult., Eleocharis interstincta (Vahl Roem. & Schult., Eleocharis maculosa (Vahl Roem. & Schult. e Eleocharis sellowiana Kunth foram testados para atividade moluscicida, contra caramujos adultos e desovas, e toxicidade (ensaio de letalidade com Artemia salina. O extrato hexânico de Eleocharis acutangula (parte subterrânea fresca foi ativo contra Artemia salina (CL50 = 476,00 mg/mL, enquanto os demais extratos apresentaram CL50 >> 10³ mg/mL, sugerindo baixa toxicidade. O extrato hidro-etanólico de Eleocharis sellowiana (parte subterrânea fresca foi ativo contra desovas de Biomphalaria glabrata (CL50 = 24,27 mg/mL mas inativo contra indivíduos adultos. Os demais extratos testados não apresentaram atividade moluscicida.

  4. Levantamento de Tibouchina Aubl. (Melastomataceae no Parque Estadual da Serra do Mar – Núcleo Curucutu – São Paulo. Survey of Tibouchina Aubl. (Melastomataceae at the Serra do Mar State Park – Curucutu Nucleous – São Paulo, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Vieira da SILVA

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho consiste no levantamentodas espécies de Tibouchina Aubl. (Melastomataceaeocorrentes no Parque Estadual da Serra do Mar,Núcleo Curucutu, Estado de São Paulo. Foramregistradas sete espécies de Tibouchina:Tibouchina cerastifolia (Naud. Cogn., Tibouchinaclinopodifolia (DC. Cogn., T. fothergillae (DC.Cogn., T. pulchra (Cham. Cogn., T. sellowiana(Cham. Cogn., T. trichopoda (DC. Baill. eT. virgata (Gard. Cogn. Para reconhecimento dasespécies são apresentadas chave analítica, descrições,ilustrações, observações fenológicas, distribuiçãogeográfica e comentários.This work is a survey of the species ofTibouchina Aubl. (Melastomataceae at the Serra doMar State Park, Curucutu Nucleus, situated inSão Paulo State. Seven species were recordedfor Tibouchina: T. cerastifolia (Naud. Cogn.,T. clinopodifolia (DC Cogn., T. fothergillae (DC.Cogn., T. pulchra (Cham. Cogn., T. sellowiana(Cham. Cogn., T. trichopoda (DC. Baill.and T. virgata (Gard. Cogn. Analytical key,descriptions, illustrations, phenological observations,geographic distribution and comments on thespecies are presented.

  5. Updates on Antiobesity Effect of Garcinia Origin (−-HCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Oon Chuah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia is a plant under the family of Clusiaceae that is commonly used as a flavouring agent. Various phytochemicals including flavonoids and organic acid have been identified in this plant. Among all types of organic acids, hydroxycitric acid or more specifically (−-hydroxycitric acid has been identified as a potential supplement for weight management and as antiobesity agent. Various in vivo studies have contributed to the understanding of the anti-obesity effects of Garcinia/hydroxycitric acid via regulation of serotonin level and glucose uptake. Besides, it also helps to enhance fat oxidation while reducing de novo lipogenesis. However, results from clinical studies showed both negative and positive antiobesity effects of Garcinia/hydroxycitric acid. This review was prepared to summarise the update of chemical constituents, significance of in vivo/clinical anti-obesity effects, and the importance of the current market potential of Garcinia/hydroxycitric acid.

  6. Screening of anti-HIV-1 inophyllums by HPLC-DAD of Calophyllum inophyllum leaf extracts from French Polynesia Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laure, Frédéric; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Butaud, Jean-François; Bianchini, Jean-Pierre; Gaydou, Emile M

    2008-08-22

    Various pyranocoumarins, calophyllolide, inophyllums B, C, G(1), G(2) and P, from Calophyllum inophyllum (Clusiaceae) leaves of French Polynesia (Austral, Marquesas, Society and Tuamotu archipelagos) have been determined in 136 leaf extracts using a high pressure liquid chromatography-UV-diode array detection (HPLC-UV-DAD) technique. Results show a wide range in chemical composition within trees growing on eighteen islands. The use of multivariate statistical analyses (PCA) shows geographical distribution of inophyllums and indicate those rich in HIV-1 active (+)-inophyllums. Inophyllum B and P contents (0.0-39.0 and 0.0-21.8 mg kg(-1), respectively) confirm the chemodiversity of this species within the large area of French Polynesia. The study suggests the presence of interesting chemotypes which could be used as plant source for anti-HIV-1 drugs.

  7. Laboratory evaluation of Clusia fluminensis extracts and their isolated compounds against Dysdercus peruvianus and Oncopeltus fasciatus

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    Rodrigo C. Duprat

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The effects of the hexanic extracts of the fruits and flowers of Clusia fluminensis Planch. & Triana, Clusiaceae, as well as their main constituents, the triterpene lanosterol and the benzophenone clusianone, were evaluated on hemipterans Dysdercus peruvianus and Oncopeltus fasciatus. The topical treatments of insects with the hexanic extracts significantly affected the survival of O. fasciatus, but not that of D. peruvianus. Concomitantly, extracts delayed the development of both hemipterans. Moreover, isolated lanosterol significantly reduced both the survival and development of O. fasciatus and D. peruvianus, while clusianone only reduce the survival of D. peruvianus and marginally inhibited the development of both insects. The results show the specific activity of lanosterol and clusianone against the two evaluated insect species and indicate the potential of compounds derived from C. fluminensis for the development of specific biopesticides for the control of agricultural pests. Subsequent work will examine the mode of action of lanosterol and clusianone isolates from C. fluminensis.

  8. Quiver Varieties and Branching

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    Hiraku Nakajima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Braverman and Finkelberg recently proposed the geometric Satake correspondence for the affine Kac-Moody group Gaff [Braverman A., Finkelberg M., arXiv:0711.2083]. They conjecture that intersection cohomology sheaves on the Uhlenbeck compactification of the framed moduli space of Gcpt-instantons on $R^4/Z_r$ correspond to weight spaces of representations of the Langlands dual group $G_{aff}^{vee}$ at level $r$. When $G = SL(l$, the Uhlenbeck compactification is the quiver variety of type $sl(r_{aff}$, and their conjecture follows from the author's earlier result and I. Frenkel's level-rank duality. They further introduce a convolution diagram which conjecturally gives the tensor product multiplicity [Braverman A., Finkelberg M., Private communication, 2008]. In this paper, we develop the theory for the branching in quiver varieties and check this conjecture for $G = SL(l$.

  9. The micromammals (Lagomorpha, Eulipotyphla and Rodentia) from the Middle Pleistocene site of Cuesta de la Bajada (Teruel, Spain): Systematic study and paleoenvironmental considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sese, C.; Soto, E.; Santonja, M.; Perez-Gonzalez, A.; Dominguez-Rodrigo, M.

    2016-07-01

    The micromammal association established in this work is the following: Lagomorpha: Oryctolagus cuniculus; Eulipotyphla: Crocidura cf. russula, cf. Sorex sp., Neomys sp., Soricidae indet. and Talpa sp.; and Rodentia: Eliomys quercinus, Apodemus cf. sylvaticus, Cricetulus (Allocricetus) bursae, Arvicola aff. sapidus, Microtus (Iberomys) brecciensis and Microtus (Terricola duodecimcostatus. This association is characteristic of the Middle Pleistocene. The morphological state of Cricetulus (A.) bursae, Arvicola aff. sapidus and Microtus (I.) brecciensis allows to place it in the advanced, but not final, Middle Pleistocene, which agrees with the numerical data of the site (243–337 ka) that places it in the MIS 8 or 9. The micromammals indicate the predominance of the open spaces with abundant vegetation mainly of herbaceous and bushes but also with some areas with trees. The climate would be of Mediterranean type, similar to the actual or perhaps a little milder and more humid. (Author)

  10. In vitro populations of rotifer Brachionus plicatilis Müller demonstrate inhibition when fed with copper-preaccumulating microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Garrido, I; Lubián, L M; Soares, A M

    1999-10-01

    Four marine microalgal species (Chlorella autotrophyca, Nannochloropsis gaditana, Tetraiselmis chuii, and Isochrysis aff. galbana) were exposed for 24 h to 1 mg L(-1) dissolved copper and then transferred to fresh medium. After that, a group of 10 neonate rotifers were fed with these four microalgal species. The levels of accumulated copper in cellular concentrations of the microalgae were checked, with the result of around 40% of original concentration, with the exception of I. aff. galbana (25% of original concentration). In all cases, cells with preaccumulated metal caused a delay of 1 or 2 days in populational development of rotifers (increase in "lag phase"). The microalgae that were not fed to rotifers (disposed in parallel series) did not significantly transfer metal to the medium after the first day.

  11. Franchising i den svenska fastighetsmäklarbranschen : Franchising in the Swedish real estate industry

    OpenAIRE

    Narkander, Christoffer; Ilchishina, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Sammanfattning Bakgrund Idag blir det allt mer vanligt att mindre enskilda mäklarbyråer ansluter sig till de stora franchisekedjorna. Anslutningen innebär att den tidigare enskilde aktören lämnar sitt varumärke och sin tidigare affärsidé för att istället ta del av ett välkänt varumärke och ett framgångsrikt affärskoncept. Syfte & metod Syftet med uppsatsen är att studera vilka positiva och negativa effekter franchising bidrar med i den svenska fastighetsmäklarbranschen samt vilka ekonom...

  12. Diffusa spänningar eller spännande tillväxt? : Företagsledning i tider av snabb förändring

    OpenAIRE

    Netz, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Ibland påstås snabba förändringar i omvärlden utmana storföretagens överlevnad mer än någonsin tidigare. I studien undersöks hur stora teknikbaserade företag förnyas genom utveckling av nya affärsområden. Sådana förnyelseprocesser har aktualiserats av informationsteknologiers snabba utveckling, en utveckling som fått till följd att etablerade handlingsmönster i affärsutveckling behöver omprövas. I snabbföränderliga miljöer utvecklas spänningar i organisationer, något som tongivande teori anta...

  13. Entering behavior of Gasteruption brachychaetum Schrottky (Hymenoptera, Gasteruptiidae into a nest of Hylaeus Fabricius (Hymenoptera, Colletidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Cruz Macedo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nests of Hylaeus aff. guaraniticus (Schrottky, 1906 were parasited by females of Gasteruption brachychaetum Schrottky, 1906 in trap nests in São Paulo (Brazil. This is thefirst host record of a Gasteruptiidae in the Neotropical Region. The behavior of a G.brachychaetum female entering a host's nest is described as follows: an inquiline female hovered near the host's nest, landed and detected that a female of H. aff. guaraniticus was inside the nest, waited for the host female to fly out, entered backwards into the nest, remained there for almost six minutes, and then went out the nest. The development time of immature stages of G.brachychaetum varied between 16 and 299 days.

  14. Florística e estrutura do componente arbóreo e análise ambiental de um fragmento de Floresta Ombrófila Mista Alto-Montana no município de Painel, SC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Higuchi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/198050988449A Floresta Ombrófila Mista Alto-Montana é uma formação pouco estudada que ocorre em altitudes acima de 1.000 m. Os objetivos deste estudo foram conhecer os padrões florísticos e estruturais do componente arbóreo de um fragmento desta floresta na região do Planalto Sul Catarinense e determinar as variáveis ambientais que influenciam esses padrões. O levantamento da composição florística e estrutural e a coleta das variáveis ambientais foram conduzidos em 50 parcelas de 200 m2. Nelas, todos os indivíduos arbóreos com CAP (circunferência medida a altura do peito ≥ 15,7 cm foram medidos (CAP e altura e identificados. Foram coletadas, em cada parcela, variáveis ambientais relacionadas às características químicas e físicas dos solos, topográficas e de cobertura do dossel. Foram calculados os parâmetros fitossociológicos e a estrutura diamétrica da comunidade e das populações com valor de importância (VI acima de 5 %. A similaridade florístico-estrutural entre as parcelas foi analisada pela NMDS (Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling e os vetores das variáveis ambientais significativas (p < 0,05 foram plotados a posteriori. Foram identificadas 50 espécies arbóreas distribuídas em 33 gêneros e 20 famílias botânicas. As espécies com maior VI foram: Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze (17,32 %, Myrceugenia euosma (O.Berg D.Legrand (15,24 % e Acca sellowiana (O.Berg Burret (7,84 %. A estrutura diamétrica de toda a comunidade e das populações estudadas (exceto Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. teve distribuição próxima ao “J invertido”. A análise NMDS demonstrou maior porcentagem de argila nas parcelas com maior densidade de Araucaria angustifolia e menor porcentagem, nas parcelas com maior densidade de Dicksonia sellowiana, Inga lentiscifolia Benth. e Ocotea pulchella Mart. As parcelas de maior declividade tiveram maior densidade de Drimys brasiliensis Miers e aquelas de

  15. Description and molecular characterization of a new species of tarantula, Pamphobeteus verdolaga , from Colombia (Araneae: Mygalomorphae: Theraphosidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Cifuentes, Yeimy; Estrada-Gomez, Sebastián; Vargas-Muñoz, Leidy Johana; Perafán, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new species of Pamphobeteus Pocock, 1901, is described from the Colombian Andes, Medellín, Antioquia. The biochemistry and molecular characteristics of the venom of this new species (previously identified as Pamphobeteus aff. nigricolor ) has been already described. A detailed taxonomic study, comparing this species with holotypes and additional material of Pamphobeteus species, allowed us to recognize it as new, and to describe it here as Pamphobeteus verdolaga sp. nov. The male o...

  16. Characterization of the main Iberian Peninsula and French Atlantic turbid plumes using MODIS satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez Novoa, Diego

    2018-01-01

    A river plume can be defined as a water mass with different properties than surrounding ocean water, in terms of salinity, temperature, composition and color, due to the influence of a river discharge. This is because river inputs provide fresh water, nutrients, sediments, organic and inorganic material and/or contaminants, among others, into the ocean, modifying the physical, chemical and biological conditions of the coastal areas under influence. Therefore, plumes play a key role in the aff...

  17. Cluster (Viridiplantae) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0”. This cluster ID is uniquely-assigned by the PGDBj Ortholog Database. Cluster size Number of proteins aff...r About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Cluster (Viridiplantae) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive ... ...List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB Cluster (Viridiplantae) Data detail Data name Cluster (Viridiplantae) DO...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  18. Supporting smoking cessation in older patients: a continuing challenge for community nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking continues to pose negative health consequences for smokers and their families, and is the single greatest cause of health inequalities in the UK. Older people are particularly vulnerable to the negative health impacts of smoking and therefore, supporting older smokers to quit remains an important public health goal. Community nurses are required to help patients to lead healthier lifestyles and have ideal opportunities to encourage smoking cessation in older people who are aff...

  19. Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. Quarterly Report to the United States Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-30

    powerful allies they have cultivated . Th e highest levels of the In late January, Deputy Prime Minister (DPM) for Energy Aff airs Hussein al...skills to combat criminal gangs and maintain the peace. General Jassam com- mented favorably on USF-I’s ability to learn from its mistakes and cultivate ...SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION FOCUS ON ANBAR • potato, mushroom , and strawberry fi elds In addition to these programs, Inma

  20. 76 FR 59953 - Designation of Agent To Receive Notification of Claimed Infringement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ..., 1057-1058 (C.D. Cal. 2002), aff'd in part and rev'd in part and remanded, 357 F.3d 1072 (9th Cir. 2004... and remanded, 357 F.3d 1072 (9th Cir. 2004). A fax number may be provided, but is optional information.../browse/app (definition of ``app''). While it is the Office's impression that as a general proposition...

  1. Conditions additionnelles régissant l'octroi de la subvention de voyage

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    en transit. Les indemnités versées en vertu de la présente subvention ne comprennent aucune disposition afférente à l'observation des législations nationales des pays que le participant pourrait visiter (y compris le Canada). Le Centre ne considérera aucune demande de remboursement relative à la délivrance de permis ...

  2. Public perceptions of west-side forests: improving visual impact assessments and designing thinnings and harvests for scenic integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Ribe

    2013-01-01

    Perceptions of public forests’ acceptability can be infl uenced by aesthetic qualities, at both broad and project levels, aff ecting managers’ social license to act. Legal and methodological issues related to measuring and managing forest aesthetics in NEPA and NFMA decision-making are discussed. It is argued that conventional visual impact assessments—using...

  3. Targeting Transcription Elongation Machinery for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Luo CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94704 REPORT DATE: May 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of California, Berkeley BERKELEY, CA 94704 9. SPONSORING...molecules. We have employed the CRISPR /Cas9 genome-editing tool to knock out the gene encoding the SEC component AFF4 or knock in a mutant cyclin T1 (AAG

  4. The Transforming Maternity Care Project: Goals, Methods, and Outcomes of a National Maternity Care Policy Initiative, With Construction of a Theoretical Model to Explain the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    although typically unaccounted for in the calculus of risks of VBAC versus repeat cesarean, the literature documents heightened risk of many short and...cessation and other behav- ioral interventions, aI!d dental care. • Within hospitals and health sys\\ ems, use person- nel policies to remove incentives...Cruel calculus : why saving premature babies is better business than helping them thrive. Health Aff (Millwood), 29(11), 2114-2117. Lawrence, P. R

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    17 mars 2015 ... l´accès aux soins, le type de patients, le plateau technique et les ressources .... expliquerait un taux élevé de prise de médicaments y afférent. 342(98 %). .... En effet, ces faibles poids de naissance sont le plus souvent rencontrés soient chez des prématurés, soient chez des nouveau-né dont l'évolution.

  6. Pengaruh Pembelanjaan Periklanan Dan Promosi Harga Pada Ekuitas Merek

    OpenAIRE

    Killa, Maklon Felipus

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of perceived advertising spending and price deal on brand equity's dimension, and the effect of brand equity's dimension onbrand equity based on consumer's perspective. University students in Yogyakarta were taken for the sample, those who owned and used notebook. Meanwhile thepurposive sampling was used for sampling technique. 350 questionnaires were distributed and 328 were used. The finding showed that brand loyalty was positivelyand significantly aff...

  7. The advantages of tomosynthesis for evaluating bisphosphonate-related atypical femur fractures compared to radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraszko, Andrew; Siegal, Daniel; Flynn, Michael; Rao, Sudhaker D; Peterson, Ed; van Holsbeeck, Marnix

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the advantages of using tomosynthesis (TS) compared to radiographs in the detection, characterization, and follow-up of bisphosphonate-related atypical femur fractures (BP-AFF). Eight patients were identified retrospectively who underwent TS for radiographic findings suspicious for BP-AFF. Two radiologists independently interpreted 15 radiographs and 16 TS examinations, indicating the presence or absence of the following: (1) cortical "beaking" on radiographs, (2) radiolucent fracture line on radiographs, and (3) fracture lucency on TS corresponding to the site of radiographic abnormality. Radiation dose data were calculated for radiographs and TS using Monte Carlo analysis. There was agreement on 100 % of radiographs regarding the presence or absence of a cortical beak. Regarding the presence or absence of a fracture lucency, there was agreement on 100 % of TS examinations (Kappa = 1.0) and 73 % of radiographs (Kappa = 0.40 ± 0.24). For the 46 % of radiographs in which one or both radiologists did not visualize a fracture line, there was 100 % agreement for the presence of a fracture line on the corresponding TS. The interobserver agreement for fracture line detection was significantly higher for TS than for radiographs (p = 0.012). The effective radiation dose using TS was approximately 96 % lower compared to radiography. TS outperformed radiographs in the detection and characterization of BP-AFF. TS may also have advantages over radiography for BP-AFF follow-up through its unique ability to visualize fracture healing with lower effective radiation doses to the patient.

  8. Assessment of reproductive and growth performances of pig breeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFF), weight at first farrowing (WtFF) and litter size (LS) of gilts were 179.97 ± 25.40 days; 1.76 ± 0.77; 100 ± 0.00; 350.47 ± 40.58 days; 107.26 ± 31.85 kg and 7.18 ± 1.93 piglets, respectively. In sows, the FI, fecundity, LS and farrowing interval ...

  9. A Study on Influence of Trust, Social identity, Perceived Risk and EWOM on Consumer Decision-Making Process in the context of Social Network Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Aizhen

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of Web 2.0 applications, social network sites enable customers to actively participate as market players and reach out to the mass population within a short span of time. The tremendous impact of the rise of social network sites not just shifted the way businesses work, it also changed the manner consumers behave. The objective of this thesis is to investigate the influence of social identity, EWOM (Electronic word-of-mouth), perceived risks, trust and purchase intentions affe...

  10. Rapid transfer of DNA from agarose gels to nylon membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, K C; Mann, D A

    1985-01-01

    The unique properties of nylon membranes allow for dramatic improvement in the capillary transfer of DNA restriction fragments from agarose gels (Southern blotting). By using 0.4 M NaOH as the transfer solvent following a short pre-treatment of the gel in acid, DNA is depurinated during transfer. Fragments of all sizes are eluted and retained quantitatively by the membrane; furthermore, the alkaline solvent induces covalent fixation of DNA to the membrane. The saving in time and materials aff...

  11. Measuring the Effectiveness of Border Security Between Ports of Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ts of migration. Massey, Durand, and Malone (2003) argue that neoclassical theory has limited explanatory power and, in fact, that immigration is...interpreted in the context of dif- ferent theories of how and why immigration occurs. Various theories explain immigration— for example, as a migrant’s...Durand, and Malone, 2003). One theory of how border security aff ects migration is that migrants employ a cost-benefi t calculation when deciding

  12. Investigating domain-general short-term memory for order versus specific item memory in developmental dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Hachmann, Wibke Maria

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that people with dyslexia experience difficulties with the learning of serial order information during the transition from short- to long-term memory. At the same time, models of short-term memory increasingly incorporate a distinction of order and item processing. This work aims to investigate whether serial order processing deficiencies in dyslexia can be traced back to a selective impairment of short-term memory for serial order, and whether this impairment also aff...

  13. Finding Bureaucracy

    OpenAIRE

    Rønningstad, Chris Andre

    2015-01-01

    This thesis will use survey data from Norwegian managers to answer the following research question: Are managers in public administrations more bureaucratic in their attitudes toward structure and values than managers in private enterprises? I will argue that the classical bureaucracy, as described by Max Weber, can be understood as defined by structure and values. One often disparages the structural elements of bureaucracy and forgets about the bureaucratic values. The mean scores from AFF's...

  14. BRAND EXPERIENCE – HOW IT RELATES TO BRAND PERSONALITY, CONSUMER SATISFACTION AND CONSUMER LOYALTY. AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF THE ADIDAS BRAND.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Cleff; Silvia Dörr; Andrew Vicknair; Nadine Walter

    2013-01-01

    Brand experience has attracted a lot of attention in the Marketing practice. With consumers seeking not only functional benefits of a brand but also emotional experiences, brand experience theory attempts to provide answers on how brand experience can be measured and how it effects consumer behavior. Th is article examines the relationship between Brakus et al.’s (2009) four brand experience dimensions – sensory, aff ective, intellectual and behavioral – and customer satisfaction and loyalty ...

  15. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-04

    conditions in the SIZ affeCt changes in cloud properties and cover, • develop novel instrumentation including low cost , expendable, air-deployed micro...hour per response, induding the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...From- To) 04 - 06 - 2017 Final Technical 0/1/01/2012 - 12/31/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Atmospheric Profiles , Clouds and the

  16. USAF Aircraft Maintenance Officer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities and Commonalities among the Logistics Officer Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    distribution managemen t operations to include managing cargo distribution functions such as receiving, inspecting, tracing, tracking, packaging, and...Production Management DE CDE ABCDEFG Scheduling DE ADEF ABCDEF T ie r 2 Flightline Operations E BDE Systems Engineering D ABDEG Table 19: 21R...logistics units/ elements and as members of general or executive s t affs in t he operating forces, supporting establishment, and joint staffs . They

  17. The first recorded bloom of Pseudochattonella farcimen (Dictyochophyceae, Heterokonta, (Riisberg I., 2008 in the Gulf of Gdańsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Łotocka

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In April 2001 a local bloom of the heterokont phytoflagellate Pseudochattonella farcimen (Riisberg I., 2008 (initially named Chattonella aff. verruculosa was observed for the first time in the southern part of the Gulf of Gdańsk.The species occurred in high cell densities: the count was 11.5 × 106 cells dm-3 and the biomass 927.5 µgC dm-3.

  18. How Bank Capital Structure Affects Business Performance---- Empirical evidence from Chinese Commercial banks

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ting

    2010-01-01

    In the end of 2006, China realizes the opening of financial market, thus Chinese commercial banks have to face the global competitors. How to exist and develop in the market with fierce competition has been more and more significant to Chinese commercial banks. Because commercial banks’ business performance is the overall reflection of banks’ competence, so they should consider improving the bank business performance. Thus this study aims to discuss how commercial banks’ capital structure aff...

  19. Pengaruh Deferensiasi Motivasi Sosial Terhadap Perilaku Profesional Guru

    OpenAIRE

    Subandowo, M

    2009-01-01

    Research on professional behavior (professional competence, personal, social, and pedagogic) related to social motivation as factors are very important, considering the teacher's role is key in improving the quality of learning. Therefore this study aims to determine the influence of differentiation of social motivation (achievement, affiliation and power) to the professional competence of teachers and also to assess how the level of social motivation relationship motivation (achievement, aff...

  20. EARLY MIOCENE INSULAR VERTEBRATES FROM LAERRU (SARDINIA, ITALY): PRELIMINARY NOTE

    OpenAIRE

    DANIEL ZOBOLI; GIAN LUIGI PILLOLA

    2017-01-01

    A new vertebrate assemblage was discovered in an Early  Miocene lacustrine deposit near the village of Laerru (northern Sardinia, Italy). The assemblage is composed by mammals, reptiles and a bird. The mammals are represented by three ruminants (cf. Sardomeryx oschiriensis, Pecora indet. small size and Pecora indet. very small size) and one dormouse (Peridyromys aff. murinus) while reptiles are represented by turtles (Trionychidae?) and crocodiles (cf. Diplocynodon sp.). A bird bone fragment ...

  1. Non-Host Plant Volatiles Disrupt Sex Pheromone Communication in a Specialist Herbivore

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fumin; Deng, Jianyu; Schal, Coby; Lou, Yonggen; Zhou, Guoxin; Ye, Bingbing; Yin, Xiaohui; Xu, Zhihong; Shen, Lize

    2016-01-01

    The ecological effects of plant volatiles on herbivores are manifold. Little is known, however, about the impacts of non-host plant volatiles on intersexual pheromonal communication in specialist herbivores. We tested the effects of several prominent constitutive terpenoids released by conifers and Eucalyptus trees on electrophysiological and behavioral responses of an oligophagous species, Plutella xylostella, which feeds on Brassicaceae. The non-host plant volatile terpenoids adversely affe...

  2. Molecular and cellular parameters of ageing: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu Thukral; Sumeet Soin; Ritu Rani; Aparna Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is characterized by a progressive loss of physiological integrity, leading to impaired function and increased propensity to death. Ageing is an actively regulated metabolic process. This wear and tear is the primary risk factor for major human pathologies including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases. Approximately worldwide 1 lakh people die each day of age related causes. Ageing, which we define as the time-dependent functional decline that affe...

  3. Analysis of the Vocational and Residential Preferences of a Rural Population: Application of an Experimental Technique to Rural Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Zanni, Alberto; Bailey, Alastair; Davidova, Sophia M.

    2008-01-01

    This study applies Choice Experiments to the analysis of the relative importance of both monetary and non-monetary determinants of vocational choice and spatial labour supply. It identifies the determinants of individuals’ choice of jobs and places of residence, and provides a better understanding of how rural labour adjustments might be managed in a country in transition. The results indicate that while wages are the most important factor influencing employment choice, other determinants aff...

  4. 地上波広告放送市場をめぐる実証分析の展望

    OpenAIRE

    春日, 教測; 宍倉, 学

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will survey recent papers on empirical economic analysis with respect to terrestrial broadcasting industry. There are four related markets; (a) contents, (b) advertiser's goods, (c) TV (or radio) advertisement, (d) program supply. Here, we focus on two markets, (c) and (d). When we analyze determinants of profit in terrestrial broadcasting industry, we must pay attention to two characteristics; (i) oligopoly structure in each market, (ii) cost-saving advantage by network aff...

  5. Tro og Viden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2015-01-01

    tid at være forskere og troende kristne. Georges Lemaître kunne således som professor i astronomi udvikle Big Bang teorien, samtidig med at han var katolsk præst.Det har affødt en kritisk kommentar (den 24. juli) fra Torben Smith Sørensen, der har opfattet det, som om Lemaître blandede naturvidenskab...

  6. Habitat use by a tree frog species of Scinax (Amphibia, Hylidae at an urban forest fragment from south-eastern Brazil Uso do hábitat por uma espécie de Scinax (Amphibia, Hylidae em um fragmento florestal urbano no sudeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrado A. B. Galdino

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the pattern of habitat use by the tree frog Scinax aff. perereca. Fieldworks were performed from August 1996 to August 1997 at Parque das Mangabeiras, Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil. Calling males were observed in September, October and December 1996, February to April and June 1997. Females were found only in October 1996. Specimens were found perched on vegetation, on the ground or on stones near waterfall. At Parque das Mangabeiras, S. aff. perereca occupied nine types of substrata. The most frequently used substrata were shrubs, stones at the stream edges, and fallen trunks. The pattern of spatial occupation varied among months. Males were found calling in aggregations on the vegetation and spatial niche breadth was related to species abundance.No presente estudo é tratado o uso do hábitat por Scinax aff. perereca, durante o período de agosto de 1996 a agosto de 1997 em uma área de mata urbana em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, sudeste do Brasil. Machos em atividade de vocalização foram encontrados em setembro, outubro e dezembro de 1996 e de fevereiro a abril e junho de 1997. As fêmeas foram capturadas apenas em outubro de 1996. Os indivíduos foram encontrados em galhos da vegetação no solo ou em pedras próximas a quedas de água. Na área estudada, S. aff. perereca usa nove tipos de substratos, sendo os mais freqüentes a vegetação herbácea, pedras na margem do riacho e troncos caídos. O padrão de ocupação espacial variou ao longo dos meses. Os machos foram encontrados vocalizando em agregados e a largura de nicho espacial foi diretamente relacionada a abundância da espécie.

  7. Development of mergers and acquisitions in the conditions of the Czech economy 2001–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroslav Sedláček; Zuzana Křížová; Eva Hýblová

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of a research project which has the aims to identify the problems appearing during the preparation of mergers in compliance with valid Czech regulations and to analyze economic causes and consequences of mergers. At the first stage it was necessary to compile a basic dataset in a structure needed for a statistical analysis. The aim of the analysis presented in this paper is to ascertain, both theoretically and empirically, how the external environment aff...

  8. Low VHF Channel Measurements and Simulations in Indoor and Outdoor Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Transactions on. 2002;50(5):591-599. 22. Nerguizian C, Despins C, Affes S, Djadel M. Radio-channel characterization of an underground mine at 2.4 ghz...INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. viii 1. Introduction Reliable wireless communication is of paramount importance for many important civilian and military...report, we study near-ground, wireless channel modeling in the lower VHF band for indoor and indoor/outdoor scenarios, drawing from extensive propagation

  9. Effect of pregnancy on plasma phenobarbital concentrations in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Moriyama, Masahiro; Domoto, Haruyo; Yamashita, Syoichi; Furuno, Katsushi; Oishi, Ryozo; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Gomita, Yutaka

    1995-01-01

    We examined the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital before and during pregnancy in rats. Animals were divided into four groups: (a) control, (b) pregnant, (c) phenobarbital-treated, and (d) phenobarbital-treated pregnant groups. The increase in body weight of nonpregnant or pregnant rats was not influenced by long-term phenobarbital treatment. Plasma phenobarbital concentrations during the period of long-term phenobarbital treatment with a fixed dosage by body weight were not significantly affe...

  10. Patterns of cross-sensitivity in the responses of clonal subpopulations isolated from the RIF-1 mouse sarcoma to selected nitrosoureas and nitrogen mustards.

    OpenAIRE

    Reeve, J. G.; Wright, K. A.; Workman, P.

    1984-01-01

    The response of clonal subpopulations isolated from the RIF-1 mouse sarcoma to melphalan treatment is independent of cell ploidy, whereas a clear relationship exists between ploidy and cell sensitivity to CCNU treatment. In the present study RIF-1 clones have been exposed to nitrogen mustard, aniline mustard and chlorambucil, and to nitrosoureas BCNU, MeCCNU and chlorozotocin, in order to evaluate whether or not the different physiochemical and biological activities of these agents would affe...

  11. Bovidae (artiodactyla, mammalia del mioceno medio de Tarazona de Aragon (depresión del Ebro, provincia de Zaragoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereda-Suberbiola, X.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper cranial, dental and postcraneal fossil remains of the Bovidae family from Tarazona de Aragón are described. There are two forms in this Middle Miocene paleontological site of the Ebro Basin according to the metric and morphological characteristics of the dentition and hom cores. One form is referred to Eotragus and classified as E. aff. sansaniensis, showing more developed features than the other Iberian forms of the same genus. The other form is classified provisionally as aff. Tethytragus because it is quite similar to the Iberian Tethytragus langai and differs from Eotragus. The two bovids from Tarazona show differences in size, hypsodoncy and dental morphology, especially the differences of development and prominence of the styles/stylideds and ribs are obvious.Se describen restos fósiles dentarios, craneales y postcraneales pertenecientes a la familia Bovidae del yacimiento de Tarazona de Aragón. Según las características morfológicas y métricas de la dentición y los núcleos óseos, existen dos formas en este yacimiento del Mioceno medio de la Cuenca del Ebro. Una ha sido atribuida al género Eotragus y clasificada como E. aff. sansaniensis, mostrando características más derivadas que el resto de las formas ibéricas del mismo género. La otra se clasifica, provisionalmente, como aff. Tethytragus, ya que guarda similitudes con la especie ibérica Tethytragus langai y diferencias evidentes con respecto a Eotragus. Los dos taxones se diferencian netamente respecto a la talla, hipsodoncia y morfología de la dentición; sobre todo, las diferencias de desarrollo y prominencia de los estilos/estílidos y costillas mismos son evidentes.

  12. Silk and Sakoku : a simulation analysis of industrial location in Edo period Japan

    OpenAIRE

    ATSUMI, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Japan closed itself to international trade from the 17^ century to the mid-19^ century during the Edo period, known as the Sakoku. After the closure, industries dispersed from western coastal cities to inland areas in western and eastern Japan. This paper investigates how the Sakoku may have aff ected industrial locations within Japan by applying a footloose entrepreneur type geography model to an economy with agricultural raw materials in a continuous space setting. The simulations based on ...

  13. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. olume 22, Number 1, January 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Bragg, NC . . 1 . . 1 2.3 Fort Bliss , TX . 1 . . . 1 2.3 Fort Hood, TX . . 1 . . 1 2.3 Joint base Langley-Eustis, VA 1 . . . . 1 2.3 Fort Lewis, WA...seasons in temperate climates but depends more on other factors aff ect- ing mosquito breeding such as the tim - ing of the rainy season and altitude (below

  14. Three new records of Desmodorids (Nematoda, Desmodoridae) from sandy seabeds of the Canary islands

    OpenAIRE

    Riera, Rodrigo; Núñez, Jorge; Brito, María del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    In an ecological study of meiofaunal assemblages in two locations (Los Abrigos and Los Cristianos) of Tenerife (Canary Islands, NE Atlantic Ocean), several desmodorid species were found throughout the study period. Three species belonging to the family Desmodoridae were collected in intertidal and shallow subtidal sandy seabeds. These species were Desmodorella aff. tenuispiculum Allgen, 1928, Metachromadora sp. and Spirinia parasitifera Bastian, 1865. Descriptions, figures and tables with mer...

  15. BRAC and Crime: Examining the Effects of an Installation’s Closure on Local Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Community Survey AFF American Fact Finder BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics BJS Bureau of Justice Statistics BRAC Base Realignment and Closure CJIS...Criminal Justice Information Services CPI Consumer Price Index DD Difference-in-Differences DOD Department of Defense DOJ Department of Justice FBI...at the Naval Postgraduate School. The education received here will prove invaluable. I also want to acknowledge the unwavering support of my advisors

  16. Administration des subventions aux institutions Dépenses de projet ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Consultants. Cette catégorie comprend toutes les dépenses engagées pour retenir les services d'un consultant aux ... déplacement, d'hébergement et de subsistance, ainsi qu'aux services de soutien retenus directement ... le transport aérien et les autres dépenses afférentes aux déplacements du personnel du projet à.

  17. The "institutional factor" in the theory of international trade: new vs. old trade theories

    OpenAIRE

    Parrinello, Sergio

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The New Trade Theory presents novel perspectives compared to the Old Theories of international trade. Increasing returns and different institutional arrangements can explain the international specialization and trade flows even between countries which are identical in terms of factor endowments, technology and preferences for private goods. In this context the pattern of trade cannot be determined by a price/cost comparison of isolated countries. Comparative advantages can be affe...

  18. Floral traits driving reproductive isolation of two co-flowering taxa that share vertebrate pollinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Joel A.; Quirino, Zelma G. M.; Machado, Isabel C.

    2015-01-01

    Floral attributes evolve in response to frequent and efficient pollinators, which are potentially important drivers of floral diversification and reproductive isolation. In this context, we asked, how do flowers evolve in a bat–hummingbird pollination system? Hence, we investigated the pollination ecology of two co-flowering Ipomoea taxa (I. marcellia and I. aff. marcellia) pollinated by bats and hummingbirds, and factors favouring reproductive isolation and pollinator sharing in these plants. To identify the most important drivers of reproductive isolation, we compared the flowers of the two Ipomoea taxa in terms of morphometry, anthesis and nectar production. Pollinator services were assessed using frequency of visits, fruit set and the number of seeds per fruit after visits. The studied Ipomoea taxa differed in corolla size and width, beginning and duration of anthesis, and nectar attributes. However, they shared the same diurnal and nocturnal visitors. The hummingbird Heliomaster squamosus was more frequent in I. marcellia (1.90 visits h−1) than in I. aff. marcellia (0.57 visits h−1), whereas glossophagine bats showed similar visit rates in both taxa (I. marcellia: 0.57 visits h−1 and I. aff. marcellia: 0.64 visits h−1). Bat pollination was more efficient in I. aff. marcellia, whereas pollination by hummingbirds was more efficient in I. marcellia. Differences in floral attributes between Ipomoea taxa, especially related to the anthesis period, length of floral parts and floral arrangement in the inflorescence, favour reproductive isolation from congeners through differential pollen placement on pollinators. This bat–hummingbird pollination system seems to be advantageous in the study area, where the availability of pollinators and floral resources changes considerably throughout the year, mainly as a result of rainfall seasonality. This interaction is beneficial for both sides, as it maximizes the number of potential pollen vectors for plants and

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04396-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rbcL intergenic spac... 44 5.3 1 ( DQ209842 ) Maxillaria lepidota atpB-rbcL inter...pacer, p... 44 5.3 1 ( DQ209656 ) Maxillaria molitor atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer, p... 44 5.3 1 ( DQ209650 ) Maxillaria lepidota...Q209568 ) Maxillaria cf. rufescens Whitten 1669 atpB-rbcL i... 44 5.3 1 ( DQ209566 ) Maxillaria aff. lepidota

  20. Creatine supplementation and exercise as possible therapeutic treatments in Parkinson’s Disease: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, S. M..; Baird, M..; Boyd, G. W..

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative condition after Alzheimer’s Disease. It is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons inthe substantia nigra region of the brain. Symptoms and signs manifest as motor disorders affecting balance and physical capacity, and non-motor symptoms such as cognitive decline and mood disorders. People with PD face considerable difficulties coping with associated physical and psychological changes that aff...

  1. Bilateral Incomplete Atypical Femoral Fracture due to Long-Term Bisphosphonate Use: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Başaran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the overall safety profile of bisphosphonates (BP is favorable, adverse effects associated with long-term use have came up during recent years. In this report, a case of bilateral incomplete atypical femoral fracture (AFF due to prolonged BP use was presented. A 69-year-old patient, who has been in surgical menopause for 20 years and was started on BP following vertebral fracture almost 10 years ago, was admitted with thigh pain, which was increased two weeks ago. On physical examination, she had antalgic gait, increased thoracic kyphosis and tenderness to percussion over the thoracolumbar region. Lateral cortical thickness in the subtrochanteric region of both femurs and cortical radiolucency on the left femur were observed on plain radiography. Loss of height in L3 and L4 vertebrae was detected on vertebral radiography. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OHD], parathyroid hormone, alkaline phosphatase and calcium levels, along with osteoporosis markers were all within the normal ranges. As the patient was diagnosed with AFF, BP therapy was terminated and vitamin D-calcium supplementation was continued. Since she did not have severe pain, conservative management (limited weight bearing, using a walking stick was recommended for 3 months. Teriparatide therapy was started and she was discharged with recommendations. AFF, which is a rare disorder, should be kept in mind in patients on long-term BP treatment who are admitted with thigh pain and, necessary interventions should be tailored before the occurrence of complete fracture.

  2. Ostracoda (Arthropoda, Crustacea from the Riachuelo Formation, Sergipe-Alagoas Basin, Brazil, Upper Aptian-Albian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Silveira Antonietto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Sergipe-Alagoas Basin has one of the most complete, exposed lithological successions of the Cretaceous period in the continental margin of Brazil. It captures several phases of the evolution of the South Atlantic Ocean, including rift, gulf and drift. The upper Aptian–Albian Riachuelo Formation corresponds to the first stages of the southern proto-Atlantic Ocean invasion in that basin. The present study reviews the taxonomic identification and ecology of 39 ostracod species of this formation, proposing a new genus – Gabonorygma gen. nov. – and three new species – Praebythoceratina deltalata sp. nov., Gabonorygma sergipana gen. et sp. nov. and Brachycythere smithsoniana sp. nov. Other taxa include Conchoecia? sp. 1, Cytherella sp. 1, C. besrineensis comb. nov., Cytherelloidea aff. globosa, C. btaterensis, Bairdoppilata sp. 1, Bairdoppilata sp. 2, B. comanchensis comb. nov., B. pseudoseptentrionalis, Robsoniella falklandensis, Cetacella sp. 1, Paracypris eniotmetos, Harbinia sinuata?, H. crepata, Liasina sp. 1, Praebythoceratina amsittenensis comb. nov., P. trinodosa comb. nov., Patellacythere sp. 1, P. shimonensis comb. nov., Xestoleberis? sp. 1, Xestoleberis? sp. 2, Apatocythere? sp. 1, Neocythere? aff. pseudovanveeni, N. (Physocythere tenuis, Aracajuia antiqua comb. nov., A. benderi, A. fragilis comb. nov., Eocytheropteron sp. 1, Metacytheropteron aff. minuta, Microceratina? sp. 1, M. azazoulensis, Veenia guianensis, Algeriana? sp. 1, Quasihermanites? sp. 1 and Sergipella viviersae.

  3. Descubrimiento de mamíferos fósiles de edad Lujanense (Pleistoceno tardío en el "Desierto" de La Tatacoa (Huila, Colombia Descubrimiento de mamíferos fósiles de edad Lujanense (Pleistoceno tardío en el "Desierto" de La Tatacoa (Huila, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villaroel A. Carlos

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available A small sedimentary basin, at the Los Hoyos locality, has been discovered with in the Tatacoa "desert". Taxonomic studies are not yet complete but at least two forms related to living species have been identified: Sylvilagus aff. floridanus and Tayassu aft. tajacu. A third form is referred to family Gomphotheriidae. Based on this small fauna, the locality can be correlated with the Lujanian Land Mammal "Age". Aspects of the paleoecology and paleogeography of the locality are also brieflydiscussed. Se da a conocer el descubrimiento de una pequeña cuenca sedimentaria con mamíferos fósiles, en el lugar denominado Los Hoyos, dentro del ámbito del "desierto" de La Tatacoa. Aunque los estudios taxonómicos de los fósiles no están aún completos, no cabe duda de que se trata, de dos formas afines a especies vivientes, identificadas como Sylvilagus aff. floridanus y Tayassu aff. tajacu , y una tercera forma, referida a la familia Gomphotheriidae. Con base en esta pequeña fauna, se data el yacimiento como de edad Lujanense, además se anotan brevemente aspectos paleoecológicos y paleogeográficos.

  4. Punição corporal aplicada por funcionários de duas escolas públicas brasileiras: prevalence in two public schools

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    Ana Carina Stelko-Pereira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo identificou casos de alunos vítimas de agressões físicas por parte de funcionários de escolas brasileiras e verificou sua relação com características demográficas, depressão e engajamento escolar. Responderam ao Questionário de Investigação de Prevalência de Violência Escolar, ao Inventário de Depressão Infantil e à Escala de Engajamento Escolar 396 estudantes de duas escolas públicas. No total, 21 alunos foram agredidos fisicamente por funcionários (AFF. Houve diferenças significativas entre o grupo AFF e o dos que não foram agredidos fisicamente (NAFF. No primeiro houve maior proporção de alunos do sexo feminino, de alunos violentos com os pares e de alunos vítimas de colegas, e maior índice de depressão. Não houve diferenças significativas entre os grupos quanto aos aspectos idade, escolaridade, reprovação e engajamento escolar. Supõe-se que o aluno AFF apresente comportamentos de agressão aos colegas e funcionários da escola e que por isso seja agredido, o que o levaria a continuar sendo agressivo com os outros. Tal hipótese deve ser investigada em estudos futuros.

  5. Atypical Femur Fractures in Patients Treated with Bisphosphonates: Identification, Management, and Prevention

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    Judith Sarah Bubbear

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a common condition with significant health care costs. First-line therapy is with bisphosphonates, which have proven anti-fracture efficacy. Around 10 years after the introduction of bisphosphonates reports began to be published of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs that may be associated with this therapy. These fractures are associated with significant morbidity although lower mortality than the more common osteoporotic neck-of-femur fractures. A case definition has been described to allow identification of this class of fracture. Further work has established a high relative risk of AFFs in patients treated with bisphosphonates, but a low absolute risk in comparison to that of osteoporotic fractures. Proposed pathological mechanisms include low bone turnover states leading to stress/insufficiency fractures. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of AFFs and in particular the high rate of prodromal thigh/groin pain that warrants investigation in a patient receiving a bisphosphonate. If an incomplete fracture is diagnosed then bisphosphonate therapy needs to be stopped and prophylactic surgery may be considered. Due to these rare side effects patients on bisphosphonates require regular review, and this is particularly advised after 5 years of oral or 3 years of intravenous therapy.

  6. Application of MSSIP-2 nutrient in marine phytoplankton culture to support the production of biomass for biofuel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba, Paulina; Kasim, S.; Raya, I.

    2018-03-01

    A research on the application of MSSIP-2 nutrient in marine phytoplankton culture has been conducted to produce biomass to be used as raw material for biofuel. Marine phytoplankton was cultivated using the nutrient media and the growth rates were studied by measuring the cell solidity at various growth times. Seven phytoplanktons; Isochrysis aff galbana, Spirulina sp., Thalassiosira sp., and Nitzchia sp., Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros calcitrans and Isochrysis tahiti were used in the research. The experimental temperature, salinity, and pH of the media were measured and the specific growth rates of phytoplanktons were determined using the first order rate equation. Results showed that the highest specific growth rate was given by Chlorella vulgaris (0.0322 cells/hour) and the lowest one was by Thalassiosira sp. (0.0277 cells/hour). The highest biomass weight was obtained from Isochrysis aff galbana (0.329 g), whereas the lowest one (0.27 g) was from Nitzchia sp. The carbohydrate content was various, the highest content was 34.07% found in Isochrysis aff galbana and the lowest was 28.16% in Thalassiosira sp.

  7. Path analysis for selection of feijoa with greater pulp weight

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    Joel Donazzolo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this paper was to identify the direct and indirect effects of feijoa fruits (Acca sellowiana traitson pulp weight, in order to use these traits in indirect genotypes selection. Fruits of five feijoa plants were collected in Rio Grande do Sul, in the years of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Six traits were evaluated: diameter, length, total weight, pulp weight, peel thickness and number of seeds per fruit. In the path analysis, with or without ridge regression, pulp weight was considered as the basic variable, and the other traits were considered as explanatory variables. Total weight and fruit diameter had high direct effect, and are the main traits associated with pulp weight. These traits may serve as criteria for indirect selection to increase feijoa pulp weight, since they are easy to be measured.

  8. BORAGINACEAE A. JUSS. SENSU LATO EM UMA FLORESTA ESTACIONAL DE TERRAS BAIXAS EM PERNAMBUCO, BRASIL

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    JOSÉ IRANILDO MIRANDA DE MELO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the survey of the family Boraginaceae in a lowland seasonal dry forest in the municipality of Aliança, Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil. Seven species and three genera were recorded: Cordia L., with three species (C. sellowiana Cham., C. taguahyensis Vell. and C. trichotoma (Vell. Arráb. ex Steud.; Heliotropium L., with only one species, H. elongatum (Lehm. I.M. Johnst. and Tournefortia L., represented by three species (T. bicolor Sw., T. gardneri A.DC. and T. rubicunda Salzm. ex A.DC.. A key to the recognition of the species, as well as descriptions and illustrations were given. Data about distribution, flowering and or fruiting of the species also are provided.

  9. PHYSIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST SEEDS REGARDING THE DESICCATION TOLERANCE AND STORAGE BEHAVIOUR

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    Rafaella Carvalho Mayrinck

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to classify forest seeds native to the Alto Rio Grande region regarding the desiccation tolerance and storage behaviour. Germination and water content tests were performed in seeds of different species. The tests were conducted immediately after seed processing, at 12% and 5% of water content, and at 5% after 3 months of storage in -18°C. Based on the results obtained, seeds were classified into recalcitrant, intermediate and orthodox class. Seeds of Brosimum gaudichaudii, Erythroxylum deciduum, Eugenia pleurantha, Myrcia venulosa, Nectandra megapotamica were classified as recalcitrant (22.7% of all species. Seeds of Aegiphila sellowiana, Aspidosperma parvifolium, Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Casearia lasiophylla, Cassia occidentalis, Dalbergia miscolobium, Diospyros brasiliensis, Diospyros hispida, Ilex brevicuspis, Ilex cerasifolia, Myrocarpus fastigiatus, Senna aversiflora, Senna splendida e Blepharocalyx salicifolius were classified as intermediate (59.1% of all species. Seeds of Miconia albicans, Platycyamus regnellii, Styrax camporum and Piptadenia gonoacantha were classified as orthodox (18.2% of all species.

  10. Características de frutos e germinação de sementes de seis espécies de Myrtaceae nativas do Rio Grande do Sul.

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    Cristina Magalhães Ribas dos Santos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A família Myrtaceae é muito bem representada na flora do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, região sul do Brasil. Frutos e sementes de seis espécies foram examinados quanto ao tamanho, cor, massa, teor de água. As espécies são: Acca sellowiana (Berg. Burnet; Campomanesia guazumifolia (Camb. Berg.; Campomanesia xanthocarpa Berg.; Eugenia rostrifolia Legr.; Myrcianthes pungens (Berg. Legr. e Psidium cattleyanum Sabine. Avaliou-se o comportamento germinativo das sementes, tendo sido usada como substrato areia de rio autoclavada umedecida com água destilada, colocada em caixas gerbox (11 x 11cm nas temperaturas constantes de 15, 20, 25 ou 30°C ou na alternada de 15°C - 30°C, com 14 horas na temperatura mais alta. Os experimentos foram efetuados na presença e ausência de luz. Acca sellowiana, Myrcianthes pungens, Psidium cattleyanum mostraram sementes fotoblásticas positivas. Todas as espécies germinaram em noventa dias, exceto Campomanesia guazumifolia, que levou cerca de cento e cinqüenta dias. O conteúdo de água das sementes variou de 9% em Campomanesia guazumifolia até 68% em Myrcianthes pungens, ocorrendo sementes de intermediárias a recalcitrantes em relação à dessecação. Os embriões tipo eugenoide mostraram germinação criptocotiledonar, enquanto os embriões tipo mircióide e pimentóide apresentaram comportamento fanerocotiledonar.

  11. O ARMAZENAMENTO REFRIGERADO PROLONGA A VIABILIDADE DE SEMENTES DE GOIABEIRA-SERRANA

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    JOEL DONAZZOLO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a viabilidade e o vigor das sementes de dois genótipos de Acca sellowiana sob diferentes condições e tempos de armazenamento. As sementes foram obtidas a partir de duas plantas (G1 e G2 localizadas em quintais da área urbana de Vacaria-RS. O experimento foi realizado em esquema trifatorial (2 x 3 x 2, sendo duas condições de armazenamento (temperatura ambiente: 20-25ºC; e refrigerado: 4-8ºC, três períodos de armazenamento (zero, um e dois anos, e dois genótipos (G1 e G2, conduzidos em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições de 50 sementes. As sementes foram postas para germinar sobre papel absorvente umedecido em caixas tipo “gerbox”, mantidas em câmara de crescimento com temperatura de 25 ± 2 °C e fotoperíodo de 16 h. Avaliaram-se o índice de velocidade de germinação, a porcentagem de germinação e o tempo médio de germinação, por meio da contagem de sementes germinadas a cada dois dias, por 44 dias após o início da germinação. Os genótipos apresentaram desempenhos significativamente diferentes na taxa germinativa e no vigor das sementes. Quando armazenadas em temperatura ambiente, as sementes perderam o poder germinativo drasticamente no primeiro ano e completamente no segundo ano. Conclui-se que é possível manter 80% de poder germinativo das sementes de Acca sellowiana por dois anos em armazenamento refrigerado (4 a 8 ºC.

  12. CARACTERÍSTICAS DE FRUTOS E GERMINAÇÃO DE SEMENTES DE SEIS ESPÉCIES DE MYRTACEAE NATIVAS DO RIO GRANDE DO SUL

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    Maria Estefânia Alves Áquila

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A família Myrtaceae é muito bem representada na flora do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, região sul do Brasil. Frutos e sementes de seis espécies foram examinados quanto ao tamanho, cor, massa, teor de água. As espécies são: Acca sellowiana (Berg. Burnet; Campomanesia guazumifolia (Camb. Berg.; Campomanesia xanthocarpa Berg.; Eugenia rostrifolia Legr.; Myrcianthes pungens (Berg. Legr. e Psidium cattleyanum Sabine. Avaliou-se o comportamento germinativo das sementes, tendo sido usada como substrato areia de rio autoclavada umedecida com água destilada, colocada em caixas gerbox (11 x 11cm nas temperaturas constantes de 15, 20, 25 ou 30°C ou na alternada de 15°C - 30°C, com 14 horas na temperatura mais alta. Os experimentos foram efetuados na presença e ausência de luz. Acca sellowiana, Myrcianthes pungens, Psidium cattleyanum mostraram sementes fotoblásticas positivas. Todas as espécies germinaram em noventa dias, exceto Campomanesia guazumifolia, que levou cerca de cento e cinqüenta dias. O conteúdo de água das sementes variou de 9% em Campomanesia guazumifolia até 68% em Myrcianthes pungens, ocorrendo sementes de intermediárias a recalcitrantes em relação à dessecação. Os embriões tipo eugenoide mostraram germinação criptocotiledonar, enquanto os embriões tipo mircióide e pimentóide apresentaram comportamento fanerocotiledonar.

  13. Neuropsychological correlates of cognitive, emotional-affective and auto-activation apathy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Roberta; Turchetta, Chiara Stella; Caruso, Giulia; Fadda, Lucia; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Augusto Giovanni

    2018-01-31

    Apathy symptoms include different dimensions: cognitive (C), emotional-affective (E-Aff) and auto-activation; they have been related to dysfunctions of the dorsolateral, orbito-basal prefrontal cortex and the subcortical frontal connections to the basal ganglia, respectively. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), an association has been found between apathy severity and both executive deficits and atrophy of the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex; however, it is not clear whether these associations concern only the cognitive aspects of apathy. Furthermore, whether there is an association in AD between E-aff apathy and theory of mind (ToM),the cognitive functions subsumed by the orbito-basal prefrontal cortex, has not been investigated. Aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between C, E-Aff and auto-activation apathy and performance on tasks investigating executive and ToM cognitive functions in AD. For this purpose, 20 AD patients with apathy and 20 matched controls were submitted to an executive and ToM neuropsychological assessment. Apathy was assessed with a weekly diary (ApD) created specifically to assist caregivers in quantifying the C, E-Aff and auto-activation symptomatology of apathy. Correlational analyses showed that AD patients' scores on the Modified Card Sorting Test (MCST) and Emotion Attribution tasks were correlated with most ApD scores. However, regression analyses showed that C diary scores were predicted by MCST performance, E-Aff diary scores by performance on the E-Attribution task and ApD scores measuring auto-activation apathy were predicted by both the MCST and the Emotion Attribution scores. These results confirm the co-occurrence of apathy and executive-function deficits in AD and suggest a specific association between AD patients' executive deficits and the cognitive component of apathy. Furthermore, they document, for the first time, an association between poor performance on tests assessing ToM abilities and the emotional

  14. Lateral Cortical Thickening and Bone Heterogeneity of the Subtrochanteric Femur Measured With Quantitative CT as Indicators for Early Detection of Atypical Femoral Fractures in Long-Term Bisphosphonate Users.

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    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-10-01

    The objective of our study was to compare subtrochanteric femur bone mineral density (BMD) and bone quality of long-term bisphosphonate (BP) users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture (AFF) with BP users who did not sustain a femoral fracture and BP-naïve patients with no history of femoral fracture using quantitative CT (QCT). Fourteen female BP users with an AFF (mean age, 72.6 years; mean duration of BP use, 6.2 years; mean body mass index, 21.9) who had undergone QCT before fracture events were sex-, age-, BP use duration-, and body mass index-matched to 14 BP users who did not sustain a fracture and 14 BP-naïve patients. The lateral cortical thickness index (CTI) and the mean BMD (BMD mean ) and SD of the BMD (BMD SD ) within the lateral cortex and within the entire cross-sectional area of the subtrochanteric femur were measured on axial QCT. Femoral neck-shaft angles were measured on the QCT scout image. Parameters were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Lateral CTIs were greater in the BP users with an AFF (median, 0.28) than in the BP users without a femoral fracture (median, 0.21) (p = 0.038) and the BP-naïve group (median, 0.21) (p = 0.009). The lateral cortex BMD SD was significantly higher in the BP users with an AFF (median, 59.59 mg/cm 3 ) than the BP users without a femoral fracture (median, 39.27 mg/cm 3 ; p = 0.049) and the BP-naïve group (median, 31.02 mg/cm 3 ; p = 0.037). There was no significant difference among groups in lateral cortex BMD mean , BMD mean and BMD SD of the entire cross-sectional area, and femoral neck-shaft angle. Long-term BP users with a subsequent AFF had a thicker lateral cortex and higher lateral cortex BMD SD at the subtrochanteric area before the fracture on QCT than BP users who did not sustain a femoral fracture and BP-naïve patients.

  15. Food-resource partitioning among fish species from a first-order stream in northwestern Paraná, Brazil

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    Jislaine Cristina da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addressed the feeding ecology of fish fauna from a first-order stream located in a rural area. The purposes were to evaluate the influence of interspecific, seasonal and spatial factors on the diet, examine the dietary overlap, and determine the predominant food sources. Sampling was conducted in December 2007, September 2008, and March 2009, in three 50-m stretches of Itiz stream (upstream, intermediate, and downstream, through electrofishing. A total of 1,102 stomach contents were analyzed from 14 species, by the volumetric method. In general, allochthonous resources were predominant in the diets. Astyanax aff. fasciatus, Astyanax aff. paranae, Astyanax bockmanni, and Bryconamericus aff. iheringi consumed a higher proportion of plant remains, and Bryconamericus stramineus consumed predominantly Hymenoptera. The diets of Cetopsorhamdia iheringi, Characidium aff. zebra, Imparfinis schubarti, and Trichomycterus sp. consisted of aquatic insects, especially immature forms of Trichoptera, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Diptera. Hypostomus ancistroides, Hisonotus sp., Poecilia reticulata, and Rineloricaria aff. pentamaculata exploited mainly detritus, while Rhamdia quelen used a variety of items, predominantly terrestrial insects. Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA showed a clear distinction among the species, with different morphology and feeding tactics. The Multi-Response Permutation Procedure (MRPP supported this differentiation, and also indicated significant spatial and temporal variations in the dietary composition; the Indicator Value Method (IndVal indicated the main items that contributed to these differences. The diet overlap among species was low (Este estudo abordou a ecologia alimentar da ictiofauna de um riacho de primeira ordem situado em área rural. Os objetivos foram verificar a influência dos fatores interespecíficos, sazonais e espaciais sobre a dieta, avaliar a sobreposição alimentar, além de determinar os

  16. Aerial organ anatomy of Smilax syphilitica (Smilacaceae

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    João Marcelo Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Smilax L. in Brazil is represented by 32 taxa and it is a taxonomically difficult genus because the plants are dioecious and show wide phenotypic variation. The analysis and use of leaf anatomy characters is recognized as a frequently successful taxonomic method to distinguish between individual taxon, when floral material is absent or minute differences in flowers and foliage exist such as in Smilax. The aim of this study was to characterize the anatomical features of the aerial organs in Smilax syphilitica collected from the Atlantic Rainforest, in Santa Teresa-ES and the Smilax aff. syphilitica from the Amazon Rainforest, in Manaus, Brazil. For this, a total of three samples of Smilax were collected per site. Sample leaves and stems were fixed with FAA 50, embedded in historesin, sectioned on a rotary microtome, stained and mounted in synthetic resin. Additionally, histochemical tests were performed and cuticle ornamentation was analyzed with standard scanning electron microscopy. S. syphilitica and S. aff. syphilitica differed in cuticle ornamentation, epidermal cell arrangement and wall thickness, stomata type and orientation, calcium oxalate crystal type, and position of stem thorns. Leaf blades of S. syphilitica from the Amazon Rainforest have a network of rounded ridges on both sides, while in S. aff. syphilitica, these ridges are parallel and the spaces between them are filled with numerous membranous platelets. Viewed from the front, the epidermal cells of S. syphilitica have sinuous walls (even more pronounced in samples from the Amazon; while in S. aff. syphilitica, these cells are also sinuous but elongated in the cross-section of the blade and arranged in parallel. Stomata of S. syphilitica are paracytic, whereas in S. aff. syphilitica, are both paracytic and anisocytic, and their polar axes are directed towards the mid-vein. Calcium oxalate crystals in S. syphilitica are prisms, whereas in S. aff. syphilitica, crystal sand. Thorns

  17. Antioxidant activity, total phenols and flavonoids of lichens from Venezuelan Andes.

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    Claudia M. Plaza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Context:The biological potential of lichens has been documented through their use in traditional medicine. Secondary lichen metabolites exert a wide variety of biological actions, including their use as antioxidants. Aims:To evaluate the antioxidant activity, total phenol content, and flavonoids of four lichen fungal taxa collected in Mérida (Venezuela, and statistically evaluate the correlation between the antioxidant activity and the amount of phenols and flavonoids in the samples. Methods: Extracts were prepared with water, ethanol and dichloromethane from Cladonia aff. rappii, Cora aff. glabrata, Peltigera laciniata and Thamnolia vermicularis. The antioxidant capacity assessment was determined using DPPH• radical method and reducing power, with ascorbic acid as control. Total phenols were determined by means of the Folin-Ciocalteu method with gallic acid. Total flavonoids were estimated according to the modified Dowd method, using quercetin as standard. Results:The ethanolic extracts of the tested lichens showed the highest scavenging activity and reducing power compared to water and dichloromethane extracts at 4 mg/mL. The highest antiradical power value was found in ethanolic extract of Peltigera laciniata (2.28 mL/mgand the lowest in dichloromethane extract of Cora aff. glabrata (0.30 mL/mg. The correlation between antioxidant activity and total phenolic content was moderate. The flavonoids content of ethanolic extracts was highly significant but negative (p < 0.05. There was good correlation in dichloromethane extracts. The ethanolic extract of P. laciniata exhibited the highest antiradical activity despite showing the lowest flavonoid content. Conclusions: The ethanolic extracts of lichens tested showed to have the higher antioxidant activity and may be used as natural sources of new antioxidants.

  18. Physical and psychological determinants of injury in Ontario forest firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H; Larivière, M

    2014-12-01

    Forest firefighters are faced with multiple physical and psychological challenges as a result of their duties. Little is known about the determinants of injury among these workers. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR) Aviation, Forest Fire and Emergency Services (AFFES) records detailed information on two mutually exclusive types of workplace injury: First aid (self-reported) and Workplace Safety Insurance Board (WSIB, i.e. received medical attention). To identify the contributions of physical and psychological factors on the likelihood of injury among forest firefighters. Participants were male and female forest firefighters aged between 18 and 65. Data were collected using two self-administered instruments: The NEO Personality Inventory and the Job Stress Survey. Secondary data were collected from the OMNR AFFES and data were analysed by way of multivariate statistical procedures. There were 252 participants. Those who were older, had a history of injury, had high scores for the personality construct of Neuroticism or low scores for the Openness construct were significantly more likely to incur a first aid injury, while those with high experience levels were significantly less likely to incur injury (P First aid and WSIB injuries in the OMNR AFFES were quite distinct phenomena and different factors need consideration in their prediction. It is recommended that managers and decision-makers in this field consider factors such as job stress, personality and the prior occurrence of injuries in their assessment of risk. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Hemiparásitas en la franja subandina del Departamento de Cundinamarca, Colombia

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    Berrera Torres Eduardo

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The hemiparasites studied are grouped in 3 families: Loranthaceae, Viscaceae and Eremolepidaceae. 30 species belonging to 7 genera are reported in this work. Phoradendron of the Viscaceae family is the genus best represented with 15 species. The species Phoradendron aft. aequatoris, P. balslevií, P. Brittonianum y P. cymosum are reported for the first time to Colombia. Four hiperparasitic species are registered: Ixocactus hutchisonií, Phoradendron aff. aequatoris, P. dipterum and Struthanthus orbicularis. The taxa studied are distributed in altitudinal ranges from the lower montane forest. The diversity of hemiparasitic species is greater in the western slope of the Eastern Andean mountain ranga. This flora correspond to 33 % of the species registered for Colombia.Las hemiparásitas estudiadas se agrupan en 3 familias: Loranthaceae, Viscaceae y Eremolepidaceae. Se registran 30 especies pertenecientes a 7 géneros: el mejor representado es Phoradendron de la familia Viscaceae, con 15 especies. Las especies Phoradendron aff. aequatoris, P. balslevií, P. brittonianum y P. cymosum se reportan por primera vez para Colombia. Además se destacan 4 especies hiperparásitas: Ixocectus hutchisonii; Phoradendron aff. aequatoris, P. dipterum y Struthanthus orbicularis. Los taxa estudiados se distribuyen en gradientes altitudinales del Bosque Subandino. La diversidad de especies hemiparásitas en el flanco occidental de la Cordillera Oriental es mayor. La comparación de los registros obtenidos con los provenientes de otros lugares, en el territorio colombiano, indica que esta flora constituye aproximadamente el 33%.

  20. Variation of the ichthyofauna along the Goioerê River: an important tributary of the Piquiri-Paraná basin

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    Claudenice Dei Tos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The construction of reservoirs is considered an important source of impacts on the fish fauna, severely altering the structure of the assemblage. This paper aimed to describe the structure of the fish assemblage of the Goioerê River, determining its longitudinal distribution and patterns of species dominance. The evaluation of its longitudinal variation in the diversity and abundance of the fish assemblage was conducted in July and October 2004 and January and May 2005. The collections were carried out near the headwaters (Gurucaia, middle stretch (Olaria, just above the falls (Paiquerê and downstream (Foz. Forty-four species were captured. The Gurucaia fish assemblages differed significantly from Olaria, Paiquerê and Foz. The Olaria assemblages differed significantly from the Foz. Gurucaia showed the lowest diversity and abundance of species. Astyanax aff paranae Eigenmann,1914 (78% of the total was found to be dominant at this site. Almost the same species richness was found at Olaria and Paiquerê, although Olaria had the greatest abundance of individuals. Astyanax aff paranae, Cyphocharax modestus (Fernández-Yépez, 1948 and Astyanax altiparanae Garutti & Britski, 2000 were the top three dominants and comprised over 71% of the total number of fish caught. At Paiquerê, Astyanax altiparanae, Hypostomus aff ancistroides (Ihering, 1911 and Loricariichthys platymetopon Isbrücker & Nijssen, 1979 composed 58% of the catches. Thirty-one species were recorded at Foz, which presented the greatest richness. The most abundant species were Apareiodon affinis (Steindachner, 1879, Galeocharax knerii (Steindachner, 1879 and A.altiparanae, which contributed to 50% of the total catches in this environment.These results record the fish biodiversity and how the community is longitudinally structured in the Goioerê River, and also demonstrate how this type of evaluation is important to understanding the fish community patterns and finding solutions to

  1. Evaluating the potential of housekeeping genes, rRNAs, snRNAs, microRNAs and circRNAs as reference genes for the estimation of PMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chunyan; Du, Tieshuai; Shao, Chengchen; Liu, Zengjia; Li, Liliang; Shen, Yiwen

    2018-04-24

    The precise estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) is a critical step in death investigation of forensic cases. Detecting the degradation of RNA in tissues by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) technology provides a new theoretical basis for estimation of PMI. However, most commonly used reference genes degrade over time, while previous studies seldom consider this when selecting suitable reference genes for the estimation of PMI. Studies have shown microRNAs (miRNAs) are very stable and circular RNAs (circRNAs) have recently emerged as a novel class of RNAs with high stability. We aimed to evaluate the stability of the two kinds of RNAs and normal reference genes using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms to identify tissue-specific reference genes for PMI estimation. The content of candidate RNAs from mouse heart, liver and skeletal muscle tissues were dynamically examined in 8 consecutive days after death. Among the 11 candidate genes (β-actin, Gapdh, Rps18, 5S, 18S, U6, miR-133a, miR-122, circ-AFF1, LC-Ogdh and LC-LRP6), the following genes showed prioritized stability: miR-122, miR-133a and 18S in heart tissues; LC-Ogdh, circ-AFF1 and miR-122 in liver tissues; and miR-133a, circ-AFF1 and LC-LRP6 in skeletal muscle tissues. Our results suggested that miRNAs and circRNAs were more stable as reference genes than other kinds of RNAs regarding PMI estimation. The appropriate internal control genes were not completely the same across tissue types.

  2. Thermodynamical double-flux ventilation system in individual house; Systeme de ventilation double flux thermodynamique en maison individuelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This guidebook written by the French scientific and technical committee of the space heating, ventilation and air-conditioning industry (Costic) with the collaboration of the French association of coldness production engineering (AFF) and Electricite de France (EdF), presents the technical rules and practical advices for the installation of thermodynamical double-flux ventilation systems in residential houses. Content: heat pumps (standardization and regulation, choice and dimensioning of the auxiliary electrical supply, installation, acoustic precautions), aeraulic networks (standardization and regulation, choice and dimensioning, installation), thermal insulation, thermoregulation, control and start-up, maintenance. (J.S.)

  3. Miscellaneous

    OpenAIRE

    NN

    2002-01-01

    CONSTANCE, LINCOLN (Eugene, OR, USA, 16 February 1909 — Berkeley, CA, USA, 11 June 2001) Foremost expert on Umbelliferae/Apiaceae systematics. His long and distinguished career began as a graduate student with Willis Linn Jepson in the 1930s. He was Curator of Seed Plants in the University Herbarium (UC) beginning in the 1940s, Chair of the Department of Botany in the early 1950s, Dean of the College of Letters and Science from the mid 1950s to the early 1960s, Vice-Chancellor of Academic Aff...

  4. Level of radiation exposure to staff in X-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zol'nikova, N.I.; Moisejtsev, P.I.; Trunov, B.V.

    1976-01-01

    In modern radiological service departments the dose rates at working placesof medical aff directly engaged in diagnostic work were found to range from 7 to 100 mR/h during fuoroscopand up to 1,200 mR/h during roentgenoscopy and ray inematography, respectively. Durig fluocopic work in the operating theatre the monthly doses to staff ranged from 100 to 380 mRfor sugeos and anaesthesists, from 110 to 225 mR for surgical nurses, and from5to 30 roranhesia nurses. AUTHOR)

  5. Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: A pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4.4 million participants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Bin; Lu, Yuan; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Bentham, James; Di Cesare, Mariachiara; Danaei, Goodarz; Bixby, Honor; Cowan, Melanie J; Ali, Mohammed K; Taddei, Cristina; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Reis-Santos, Barbara; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Riley, Leanne M.; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Source: doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)00618-8 Background:One of the global targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the agestandardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. We aimed to estimate worldwide trends in diabetes, how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target, and how changes in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, are aff ecting the number of adults with diabetes. Methods:We pooled data from popu...

  6. PENGARUH PEMBELANJAAN PERIKLANAN DAN PROMOSI HARGA PADA EKUITAS MEREK

    OpenAIRE

    Killa, Maklon Felipus

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of perceived advertising spending and price deal on brand equity’s dimension, and the effect of brand equity’s dimension onbrand equity based on consumer’s perspective. University students in Yogyakarta were taken for the sample, those who owned and used notebook. Meanwhile thepurposive sampling was used for sampling technique. 350 questionnaires were distributed and 328 were used. The finding showed that brand loyalty was positivelyand significantly aff...

  7. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 2. Confirmation/Quantification. Stage 1. Reese Air Force Base, Lubbock, Texas. Volume 2. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    12 XR7Jw - - DRILLNdL - SITE NAlE: SITE I.D: SITE LOCATION: 009 TDD #R6- DATE: ROLE DESIGNATION: .;] HOLE LOCATION: GROUND ELEV: TOP OF CASING FLEV...0 STAflDBY POWER IASB , 0 HP RP DESCRhIPTION VI~S~G ANDNELL~Rr~T~ T~V~L ~5~ .LLNGTh - IeA : - - - Flur27 AFF:m98 Well, Allt; ’PV$ - p I3 n I’I Figue...require a complete respect for safety by all team members to prevent injury or loss of life. 15.1 ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES There are eight roles

  8. Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, U.S. Armed Forces, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    were aff ected by unspecifi ed (“all other”) musculoskeletal disorders (e.g., disorders of “other” joints, muscles , tendons, soft tissues) than by...2012 Vol. 19 No. 4 M S M R Page 7 Endocrine disorders Other endocrine dis 17,565 (66) 7,362 (70) 240 (89) Hypothyroidism 14,147 (71) 7,521 (69...foot/ankle), and two musculoskeletal disorders (back and disorders of “other” joints, muscles , ten- dons, soft tissues). Th roughout military history

  9. Działania środowiskowe i współpraca instytucji na rzecz osób chorujących psychicznie

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalewska, Marta; Goździalska, Anna; Jaśkiewicz, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Praca recenzowana / peer-reviewed paper Mental and behavioral disorders are common diseases aff ecting more than 25% of the population. Th ey are as universal as they relate to people from all countries and societies, people of all ages – both women and men, people of varying fi nancial status, living in urban areas or rural areas. Changing the behavior of a suff ering persons concern his/her family, then other members of local society, because no one really understand what had happen t...

  10. Higher Education in the Global Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume is about higher education in the context of globalization. Universities are rapidly becoming internationalized, and far from being just' a question of the English language replacing local languages as the working language, this process has introduced a whole range of sociolinguistic...... processes and resources have to be made which will aff ect every level and type of academic, social and administrative practice. The aim of the research represented by this anthology is to develop a new theoretical understanding of the internationalization process, in which - inspired by Bourdieu - we see...

  11. Body weight has no impact on self-esteem of minority children living in inner city, low-income neighborhoods: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, William W; Mikhail, Carmen; Ortiz, Christina L; Lathan, Debra; Moore, Louis A; Konzelmann, Karen L; Smith, E O’Brian

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between body weight and self-esteem among underserved minority children is not well documented. Methods We measured the self-esteem profile using the Self-Perception Profile for Children among 910 minority children at 17 Houston community centers. Results Weight status had no effect on any of the self-esteem scores among the minority children (P ≥ 0.21). Black children had higher scholastic competence than Hispanic children (P = 0.05). Social acceptance was not aff...

  12. Micofagia por roedores en un bosque templado del centro de México Mycophagy by rodents in a temperate forest of Central Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citlalli Castillo-Guevara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La micofagia por roedores en hongos hipogeos ha sido documentada en diversos ecosistemas del mundo; sin embargo, el estudio del consumo de hongos epigeos por este grupo ha sido insuficiente. En el presente trabajo se evaluó de manera experimental la micofagia de 2 especies de ratones silvestres (Neotomodon alstoni y Peromyscus maniculatus en el hongo epigeo ectomicorrizógeno Russula aff. cuprea y la posible preferencia de estos ratones por consumir alguna estructura específica del hongo (píleo, himenio o estípite. Asimismo, se analizó si el paso del hongo a través del tracto digestivo afectaba la actividad metabólica esporal. Los resultados indican que aunque el esporoma entero puede ser consumido, el himenio (parte fértil es la primera estructura seleccionada por ambas especies. Además, se encontró que el paso por el tracto digestivo de las 2 especies de ratones no tiene efecto significativo (p= 0.067 en la actividad metabólica esporal de R. aff. cuprea, sugiriendo que estos ratones silvestres podrían ser dispersores efectivos de las esporas del hongo epigeo en el Parque Nacional La Malinche.The mycophagy by rodents in hypogeous fungal species has been widely documented in different ecosystems around the world. However, the consumption of epigeos fungi by this group has been poorly studied. In this study we evaluated the mycophagy by 2 mice species (Neotomodon alstoni and Peromyscus maniculatus in the epigeous ectomycorrhizal fungi Russula aff. cuprea. Experimentally tests were carried out to see if these mice species have a preference to consume a specific structure of the fungus (pileus, hymenium or stipe. Also, we analyzed if the passage of this fungus through the digestive tract has an effect on the sporal metabolic activity. Our results indicate that although the whole sporocarp can be consumed, the hymenium (fertile part of the sporocarp was the first structure selected by both mice species. Furthermore, we found that the

  13. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Myong-Seop; Park Byung-Gun; Kang Gi-Doo

    2018-01-01

    A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affe...

  14. Alopecia frontal fibrosante: una enfermedad en auge

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana-Sancho, A. de; Piris-García, X.; Valle-García, N.; Hierro-Cámara, M.

    2016-01-01

    La alopecia frontal fibrosante (AFF) es un tipo de alopecia cicatricial cuya incidencia está aumentando de forma significativa en nuestro país. Se caracteriza por un retroceso en la línea de implantación del pelo a nivel frontotemporal que afecta mayoritariamente a mujeres postmenopaúsicas, con un impacto negativo en su calidad de vida. Se asocia a menopausia precoz en un 14% de los casos y a hipotiroidismo en un 15%. Con respecto al tratamiento, son los inhibidores de la 5alfa-reductasa, los...

  15. Exploration of Computer Game Interventions in Improving Gaze Following Behavior in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Jessi Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Statistics show the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a developmental delay disorder, is now 1 in 110 children in the United States (Rice, 2009), nearing 1% of the population. Therefore, this study looked at ways modern technology could assist these children and their families. One deficit in ASD is the inability to respond to gaze referencing (i.e. follow the eye gaze of another adult/child/etc), a correlate of the responding to joint attention (RJA) process. This not only aff...

  16. Automated Structural Optimization System (ASTROS). Volume 1. Theoretical Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    corresponding frequency list are given by Equation C-9. The second set of parameters is the frequency list used in solving Equation C-3 to obtain the response...vector (u(w)). This frequency list is: w - 2*fo, 2wfi, 2wf2, 2wfn (C-20) The frequency lists (^ and w are not necessarily equal. While setting...alternative methods are used to input the frequency list u. For the first method, the frequency list u is input via two parameters: Aff (C-21

  17. Shallow-water Aplysina Nardo (Aplysinidae, Verongida, Demospongiae from the São Sebastião Channel and its environs (Tropical southwestern Atlantic, with the description of a new species and a literature review of other brazilian records of the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulisses dos Santos Pinheiro

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Two species of Aplysina Nardo, 1834 are described in this article, Aplysina caissara sp. n. and A. fulva (Pallas, 1766. Additionally, a possible third species was identified as A. aff. cauliformis. Collections were done in the São Sebastião Channel area as an ongoing effort to assess the poriferan biodiversity of the northern sector of the São Paulo State coastline. Specimens were collected by scuba diving, and descriptions of external morphology are based on the observation of populations alive, and on extensive underwater photography. A literature review of other brazilian records of Aplysina was undertaken, and an ammended species list is offered.

  18. Search for a new bottomonium state decaying to aff/dtd">Υ(1S)π+π- in pp collisions at aff/dtd">s=8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-01

    The results of a search for the bottomonium counterpart, denoted as $X_b$, of the exotic charmonium state X(3872) is presented. The analysis is based on a sample of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.7 inverse femtobarns. The search looks for the exclusive decay channel $X_b \\to \\Upsilon(1S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ followed by $\\Upsilon(1S) \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. No evidence for an $X_b$ signal is observed. Upper limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the inclusive production cross sections times the branching fractions to $\\Upsilon(1S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ of the $X_b$ and the $\\Upsilon$(2S). The upper limits on the ratio are in the range 0.9-5.4% for $X_b$ masses between 10 and 11 GeV. These are the first upper limits on the production of a possible $X_b$ at a hadron collider.

  19. Measurement of the top quark mass in the aff/dtd">tt¯dilepton channel from aff/dtd">s=8 TeV ATLAS data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D' amen, G.; D' Auria, S.; D' Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. 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M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. 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W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muškinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. 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C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. 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E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. 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M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. 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C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    The top quark mass is measured in the t¯t→dileptonchannel (lepton=e, μ) using ATLAS data recorded in the year 2012 at the LHC. The data were taken at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s=8TeVand correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 20.2fb-1. Exploiting the template method, and using the distribution of invariant masses of lepton–b-jetpairs, the top quark mass is measured to be mtop=172.99 ±0.41(stat)±0.74(syst)GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.84GeV. Finally, acombination with previous ATLAS mtopmeasurements from √s=7TeVdata in the t¯t→dileptonand t¯t→lepton+jetschannels results in mtop=172.84 ±0.34(stat)±0.61(syst)GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.70GeV.

  20. Search for a narrow baryonic state decaying to aff/dtd">pKS0 and aff/dtd">pKS0 in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    OpenAIRE

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E.G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N.H.; Brugnera, R.

    2016-01-01

    A search for a narrow baryonic state in the $pK^0_S$ and $\\bar{p}K^0_S$ system has been performed in $ep$ collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 358 pb$^{-1}$ taken in 2003-2007. The search was performed with deep inelastic scattering events at an $ep$ centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV for exchanged photon virtuality, $Q^2$, between 20 and 100 $\\rm{} GeV^{2}$. Contrary to evidence presented for such a state around 1.52 GeV in a previous ZEUS analysis using ...

  1. Event shapes and azimuthal correlations in aff/dtd">Z+jets events in pp collisions at aff/dtd">s=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; DʼHondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. 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C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. 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T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; DʼAgnolo, R. T.; DellʼOrso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. 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A.; DʼEnterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y. -J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R. -S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Bahtiyar, H.; Barlas, E.; Cankocak, K.; Günaydin, Y. O.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Mall, O.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; DʼAlfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; OʼDell, V.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Park, M.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; OʼBrien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Mozer, M. U.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2013-05-01

    Measurements of event shapes and azimuthal correlations are presented for events where a Z boson is produced in association with jets in proton-proton collisions. The data collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns. The analysis provides a test of predictions from perturbative QCD for a process that represents a substantial background to many physics channels. Results are presented as a function of jet multiplicity, for inclusive Z boson production and for Z bosons with transverse momenta greater than 150 GeV, and compared to predictions from Monte Carlo event generators that include leading-order multiparton matrix-element (with up to four hard partons in the final state) and next-to-leading-order simulations of Z + 1-jet events. The experimental results are corrected for detector effects, and can be compared directly with other QCD models.

  2. Moscas frugívoras associadas a mirtáceas e laranjeira "Céu" na região do Vale do Rio Caí, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Frugivorous flies in myrtaceans and orange trees 'Céu' in the region of Vale do Rio Caí, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

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    Tacimara Gattelli

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve o objetivo de reconhecer as espécies de moscas frugívoras em mirtáceas: Eugenia uniflora L., Campomanesia xanthocarpa Berg., Psidium cattleianum Sabine, Psidium guajava L. e Acca sellowiana (Berg. Burret., bem como em Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck (Rutaceae, na região do Vale do Caí, RS. Os frutos foram coletados no período de maturação de cada espécie frutífera, entre outubro de 2004 e julho de 2005, levados ao laboratório e acondicionados em potes com areia mantidos a 25 ± 1°C; 80 ± 10% UR e fotofase de 12 horas. Os pupários obtidos foram individualizados e suas características foram registradas. De Tephritidae foi registrada apenas Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann e de Lonchaeidae Neosilba n. sp. 3, Neosilba zadolicha McAlpine & Steyskal e Neosilba certa (Walker. As duas últimas são novos registros para o Rio Grande do Sul. Apenas em P. cattleianum foram registradas todas as espécies de moscas encontradas neste trabalho. Os resultados evidenciam que A. fraterculus é a espécie de mosca-das-frutas de maior ocorrência para a região do Vale do Caí, RS, nas frutíferas estudadas.This study aimed at recognizing frugivorous flies species in Myrtaceae: Eugenia uniflora L., Campomanesia xanthocarpa Berg. Psidium cattleianum Sabine, Psidium guajava L. and Acca sellowiana (Berg. Burret., as well as in Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck (Rutaceae, at Vale do Cai region, Rio Grande do Sul. Fruits were collected at the maturation stage of each fruit species between October 2004 and July 2005, and at the laboratory they were placed in pots with sand and were kept at 12h photoperiod, 80 ± 10% RH and 25 ± 1°C. Pupae were individualized and their characteristics were recorded. In Tephritidae only Anastrepha fraterculus (Wied. was recorded and in Lonchaeidae, Neosilba n. sp. 3, Neosilba zadolicha McAlpine & Steyskal and Neosilba certa (Walker. These last two species were recorded for the first time in Rio Grande do Sul. Only on

  3. Substratos alternativos ao xaxim na produção de bromélia ornamental Alternative substrates to fern tree fiber in the production of ornamental bromeliad

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    Shoey Kanashiro

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar substratos alternativos para o cultivo da bromélia Aechmea fasciata (Lindley Baker, para substituir com eficiência as misturas formuladas com o xaxim Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl. Hook. Foram testados os substratos: casca de Pinus, casca de Eucalyptus, coxim, fibra de coco e xaxim, misturados com turfa e perlita, nas proporções 2:7:1, 5:4:1 e 8:1:1. O experimento foi realizado em condições de estufa com cobertura de polietileno, sombreada com tela a 70%. As bromélias foram cultivadas durante 435 dias, até o início do florescimento - estádio de comercialização. As variáveis analisadas foram as massas de matéria seca de: folhas, raiz, inflorescência, escapo floral e caule; além da massa de matéria seca total e a qualidade comercial. Os substratos formulados com xaxim ou casca de Pinus, nas proporções 2:7:1, 5:4:1 e 8:1:1, e com casca de Eucalyptus, fibra de coco ou coxim, na proporção 2:7:1, foram as misturas que apresentaram os melhores resultados. Os substratos formulados com casca de Eucalyptus, fibra de coco ou coxim, com 10% de turfa e 10% de perlita, na proporção 8:1:1, apresentaram os piores resultados.The objective of this study was to evaluate alternative substrates for the cultivation of the bromeliad Aechmea fasciata (Lindley Baker, to substitute the formulated mixtures with fern tree fiber from Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl. Hook. Tested substrates were: Pinus bark, Eucalyptus bark, coxim (made of coconut fiber, coir or fern tree fiber, mixed with peat and perlite, in the proportions 2:7:1, 5:4:1 and 8:1:1. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse covered with polyethylene and shaded with shade cloth 70%. The bromeliads were cultivated during 435 days, until the beginning of the flowering, when they were suitable for commercialization. The evaluated parameters were dry masses of leaf, root, inflorescence, floral scape, and stem, besides total dry mass and the commercial

  4. Semente de amendoeira (Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae como substrato para o cultivo de orquídeas epífitas = Tropical almond seeds (Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae as a substrate for epiphytic orchid cultivation

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    Marcus Nascimento Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O uso de semente de Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae como substrato para o cultivo de orquídeas das espécies Oncidium flexuosum Sims, Dendrobium nobile Lindl. e Brassavola tuberculata Hook. foi comparado ao do xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. Esta espécie é muito usada para o cultivo de orquídeas, mas está ameaçada de extinção e com a sua exploração proibida por lei. Ao final de 12 meses de cultivo, foram avaliadas as seguintes variáveis: altura da parte aérea, diâmetro dos pseudobulbos, número de pseudobulbos e pH.Não houve interação significativa entre substratos e espécies para as variáveis avaliadas. As orquídeas desenvolvidas em substrato de T. catappa e em xaxim apresentaram alturas da parte aérea, diâmetro dos pseudobulbos e número de pseudobulbos equivalentes. O substrato de T. catappa apresentou baixa velocidade de decomposição, o que manteve a sua boa capacidade de aeração, desenvolvimento das raízes e valor de pH próximo ao encontrado para o xaxim. O uso de T. catappa apresentou-se viável como substituto ao xaxim para o cultivo das orquídeas avaliadas.The use of Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae seeds as a substrate for growing orchids of the species Oncidium flexuosum Sims, Dendrobium nobile Lindl. and Brassavola tuberculata Hook was compared to the tree fern fiber Dicksonia sellowiana Hook, largely used for that purpose. This species is endangered and its exploitation is prohibited by law. After twelve months, the following parameters were evaluated: aerial part height, pseudo bulb diameter, number of pseudo bulbs and pH of substrate. There was no significant interaction between substrates and species for the evaluated parameters. The orchids developed on T. catappa substrate and tree fern fiber showed similar aerial parts, diameter and number of pseudo bulbs. T. catappa substrate showed a low rate of decomposition, which maintained good aeration capacity, root development and pH values close to

  5. De novo transcriptome assembly of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. fruit

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    Deden Derajat Matra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia mangostana L. (Mangosteen, of the family Clusiaceae, is one of the economically important tropical fruits in Indonesia. In the present study, we performed de novo transcriptomic analysis of Garcinia mangostana L. through RNA-Seq technology. We obtained the raw data from 12 libraries through Ion Proton System. Clean reads of 191,735,809 were obtained from 307,634,890 raw reads. The raw data obtained in this study can be accessible in DDBJ database with accession number of DRA005014 with bioproject accession number of PRJDB5091. We obtained 268,851 transcripts as well as 155,850 unigenes, having N50 value of 555 and 433 bp, respectively. Transcript/unigene length ranged from 201 to 5916 bp. The unigenes were annotated with two main databases from NCBI and UniProtKB, respectively having annotated-sequences of 73,287 and 73,107, respectively. These transcriptomic data will be beneficial for studying transcriptome of Garcinia mangostana L.

  6. Methodology to evaluate the insecticide potential of forest tree species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Soto, Leon; Garcia P, Carlos Mario

    2000-01-01

    The flora diversity of Colombia has an enormous potential in the rational use of its forest resources. Trees with biocidal effects to control pests and diseases need to be investigated. The objective of this research was to develop a methodology with low costs, easy application and quick results. The methodology employed was as follows: selection of tree species based on bibliography, ancestral reports and personal observations. The process was as follows: field collection of plants, preparation of plants extracts and test with Artemia salina Leach to detect biological activity of the extracts using LC50. Bioassays with those extract more promising (LC50 less than 1000 ppm) Determination of active compounds. The methodology was employed with 5 forest tree species: guarea guidonia (L) Sleumer and trichia hirta L. (Meliaceae), Machaerium Moritzianum Benth. (Fabaceae), Swinglea glutinosa Merrill (rutaceae) and Mammea americana L. (Clusiaceae). Using Artemia salina Leach as indicator of biocidal potential, two species were selected as the most promising, those were: Swinglea glutinosa Merril and Machaerium moritzianum Benth. In addition bioassays were made to evaluate fagoinhibition on Atta cephalotes (L.) (Hym: Formicidae) and control of Alconeura. This methodology is recommended for this kind of research

  7. Methodology for the insecticide potential evaluation of forest species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Soto, Leon; Garcia P, Carlos Mario

    2000-01-01

    The flora diversity of Colombia has an enormous potential in the rational use of its forest resources. Trees with biocides effects to pest control and diseases need to be investigated. The objective of this research was to develop a methodology with low costs, easy application and quick results. The methodology employed was as follows: selection of tree species based on bibliography, ancestral reports and personal observations. The process was as follows: field collection of plants, preparation of plants extracts, and test with Artemia Salina, leach to detect biological activity of the extracts using LC50. Bioassays with those extract more promising (LC50 less than 1000 ppm). The methodology was employed with 5 forest tree species: Guarea guidonia (L.) Sleumer and Trichia hirta L. (Meliaceae), machaerium moritzianum Benth. (Fabaceae), Swinglea glutinosa Merrill. (Rutaceae) and Mammea americana L. (Clusiaceae). Using Artemia salina Leach as indicator of biocidal potential, two species were selected as the most promising, those were: Swinglea glutinosa Merril and Machaerium moritzianum Benth. In addition bioassays were made to evaluate fagoinhibition on Atta cephalotes (L.) and control of Alconeura. This methodology is recommended for this kind of research

  8. Alternative food sources and over wintering feeding behavior of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis boheman (coleoptera: curculionidae) under the tropical conditions of central Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Paulina de A.; Sujii, Edison R.; Pires, Carmen S.S.; Fontes, Eliana M.G.; Diniz, Ivone R.; Salgado-Labouriau, Maria L.

    2010-01-01

    The boll weevil causes serious damage to the cotton crop in South America. Several studies have been published on this pest, but its phenology and behavior under the tropical conditions prevailing in Brazil are not well-known. In this study the feeding behavior and main food sources of adult boll weevils throughout the year in Central Brazil was investigated. The digestive tract contents of insects captured in pheromone traps in two cotton fields and two areas of native vegetation (gallery forest and cerrado sensu stricto) were analyzed. The insect was captured all through the year only in the cerrado. It fed on pollen of 19 different plant families, on Pteridophyta and fungi spores and algae cysts. Simpson Index test showed that the cerrado provided greater diversity of pollen sources. In the beginning of the cotton cycle, the plant families used for pollen feeding were varied: in cotton area 1, the weevil fed on Poaceae (50%), Malvaceae and Smilacaceae (25% each); in cotton area 2 the pollen sources were Malvaceae (50%), Asteraceae (25%) and Fabaceae and Clusiaceae (25% each); in the cerrado they were Chenopodiaceae (67%) and Scheuchzeriaceae (33%). No weevils were collected in the gallery forest in this period. After cotton was harvested, the family Smilacaceae was predominant among the food plants exploited in all the study areas. These results help to explain the survivorship of adult boll weevil during cotton fallow season in Central Brazil and they are discussed in the context of behavioral adaptations to the prevailing tropical environmental conditions. (author)

  9. Alternative food sources and over wintering feeding behavior of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis boheman (coleoptera: curculionidae) under the tropical conditions of central Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Paulina de A.; Sujii, Edison R.; Pires, Carmen S.S.; Fontes, Eliana M.G. [EMBRAPA Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia (CENARGEN), Brasilia, DF (Brazil)], e-mail: paulina723@hotmail.com, e-mail: sujii@cenargen.embrapa.br, e-mail: cpires@cenargen.embrapa.br, e-mail: eliana@cenargen.embrapa.br; Diniz, Ivone R. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Dept. de Zoologia], e-mail: irdiniz@unb.br; Medeiros, Maria A. de; Branco, Marina C. [EMBRAPA Hortalicas, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)], e-mail: medeiros@cnph.embrapa.br, e-mail: marina@cnph.embrapa.br; Salgado-Labouriau, Maria L. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia], e-mail: mlea@unb.br

    2010-01-15

    The boll weevil causes serious damage to the cotton crop in South America. Several studies have been published on this pest, but its phenology and behavior under the tropical conditions prevailing in Brazil are not well-known. In this study the feeding behavior and main food sources of adult boll weevils throughout the year in Central Brazil was investigated. The digestive tract contents of insects captured in pheromone traps in two cotton fields and two areas of native vegetation (gallery forest and cerrado sensu stricto) were analyzed. The insect was captured all through the year only in the cerrado. It fed on pollen of 19 different plant families, on Pteridophyta and fungi spores and algae cysts. Simpson Index test showed that the cerrado provided greater diversity of pollen sources. In the beginning of the cotton cycle, the plant families used for pollen feeding were varied: in cotton area 1, the weevil fed on Poaceae (50%), Malvaceae and Smilacaceae (25% each); in cotton area 2 the pollen sources were Malvaceae (50%), Asteraceae (25%) and Fabaceae and Clusiaceae (25% each); in the cerrado they were Chenopodiaceae (67%) and Scheuchzeriaceae (33%). No weevils were collected in the gallery forest in this period. After cotton was harvested, the family Smilacaceae was predominant among the food plants exploited in all the study areas. These results help to explain the survivorship of adult boll weevil during cotton fallow season in Central Brazil and they are discussed in the context of behavioral adaptations to the prevailing tropical environmental conditions. (author)

  10. Micropropagation of Calophyllum brasiliense (Cambess.) from nodal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, S S; Cordeiro-Silva, R; Degenhardt-Goldbach, J; Quoirin, M

    2016-05-03

    Micropropagation of Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess. (Clusiaceae) is a way to overcome difficulties in achieving large-scale plant production, given the recalcitrant nature of the seeds, irregular fructification and absence of natural vegetative propagation of the species. Cultures were established using nodal segments 2 cm in length, obtained from 1-2 year old seedlings, maintained in a greenhouse. Mercury chloride and Plant Preservative Mixture™ were used in the surface sterilizing stage, better results being achieved with Plant Preservative Mixture™ incorporation in culture medium, at any concentration. Polyvinylpyrrolidone, activated charcoal, cysteine, ascorbic acid or citric acid were added to the culture medium to avoid oxidation. After 30 days of culture, polyvinylpirrolidone and ascorbic acid gave better results, eliminating oxidation in most explants. For shoot multiplication, benzylaminopurine was used in concentrations of 4.4 and 8.8 µM in Woody Plant Medium, resulting in an average of 4.43 and 4.68 shoots per explant, respectively, after 90 days. Indole-3-butyric acid and α-naphthalene acetic acid were used to induce root formation, reaching a maximum rooting rate of 24% with 20µM α-naphthalene acetic acid. For acclimatization. the rooted plants were transferred to Plantmax® substrate and cultured in a greenhouse, reaching 79% of survival after 30 days and 60% after one year.

  11. Evaluation of effects of dichloromethane fraction from Platonia insignis on pilocarpine-induced seizures

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    Joaquim S. da Costa Júnior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study was to evaluate the antioxidant and anticonvulsant activities of dichloromethane fraction (DMF from Platonia insignis Mart., Clusiaceae. The DMF from P. insignis (2 mg/kg was tested by intraperitoneal (i.p. to evaluate effects on lipid peroxidation level, nitrite formation, as well as on locomotor and anticonvulsant activities. Wistar rats were treated with, (saline/Tween 80 0.5%, i.p., control group, DMF (2 mg/kg, i.p., DMF group, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p., P400 group, or the combination of DMF (2 mg/kg, i.p. and pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p., DMF plus P400. After the treatments all groups were observed for 24 h. In P400 group rats there was a decrease in the motor activity when compared with control group. In DMF plus P400 co-administered rats was observed an increase in motor activity when compared with P400 group. In P400 group rats there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels. In DMF plus P400 co-administered rats, antioxidant treatment significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation level and nitrite content after seizures. Previous findings strongly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress occurs in rat striatum during pilocarpine-induced seizures, and our results imply that strong neuprotective effect on this brain region could be achieved using DMF from P. insignis.

  12. Response of a tropical tree to non-timber forest products harvest and reduction in habitat size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouagou, M’Mouyohoun; Natta, Armand K.; Gado, Choukouratou

    2017-01-01

    Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) are widely harvested by local people for their livelihood. Harvest often takes place in human disturbed ecosystems. However, our understanding of NTFPs harvesting impacts in fragmented habitats is limited. We assessed the impacts of fruit harvest, and reduction in habitat size on the population structures of Pentadesma butyracea Sabine (Clusiaceae) across two contrasting ecological regions (dry vs. moist) in Benin. In each region, we selected three populations for each of the three fruit harvesting intensities (low, medium and high). Harvesting intensities were estimated as the proportion of fruits harvested per population. Pentadesma butyracea is found in gallery forests along rivers and streams. We used the width of gallery forests as a measure of habitat size. We found negative effects of fruit harvest on seedling and adult density but no significant effect on population size class distribution in both ecological regions. The lack of significant effect of fruit harvest on population structure may be explained by the ability of P. butyracea to compensate for the negative effect of fruit harvesting by increasing clonal reproduction. Our results suggest that using tree density and population structure to assess the ecological impacts of harvesting clonal plants should be done with caution. PMID:28850624

  13. Alternative food sources and overwintering feeding behavior of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) under the tropical conditions of Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Paulina de A; Sujii, Edison R; Diniz, Ivone R; Medeiros, Maria A de; Salgado-Labouriau, Maria L; Branco, Marina C; Pires, Carmen S S; Fontes, Eliana M G

    2010-01-01

    The boll weevil causes serious damage to the cotton crop in South America. Several studies have been published on this pest, but its phenology and behavior under the tropical conditions prevailing in Brazil are not well-known. In this study the feeding behavior and main food sources of adult boll weevils throughout the year in Central Brazil was investigated. The digestive tract contents of insects captured in pheromone traps in two cotton fields and two areas of native vegetation (gallery forest and cerrado sensu stricto) were analyzed. The insect was captured all through the year only in the cerrado. It fed on pollen of 19 different plant families, on Pteridophyta and fungi spores and algae cysts. Simpson Index test showed that the cerrado provided greater diversity of pollen sources. In the beginning of the cotton cycle, the plant families used for pollen feeding were varied: in cotton area 1, the weevil fed on Poaceae(50%), Malvaceae and Smilacaceae (25% each); in cotton area 2 the pollen sources were Malvaceae (50%), Asteraceae (25%) and Fabaceae and Clusiaceae (25% each); in the cerrado they were Chenopodiaceae (67%) and Scheuchzeriaceae (33%). No weevils were collected in the gallery forest in this period. After cotton was harvested, the family Smilacaceae was predominant among the food plants exploited in all the study areas. These results help to explain the survivorship of adult boll weevil during cotton fallow season in Central Brazil and they are discussed in the context of behavioral adaptations to the prevailing tropical environmental conditions.

  14. Clusiaxanthone and tocotrienol series from Clusia pernambucensis and their antileishmanial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Everton M.; Freire-Filha, Lindomar G.; Espindola, Laila S., E-mail: darvenne@unb.br [Laboratorio de Farmacognosia, Universidade de Brasilia, Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Araujo, Renata M. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal-RN (Brazil); Silveira, Edilberto R. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza-CE (Brazil); Lopes, Norberto P. [Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Paula, Jose Elias de [Laboratorio de Anatomia Vegetal, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Laboratorio de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Phytochemical analysis of the ethyl acetate extract from the stem bark of Clusia pernambucensis G. Mariz, Clusiaceae, a Brazilian Cerrado species, led to the isolation and full characterization of a new xanthone, 1,7-dihydroxy-2-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-6',6'- dimethylpyrano(2',3':3,4)xanthone, namely clusiaxanthone. Four previously unreported tocotrienols from this species were also isolated. A derivative was obtained from clusiaxanthone, 1-hydroxy,7-methoxy-2-(3-methyl- 2-butenyl)-6',6'-dimethylpyrano(2',3':3,4)xanthone (7-O-methylclusiaxanthone), and an additional derivative was obtained from Z-{delta}-tocotrienoloic acid. The structures of these compounds were established based on data from {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (1D and 2D NMR), high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HRESIMS) and infrared spectroscopy. The clusiaxanthone and its derivative were able to control macrophage infection by Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis amastigotes (IC{sub 50} = 66.9 and 57.4 {mu}M, respectively). The cytotoxicity of the compounds was assessed in BALB/c mouse peritoneal macrophages. (author)

  15. Representatividade do gênero Lopesia Rübsaamen (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Cid Maia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vinte e três espécies de Lopesia Rübsaamen (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae são conhecidas, todas como indutoras de galhas. A maioria das espécies é Neotropical, também com distribuição Neártica, Afrotropical e Australasiana. A diversidade do gênero no Brasil é avaliada com base na literatura e dados da coleção de Cecidomyiidae do Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro. O gênero está representado no Brasil por 23 espécies (18 descritas e 5 não determinadas, o que corresponde a 78% do total de espécies descritas e 95% da fauna neotropical fauna. Estes dados mostram que o gênero é representado no Brasil. A maioria das espécies (78% induz galhas foliares. Gema e caule foram outros órgãos vegetais galhados. As espécies estão associadas a dez famílias botânicas, sendo mais comuns em Burseraceae, Clusiaceae e Fabaceae. A maior parte foi coletada em Mata Atlântica, principalmente em restinga, e o Rio de Janeiro suporta o maior número de espécies registradas. A distribuição geográfica de três espécies é ampliada.

  16. Antiproliferative Constituents of Geopropolis from the Bee Melipona scutellaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Franchin, Marcelo; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Ransom, Tanya; Beutler, John Albert

    2016-02-01

    Fractionation of geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris, guided by antiproliferative activity against two colon cancer cell lines (COLO205 and KM12), led to the isolation of two new cinnamic acid esters, mammea-type coumarins 5,7-dihydroxy-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-8-(4-cinnamoyl-3-methyl-1-oxobutyl)-4-propyl-coumarin (1) and 5,7-dihydroxy-6-(4-cinnamoyl-3-methyl-1-oxobutyl)-4-phenylcoumarin (2), along with five known coumarins, mammeigin (3), hydroxymammeigin (4), mammeisin (5), cinnamoyloxy-mammeisin (6), and mammein (7), and the prenylated benzophenone ent-nemorosone (8). Among the isolated compounds, 5 and 7 showed the highest cell growth inhibition against COLO205 (GI50 9.7 and 10.7 µM, respectively) and KM12 (GI50 12.0 and 10.9 µM, respectively). The presence of these compounds suggests that plants of Clusiaceae family, especially the genera Kielmeyera and Clusia, are likely to be major sources of geopropolis produced by M. scutellaris. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Hypoglycemic effect of formulation containing hydroethanolic extract of Calophyllum brasiliense in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helison de Oliveira Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Diabetes mellitus is a chronic and severe metabolic dysfunction, it's slow and progressive evolution interferes directly in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins, causing hyperglycemia, glycosuria, polydipsia, hyperlipidaemia, among others. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic effect of hydroethanolic extract and granulated of Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess., Clusiaceae, species in diabetic rats as well as it's biochemical parameters. The results demonstrated that both the pharmaceutical forms, hydroethanolic extract and granulated, were able to reduce significantly (p < 0.001 hyperglycemia and glycosuria, in addition to improve polydipsia, polyuria, and weight loss. Treatments using hydroethanolic extract and granulated were also able to reduce significantly levels of triacylglycerides, cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein, as well as the transaminases, urea and creatinine levels. Therefore, it is concluded that these pharmaceutical forms have anti-diabetic effect and act improving the biochemical parameters, this effect is probably due to the high content of polyphenolic compounds found in the formulations.

  18. Trypanocidal constituents in plants: 7. Mammea-type coumarins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Reyes-Chilpa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Calophyllum brasiliense and Mammea americana (Clusiaceae are two trees from the tropical rain forests of the American continent. A previous screening showed high trypanocidal activity in the extracts of these species. Several mammea-type coumarins, triterpenoids and biflavonoids were isolated from the leaves of C. brasiliense. Mammea A/AA was obtained from the fruit peels of M. americana. These compounds were tested in vitro against epimastigotes and trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. The most potent compounds were mammea A/BA, A/BB, A/AA, A/BD and B/BA, with MC100 values in the range of 15 to 90 g/ml. Coumarins with a cyclized ,-dimethylallyl substituent on C-6, such as mammea B/BA, cyclo F + B/BB cyclo F, and isomammeigin, showed MC100 values > 200 g/ml. Several active coumarins were also tested against normal human lymphocytes in vitro, which showed that mammea A/AA and A/BA were not toxic. Other compounds from C. brasiliense, such as the triterpenoids, friedelin, canophyllol, the biflavonoid amentoflavone, and protocatechuic and shikimic acids, were inactive against the epimastigotes. The isopropylidenedioxy derivative of shikimic acid was inactive, and its structure was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Our results suggest that mammea-type coumarins could be a valuable source of trypanocidal compounds.

  19. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of the aqueous extract of Rheedia longifolia Planch & Triana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valber da Silva Frutuoso

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Rheedia longifolia Planch et Triana belongs to the Clusiaceae family. This plant is widely distributed in Brazil, but its chemical and pharmacological properties have not yet been studied. We report here that leaves aqueous extract of R. longifolia (LAE shows analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Oral or intraperitoneal administration of this extract dose-dependently inhibited the abdominal constrictions induced by acetic acid in mice. The analgesic effect and the duration of action were similar to those observed with sodium diclofenac, a classical non-steroidal analgesic. In addition to the effect seen in the abdominal constriction model, LAE was also able to inhibit the hyperalgesia induced by lipopolysaccharide from gram-negative bacteria (LPS in rats. We also found that R. longifolia LAE inhibited an inflammatory reaction induced by LPS in the pleural cavity of mice. Acute toxicity was evaluated in mice treated with the extract for seven days with 50 mg/kg/day. Neither death, nor alterations in weight, blood leukocyte counts or hematocrit were noted. Our results suggest that aqueous extract from R. longifolia leaves has analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity with minimal toxicity and are therefore endowed with a potential for pharmacological control of pain and inflammation.

  20. Antibacterial and EGFR-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitory Activities of Polyhydroxylated Xanthones from Garcinia succifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susawat Duangsrisai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the wood of Garcinia succifolia Kurz (Clusiaceae led to the isolation of 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1, 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2, 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone (3, 1,5,6-trihydroxyxanthone (4, 1,6,7-trihydroxyxanthone (5, and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (6. All of the isolated xanthones were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against bacterial reference strains, two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATTC 25923, Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633 and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and environmental drug-resistant isolates (S. aureus B1, Enteroccoccus faecalis W1, and E. coli G1, as well as for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR of tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity. Only 1,5,6-trihydroxy-(4, 1,6,7-trihydroxy-(5, and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthones (6 exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, however none was active against vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis. Additionally, 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2 showed synergism with oxacillin, but not with ampicillin. On the other hand, only 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1 and 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2 were found to exhibit the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 90.34 and 223 nM, respectively.

  1. Autophagy mediates cytotoxicity of human colorectal cancer cells treated with garcinielliptone FC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Shen-Jeu; Yen, Cheng-Hsin; Lin, Ting-Yu; Jiang-Shieh, Ya-Fen; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chen, Jyun-Ti; Su, Chun-Li

    2018-01-01

    The tautomeric pair of garcinielliptone FC (GFC) is a novel tautomeric pair of polyprenyl benzophenonoid isolated from the pericarps of Garcinia subelliptica Merr. (G. subelliptica, Clusiaceae), a tree with abundant sources of polyphenols. Our previous report demonstrated that GFC induced apoptosis on various types of human cancer cell lines including chemoresistant human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells. In the present study, we observed that many autophagy-related genes in GFC-treated HT-29 cells were up- and down-regulated using a cDNA microarray containing oncogenes and kinase genes. GFC-induced autophagy of HT-29 cells was confirmed by observing the formation of acidic vesicular organelles, LC3 puncta, and double-membrane autophagic vesicles using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Inhibition of AKT/mTOR/P70S6K signaling as well as formation of Atg5-Atg12 and PI3K/Beclin-1 complexes were observed using Western blot. Administration of autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine and shRNA Atg5) and apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD showed that the GFC-induced autophagy was cytotoxic form and GFC-induced apoptosis enhanced GFC-induced autophagy. Our data suggest the involvement of autophagy and apoptosis in GFC-induced anticancer mechanisms of human colorectal cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Response of a tropical tree to non-timber forest products harvest and reduction in habitat size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orou G Gaoue

    Full Text Available Non-timber forest products (NTFPs are widely harvested by local people for their livelihood. Harvest often takes place in human disturbed ecosystems. However, our understanding of NTFPs harvesting impacts in fragmented habitats is limited. We assessed the impacts of fruit harvest, and reduction in habitat size on the population structures of Pentadesma butyracea Sabine (Clusiaceae across two contrasting ecological regions (dry vs. moist in Benin. In each region, we selected three populations for each of the three fruit harvesting intensities (low, medium and high. Harvesting intensities were estimated as the proportion of fruits harvested per population. Pentadesma butyracea is found in gallery forests along rivers and streams. We used the width of gallery forests as a measure of habitat size. We found negative effects of fruit harvest on seedling and adult density but no significant effect on population size class distribution in both ecological regions. The lack of significant effect of fruit harvest on population structure may be explained by the ability of P. butyracea to compensate for the negative effect of fruit harvesting by increasing clonal reproduction. Our results suggest that using tree density and population structure to assess the ecological impacts of harvesting clonal plants should be done with caution.

  3. Garcinia dulcis Fruit Extract Induced Cytotoxicity and Apoptosis in HepG2 Liver Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fadzelly Abu Bakar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia dulcis or locally known in Malaysia as “mundu” belongs to the family of Clusiaceae. The study was conducted to investigate the anticancer potential of different parts of G. dulcis fruit extracts and their possible mechanism of action in HepG2 liver cancer cell line. MTT assay showed that the peel, flesh, and seed extracts of G. dulcis induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell line with IC50 values of 46.33 ± 4.51, 38.33 ± 3.51, and 7.5 ± 2.52 µg/mL, respectively. The flesh extract of G. dulcis induced cell cycle arrest at sub-G1 (apoptosis phase in a time-dependent manner. Staining with Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide showed that 41.2% of the cell population underwent apoptosis after 72 hours of exposure of the HepG2 cell line to G. dulcis flesh extract. Caspase-3 has been shown to be activated which finally leads to the death of HepG2 cell (apoptosis. GC-MS analysis showed that the highest percentage of compound identified in the extract of G. dulcis flesh was hydroxymethylfurfural and 3-methyl-2,5-furandione, together with xanthones and flavonoids (based on literature, could synergistically contribute to the observed effects. This finding suggested that the flesh extract of G. dulcis has its own potential as cancer chemotherapeutic agent against liver cancer cell.

  4. AKTIVITAS INSEKTISIDA BAGIAN TUMBUHAN CALOPHYLLUM SOULTTRI BURM.F. (CLU IACEAE TERHADAP LARVA LEPIDOPTERA

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    Edy Syahputra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this test was evaluate the insecticidal activity of ectract of some parts of Calophyllum soulattri (Clusiaceae against larvae of three species of Lepidoptera, i. e Crocidolomia pavonana, Plutella xylostela, and Pieris sp.. Extraction of plant materials was done by infusion method using ethanol. The bioassays were conducted by leaf-feeding method. Second-instar larvae were fed extract-treated broccoli leaves of 48 hours, then they were presented with untreated leaves until the surviving larvae larvae reached the fourth-instar stage. The number of dead larvae was recorded daily an larval mortality date were analyzed by probit method. The result showed the gummy bark exudates and bark extract of old and young C. soulattri plants were highly active against C. pavonana. The abrk extact of old C. soulattri plant was also effective against P. xilostella and Pieris sp. The gummy exudates possessed strong insecticidal activity against C. pavonana larvae with LC50 of 0.04% and prolonged the developmental time from second to fourth instar of C. soulattri 2.03-7.25 days compared with control. The bark excudate gave positive respon to alkaloid flavonoid, and tannin test. Futher studies are needed to identify insecticidal compound in those active extracts.

  5. Antitumor Activity of Kielmeyera Coriacea Leaf Constituents in Experimental Melanoma, Tested in Vitro and in Vivo in Syngeneic Mice

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    Carlos Rogério Figueiredo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The antitumor activity of Kielmeyera coriacea (Clusiaceae, a medicinal plant used in the treatment of parasitic, as well as fungal and bacterial infections by the Brazilian Cerrado population, was investigated. Methods: A chloroform extract (CE of K. coriacea was tested in the murine melanoma cell line (B16F10-Nex2 and a panel of human tumor cell lines. Tumor cell migration was determined by the wound-healing assay and the in vivo antitumor activity of CE was investigated in a melanoma cell metastatic model. 1H NMR and GC/MS were used to determine CE chemical composition. Results: We found that CE exhibited strong cytotoxic activity against murine melanoma cells and a panel of human tumor cell lines in vitro. CE also inhibited growth of B16F10-Nex2 cells at sub lethal concentrations, inducing cell cycle arrest at S phase, and inhibition of tumor cell migration. Most importantly, administration of CE significantly reduced the number of melanoma metastatic nodules in vivo. Chemical analysis of CE indicated the presence of the long chain fatty compounds, 1-eicosanol, 1-docosanol, and 2-nonadecanone as main constituents. Conclusion: These results indicate that K. coriacea is a promising medicinal plant in cancer therapy exhibiting antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo against different tumor cell lines.

  6. Clusiaxanthone and tocotrienol series from Clusia pernambucensis and their antileishmanial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Everton M.; Freire-Filha, Lindomar G.; Espindola, Laila S., E-mail: darvenne@unb.br [Laboratorio de Farmacognosia, Universidade de Brasilia, Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Araujo, Renata M. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal-RN (Brazil); Silveira, Edilberto R. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza-CE (Brazil); Lopes, Norberto P. [Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Paula, Jose Elias de [Laboratorio de Anatomia Vegetal, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Laboratorio de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Phytochemical analysis of the ethyl acetate extract from the stem bark of Clusia pernambucensis G. Mariz, Clusiaceae, a Brazilian Cerrado species, led to the isolation and full characterization of a new xanthone, 1,7-dihydroxy-2-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-6',6'- dimethylpyrano(2',3':3,4)xanthone, namely clusiaxanthone. Four previously unreported tocotrienols from this species were also isolated. A derivative was obtained from clusiaxanthone, 1-hydroxy,7-methoxy-2-(3-methyl- 2-butenyl)-6',6'-dimethylpyrano(2',3':3,4)xanthone (7-O-methylclusiaxanthone), and an additional derivative was obtained from Z-{delta}-tocotrienoloic acid. The structures of these compounds were established based on data from {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (1D and 2D NMR), high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HRESIMS) and infrared spectroscopy. The clusiaxanthone and its derivative were able to control macrophage infection by Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis amastigotes (IC{sub 50} = 66.9 and 57.4 {mu}M, respectively). The cytotoxicity of the compounds was assessed in BALB/c mouse peritoneal macrophages. (author)

  7. Allanblackia Oil: Phytochemistry and Use as a Functional Food

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    Sara L. Crockett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The consumption and commercial exploitation of Allanblackia (Clusiaceae seed oils is of current interest. The favorable physicochemical characteristics of Allanblackia oil (solid at room temperature; high stearic acid content lend food products that contain it (i.e., vegetable-based dairy products, ice cream, spreads health advantages over others that contain higher levels of lauric, myristic, and/or palmitic acids, which can increase blood cholesterol levels. Such considerations are important for individuals prone to cardiovascular disease or with hypercholesterolemia. Domestication projects of several Allanblackia species in tropical Africa are underway, but wildcrafting of fruits to meet the seed demand still occurs. Proper species authentication is important, since only authenticated oil can be deemed safe for human consumption. The chemical constituency of Allanblackia seed oils, and potential roles of these phytochemicals in preventive strategies (e.g., as part of a healthy diet and as pharmacological agents used to treat chronic disease were examined in this review. The primary and secondary metabolite constituency of the seed oils of nearly all Allanblackia species is still poorly known. The presence, identity, and quantity of potentially bioactive secondary metabolites in the seed oils, and pharmacological testing of isolated compounds were identified as important directions for future research.

  8. Bleaching and recovery of a phototrophic bioeroding sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Joseph; Davy, Simon K.; Shaffer, Megan; Haris, Abdul; Bell, James J.

    2018-06-01

    In the Wakatobi region of Indonesia, a prolonged period of elevated water temperature in 2016 caused extensive coral bleaching and mortality. Unusually, bleaching was also observed in the bioeroding sponge Cliona aff. viridis, with affected sponges expelling 99% of their Symbiodinium. Bleaching surveys of C. aff. viridis were conducted 6 weeks apart, coinciding with a 0.8 °C drop in water temperature. Over this period, bleaching prevalence dropped from 73.9% (± 9.9 SE) to 25.7% (± 5.8 SE), and bleaching severity dropped from 25.95% (± 4.5 SE) to 11.54% (± 1.9 SE) of sponge tissue. Over the same period, monitored bleached sponges showed an 81% drop in bleaching severity, but also a 13% reduction in overall sponge size. Our results show that while the clionaid- Symbiodinium relationship is susceptible to break down under thermal stress, rapid recovery can occur, although incurring some partial host mortality.

  9. Marine sponges (Porifera: Demospongiae) from the Gulf of México, new records and redescription of Erylus trisphaerus (de Laubenfels, 1953).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Diana; Gómez, Patricia; Simões, Nuno

    2015-01-19

    Marine sponges usually constitute the most diverse group of the benthic community in coral reefs. Although they are reasonably well studied at the northern Gulf of Mexico (GMx), the southern GMx is poorly known and lacks records from many major reef systems that lie off the Mexican coast. The present taxonomic study is the first sponge account from Alacranes reef, the largest coral reef system in the GMx, and from the shallow reef banks of Sisal, both in the northwest Yucatan Peninsula. The 19 species herein described represent the first sponge fauna records from these reefs. Among these, seven species represent new record for GMx: Erylus formosus, Cliona flavifodina, Spirastrella aff. mollis, Strongylacidon bermuda, Topsentia bahamensis, Agelas tubulata and Chelonaplysilla aff. erecta. Twelve species are new records for the Southern GMx: Erylus trisphaerus, Cliona amplicavata, Chondrilla caribensis, Halichondria lutea, Hymeniacidon caerulea, Axinella corrugata, Dragmacidon reticulatum, Chalinula molitba, Amphimedon caribica, A. complanata, Hyatella cavernosa and Dysidea variabilis. Additionally, a redescription of Erylus trisphaerus is presented which had not been reviewed since its original description in 1953 off Western Florida, except that it was listed for north La Habana, Cuba. 

  10. Work-related motives and self-esteem in American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedeian, A G; Touliatos, J

    1978-05-01

    Acknowledging the need for additional research on work-related motives and self-esteem in American women, this study investigated the hypothesis that women with a favorable self-esteem would score high in n Ach, in Pow, and n Auto, whereas women with a less favorable self-esteem would score high in n Aff, n Agg, and n Def. Eighty-five female college students completed Gough and Heilbrun's Adjective Check List and Form B of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Data were analyzed by means of chi square tests in conjunction with the coefficient of association asymmetric lambda. The results indicated that, as predicted, women with a favorable self-esteem scored high in n Ach (p less than .001) and n Pow (p less than .001), while contrary to expectation, they also scored high in n Aff (p less than .05). All other relationships were found to be nonreliable. These findings were interpreted as stressing the importance of the relationship between self-esteem and work-related motives in women.

  11. Effect of soy lecithin on total cholesterol content, fatty acid composition and carcass characteristics in the Longissimus dorsi of Hanwoo steers (Korean native cattle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang Zi; Park, Byung Ki; Hong, Byuong Chon; Ahn, Jun Sang; Shin, Jong Suh

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of soy lecithin on the total cholesterol content, the fatty acid composition and carcass characteristics in the Longissimus dorsi in Hanwoo steers. Hanwoo steers (24 head) were fed two diets: Control (CON) (concentrate + alcohol-fermented feed (AFF)) and soy lecithin treatment (CON + soy lecithin at 0.5% of the AFF). Soy lecithin treatment increased average daily gain, serum concentrations of triglyceride, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the blood. A lower cholesterol concentration was found in the Longissimus dorsi for the soy lecithin diet compared to the CON diet. With respect to the marbling score and quality grade of Longissimus dorsi, soy lecithin supplementation significantly increased the C20:5n3, C22:4 and polyunsaturated fatty acids contents compared to the CON diet. Soy lecithin supplementation would alter the total cholesterol content, polyunsaturated fatty acid profile and meat quality of Longissimus dorsi. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Sedimentary paleoenvironments of the Candeleros Formation(Rio Limay Subgroup)upper cretaceous, Ezequiel Ramos Mexia, Neuquen, Argentina daming west, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.

    2004-01-01

    Sedimentary facies from the Candeleros Formation (Rio Limay Subgroup), cropping out at the El Escondido creek, at the Ezequiel Ramos Mexia dam, are analyzed and interpreted in this paper. A sedimentological detailed section was measured to get the main goal of this paper which is the sedimentary paleoenvironment. The outcroppings were pictured and a section was measured, geometries and espacial relation between them were analyzed. Eight lithofacies were identified which are: coarse sandstone facies (Se), sandstones (Sm, St, Sp, Sh t Sr), siltstones and shales (Fl and Fr). These lithofacies were agrupated into eight facies associations (FA). AFA constitutes the registration of multiepisodic events of sheet floods; AFB, C and D are product of the depositation in a braided channel belt, AFE represents units of lateral accretion, AFF is assigned deposits of crevasse splay and AFG and H are assigned to plain of flood. The distribution of these associations in the column defines an terminal fan paleoenvironment where is represented of base to top: distal (AFA, B and G) and proximal area (AFD and G) of the distributary plain; zone of feeding of the system (AFC, And, F and G), media-proximal distributary plain (AFD and F), proximal distributary plain (AFC, And, F and G); and flood basin (AFF, G and H) [es

  13. Microplankton of the Barents Sea: current composition and structure on the eve of the winter

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    Makarevich P. R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of microplankton (Protista investigations in the Barents Sea (standard "Kola Meridian Transect", ~70–78° N, 33° 30′ E in November / December have been presented. Samples for the determination of the taxonomical composition and abundance have been fixed with buffered formalin and examined with light microscopy using Nageotte counting chambers. A list of species recorded in the Barents Sea on transect, abundance and vertical distribution of microplankton has been given: a the seasonal composition of species (Ceratium fusus, Dicroerisma psilonereiella, Dinophysis rotundata, Lessardia elongata aff., Oxytoxum caudatum, Pronoctiluca pelagica, Protoperidinium brevipes, Prorocentrum balticum (Dinophyta, Corethron criophilum (Bacillariophyta, Coccolithus pelagicus (Haptophyta, Halosphaera viridis (Prasinophyta; b mean values of the total biomass of microplankton and its distribution in the water column (1.14 mkg/l in the layer of 50–0 m, 0.97 mkg/l – 100–50 m, 0.75 mkg/l – 200–100 m, 0.53 mkg/l – 300–200 m. Such parameter as dominant species in the structure of the total number is less constant (the ordinary dominant O. caudatum, subdominants – L. elongata aff., P. balticum, C. pelagicus, C. criophilum; in some years, at selected sites of the Barents Sea most of the total number has been formed to unusual species (Emiliania huxleyi, Mesoporos perforatus. The less stable characteristics of microplancton are dominant species composition in the biomass structure, total number of cells and their distribution in the water column.

  14. E-Orbit Functions

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    Jiri Patera

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We review and further develop the theory of $E$-orbit functions. They are functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ obtained from the multivariate exponential function by symmetrization by means of an even part $W_{e}$ of a Weyl group $W$, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. They are closely related to symmetric and antisymmetric orbit functions which are received from exponential functions by symmetrization and antisymmetrization procedure by means of a Weyl group $W$. The $E$-orbit functions, determined by integral parameters, are invariant withrespect to even part $W^{aff}_{e}$ of the affine Weyl group corresponding to $W$. The $E$-orbit functions determine a symmetrized Fourier transform, where these functions serve as a kernel of the transform. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of the fundamental domain $F^{e}$ of the group $W^{aff}_{e}$ (the discrete $E$-orbit function transform.

  15. Capra alba Moyà-Solà, 1987 del Pleistoceno Inferior de la Sierra de Quibas (Albanilla, Murcia, España

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    Romero, G.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The first palaeontological study of the locality of Quibas dates from the end of the 1990ties (Montoya et al., 1999, describing over 60 vertebrate taxa. One of these was a caprine assigned to Capra sp. aff. Capra alba. Recent excavations yielded new remains of this taxon, which permits a more profound study of its affinities and an assignation to Capra alba, without reservation. This assignation is based on the morphological and metrical comparison of the skulls, horn cores, dentition and metapodials from Quibas with those of Capra alba from Venta Micena (Orce Granada.A finales de la década de los 90 se realizó el primer estudio paleontológico del yacimiento de la Sierra de Quibas (Montoya et al., 1999 en el que se describieron más de 60 taxones de vertebrados. Uno de ellos fue el de un caprino asignado como Capra sp. aff Capra alba. Las últimas campañas de excavación han librado nuevos restos de este taxón, lo que ha permitido poder estudiarlo con mayor profundidad y asignarlo a Capra alba. Esta atribución se basa en la comparación morfológica y métrica de los cráneos, núcleos óseos, dentición y metápodos con los ejemplares de C. alba de Venta Micena (Orce, Granada.

  16. Physical mapping of the 5S and 18S rDNA in ten species of Hypostomus Lacépède 1803 (Siluriformes: Loricariidae): evolutionary tendencies in the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Vanessa; Venere, Paulo César; Thums Konerat, Jocicléia; Zawadzki, Cláudio Henrique; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Hypostomus is a diverse group with unclear aspects regarding its biology, including the mechanisms that led to chromosome diversification within the group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 18S rDNA probes was performed on ten Hypostomini species. Hypostomus faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had only one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sites, while H. ancistroides, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, H. regani, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 18S rDNA sites. Regarding the 5S rDNA genes, H. ancistroides, H. regani, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had 5S rDNA sites on only one chromosome pair and H. faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 5S rDNA sites. Most species had 18S rDNA sites in the telomeric region of the chromosomes. All species but H. cochliodon had 5S rDNA in the centromeric/pericentromeric region of one metacentric pair. Obtained results are discussed based on existent phylogenies for the genus, with comments on possible dispersion mechanisms to justify the variability of the rDNA sites in Hypostomus.

  17. Noninvasive prediction of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in patients with coronary artery disease and preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aziz, Tarek A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 3 different available methods for estimating left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) noninvasively in patients with coronary artery disease and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (EF). We used 3 equations for noninvasive estimation of LVEDP: The equation of Mulvagh et al., LVEDP(1) = 46 - 0.22 (IVRT) - 0.10 (AFF) - 0.03 (DT) - (2 ÷ E/A) + 0.05 MAR; the equation of Stork et al., LVEDP(2) = 1.06 + 15.15 × Ai/Ei; and the equation of Abd-El-Aziz, LVEDP(3) = [0.54 (MABP) × (1 - EF)] - 2.23. ( A, A-wave velocity; AFF, atrial filling fraction; Ai, time velocity integral of A wave; DT, deceleration time; E, E-wave velocity; Ei, time velocity integral of E wave; IVRT, isovolumic relaxation time; MABP, mean arterial blood pressure; MAR, time from termination of mitral flow to the electrocardiographic R wave; Ti, time velocity integral of total wave.) LVEDP measured by catheterization was correlated with LVEDP(1) (r = 0.52, P Aziz, LVEDP = [0.54 MABP × (1 - EF)] - 2.23, appears to be the most accurate, reliable, and easily applied method for estimating LVEDP noninvasively in patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction and an LVEDP < 20 mm Hg. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Physical Mapping of the 5S and 18S rDNA in Ten Species of Hypostomus Lacépède 1803 (Siluriformes: Loricariidae: Evolutionary Tendencies in the Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypostomus is a diverse group with unclear aspects regarding its biology, including the mechanisms that led to chromosome diversification within the group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with 5S and 18S rDNA probes was performed on ten Hypostomini species. Hypostomus faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had only one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sites, while H. ancistroides, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, H. regani, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 18S rDNA sites. Regarding the 5S rDNA genes, H. ancistroides, H. regani, H. albopunctatus, H. aff. paulinus, and H. topavae had 5S rDNA sites on only one chromosome pair and H. faveolus, H. cochliodon, H. commersoni, H. hermanni, and H. strigaticeps had multiple 5S rDNA sites. Most species had 18S rDNA sites in the telomeric region of the chromosomes. All species but H. cochliodon had 5S rDNA in the centromeric/pericentromeric region of one metacentric pair. Obtained results are discussed based on existent phylogenies for the genus, with comments on possible dispersion mechanisms to justify the variability of the rDNA sites in Hypostomus.

  19. Effects of Stingless Bee Propolis on Experimental Asthma

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    José Hidelbland Cavalcante de Farias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee products have been used empirically for centuries, especially for the treatment of respiratory diseases. The present study evaluated the effect of treatment with a propolis hydroalcoholic extract (PHE produced by Scaptotrigona aff. postica stingless bee in a murine asthma model. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with ovalbumin (OVA subcutaneously. After 14 days, they were intranasally challenged with OVA. Groups P50 and P200 received PHE by gavage at doses of 50 and 200 mg/kg, respectively. The DEXA group was treated with intraperitoneal injection of dexamethasone. The OVA group received only water. The mice were treated daily for two weeks and then they were immunized a second time with intranasal OVA. The treatment with PHE decreased the cell number in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BAL. Histological analysis showed reduced peribronchovascular inflammation after treatment with PHE especially the infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells. In addition, the concentration of interferon-γ (IFN-γ in the serum was decreased. These results were similar to those obtained with dexamethasone. Treatment with S. aff postica propolis reduced the pathology associated with murine asthma due an inhibition of inflammatory cells migration to the alveolar space and the systemic progression of the allergic inflammation.

  20. Habitat preferences of common native fishes in a tropical river in Southeastern Brazil

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    Marcus Rodrigues da Costa

    Full Text Available We determined in this study the habitat preferences of seven native fish species in a regulated river in Southeastern Brazil. We tested the hypothesis that fishes differ in habitat preference and that they use stretches of the river differing in hydraulic characteristics and substrate type. We surveyed fishes in four 1-km long river stretches encompassing different habitat traits, where we also measured water depth, velocity, and substrate type. We investigated preference patterns of four Siluriformes (Loricariichthys castaneus, Hoplosternum littorale, Pimelodus maculatus, and Trachelyopterus striatulus and three Characiformes (Astyanax aff. bimaculatus, Oligosarcus hepsetus, and Hoplias malabaricus, representing approximately 70% of the total number of fishes and 64% of the total biomass. We classified fishes into four habitat guilds: (1 a slow-flowing water guild that occupied mud-sand substrate, composed of two Siluriformes in either shallow ( 8 m, L. castaneus waters; (2 a run-dwelling guild that occurs in deep backwaters with clay-mud substrate, composed of the Characiformes A. aff. bimaculatus and O. hepsetus; (3 a run-dwelling guild that occurs in sandy and shallow substrate, composed of T. striatulus; and (4 a fast-flowing guild that occurs primarily along shorelines with shallow mud bottoms, composed of H. malabaricus and P. maculatus. Our hypothesis was confirmed, as different habitat preferences by fishes appear to occur in this regulated river.

  1. Digital Forensics Formats: Seeking a Digital Preservation Storage Container Format for Web Archiving

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    Yunhyong Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss archival storage container formats from the point of view of digital curation and preservation, an aspect of preservation overlooked by most other studies. Considering established approaches to data management as our jumping off point, we selected seven container format attributes that are core to the long term accessibility of digital materials. We have labeled these core preservation attributes. These attributes are then used as evaluation criteria to compare storage container formats belonging to five common categories: formats for archiving selected content (e.g. tar, WARC, disk image formats that capture data for recovery or installation (partimage, dd raw image, these two types combined with a selected compression algorithm (e.g. tar+gzip, formats that combine packing and compression (e.g. 7-zip, and forensic file formats for data analysis in criminal investigations (e.g. aff – Advanced Forensic File format. We present a general discussion of the storage container format landscape in terms of the attributes we discuss, and make a direct comparison between the three most promising archival formats: tar, WARC, and aff. We conclude by suggesting the next steps to take the research forward and to validate the observations we have made.

  2. Antifungal activity of extracts from three species of lichens in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaillant-Flores, Daymara Idonay; Romeu-Carballo, Carlos Rafael; Ramirez-Ochoa, Rebeca; Porras-Gonzalez, Angela; Gomez-Peralta, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    The antifungal activity of the three lichens extracts was evaluated in this work. Extracts from Leptogium cyanescens, Physcia americana and Pyxine aff. cocoes were collected extracts from the lichens thallus in 2009 in areas fromo the Jardin Botanico Cienfuego, Cuba. The fungicide activity was evaluated against phytopathogens fungi of potato: Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophthora nicotianae var parasitica. The study was conducted from 2009 to 2011. The compounds were extracted with acetone, concentrated by rotoevaporation, and evaluated at concentrated of 0,01 and 0,07% in potato dextrose agar (PDA) culture medium; stock solution was made of 5% dimethilsufoxide. These extracts were classified by their toxicity as: toxic, slight and moderately toxic and harmless. The extracts from P. americana of 0,07% inhibited P. nicotianae 100%, and it showed values over 50% for R. solani. L. cyanescens only showed fungicide activity in both phytopathogens at the maximum concentration studied; similar results were obtained with the extract from P. aff. cocoes. The lichens extracts were classified as lightly toxic at the maximun concentration, and harmless at the minimum concentration. (author) [es

  3. Cytogenetic and Molecular Findings in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Experience of a Single Institution in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccé, Mariela C.; Alonso, Cristina N.; Rossi, Jorge G.; Bernasconi, Andrea R.; Rampazzi, Maria A.; Felice, Maria S.; Rubio, Patricia L.; Eandi Eberle, Silvia; Medina, Adriana; Gallego, Marta S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the cytogenetic findings in 1,057 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) referred to the cytogenetics laboratory at the Hospital de Pediatría Dr. Juan P. Garrahan, between 1991 and 2014. Chromosomal abnormalities were evaluated by G-banding and FISH. Since December 2002, RT-PCR determinations were systematically carried out for BCR-ABL1, KMT2A-AFF1, ETV6-RUNX1, and TCF3-PBX1 rearrangements in children, adding KMT2A-MLLT3 and KMT2A-MLLT1 in infants. The percentage of abnormalities detected by cytogenetics was 70.1%. Four novel abnormalities, t(2;8)(p11.2;p22), inv(4)(p16q25), t(1;7)(q25;q32), and t(5;6)(q21;q21), were found in this cohort. We compared cytogenetic and RT-PCR results for BCR-ABL1, KMT2A-AFF1 and TCF3-PBX1 rearrangements in 497 children evaluated by both methods. The results were highly concordant (p cytogenetic findings in children with ALL reported in Argentina. PMID:26648836

  4. Snakes of the genus Oxyrhopus (Colubridae: Squamata in Colombia: taxonomy and geographic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Lynch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Oxyrhopus occur in Colombia, one (O. leucomelas of which is Andean and the other three occur in lowlands. No geographic variation was detected in O. occipitalis but there is marked geographic variation in color pattern and scutellation for the widely distributed O. petola. Recognition of subspecies within O. petola is possible but appears to obscure more than it illuminates. The snake previously reported as O. melanogenys or O. aff. melanogenys is diagnosed as a previously unrecognized species.Cuatro especies del género Oxyrhopus se encuentran en Colombia. De las cuatro especies, una (O. leucomelas es una especie andina y las otras tres son especies de las tierras bajas. Variación geográfica no fue detecta en O. occipitalis pero mucha variación se encuentra en O. petola, en términos de patrón y de conteos de escamas. Se posible de reconocer subespecies pero tal reconocimiento oscura mas que ilumina. La serpiente conocida antes como O. melanogenys o O. aff. melanogenys está descrita como especie nueva.

  5. Trap-Nesting Bees in Montane Grassland (Campo Rupestre) and Cerrado in Brazil: Collecting Generalist or Specialist Nesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, P C S; Lourenço, A P; Raw, A

    2016-10-01

    Species richness and seasonal abundance of solitary bees were investigated in rocky, montane grassland (campo rupestre) (1180 m asl) and cerrado sensu stricto (680 m asl) in the Biribiri State Park, Diamantina, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Three hundred nineteen nest traps of bamboo canes and black cardboard tubes were monthly inspected at each site during 15 months. A total of eight species of bees built 97 nests. Four species were common to both sites. Tetrapedia aff. curvitarsis Friese and Tetrapedia aff. peckoltii Friese were the most abundant at campo rupestre and cerrado s.s., respectively, followed by Centris analis (Fabricius) in campo rupestre and Centris tarsata Smith in cerrado s.s. The nesting peaks occurred in May in campo rupestre and in February in cerrado s.s. Three cuckoo bees and one bee-fly were collected as natural enemies. The findings suggest that differences between the sites were related more to ecological factors (floral resources, natural nest sites) than to the altitudinal difference. The species richness was similar to that in other habitats with open vegetation. We demonstrate the need to use several types of trap-nest to increase the range of species sampled; some species used only one of the two types traps provided. We also comment on the limitations of trap-nests in cerrado vegetation. Most cerrado species of bees are very selective in their choice for a nesting site, but bees that use trap-nests are more generalists.

  6. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in aff/dtd">sNN=200 GeV Au+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahab, N. M.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-01

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at root S-NN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance Delta eta-dependent and Delta eta-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a Delta eta-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of. within the measured range of pseudorapidity vertical bar eta vertical bar < 1. In 20-30% central Au+Au collisions, the relative flow fluctuation was found to be 34% +/- 2%(stat.) +/- 3%(sys.) for particles with transverse momentum p(T) less than 2 GeV/c. The Delta eta-dependent part, attributed to nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% +/- 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at vertical bar Delta eta vertical bar > 0.7. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Search for high-mass new phenomena in the dilepton final state using proton–proton collisions at aff/dtd">s=13TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D' amen, G.; D' Auria, S.; D' Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell' Acqua, A.; Dell' Asta, L.; Dell' Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. 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P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O' grady, F.; O' Neil, D. C.; O' Rourke, A. 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H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    A search is conducted for both resonant and non-resonant high-mass new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states. The search uses 3.2 fb-1of proton–proton collision data, collected at √s = 13 TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2015. The dilepton invariant mass is used as the discriminating variable. No significant deviation from the Standard Model prediction is observed; therefore limits are set on the signal model parameters of interest at 95% credibility level. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for resonances decaying to dileptons, and the limits are converted into lower limits on the resonance mass, ranging between 2.74 TeV and 3.36 TeV, depending on the model. Lower limits on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale are set between 16.7 TeV and 25.2 TeV, also depending on the model.

  8. Measurement of the total cross section from elastic scattering in pp collisions at aff/dtd">s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. 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G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    A measurement of the total ppcross section at the LHC at √s=8TeV is presented. An integrated luminosity of 500 μb-1 was accumulated in a special run with high-β beam optics to measure the differential elastic cross section as a function of the Mandelstam momentum transfer variable t. The measurement is performed with the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS. Using a fit to the differential elastic cross section in the -t range from 0.014GeV2 to 0.1GeV2 to extrapolate t→0, the total cross section, σtot(pp →X), is measured via the optical theorem to be σtot(pp→ X) = 96.07±0.18 (stat.)±0.85 (exp.)± 0.31 (extr.) mb, where the first error is statistical, the second accounts for all experimental systematic uncertainties and the last is related to uncertainties in the extrapolation t→0. In addition, the slope of the exponential function describing the elastic cross section at small t is determined to be B =19.74 ±0.05 (stat.) ±0.23 (syst.) GeV-2.

  9. Measurement of the aff/dtd">Υ(1S), aff/dtd">Υ(2S), and

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; DʼHondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. 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S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; DʼAlessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; DʼAgnolo, R. T.; DellʼOrso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Butt, J.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Shreyber, I.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Popov, A.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; DʼEnterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y. -J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R. -S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Srimanobhas, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Mall, O.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; DʼAlfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Kcira, D.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. 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V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; OʼBrien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2013-10-21

    The $\\Upsilon$(1S), $\\Upsilon$(2S), and $\\Upsilon$(3S) production cross sections are measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.8 $\\pm$ 1.4 inverse picobarns of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The Upsilon resonances are identified through their decays to dimuons. Integrated over the $\\Upsilon$ transverse momentum range $p_{t}^{\\Upsilon} \\lt$ 50GeV and rapidity range |$y^\\Upsilon$| $\\lt$ 2.4, and assuming unpolarized Upsilon production, the products of the Upsilon production cross sections and dimuon branching fractions are \\begin{equation*}\\sigma(pp \\to \\Upsilon(1S) X) . B(\\Upsilon(1S) \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-) = (8.55 \\pm 0.05^{+0.56}_{-0.50} \\pm 0.34) nb,\\end{equation*} \\begin{equation*}\\sigma(pp \\to \\Upsilon(2S) X) . B(\\Upsilon(2S) \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-) = (2.21 \\pm 0.03^{+0.16}_{-0.14} \\pm 0.09) nb,\\end{equation*} \\begin{equation*}\\sigma(pp \\to \\Upsilon(3S) X) . B(\\Upsilon(3S) \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-) = (1.11 \\pm 0.02^{+0.10}_{-0.08} \\pm 0.04) nb, \\end{equation*} where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is from the uncertainty in the integrated luminosity. The differential cross sections in bins of transverse momentum and rapidity, and the cross section ratios are presented. Cross section measurements performed within a restricted muon kinematic range and not corrected for acceptance are also provided. These latter measurements are independent of Upsilon polarization assumptions. The results are compared to theoretical predictions and previous measurements.

  10. Searches for Higgs bosons in pp collisions at aff/dtd">s=7 and 8 TeV in the context of four-generation and fermiophobic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

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