WorldWideScience

Sample records for aesthetics tooth repair

  1. A guide to minimally invasive crown lengthening and tooth preparation for rehabilitating pink and white aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, F; Ahmad, I

    2018-02-23

    The rehabilitation of anterior dental aesthetics involves a multitude of disciplines, each with its own methodologies for achieving a predefined goal. The literature is awash with different techniques for a given predicament, based on both scientific credence, as well as empirical clinical judgements. An example is crown lengthening for correcting uneven gingival zeniths, increasing clinical crown lengths, and therefore, reducing the amount of maxillary gingival display that detracts from pleasing pink aesthetics. Many procedures have been advocated for rectifying gingival anomalies depending on prevailing clinical scenarios and aetiology. This paper presents a minimally invasive technique for crown lengthening for short clinical crowns concurrent with excessive maxillary gingival display, which is expedient, maintaining the inter-proximal papilla, mitigating morbidity, reducing post-operative inflammation, and increasing patient comfort. In addition, with a similar ethos, a minimally invasive tooth preparation approach is presented for achieving optimal white aesthetics.

  2. Materials chemistry: A synthetic enamel for rapid tooth repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Kazue; Onuma, Kazuo; Suzuki, Takashi; Okada, Fumio; Tagami, Junji; Otsuki, Masayuki; Senawangse, Pisol

    2005-02-01

    The conventional treatment of dental caries involves mechanical removal of the affected part and filling of the hole with a resin or metal alloy. But this method is not ideal for tiny early lesions because a disproportionate amount of healthy tooth must be removed to make the alloy or resin stick. Here we describe a dental paste of synthetic enamel that rapidly and seamlessly repairs early caries lesions by nanocrystalline growth, with minimal wastage of the natural enamel.

  3. Monolithic zirconia crowns in the aesthetic zone in heavy grinders with severe tooth wear - An observational case-series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Torbjørn Leif; Schriwer, Christian; Øilo, Marit; Gjengedal, Harald

    2018-02-13

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with monolithic zirconia crowns in patients with severe tooth wear (≥1/3 of the tooth crown) in the aesthetic zone. The historical prospective study sample consisted of 13 patients previously treated with a total of 84 monolithic zirconia crowns. The patients had been treated in a private clinic in Bergen, Norway, in the period 2012 to 2014. All patients were men, aged 35-67 years (mean age 56.3 years) and had been in need of prosthetic rehabilitation because of severe tooth wear in the aesthetic zone. Technical complications as well as biologic findings were registered when the crowns had been in function one to three years (mean 20 months). The patients completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding satisfaction with aesthetic and function. No biological complications were registered in 79 of the crowns (94%), and technical complications were registered in only two patients. All patients were satisfied with the aesthetic and function of the monolithic zirconia crowns and would choose the same treatment modality if they were to be treated again. Within the limitations of this study, we conclude that the rate of clinical complications was low and that the patients were satisfied with the aesthetic as well as the function of the monolithic zirconia crowns. Monolithic zirconia crowns may provide a valid treatment modality in the aesthetic zone in patients with severe tooth wear. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimizing Maxillary Aesthetics of a Severe Compromised Tooth through Orthodontic Movement and Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Scaf de Molon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of severe compromised tooth in the maxillary anterior area still poses great challenge to the clinicians. Several treatment modalities have been proposed to restore the function and aesthetics in teeth with advanced periodontal disease. The present study aims to report a case of traumatic injury of a left-maxillary central incisor with ridge preservation, orthodontic movement, and implant therapy. A 45-year-old woman underwent the proposed treatment for her left central incisor: basic periodontal therapy, xenogenous bone graft, and guided bone regeneration (GBR. Six months after the graft procedure, orthodontic movement by means of alignment and leveling was made and a coronal displacement of the gingival margin and vertical bone apposition could be observed after 13 months of active movement. Afterwards, a dental implant was placed followed by a connective tissue graft and immediate provisionalization of the crown. In conclusion, orthodontic movement was effective to improve the gingival tissue and alveolar bone prior to implant placement favoring the aesthetic results. Six years postoperatively, the results revealed height and width alveolar bone gain indicating that the treatment proposed was able to restore all the functional and aesthetic parameters.

  5. Feasibility of immediate placement of single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone : a1-year randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    AimTo assess whether outcome of immediate implant placement and immediate provisionalization after 1year was non-inferior to immediate implant placement and delayed provisionalization regarding Marginal Bone Level (MBL). Materials and MethodsForty patients with a failing tooth in the aesthetic zone

  6. Treatment outcome of immediate, early and conventional single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone : a systematic review to survival, bone level, soft-tissue, aesthetics and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Huddleston Slater, James J. R.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2008-01-01

    den Hartog L, Huddleston Slater JJR, Vissink A, Meijer HJA, Raghoebar GM. Treatment outcome of immediate, early and conventional single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone: a systematic review to survival, bone level, soft-tissue, aesthetics and patient satisfaction. J Clin Periodontol 2008; 35:

  7. Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This anthology is the proceedings publication from the 2013 NAF Symposium Aesthetics, the Uneasy Dimension in Architecture. As a co-production between the Nordic Association of Architectural Research (NAF) and the Faculty of Architecture and Fine Arts at the Norwegian University of Science and Te...

  8. Biology Explaining Tooth Repair and Regeneration: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balic, Anamaria

    2018-03-13

    The tooth is an intricate composition of precisely patterned, mineralized matrices and soft tissues. Mineralized tissues include enamel (produced by the epithelial cells called ameloblasts), dentin and cementum (produced by mesenchymal cells called odontoblasts and cementoblasts, respectively), and soft tissues, which include the dental pulp and the periodontal ligament along with the invading nerves and blood vessels. It was perceived for a very long time that teeth primarily serve an esthetical function. In recent years, however, the role of healthy teeth, as well as the impact of oral health on general well-being, became more evident. Tooth loss, caused by tooth decay, congenital malformations (tooth agenesis), trauma, periodontal diseases, or age-related changes, is usually replaced by artificial materials which lack many of the important biological characteristics of the natural tooth. Human teeth have very low to almost absent regeneration potential, due to early loss of cell populations with regenerative capacity, namely stem cells. Significant effort has been made in recent decades to identify and characterize tooth stem cells, and to unravel the developmental programs which these cells follow in order to generate a tooth. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. 'Batman excision' of ventral skin in hypospadias repair, clue to aesthetic repair (point of technique).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebeke, P B; De Kuyper, P; Van Laecke, E

    2002-11-01

    In the hypospadiac penis the ventral skin is poorly developed, while dorsal skin is redundant. The classical Byars' flaps are a way to use the excess dorsal skin to cover the penile shaft. The appearance after Byars' flaps however is not natural. We use a more natural looking skin allocation with superior aesthetic results. The clue in this reconstruction is an inverted triangle shaped excision of ventral skin expanding over the edges of the hooded prepuce (which makes it look like Batman). After excision of the ventral skin it is possible to close the penile skin in the midline, thus mimicking the natural raphe. In case of preputial reconstruction the excised ventral skin makes the prepuce look more natural. The trend of further refining aesthetic appearance of the hypospadiac penis often neglects the penile skin reconstruction. A technique is presented by which the total penile appearances after surgery ameliorates due to better skin reconstruction.

  10. Evaluation of aesthetics of implant-supported single-tooth replacements using different bone augmentation procedures : A prospective randomized clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijndert, Leo; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Stellingsma, Kees; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the aesthetics of implant-supported single-tooth replacements using different augmentation procedures in a prospective study with the use of an objective rating index and with a subjective patient questionnaire, and to compare the results with each

  11. Repair Responses of Dental Pulp to Tooth Injury and Biological Properties of Dentin-pulp Complex

    OpenAIRE

    大島, 勇人; Ohshima, Hayato

    2004-01-01

    Regeneration-the creation of a new tissue after the original one has been lost-is the fundamental biological capability in an organism. Numerous organs are considered to contain stem cells referred to as adult stem cells, even in the adult. Adult stem cells can give rise to a limited set of adult tissue types. In the field of clinical dentistry, it is well-known that the dentin-pulp complex is capable of repair after tooth injuries such as tooth replantation/transplantation or restorative pro...

  12. Stem cells applications in bone and tooth repair and regeneration: New insights, tools, and hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Meguid, Eiman; Ke, Yuehai; Ji, Junfeng; El-Hashash, Ahmed H K

    2018-03-01

    The exploration of stem and progenitor cells holds promise for advancing our understanding of the biology of tissue repair and regeneration mechanisms after injury. This will also help in the future use of stem cell therapy for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for the treatment of different tissue-species defects or disorders such as bone, cartilages, and tooth defects or disorders. Bone is a specialized connective tissue, with mineralized extracellular components that provide bones with both strength and rigidity, and thus enable bones to function in body mechanical supports and necessary locomotion process. New insights have been added to the use of different types of stem cells in bone and tooth defects over the last few years. In this concise review, we briefly describe bone structure as well as summarize recent research progress and accumulated information regarding the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, as well as stem cell contributions to bone repair/regeneration, bone defects or disorders, and both restoration and regeneration of bones and cartilages. We also discuss advances in the osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration of dental and periodontal stem cells as well as in stem cell contributions to dentine regeneration and tooth engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Repair of a defect following the removal of an impacted maxillary canine by orthodontic tooth movement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wai Yip; Rabie, A Bakr M; Wong, Ricky Wk

    2010-02-15

    This case report describes a 13-year-old boy with alveolar bony defect resulted from surgical removal of impacted upper canine transposed in the anterior region. The boy had a normal occlusion with malposition of upper central and lateral incisors. The treatment objectives were to align teeth, close spaces by mesial movement of the buccal segments in the upper jaw to repair bone loss. Fixed appliance with palatal root torque was used for the mesial movements, levelling, and alignment of teeth.Orthodontic tooth movement consisted of a sequence of root movement in a direction to increase the thickness of the labial cortical plate of bone, could ensure healthier periodontium. A healthier periodontium prior to space closure ensured repair of alveolar bony defect after surgical intervention. Orthodontic tooth movement should be added to our armamentarium for the repair of alveolar bony defect.

  14. [Repair and revision 4. Cracked tooth and crown fractures: diagnostics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, W L; van der Meer, W J

    2001-05-01

    Trauma to the teeth can result in the formation of cracks in the crown or root of the tooth. The location and the extent of these cracks determine the proper treatment choice. This treatment is oriented towards saving pulp vitality and/or tooth integrity. In this paper the diagnosis of these cracks is described as well as the desired treatment. These are discussed relative to the location of the cracks, namely in the clinical crown of the tooth, resulting in enamel infraction, cracked tooth and crown fractures, and in the root of the tooth, resulting in a vertical or horizontal root fracture.

  15. Feasibility of immediate placement of single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone: a 1-year randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagter, Kirsten W; Meijer, Henny J A; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    2015-06-26

    To assess whether outcome of immediate implant placement and immediate provisionalization after 1 year was non-inferior to immediate implant placement and delayed provisionalization regarding Marginal Bone Level (MBL). Forty patients with a failing tooth in the aesthetic zone were randomly assigned for immediate implant placement with immediate (n = 20) or delayed (n = 20) provisionalization. Follow-up was at 1 month and after 1 year. The study was powered to detect a difference in MBL of implant parameters, aesthetic indexes and patient satisfaction were assessed. After 1 year, MBL changes were -0.75 ± 0.69 mesially and -0.68 ± 0.65 distally mm for the immediate group and -0.70 ± 0.64 and -0.68 ± 0.64 mm for the delayed group respectively (NS). Regarding differences in means, non-inferiority was observed after 1 year (mesially: Group A versus B: difference in mean 0.08 mm (95% CI -0.38 to 0.53, p = 0.71 distally: Group A versus B: difference in mean 0.09 mm (95% CI -0.37 to 0.56 mm, p = 0.66).No significant differences in the other outcome variables were observed. This study showed that immediate placement and immediate provisionalization was non-inferior to immediate placement with delayed provisionalization. In addition, although not powered for these outcome variables, no clinically relevant differences in other outcomes were observed (www.isrtcn.com: ISRCTN57251089). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Worley, Donald C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, prestoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, prestoration (OR=12.2, prestorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. PMID:22342563

  17. Crown preservation of the mandibular first molar tooth impacts the strength and stiffness of three noninvasive jaw fracture repair constructs in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eLothamer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Repairing mandibular body fractures present unique challenges not encountered when repairing long bones. Large tooth roots and the presence of the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle limit safe placement for many types of orthopedic implants. Use of noninvasive fracture repair methods have increasingly become popular and have proven safe and effective at achieving bone healing. Noninvasive fixation constructs have not been tested in dogs using cantilevered bending. Furthermore noninvasive fracture repair constructs have not been tested at the location of a common fracture location- the mandibular first molar tooth (M1. The objectives of this study were to test the strength and stiffness of three noninvasive mandibular fracture repair constructs and to characterize the impact that tooth crown preservation has on fixation strength for fractures occurring at the M1 location. Specimens were assigned to three treatment groups: (1 composite only, (2 interdental wiring and composite and (3 transmucosal fixation screw and composite. For each pair of mandibles, one mandible received crown amputation at the alveolar margin to simulate the effect of crown loss on fixation strength and stiffness. Regardless of the status of crown presence, interdental wiring and composite demonstrated the greatest bending stiffness and load to failure. With the crown removed, interdental wiring and composite was significantly stronger compared to other treatments. All fixation constructs were stiffer when the tooth crown was preserved. In fractures at this location, retaining the tooth crown of M1 significantly increases stiffness of interdental wiring with composite and transmucosal screw with composite constructs. If the crown of M1 was removed, interdental wiring and composite was significantly stronger than the other two forms of fixation.

  18. Crown Preservation of the Mandibular First Molar Tooth Impacts the Strength and Stiffness of Three Non-Invasive Jaw Fracture Repair Constructs in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothamer, Charles; Snyder, Christopher John; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Kloke, John; McCabe, Ronald P; Vanderby, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Repairing mandibular body fractures presents unique challenges not encountered when repairing long bones. Large tooth roots and the presence of the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle limit safe placement for many types of orthopedic implants. Use of non-invasive fracture repair methods have increasingly become popular and have proven safe and effective at achieving bone healing. Non-invasive fixation constructs have not been tested in dogs using cantilevered bending. Furthermore, non-invasive fracture repair constructs have not been tested at the location of a common fracture location - the mandibular first molar tooth (M1). The objectives of this study were to test the strength and stiffness of three non-invasive mandibular fracture repair constructs and to characterize the impact that tooth crown preservation has on fixation strength for fractures occurring at the M1 location. Specimens were assigned to three treatment groups: (1) composite only, (2) interdental wiring and composite (IWC), and (3) transmucosal fixation screw and composite. For each pair of mandibles, one mandible received crown amputation at the alveolar margin to simulate the effect of crown loss on fixation strength and stiffness. Regardless of the status of crown presence, IWC demonstrated the greatest bending stiffness and load to failure. With the crown removed, IWC was significantly stronger compared to other treatments. All fixation constructs were stiffer when the tooth crown was preserved. In fractures at this location, retaining the tooth crown of M1 significantly increases stiffness of interdental wiring with composite and transmucosal screw with composite constructs. If the crown of M1 was removed, IWC was significantly stronger than the other two forms of fixation.

  19. Quantifying Coronal Tooth Discoloration Caused by Biodentine and EndoSequence Root Repair Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Hannah; Svec, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot [PR]; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK) has been shown to have high rates of success in various endodontic applications. A major drawback is its tendency to discolor dentin. Two new bioceramics (BD, Biodentine [BD]; Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France; and EndoSequence [ES]; Brasseler, Savannah, GA) have been developed that claim to not discolor teeth. The aim of this study was to compare tooth discoloration between these 3 materials. Forty-eight bovine mandibular incisors (4 groups, n = 12) were obtained and prepared from the apical aspect after root resection. Canals were prepared with sequentially larger ParaPost drills (Coltene/Whaledent Inc, Cuyahoga Falls, OH) to size 7 to 3 mm coronal to the cementoenamel junction. Experimental materials were condensed into the crowns and the access sealed. Color was assessed at various times up to 2 months according to the CIE L*a*b* color space system. Change in color, ΔE, was compared among groups and over time using analysis of variance. For all materials, there was a sharp increase in ΔE after placement. There was a rebound effect on day 1. After a rebound toward the initial color, all materials displayed a trend toward discoloration through the experimental period. At the end of 8 weeks, both BD and ES had discolored significantly more than either control or PR. BD and ES were not significantly different from each other. Control and PR were not significantly different from one another at the end of the experimental period. BD and ES discolor bovine tooth structure to a perceptible degree. At 8 weeks, this was significantly more than PR. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Environmental Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie; Ekelund, Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    The philosophical subfield environmental aesthetics can contribute to the design of sustainable futures. Environmental aesthetics provides a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between nature and culture. Current positions in environmental aesthetics are lined out and used...

  1. Robot Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth Ann; Putnam, Lance Jonathan

    This paper considers art-based research practice in robotics through a discussion of our course and relevant research projects in autonomous art. The undergraduate course integrates basic concepts of computer science, robotic art, live performance and aesthetic theory. Through practice...... in robotics research (such as aesthetics, culture and perception), we believe robot aesthetics is an important area for research in contemporary aesthetics....

  2. Aesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Martin; Petersen, M.G.; Iversen, O.

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  3. Television Aesthetics as Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gary

    In opposition to popular disparaging of television as an artistic medium, television can be considered as having its own aesthetics and can be placed in the category of fine arts (as opposed to folk arts). Television art can and should be distinguished from video art and film art in the ways in which it imitates reality; program content and…

  4. Implant-supported single tooth replacement in the aesthetic zone : a prospective, randomized clinical trial comparing the treatment outcome of three augmentation strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijndert, Leendert

    2007-01-01

    The strive for perfection in dental implantology has moved the focus of attention from mere implant survival to predictability and perfection of the hard and soft tissues in the aesthetic area of the dentition. In particular the identification and the understanding of the relevant biological

  5. Aesthetic Appeal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    ’. The paper will conclude by pointing at the impact of the cultural framing of design and the procedures by which design objects are not only regarded as aesthetic by their inherent qualities but are also attributed meaning and value as aesthetic by external factors, e.g. in visual mediation. Thus......, the question of aesthetics in design may be answered by both addressing the internal meaning formulation of the aesthetic appeal and the external cultural and discursive framing of design that influences how design is perceived as ‘aesthetic’.......This paper is a theoretical contribution to an aesthetics of design beyond style. The paper will present an interpretive framework for investigating and questioning the formation and articulation of aesthetic meaning in design. In the context of the paper, aesthetic meaning can be seen to evolve...

  6. Aesthetic possibilities in removable prosthodontics. Part 2: start with the face not the teeth when rehearsing lip support and tooth positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besford, J N; Sutton, A F

    2018-02-09

    Even dentures exhibiting superb aesthetics are of no use if they visibly move during speech and social intercourse. In this, the second paper of three on removable denture aesthetics, we describe impression making and shaping the wax occlusal record rims. Not only are the impressions important for producing dentures with maximum retention, stability and support, but their extensions and the thickness of their borders have a decisive influence on lip support and profile. This article shows how the contours of the definitive impressions and the wax rims are developed so as to prescribe the overall form of the replacement gums and teeth. Properly trimmed rims are in essence an early three-dimensional rehearsal, an opportunity for developing the patient's preferred lip support and natural positioning of the denture teeth at subsequent stages. They can also give an early indication of what speech will be like with the new dentures. Without this 3D clinical information, laboratory technicians have to guess where to put the teeth and have little option but to fall back on the stereotypes of their textbook training.

  7. Orthodontic extrusion of subgingivally fractured tooth using a removable appliance: an alternative treatment to reestablish biological width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kanika Gupta; Juneja, Suruchi; Kumar, Sandeep; Goyal, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of a traumatically injured tooth presents a clinical challenge for a predictable aesthetic outcome. This case report describes a multidisciplinary approach of a subgingivally fractured permanent maxillary central incisor. A removable orthodontic appliance was used for orthodontic extrusion of root, and surgical gingival recontouring was done with electrocautery to reestablish the biological width. Form and function were restored establishing biological width and esthetics was repaired with porcelain fused to metal crown.

  8. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  9. Single-tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla by means of immediate implantation and early loading: clinical and aesthetic results at 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Renzo; Ceccherini, Alessandro; Grande, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that the early loading of single implants-supported restorations, replacing single extracting teeth in the anterior region of the maxilla in case of fresh extraction sockets with residual hard and soft tissue preservation, could be a successful procedure. Twenty-one implants were placed into maxillary anterior fresh extraction sockets using a flapless technique. Temporary restorations, which were fabricated from the impression taken immediately after implant placement, were connected within 2 weeks. These temporary restorations were adjusted in order to avoid any direct occlusive contacts. Six months after implantation, the implants were restored with single-teeth all-ceramic prostheses. Patients were followed for 5 years. Radiographic and clinical examinations were made at baseline, at time of definitive crowns delivery, and each subsequent year. Survival rate, cortical bone responses, and peri-implant mucosal responses were evaluated. One implant was lost at 6 months. Clinical osseointegration of 20 implants was achieved (95.2% implant survival rate after 5 years) with minimal gingival recession and papillae preservation. The mean change in marginal cortical bone level was 0.40 mm at 6 months and 0.83 mm at 5 years. Within the limit of the present study, the data indicate that, under a strictly controlled oral hygienic regimen, single-tooth implants, with immediate placement and early loading protocol, may be used in anterior maxillary fresh extraction sockets with residual hard and soft tissues preservation, if patients are selected carefully and if high primary stability is strictly followed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in r...

  11. Satisfaction with Appearance and the Desired Treatment to Improve Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader K. Al-Zarea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify participants’ satisfaction with appearance and the desired treatment to improve aesthetics. Materials and Methods. 220 participants (127 males and 93 females, mean age = 21.4 ± 1.5 years were recruited into the study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess patients’ satisfaction with appearance and what treatment they desire to improve aesthetics. Participants scored the level of satisfaction with appearance using visual analogue scale. Results. The VAS mean score of satisfaction with general appearance was 6.8 ± 2.3. Half participants were dissatisfied with tooth appearance and 65.9% were dissatisfied with tooth colour. Higher VAS scores were associated with higher desire for all treatments that improve tooth appearance (. Dissatisfaction with tooth appearance increased with increased dissatisfaction with teeth colour, feeling of poor tooth alignment, presence of fractured anterior teeth, and increased desire for orthodontic, crowns, and dentures treatments (. Dissatisfaction with tooth colour was associated with increased desire for tooth whitening and tooth coloured fillings (. Conclusions. Participants had high levels of dissatisfaction with tooth appearance and tooth colour. Dissatisfaction with tooth colour contributed to the increased dissatisfaction with tooth appearance. Dissatisfaction with tooth appearance, colour, alignment, and condition was significantly related to high desire for aesthetic treatments.

  12. Aesthetic Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting....... Whereas pure art is produced in order to be observed, applied art has to fulfill practical purposes as well. Modern organizations, defined as systems of communication, may use art works to embellish and define themselves. But they inevitably use applied art as a practical tool in their normal....... As communication inevitably makes use of a sensuous medium, such as light or sound, all communication has an aesthetic dimension. In the 19th Century, an important distinction was made between pure and applied art, following Immanuel Kant's separation of theory of knowledge, moral theory and aesthetic theory...

  13. Internet Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, Sean

    This article addresses the ephemeral nature of digital media, especially of artworks designed for the world wide web and other network devices. It traces debates over the nature of digital aesthetics, including discussions of software authoring, interaction and conviviality. It looks at low and high tech paths, suggesting that the fundamental dialectic in digital media lies between democratisation and expertise. It concludes with the suggestion that digital aesthetics are subject to change, because they are embedded in the broader social, political and economic histories, as well as the technological and regulatory environments, in which they evolve.

  14. Troiage Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sheldon

    As the world around us is transformed into digitally enabled forms and processes, aesthetic strategies are required that articulate this underlying condition. A method for doing so involves a formal and conceptual strategy that is derived from collage, montage and assemblage. This triple "age" is termed "troiage", and it uses a style of computational apparency which articulates the edges of our current representational forms and processes as the semantic elements of culture. Each of these component aesthetics has previously had an important effect upon different areas of contemporary art and culture. Collage in painting, montage in film, assemblage in sculpture and architecture, are recombined via algorithmic methods, forefronting the structure of the algorithmic itself. The dynamic of the aesthetic is put into play by examining binary relationships such as: nature/culture, personal/public, U.S/Mexico, freedom/coercion, mediation/experience, etc. Through this process, the pervasiveness of common algorithmic approaches across cultural and social operations is revealed. This aesthetic is used in the project "The Scalable City" in which a virtual urban landscape is created by users interacting with data taken from the physical world in the form of different photographic techniques. This data is transformed by algorithmic methods which have previously been unfamiliar to the types of data that they are utilizing. The Scalable City project creates works across many media; such as prints, procedural animations, digital cinema and interactive 3D computer graphic installations.

  15. Aesthetic Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting. As communic......Based on Niklas Luhmann's systems theory, aesthetics is defined as a manner of reinforcing the connectivity, or Anschlusswert, of communication. Without changing the content, a message can be made more attractive, strengthening the receiver's willingness to be attentive and accepting....... As communication inevitably makes use of a sensuous medium, such as light or sound, all communication has an aesthetic dimension. In the 19th Century, an important distinction was made between pure and applied art, following Immanuel Kant's separation of theory of knowledge, moral theory and aesthetic theory....... Whereas pure art is produced in order to be observed, applied art has to fulfill practical purposes as well. Modern organizations, defined as systems of communication, may use art works to embellish and define themselves. But they inevitably use applied art as a practical tool in their normal...

  16. Tooth fragment reattachment technique on a pluri traumatized tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice; Frank Lipari; Angelo Lizio; Gabriel Cervino; Marco Cicciù

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes and analyses a tooth fragment reattachment technique used to resolve crown fractures of the anterior teeth. This treatment allows a conservative approach to traumatic coronal lesions offering a better possibility of maintaining aesthetics and function. The authors have illustrated here a clinical case of a fractured incisor. This case is characterized by several traumas on the same tooth that required different therapeutic solutions. We used an easy and ultra-conser...

  17. Aesthetic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2003-01-01

    Aesthetics, Art & Management - Towards a New Field of Flow. European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) Workshop , Gattières (France). 2003 Short description: This paper explores some of the rigid theoretical interpretations of the interplay between art and business through a case...... is often described in terms of what a business manager is not and vice versa. This paper explores some of the rigid theoretical interpretations of the interplay between art and business through a case study of two radical Danish artists, Kristian Hornsleth and Michael Brammer. Today, these two artists......, also create for myself, otherwise I don?t live up to people?s expectations.? (Brammer, Interview, August 6, 2002). This paper was presented at the European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) Workshop on "Aesthetics, Art & Management - Towards a New Field of Flow"....

  18. Aesthetics in implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoexter, D L

    1998-10-01

    A young man presented himself with a missing maxillary central incisor and a depressed defect due to a trauma. The trauma caused the loss of No. 8 and its surrounding supportive structure. The defective results were seen by the labial bone loss in the area and a depression. The depression became a food-and-plaque trap and an unaesthetic eyesore. Before the tooth loss, iatrogenic factors from a root canal or retrograde amalgam caused a permanent gingival tattoo. The bonded temporary pontic was larger mesio-distally than the adjacent teeth, and this was very noticeable. It was dull in its finish and poor aesthetically. The patient requested an implant to avoid excess drilling of natural teeth. A combined effort was used to achieve the pleasing final result. To correct the area and improve the physiology and aesthetics, several techniques had to be understood. These techniques also need to be mastered, recalled, and used almost instinctively, and done in a proper team-like sequence. In this case we performed an aesthetic ridge augmentation and tissue surgical manipulation to acquire the form, shape, and correct color background. Deciding upon which implant and material involved choosing the size, type, and shape for the area involved. The techniques used included implant insertion, surgical second stage abutment, mucosal periosteal flap design, various suturing and gingival grafting techniques, ridge buildup augmentation, and GTR. Other choices included which resorbable membrane to use, what bone graft materials, and what oral hygiene to recommend to maintain final health. The restorative technique included full crown coverage, laminate veneers, provisional pontic design and bonding, control of porcelain materials, computer imaging, occlusion, cementing, smile designs, and implant prosthodontics.

  19. Aesthetic Cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toland, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Art theorists, Carole Gray and Heather Delday (2010) pose the question, "What might be known through creative practice that could not be known by any other means?" As a visual artist with a doctorate degree in environmental planning from the TU-Berlin's Department of Soil Protection, I have long considered this question in my work and over the years contributed an active voice to discussions on research, education, and public engagement with soil and art and soil and culture in Germany and around the world. After presenting many other examples of artists' work at international scientific symposia, I would like to present examples of some of my own artistic practice with soil mapping and soil protection issues at the 2017 EGU. In combining methods of visual art, landscape analysis, and soil mapping, I have developed a practice called Aesthetic Cartography that employs sculptural techniques, object-making, installation and performance, printing and graphic design, as well as site analysis, data mining, and map reading and interpretation. Given my background in participatory planning practices, I also integrate small-group dialogic processes in the creation and implementation of my works. The projects making up the body of works in Aesthetic Cartography are mainly focused on urban issues, including: soil sealing, inner-city watershed management, creative brownfield use, rubble substrates and leachates, foraging and urban agriculture, and envisioning sustainable cities of the future. In the session SSS1.4 - Soil, Art, and Culture I will summarize project goals, materials and methods, venues and public contexts, elements of collaboration and participation, as well as target audiences involved in several projects of the Aesthetic Cartography series. The aim of the presentation is not to give a comprehensive answer to Gray and Delday's question above, but rather to share personal insights from a professional practice that merges artistic and scientific approaches to soil

  20. Wavefront Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Riis, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we offer an object-oriented ontological perspective to complement the diversity of sounding ontologies, challenging the human perspective as the only valid perspective and call for the necessity of including perspectives of objects such as a speakers, voices and light sensors....... Subscribing to this view also confronts music and sound art as consistent autonomous categories and focuses on how the pieces attune to the environment, emphasising meetings, transformations and translations through and with other objects. These meetings generate an ecological awareness of causal aesthetics...

  1. Immediate dental implant placement in the aesthetic zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten Willemijn

    2016-01-01

    After pulling a tooth when aesthetics play a role, there is a tendency to place a dental implant immediately after pulling the tooth, preferably in combination with a temporary crown. This tendency is probably related to evolving society factors, with more demanding patients and a wish for an

  2. Aesthetic Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landgrebe, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with how an aesthetic performance is enacted and coordinated by a performance group attracting attention and engaging commuters in a public space. Multimodal interactional resources and the way they are coordinated by interactants are investigated, and include verbal and non......-verbal actions, gaze orientation, active and static interactional strategies and props. From the data investigated, it seems that the performance act is divided into different stages which each calls for different strategies: the group's initiation of the entire performance act reveals that the group stand out...... as uncoordinated and it may have a significance for whether the 'street' performers manage to stay in character or not. Once attention from commuters is obtained, a continued gaze from these commuters opens up for subsequent interaction, which then ultimately may result in the successful handing over of a card...

  3. Aesthetic implant: A new era of aesthetic dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mujibur Rahman Howlader

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dental implant is used to replace the natural tooth system. It requires comprehensive preoperative planning and precise surgical execution. In this case report, a 45 year old male presented with missing upper left maxillary central incisor which was extracted 5 months back. He had discomfort during function and unwillingness to smile. He wanted to replace that edentulous area. The treatment options for replacing the missing tooth were discussed with the patient. Finally, with patient's consent the decision was made to replace that edentulous area with an implant supported porcelain fused to metal prosthesis in an esthetic manner. Recall visits exhibited patient's high-level confidence of smile with optimum satisfaction and successful aesthetic outcome. 

  4. Tooth extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several teeth using the methods above. For an impacted tooth , the surgeon may have to cut a flap ... loosens or damages teeth Tooth injury from trauma Impacted teeth that are causing problems, such as wisdom teeth ( ...

  5. Tooth anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Chan S, Alessandrini EA. Dental injuries. In: Selbst ...

  6. Bioeconomy analysis in Aesthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Dana Tudose

    2015-12-01

    technical report of treatment ( labor - price, average duration, satisfaction, relative to direct restoration techniques versus indirect techniques . In conclusion, SWOT analysis can be successfully applied to a better targeting of treatments, applying a plan lines for management in dental treatment units. None of direct techniques can not fit the bioeconomy principles (saves time, money, dental tissue in the short term. All maneuvers efficient in terms of functional aesthetics dentistry win at time saving and lost tooth structure chapter to the cost issue. In the long run costs can be amortized, especially since the restoration increases predictability.

  7. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation. PMID:24174765

  8. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Nagappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  9. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, G; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-09-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  10. Gingival and dental parameters in the evaluation of aesthetic characteristics of fixed restorations (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a continuing evaluation of dental and facial parameters in the estimation of aesthetic characteristic of fixed restorations. First of all, attention is paid to the phenomenon describing the tooth tissue's characteristics (transiucency, opalescence, and transparency. The paper also discusses tooth color as a special occurrence, the position of the lower lip line as well as the symmetry of the smile. In addition to these fundamental objective criteria, the paper also deals with subjective criteria (tooth arrangement and position, variation in tooth form, and relative crown length, which play a part in the successful aesthetic integration of fixed restorations.

  11. Informational aesthetics measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigau, Jaume; Feixas, Miquel; Sbert, Mateu

    2008-01-01

    The Birkhoff aesthetic measure of an object is the ratio between order and complexity. Informational aesthetics describes the interpretation of this measure from an information-theoretic perspective. From these ideas, the authors define a set of ratios based on information theory and Kolmogorov complexity that can help to quantify the aesthetic experience.

  12. Evaluating aesthetics in design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2010-01-01

    : an aesthetics of sensual relation and an aesthetics of communicative self-reflection. Following these concepts the article raises questions of dealing with design as a structure of sensual appearance, and of design as an act of communication that can contain an aesthetic coding in letting an idea or content......The article proposes a conceptual framework for discussing, theorizing, analyzing and practically dealing with aesthetics in design. With the phenomenological theory of Maurice Merleau-Ponty as its point of departure, the article identifies two important aspects of aesthetics in design...

  13. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  14. Aesthetics and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennyé D.; Sørensen, Merete

    This paper is built on our book "Aesthetics and Learning", Hans Reizels Publishers, Copenhagen 2010. In this book we describe the relationship between aesthetic creative activities and children’s development and learning, based on among other the theories of Malcolm Ross (1988), Hansjörg Hohr (2000......) and Bjørn Rasmussen (1998). According to these theories aesthetic activities are an integrated and irreplaceable part of all children's socialization. Essential activities that develops creativity and enables the child to use the aesthetic languages to reflect and communicate feelings, experiences...... and Wright 2001). We will in this paper, based on a modern aesthetic comprehension, present a theoretical background for using aesthetic learning processes as an integrated part of the curriculum....

  15. Archaeology, landscape and aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Cooper

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role, if any, of aesthetic reflections in the discipline of landscape archaeology. It begins by rejecting the charge that archaeologists should set aside their own aesthetic sensibility when studying landscapes. The bulk of the paper, however, is concerned with arguing that attention to the aesthetic sensibilities of the peoples who made the landscapes studied is essential to the kind of understanding and reconstruction of ways of life that landscape archaeology aims to provide. Two important themes that are developed during the course of this argument are: (1 a distinction (ignored by some archaeologists who are critical of appeals to aesthetic enjoyment between aesthetic appreciation and a dilettante “aestheticism” and (2 the aesthetic satisfactions that must be taken in work, such as farming, if this is to flourish.

  16. Virtual reality - aesthetic consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Benda, Lubor

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we study aesthetic consequences of virtual reality. Exploring the fringe between fictional and virtual is one of the key goals, that will be achieved through etymologic and technologic definition of both fiction and virtual reality, fictional and virtual worlds. Both fiction and virtual reality will be then studied from aesthetic distance and aesthetic pleasure point of view. At the end, we will see the main difference as well as an common grounds between fiction and virtu...

  17. Immediate implant placement and provisionalisation in the aesthetic zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nimwegen, W. G.; Goene, R. J.; Van Daelen, A. C. L.; Stellingsma, K.; Raghoebar, G. M.; Meijer, H. J. A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the outcome of immediate single-tooth implant placement and provisionalisation in the aesthetic zone regarding hard and soft peri-implant tissue parameters and patient-related outcome measures in a private practice. All consecutively treated patients

  18. Aesthetic responses to music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Istok, Eva; Brattico, Elvira; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We explored the content and structure of the cognitive, knowledge-based concept underlying aesthetic responses to music. To this aim, we asked 290 Finnish students to verbally associate the aesthetic value of music and to write down a list of appropriate adjectives within a given time limit. No m...

  19. Aesthetic Judgements and Motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archer, Alfred

    Are aesthetic judgements cognitive, belief-like states or non-cognitive, desire-like states? There have been a number of attempts in recent years to evaluate the plausibility of a non-cognitivist theory of aesthetic judgements. These attempts borrow heavily from Non-cognitivism in metaethics. One

  20. Empirical Music Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    musical performance and reception is inspired by traditional approaches within aesthetics, but it also challenges some of the presuppositions inherent in them. As an example of such work I present a research project in empirical music aesthetics begun last year and of which I am a team member....

  1. Aesthetics of sustainable architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.; Hill, G.; Sauerbruch, M.; Hutton, L.; Knowles, R.; Bothwell, K.; Brennan, J.; Jauslin, D.; Holzheu, H.; AlSayyad, N.; Arboleda, G.; Bharne, V.; Røstvik, H.; Kuma, K.; Sunikka-Blank, M.; Glaser, M.; Pero, E.; Sjkonsberg, M.; Teuffel, P.; Mangone, G.; Finocchiaro, L.; Hestnes, A.; Briggs, D.; Frampton, K.; Lee, S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to reveal, explore and further the debate on the aesthetic potentials of sustainable architecture and its practice. This book opens a new area of scholarship and discourse in the design and production of sustainable architecture, one that is based in aesthetics. The

  2. Evaluation of autogenous tooth transplantation for replacement of the missing or unrestorable mandibular molar tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahiduj Jaman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the functional and occlusal stability of autogenous tooth transplantation. A total of 30 patients were included. Among them, 21 participants received transplanted first molar and the remaining 9 received transplanted second molar. In all the cases, donor tooth were third molar. In each participant, extraction of un-restorable first or second molar tooth was performed which was then replaced by atrumatic extracted third molar tooth. Each third molar tooth was placed in the recipient extracted socket, followed by the evaluation of the occlusion and then stabilized with arch bar and ligature wire. Clinical follow-up evaluation was performed at 15 days, 3 and 12 months in respect to occlusal stability, tooth mobility and periodontal status. It was found that 23 transplanted tooth were successful and the remaining 7 tooth need long-term observation for the final outcome, which was statistically significant. It can be concluded that the autogenous tooth transplantation can replace missing tooth to ensure the preservation of function, aesthetic and to prevent bone resorption of the missing area of the jaw, which can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional outcome.

  3. Implant placement and immediate loading in aesthetic zone- A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Deshmukh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Single teeth replaced by implants in the aesthetic zone are one of the most challenging situations faced by a clinician. Recent studies have encouraged a progressive shortening of the healing period for single-tooth implants with immediate implantation and immediate loading being proposed for the aesthetic zone in the maxilla. The present report describes three cases with single tooth replacement in the anterior maxillary region by implant therapy with flapless technique followed by immediate provisionalization of the implant with all-ceramic crown. The patients exhibited no clinical or radiologic complications 1 year after loading. Implant placement and immediate loading of single tooth can provide an attractive treatment option in the aesthetic zone. Careful assessment must be made of mucosal and bone volumes in relation to implant placement for optimum aesthetic outcome.

  4. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Preeti; Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-06-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it's necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth.

  5. Immediate implants for aesthetic success: New guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monish Bhola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immediate implant placement in extraction sockets is well-documented. There is adequate long-term evidence that immediate implants have survival rates similar to delayed placement. Additionally, immediate implants also help preserve the crestal bone and minimize soft tissue changes in the aesthetic zone. The decision to extract teeth and replace them with implants is determined by many factors. While implant insertion at the time of tooth extraction is desirable for a number of reasons, extraction socket morphology, soft tissue biotype, presence of infection, health of the bone and soft tissue, and other factors help determine if the site is ideal for immediate implant placement or not. This article will review some key and new guidelines for immediate implant placement in the aesthetic zone for long-term success and stability.

  6. Tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction, which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to tooth abfraction and microfracture. Wear of tooth surfaces due to the presence of microscopic imperfections of tooth surfaces is clinically manifested as sanding veneers. Tribology, as an interdisciplinary study of the mechanisms of friction, wear and lubrication at the ultrastructural level, has defined a universal model according to which the etiopathogenesis of tooth wear is caused by the following factors: health and diseases of the digestive tract, oral hygiene, eating habits, poor oral habits, bruxism, temporomandibular disorders and iatrogenic factors. Attrition and dental erosion are much more common in children with special needs (Down syndrome. Erosion of teeth usually results from diseases of the digestive tract that lead to gastroesophageal reflux (GER of gastric juice (HCl. There are two basic approaches to the assessment of the degree of wear and dental erosion. Depending on the type of wear (erosion, attrition, abfraction, the amount of calcium that was realised during the erosive attack could be determined qualitatively and quantitatively, or changes in optical properties and hardness of enamel could be recorded, too. Abrasion of teeth (abrasio dentium is the loss of dental hard tissue caused by friction between the teeth and exogenous foreign substance. It is most commonly provoked by prosthetic dentures and bad habits, while its effect depends on the size of abrasive particles and their amount, abrasive particle hardness and hardness of tooth

  7. Personalized visual aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessel, Edward A.; Stahl, Jonathan; Maurer, Natalia; Denker, Alexander; Starr, G. G.

    2014-02-01

    How is visual information linked to aesthetic experience, and what factors determine whether an individual finds a particular visual experience pleasing? We have previously shown that individuals' aesthetic responses are not determined by objective image features but are instead a function of internal, subjective factors that are shaped by a viewers' personal experience. Yet for many classes of stimuli, culturally shared semantic associations give rise to similar aesthetic taste across people. In this paper, we investigated factors that govern whether a set of observers will agree in which images are preferred, or will instead exhibit more "personalized" aesthetic preferences. In a series of experiments, observers were asked to make aesthetic judgments for different categories of visual stimuli that are commonly evaluated in an aesthetic manner (faces, natural landscapes, architecture or artwork). By measuring agreement across observers, this method was able to reveal instances of highly individualistic preferences. We found that observers showed high agreement on their preferences for images of faces and landscapes, but much lower agreement for images of artwork and architecture. In addition, we found higher agreement for heterosexual males making judgments of beautiful female faces than of beautiful male faces. These results suggest that preferences for stimulus categories that carry evolutionary significance (landscapes and faces) come to rely on similar information across individuals, whereas preferences for artifacts of human culture such as architecture and artwork, which have fewer basic-level category distinctions and reduced behavioral relevance, rely on a more personalized set of attributes.

  8. Papilla Preservation Flap as Aesthetic Consideration in Periodontal Flap Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Olivia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Flap surgery is treatment for periodontal disease with alveolar bone destruction. Surgical periodontal flap with conventional incision will result in gingival recession and loss of interdental papillae after treatment. Dilemma arises in areas required high aesthetic value or regions with a fixed denture. It is challenging to perform periodontal flap with good aesthetic results and minimal gingival recession. This case report aimed to inform and to explain the work procedures, clinical and radiographic outcomes of surgical papilla preservation flap in the area that requires aesthetic. Case 1 was a surgical incision flap with preservation of papillae on the anterior region of teeth 11 and 12, with a full veneer crown on tooth 12. Case 2 was a surgical incision flap with preservation of papillae on the posterior region of tooth 46 with inlay restoration. Evaluation for both cases were obtained by incision papilla preservation of primary closure was perfect, good aesthetic results, minimal gingival recession and the interdental papillae can be maintained properly. In conclusion, periodontal flap surgery on the anterior region or regions that require high aesthetic value could be addressed with papilla preservation incision. Incision papilla preservation should be the primary consideration in periodontal flap surgery if possible.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v19i3.144

  9. The aesthetics of chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and philosophers have long reflected on the place of aesthetics in science. In this essay, I review these discussions, identifying work of relevance to chemistry and, in particular, to the field of chemical biology. Topics discussed include the role of aesthetics in scientific theory choice, the aesthetics of molecular images, the beauty-making features of molecules, and the relation between the aesthetics of chemical biology and the aesthetics of industrial design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Complex single-tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Burgess, John O

    2002-04-01

    There are many options for restoring the decimated dentition. [43] Excellent results can be obtained with many of the materials currently available. The restorative option will depend on the size and location of the lesion, adequate isolation for adhesive restorations, caries rate, the patient's age, the aesthetic needs of the patient, occlusal habits, maintenance of maximum tooth structure, the skill of the dentist, and the longevity desired for the restoration. Amalgam is a cost-effective material, and when used properly, it can provide many years of service. Aesthetic demands, the desire to strengthen teeth, [44] and concern about the safety of mercury in amalgam have increased the use of direct composites, ceramic material, and indirect composites. The main drawback with these materials, however, is their increased technique sensitivity and concerns about their longevity. Gold continues to be a cost-effective and predictable material if placed properly. Full-coverage gold or porcelain fused to metal provides long-term predictability but is more destructive and not as aesthetically appealing. The wide varieties of materials available provide both a challenge and an opportunity to place the most effective material for a particular patient. A thorough understanding of the available materials and their appropriate use is needed to achieve a long-lasting restoration that serves the patient's needs.

  11. Aesthetic responses to music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Istok, Eva; Brattico, Elvira; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We explored the content and structure of the cognitive, knowledge-based concept underlying aesthetic responses to music. To this aim, we asked 290 Finnish students to verbally associate the aesthetic value of music and to write down a list of appropriate adjectives within a given time limit....... No music was presented during the task. In addition, information about participants' musical background was collected. A variety of analysis techniques was used to determine the key results of our study. The adjective "beautiful" proved to be the core item of the concept under question. Interestingly......, the adjective "touching" was often listed together with "beautiful". In addition, we found music-specific vocabulary as well as adjectives related to emotions and mood states indicating that affective processes are an essential part of aesthetic responses to music. Differences between music experts and laymen...

  12. Smile Aesthetics Satisfaction Scale: development and validation of a new brief five-item measure of satisfaction with smile aesthetics in adults and the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnert, Vlatka; Kovacevic Pavicic, Daniela; Pavlic, Andrej; Pokrajac-Bulian, Alessandra; Spalj, Stjepan

    2018-02-07

    To create and validate a brief questionnaire designed for the assessment of satisfaction with smile aesthetics and to test its efficiency as a patient-centred outcome measure of aesthetic interventions in dentistry. A team of three specialists - two from prosthodontics and one psychologist - used a self-evaluation scale consisting of five elements in order to rate self-perceived smile aesthetics. A total of 671 subjects (63% female), 18-86 years of age, were included in the investigation. The internal consistency, validity and stability of the questionnaire, along with the responsiveness induced by the tooth-whitening procedure, were evaluated. The relationship between self-perceived satisfaction with the smile aesthetics and the clinical status of the dentition was assessed. The questionnaire had one dimension accounting for 64.3% of variance and showed a high level of reliability (Cronbach α = 0.859). It measured a construct similar to concern with tooth appearance and the desire to improve this appearance (r = -0.403 and r = -0.353, respectively; P < 0.001). High test-retest reliability was demonstrated (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.985). The questionnaire was able to detect an increase in satisfaction with smile aesthetics as a result of the tooth-whitening procedure (P = 0.016). Clinical predictors of greater satisfaction with smile aesthetics were greater tooth display when smiling, decreased chroma and the absence of gingivitis, as well as absence of crowded, fractured and restored teeth in the anterior segment. A new questionnaire, titled the Smile Aesthetics Satisfaction Scale (SASS), showed good psychometric properties and its use can be recommended. © 2018 FDI World Dental Federation.

  13. Professional and patient-based evaluation of oral rehabilitation in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueled, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Trab Damsgaard, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    : The study included 129 patients with tooth agenesis rehabilitated with implant- or tooth-supported reconstructions, and a control group of 58 patients. Professional assessments included biological, technical and aesthetic variables. An aesthetic index score included mucosal discoloration, crown morphology......, crown color match, occlusal harmony, and papilla level. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) questionnaire was used to evaluate the patient-based outcomes. Six OHIP questions were subtracted to evaluate the patient-based aesthetic outcomes. RESULTS: Severe root resorption was observed in 36...

  14. Aesthetic experience of dance performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Maja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the aesthetic experience of dance performances is investigated. The study includes construction of an instrument for measuring the aesthetic experience of dance performances and an investigation of the structure of both dancers’ and spectators’ aesthetic experience. The experiments are carried out during eight different performances of various dance forms, including classical ballet, contemporary dance, flamenco and folklore. Three factors of aesthetic experience of dance performances are identified: Dynamism, Exceptionality and Affective Evaluation. The results show that dancers’ aesthetic experience has a somewhat different factorial structure from that of the spectators’. Unlike spectators’ aesthetic experience, dancers’ aesthetic experience singles out the Excitement factor. The results are discussed within the context of dancers’ proprioception and spectators’ exteroception since these findings confirm the idea of a significant role of proprioception in dancers’ aesthetic experience.

  15. Complex aesthetic treatment on anterior maxillary teeth with malposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriastuti Febriastuti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complex aesthetic treatment on anterior teeth involves more than one caries tooth with malformed shape and malposition. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to find the alternative treatment for anterior maxillary teeth with malposition. Case: In this case, a 25 year-old man with a peg shaped teeth and caries on several teeth and malposition can be treated with complex aesthetic treatment. Case management: Endodontic pulpectomy treatment on anterior maxillary teeth and post construction with splint porcelain fused to metal crowns on 11, 12, and 21, 22 to correct the shape and position into normal position. Conclusion: Malformed and malpositioned teeth with caries can be treated with complex aesthetic treatment.

  16. An Afropolitan literary aesthetics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Ulla; Knudsen, Eva Rask

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses what the authors call an emerging Afropolitan aesthetics. Through an exploration of recurring stylistic features, the article focuses particularly on the trope of a mobility-induced anxiety that entwines place and self. The ontological and affective troping of return...

  17. Revegetation for aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard M. Slick

    1980-01-01

    Surface mining is changing the landscape character of forests in the East. Aesthetic visual aspects of the landscape are considered in the analysis, planning, and design of revegetation strategies. Application of landscape architectural design techniques in the revegetation of surface-mined lands, as well as knowledge of biological characteristics, will enhance the...

  18. Against Moderate Aesthetic Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Formalists believe that the aesthetic appreciation of an artwork generally involves an attentive awareness of its sensory or perceptual qualities and does not require knowledge about its nonperceptual properties. Criticisms of classical formalist views, such as that of Clive Bell, are well known. However, a number of philosophers have recently…

  19. Pragmatist Aesthetics, Twenty Years Later

    OpenAIRE

    Dreon, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Pragmatist Aesthetics was published in 1992, by now twenty years ago. Through his book Richard Shusterman was able to revitalize a debate in the aesthetic field, which tended to stagnate. But its claims, implications and consequences went beyond the narrow limits of aesthetics, understood as philosophy of art according to a traditional modern approach. His reinterpretation of pragmatist aesthetics, expressly derived from Dewey’s work, was able to show not only that those defining anxieties ch...

  20. A SINGLE VISIT IMMEDIATE TEMPORIZATION WITH NATURAL TOOTH PONTIC FOR PERIODONTALLY INVOLVED ANTERIOR TEETH : ANESTHETIC AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Nilofer Sultan Sheikh, Neelima S. Rajhans, Preeti Mundhe, Gabriela Jude Fernandez, Nilkanth Mhaske, Nikesh Moolya, Sudeep HM

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: Sudden loss of anterior tooth is a dreadful situation. It can be as a result of trauma, endodontic failure or periodontal disease which is a true aesthetic emergency for a patient. Along with the patient, the dentist also emphasizes on saving an anterior tooth for the primary reason of aesthetics. If the tooth crown is intact, is not grossly decayed, broken down or discoloured, it can be used as a natural tooth pontic in designing an interim prosthesis. Case: A chair side ...

  1. A report of an impacted primary maxillary central incisor tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonappa, Robert P; Ongtengco, Kristine L; King, Nigel M

    2013-10-01

    Primary tooth impaction is a rare phenomenon when compared to permanent teeth impaction. The purpose of this report is to present a 5-year-old Chinese girl who exhibited impaction of tooth 51, its unusual consequence on the permanent successor tooth and its comprehensive management. Her parents revealed that at 6 months of age, the patient had fallen from her bed and struck her face on the floor; however, there were no teeth present in the oral cavity. The intraoral examinations identified a bony-like projection on the buccal aspect of the alveolus in the 51 region. Radiographic examination revealed that tooth 51 exhibited an unfavourable orientation, with the crown directed towards the palate. Therefore, the impacted tooth 51 was surgically removed, and two years later tooth 11 erupted into the oral cavity with an indentation on its incisal aspect, which resembled the crown of the primary teeth, thus giving the appearance of a tooth within a tooth or 'dens in dente'. Subsequently, enameloplasty and composite resin build-up was performed on tooth 11 for aesthetic reasons. It is very unusual to have the clinical crowns of both primary and permanent teeth in such close proximity within the alveolar bone, and the present case is a good example to emphasize that trauma to the primary teeth is of considerable importance due to the close proximity of the primary teeth to permanent tooth germs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. A Quiet Revolution: Education for Aesthetic Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiner, Linda C.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a teacher-training program--Education for Aesthetic Awareness--designed to sensitize teachers to aesthetics, to help them become aesthetically literate, and to help them be better aesthetic educators. (Author/KC)

  3. Management of anterior teeth damage caused by complex caries through aesthetic endorestoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Zubaidah

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a microbiological disease that result in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. It is multifactorial, therefore prevention must be based on a multifactorial approach. The damage of anterior teeth due to complex caries, for certain person may interfere their performance and decrease their self confidence aesthetically. Restoration of tooth form and function, especially on anterior teeth is highly valuable. Purpose: To present a case of maxillary anterior teeth with complex caries, through endorestoration treatment for recovering its original function and aesthetic. Case: The 21 years old male patient with complex carries on maxillary anterior teeth number 12, 11, 21, 22 and 23. The patient felt bad about his performance and affect his self confidence. The patient visited the clinic to repair his teeth and to get its form and function aesthetically. Case management: The endorestoration treatment was performed for carious teeth through pulpectomy followed by insertion of post retention and porcelain fused to metal crowns. Conclusion: Anterior teeth with severed complex caries can be managed through endorestoration treatment to recover its performance and function aesthetically.Latar belakang: Dental karies adalah penyakit infeksi yang berakibat kerusakan jaringan kalsifikasi dan bersifat multifactorial. Oleh karena itu pencegahan dilakukan dengan pendekatan multifactorial. Kerusakan gigi anterior karena karies kompleks untuk orang-orang tertentu mungkin berdampak pada penampilan dan penurunan kepercayaan diri karena factor estetik. Perbaikan gigi anterior dari berbagai kerusakan baik dalam hal bentuk maupun fungsinya sangat besar nilainya. Tujuan: Untuk menunjukkan kasus gigi anterior rahang atas karena karies kompleks melalui perawatan endorestorasi untuk mengembalikan fungsi gigi asli dan estetik. Kasus: Laki-laki usia 21 tahun dengan karies kompleks pada gigi anterior rahang atas 12, 11, 21

  4. Interpretation and the Aesthetic Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Charles O.

    1976-01-01

    The author, utilizing a synthesis of philosophic comments on aesthetics, provides a discourse on the aesthetic dimension and offers examples of how interpreters can nurture the innate sense of beauty in man. Poetic forms, such as haiku, are used to relate the aesthetic relationship between man and the environment. (BT)

  5. Morphological and Functional Parameters in Patients with Tooth Wear before and after Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sierpinska, Teresa; Kuc, Joanna; Golebiewska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Advanced tooth wear often results in lost vertical dimension and impacts facial aesthetics. Complex restorative treatment can replace the lost tooth structure and improve functional occlusal and facial skeleton parameters. Purpose: The aim of the study is to assess changes in the morphological and functional occlusal parameters of the facial skeleton after prosthetic rehabilitation that increased lost occlusal vertical dimension. Material and Methodology: 50 patients with advanced tooth wear ...

  6. Whole Tooth Regeneration as a Future Dental Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Dental problems caused by dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury compromise the oral and general health issues. Current advances for the development of regenerative therapy have been influenced by our understanding of embryonic development, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering technology. Tooth regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole tooth replacement is currently expected a novel therapeutic concept with the full recovery of tooth physiological functions. Dental stem cells and cell-activating cytokines are thought to be candidate approach for tooth tissue regeneration because they have the potential to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole tooth replacement therapy is considered to be an attractive concept for next generation regenerative therapy as a form of bioengineered organ replacement. For realization of whole tooth regeneration, we have developed a novel three-dimensional cell manipulation method designated the "organ germ method". This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in organogenesis. The bioengineered tooth germ generates a structurally correct tooth in vitro, and erupted successfully with correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Bioengineered teeth were also able to perform physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function and response to noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning whole tooth regenerative therapy.

  7. Ceromer/FRC technology: the future of biofunctional adhesive aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahl, N; Casellini, R C

    1997-01-01

    With recent advancements in adhesive technology, restorative materials have evolved to an enhanced level of aesthetics while enabling more conservative cavity preparations and promoting reinforcement of the remaining tooth structure. These restorations have included both anterior and posterior treatment modalities applied directly and indirectly. With a growing awareness on the part of many patients of the possible cosmetic treatment alternatives came the desire for aesthetic, metal-free, durable restorations. This presentation discusses the material properties and clinical protocol of a new material which combines a ceramic optimized polymer with a fiber-reinforced framework for durable, aesthetic anterior and posterior restorations.

  8. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored.

  9. Aesthetics and collective creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Annette Svaneklink

    2013-01-01

    possibilities for relations and differentiated movement patterns to further transform the potentials of visitorʼs interactions with each other and with works of art. Lacaton & Vassalʼs relational, bottom-up architecture resonated well with the aesthetic thinking by one of the initial directors of the Palais de...... Tokyo, Nicolas Bourriaud (Bourriaud:1998) and now, the art centre stands as place where a cultural institution, an architectural mode of thinking and participatory artistic experiments work together. Recently, is has become of increasing interest to art museums to be relational and socially aware...... that reactualises the experimental exhibition space designed by Lina Bo Bardi for Museu de Arte de Sao Paulo (1968). These aspects of the practice of museums and art centres, where social change, creation and exhibition experience affect each other raise the question of how (social) change is related to aesthetics...

  10. Big Data Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnsten, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of large data sets – or Big Data – into the sphere of art and the aesthetic. Central to the discussion here is the analysis of how different structuring principles of data and the discourses that surround these principles shape our perception of data. This discussion involves considerations on various...... is to critically question how and whether such artistic practices can eventually lead to the experience and production of knowledge that could not otherwise be obtained via more traditional ways of data representation. The article, thus, addresses both the problems and possibilities entailed in extending the use...... notions of the ‘database’ and ‘narrative’, as well as ‘aesthetics’ and ‘aesthetic experience’, with the latter conceived as a theoretical field and methodological approach to understand the interplay between sensation, information, experience, and knowledge production....

  11. Stylize Aesthetic QR Code

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Mingliang; Su, Hao; Li, Yafei; Li, Xi; Liao, Jing; Niu, Jianwei; Lv, Pei; Zhou, Bing

    2018-01-01

    With the continued proliferation of smart mobile devices, Quick Response (QR) code has become one of the most-used types of two-dimensional code in the world. Aiming at beautifying the appearance of QR codes, existing works have developed a series of techniques to make the QR code more visual-pleasant. However, these works still leave much to be desired, such as visual diversity, aesthetic quality, flexibility, universal property, and robustness. To address these issues, in this paper, we pro...

  12. Aesthetics and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Barretto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this few comments is to link tourism to the desire for beauty that seems to be side by side with humankind since the very beginnings. Reflections are grounded on Benjamin ́s interpretation of Baudelaire, on Boorstin, MacCannel and Urry, as well as on my own field experience and intend to stimulate more research on the role played by aesthetics in tourism experience.

  13. Aesthetics and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Barretto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this few comments is to link tourism to the desire for beauty that seems to be side by side with humankind since the very beginnings. Reflections are grounded on Benjamin ́s interpretation of Baudelaire, on Boorstin, MacCannel and Urry, as well as on my own field experience and intend to stimulate more research on the role played by aesthetics in tourism experience.

  14. A SINGLE VISIT IMMEDIATE TEMPORIZATION WITH NATURAL TOOTH PONTIC FOR PERIODONTALLY INVOLVED ANTERIOR TEETH : ANESTHETIC AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilofer Sultan Sheikh, Neelima S. Rajhans, Preeti Mundhe, Gabriela Jude Fernandez, Nilkanth Mhaske, Nikesh Moolya, Sudeep HM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objectives: Sudden loss of anterior tooth is a dreadful situation. It can be as a result of trauma, endodontic failure or periodontal disease which is a true aesthetic emergency for a patient. Along with the patient, the dentist also emphasizes on saving an anterior tooth for the primary reason of aesthetics. If the tooth crown is intact, is not grossly decayed, broken down or discoloured, it can be used as a natural tooth pontic in designing an interim prosthesis. Case: A chair side technique for replacing the missing tooth using the patient’s own natural tooth as a pontic in the three dimensional original position using a fibre reinforced composite resin splint thus restoring the aesthetics and relieving the apprehension of the patient, as described in this case report. Conclusion: The concept of Natural tooth pontic placement is a simple, economical, minimal intervention, viable and an easy to handle treatment option and promises an excellent transient aesthetic solution for a lost tooth as well as require minimal or no tooth preparation, thus is a reversible technique and avoids the laboratory cost.

  15. Joint action aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicary, Staci; Sperling, Matthias; von Zimmermann, Jorina; Richardson, Daniel C; Orgs, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized movement is a ubiquitous feature of dance and music performance. Much research into the evolutionary origins of these cultural practices has focused on why humans perform rather than watch or listen to dance and music. In this study, we show that movement synchrony among a group of performers predicts the aesthetic appreciation of live dance performances. We developed a choreography that continuously manipulated group synchronization using a defined movement vocabulary based on arm swinging, walking and running. The choreography was performed live to four audiences, as we continuously tracked the performers' movements, and the spectators' affective responses. We computed dynamic synchrony among performers using cross recurrence analysis of data from wrist accelerometers, and implicit measures of arousal from spectators' heart rates. Additionally, a subset of spectators provided continuous ratings of enjoyment and perceived synchrony using tablet computers. Granger causality analyses demonstrate predictive relationships between synchrony, enjoyment ratings and spectator arousal, if audiences form a collectively consistent positive or negative aesthetic evaluation. Controlling for the influence of overall movement acceleration and visual change, we show that dance communicates group coordination via coupled movement dynamics among a group of performers. Our findings are in line with an evolutionary function of dance-and perhaps all performing arts-in transmitting social signals between groups of people. Human movement is the common denominator of dance, music and theatre. Acknowledging the time-sensitive and immediate nature of the performer-spectator relationship, our study makes a significant step towards an aesthetics of joint actions in the performing arts.

  16. A novel computer system for the evaluation of nasolabial morphology, symmetry and aesthetics after cleft lip and palate treatment. Part 2: Comparative anthropometric analysis of patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip and palate and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruski, Piotr; Majak, Marcin; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Skiba, Adam; Antoszewski, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to use a novel system, 'Analyse It Doc' (A.I.D.) for a complex anthropometric analysis of the nasolabial region in patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip and palate and in healthy individuals. A set of standardized facial photographs in frontal, lateral and submental view have been taken in 50 non-cleft controls (mean age 20.6 years) and 42 patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft and palate (mean age 19.57 years). Then, based on linear, angular and area measurements taken from the digital photographs with the aid of the A.I.D. system, a photogrammetric analysis of intergroup differences in nasolabial morphology and symmetry was conducted. Patients with cleft lip and palate differed from the controls in terms of more than half of analysed angular measurements and proportion indices derived from linear and area measurements of the nasolabial region. The findings presented herein imply that despite primary surgical repair, patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate still show some degree of nasolabial dysmorphology. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that the novel computer system is suitable for a reliable, simple and time-efficient anthropometric analysis in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Contemporary Culture and Aesthetic Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    century, a focus we on aesthetic education and communication. Important were arts and letters which still are important but very much on the defensive in our contemporary culture also because aesthetics often is a debate about criticism rather than about the sensorial and bodily aspect of cultural...... products. We can learn from the early generations within aesthetics not least from Kant when we keep in mind that his investigation of the aesthetic judgement is for the sake of judgement as such, thus for our ability to chose the right conduct of behaviour. The aesthetic judgement is a judgement about our...... relation to a specific cultural context, and our acquisition of it comes from being acquainted with cultural products. Aesthetics is thus closely related to hermeneutics, to how we interpret specific situations we find ourselves in. Key words: education, sensorial, judgement, hermeneutics, Kant...

  18. An Evolution of Sustainable Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This paper will reflect on an exploration of the aesthetical influence of the sustainable architecture discourse from a historical and contemporary perspective. It aims to understand the link between different sustainable architecture movements, their labels, implications and subsequent aesthetics...... their aesthetical influence both on alternative architecture and the everyday. In continuation, a visual analysis of selected case studies, both historical and contemporary analyses visually what different theoretical concepts are implemented into different design aesthetics. Initial findings emphasise....... This paper is framed within the understanding that while sustainable architecture has showcased ethical technology, it lacks the holistic aesthetic language needed for the discipline to progress. A discussion of literature concerning sustainability, architecture, and aesthetics, articulating the particularly...

  19. Joint action aesthetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staci Vicary

    Full Text Available Synchronized movement is a ubiquitous feature of dance and music performance. Much research into the evolutionary origins of these cultural practices has focused on why humans perform rather than watch or listen to dance and music. In this study, we show that movement synchrony among a group of performers predicts the aesthetic appreciation of live dance performances. We developed a choreography that continuously manipulated group synchronization using a defined movement vocabulary based on arm swinging, walking and running. The choreography was performed live to four audiences, as we continuously tracked the performers' movements, and the spectators' affective responses. We computed dynamic synchrony among performers using cross recurrence analysis of data from wrist accelerometers, and implicit measures of arousal from spectators' heart rates. Additionally, a subset of spectators provided continuous ratings of enjoyment and perceived synchrony using tablet computers. Granger causality analyses demonstrate predictive relationships between synchrony, enjoyment ratings and spectator arousal, if audiences form a collectively consistent positive or negative aesthetic evaluation. Controlling for the influence of overall movement acceleration and visual change, we show that dance communicates group coordination via coupled movement dynamics among a group of performers. Our findings are in line with an evolutionary function of dance-and perhaps all performing arts-in transmitting social signals between groups of people. Human movement is the common denominator of dance, music and theatre. Acknowledging the time-sensitive and immediate nature of the performer-spectator relationship, our study makes a significant step towards an aesthetics of joint actions in the performing arts.

  20. The aesthetics of the underworld

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhelifa, Nadia; Duke, David

    2008-01-01

    Although the development of computational aesthetics has largely concentrated on 3D geometry and illustrative rendering, aesthetics are equally an important principle underlying 2D graphics and information visualization. A canonical example is Beck’s design of the London underground map, which not only produced an informative and practical artefact, but also established a design aesthetic that has been widely adopted in other applications. This paper contributes a novel hybrid view to the deb...

  1. Assembling an aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Recent research informing and related to the study of three-dimensional scientific models is assembled here in a way that explores an aesthetic, specifically, of touch. I concentrate on the materiality of models, drawing on insights from the history and philosophy of science, design and metaphysics. This article chronicles the ways in which touch, or material interactions, operate in the world of 3D models, and its role in what models mean and do. I end with a call for greater attention to scientific process, described as assembly of and within science, which is revealed by this focus on touch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Single implants with different neck designs in the aesthetic zone : a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Tymstra, Nynke; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare single implants in the aesthetic zone with different neck designs for marginal bone-level changes and clinical outcome measures. Materials and methods: Ninety-three patients with a missing anterior tooth in the maxilla were randomly assigned to be treated with an implant with

  3. What Can the Aesthetic Movement Tell Us about Aesthetic Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Jette

    2001-01-01

    In this article, the author presents two quotations from Walter Pater which suggest a provoking and demanding recipe by which to live one's aesthetic life and point out where all aesthetic education must begin. The author also exemplifies Walter Pater's ideas through two works by the painter James McNeill Whistler and the poet Algernon Swinburne…

  4. Fechner's aesthetics revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Flip; Norman, J Farley; Beers, Amanda M

    2010-01-01

    Gustav Fechner is widely respected as a founding father of experimental psychology and psychophysics but fewer know of his interests and work in empirical aesthetics. In the later 1800s, toward the end of his career, Fechner performed experiments to empirically evaluate the beauty of rectangles, hypothesizing that the preferred shape would closely match that of the so-called 'golden rectangle'. His findings confirmed his suspicions, but in the intervening decades there has been significant evidence pointing away from that finding. Regardless of the results of this one study, Fechner ushered in the notion of using a metric to evaluate beauty in a psychophysical way. In this paper, we recreate the experiment using more naturalistic stimuli. We evaluate subjects' preferences against models that use various types of object complexity as metrics. Our findings that subjects prefer either very simple or very complex objects runs contrary to the hypothesized results, but are systematic none the less. We conclude that there are likely to be useful measures of aesthetic preference but they are likely to be complicated by the difficulty in defining some of their constituent parts.

  5. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessitated by crowns and bridges. Bonding involves the attachment of tooth-colored fillings to natural teeth with ... Drugs Mentioned In This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names tetracycline ACHROMYCIN V Tooth Disorders Overview of ...

  6. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  7. Tooth Eruption without Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the diffic...

  8. Aesthetics of religious authority. Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunier, J.T.; de Witte, M.; de Koning, M.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue brings together anthropologists in the field of religion with the aim of exploring the aesthetic dimensions of authority in religious leadership.Taking aesthetics to refer to the range of sensory forms and experiences that shape the relation between religious practitioners and

  9. Aesthetics from a design perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, I.S.; Weggeman, M.; Akkermans, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to explore the relationship between aspects of aesthetics and the performance of organizations. It outlines a research agenda for studying the impact of aesthetic factors upon organizational design and change. Design/methodology/approach - In the paper, a set of seven

  10. Landscape aesthetics for sustainable architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jauslin, D.

    2012-01-01

    No, No and No. Three times No is the answer to the question: is there currently such a thing as aesthetics in sustainable architecture? This answer is drawn from the discussions of three architects who are acclaimed practitioners and thinkers in the field. If we assume that aesthetics is something

  11. Objectivity, Autonomy, and Aesthetic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Landon E.

    1974-01-01

    Author tried to present a coherent view of the relation between aesthetics and the moral actions of man, and to connect this with aesthetic objectivity to form a theory of uniqueness that has definite application in the philosophy of criticism. (Author/RK)

  12. Miserere. Aesthetics of Terror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Incampo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available I say: “Oh, what a beautiful surrealist picture!” With quite precise awareness: this páthos, these emotions of mine do not stem from our common sense. An aesthetic judgment is founded on an immediate subjective intuition: an emotion or a free feeling of a single subject towards an object. A universal sense, possibly. Some judgments of ours in ethics and in law are no different from our perceptions in front of art. It would be the same for a hypothetical sentence of the judge that concluded with these words: “I acquit Arsenio Lupin because of his magnificent handlebar moustache like that of Guy de Maupassant”. Everyone would think intuitively that it is an unfair sentence. Is there aesthetics of terror? The case that the article intends to examine is that of the famous kidnapping and murder of the Italian statesman Aldo Moro by the “Brigate Rosse” [Red Brigades] (1978. The method used here consists in studying the image of the kidnapping as iconic documentation of reality, and, above all, as an ethical-legal judgment about the terrorist crime. Moro was photographed during his kidnapping. There are at least two pictures. Both constitute an extraordinary source for a judgment on the basis of an image. In both of them, Aldo Moro is pictured in front of a Red Brigades banner during the captivity. In what sense do these pictures document an aesthetic judgment concerning the “case Moro”? The answer can be found in a remarkable iconic coincidence of these pictures with a masterpiece by Georges Rouault (Paris 1871-1958 devoted to the theme of the “Ecce Homo”. The Gospel in the “Ecce Homo” scene (John: 19, 4-5 narrates how Pontius Pilate wanted to arouse the compassion of the people with a scourging and the exposure of Jesus to the crowd. The plate under consideration is entitled “Qui ne se grime pas?” [Who does not have a painted face?] and is a key work in Rouault’s suite of prints Miserere, dated for 1923.

  13. THE AESTHETIC AXIOMATIC: DECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRINA VASKES SANTCHES

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El presente trabajo contribuye al debate sobre la actualidad estética, abordando diferentes enfoques del polémico concepto de deconstrucción, introducido por Jacques Derrida. Esta categoría es de referencia casi obligatoriacuando se habla sobre teoría estética contemporánea, forma parte de su nuevo aparato conceptual y expresa bien la nueva realidad que no tiene análogos históricos en lo que antes llamaban arte, estética y cultura. La elaboracióndel concepto de deconstrucción, el análisis de cómo funciona esa nueva forma del pensamiento crítico, y el método creativo de la interpretación y de la producción del texto artístico, nos permite entrar en el código de muchas obras artísticas actuales donde el espacio entre arte y teoría del arte es cada vez más incierto, especialmente en las diversas formas de arte conceptual o “performance art”.Abstract: Tackling polemic concept of deconstruction, introduced by Jacqes Derrida, from different approaches this article contributes to the debate on aesthetic current issues. This category is of almost obligatory reference when discussing about contemporary aesthetic theory. Deconstruction belongs to its new conceptual apparatus, and expresses well new reality that does not have historical analogy with what before was called art, aesthetics and culture. The elaboration of the concept of deconstruction, and the analysis of how this new form of strategical “procedure” of interpretation and production of the text (as textual reading is functioning allow us to enter the code of many current art works where the space between art and theory of the art is more and more uncertain, specially in the diverse forms of conceptual art or “performance art“.

  14. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-01-01

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition.

  15. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-06-09

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Invisible orthodontics part 3: aesthetic orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, David; McMullin, Ailbhe; Malik, Ovais H

    2013-09-01

    In this, the third part of the series, aesthetic orthodontic treatment will be considered. The previous two articles have looked at invisible orthodontics with Invisalign and lingual brackets. This article will discuss the properties and use of aesthetic brackets, along with examples of orthodontic treatment cases using the aesthetic brackets. Increasing demand for aesthetics during orthodontic treatment has resulted in a significant increase in the use of aesthetic brackets. Clinicians need to be aware of the benefits and drawbacks of aesthetic brackets.

  17. PSYCHOANALYSIS AS APPLIED AESTHETICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The question of how to place psychoanalysis in relation to science has been debated since the beginning of psychoanalysis and continues to this day. The author argues that psychoanalysis is best viewed as a form of applied art (also termed applied aesthetics) in parallel to medicine as applied science. This postulate draws on a functional definition of modernity as involving the differentiation of the value spheres of science, art, and religion. The validity criteria for each of the value spheres are discussed. Freud is examined, drawing on Habermas, and seen to have erred by claiming that the psychoanalytic method is a form of science. Implications for clinical and metapsychological issues in psychoanalysis are discussed. © 2016 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  18. SLAC site design aesthetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC

  19. Experience Communication and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    to user aspect (web 2.0), the personal engagement or the community spirit. This increasing demand of experiences reflects the postmodern cultural trends where rules for how to think and behave no longer exist. This results in individualism, where the identity of the human being has changed from something...... are produced within the field of experience communication. Aesthetical experiences may be a product of the concept of novelty, the unpredictable, the inexpressible, the making of identity, the self-actualization, the self-staging, the interactive aspect, the co-producer role (the prosumer role), the user...... challenge in terms of creating experience based communication designs which meet the need of self-actualization and creation of own identities of the target audiences.  ...

  20. Tooth eruption without roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-P

    2013-03-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the difficulties in studying late stages of tooth development and tooth movement and the lack of good model systems. Transgenic mice with eruption problems and short or no roots can be used as a powerful model for further deciphering of the cellular, molecular, and genetic mechanisms underlying root formation and tooth eruption. Better understanding of these processes can provide hints on delivering more efficient dental therapies in the future.

  1. Immediate implant placement and provisionalisation in the aesthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nimwegen, W G; Goené, R J; Van Daelen, A C L; Stellingsma, K; Raghoebar, G M; Meijer, H J A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the outcome of immediate single-tooth implant placement and provisionalisation in the aesthetic zone regarding hard and soft peri-implant tissue parameters and patient-related outcome measures in a private practice. All consecutively treated patients with single-tooth immediate implant placement and provisionalisation between the period 1 January 2006 and 1 April 2013 in a referral practice in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, were included in the study. Fifty-one patients of a total of 64 could be examined at follow-up (Tfollow-up ). Radiographs were present from implant placement (Tplacement ), after definitive crown placement (Tdefinitive ), and new radiographs were taken at the follow-up appointment (Tfollow-up ). Next to this, soft tissue parameters, patients' satisfaction and professionals' aesthetic scores were measured at Tfollow-up . Implant survival was 96·9% after a mean follow-up period of 4 years following implant placement. At definitive crown placement, mean marginal bone-level loss was 0·25 mm (SD 0·19). Mean marginal bone-level loss following definitive crown placement was 0·06 mm (SD 0·10) (Tdefinitive to Tfollow-up ) after a mean follow-up period of 4 years. Plaque index, bleeding index and gingival index scores were low. Patients' satisfaction was rated very high: 9·0 (SD 0·7). Professionals aesthetic score was 16·49 (SD 1·86). From this study can be concluded that immediate placement of implants followed by immediate provisionalisation resulted in a high survival rate, minimum peri-implant bone loss, very good aesthetics and satisfied patients after a mean follow-up period of 4 years. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Philosophical aesthetics and cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskin, Aaron; Robson, Jon; Ichino, Anna; Goffin, Kris; Monseré, Annelies

    2018-01-01

    Philosophical aesthetics is the branch of philosophy which explores issues having to do with art, beauty, and related phenomena. Philosophers have often been skeptical about the place of empirical investigation in aesthetics. However, in recent years many philosophical aestheticians have turned to cognitive science to enrich their understanding of their subject matter. Cognitive scientists have, in turn, been inspired by work in philosophical aesthetics. This essay focuses on a representative subset of the areas in which there has been fruitful dialog between philosophical aestheticians and cognitive scientists. We start with some general topics in philosophical aesthetics-the definition of art and the epistemic status of aesthetic judgments. We then move on to discussing research concerning the roles that imagination and perception play in our aesthetic engagement. We conclude with a discussion of the emerging field of experimental philosophical aesthetics. WIREs Cogn Sci 2018, 9:e1445. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1445 This article is categorized under: Philosophy > Value. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: A microleakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Araújo Veloso Popoff

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  4. Queering Islamic Aesthetics: Embodied Aesthetics and Queer Phenomenology

    OpenAIRE

    Zorlutuna, Alize Eren

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the collision of two seemingly disparate interests: the notion of queering, and Islamic Aesthetics. By critically engaging tropes from Islamic aesthetics and culture (i.e. architectural geometry, crocheting, carpets, and the Ezan – the Islamic call to prayer), and combining these with abstracted and figurative representations of the body, the work produced for this MFA thesis suggests the forbidden nature of queer desire and its relationship to Islamic culture and spiritual...

  5. Aesthetic Diagnosis in Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubal, Jan; Francesetti, Gianni; Gecele, Michela

    2017-10-17

    The diagnostic process in psychotherapy using the aesthetic evaluation is described in this article. Unlike the classical diagnostic process, which presents a result of comparing clinicians´ observations with a diagnostic system (DSM, ICD, etc.), the aesthetic evaluation is a pre-reflexive, embodied, and preverbal process. A Gestalt Therapy theoretical frame is used to introduce a concept of the aesthetic diagnostic process. During this process, the clinicians use their own here-and-now presence, which takes part in the co-creation of the shared relational field during the therapeutic session. A specific procedure of the aesthetic evaluation is introduced. The clinical work with depressed clients is presented to illustrate this perspective.

  6. Aesthetic Diagnosis in Gestalt Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Roubal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The diagnostic process in psychotherapy using the aesthetic evaluation is described in this article. Unlike the classical diagnostic process, which presents a result of comparing clinicians´ observations with a diagnostic system (DSM, ICD, etc., the aesthetic evaluation is a pre-reflexive, embodied, and preverbal process. A Gestalt Therapy theoretical frame is used to introduce a concept of the aesthetic diagnostic process. During this process, the clinicians use their own here-and-now presence, which takes part in the co-creation of the shared relational field during the therapeutic session. A specific procedure of the aesthetic evaluation is introduced. The clinical work with depressed clients is presented to illustrate this perspective.

  7. Aura, Self, and Aesthetic Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Battani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic experiences are generated in encounters with cultural objects and such experiences are marked by the free play of cognitive and numinous experience unstructured by concepts. Kant’s famous three types of pleasure, made infamous in social theory by Pierre Bourdieu, are examined in relation to the critical theoretical concept of aura, the social psychology of “flow,” and cognitive explanations of perception to explain experience in aesthetic fields. Theories of aesthetic experience developed at the crossroad of critical social thought and cognitive science hold promise for a social analysis able to avoid the usual sociological pitfalls of either ignoring aesthetics or reducing it to structurally determined differences of taste.

  8. Paediatric aesthetic dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, R; Malik, P

    2012-03-01

    A number of conditions can lead to aesthetically unacceptable dentitions like dental caries, discoloration, trauma, early loss of teeth, misalignment and any abnormality of shape and size. Today we have a large number of solutions available for aesthetic problems in paediatric dentistry. But the biggest dilemma is: How to choose what is best for a particular patient and that situation? Through this review we try to precisely highlight the various options for aesthetic restorations along with their indications, advantages and disadvantages. A search and analysis of international works on aesthetics in paediatric dentistry is presented. A considerable number of studies have shown that people are more concerned about missing anterior teeth and their replacement than about posterior ones as aesthetics seems to be more important than function. Dental caries, although not life threatening, causes nagging pain and physical as well as psychological discomfort. Nevertheless, it is clear that the condition is complex and multifactorial and hence it is important to review the various approaches available to restore the lost aesthetics.

  9. Aesthetic soft tissue integration and optimized emergence profile: provisionalization and customized impression coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, B; Guez, G; Saadoun, A

    1999-04-01

    In the anterior region, the successful replacement of a single tooth with an implant-supported restoration is one of the most difficult treatment options due to numerous functional and biological requisites. Such prostheses should also satisfy the increasing aesthetic demands of patients who expect the definitive restoration to mimic the natural dentition and their supporting gingival tissues. This article highlights the importance of the provisional restoration as the critical element for aesthetic success and gingival integration. Its perfect replication in the definitive restoration requires the use of optimized transference techniques.

  10. Aspects of wear and tear of tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Bill

    2010-03-01

    Lifestyle factors and the increased longevity of the dentition due to greater life expectancy have resulted in greater wear and tear (cracking) of teeth. Often there exists interplay between damage and repair. An understanding of these mechanisms of damage and repair will assist the clinician in correct diagnosis and treatment planning. Preventive strategies as well as interdisciplinary measures are required for optimal outcomes. However, are some of our restorative interventions causing further damage to tooth structure?

  11. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a process that occurs over time. Here's how tooth decay develops: Plaque forms. Dental plaque is a clear sticky film that coats ... by a lack of saliva, which helps prevent tooth decay by washing away food and plaque from your teeth. Substances found in saliva also help counter the ...

  12. Organization aesthetics in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujala, Anneli; Rissanen, Sari

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to make visible the material dimensions of nursing management.   Management theories have mainly ignored the material dimensions, namely the physical spaces in which management actually takes place as well as the physical bodies of organization members. The perspective of organization aesthetics enhances our understanding of the role of materiality in nursing management. The data were collected in 2009 using observation and interviews in eight nursing homes. Qualitative content analysis with critical interpretations was used. Three main issues of organizational aesthetics related to nursing management were identified: (1) the functionality of working spaces and equipment; (2) the relevance of 'organizational' space; and (3) the emotional-aesthetic dimension of daily work. Materiality is closely related to management topics, such as decision-making, values and identity formation of organizational members. Aesthetic dimensions of care are constructed by management practices which, in their turn, influence the nature of management. Implications for nursing management  Nurse managers need to be aware of the unintended and unnoticed consequences of materiality and aesthetics. Space and body issues may have considerable effects, for example, on the identity of care workers and on the attractiveness of the care branch. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Effect of Melamine Sponge on Tooth Stain Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takero; Kawata, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the stain removal ability of melamine sponge before aesthetic tooth whitening in extracted teeth. Melamine sponge of thickness 40 mm was compressed and the destruction of the partition wall structure during the compression process was examined under a stereoscopic microscope. An extracted human tooth was cleaned by normal polishing or with melamine sponge for 90 s. To evaluate the stain level, the tooth surfaces were photographed under a stereoscopic microscope at 0, 30, 60 and 90 s. The residual stained region was traced in a high-magnification photograph, and the stain intensity was presented as a change, relative to the intensity before the experiment (0 s). Mechanical cleaning by toothbrushing produced polishing scratches on the tooth surface, whereas use of the melamine sponge resulted in only minimal scratches. As the compression level increased, the stain-removing effect tended to become stronger. Melamine sponge can remove stains from the tooth surface more effectively and less invasively compared to a conventional toothbrush. As no new scratches are made on the tooth surface when using a melamine sponge brush, the risk of re-staining is reduced. Cleaning using a melamine sponge brush can be easily and effectively performed at home and in a dental office.

  14. Tooth agenesis: dento-skeletal characteristics in subjects with orthodontic treatment need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, G; Lombardi, C C; Franchi, L; Cozza, P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse skeletal, dental and arch morphology in a group of subjects with dental agenesis and to compare it with a control group. 2 groups of subjects were selected: an experimental group (84 patients) with tooth agenesis and a control group (84 subjects) without tooth agenesis. Skeletal, dental, morphological and aesthetic parameters were studied using lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms and dental casts. Transversal and sagittal measurements showed a significant decrease in maxillary size associated with tooth agenesis in the agenesis group. No changes were observed in mandibular size. Orthodontists should consider that patients with agenesis present altered craniofacial dimensions.

  15. ETHICAL CHALLENGES IN AESTHETIC DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius NEAGU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic dentistry is a branch of dentistry which aims primarily at improving patient’s physical appearance and, to a lesser extent, the functionality of teeth. This field raises particular ethical dilemmas and requires a careful evaluation of patient’s needs and wishes versus his/her clinical best interests. In this article, the authors discuss the main ethical challenges in the field of aesthetic dentistry in the light of the four “classical” principles of bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. The authors conclude that the principles of medical ethics should be at the very foundation of the field of aesthetic dentistry, for establishing a patient-physician relationship which could lead to optimum clinical outcomes, while respecting the wishes of the patient and promoting his/her best interests.

  16. Creating a Single-Visit, Fibre-Reinforced, Composite Resin Bridge by Using a Natural Tooth Pontic: A Viable Alternative to a PFM Bridge

    OpenAIRE

    Khetarpal, Ambica; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The rehabilitation of an anterior tooth space presents a confronting situation. Several modalities are presently available to address the challenge of an immediate replacement of a missing anterior tooth. These include a removable temporary acrylic prosthesis or resin-bonded bridges. Fibre-Reinforced Composite (FRC) bridges are preferable if they are fixed and if a cost-effective tooth replacement is desired. Also, they provide an aesthetic and a conservative treatment choice as t...

  17. Towards a cosmopolitan criticality? Relational aesthetics, Rirkrit Tiravanija and transnational encounters with pad thai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Dohmen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Marsha Meskimmon and Nikos Papastergiadis have responded to contemporary art’s concern with transculturalism, audience participation and intersubjectivity by re-articulating the cosmopolitan in relation to both aesthetics and globalisation. Dohmen investigates how their cosmopolitanism translates into a mode of critical address and probes this question with regard to the work of Rirkrit Tiravanija, a key proponent of relational aesthetics, an art movement of the 1990s championing audience participation and the intersubjective. Even though Tiravanija expressly draws attention to his Thai background by cooking pad thai in the gallery, Dohmen detects a striking disavowal of cultural alterity at the heart of relational aesthetics, which she regards as untenable within the context of the art world’s increasing internationalisation. Dohmen demonstrates how relational aesthetics appropriated key aspects of Tiravanija’s Thai-derived outlook while asking how a cosmopolitan outlook might redress and repair this marked critical Eurocentricity.

  18. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  19. [Mechanisms of tooth eruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, J C

    2014-04-01

    Tooth eruption is of the utmost importance for the normal development of the dentition and the face. Since the 1980s, it has been known that the tooth germ itself is not essential for facilitating the processes that make tooth eruption possible. For that reason, recent research on the regulatory mechanisms of tooth eruption has focused mainly on the enamel organ and the dental follicle. Different regulatory mechanisms act on the occlusal and the apical sides of an erupting tooth. On the occlusal side osteoclast differentiation is stimulated. This leads to the development of an eruption canal, a process in which macrophages and matrix metalloproteases also play an important role. On the apical side the most important factors are the transcription factor RUNX2 and the bone morphogenic protein 2. They are responsible for the deposition of trabecular bone in that area. Many regulatory mechanisms which are involved in tooth eruption are also active in other developmental processes. This explains that certain syndromes can also have an effect on the tooth eruption process.

  20. Environmental Aesthetics, Social Engagement and Aesthetic Experiences in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the Youth Theatre for Peace (YTP) project in relation to environmental aesthetics and engaged participatory practices towards tolerance building in Central Asia. My main argument is that cultural histories of storytelling, "manas" (an oral and now literary Kyrgyz epic) and trickster tales incorporate ideas and…

  1. "Aesthetic Emotion": An Ambiguous Concept in John Dewey's Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohr, H.

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses the concept of "aesthetic emotion" in John Dewey's "Art as experience". The analysis shows that Dewey's line of investigation offers valuable insights as to the role of emotion in experience: it shows emotion as an integral part and structuring force, as a cultural and historical category. However, the notion of aesthetic…

  2. North Korean Aesthetic Theory: Aesthetics, Beauty, and "Man"

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-West, Alzo

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetics is not a subject usually associated with North Korea in Western scholarship, the usual tropes being autocracy, counterfeiting, drugs, human-rights abuse, famine, nuclear weapons, party-military dictatorship, Stalinism, and totalitarianism. Where the arts are concerned, they are typically seen as crude political propaganda. One British…

  3. Embodied Aesthetics, Evocative Art Criticism: Aesthetically Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Boyd

    2011-01-01

    This study introduces one approach to arts-based research, one that emerges from aesthetic encounters and ensuing art criticism. Examples are drawn from one preservice teacher's attempts to write art criticism, both discursive and evocative, based on her personal responses to a chosen artwork. The articulation of her responses is a form of…

  4. An in vitro study of the effect of design of repair surface on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-23

    Mar 23, 2013 ... if all other criteria are met such as good aesthetics, occlusion, and functionality; denture repair is acceptable. Once denture fractures, we ... Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different repair surface design on the transverse strength of repaired ... Website: www.njcponline.com.

  5. The profile prosthesis: an aesthetic fixed implant-supported restoration for the resorbed maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitman, P A

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses a method for the predictable fabrication of fixed detachable maxillary reconstructions that abut and precisely follow the gingival contours--regardless of implant angulation or position. The technique reorders the traditional implant protocol and delays abutment selection until the definitive tooth position has been established. In this manner, final abutment selection and framework design become a single, integrated process that results in improved aesthetics, reduced angulation difficulties, and elimination of the phonetic concerns traditionally associated with fixed maxillary prostheses.

  6. Autogenous tooth transplantation for replacing a lost tooth: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Kang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The autogenous tooth transplantation is an alternative treatment replacing a missing tooth when a suitable donor tooth is available. It is also a successful treatment option to save significant amount of time and cost comparing implants or conventional prosthetics. These cases, which required single tooth extraction due to deep caries and severe periodontal disease, could have good results by transplanting non-functional but sound donor tooth to the extraction site.

  7. Design and the question of aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    In the article an approach to aesthetics is suggested with the focus on the education of the designer rather than on the outcome of the design. Design is taken to be an interpretative intervention into a social context which requires a sensibility for the context. The forming of this sensibility...... is the goal of an aesthetic education. Through discussions of different approaches to aesthetics like Grant Kester’s dialogical aesthetics and Kant’s critique of the faculty of judgement, it is emphasized how sensibility as the key focus of aesthetics rather than art and beauty makes the ability to manoeuvre...... in the social context a central issue of aesthetics. Here, is the argument, is the link to an aesthetic education understood as an education of our senses through cultural products which is also a link to a perspective that appears to be absent in present debates on aesthetics in relation to design. Taking up...

  8. Toward Connectedness: Aesthetically Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Liora

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I suggest that aesthetics is at the heart of both artistic experience and qualitative research, and that artistic processes, in particular, the space surrounding art experiences, can illuminate significant aspects of qualitative research, including data collection, data analysis, and writing. Examining the ways in which the arts…

  9. Understanding the Black Aesthetic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marvin V.

    1988-01-01

    Discussing the importance of the Black aesthetic experience, Curtis examines Black cultural heritage and participatory style, the spiritual, and the creation and recreation of Black music. Advocating multicultural music education in teacher training, he suggests that Black music be studied for its value and contribution to society. Lists five ways…

  10. Birkhoff’s aesthetic measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Douchová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review and critically evaluate George D. Birkhoff’s work concerning formalisation of aesthetics, as it appeared in his book Aaesthetic Measure from 1933, and discuss its influence on further research in the field. In the book, Birkhoff defines an aesthetic measure M of an art object as the ratio between its order and complexity, or more generally a function f of this ratio: M = f (OC , where O stands for order and C for complexity. The specific definitions of O and C depend on the type of the analysed object. Birkhoff applied the formula to multiple classes of objects (e.g. vases, music, or English poetry and calculated the aesthetic measure for many art objects from these classes. We give an example of Birkhoff’s analysis using polygons, and we further discuss to what extent the ordering of the polygons (or other objects according to the resulting measures can be used, or interpreted, as an ordering according to a degree of aesthetic preference. We also include an extensive bibliography, supplemented by a critical discussion of the influence of Birkhoff’s work on further research.

  11. Aesthetics, Affect, and Educational Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores aesthetics, affect, and educational politics through the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Ranciere. It contextualizes and contrasts the theoretical valences of their ethical and democratic projects through their shared critique of Kant. It then puts Ranciere's notion of dissensus to work by exploring it in relation to a…

  12. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there are two options for replacement: First, a removable partial denture may be used to replace the missing tooth. ... appearance look and feel more natural than a removable partial denture. However, it does require grinding down the support ...

  13. To Tell the Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Sparkling Smile Holiday Workshop Thanksgiving Back to School Fourth of July Fun Tooth Fairy Sugar Wars Valentine's Day Halloween Defeat Monster Mouth! Color and Count Puzzle Fun Oral Health Made Easy ...

  14. The cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Fractured molars and premolars are very common. Fractures usually result from cracks that develop and slowly extend until the tooth separates into buccal and lingual fragments. Sometimes, as these cracks expand, the patient exhibits symptoms of what is commonly referred to as "cracked tooth syndrome" (CTS). When CTS occurs, an opportunity exists to diagnose and treat these patients, to relieve their discomfort and prevent sequelae that would require more extensive treatment.

  15. Magic and the aesthetic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, Leon

    2002-01-01

    The aesthetic illusion is the subjective experience that the content of a work of art is reality. It has an intrinsic relation to magic, an intrapsychic maneuver oriented toward modification and control of the extraspyschic world, principally through ego functioning. Magic is ontogenetically and culturally archaic, expresses the omnipotence inherent in primary narcissism, and operates according to the logic of the primary process. Magic is a constituent of all ego functioning, usually latent in later development. It may persist as an archaic feature or may be evoked regressively in global or circumscribed ways. It causes a general disinhibition of instincts and impulses attended by a sense of confidence, exhiliration, and exuberance. The aesthetic illusion is a combination of illusions: (1) that the daydream embodied by the work of art is the beholder's own, the artist being ignored, and (2) that the artistically described protagonist is a real person with a real "world." The first illusion arises through the beholder's emotional-instinctual gratification from his or her own fantasy-memory constellations; the second comes about because the beholder, by taking the protagonist as proxy, mobilizes the subjective experience of the imaginary protagonist's "reality." The first illusion is necessary for the second to take place; the second establishes the aesthetic illusion proper. Both illusions are instances of magic. Accordingly, the aesthetic illusion is accompanied by a heady experience of excitement and euphoria. The relation among the aesthetic illusion, magic, and enthusiasm is illustrated by an analytic case, J. D. Salinger's "The Laughing Man," Woody Allen's Play It Again, Sam, Don Quixote, and the medieval Cult of the Saints.

  16. Coevolutionary aesthetics in human and biotic artworlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes a coevolutionary theory of aesthetics that encompasses both biotic and human arts. Anthropocentric perspectives in aesthetics prevent the recognition of the ontological complexity of the aesthetics of nature, and the aesthetic agency of many non-human organisms. The process of evaluative coevolution is shared by all biotic advertisements. I propose that art consists of a form of communication that coevolves with its own evaluation. Art and art history are population phenomena. I expand Arthur Danto's Artworld concept to any aesthetic population of producers and evaluators. Current concepts of art cannot exclusively circumscribe the human arts from many forms of non-human biotic art. Without assuming an arbitrarily anthropocentric perspective, any concept of art will need to engage with biodiversity, and either recognize many instances of biotic advertisements as art, or exclude some instances of human art. Coevolutionary aesthetic theory provides a heuristic account of aesthetic change in both human and biotic artworlds, including the coevolutionary origin of aesthetic properties and aesthetic value within artworlds. Restructuring aesthetics, art criticism, and art history without human beings at the organizing centers of these disciplines stimulate new progress in our understanding of art, and the unique human contributions to aesthetics and aesthetic diversity.

  17. Aesthetics and function in web design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    Since the origin of the web site in the first part of the 90’s there has been discussions regarding the relative weighting of function and aesthetics. A renewed discussion is needed, however, to clarify what exactly is meant by aesthetics in web design. Moreover the balance between aesthetics and...

  18. An ecological aesthetic for forest landscape management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gobster

    1999-01-01

    Although aesthetics and ecological sustainability are two highly regared values of forest landscapes, practices developed to manage forests for these values can sometimes conflict with one another. In this paper I argue that such conflicts are rooted in our conception of forest aesthetics as scenery, and propose that a normative, "ecological aesthetic" based...

  19. Automated Aesthetic Analysis of Photographic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Tunç Ozan; Smolic, Aljoscha; Gross, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We present a perceptually calibrated system for automatic aesthetic evaluation of photographic images. Our work builds upon the concepts of no-reference image quality assessment, with the main difference being our focus on rating image aesthetic attributes rather than detecting image distortions. In contrast to the recent attempts on the highly subjective aesthetic judgment problems such as binary aesthetic classification and the prediction of an image's overall aesthetics rating, our method aims on providing a reliable objective basis of comparison between aesthetic properties of different photographs. To that end our system computes perceptually calibrated ratings for a set of fundamental and meaningful aesthetic attributes, that together form an "aesthetic signature" of an image. We show that aesthetic signatures can still be used to improve upon the current state-of-the-art in automatic aesthetic judgment, but also enable interesting new photo editing applications such as automated aesthetic analysis, HDR tone mapping evaluation, and providing aesthetic feedback during multi-scale contrast manipulation.

  20. AESTHETIC ANALYSIS AND THE ARTS: AN INTRODUCTORY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aesthetic value is culture bound, whereas aesthetic experience (sense perception) can be felt by every normal person. This paper concludes that aesthetic theories and concepts should be approached and applied in terms of the ethno-cultural distinctiveness of the art and art concept, and in terms of the cultural relativity or ...

  1. Dental regenerative therapy: Stem cell transplantation and bioengineered tooth replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakao

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available For clinical treatment of tooth defects and tooth loss, nonbiotechnological approaches, such as the use of prostheses and implants, have generally been employed. Dental regenerative therapies which restore or replace defective teeth using autologous explants are being investigated using current understandings of developmental biology, stem cell biology, and regenerative medicine. Recently, dental tissue stem/progenitor cells, which can differentiate into dental cell lineages, have been identified in both impacted and erupted human teeth, and these cells can be used to regenerate some dental tissues. Tissue engineering using scaffold and cell aggregate methods may also be used to produce bioengineered teeth from dissociated cells for therapeutic applications of whole tooth replacement. Recent breakthroughs in single cell manipulation methods for the reconstitution of bioengineered tooth germ and the investigation of in vivo development of artificial tooth germ in the adult oral environment have been reported. These researches and developments will ultimately lead to the realization of dental regenerative therapies for partial repair by stem cell transplantation and for whole tooth replacement using bioengineered tooth germ.

  2. Unusual intraosseous transmigration of impacted tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Santosh; Urala, Arun Srinivas; Kamath, Abhay Taranath; Jayaswal, Priyanka; Valiathan, Ashima [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal (India)

    2012-03-15

    Transmigration of an impacted tooth through the symphyseal suture is a rare and special developmental anomaly of unknown etiology that is unique to the mandibular canine. Maxillary canine transmigration is even rarer. Transmigrated canines are particularly significant due to the aesthetic and functional importance. A maxillary lateral incisor crossing the mid-palatal suture has never been reported in the literature. The aim of this report is to present the first case of simultaneous transmigration of a lateral incisor and canine in the maxilla. The paper also reports four unusual cases of unilateral canine transmigration in the maxilla and mandible and successful eruption of one of the transmigrated mandibular canines following orthodontic traction. Etiology of transmigration and its clinical considerations are also discussed.

  3. Hypospadias repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003000.htm Hypospadias repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypospadias repair is surgery to correct a defect in ...

  4. Duplication of a permanent maxillary incisor root caused by trauma to the predecessor primary tooth: clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, T; Lenzi, M; Simões, M; Campos, V

    2011-07-01

    This report describes a permanent maxillary incisor tooth with two roots possibly caused by trauma to the predecessor primary tooth. Diagnosis, aetiology, clinical implications and endodontic and aesthetic treatment of an incisor tooth with two roots are presented. Diagnosis, early intervention by a multidisciplinary team and clinical and radiographic examination of patients who suffer trauma to primary teeth are of importance to minimize or avoid damage to successor teeth. • A possible sequelae of trauma to a primary tooth is root duplication in the permanent tooth. • Root duplication is a rare anomaly that has its diagnosis based on the radiographic examination. • Careful diagnosis and follow-up are necessary to prevent future complications related to the successor tooth. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  5. Public Aquariums and Marine Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nola Semczyszyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the inaccessibility of the marine environment, the closest many of us come to viewing it is at public aquariums. Aquariums also provide us with rich aesthetic experiences, but it is not clear whether we appreciate the marine environment at aquariums. I present the dilemma of aquarium appreciation as an inconsistent triad: 1 we treat aquariums as places to appreciate marine environments, 2 aquariums are artifacts, not natural objects, and 3 nature and art should be appreciated differently. I argue that aquarium displays are scientific models of marine environments with aesthetic, educational, and scientific aims. My solution to the dilemma involves accepting the paradox and modifying 2. By appreciating displays as the kind of artifacts they are, we are better able to appreciate the marine environment.

  6. Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Câmara

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: A reasonable exposure of incisors and gingival tissues is generally considered more attractive than excess or lack of exposure. A reasonable gingival exposure is considered to be around 0 to 2 mm when smiling and 2-4 mm exposure of the maxillary incisor edge when the lips are at rest. Objective: The aim of this paper is to present the Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP, which aims to help in the diagnosis of the relationships established among molars, incisors and the upper lip. Conclusion: FAOP can complement an existing and established orthodontic treatment plan, facilitating the visualization of functional and aesthetic demands by giving a greater focus on the position of incisors in the relationship established among the incisors, molars and the upper lip stomion.

  7. Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara, Carlos Alexandre; Martins, Renato Parsekian

    2016-01-01

    A reasonable exposure of incisors and gingival tissues is generally considered more attractive than excess or lack of exposure. A reasonable gingival exposure is considered to be around 0 to 2 mm when smiling and 2-4 mm exposure of the maxillary incisor edge when the lips are at rest. The aim of this paper is to present the Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP), which aims to help in the diagnosis of the relationships established among molars, incisors and the upper lip. FAOP can complement an existing and established orthodontic treatment plan, facilitating the visualization of functional and aesthetic demands by giving a greater focus on the position of incisors in the relationship established among the incisors, molars and the upper lip stomion.

  8. The Aesthetics of Sustainable Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard; Riisberg, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    is paper will investigate the aesthetics of sustainable design by exploring di erent strategies of communicating products as being sustainable. It can be questioned how the sustainable element is present and detectable in design: Whether it is a principle of internal construction, operates...... instead of plastic in the 1970s and 1980s, 2) indirect representation and critical-constructive re ec- tion of sustainability as a principle of the design as in newer explo- rations of materials, 3) avant-gardist explorations of the potential of sustainability and 4) the evocation of emotional attachment...... as a strategy of emotional commitment and subsequent prolonged use through employing symbolic elements or is detectable through ‘external’ signs designating e.g. “eco design” through a speci c colour palette. “Aesthetic coding” will be employed as a central concept to de- scribe the relationship between outer...

  9. Bridge Aesthetics and Structural Honesty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In bridges the overall form must be chosen with due respect to the transmission of forces if efficient structures shall be created, The design must therefore be governed by experienced structural engineers - in some cases assisted by aesthetic advisers on specific issues. Some basic requirements...... decisive for choosing the form of trusses, arches and cable-stayed bridges are outlined, and several examples show bridges designed without giving priority to the structural aspects....

  10. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  11. Aesthetic Engagement, Ecosophy C, and Ecological Appreciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xiangzhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of healing the earth and sustain a healthy ecosystem for all life forms, not humankind alone, ecoaesthetics emerges as a critique of Enlightenment mentality and of modern aesthetics as it is embodied in it. This mentality contributes greatly to the global ecological crisis and to other problem areas, such as population, economic, political and religious ones. In my understanding of aesthetics, ecoaesthetics is defined as the theory of ecological aesthetic appreciation.[1] With ecoaesthetics as my research horizon, there are at least two reasons for me to pay special attention to American philosopher Arnold Berleant’s conception of aesthetic engagement and his aesthetic theory based on it, an aesthetics of engagement. The first is our shared theme, which is the critique of modern aesthetics. The second reason is more complex for it involves the crucial question of the proper manner of aesthetic appreciation. From the perspective of ecoaesthetics, the contemplation of objects by a separated perceiver, an approach that is based on the modern philosophical dualism of subject and object, is unsatisfactory and inadequate. Berleant’s aesthetic engagement is a more satisfactory account of appreciation that is aesthetic and ecological. This emphasizes the ecological continuity or interrelatedness between the human appreciator and objects. Of course, any theory can occasion critique and development. Based on Berleant’s idea of aesthetic engagement, I would like to propose Ecosophy C. This can be contrasted with Ecosophy T proposed by the Norwegian, Arne Naess, and with traditional Chinese aesthetic wisdom. In contrast with these, I would like to develop my own view of ecological understanding. In order to construct a more comprehensive and reasonable ecoaesthetics, my Ecosophy C contains eight points that are crucial in building an ecological model of aesthetic appreciation for this period of ecological crisis.

  12. [The therapeutic function of the aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flageul, G; Godefroy, M; Lacoeuilhe, G

    2003-10-01

    By its definition and its etymology, aesthetic surgery is as much a surgery for the soul as for the body. Aesthetic surgery is a true "armed" therapy that essentially targets the psychology of the patient. This therapeutic "arsenal" preserves and/or restores the health of the patient according to its different aspects as defined by the World Health Organization. The plastic surgeon is always concerned about his patient as a whole, and as a human being, of whom he takes charge. Indeed there lies his specificity: He is as well a surgeon and a physician. We identify and analyze, in this chapter, the particular quality of patient-surgeon relationship on a surgical, psychological and juridical level. It is interesting to note that this collaboration results from a spontaneous convergence. The surgeon, the main interested figure, asserts himself mainly as a physician that is totally involved in a dialogue with his patient. He multiplies the interviews and he sharpens his clinical approach, and his own reactions, with regard to the demand for plastic surgery. The psychiatrist establishes the theoretical and practical aspects of the patient demand. The jurist, far from the barren dissertation of the law, reconsiders the environment of the demand and legitimates the generating wish: he insists on the necessary information but also on assuming responsibility. The therapeutic function of the plastic surgery appears essentially related to the success of a psychic repair solicited by the patient but that is scarcely specified by him as such, and of which he is, most probably, rarely fully aware. The process is to listen and to gather the information that guarantees mutual understanding. Plastic surgery is considered irreplaceable by many of our patients, and indisputable by us. It brings incomparable social and human fertility. It is, however, an ambitious and difficult project that is highly demanding. It is far from the impression of facility reflected by the media. Every

  13. Temperament and perception of tooth bleaching results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mehr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . The neurophysiological process of perceiving the results of tooth bleaching requires the correct interaction between the central nervous system and the organs of sight. Exaggerated beliefs concerning defective facial features may enhance inner attitudes about one’s own color of dentition, as well as a feeling of dissatisfaction with the degree of leaching. Objectives. The study aimed to assess the degree of the patient satisfaction with the results of tooth bleaching in relation to their temperament. Material and methods. There were 68 generally healthy volunteers, aged 28–38 years, with external discolorations of the teeth. They had never undergone dental bleaching and their frontal teeth did not have any fillings. After clinical evaluation and the completion of formalities, the patients were asked to fill in Strelau’s temperament questionnaire. Questionnaires and visual status were assessed three times by three doctors: before bleaching, and then 24 hours and two weeks after the home-bleaching operation, which was done with the use of Opalescence (Ultradent in uniform sequence. Results . There were practically no adverse side results, except a periodic dentin hypersensitivity that occurred periodically in 44 patients. The results of the visual assessment performed by the physicians did not differ. The questionnaire data showed that women were more critical of the results in relation to the expectations. Among elancholics, full satisfaction was declared by 41%, whereas among sanguine people, full satisfaction was obtained by 85%. Satisfaction with the aesthetic results was associated with bleaching by at least 4 degrees. Conclusions . Patients’ temperament affects their subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of tooth bleaching, which should be taken into consideration in the patient’s individual dental treatment plan.

  14. Designers as determinants for aesthetic innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    The innovation literature states that scientists are core ingredients in creating technological innovations. This paper investigates whether the hiring of a designer generates aesthetic innovations by a firm. Further we investigate what the level of design knowledge of the receiving firm means...... for the firms’ absorptive capacity, in terms of turning the hiring of the designer into aesthetic innovations. We explore a unique dataset containing information on firms, their hiring of designers and aesthetic innovations measured by design applications (design patents). Our findings show that hiring...... a designer does increase firms’ likelihood of producing aesthetic innovations. Secondly, firms with prior experience of aesthetic innovations are more likely to apply for design registrations. Thirdly, there is a positive moderating effect of firms with prior experience of generating aesthetic innovations...

  15. Designers as the Determinants of Aesthetic Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin

    the growing interest of firms in aesthetic innovations, knowledge on the ir determinants is limited. Work on labor mobility with in the innovation studies literature focuses mainly on discussion of scientists as crucial for creating technological innovations. This paper adds to work on labor mobility......Aesthetic innovations have become increasingly important appropriation mechanisms for firms. Since 2003, the number of design patent applications (to protect aesthetic innovations) has tripled compared to doubling in the numbers of both patent and trademark applications. However, despite...... and innovation by examining whether this holds in the case of designers' mobility and aesthetic innovations. Does the hiring of a new designer generate more aesthetic innovations than in a matched firm, which does not hire a designer? What is the importance of prior experience with aesthetic innovation...

  16. On the electrophysiology of aesthetic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    One important method that can be applied for gaining an understanding of the underpinning of aesthetics in the brain is that of electrophysiology. Cognitive electrophysiology, in particular, allows the identification of components in a mental processing architecture. The present chapter reviews findings in the neurocognitive psychology of aesthetics, or neuroaesthetics, that have been obtained with the method of event-related brain potentials, as derived from the human electroencephalogram. The cognitive-perceptual bases as well as affective substages of aesthetic processing have been investigated and those are described here. The event-related potential method allows for the identification of mental processing modes in cognitive and aesthetic processing. It also provides an assessment of the mental chronometry of cognitive and affective stages in aesthetic appreciation. As the work described here shows, distinct processes in the brain are engaged in aesthetic judgments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christoper D; McConnell, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the clinical features, diagnosis and management of the cracked tooth syndrome (CTS). The condition refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth that occasionally extends into the pulp. A lack of awareness of the condition coupled with its varied clinical features can make diagnosis of CTS difficult. Common symptoms include an uncomfortable sensation or pain from a tooth that occurs while chewing hard foods and which ceases when the pressure is withdrawn. The patient is often unable to identify the offending tooth or quadrant involved, and may report a history of numerous dental procedures with unsatisfactory results. Successful diagnosis and management requires an awareness of the existence of CTS and the appropriate diagnostic tests. Management options depend on the nature of the symptoms and extent of the lesion. These options include routine monitoring, occlusal adjustments, placement of a cast restoration and endodontic treatment. A decision flowchart indicating the treatment options available to the dental practitioner is presented.

  18. Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roald, Tone

    2014-01-01

    above, or as critics argue, from “nowhere,” psychological phenomena and human life can only be understood in an abstract and reduced form. The individual appears one-sidedly as an effected and conditioned being, and the concrete reality of human subjectivity and agency, the active and acting side...

  19. Sexuality in Aesthetic Breast Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Paulo Afonso Monteiro Pacheco; Resende, Vanessa Contato Lopes; Sabino Neto, Miguel; Seito, Caroline Lumy; de Brito, Maria José Azevedo; Abla, Luiz Eduardo Felipe; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-12-01

    The breasts are important for a woman's psychological well-being, which may be negatively affected by distortions of breast size and shape. Improvements in self-esteem and sexuality are important psychological factors associated with motivation for cosmetic surgery. Mammaplasty is among the most sought-after and performed cosmetic procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of aesthetic breast surgery on a woman's sexuality. This study was conducted in a plastic surgery clinic of a hospital university in Brazil, between 2009 and 2012. Forty-six patients with hypomastia and 30 patients with breast hypertrophy, who expressed the desire for aesthetic breast surgery, were selected for the study. The patients were assessed preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively using the sexual quotient-Female version scale (QS-F). The QS-F is a validated Brazilian questionnaire to assess sexual function. It contains ten items covering five domains of female sexual function: desire and interest, foreplay, excitement and harmony, comfort, and orgasm and satisfaction. Higher QS-F scores indicate better sexual functioning. There was a significant increase in the mean total QS-F score after surgery in both groups (p surgery was observed in both groups, which is consistent with the literature. Aesthetic breast surgery has a positive impact on the sexuality of patients. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  20. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires: Progress in their knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Rongo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In orthodontics, is quickly increasing the demand for treatments with a very low aesthetic impact in the social life. More and more adult patients want satisfy their necessity to have a beautiful smile, with “invisible” appliances. Numerous are the opportunities to perform an aesthetic orthodontic treatment such as lingual orthodontics, clear aligners or clear labial orthodontics. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires are a component of clear labial orthodontics together with aestheti...

  1. Automatic prediction of text aesthetics and interestingness

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguly, Debasis; Leveling, Johannes; Jones, Gareth J.F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of automated text aesthetics prediction. The availability of user generated content and ratings, e.g. Flickr, has induced research in aesthetics prediction for non-text domains, particularly for photographic images. This problem, however, has yet not been explored for the text domain. Due to the very subjective nature of text aesthetics, it is dicult to compile human annotated data by methods such as crowd sourcing with a fair degree of inter-annotator agre...

  2. Leadership and Management in Aesthetic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Connie

    2016-01-01

    The aesthetic provider is obligated to leverage their leadership, management, and teamwork skills on a daily basis in order to deliver optimum aesthetic outcomes for their clients. This article discusses leadership and motivational theories, leadership and management traits, complexity theory, Gardner's tasks of leadership, and the role of emotional intelligence in leading, managing, and following, so the aesthetic provider can identify and align with a particular leadership and management style that suits their practice philosophy.

  3. Meningocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is surgery to repair birth defects of the spine and spinal membranes. Meningocele and myelomeningocele are types of spina bifida . Description For both meningoceles and myelomeningoceles, the surgeon ...

  4. Evolutionary Aesthetics and Print Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Luczaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the extent to which predictions based on the theory of evolutionary aesthetics are utilized by the advertising industry. The purpose of a comprehensive content analysis of print advertising is to determine whether the items indicated by evolutionists such as animals, flowers, certain types of landscapes, beautiful humans, and some colors are part of real advertising strategies. This article has shown that many evolutionary hypotheses (although not all of them are supported by empirical data. Along with these hypotheses, some inferences from Bourdieu’s cultural capital theory were tested. It turned out that advertising uses both biological schemata and cultural patterns to make an image more likable.

  5. Care and Aftercare Related to Implant-Retained Dental Crowns in the Maxillary Aesthetic Region : A 5-Year Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anita; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Meijndert, Leo; Vissink, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To prospectively assess surgical and prosthetic care and aftercare related to the placement of implant-retained dental crowns after local bone augmentation in patients missing one tooth in the maxillary aesthetic region. Methods: Ninety-three patients were randomly allocated to one of three

  6. Exploring the Aesthetics of Sustainable Fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    , sustainable fashion. In programming the didactical setting for the students’ projects, several aesthetics must be considered: the aesthetic codes of the textile and fashion design discipline, both in terms of materials and expression, deriving from within the design practice itself and the aesthetic codes...... of mediated expressions seen in e.g. fashion magazines which create a frame of aestheticization influencing how fashion expressions are valued. In this tension between internal aesthetics and external aestheticization, the students are set out to create a new design expression for sustainable design which...

  7. Dewey and Everyday Aesthetics - A New Look

    OpenAIRE

    Kalle Puolakka

    2014-01-01

    John Dewey is frequently mentioned as an important forerunner of everyday aesthetics. In this article, I attempt to provide an updated view of Dewey’s place within everyday aesthetics by drawing attention to aspects in Dewey’s own work and in contemporary interpretations of his philosophy that have not been thoroughly discussed in the context of everyday aesthetics. In the first part, I offer a reading of Dewey’s notion of aesthetic experience that unties its content through noting the impo...

  8. Exploring the Aesthetics of Sustainable Fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    , sustainable fashion. In programming the didactical setting for the students’ projects, several aesthetics must be considered: the aesthetic codes of the textile and fashion design discipline, both in terms of materials and expression, deriving from within the design practice itself and the aesthetic codes...... of mediated expressions seen in e.g. fashion magazines which create a frame of aestheticization influencing how fashion expressions are valued. In this tension between internal aesthetics and external aestheticization, the students are set out to create a new design expression for sustainable design which...

  9. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  10. Nietzsche's aesthetic critique of Darwin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Charles H

    2011-01-01

    Despite his position as one of the first philosophers to write in the "post-Darwinian" world, the critique of Darwin by Friedrich Nietzsche is often ignored for a host of unsatisfactory reasons. I argue that Nietzsche's critique of Darwin is important to the study of both Nietzsche's and Darwin's impact on philosophy. Further, I show that the central claims of Nietzsche's critique have been broadly misunderstood. I then present a new reading of Nietzsche's core criticism of Darwin. An important part of Nietzsche's response can best be understood as an aesthetic critique of Darwin, reacting to what he saw as Darwin having drained life of an essential component of objective aesthetic value. For Nietzsche, Darwin's theory is false because it is too intellectual, because it searches for rules, regulations, and uniformity in a realm where none of these are to be found - and, moreover, where they should not be found. Such a reading goes furthest toward making Nietzsche's criticism substantive and relevant. Finally, I attempt to relate this novel explanation of Nietzsche's critique to topics in contemporary philosophy of biology, particularly work on the evolutionary explanation of culture.

  11. Treatment of a cracked tooth with a resin-ionomer restoration and a connective tissue graft: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R J

    2000-12-01

    Treatment of a cracked tooth can be difficult and unpredictable. Quite often, the most predictable treatment possible is simply extraction. This is a case report of the treatment of a cracked tooth with a resin-ionomer restoration and a connective tissue with partial-thickness double pedicle graft. The crack was detected during a routine root coverage procedure using this type of graft. A resin-ionomer was used to repair the crack. Then, the root coverage procedure was completed. Complete root coverage was obtained, including the portion of the root that was repaired. The results remained stable and the tooth treated remained asymptomatic. Clinically, the treatment was a success.

  12. A simplified method to develop optimal gingival contours for the single implant-supported, metal-ceramic crown in the aesthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsel, Richard P; Capoferri, Daniele

    2008-05-01

    Prosthetic replacement of the missing single maxillary central incisor with an implant-supported crown represents a profound aesthetic challenge for the restorative dentist, laboratory technician, and surgeon. In addition to the visual fidelity of color, translucency, contour, and surface texture, the proper soft tissue outline is sacrosanct to the illusion of a natural tooth. The contrast between the uniformly round shoulder of the implant and the tooth's curvilinear cementoenamel junction is particularly problematic. This clinical report demonstrates a simplified method that precisely controls the facial gingival and proximal soft tissue contours for implant-supported, metal-ceramic crowns in the aesthetic zone, using the cervical anatomy of the maxillary incisor tooth as a guide. A new role for the provisional crown that is intended to maximize the volume of keratinized tissue is also described.

  13. Cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Tanumihardja

    2009-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome is usually found in daily dental practice. The incidence of cracks teeth tends to increasing. People are living longer and keeping their teeth longer. As a consequence, people have more complex restoration and endodontic treatment, leaving teeth more prone to cracks. In addition, stressful lives may provoke unconscious habits such as clenching and bruxism which can induce cracks in teeth. However, many cracks teeth can be saved nowadays when the character...

  14. The Role of Aesthetics in Web Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    is to present and discuss the four main areas in which aesthetics play an important role in the design of successful Web sites: aesthetics play an important role in supporting the content and the functionality, in appealing to the taste of the target audience, in creating the desired image for the sender...

  15. "Living Drawing": Aesthetic Teaching for Moral Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiwon

    2016-01-01

    With its inherent attributes such as qualitative immediacy, imaginativeness, and embodiment, John Dewey's concept of aesthetic experience makes a difference in moral education, in the ways of empathetic moral perception, moral reasoning, and moral action. If it matters then how can we help students gain aesthetic experience? By analyzing teacher…

  16. Design Criteria Based on Aesthetic Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic criteria for designs are often debated in a very subjective manner which makes it difficult to reach consensus. In order to have a more rational and transparent process, in particular in industrial design, we propose a procedure based on Baumgarten's aesthetic considerations and Thommesen......'s dividing of a form into form elements. The procedure has been tested in student projects....

  17. On the perceptual aesthetics of interactive objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soranzo, Alessandro; Petrelli, Daniela; Ciolfi, Luigina; Reidy, John

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the aesthetics of interactive objects (IOs), which are three-dimensional physical artefacts that exhibit autonomous behaviour when handled. The aim of the research was threefold: first, to investigate whether aesthetic preference for distinctive objects' structures emerges in compound stimulation; second, to explore whether there exists aesthetic preference for distinctive objects' behaviours; and, finally, to test whether there exists aesthetic preference for specific combinations of objects' structures and behaviours. The following variables were systematically manipulated: (a) IOs' contour (rounded vs angular), (b) IOs' size (small vs large), (c) IOs' surface texture (rough vs smooth), and (d) IOs' behaviour (lighting, sounding, vibrating, and quiescent). Results show that behaviour was the dominant factor: it influenced aesthetics more than any other characteristic; vibrating IOs were preferred over lighting and sounding IOs, supporting the importance of haptic processing in aesthetics. Results did not confirm the size and smoothness effects previously reported in vision and touch, respectively, which suggests that the aesthetic preference that emerges in isolated conditions may be different in compound stimulation. Results corroborate the smooth curvature effect. We suggest that behavior may be an aesthetic primitive.

  18. Management of birch for aesthetics and recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    John H. Noyes

    1969-01-01

    When paper birch and yellow birch are managed for aesthetic and recreation purposes, timber values become secondary, although in some instances compatibility exists among the several objectives. At times, timber and wood-products production is excluded entirely in the interests of aesthetics and recreation. In keying forest-management practices to the appearance...

  19. Sense Training as Basis for Aesthetic Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2016-01-01

    . It is a special problem for design engineers, who must guarantee the aesthetic, ethical and utilitarian qualities of products in a product development process. It does not matter whether they or other designers have conceived the product idea. It has been found that sense training can open up to aesthetic...

  20. Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuts, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Can moral flaws lessen an artwork's aesthetic value? Answering yes to this question requires both that artworks can be morally flawed and that moral flaws within a work of art can have an aesthetic impact. For present purposes, the author will assume that artworks can be morally flawed by such means as endorsing immoral perspectives, culpably…

  1. African Traditional Sculpture and Aesthetic Realism | Mangiri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditional African sculpture which is one of the essences of modern art movements in the world of art has not been attributed with that aesthetic identity. However, a close look at the traditional African sculpture reveals the artistic and aesthetic qualities. African traditional sculpture was regarded as mere objects or crafts.

  2. Aesthetic Learning, Creative Writing and English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Francis

    2016-01-01

    My article argues that the concept of "aesthetic learning" can be helpful for English teachers on two levels. First, it can be a useful identity for English teachers and students to adopt, based upon my own experiences as a secondary English teacher, creative writer and PhD student. Second, I argue that "aesthetic learning" is…

  3. Designers as determinant for aesthetic innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates whether the hiring of a designer generates aesthetic innovations by a firm and what the level of design knowledge of the receiving firm means for the firms’ absorptive capacity in terms of turning the hiring of the designer into aesthetic innovations. We explore a unique d...

  4. Aesthetic creation theory and landscape architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etteger, Van Rudi; Thompson, I.H.; Vicenzotti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades the landscape architectural discourse has tended to eschew ideas of aesthetics while focusing instead on notions of functional and sustainable design. We offer the view that Aesthetic Creation Theory, whose principal exponent is the philosopher Nick Zangwill, has the potential

  5. Aesthetic Encounters: Contributions to Generalist Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Boyd

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the learning experiences of three pre-service teachers within a university-level course entitled "Aesthetics and Art Criticism for the Classroom." Discussion is focused on the nature of the meaning-making that emerges from aesthetic encounters and its educational value. Specifically, what can pre-service generalist teachers…

  6. Therapeutic Dimensions of the Black Aesthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors of this article see the black aesthetic largely in terms of the affective component. Emotional oneness which is foreign to the white world view is the means by which the black man can achieve optimal mental health and development. The therapeutic implications of the black aesthetic are outlined. (NG)

  7. Clinical Effectiveness of Using Aesthetic Fixed Prosthetic Appliances with Combined Occlusal Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Andrii Biben; Zinovii Ozhohan

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the research was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of using aesthetic fixed prosthetic appliances with combined occlusal surface. Materials and methods. The study included 30 patients who were divided into 2 groups: Group I included 20 patients with combined occlusal surface of the crowns; Group II included 22 patients with ceramic occlusal surface of the crowns. The patients were observed 3, 6 and 12 months after prosthetic repair. Results. 6 months after prosthet...

  8. Chick tooth induction revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Ishiyama, Mikio; Mikami, Masato; Hosoya, Akihiro; Kozawa, Yukishige; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-07-15

    Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. The aesthetic unit principle of facial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Susan L; Brandt, Michael G; Yeung, Jeffrey C; Doyle, Philip C; Moore, Corey C

    2015-01-01

    In youth, facial aesthetic units flow together without perceptible division. The face appears as a single dynamic structure with a smooth contour and very little if any shadowing between different anatomical regions. As one ages, facial aesthetic units slowly become distinct. This process may be a consequence of differences in skin thickness, composition of subcutaneous tissue, contour of the facial skeleton, and location of facial ligaments. Although the impact of aesthetic unit separation is clinically apparent, its fundamental role in perceived facial aging has not yet been defined empirically. To evaluate and define the effect of aesthetic unit separation on facial aging and to empirically validate the rationale for the blending of aesthetic units as a principle for facial rejuvenation. We prepared the photographs of 7 women for experimental evaluation of the presence or absence of facial aesthetic unit separation. Photographic stimuli were then presented to 24 naive observers in a blinded paired comparison. For each stimulus pair, observers were asked to select the facial photograph that they considered to be more youthful in appearance. Each stimulus was compared with all others. We calculated a preference score for the total number of times any photograph was chosen to be more youthful compared with all others. Paired t tests were used to compare the preference scores between the facial stimuli with and without aesthetic unit separation. We generated 4032 responses for analysis. Photographs without facial aesthetic unit separation were consistently judged to be more youthful than their aged original or modified counterparts, with mean preference scores of 0.66 and 0.33, respectively (P ≤ .047). When we selected the paired stimulus that directly compared one photograph with aesthetic unit separation with another with blended aesthetic units (2015 pairs), observers indicated that the photograph with the blended aesthetic unit was younger 95% of the time

  10. The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    and the phenomenology of imagination, he seeks to answer fundamental questions about what design is and how it works that are often ignored in academic research. Folkmann considers three conditions in design: the possible, the aesthetic, and the imagination. Imagination is a central formative power behind the creation......In The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design, Mads Folkmann investigates design in both material and immaterial terms. Design objects, Folkmann argues, will always be dual phenomena--material, and immaterial, sensual and conceptual, actual and possible. Drawing on formal theories of aesthetics...... and the life of design objects; aesthetics describes the sensual, conceptual, and contextual codes through which design objects communicate; the concept of the possible--the enabling of new uses, conceptions, and perceptions--lies behind imagination and aesthetics. The possible, Folkmann argues, is contained...

  11. The Role of Aesthetics for Design Phenomenology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    The aim of the paper is to conceptualize the means and effects of different dimensions of aesthetic meaning in relation to the experience of design. In doing so, the paper combines two philosophical interests in design, design phenomenology and design aesthetics, in order to promote a framework...... for discussing the impact of aesthetic meaning construction on experience. First, the paper raises the phenomenological question of the relationship between design and experience, specifically, how design conditions experience. Second, in looking at aesthetics in terms of a) the sensual appeal of design, b...... our experience: We can look at sensual, conceptual, and contextual aesthetic dimensions of design and examine their contribution to the framing of experience, that is, how different dimensions of meaning articulation in design offer different framings of the experiences promoted by design objects...

  12. Conceptualizing Aesthetics in Design: A Phenomenological Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2018-01-01

    of aesthetic meaning construction on experience. First, the chapter raises the phenomenological question of the relationship between design and experience, specifically, how design conditions experience. Second, in looking at aesthetics in terms of a) the sensual appeal of design, b) design objects......The aim of this chapter is to introduce and discuss aesthetics as an approach to understand how design frames experience. In doing so, the chapter combines two philosophical interests in design, design phenomenology and design aesthetics, in order to promote a framework for discussing the impact...... experience: We can look at sensual, conceptual, and contextual aesthetic dimensions of design and examine their contribution to the framing of experience, that is, how different dimensions of meaning articulation in design offer different framings of the experiences promoted by design objects and solutions...

  13. The Third Tear in Everyday Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Mandoki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although totally overlooked by mainstream aesthetic theory, various paths were nevertheless left open for addressing everyday aesthetics, a natural yet surprisingly controversial topic. Why they were never taken until recently, when the theme of everyday aesthetics is now becoming fashionable, can be explained not only by the obvious fact of philosophical aesthetics’ restrictive focal point on art but, among other reasons, by a kind of fetishism that demands an object of recognized value for legitimating an aesthetic inquiry. This new popularity entails, however, certain theoretical risks such as clinging to traditional art-centric and beauty-centric categories to explain the everyday and borrowing their concepts uncritically. In this paper I will examine some of these paths and risks with special emphasis on current events which exude aesthetics throughout their pores and require attention from this discipline.

  14. Art fighting its way back to aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejten, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    . In this essay, ‘Aesthetics is not what you think it is’ is thus an invitation to break through at the very point in which contemporary art seems to state the opposite—that art no longer should be a concern of aesthetics. The iconic example of Marcel Duchamp’s readymade, Fountain, which writes art history......When Claire Farago and Donald Preziosi claim that ‘art is not what you think it is,’ aesthetics itself is implicitly challenged, especially aesthetics’ seemingly inherent correlation with art. However, aesthetics, as complex and ambiguous as the concept of art, calls for a similar suspicion...... at the threshold of contemporary art, is summoned, on the contrary, to give evidence of an intact, though profoundly transformed, aesthetic engagement by the artist....

  15. Balancing bioethics by sensing the aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneill, Paul

    2017-10-01

    This article is critical of "bioethics" as it is widely understood and taught, noting in particular an emphasis given to philosophical justification, reason and rationality. It is proposed that "balancing" bioethics be achieved by giving greater weight to practice and the aesthetic: Defined in terms of sensory perception, emotion and feeling. Each of those three elements is elaborated as a non-cognitive capacity and, when taken together, comprise aesthetic sensitivity and responsiveness. This is to recognise the aesthetic as a productive element in bioethics as practice. Contributions from the philosophy of art and aesthetics are drawn into the discussion to bring depth to an understanding of "the aesthetic". This approach is buttressed by philosophers - including Foucault and 18th century German philosophers (in particular Kant) - who recognized a link between ethics and aesthetics. The article aims to give substance to a claim that bioethics necessarily comprises a cognitive component, relating to reason, and a non-cognitive component that draws on aesthetic sensibility and relates to practice. A number of advantages of bioethics, understood to explicitly acknowledge the aesthetic, are proffered. Having defined bioethics in conventional terms, there is discussion of the extent to which other approaches to bioethics (including casuistry, virtue ethics, and narrative ethics) recognize aesthetic sensitivity in their practice. It is apparent that they do so to varying extents although not always explicitly. By examining this aspect of applied ethics, the paper aims to draw attention to aesthetic sensitivity and responsiveness as integral to ethical and effective health care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The aesthetics of simple figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C

    1980-11-01

    After reviewing the literature on experimental rectangle aesthetics ('the golden section') it was concluded that all of the effects demonstrated in the literature were dubious, either due to methodological limitations or inadvertent experimenter bias, these defects being compounded by most studies only considering population preferences and ignoring individual differences in preference. A series of experiments is described in which highly significant and temporally stable, but somewhat idiosyncratic, individual preferences were found. A taxonomy of these preferences, as well as of those for three separate types of triangle preference, is provided, based on factorial analysis. Two clear factors were demonstrated, one based on the square, and the other upon a proportion similar to that of the golden section.

  17. Black Orpheus and Aesthetic Historicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay offers a novel approach for understanding the poetry of negritude and its role in the struggle for black liberation by appealing to Giambattista Vico’s insights on the historical, cultural, and myth-making function of poetry and of the mythopoetic imagination.  The essay begins with a discussion of Vico’s aesthetic historicism and of his ideas regarding the role of imagination, poetry, and myth-making and then brings these ideas to bear on the discussion of the function of negritude poetry, focusing primarily on the writings of Aimé Césaire and on Jean-Paul Sartre’s essay, Black Orpheus.

  18. Aesthetic Experience, Mimesis and Testimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger W. H. Savage

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I relate the demand that Paul Ricoeur suggests mimesis places on the way we think about truth to the idea that the work of art is a model for thinking about testimony. By attributing a work’s epoché of reality to the work of imagination, I resolve the impasse that arises from attributing music, literature, and art’s distance from the real to their social emancipation. Examining the conjunction, in aesthetic experience, of the communicability and the exemplarity of a work reveals how Ricoeur’s definition of mimesis as refiguration relates to the “rule” that the work summons. This “rule” constitutes the solution to a problem or question for which the work is the answer. In conclusion, as a model for thinking about testimony, the claims that works make have a counterpart in the injunctions that issue from exemplary moral and political acts. 

  19. Atopia & Aesthetics. A Modal Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Millet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Living in an era where global exchanges of forms and ideas are the norm raises some questions about the status of artistic practices. To explore these questions, we use Roland Barthes’ notion of atopia and the complementary yet related notion of Neutral on which Barthes commented in his later years. Atopia highlights the fact that rather than viewing current artistic activities as searches for homogenous identity, we need to view them as belonging to plural communities of practices offering modal and qualitative distinctions. We suggest that adopting this perspective sheds light on the capacity of any individual to act creatively within his or her daily life. Before considering this last point, we will explore how adopting an atopic perspective helps to throw light on the relation between aesthetics and politics.

  20. Transcendental in Hans Urs von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics and its significance for Chinese academic aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Sheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This thesis begins a dialogue between Hans Urs von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics and Chinese academic aesthetics. We identify a tension between aesthetics and religion in Chinese academic aesthetics, and argue that a dialogue with von Balthasar’s work has the potential to contribute to the development of Chinese academic aesthetics with regard to overcoming that tension. In order to set a ground for the dialogue, von Balthasar’s theological aesthetics is examined in Par...

  1. Aesthetic Emotions Across Arts: A Comparison Between Painting and Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miu, Andrei C; Pițur, Simina; Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Emotional responses to art have long been subject of debate, but only recently have they started to be investigated in affective science. The aim of this study was to compare perceptions regarding frequency of aesthetic emotions, contributing factors, and motivation which characterize the experiences of looking at painting and listening to music. Parallel surveys were filled in online by participants (N = 971) interested in music and painting. By comparing self-reported characteristics of these experiences, this study found that compared to listening to music, looking at painting was associated with increased frequency of wonder and decreased frequencies of joyful activation and power. In addition to increased vitality, as reflected by the latter two emotions, listening to music was also more frequently associated with emotions such as tenderness, nostalgia, peacefulness, and sadness. Compared to painting-related emotions, music-related emotions were perceived as more similar to emotions in other everyday life situations. Participants reported that stimulus features and previous knowledge made more important contributions to emotional responses to painting, whereas prior mood, physical context and the presence of other people were considered more important in relation to emotional responses to music. Self-education motivation was more frequently associated with looking at painting, whereas mood repair and keeping company motivations were reported more frequently in relation to listening to music. Participants with visual arts education reported increased vitality-related emotions in their experience of looking at painting. In contrast, no relation was found between music education and emotional responses to music. These findings offer a more general perspective on aesthetic emotions and encourage integrative research linking different types of aesthetic experience.

  2. Aesthetic Emotions Across Arts: A Comparison Between Painting and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miu, Andrei C.; Pițur, Simina; Szentágotai-Tătar, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Emotional responses to art have long been subject of debate, but only recently have they started to be investigated in affective science. The aim of this study was to compare perceptions regarding frequency of aesthetic emotions, contributing factors, and motivation which characterize the experiences of looking at painting and listening to music. Parallel surveys were filled in online by participants (N = 971) interested in music and painting. By comparing self-reported characteristics of these experiences, this study found that compared to listening to music, looking at painting was associated with increased frequency of wonder and decreased frequencies of joyful activation and power. In addition to increased vitality, as reflected by the latter two emotions, listening to music was also more frequently associated with emotions such as tenderness, nostalgia, peacefulness, and sadness. Compared to painting-related emotions, music-related emotions were perceived as more similar to emotions in other everyday life situations. Participants reported that stimulus features and previous knowledge made more important contributions to emotional responses to painting, whereas prior mood, physical context and the presence of other people were considered more important in relation to emotional responses to music. Self-education motivation was more frequently associated with looking at painting, whereas mood repair and keeping company motivations were reported more frequently in relation to listening to music. Participants with visual arts education reported increased vitality-related emotions in their experience of looking at painting. In contrast, no relation was found between music education and emotional responses to music. These findings offer a more general perspective on aesthetic emotions and encourage integrative research linking different types of aesthetic experience. PMID:26779072

  3. Aesthetic emotions across arts: A comparison between painting and music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei C. Miu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotional responses to art have long been subject of debate, but only recently have they started to be investigated in affective science. The aim of this study was to compare perceptions regarding frequency of aesthetic emotions, contributing factors and motivation which characterize the experiences of looking at painting and listening to music. Parallel surveys were filled in online by participants (N = 971 interested in music and painting. By comparing self-reported characteristics of these experiences, this study found that compared to listening to music, looking at painting was associated with increased frequency of wonder and decreased frequencies of joyful activation and power. In addition to increased vitality, as reflected by the latter two emotions, listening to music was also more frequently associated with emotions such as tenderness, nostalgia, peacefulness and sadness. Compared to painting-related emotions, music-related emotions were perceived as more similar to emotions in other everyday life situations. Participants reported that stimulus features and previous knowledge made more important contributions to emotional responses to painting, whereas prior mood, physical context and the presence of other people were considered more important in relation to emotional responses to music. Self-education motivation was more frequently associated with looking at painting, whereas mood repair and keeping company motivations were reported more frequently in relation to listening to music. Participants with visual arts education reported increased vitality-related emotions in their experience of looking at painting. In contrast, no relation was found between music education and emotional responses to music. These findings offer a more general perspective on aesthetic emotions and encourage integrative research linking different types of aesthetic experience.

  4. Hydrocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about 4 to 7 days. Outlook (Prognosis) The success rate for hydrocele repair is very high. The ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  5. Craniosynostosis repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children having an open repair may need a transfusion) Reaction to medicines Risks for this surgery are: Infection in the brain Bones connect together again, and more surgery is needed Brain swelling Damage to brain tissue

  6. Impaired tooth eruption: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffke, C E E; Chabikuli, N J; Nzima, N

    2005-11-01

    Eruption is the continuous process of movement of a tooth from its developmental location inside the jaw to its functional location in the mouth. Impaired tooth eruption, where this process is disturbed, is common in dental practice. It may manifest either as delayed or complete absence of eruption. Although unerupted teeth are usually asymptomatic, they may cause cosmetic and pathologic complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a review on the pathogenesis and differential radiographic interpretation of impaired tooth eruption.

  7. Ptosis repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, John; Hauck, Matthew J

    2013-02-01

    Acquired blepharoptosis presents as both a functional and cosmetic problem commonly encountered by facial plastic surgeons. Ptosis repair can be both challenging and frustrating, especially given ever-increasing demands for an optimal cosmetic surgical result. The authors present a brief overview of key points to consider when attempting to achieve excellent blepharoptosis repair outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Maximizing aesthetics in lateral-tension abdominoplasty and body lifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Ted E

    2004-10-01

    The high-lateral-tension abdominoplasty addresses the practical and theoretic faults of standard abdominoplasty design. Key features include limited direct undermining, increased lateral skin resection with highest-tension wound closure along lateral limbs, two-layer superficial fascial system repair, and significant truncal liposuction when needed. The high-lateral-tension design limits the unfavorable features of standard abdominoplasty and produces balanced natural aesthetic contours. The high-lateral-tension abdominoplasty is the foundation for treatment of more generalized relaxation problems in the circumferential trunk and thighs. For more significant thigh laxity and buttock ptosis, the lateral-tension abdominoplasty is combined with the transverse thigh/buttock lift to produce the lower body lift #2.

  9. [Tooth eruption disturbances and syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterkamp, B C M; Ockeloen, C W; Carels, C E L; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    2014-04-01

    In the tooth eruption mechanism, various disturbances can appear as a result of gene mutations, a consequence of which can be that tooth eruption does not occur. There are 5 syndromes which involve the complete failure of several or even all teeth to erupt, specifically: cleidocranial dysplasia, Gardner's syndrome, osteopetrosis, mucopolysaccharidosis and GAPO syndrome. Some are very rare and will seldom be encountered in a dental practice, but they show how vulnerable the tooth eruption mechanism is. Dentists are generally the ones who identify a tooth eruption problem in a patient. Since syndromes can be associated with other disorders, additional investigation by a clinical geneticist is always important when a syndrome is suspected.

  10. The Introduction of Aesthetics in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasi Roviró Alemany

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of aesthetics in Spain developed in several ways. One was the university. This paper makes a study about how this discipline entered the university. We are particularly interested in texts that were used at the time. For this reason, we review the programme of studies and realize how aesthetics was the subject of political debate. On the other hand, we study the texts of several subjects produced for students, such as, literature, metaphysics, psychology and rhetoric. They used aesthetics as an introductory phase in their schoolbooks.

  11. Film Aesthetics and the Embodied Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses - based on neuroscience and cognitive science - how the aesthetic experience of films depends on the brain's architecture and the mental flow called the PECMA flow. It describes how the flow from (visual and acoustic) perception of the film, via emotional and cognitive...... processes in the brain to simulated motor actions provides a series of options for aesthetic effects by the film's control of focus; focus on different steps in the flow will evoke different effects. The article further describe how shift of focus control experience of reality status, that is, whether...... something is real or mental Keywords: Film aesthetics, neuroaesthetics, cognitive film theory film emotions   ...

  12. Capoeira, ADHD and Aesthetic Movements of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    In psychological research art and aesthetics are rarely considered central to the perspective of everyday life. Philosophically this relates to an insistent separation of art and life that goes back to Immanuel Kant’s theory of sensation in which aesthetics takes on a double meaning. Thus, on the...... of an aesthetic approach to everyday life I will take point of departure in my own research exploring the relationship between the expressive movements in the Brazilian martial art, capoeira, and the conduct of children diagnosed with ADHD....

  13. Processes of aesthetic transformation in ordinary landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Jonna Majgaard

    2004-01-01

    . These features determined the specific aesthetic and architectural identity of ordinary Danish, i.e. Nordic, landscapes. Contemporary cultural changes such as the aesthetification of everyday life and of ordinary landscape, i.e. farming landscape, are now manifest in the way the windbreaks are motivated...... with utilitarian aspects. This is seen both as an example of how transnational contemporary cultural changes have an impact on local Nordic farming landscapes and their aesthetic expression and as an example of how processes of transformation in aesthetic experience and interpretation have an impact on the general...

  14. On the aesthetics of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, M

    1995-01-01

    The longstanding debate concerning the credibility of qualitative work and the increasing interest in computerized systems for qualitative data are, arguably, manifestations of efforts to make qualitative research more closely resemble conventional science. Computer technology, in particular, is transforming the look and feel of qualitative work. Yet, qualitative research continues to convey the feeling tone of art. Although the sciences and the arts involve different aesthetics, they share common aesthetic criteria for evaluation, such as beauty and style. Recognition of the aesthetic in works of science and art suggests that both artistic and scientific canons of criticism be used for evaluating qualitative work.

  15. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.

  16. Brain and Aesthetic Attitude: How to Integrate "Old" and "New" Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Consoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, various efforts are being put forward to naturalize aesthetics. One of the most controversial disciplines of aesthetics is neuroaesthetics. The first applications of neuroimaging of the aesthetic experience of paintings occurred ten years ago. Over this decade, neuroscientific findings have determined three common centers of visual aesthetic experience: top-down processing; reward and evaluation; and cortical sensory processing. Undoubtedly, these common centers require better identification and further investigation. However, the experimental data currently available make it possible to falsify or corroborate traditional philosophical theories of aesthetic perception and evaluation. Within an integrated approach to aesthetics, this selective function might constitute a future role for neuroaesthetics in humanities research.

  17. Tooth injury in anaesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, José Miguel Brandão Ribeiro; Mourão, Joana Irene de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dental injury is the most common complication of general anaesthesia and has significant physical, economic and forensic consequences. The aim of this study is to review on the characteristics of dental injury associated with anaesthesiology and existing methods of prevention. In this review, the time of anaesthesia in which the dental injury occurs, the affected teeth, the most frequent type of injury, established risk factors, prevention strategies, protection devices and medico-legal implications inherent to its occurrence are approached. Before initiating any medical procedure that requires the use of classic laryngoscopy, a thorough and detailed pre-aesthetic evaluation of the dental status of the patient is imperative, in order to identify teeth at risk, analyze the presence of factors associated with difficult intubation and outline a prevention strategy that is tailored to the risk of dental injury of each patient. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Tooth injury in anaesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Brandão Ribeiro de Sousa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Dental injury is the most common complication of general anaesthesia and has significant physical, economic and forensic consequences. The aim of this study is to review on the characteristics of dental injury associated with anaesthesiology and existing methods of prevention. CONTENTS: In this review, the time of anaesthesia in which the dental injury occurs, the affected teeth, the most frequent type of injury, established risk factors, prevention strategies, protection devices and medico-legal implications inherent to its occurrence are approached. CONCLUSIONS: Before initiating any medical procedure that requires the use of classic laryngoscopy, a thorough and detailed pre-aesthetic evaluation of the dental status of the patient is imperative, in order to identify teeth at risk, analyze the presence of factors associated with difficult intubation and outline a prevention strategy that is tailored to the risk of dental injury of each patient.

  19. [Tooth injury in anaesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão Ribeiro de Sousa, José Miguel; de Barros Mourão, Joana Irene

    2015-01-01

    Dental injury is the most common complication of general anaesthesia and has significant physical, economic and forensic consequences. The aim of this study is to review on the characteristics of dental injury associated with anaesthesiology and existing methods of prevention. In this review, the time of anaesthesia in which the dental injury occurs, the affected teeth, the most frequent type of injury, established risk factors, prevention strategies, protection devices and medico-legal implications inherent to its occurrence are approached. Before initiating any medical procedure that requires the use of classic laryngoscopy, a thorough and detailed pre-aesthetic evaluation of the dental status of the patient is imperative, in order to identify teeth at risk, analyze the presence of factors associated with difficult intubation and outline a prevention strategy that is tailored to the risk of dental injury of each patient. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Aesthetic design and green roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberlander, C.H.; Whitelaw, E. [Cornelia Hahn Oberlander Landscape Architects, Vancouver, BC (United States)

    2005-07-01

    This paper illustrated several recent approaches to aesthetically pleasing designs in different climatic zones by a renowned Canadian landscape architect. It was argued that landscape architects should join with researchers to find new alternatives to the sedums and grasses typically used in green roof systems. Buildings reviewed in the study included the new Canadian Chancery in Washington DC; the Library Square in Vancouver; the Portland Hotel in Vancouver; a therapeutic garden at the Vancouver General Hospital and a provincial courthouse complex. All designs used a combination of intensive and extensive roof garden techniques, as well as vertical landscaping features. It was suggested that as cities grow vertically, more and more rooftops will be seen. While some will not be accessible, other roof gardens will be subject to intensive use, constituting a unique urban facade. Extensive research and planning for projects will allow for the correct determination of plants and roof landscape structures. It was concluded that patterned landscapes where the eye can explore and make sense of shapes and gradations of colour as well as as textures are restorative and uplifting to many people. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Aesthetic, urological, orthopaedic and functional outcomes in complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias′s management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertin Dibi Kouame

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative complications are related to the surgical procedures, of failures of initial bladder closure and influence the urological, aesthetical and orthopaedic outcomes. Materials and Methods: We reviewed four patients who underwent complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias repair over a period of 14 years. The outcomes of treatment were assessed using, aesthetic, urological and orthopaedic examination data. Orthopaedic complications were explored by a radiography of the pelvis. Results: Out of four patients who underwent bladder exstrophy surgical management, aesthetic, functional outcomes and complications in the short and long follow-up were achieved in three patients. The first patient is a male and had a good penis aspect. He has a normal erection during micturition with a good jet miction. He has a moderate urinary incontinence, which requires diaper. In the erection, his penis-measures 4 cm long and 3 cm as circumference. The second patient was a female. She had an unsightly appearance of the female external genitalia with bipartite clitoris. Urinary continence could not be assessed; she did not have the age of cleanness yet. The third patient had a significant urinary leakage due to the failure of the epispadias repair. He has a limp, a pelvic obliquity, varus and internal rotation of the femoral head. He has an inequality of limbs length. Pelvis radiograph shows the right osteotomy through the ilium bone, the left osteotomy through the hip joint at the acetabular roof. Conclusion: When, the epispadias repair is performed contemporary to initial bladder closure, its success is decisive for urinary continence. In the female, surgical revision is required after the initial bladder closure for an aesthetic appearance to the external genitalia. Innominate osteotomy must be performed with brilliancy amplifier to avoid osteotomy through to the hip joint to prevent inequality in leg length.

  2. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina1, Alberto Goldman21Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande du Sul, BrazilAbstract: Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asymmetries, correction after body modifying procedures, and facial sculpturing are important issues for young adults. The implication of aesthetic medicine as part of preventive medicine is a major ethical challenge that differentiates aesthetic medicine from fashion.Keywords: acne scars, ice pick scars, boxcar scars, fillers 

  3. The religion under the rule of aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto da Silva Moreira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the modern process of aestheticization of culture and religion as consequent unfolding of the expansion of market rationality to the subjective life and the libidinal sphere of subjects. Its main objective is to inquire about the future of religion under the impact of sensation seeking culture and the inflation of aesthetics. Firstly, with the help of Türcke, Welsch, Foucault and Schultze´s investigate the aestheticization process of of social life, its causes and characteristics; Secondly, following Dufour, Türcke Leiss, Kline, Jhally e Welsch, it asks how the dynamics of aesthetical impacts the daily life and the bio-psychic economy of people; thirdly, it applies the results obtained to the analysis of what is happening with religion under the regime of aesthetics and sensational culture. Finally, it asks about the possible emancipatory potential of aestheticized own religious experience and tries to draw some further consequences for religion in the aesthetic field.

  4. Dental aesthetics and the aging patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Betsy K

    2006-05-01

    Those over the age of 65 years old and the "baby boomers" regard oral health, including oral/dental/facial aesthetics, as part of their overall health and wellness. Over 65% of discretionary wealth in the United States belongs to those over the age of 50. In many instances, they have had to deny their own needs for those of their families and are now at a point where their dental issues can finally be addressed. Aesthetic dentistry offers the opportunity to reverse the signs of aging and restore a youthful appearance. A smile can be the most eye-catching feature of a face and therefore should blend in or harmonize with facial appearance. Advances in aesthetic dentistry, such as porcelain veneers, bonding, periodontal surgery, and dental implants, have shown great efficacy and reliability when used properly. Aesthetic dentistry offers the opportunity for the aged population to have a more youthful, harmonious smile with improved function and optimum oral health.

  5. Nietzsche and the Aesthetics of Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Steve; Poulakos, John

    1993-01-01

    Addresses the debate over rhetoric's epistemic status in terms of Nietzsche's critique of epistemology. Suggests that Nietzsche's aestheticism provides an alternative to the debate. Focuses on differences between the rhetorics of the epistemic and the aesthetic. (SR)

  6. Pursuing Aesthetic Inquiry in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We introduce aesthetic inquiry as an important perspective to pursue in Participatory Design. Within the scope of tradition and transcendence we pursue aesthetic inquiry by tipping the scale towards transcendence and by staging offline loops for detached reflection by use of imaginative artefacts....... Although aesthetic inquiry to some extent resides in most Participatory Design practice, we see the need for elaborating this perspective and to further build Participatory Design practice, tools and techniques that address this issue. The Fictional Inquiry technique is presented as an illustrating example...... of a design technique for pursuing aesthetic inquiry by using fictional narratives to temporarily by-pass the existing structures of meaning and expectations within a given practice. We illustrate how Fictional Inquiry was utilized in a participatory design project in which two design concepts...

  7. The Listening Train: A Collaborative, Connective Aesthetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in establishing imaginal thinking, moral intuition, empathy, participative parity, and emergence, and how these are important for transformation and establishing new capacities for ecological/global citizenship and collaborative intelligence. Keywords: Connective aesthetics, transgressive learning, transformation, social ...

  8. Teaching Art Criticism As Aesthetic Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, David W.

    1972-01-01

    The teaching model in the visual arts will be derived less from the painter and more from the art critic as art education moves into aesthetic inquiry. There are implications for other arts as well. (Editor)

  9. Trash and Aesthetics in the Hoard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Eddy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trash and Aesthetics in the Hoard by Charmaine Eddy, Issue 7: The Aesthetics of Trash. This article examines two reality television series, Hoarders and Hoarding: Buried Alive, in terms of a variation in the understanding of the object in relation to value based upon an aesthetic tied to consumer capitalism. Object collection is viewed as a spectacle of abjection in each episode, as items that were once worthy of purchase come to produce a garbage heap within the home. The concept of “trash” is an evaluative category applied to objects over time, but it also becomes part of the therapeutic process, as hoarders are required to dispose of their things. Object-oriented ontology, or “thing theory,” provides an alternate semiology for the object, ultimately illustrating how an evaluative aesthetics of the object in these series is linked to consumer capitalism and normative patterns of consumption.

  10. The phenomenology in the environmental aesthetic education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera de Echeverri, Ana Patricia

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present an abstract about our Philosophical Doctor Thesis make on Campinas University (Sao Paulo, Brazil) titled educacion estetico ambiental y fenomenologia: problemas de la educacion estetico ambiental en la modernidad. In this thesis we do a critical thinking about the epistemological model of relation subject -object on modern education, and on the other side, we work in the construction about a aesthetic - environmental education model. We propose here an aesthetization of the education, for conjoint body and world-of-life (lebenswelt) into scenarios and actors of the pedagogical process. Body and world-of-life, are two concepts of Husserl's phenomenology that open the door about the environment' s studies aesthetization and aesthetic' s studies environment, separated on modernity, between the metaphysical subject and physicality objects. Body and world-of-life -symbolic-biotic- are marginal alterities on modernity. This marginality has been a structural lead on the contemporary environmental problems

  11. Aesthetic Diagnosis in Gestalt Therapy †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubal, Jan; Francesetti, Gianni; Gecele, Michela

    2017-01-01

    The diagnostic process in psychotherapy using the aesthetic evaluation is described in this article. Unlike the classical diagnostic process, which presents a result of comparing clinicians´ observations with a diagnostic system (DSM, ICD, etc.), the aesthetic evaluation is a pre-reflexive, embodied, and preverbal process. A Gestalt Therapy theoretical frame is used to introduce a concept of the aesthetic diagnostic process. During this process, the clinicians use their own here-and-now presence, which takes part in the co-creation of the shared relational field during the therapeutic session. A specific procedure of the aesthetic evaluation is introduced. The clinical work with depressed clients is presented to illustrate this perspective. PMID:29039752

  12. [Tooth eruption disturbances and syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.A.M. van; Ockeloen, C.W.; Carels, C.E.L.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the tooth eruption mechanism, various disturbances can appear as a result of gene mutations, a consequence of which can be that tooth eruption does not occur. There are 5 syndromes which involve the complete failure of several or even all teeth to erupt, specifically: cleidocranial dysplasia,

  13. Broken or knocked out tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Broken or knocked out tooth URL of this page: // ... and fluid solution. Consider buying 1 for your home first aid kit . Also ... If your tooth is badly broken, your nerve endings may be exposed. You will ...

  14. Reimer through Confucian Lenses: Resonances with Classical Chinese Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I compare all three editions of Bennett Reimer's "A Philosophy of Music Education" with early Chinese philosophy, in particular, classical Chinese aesthetics. I structure my analysis around a quartet of interrelated themes: aesthetic education, education of feeling, aesthetic experience, and ethics and aesthetics. This…

  15. Aesthetic approach to green transportation planning in tourism with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demand increase in public transportation. Hence, aesthetic factors should be considered significantly. However, a difficult problem for reflecting aesthetic aspect is that there is no clear design standard for railway to reflect aesthetic features. This paper aims to suggest aesthetic factors to be guidance of rail transit planning in ...

  16. A Model for Visual Aesthetic Inquiry in Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degge, Rogena M.

    1985-01-01

    An aesthetically based analysis of the visual imagery of commercial television is provided, and the usefulness of television as a basis for visual aesthetic criticism in aesthetic education is considered. Directed, critical inquiry of television can extend knowledge in art and aesthetics and enhance the quality of people's lives. (RM)

  17. Exploring the Relationship between Humor and Aesthetic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience." For Morreall, both humor and…

  18. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Uwe Wollina1, Alberto Goldman21Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande du Sul, BrazilAbstract: Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asy...

  19. Reflections on Designing for Aesthetic Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Peeters, Jeroen; Trotto, Ambra

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a clear shift in the Interaction Design community towards the design for engagement as opposed to more traditional ideals of efficiency and functionality. Our work explores how to design for aesthetic engagement in interaction; building on an approach founded on phenomenology, embodiment, pragmatist aesthetics and embodied cognition. In this paper, we present four different research through design projects we have undertaken, in which we leveraged this approach. These...

  20. The Aesthetics of Junkyards and Roadside Clutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Leddy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A little more than thirty years ago, Allen Carlson argued that although the concept of "Camp" would seem to allow for the aesthetic redemption of roadside clutter and junkyards, it does not.[1] He opposes those who claim that if one takes the right attitude to roadside clutter it can be seen as aesthetic. In this essay I argue that that there is nothing wrong with this, although I will not base my argument on the idea of Camp sensibility.

  1. The art of nursing: an aesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Raeve, L

    1998-09-01

    This article explores the question of whether or not the 'art' of nursing can properly be described as an 'aesthetics'. The author concludes that, although much nursing literature on the subject is confused and even incoherent, there is nevertheless some justification for seeing a connection between the art of nursing and aesthetics. The philosophical writings of Martha Nussbaum and Iris Murdoch are used to support this position.

  2. Aesthetics and the Effects of Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian

    Based on an evolutionary understanding of aesthetics a cognitive approach to analyzing advertising is proposed. This approach is compared with different semiotic traditions, and the advantages of a semio-cognitive approach are foregrounded.......Based on an evolutionary understanding of aesthetics a cognitive approach to analyzing advertising is proposed. This approach is compared with different semiotic traditions, and the advantages of a semio-cognitive approach are foregrounded....

  3. PERCEPTION, AESTHETICS AND USE OF URBAN FURNITURE

    OpenAIRE

    Naiana Maura John; Antonio Tarcísio da Luz Reis

    2010-01-01

    Proposal: This paper discusses the importance of environmental perception approach to a more qualified design and location of urban furniture. Considering that the quality of the design and the performance of public spaces are related to the fulfillment of users’ needs, it’s important to study how users perceive the urban furniture. Methods: The discussion deals with issues related to aesthetic and functional needs of users of urban spaces. Regarding aesthetics, aspects such as order and ...

  4. AESTHETIC EDUCATION OF ELDERLY BY DIGITAL INCLUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Barreto Cesarino; Marcos Antonio Oliveira Cruz; Isa Omena Machado Freitas; Vinicius Pinheiro Marques; João Marcelo dos Santos Silva

    2014-01-01

    This research project has as delimiting central theme and also central question whether digital inclusion of elderly enable increasing their aesthetic education. Being its specific goals study what is aesthetic education, using the theoretical framework the German philosopher Friedrich Schiller, conceptualize what is senior and define digital inclusion. Its relevance is the increment that Beauty favors the increased awareness of self, others and their environment. The population and sample wi...

  5. Tooth Fairy guilty of favouritism!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patcas, Raphael; van Waes, Hubertus Jm; Daum, Moritz M; Landolt, Markus A

    2017-12-11

    To determine the proportion of children visited by the Tooth Fairy, the child-related factors that influence the likelihood of her visit, and the parent-related variables that affect the amount of money the Tooth Fairy leaves. Cross-sectional questionnaire study. Zürich, Switzerland. 3617 parents of children (mean age of children, 6.8 years; 51.9% girls) who had lost at least one deciduous tooth received a self-developed questionnaire; 1274 questionnaires were returned (35.2%). Primary outcome variables were the Tooth Fairy's visit after tooth loss and the amount of money given in case of a visit. Child- and parent-related variables were assessed as predictors of the main outcomes. Most parents (71.0%) reported that the Tooth Fairy visited their child. She usually exchanged the lost tooth for money (55.8% of visits) or placed money next to the tooth (40.7%); rarely did she take the tooth without pecuniary substitution. The Tooth Fairy left an average of 7.20 Swiss francs (approximately AU$9.45). The Tooth Fairy favoured visiting for the teeth of older children (odds ratio [OR], per year, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.09-3.21), of boys (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.09-6.42), and of children who believed in her (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.77-9.64). The amount of money was influenced by maternal, but not paternal socio-demographic factors, including level of education (OR, per level, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92) and country of origin (OR, Western countries v non-Western countries, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.20-4.62). The Tooth Fairy does not visit all children after tooth loss, displaying clear preferences in her choice of business partners. The odds of a visit are dramatically increased if she is believed in, and the value of a deciduous tooth is influenced by socio-demographic factors.

  6. Biomechanical metrics of aesthetic perception in dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Shippen, James

    2015-12-01

    The brain may be tuned to evaluate aesthetic perception through perceptual chunking when we observe the grace of the dancer. We modelled biomechanical metrics to explain biological determinants of aesthetic perception in dance. Eighteen expert (EXP) and intermediate (INT) dancers performed développé arabesque in three conditions: (1) slow tempo, (2) slow tempo with relevé, and (3) fast tempo. To compare biomechanical metrics of kinematic data, we calculated intra-excursion variability, principal component analysis (PCA), and dimensionless jerk for the gesture limb. Observers, all trained dancers, viewed motion capture stick figures of the trials and ranked each for aesthetic (1) proficiency and (2) movement smoothness. Statistical analyses included group by condition repeated-measures ANOVA for metric data; Mann-Whitney U rank and Friedman's rank tests for nonparametric rank data; Spearman's rho correlations to compare aesthetic rankings and metrics; and linear regression to examine which metric best quantified observers' aesthetic rankings, p dance movements revealed differences between groups and condition, p brain combines sensory motor elements into integrated units of behaviour. In this representation, the chunk of information which is remembered, and to which the observer reacts, is the elemental mode shape of the motion rather than physical displacements. This suggests that reduction in redundant information to a simplistic dimensionality is related to the experienced observer's aesthetic perception.

  7. Reshaping Spectatorship: Immersive and Distributed Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwina Bartlem

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although discourses of immersive aesthetics and distributed aesthetics may evoke associations with different media, creative processes, modes of audience engagement and even political ideologies, artists using these aesthetics often share similar interests in transforming and enhancing notions of the body and perception through technological intervention. This paper undertakes a comparison between immersive and distributed aesthetics in relation to Virtual Reality (VR and Networked Art (net.art, particularly networked installation art. It focuses on the ways in which both VR and networked installations immerse the viewer in states of perceptual and cognitive transition. Central to this article is the argument that VR and net.art are able to generate immersive experiences in the viewer by creating the sensation of being (tele-present in an electronically mediated environment that is illusionistic and sometimes remote from the physical body of the participant. Furthermore, the immersive and distributed aesthetics generated by specific VR and net.art projects have revolutionary consequences for traditional aesthetic theories of spectatorship and art appreciation that assert the need for critical and physical distance.

  8. Surgical management with intentional replantation on a tooth with palato-radicular groove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Forero-López

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A palato-radicular groove (PRG is a developmental anomaly primarily found in the maxillary lateral incisors. It is a potential communication path between the root canal and the periodontium that decreases the survival prognosis of the affected tooth, therefore compromising the stability of the dental structure in the oral cavity. The aim of this case report is to present an original technique where a PRG was treated by means of intracanal disinfection, PRG sealing with glass ionomer, replantation with intentional horizontal 180 degree rotation of the tooth, and an aesthetic veneer placed to provide adequate tooth morphology. The clinical and biological benefits of this novel technique are presented and discussed.

  9. Fiber composites as a method of treatment splinting tooth mobility in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Lidya Ichwana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with periodontal disease can lead to severe tooth mobility so often complains of pain when eating, decreased chewing ability and functional occlusion. Tooth mobility is a movement in a horizontal or vertical direction and one of the most unpleased effects from periodontal disease. Basically, tooth mobility is not a disease that requires treatment, but it is a symptom of periodontal tissue morphology changes, so it became a challenge for dentists in making decisions to maintain proper care of the teeth. Recent studies improved the use of periodontal splint with fiber reinforced composite (FRC or fiber composite may lead to a long-term prognosis of teeth mobility due to periodontal disase. The case report describes treatment of chronic periodontitis patients with splinting fiber composites as a method for stabilization of the lower anterior teeth providing aesthetics, comfort, improved functionality occlusion, mastication and a good prognosis.

  10. Nano-ionomer tooth repair in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Constance Marie; Croll, Theodore P

    2010-01-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cements have shown their reliability and durability in various applications in young dental patients. The latest generation of these materials, the nano-ionomer, has been introduced, and its improved properties make it an effective alternative for restoring primary and permanent teeth. The purpose of this paper was to describe the properties of the nano-ionomer, provide indications for its use, and illustrate the technique for applying the material. Representative clinical cases are presented.

  11. Photo Aesthetics Ranking Network with Attributes and Content Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Shu; Shen, Xiaohui; Lin, Zhe; Mech, Radomir; Fowlkes, Charless

    2016-01-01

    Real-world applications could benefit from the ability to automatically generate a fine-grained ranking of photo aesthetics. However, previous methods for image aesthetics analysis have primarily focused on the coarse, binary categorization of images into high- or low-aesthetic categories. In this work, we propose to learn a deep convolutional neural network to rank photo aesthetics in which the relative ranking of photo aesthetics are directly modeled in the loss function. Our model incorpor...

  12. Repair process and a repaired component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component, and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.

  13. Abiotic tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  14. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  15. Personality traits in aesthetic surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Visal Buturak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: It has been known that psychological factors have an important effect on the decision to undergo aesthetic surgery. In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis that the personality traits of people admitted for aesthetic surgery differ from those of people who have never planned to undergo aesthetic surgery in their lives. Material and Methods: Forty-seven patients who were referred to the outpatient clinic of the Faculty of Medicine, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Kirikkale University to undergo aesthetic surgery were enrolled in the study. Forty-three subjects who neither underwent nor planned to undergo aesthetic surgery at any time in their lives were included in the study as a control group. Psychometric evaluation of the patients and the control group was conducted using the Turkish version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI. Results: Taking 65 as a cut-off point, the ratio of patients who scored and #8805;65 on the hysteria subscale of the MMPI was found to be significantly higher in the sugery group than in the control group and the ratio on social introversion subscale was also higher in the patient group than in the control group, very closely approaching significance. Conclusion: It should be kept in mind that people who have personality traits that can be partially improved with psyachiatric treatment, such as social introverted, lonely, timid, shy, and hysterical and feel the need for validation by others, may be more often admitted for aesthetic surgery. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 554-558

  16. The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The main intent of this article is to describe some opportunities for an education in aesthetics by referring to similarities between intensive experiences of music in the individual life and in the history of aesthetics. Here, the author discusses Romanticism through the writings of Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder. Among other things, she discusses…

  17. Soft tissue preservation and pink aesthetics around single immediate implant restorations: a 1-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyn, Jan; De Bruyn, Hugo; Cleymaet, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    (1) To document soft tissue aspects using a specific protocol for immediate implant treatment (IIT) following single-tooth removal; (2) to evaluate whether this protocol allows preservation of pink aesthetics as objectively assessed. Patients with a thick gingival biotype and intact buccal bone wall upon extraction of a single tooth in the aesthetic zone (15-25) were consecutively treated. The protocol included flapless extraction and implant surgery, socket grafting, immediate nonocclusal loading with a screw-retained provisional crown, and replacement by a permanent crown 6 months thereafter. The outcome was assessed after 3, 6, and 12 months. Cases demonstrating major alveolar process remodeling and/or advanced midfacial recession (>1 mm) at 3 months were additionally treated with a connective tissue graft (CTG). The emergence profile of the provisional crown was replicated for all permanent crowns. Twenty-two patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 50) were treated after tooth extraction for nonperiodontal reasons using a novel bone condensing implant with variable-thread design, conical connection, and platform switch (NobelActive®, Nobel Biocare, Göteborg, Sweden). One implant failed and mean marginal bone loss was 0.1 mm (p = .059). Temporary mesial papilla reduction occurred, whereas distal papilla reduction was permanent (mean 0.5 mm; p = .001). At 3 months, five cases demonstrated major alveolar process remodeling and two advanced midfacial recession. Hence, slight initial decline in the pink esthetic score (PES) (p = .053) was observed. CTG resulted in a steady improvement of the PES after 3 months (p ≤ .037). At 12 months, pink aesthetics (mean PES 12.15) was comparable to the preoperative status (mean PES 11.86; p = .293). Distal papillae had significantly deteriorated (p = .020) in this time span, whereas midfacial contour had significantly improved (p = .005). Preservation of pink aesthetics is possible following

  18. Aesthetic quality inference for online fashion shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Allebach, Jan

    2014-03-01

    On-line fashion communities in which participants post photos of personal fashion items for viewing and possible purchase by others are becoming increasingly popular. Generally, these photos are taken by individuals who have no training in photography with low-cost mobile phone cameras. It is desired that photos of the products have high aesthetic quality to improve the users' online shopping experience. In this work, we design features for aesthetic quality inference in the context of online fashion shopping. Psychophysical experiments are conducted to construct a database of the photos' aesthetic evaluation, specifically for photos from an online fashion shopping website. We then extract both generic low-level features and high-level image attributes to represent the aesthetic quality. Using a support vector machine framework, we train a predictor of the aesthetic quality rating based on the feature vector. Experimental results validate the efficacy of our approach. Metadata such as the product type are also used to further improve the result.

  19. Towards a sensorimotor aesthetics of performing art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Merino, B; Jola, C; Glaser, D E; Haggard, P

    2008-09-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing arts. We investigated brain areas whose activity during passive viewing of dance stimuli was related to later, independent aesthetic evaluation of the same stimuli. Brain activity of six naïve male subjects was measured using fMRI, while they watched 24 dance movements, and performed an irrelevant task. In a later session, participants rated each movement along a set of established aesthetic dimensions. The ratings were used to identify brain regions that were more active when viewing moves that received high average ratings than moves that received low average ratings. This contrast revealed bilateral activity in the occipital cortices and in right premotor cortex. Our results suggest a possible role of visual and sensorimotor brain areas in an automatic aesthetic response to dance. This sensorimotor response may explain why dance is widely appreciated in so many human cultures.

  20. Medical Aesthetics Training: Shifting to Collective Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Iris; Peisachovich, Eva; Da Silva, Celina; Lee, Charlotte; Solomon, Philip

    With increased demands for medical aesthetics procedures and the sudden profusion of newly licensed, and unlicensed, providers who are performing these medical aesthetics procedures also comes the responsibility to shift to collective competence. Collective competence refers to what occurs among professionals in action, emphasizing the sharing of experiences, knowledge, and perceptions among those who are providing services to the medical aesthetics client. Registered nurses and medical students are not taught to perform cosmetic procedures in basic nursing or medical programs and thus require a post-entry-level education to validate their competency. The current medical aesthetics apprenticeship training approach of see one, do one, and teach one focuses on teaching technical skills and thus does not sufficiently address the ever-changing health care context and the ambiguity in practitioner role. Recent scholars highlight that when health care failed or an error has been identified, it is rarely adduced to an individual's competence but rather is more likely to be a failure of the collective team. In this article, we are advocating for a change in how medical aesthetics practitioners are trained. In particular, it advocates creating opportunities within the curricula to train practitioners as a collective body, as opposed to providing training that focuses on the individual's competence and technical skills alone.

  1. Neuroaesthetics: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Aesthetic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Marcus T; Zaidel, Dahlia W; Vartanian, Oshin; Skov, Martin; Leder, Helmut; Chatterjee, Anjan; Nadal, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    The field of neuroaesthetics has gained in popularity in recent years but also attracted criticism from the perspectives both of the humanities and the sciences. In an effort to consolidate research in the field, we characterize neuroaesthetics as the cognitive neuroscience of aesthetic experience, drawing on long traditions of research in empirical aesthetics on the one hand and cognitive neuroscience on the other. We clarify the aims and scope of the field, identifying relations among neuroscientific investigations of aesthetics, beauty, and art. The approach we advocate takes as its object of study a wide spectrum of aesthetic experiences, resulting from interactions of individuals, sensory stimuli, and context. Drawing on its parent fields, a cognitive neuroscience of aesthetics would investigate the complex cognitive processes and functional networks of brain regions involved in those experiences without placing a value on them. Thus, the cognitive neuroscientific approach may develop in a way that is mutually complementary to approaches in the humanities. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. A memory of an aesthetic experience transferred to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Britt-Maj

    2003-03-01

    To examine the usefulness of writing about a memory of an aesthetic experience, and then transfer the aesthetic experience to a health care situation. The study was accomplished at two university colleges of health sciences in Sweden. It started with student nurses (N=291) writing about a memory of an aesthetic experience. Then they transferred the aesthetic experience to a purposeful clinical practice. The results showed that each student could report on a positive memory of an aesthetic experience. Embedded in each story was an aesthetic experience that was meaningful to the student. Domains of memory most frequently reported were music, work of art and nature. Themes derived from the aesthetic memory were happiness and awareness. The awareness theme comprized the value of aesthetic experiences for the patients, and for student nurses. The process of writing about a memory of an aesthetic experience provided an alternative model for nursing education that could improve patient care.

  3. Comparison of aesthetic perception of smile between dentists and general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, H.A.; Qazi, F.U.R.; Jat, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    To compare aesthetic perception of smile between general population and dentists by varying lengths of maxillary lateral incisors. Introduction: Patient perception and expectation of their smile plays a very important role when providing an anterior tooth restoration. The aim of conducting the study was to compare the perception of esthetic smile between general population and dentists by varying length of maxillary lateral incisors. Design: Cross sectional study. Materials and Methods: A photograph of a female smile from frontal view was digitally altered to produce images with varying lengths of maxillary lateral incisor. These images were arranged in descending order; from most attractive to least attractive by the participants. The participants of the study included two groups; first group comprised of Dental Surgeons where as second group consisted of general population. Results: Evaluation of the results showed a significant difference in aesthetic perception of smile between the Dentist and general population. Conclusion: Perception of aesthetics is not similar between the dentists and the general population. (author)

  4. NSAIDs in orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Karthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response toward a mechanical force. The movement is induced by prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces, which create pressure and tension zones in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing remodeling of tooth sockets. Orthodontists often prescribe drugs to manage pain from force application to biologic tissues. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the drugs usually prescribed. NSAIDs block prostaglandin synthesis and result in slower tooth movement. Prostaglandins have been found to play a direct role in bone resorption. Aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, vadecoxib, and celecoxib are the commonly prescribed drugs. Acetaminophen is the drug of choice for orthodontic pain without affecting orthodontic tooth movement.

  5. Erosive tooth wear in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; Lussi, A.; Jaeggi, T.; Gambon, D.L.; Lussi, A.; Ganss, C.

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are

  6. SEM Analysis of Tooth Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Azinović, Zoran; Keros, Jadranka; Buković, Dino; Azinović, Ana

    2003-01-01

    SEM analysis contains researches of tooth enamel surfaces of two populations. First group of samples is tooth enamel of prehistorically ancestor from Vu~edol and the second group of samples is enamel of modern Croatian citizen. Even on small number of human teeth samples from cooperage site of Vu~edol (3,000 BC) and today’s Croatian people, we can conclude about chewing biometry of prehistorically ancestors and today’s modern Croatian people, comparing interspecifically the mor...

  7. Orthodontic tooth movement and bioelectricity.

    OpenAIRE

    Karanth H; Shetty K

    2001-01-01

    Research in the field of orthodontics is now focused on the biology of tooth movement. Advanced molecular biology techniques has showed the researchers new avenue towards finding answers to the questions asked for the last few decades. Now it is possible for the researches to explore the lacunae in the field. One such field is, pharmaco-therapeutically or electrophysiologically enhancing the rate of tooth movement, improving the stability of the results, augmenting the anchorage. The voltage ...

  8. Cognitive Aesthetics, Neurosciences and Filmed Opera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Julio Pérez López

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The introductory pages of this contribution deal with one of the main discussions in the field of media studies with a possible impact on an aesthetic interpretation of filmed opera: the opposition between spectacle and narration as described by Andrew Darley. In opposition to Darley’s theory, or its possible application to filmed opera, I posit the hypothesis that the increased visibility of the actions and gestures in filmed opera enhances the audience’s attention to the narrative as one of the salient features of its aesthetic experience. The main section of this article will examine some findings in the fields of cognitive aesthetics and neurosciences as a support for a deeper understanding of the hypothesis proposed above.

  9. Complications associated with cutaneous aesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Daniela; Ruzicka, Thomas; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, a plethora of novel therapeutic approaches to fight signs of aging and to influence external body appearance have become available in aesthetic dermatology. Extensive research in this field has led to advanced understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the aging face. To successfully address the complex age-related alterations anti-aging treatment nowadays calls for a multi-faceted approach. Most frequently utilized aesthetic procedures include the use of botulinum toxin, a variety of filling substances, microneedling (collagen induction therapy), chemical peeling, lasers, radiofrequency, thread facelift and injectional lipolysis with phosphatidylcholine/deoxycholate among others. Unfortunately, many clinicians still lack in-depth understanding of potential complications, risk factors and side effects associated with minimal-invasive procedures. The following review aims to give a broad overview of nowadays most frequently used approaches in the dermato-aesthetic field and their related complications. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Should advertising by aesthetic surgeons be permitted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Nagpal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opinion in their favour. However, these saloons and spas lack basic medical facilities in terms of staff or equipment to handle any complication or medical emergency. To have a level playing field ethical advertising should be permitted to qualified aesthetic surgeons as is permitted in the US and UK by their respective organisations.

  11. Aesthetic Qualities of Cross Laminated Timber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejder, Anne Kirkegaard

    to its sustainable profile. In parallel to this, new production methods and further refined timber products have been developed. Among these are the engineered timber-based product Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) that show enhanced structural properties compared to unrefined timber. However, the question...... is what happens to the aesthetic qualities of wood as a building material in this process? What does it mean to the experience and perception of CLT that it is processed to products whose properties differ significantly from those of wood in its raw form? Based on the hypothesis that CLT possesses...... an undefined aesthetic potential that may innovate how we construct and perceive timber architecture, the overall aim of the thesis is to inquire into the architectural and aesthetic qualities of CLT. Through three chapters this thesis examines and discusses 1) the architectural qualities of CLT, 2...

  12. Aesthetics of interdisciplinarity art and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Lähdesmäki, Tuuli

    2017-01-01

    This anthology fosters an interdisciplinary dialogue between the mathematical and artistic approaches in the field where mathematical and artistic thinking and practice merge. The articles included highlight the most significant current ideas and phenomena, providing a multifaceted and extensive snapshot of the field and indicating how interdisciplinary approaches are applied in the research of various cultural and artistic phenomena. The discussions are related, for example, to the fields of aesthetics, anthropology, art history, art theory, artistic practice, cultural studies, ethno-mathematics, geometry, mathematics, new physics, philosophy, physics, study of visual illusions, and symmetry studies. Further, the book introduces a new concept: the interdisciplinary aesthetics of mathematical art, which the editors use to explain the manifold nature of the aesthetic principles intertwined in these discussions.

  13. A Functional Model of the Aesthetic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Conrad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In a process of somatic evolution, the brain semi-randomly generates initially-unstable neural circuits that are selectively stabilized if they succeed in making sense out of raw sensory input. The human aesthetic response serves the function of stabilizing the circuits that successfully mediate perception and interpretation, making those faculties more agile, conferring selective advantage. It is triggered by structures in art and nature that provoke the making of sense. Art is deliberate human action aimed at triggering the aesthetic response in others; thus, if successful, it serves the same function of making perception and interpretation more agile. These few principles initiate a cascade of emergent phenomena which account for many observed qualities of aesthetics, including universality and idiosyncrasy of taste, the relevance of artists’ intentions, the virtues of openness and resonance, the dysfunction of formulaic art, and the fact that methods of art correspond to modes of perceptual transformation.

  14. Processes of aesthetic transformation in ordinary landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Jonna Majgaard

    2004-01-01

    it was distributed systematically as an almost industrially produced landscape element. Windbreaks are now regarded as a traditional element in the Danish agricultural landscape. As a landscape element it is an international phenomenon known and used in Germany, France, England etc. Originally local farming...... practices, natural conditions, techniques and national legislation in the respective countries, formed the aesthetic expression. In this respect one could speak of the impact of northern nature on the aesthetic expression of the Danish windbreaks, as well as the impact from national phenomena....... These features determined the specific aesthetic and architectural identity of ordinary Danish, i.e. Nordic, landscapes. Contemporary cultural changes such as the aesthetification of everyday life and of ordinary landscape, i.e. farming landscape, are now manifest in the way the windbreaks are motivated...

  15. "Light and the aesthetics of the perception"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volf, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Light seems to be a very changeable size in our build environment. Being an immaterial building stone, light takes a very liquid shape in our design-vocabulary. It consists of an invisible material – photons – and therefore it takes no specific form in itself but is only articulated...... through the meeting with form. Therefore, since form has been the major theme for the aesthetics up until now, giving form to light is a complex and challenging task and reducing it to Lux and measurable numbers only an escape from facing what is actually percieved. In this way light seems to suffer from...... what can be called the dichotomy between the aesthetics of the objects and the aesthetics of the perception - as stated by Boehme. To improve practice this article conducts a study of our perception, focusing more on the effects of light and less on the physical light (Lux). By doing so the article...

  16. Introduction to the special issue on visual aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual aesthetics encompasses the studies of the relationship between vision and various aesthetic phenomena - from the beauty ratings of simple visual patterns to the appreciation of visual art, from the preference for natural objects and scenes to the preference for products of human creativity, from the aesthetic effects of culture to the aesthetic effects of biology, from the universal aesthetic sensitivity to the individual differences in taste, and so on. In this special issue ten papers reported the most recent studies on very different subjects related to visual aesthetics.

  17. Integrating the philosophy and psychology of aesthetic experience: development of the aesthetic experience scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulou, Despina

    2004-10-01

    This study assessed the dynamic relationship between person and object in aesthetic experience. Patterns of the structure of aesthetic experience were derived from a conceptual model based on philosophical and psychological ideas. These patterns were further informed by interviewing individuals with extensive involvement in aesthetic activities and 25 secondary students. Accordingly, patterns were tested by developing a large pool of items attempting to identify measurable structural components of aesthetic experience. Refined first in a pilot study, the 36-item questionnaire was administered to 652 Greek students, aged from 13 to 15 years. Correlation matrices and exploratory factor analyses on principal components were used to examine internal structural relationships. The obliquely rotated five-factor solution of the refined instrument accounted for the 44.1% of the total variance and was combatible with the conceptual model of aesthetic experience, indicating the plausibility of both. The internal consistency of the items was adequate and external correlational analysis offered preliminary support for subsequent development of a self-report measure that serves to operationalize the major constructs of aesthetic experience in the general adolescent population. The results also raise theoretical issues for those interested in empirical aesthetics, suggesting that in experiential functioning, expressive perception and affect may play a more constructive role in cognitive processes than is generally acknowledged.

  18. A New Kind of Aesthetics —The Mathematical Structure of the Aesthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Kubota

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new approach to the investigation into aesthetics. Specifically, it~argues that it is possible to explain the aesthetic and its underlying dynamic relations with an~axiomatic structure (the octahedral axiom-derived category based on contemporary mathematics (namely category theory, and through this argument suggests the possibility for discussion about the mathematical structure of the aesthetic. If there were a way to describe the structure of the aesthetic with the language of mathematical structures and mathematical axioms---a~language completely devoid of arbitrariness---then we would make possible a universal argument about the essential human activity of ``the aesthetic'', and we would also gain a new method and viewpoint into the philosophy and meaning of the act of creating a work of art and artistic activities. This paper presents one mathematical structure as a foundation in constructing the science of dynamic aesthetics based on axiomatic functionalism, which is in turn based on a new interdisciplinary investigation into the generative structure of the aesthetic.

  19. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically "safe" materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile.

  20. Toward Measuring Network Aesthetics Based on Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengqiang Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this exploratory paper, we discuss quantitative graph-theoretical measures of network aesthetics. Related work in this area has typically focused on geometrical features (e.g., line crossings or edge bendiness of drawings or visual representations of graphs which purportedly affect an observer’s perception. Here we take a very different approach, abandoning reliance on geometrical properties, and apply information-theoretic measures to abstract graphs and networks directly (rather than to their visual representaions as a means of capturing classical appreciation of structural symmetry. Examples are used solely to motivate the approach to measurement, and to elucidate our symmetry-based mathematical theory of network aesthetics.

  1. The Biological Roots of Aesthetics and Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Heinrich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals' choice behavior is driven by motivation that is attributable to both innate urges and from positive and negative reinforcements. Using a comparative approach as well as experimental evidence, I explore how the first involves fitness-enhancing benefits from aesthetics that are derived from ancestral choices via natural selection. Innate urges and aesthetics help guide animals to produce appropriate positive and negative choices that are species-specific. Choices of food, habitat and mates or associates are considered. I propose that art is not a uniquely human product, but a representation or an extension of the maker, as are the ornaments, displays, and songs of a bird.

  2. Aesthetic Learning, Creative Writing and English Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Francis

    2016-01-01

    My article argues that the concept of ‘aesthetic learning’ can be helpful for English teachers on two levels. First, it can be a useful identity for English teachers and students to adopt, based upon my own experiences as a secondary English teacher, creative writer and PhD student. Second, I argue that ‘aesthetic learning’ is an effective and productive way of analysing some of the learning processes that happen in the English teacher’s classroom. In order to arrive at these conclusions, I e...

  3. [A "dialogue" between the aesthetics of nursing and philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hsiu; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2012-02-01

    Nursing aesthetics belong to the broader school of aesthetics, a branch of philosophy, as well as the nursing arts, an element of professional nursing. The philosophy of aesthetics recognizes the connection between an author and appreciators and identifies both substantive and abstract aesthetic experiences in interpersonal communication through the fine arts. Nursing aesthetics values the meaningful moments of patients, is sensitive to the influences of different circumstances and situations, and appreciates the unique qualities of humanness. Nursing aesthetics is emancipatory knowledge and involves empirical, ethical and personal knowing. The article is based on a search of OvidSP and Chinese Electronic Periodical Services (CEPS) database references using key words including aesthetic, aesthetics, art of nursing, or nursing aesthetics as well as a review of books related to aesthetics, knowledge construction, and nursing aesthetics. Authors determined definitions as defined by nursing experts and the applications thereof in clinical practice. This article aimed to illustrate that the ultimate concern of philosophy is "goodness" and that the foundation of caring behaviors is "love". In practice, nursing aesthetics is expressed through empathy, appreciation, inspiration and the therapeutic use of the self. Through aesthetic knowing and enhanced perceptual sensibility and reflection, nurses can transform intuitive knowing into art-acts and ultimately enhance nursing care quality.

  4. Analysis of split tooth as an unstudied reason for tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Osaghae, Ifueko Patience; Azodo, Clement Chinedu

    2014-01-01

    Background Split tooth is an unstudied reason for tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze split tooth as a reason for extraction in a dental clinic in Benin City. Methods The prospective study was carried out on 669 patients having tooth extraction between May, 2005 and December, 2012. Over the period of the study, diagnosis and tooth extraction were done by three dentists of more five years practice experience. The indications for tooth extraction were noted ...

  5. Art's Detour: A Clash of Aesthetic Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Both John Dewey and Martin Heidegger thought that art's audience had to take a detour in order to appreciate or understand a work of art. They wrote about this around the same time (mid-1930s) and independently of one another, so this similar circumstance in the history of aesthetics is unusual since they come from very different philosophical…

  6. Aesthetics in Asian Child Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice S.

    This speech presents observations, made on a trip in June 1976, of the aesthetic environments of children in China, Japan, and Hong Kong. Home, school and day care environments are compared in terms of living and play space, room decor, the presence of art and toys, dramatic play and performance, music, nature and outdoor appreciation, food and…

  7. Original Sin and T. E. Hulme's Aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishler, Thomas C.

    1976-01-01

    T. E. Hulme, a vigorous opponent of romanticism in art, poetry, and philosophy, insisted that the underlying flaw of the romantic view was its rejection of the dogma of Original Sin and the fall of man. His views are explored for the significant bearing they have on the development of aesthetic insight and indirectly on value and outlook.…

  8. Designers as Determinant for Aesthetic Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    The innovation literature states that scientists are core ingredients in creating technological innovations. This paper investigates whether the hiring of a designer generates aesthetic innovations by a firm. Further we investigate what the level of design knowledge of the receiving firm means fo...

  9. Designers as Determinant for Aesthetic Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjællegaard, Cecilie Bryld; Beukel, Karin; Alkærsig, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The innovation literature states that scientists are core ingredients in creating technological innovations. This paper investigates whether the hiring of a designer generates aesthetic innovations by a firm. Further we investigate what the level of design knowledge of the receiving firm means fo...

  10. Titles change the aesthetic appreciations of paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot eGerger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic experiences of artworks are influenced by contextualizing information such as titles. However, how titles contribute to positive aesthetic experiences is still an open issue. Considering that fluency, as well as effortful elaborate processing, potentially influence aesthetic experiences, we tested how three different title types—semantically matching (fluent, semantically non-matching (non-fluent, and an untitled condition (control—affected experiences of abstract, semi-abstract, and representational art. While participants viewed title/artwork combinations we assessed facial electromygraphic (fEMG recordings over M. corrugator supercilii and M. zygomaticus major muscle to capture subtle changes in emotional and cognitive processing, and asked for subjective liking and interest. Matching titles, but also the more effortful untitled condition, produced higher liking compared to non-fluently processed, non-matching titles especially in abstract art. These results were reflected in fEMG with stronger M. corrugator activations in the non-matching condition followed by the untitled condition. This implies high cognitive effort as well as negative emotions. Only in the matching condition, M. zygomaticus was more strongly activated indicating positive emotions due to fluency. Interest, however, was hardly affected. These results show that high levels of dis-fluency and cognitive effort reduce liking. However, fluency as well as moderate levels of effort contribute to more positive aesthetic experiences.

  11. A standardized formula for aesthetic mandibular reconstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ameloblastoma is the most common benign odontogenic tumor of the jaw, and expansional growth of a huge untreated ameloblastoma can result in disturbances in facial aesthetics and function, such as difficulty with mouth opening, swallowing, chewing, breathing, neurologic deficits, and pathologic fractures. Radical wide ...

  12. "ZEAL": An Aesthetic Revolution for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Barbara A.; French, James Joss

    2012-01-01

    Educators are hesitant to venture into the unknown landscape within a child's heart and mind because they have throughout their education experienced the same non-compassionate teachers. This research proposes an awakening, making a wave for a new revolution of compassionate teachers that institutes aesthetic methodology to address relevant…

  13. Nietzsche on Aesthetics, Educators and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    This essay argues that much can be gained from a close examination of Nietzsche's work with respect to education. In order to contextualise my argument, I provide a brief critique of Nietzsche's thinking on aesthetics, educators and education. I then turn my attention to the work of "Thus Spoke Zarathustra", the figures Zarathustra and…

  14. McLuhan: The Aesthete as Historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Attributes McLuhan's theories about media to his interpretation of history as an interpenetrating sequence of three processes: all history originated in oral societies, which were fragmented by literacy, but electronic media are returning society to that original state through implosion. Reviews the historical, literary, and aesthetic sources for…

  15. The Listening Train: A Collaborative, Connective Aesthetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This reflexive narrative explores the development of a 'Climate Train', a mobile social-learning platform, that was conceived and created through a ... Key findings include the vital role of connective aesthetics in establishing imaginal thinking, moral intuition, empathy, participative parity, and emergence, and how these are ...

  16. From the Editor: Aesthetics as First Philosophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gerwen, R.C.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Not metaphysics but aesthetics should be viewed as first philosophy, because it, and its subject matter, art, are concerned with the way representations work. All other disciplines, whether in philosophy or in the sciences base their insights in representations, assuming that these work as intended.

  17. Therapy and the Aesthetics of the Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Post-structuralists argue that personal identity is a function of societal power dynamics. This becomes especially problematic for persons recruited into problem-saturated identities. In this paper, inspired by Foucault's call for us to "create ourselves as a work of art" (p. 262), I explore the therapeutic value of an aesthetic approach…

  18. Further studies in aesthetic field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraskin, M.

    1984-01-01

    We study different facets of Aesthetic Field Theory. First, we have found within the complex version of the theory a bounded particle system which has more structure than what we have previously observed. The particle is built from planar 3 maxima--minima confluence regions. The confluence region closes in 3 spatial dimensions, so once again we have a ''topological'' particle. If we characterize bound stats by the number of large magnitude regions in close proximity, then the simplest interpretation of what we are seeing is that of a 3 particle bound system. Secondly, again within the framework of complex Aesthetic Field Theory, but using a more symmetric system of equations, we observe a confluence type topological particle spontaneously arising out of the vacuum (creation effect). The particle again has a loop shape. The extended particles thus far found in 4 dimensional Aesthetic Field Theory have always had problems with the spreading of the particle system as time went on. Thirdly, we found a bounded confluence particle system, which in addition to confinement and non attenuation shows the desirable property of not spreading in time. In this case, we work exclusively with real fields. The particle system has a dipole looking shape. We also studied complex null Aesthetic Field Theory in 8 dimensions having a 4 direct-sum 4 structure. We were not able to find a bound to our particle system here

  19. Performing Perception - Staging Aesthetics of Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2008-01-01

    In interaction design for experience-oriented uses of technology, a central facet of aesthetics of interaction is rooted in the user's experience of herself “performing her perception.” By drawing on performance (theater) theory, phenomenology and sociology and with references to recent HCI-work...

  20. Aesthetic experiences of designed organizational space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marrewijk, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    The paper explores employees' aesthetic experiences of designed organisational space. These experiences are important because designs are incomplete until they are realised in action. However, one of the main issues in this is the difficulty to grasp employees' perceptions and judgements of spatial

  1. Deconstruction in Performance for Audience Aesthetic Preference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The investigation combines the quantitative and qualitative methods for data capture and analysis, and thus deduced that the audience aesthetic preference was in favour of the day two performance. Hinging on the theory of deconstruction, the paper recommends that all such African plays bestowed with the shortcomings ...

  2. Aesthetics and Political Culture in Modern Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Kaare

    Do aesthetic appeals to senses and emotions in political debate necessarily marginalise political reason and reduce citizens to consumers – thus dangerously undermining democracy? Or is sensuous-emotional engagement, on the contrary, a basic fact of the political process and a crucial preconditio...

  3. Perception of Aesthetics in Consumer Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez Mata, Marta; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema; Yanagisawa, Hideyoshi

    2013-01-01

    In today´s highly saturated consumer markets, competition among products is high. Emotional design, kansei engineering and aesthetics are tools increasingly used to make products stand out from their competitors. This study investigates how the desire to own a product is related to the perceptions...

  4. Aesthetic Education for Morality: Schiller and Kant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    Kant's "Critique of Judgment," which was published in 1790, referred in detail to the affinity between beauty and morality. Schiller's writings from the 1790s dealing with aesthetics and ethics are intertwined, simultaneously, both with an affirmative reception of Kant's ideas and with critical attitudes against them. This applies to essays such…

  5. Aesthetic Solidarity "after" Kant and Lyotard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2008-01-01

    One of the most complex issues in Kant's "Critique of Judgment" is the aesthetic judgment's claim to universal validity and shareability. Kant is not very clear about the exact status of this claim. Kant's distinction between the beautiful and the sublime only complicates the matter, since the universal shareability of the judgment of the sublime…

  6. Architecture and aesthetics of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreu, P.

    1977-01-01

    Having first analysed the main aesthetical and architectural problems related to the establishment of nuclear sites, the first results of the description is given of studies undertaken by a group of architects asked by E.D.F. to conceive the main buildings of a nuclear power plant and to imagine their insert in the site [fr

  7. Industrial Design: Aesthetical Dynamics and Visual Alphabetization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emergence of industrial Design and Designers in postmodern Europe obviously changed the Aesthetical Dynamics and visual redefinition, reordering or the visual alphabetization of the man-made environment and material culture forever. Hence the need and trust for this paper. The focus of the paper is an attempt at ...

  8. Combining rhinoplasty with septal perforation repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T; Magdy, Emad A

    2006-11-01

    A combined septal perforation repair and rhinoplasty was performed in 80 patients presenting with septal perforations (size 1 to 5 cm) and external nasal deformities. The external rhinoplasty approach was used for all cases and the perforation was repaired using bilateral intranasal mucosal advancement flaps with a connective tissue interposition graft in between. Complete closure of the perforation was achieved in 90% of perforations of size up to 3.5 cm and in only 70% of perforations that were larger than 3.5 cm. Cosmetically, 95% were very satisfied with their aesthetic result. The external rhinoplasty approach proved to be very helpful in the process of septal perforation repair especially in large and posteriorly located perforations and in cases where the caudal septal cartilage was previously resected. Our results show that septal perforation repair can be safely combined with rhinoplasty and that some of the routine rhinoplasty maneuvers, such as medial osteotomies and dorsal lowering, could even facilitate the process of septal perforation repair.

  9. The Cosmological Potential of Byzantine Ascetic Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аndrey Tsarenok

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study explores the peculiarities of the cosmological senses, which exist in Byzantine ascetic aesthetical doctrine. Underlining the obvious strong connection between theological aesthetics, ontology and cosmology, the author of the article points out the interpretation of world’s beauty, order and harmony by representatives of ascetic culture of Byzantium (sts. Grigoriy the Theologian, Grigoriy, bishop of Niss, Ioann Chrysostom, Ioann Damaskin, Simeon the New Theologian and others. The aesthetics of the asceticism is characterized as theocentrical ontology of beauty. Its development has been influenced by theism, trinitary monotheism and theocentrism of Christian world-view tradition. The theologians speak about the existence of the Highest Absolute Beauty, Who is the cause of the beautiful things in created reality. The impressive qualities of cosmos are considered as evidence of being of their Almighty Creator. Therefore, the sensual cognition can help believer in his or her search of God. At the same time, ascetic aesthetics prevents from unreasonable enjoying of the sensual (material, somatic beauty for such enjoying is able to make the true person’s spiritual perfection impossible. Moreover, according to Christian theology, absolutization of the cosmical beauty regularly distorts the person’s belief: Byzantine ascetics point out the “aesthetical” cause of paganism appearance. Appealing to Bible, theologians differentiate two periods in history of cosmos, which can be interpreted as the pre-sin and the post-sin ones. The beginning of visible world existence was marked with being of original beauty, order and harmony, but the transgression, committed by the first people, distorted the cosmos to a great degree. Acknowledging of this sorrowful fact does not ruin quite an optimistic character of ascetic aesthetical, ontological and cosmological conceptions of Byzantium. According to them, the beauty of Universe will be completely

  10. Aesthetic/Cosmetic surgery and ethical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Rubeiz, Michel T; Hayek, Shady N

    2008-11-01

    Is aesthetic surgery a business guided by market structures aimed primarily at material gain and profit or a surgical intervention intended to benefit patients and an integral part of the health-care system? Is it a frivolous subspecialty or does it provide a real and much needed service to a wide range of patients? At present, cosmetic surgery is passing through an identity crisis as well as an acute ethical dilemma. A closer look from an ethical viewpoint makes clear that the doctor who offers aesthetic interventions faces many serious ethical problems which have to do with the identity of the surgeon as a healer. Aesthetic surgery that works only according to market categories runs the risk of losing the view for the real need of patients and will be nothing else than a part of a beauty industry which has the only aim to sell something, not to help people. Such an aesthetic surgery is losing sight of real values and makes profit from the ideology of a society that serves only vanity, youthfulness, and personal success. Unfortunately, some colleagues brag that they chose the plastic surgery specialty just to become rich aesthetic surgeons, using marketing tactics to promote their practice. This is, at present, the image we project. As rightly proposed, going back a little to Hippocrates, to the basics of being a physician, is urgently warranted! Being a physician is all that a "cosmetic" surgeon should be. In the long run, how one skillfully and ethically practices the art of plastic surgery will always speak louder than any words.

  11. Aesthetic Appreciation, Ethics, and 9/11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Aretoulakis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous critical articles on what really happened on the otherwise beautiful morning of 11 September 2001. Beyond doubt, the bulk of the critical responses to the terrorist attacks focused on the ethical and humanitarian, or rather the unethical and inhumane implications of the atrocious act, leaving no room for any philosophical reflection on the potential assessment or reception of the event from the perspective of art and aesthetics. The few years that have gone by since 2001 have provided us with some a sense of emotional detachment from the horror of that day, a detachment that may have awakened our aesthetic and artistic instincts with regard to the attacks themselves as well as their visual representation. Chronological distance renders an unprejudiced and independent stance more possible now than ever. It also allows us to reconsider our initial politically correct and ethically justified repulsion of the efforts made by a few artists to aestheticize 9/11. Such repulsion, however, was associated with the delusion that by denouncing aesthetics we were really securing the prevalence of politics, morality and ethical responsibility in a terror-afflicted society. My point in this paper is that there is a need for aesthetic appreciation when contemplating a violent event such as the 9/11 terrorist attacks. What is more, appreciation of the beautiful, even in case of a 9/11, seems necessary because it is a key to establishing an ethical stance towards terror, life, and art. It should be stressed that independent aesthetic experience is not important in itself but is a means of cultivating an authentic moral and ethical judgment.

  12. Viewpoint A Viewpoint of Personal Aesthetic Preferences and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Viewpoint A Viewpoint of Personal Aesthetic Preferences and Aesthetic Education, Landscape Theory and Survival in the Kalahari Region of South Africa: Implications ... of what aesthetic education might have required from their ancestors in prehistoric times and what this might imply for educationalists in the 21st Century.

  13. 281 Igbo Symbols: Developing Aesthetic Values on the Igbo Child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Ndi Igbo are known by their symbols. Aesthetic relates to the principles of beauty and taste of an art. Aesthetics and Ethics often overlap to the degree that this impression is embodied in a moral ethical code. The symbols in Igbo land are of the ethical codes of the society that project its aesthetic values as such they ...

  14. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... an external prosthesis adhesive to fasten it to the body, the device is exempt from the current good... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration prosthesis...

  15. Aesthetic Discourses in Early Childhood Settings: Dewey, Steiner, and Vygotsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Booyeun

    2004-01-01

    Early childhood, when young children are already capable of undergoing aesthetic experience, must be the starting point for aesthetic education. Despite increasing attention to the significant values of the arts in early childhood classrooms, no theoretical framework to support aesthetic education has been established. This article introduces the…

  16. A Scandinavian View on the Aesthetics as a Learning Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennyé D.; Sørensen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    As the aesthetic learning process is always relational and developed in interaction with the surrounding culture, the participants in the aesthetic activities can develop cultural identity and social skills. Add to this that the individual can share its inner world with others through aesthetic...

  17. Tooth polishing: The current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Alankar Sawai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients′ need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same.

  18. Coping with cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benenati, F W

    1996-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome typically poses a diagnostic challenge for the dentist. Symptoms include tenderness to biting on certain foods, often poorly localized, and occasional thermal sensitivity. Knowing where to look for this entity, especially in the mandibular molar region, can be especially helpful. Treatment of the tooth depends on the degree of pulpal involvement and the extent of the crack. Cuspal coverage is required of all cracked posterior teeth that are retainable. Root canal therapy is included if symptoms persist or if pulpal pathosis exists at the outset. Cracks extending beyond the osseous crest indicate a poor prognosis. Armed with this knowledge, the dentist can overcome many cracked tooth dilemmas, resulting in satisfaction for both patient and practitioner alike.

  19. [Aesthetic criteria in surgical treatment of hypospadias in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, G V; Protasov, A A; Nikolaev, V V; Abdullaev, F K; Abdulkarimov, G A; Karmanov, M E

    2017-10-01

    Aesthetically acceptable cosmetic results of surgical correction of external genital organ defects are important for treatment evaluation along with well-known criteria of good functional outcomes.The purpose of this study was to improve the results of treating children with hypospadias by improving the assessment of results and introducing multi-step correction modalities. From 2013 to 2015, 476 patients with various forms of hypospadias were treated at the Department of Uroandrology of RCCH. The patients age ranged from 1 year to 17 years (mean age 3 years). All patients were divided into 3 groups depending on the form of hypospadias and type of treatment. They included patients with distal forms of hypospadias (group1, n=270), proximal forms (group 2, n=112) and patients with stem and penoscrotal hypospadias who underwent 3-6 operations before admission (group 3, n=94). The study evaluated both functional and cosmetic results. Cosmetic appearance was assessed using the HOPE scoring system [2]. Despite the difference in surgical methods used for all types of hypospadias, good cosmetic results have been achieved in the majority of patients (65%). Functional outcomes differed depending on the form of hypospadias. In primary patients with distal and proximal forms of hypospadias, good results were achieved in 96% and 77% of patients, respectively. At the same time, 72% of patients who underwent repeat interventions had good results, which is comparable to the group of primary patients with proximal forms. The results of treating patients after repeat/failed surgery confirm the high effectiveness of our surgical methods (the Bracka two-stage graft repair, buccal mucosa hypospadias repair, reconstruction with scrotal skin flaps, correction of scrotal transposition). Using the HOPE scoring system to assess cosmetic results helps motivate surgeons to achieve the best treatment results.

  20. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  1. Primary culprit for tooth loss!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvvula, Sailavanya; Chava, Vijay Kumar; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    In order to facilitate planning for dental health services and to progress strategies to continue the reduction in tooth loss, it is important to identify the factors that result in such loss. therefore the aim of the study is to investigate the major cause for tooth extraction. to examine whether the major reason for tooth extraction is dental caries or periodontal disease. The study is carried out among the dental practitioners in our district. A questionnaire containing 10 items was distributed to the dental practitioners, which included age, gender, no of teeth indicated for extraction, the reason for extraction, and the periodontal parameters that are involved with the extracted tooth and were requested to complete the form on every extraction they were to undertake. the study form was collected at the end of the study period and data was subjected to statistical analysis. A total of 502 patients were enrolled during the study period, and a total of 1055 teeth were extracted for several reasons. we found that 51.14%extractions are due to dental caries in case of 20-30years age groups, which is more when compared to tooth loss due to periodontal diseases in this age group. whereas in case of >40years of age group periodontal diseases account for 54.11%, and dental caries accounts for only 29.11%. Showing more teeth were lost due to periodontal disease. therefore we concluded that, caries is the dominant reason for extraction in patients with 20-30 years of age while periodontal disease accounts for the majority of tooth extraction in patients older than 40 years.

  2. External resorption presenting as an intracoronal radiolucent lesion in a pre-eruptive tooth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    1997-09-01

    A large intracoronal radiolucent lesion in an unerupted permanent molar was found during the routine assessment of a young male Caucasian prior to orthodontic treatment. The tooth was extracted. Histological examination indicated the lesion was caused by external resorption. The defect extended widely into the enamel and dentine, and was repaired in part by bone. The pulp chamber was not involved. The aetiology of these lesions is often obscure but in this case it appeared to have originated in the floor of two developmental pits on the occlusal surface of the tooth.

  3. Laboratory assessment of tooth whitening by sodium bicarbonate dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleber, C J; Moore, M H; Nelson, B J

    1998-01-01

    The increasing emphasis on dental aesthetics has made tooth whitening an important function of a dentifrice. This laboratory study investigated the whitening effect of toothbrushing with sodium bicarbonate-based dentifrices compared with standard dentifrices that do not contain sodium bicarbonate. Six dentifrices and a distilled water control were tested for their ability to whiten teeth with intrinsic stain. The dentifrices contained different abrasive systems: (1) 45% NaHCO3; (2) 65% NaHCO3 (Arm and Hammer Dental Care); (3) 94% NaHCO3; (4) 94% NaHCO3 + 1.5% H2O2; (5) silica (Crest Regular Toothpaste); and (6) dicalcium phosphate (Colgate Regular Toothpaste). After a thorough rubber cup cleaning with a pumice slurry, the intrinsic color of the test teeth with a Vita shade of A3 or darker was measured with a spectrophotometer using the standard L*a*b* color scale. Measurements were taken on a total of 12 teeth per test dentifrice before treatment, and after 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes of mechanical toothbrushing. No changes in L* (lightness/brightness) or a* (red-green hue) occurred, but significant differences in b* (yellow-blue hue) were observed over time. Compared to baseline tooth color, all four sodium bicarbonate-based dentifrices were significantly effective in removing the yellow intrinsic tooth stain, while the water control, silica dentifrice, and dicalcium phosphate dentifrice demonstrated no significant change. Between-group comparisons showed that the four dentifrices containing sodium bicarbonate were significantly more effective than the water and dicalcium phosphate dentifrice groups. The commercial dentifrice containing 65% sodium bicarbonate was also more effective than the commercial silica dentifrice. Although continued toothbrushing from 30 to 120 minutes resulted in additional stain removal, most of the tooth whitening by the sodium bicarbonate-based dentifrices occurred in the first 30 minutes of brushing. In the studies conducted

  4. On gear tooth stiffness evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Jørgensen, Martin Felix

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation...... and secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffnesses of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of an individual tooth can be expressed in a linear form assuming that the contact width is constant. © 2014...... Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Aesthetic Closure of Maxillary and Mandibular Anterior Spaces Using Direct Composite Resin Build-Ups: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schick Simona-Georgiana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of multiple spaces in the anterior aesthetic zone can produce discomfort for patients and its treatment can be difficult for dental professionals. A variety of treatment options are available and these include orthodontic movement, prosthetic indirect restorations or direct composite resin build-ups. Among these, the closure of interdental spaces using composite build-ups combined with orthodontic treatment is considered to be most conservative. This type of treatment has several advantages like the maximum preservation of tooth substance (no tooth preparation, no need for anesthesia, no multiple time-consuming visits, no provisional restorations and also comparably low costs. Clinical Consideration: This case report describes the clinical restorative procedure of direct composite resin build-ups for the closure of multiple anterior spaces.

  6. Proteomic analysis of human tooth pulp: proteomics of human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    The unique pulp-dentin complex demonstrates strong regenerative potential, which enables it to respond to disease and traumatic injury. Identifying the proteins of the pulp-dentin complex is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of regeneration, tissue calcification, defense processes, and the reparation of dentin by dental pulp. The lack of knowledge of these proteins limits the development of more efficient therapies. The proteomic profile of human tooth pulp was investigated and compared with the proteome of human dentin and blood. The samples of tooth pulp were obtained from 5 sound permanent human third molars of 5 adults (n = 5). The extracted proteins were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and identified by correlating mass spectra to the proteomic databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 2 proteins were detected for the first time in an actual human sample. The identified tooth pulp proteins have a variety of functions: structural, catalytic, transporter, protease activity, immune response, and many others. In a comparison with dentin and blood plasma, 140 (pulp/dentin) shared proteins were identified, 37 of which were not observed in plasma. It can be suggested that they might participate in the unique pulp-dentin complex. This proteomic investigation of human tooth pulp, together with the previously published study of human dentin, is one of the most comprehensive proteome lists of human teeth to date. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mismatch Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism. PMID:26354434

  8. DNA repair , cell repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained in laboratory of radiation cytology and literature data testifying to a considerable role of DNA repair in cell sensitivity to radiation and chemical DNA-tropic agents have been considered. Data pointing to the probability of contribution of inducible repair of DNA into plant cells sensitivity to X-rays are obtained. Certain violations of DNA repair do not result in the increase of radiosensitivity. It is assumed that in the cases unknown mechanisms of DNA repair operate

  9. Factors influencing patient satisfaction with dental appearance and treatments they desire to improve aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Nurhidayati

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We assessed factors influencing patients' satisfaction with their dental appearance and the treatments they desired to improve dental aesthetics. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed out among 235 adult patients who visited the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia dental clinic. A structured, interviewer-guided questionnaire was used to identify patient satisfaction with their general dental appearance, cosmetic elements and desired treatments. Results The 235 patients consisted of 70 males (29.8% and 165 females (70.2%, of mean age 31.5 years (SD 13.0. Of these patients, 124 (52.8% were not satisfied with their general dental appearance. In addition, 132 patients (56.2% were not happy with the color of their teeth, 76 (32.3%, regarded their teeth were poorly aligned, 62 (26.4%, as crowded and 56 (23.4% protruded. Dissatisfaction with tooth color was significantly higher in female than in male patients (odds ratio [OR] of 1.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-3.50. Tooth whitening was the treatment most desired by patients (48.1%. Results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that patient dissatisfaction with general dental appearance was significantly associated with female gender (OR = 2.18; 95% CI: 1.18-4.03, unhappiness with tooth color (OR = 3.05; 95% CI: 1.74-5.34 and the opinion that their teeth protruded (OR = 2.91, 95% CI: 1.44-5.91. Conclusions Most patients in this study were not satisfied with their dental appearance with a greater percentage of females expressing dissatisfaction than males. An age was not associated with satisfaction. Unhappiness with tooth color and feelings of having protruding teeth also had a significant negative influence on patient satisfaction with general dental appearance.

  10. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? What is Orofacial Pain? How Do I Care ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  11. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? What is Orofacial Pain? How Do I Care ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  12. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Child First See a Dentist? The History of Dental Advances Why is Oral Health Important for Men? What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | ...

  13. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Why is Oral ... Tooth Decay? The History of Dental Advances Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a ...

  14. The cracked tooth syndrome: an elusive diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türp, J C; Gobetti, J P

    1996-10-01

    The authors review the literature and present a case of cracked tooth syndrome. Special emphasis is placed on diagnostic problems associated with this syndrome. The case report demonstrates classic and atypical features of cracked tooth syndrome.

  15. Information Technology and Aesthetics: Passive and Active Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Haynes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with examining and recognizing aesthetics in an Information System (an organization incorporating both humans and information technology. Aesthetics emerge from the wholeness of things, not from specific parts or components. As such, aesthetics may naturally be considered in “systems”, and we propose that an effective manner of thinking of aesthetics is to think in terms of “themes”. Humans have an extraordinary capacity to capture events thematically. In other words, human beings have a natural sense of aesthetics. To examine aesthetics in an information systems context, we argue that one must consider not only aesthetics that may be perceived by the senses (a passive dimension, but also aesthetics that may be conceived in the mind (an active dimension. This paper draws the conclusion that the benefits of aesthetics in relation to the study of Information Systems, has characteristics similar to the nature and importance of ethics in IS. Also, the study of aesthetics in IS has greater implications than simply recognizing and appreciating beauty and art. The very human capacity for recognizing and appreciating beauty and art is also the same capacity for effective creativity and happiness: the active aesthetic dimension. It follows that if an information system encouraged and provided the enabling circumstances for the human capacity of thematic recognition (as found in the human appreciation of art and beauty it thereby also provides the ground and the necessary thematically recognizable stimulus for effective creative and visionary organizational management.

  16. A 5-year prospective study of single-tooth replacements supported by the Astra Tech implant: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant-supported single-tooth replacements are an increasingly used method to replace teeth, especially in young patients. Therefore, long-term validation of different treatment modalities with different implant systems is of great importance. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study...... was to make a biologic, technical, and aesthetic evaluation of single-tooth replacement supported by the Astra Tech implant (Astra Tech AB, Mölndal, Sweden) during a 5-year period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients were divided into two consecutively treated groups. In group A the implants were placed...... "early" in the extraction sockets, and standard single-tooth abutments were used. In group B the implants were placed "delayed," and preparable abutments were used. Clinical examinations including registration of plaque, bleeding, crown lengths, soft tissue marginal level, papilla height, complications...

  17. Mastering aesthetics in post-extraction sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goené, R.J.; van Daelen, A.C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients increasingly seek implant-supported restorations that can be delivered as quickly and non-invasively as possible. Many also prefer to avoid wearing a removable prothesis after tooth extraction. Implants that are placed immediately in fresh extraction sockets and provisionalized immediately

  18. Aesthetics in the age of digital humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossi Naukkarinen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most difficult but yet unavoidable tasks for every academic field is to define its own nature and demarcate its area. This article addresses the question of how current computational text-mining approaches can be used as tools for clarifying what aesthetics is when such approaches are combined with philosophical analyses of the field. We suggest that conjoining the two points of view leads to a fuller picture than excluding one or the other, and that such a picture is useful for the self-understanding of the discipline. Our analysis suggests that text-mining tools can find sources, relations, and trends in a new way, but it also reveals that the databases that such tools use are presently seriously limited. However, computational approaches that are still in their infancy in aesthetics will most likely gradually affect our understanding about the ontological status of the discipline and its instantiations.

  19. Kin-aesthetic Space-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Body Space Object Symposium 26.02.2016 Strand: The (Moving) Body as Archive Title: Kin-aesthetic Space-making The paper presents a cross-medial practice exchanging body movement and tectonic space. Working with a performative model of gesture, the practice takes up a dialogue with Jean......’s How the Body Shapes the Mind forms part of the theoretical approach to motile kin-aesthetical forces of art-making, underlying this paper. In my practice I work with body- and space gestures, interchanging through a ‘third’ material, featured on screens. The hybrid production includes animated 2 and 3......D drawings, video sequences, and technological treatment constituted by movement of camera, light and diverse editing. Creating a mutable changing sensory surface, the modelling gestures draw attention to their actual occurring in space-time, articulating and transforming space-time configurations...

  20. Aesthetics, mysticism and the art of living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter G.R. de Villiers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses aesthetics and mysticism in the writings of Albert Geyser, the prominent South African theologian who is mostly known for his brave, uncompromising struggle against the apartheid system. In the first part of the article, brief introductory comments are made about Geyser’s theological and political role in South Africa in the light of his Protestan tcontext and his opposition to apartheid. It is then investigated how his reputation as a Biblical scholar and his protracted, much publicised stance against apartheid obfuscate his remarkable interest in aesthetics and mysticism and explains why his other theological interests and especially his interest in mysticism have not yet been researched. In the second part of the paper Geyser’s mystical interests are investigated by analysing his comments on church architecture, worship, music, liturgy and his pioneering translation of Thomas á Kempis’ Imitatio Christi.

  1. The aesthetics of the city–image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria POPCZYK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I will examine the aesthetic implications of the theories which regard the city as an image. Essentially, I will focus on the positions of the two practitioners, Kevin Lynch and Juhani Pallasmaa, who are an urban planner and an architect respectively, in order to confront two very different approaches to the ‘image’; namely, an empirical approach and a phenom‑ enological one. I am interested in what the city becomes when it is looked upon as an image and I will reflect on the experiences of the city‑image in its various aspects. The aim of this discussion is an attempt to outline certain research areas for exploring the aesthetics of the city centred on the image, with the practitioners’ theories enabling us to widen the scope of this exploration.

  2. Kin-aesthetic Space-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Body Space Object Symposium 26.02.2016 Strand: The (Moving) Body as Archive Title: Kin-aesthetic Space-making The paper presents a cross-medial practice exchanging body movement and tectonic space. Working with a performative model of gesture, the practice takes up a dialogue with Jean......’s How the Body Shapes the Mind forms part of the theoretical approach to motile kin-aesthetical forces of art-making, underlying this paper. In my practice I work with body- and space gestures, interchanging through a ‘third’ material, featured on screens. The hybrid production includes animated 2 and 3......-Francois Lyotard’s Gestus , discussing the work-of-art as a sensuously expressed ‘torsion’ of space/ time/ matter, producing its own space/ time/ matter. Erin Brannigan in Dancefilm uses the gesture-model as well, and points to a hybrid practice where dance and film work on each other. Likewise Shaun Gallagher...

  3. PERCEPTION, AESTHETICS AND USE OF URBAN FURNITURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiana Maura John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Proposal: This paper discusses the importance of environmental perception approach to a more qualified design and location of urban furniture. Considering that the quality of the design and the performance of public spaces are related to the fulfillment of users’ needs, it’s important to study how users perceive the urban furniture. Methods: The discussion deals with issues related to aesthetic and functional needs of users of urban spaces. Regarding aesthetics, aspects such as order and complexity are discussed. Moreover, issues related to functionality of urban furniture and their impact on the use of public spaces are considered. Findings: it is expected to contribute to the discussion about the importance of urban furniture design and location to satisfy users’ needs. Originality/value: Contribution to research on quality of urban furniture and space.

  4. Multiphoton microscopy imaging of developing tooth germs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yu Pan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, a novel multiphoton microscopy database of images from developing tooth germs in mice was set up. We confirmed that multiphoton laser microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the development of tooth germ and is worthy for further application in the study of tooth regeneration.

  5. AUTOGENOUS TOOTH TRANSPLANTATION IN ADULT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    ABSTRACT. A case of autotransplantation of a tooth in a 26 year old female African cleft palate patient is reported. This case report emphasizes the possibility and success of autotransplantation in our centre, it also emphasizes that transplantation is only technique sensitive but less equipment sensitive. It further stresses.

  6. Stem cells for tooth engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bluteau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come.

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. ... a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize ...

  8. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebeena Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  9. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, Sivakumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-08-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  10. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, SivaKumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-01-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  11. Aesthetics and Composition in Deep Sky Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendler, Robert

    It's safe to say that many of us began astrophotography feeling overwhelmed by the unnerving task of creating even the simplest astro image. Typically those first successful images were met with a healthy dose of humility as we began to understand the reality of assembling an aesthetically pleasing astronomical image. As we acquired more experience and gradually mastered the fundamentals of image processing our goals and objectives likely evolved and matured.

  12. The Aesthetics of Social Movements in Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Jacques Rancière, the chapter explores how consensus on the surface is questioned through the introduction of conflict by a community (politics), who challenges the ways of doing, acting, saying, and feeling (aesthetics). Social movements in Spain, after the economic crisis...... of interrupting the dominant order in specific settings (i.e., the streets as public spaces): the part which has no justice, the part which has no visibility, and the part which has no voice....

  13. Fitness for Function and Dance Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Eric C. Mullis

    2014-01-01

    This essay discusses the manner in which the appreciation of fitness for function can be applied to dance aesthetics. Drawing on Allen Carlson and Glenn Parsons’ work, the essay considers the problems of indeterminacy, translation, and dysfunction as they pertain to the appreciation of dance movement. It then argues that fitness for function can be used to critically assess post-modern task dances and contemporary dance works that do not rely on the execution of codified dance technique.

  14. Pater as Psychagogue: Psychology, Aesthetics, Rhetoric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Beaumont

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores Pater’s use of the term ‘psychology’ in order to explore the relationship in his work between psychology and aesthetics, proposing that his allusion in Plato and Platonism to ‘psychagogia’, an ancient rhetorical practice, can productively be used to rethink this relationship, especially in relation to 'Studies in the History of the Renaissance'.

  15. [Aesthetic surgery, medical discourse and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Francisco Romão

    2011-05-01

    The increase in plastic surgery interventions in Brazil and the growth of the beauty industry, as well as care of the body and corporal enhancement, are part of a broader process of medical and aesthetic preoccupation with health. According to the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association there has been a substantial increase in the number of plastic surgery procedures in Brazil. Every year, approximately 350,000 aesthetic surgical interventions are performed in the country. Our work investigated the construction of meaning and value, the use of aesthetic parameters in this construction and how those meanings are appropriated and treated by those representatives of the medical profession who work in the body transformation process, namely plastic surgeons. In this respect, an analysis of the pronouncements and discourse posted on the Brazilian Plastic Surgery Association website was conducted, as it is the regulatory body of the field and is responsible for training professionals and supervising the sector. Analysis of the official content of the website page posted on September 26, 2005 was the basis for this research.

  16. Applications of virtual reality in aesthetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darren M; Aston, Sherrell J; Cutting, Court B; Oliker, Aaron

    2005-09-01

    Virtual reality has a long history in plastic and reconstructive surgery, with uses ranging from anatomical demonstration to craniofacial surgical planning. The purpose of this article is to add to the literature a computer graphics-based resource for aesthetic surgery. Deformation tools, virtual cameras, and other components of Alias's Maya 4.0 were used to perform virtual surgical procedures on a detailed model of superficial facial anatomy. This three-dimensional model of superficial facial anatomy, derived from the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project, was also "aged" in Maya at key depths of anatomical dissection. Adobe's After Effects 5.5 was used for animation postproduction work for all animations. Three-dimensional computer animations were developed to illustrate techniques in aesthetic surgery. Another animation was created that simulates facial aging at various levels of anatomical dissection. Computer modeling and animation have the potential to play an important role in education, surgical planning, development, and other aspects of aesthetic surgery.

  17. AESTHETIC EDUCATION OF ELDERLY BY DIGITAL INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Barreto Cesarino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research project has as delimiting central theme and also central question whether digital inclusion of elderly enable increasing their aesthetic education. Being its specific goals study what is aesthetic education, using the theoretical framework the German philosopher Friedrich Schiller, conceptualize what is senior and define digital inclusion. Its relevance is the increment that Beauty favors the increased awareness of self, others and their environment. The population and sample will be among the students of the University of maturity (UMA, extension course of Pedagogy of the University of Tocantins in Palmas / TO campus and as a sample of eighteen individuals without mental abnormalities or loss, of both sexes, above sixty years. A qualitative study will be used as a qualitative methodological strategy the Focus Group. The data will be analyzed in order to assess the perception of the respondents in relation to specific goals. Case study. The project will be submitted to the Ethics Committee on Human Research of the Federal University of Tocantins as required by Resolution 196/96 of the National Health Council under No. 179/2012 and shall be applied only after approval. Have hypothesized that through digital inclusion the elderly will have more access to different forms of arts and therefore broaden the chances of their meeting with the aesthetic education.

  18. Unbinding critics: psychoanalysis and aesthetic thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Dionisio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to discuss the relationship between psychoanalysis and aesthetic thinking under the prism of the “unbinding” theory – earlier conceived by the psychoanalyst Andre Green –, linking it to some theories proposed by Hal Foster, art historian and art critic, where we can find the lacanian “real” as the linking concept. One could say, in this linkage made here, that both authors are dealing, in a very particular way, with a question that refers to the theory of the real (as it was conceived by Jacques Lacan, even in the case of Green it is not referred directly; Green’s theory, however, seems to discuss some kind of a regredience that could be linked to the death drive. Accessing the psychoanalytical dispositive, and using it as it is appropriated to the (art object to be interpreted, Foster, for example, advances in both the field of aesthetic reflection and in the more specific field of psychoanalysis. It should be noted that Foster’s reflection refers strictly to the post-pop images, observed mainly in the 1990’s photography. Thus, I think that this intersection between aesthetics and psychoanalysis might allow us to shed some light on a new art reading possibility towards a “non-applied” psychoanalytical paradigm, which, in my opinion, seems to be an appropriate way to understand some of the contemporary art production.

  19. The application of methacrylate resin and the derivation as restorative material of damaged tooth tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adioro Soetojo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of methacrylate resin and the derivation (composite resin and dentin bonding in clinical conservative dentistry has been widely developed. This material could be used to restore class I-V cavity with good aesthetic due to the compatible color with tooth. Composite resin adhesion hydrophobically in enamel that is due to mechanic retention in the form of resin tags which penetrates into enamel porosity. Meanwhile hydrophilic dentin bonding adhesion due to the chemical reaction between functional groups of amino collagen with carbonyl in dentin bonding forming amide binding. In addition mechanical retention in which dentin bonding penetrating into nano inter fibrilar cavity then polymerized. The success of methacrylate resin adhesion restoration is decided by enamel porosity, wetting character of resin, wetting contact angle, good etching acid, optimal humidity of tooth surface, the accuracy of dentist during filling is done etc.

  20. Leukotrienes in orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, A H; Tatakis, D N; Dziak, R

    1989-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) are products of arachidonic acid conversion. PGs have an established role in mediating orthodontic tooth movement. The role of LTs in modulating or mediating orthodontic tooth movement was investigated in this study. One hundred thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were used; the animals weighed 300 to 400 gm with equal numbers of male and female rats. They were divided into five main groups of 24 animals each and a sham group of 12 animals. An orthodontic appliance was placed and activated on all the animals except the sham group; in this group the appliances were not active. Each main group was given one of the following treatments daily: distilled water, 5% gum arabic solution, PG synthesis inhibitor indomethacin, LT synthesis inhibitor AA861, and a combination of both drugs. Each group was divided into six subgroups of four animals; the animals were killed at either 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 14 days, and tooth movement measured. The three sham subgroups received distilled water and were killed at 1, 7, or 10 days. The first maxillary molar (the moved tooth) and surrounding tissues were removed from all animals in the sham group and the subgroups killed at 1, 7, and 10 days in the gum arabic solution group and the LT synthesis inhibitor group. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were extracted, measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA), and standardized per milligram of protein in the sample. A significant inhibition of tooth movement occurred beginning on day 7 in the indomethacin, AA861, and combination groups; there was no significant difference among these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation of crowns, cement excess and technical complications. The aesthetic outcome was assessed by using the Copenhagen Index Score, and the patient-reported outcomes were recorded using the OHIP-49 questionnaire. The statistical analyses were mainly performed by using mixed model of ANOVA for quantitative data and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic crowns were significantly less optimal than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.020). The professional-reported aesthetic outcome demonstrated significantly superior colour match of all-ceramic over metal

  2. [Clinical observation on the characteristics of occlusion and tooth abrasion in patients with cracked tooth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Zheng-mei; Ling, Jun-qi

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the occlusal characteristics and the condition of tooth abrasion in patients with cracked tooth and to discuss the etiology of the cracked tooth and the relationships between occlusal disorder, tooth abrasion and cracked tooth. Twenty-seven patients with cracked tooth were selected. The occlusal courses were recorded by T-ScanIII system in intercuspal position, protrusive movement and lateral movement. Teeth with cracked tooth were regarded as the cracked tooth group, and the healthy adjacent teeth as the control group. The distribution of premature contact, occlusal interference, the center of occlusal force were examined. The abrasive conditions of the two groups were recorded according to the Smith tooth wear index and compared. There were more teeth with occlusal interference in cracked tooth group (20 teeth) than in the control group (6 teeth), which was significantly different (OR = 5.67, chi(2) = 8.45, P = 0.003). In 24 patients with single affected tooth, the center of occlusal force (COF) located in the inside and outside ellipse were 6 teeth (25%) and 18 teeth (75%) respectively, Z test showed that there were statistical differences between the cracked tooth group and normal people. In cracked tooth group, the proportion of the teeth with abrasion was higher in teeth with occlusal interference than those without occlusal interference (chi(2) = 4.79, P = 0.029). The formation of the cracked tooth was related to the occlusal disorder and associated with the tooth abrasion.

  3. Esteetilise suhtumise mõiste Nõukogude Eesti esteetikas. The Concept of Aesthetic Approach in Soviet Estonian Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Volt

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This nostalgic yet analytic article discusses the topic of aesthetic approach in the aesthetic literature of Soviet Estonia (authors Borev, Kagan, Stolovich and others. Firstly, the aesthetic approach engages man’s creative/reshaping activities in relation to the world (following Marx’s slogan that ’man also produces in accordance with the laws of beauty’. Secondly, an artistic meaning can be distinguished, followed by a third, the subjective aesthetic meaning, which indicates the actual application of aesthetic categories (such as ’beauty’, ’sublimity’, etc.. Since the subjective aesthetic meaning is fundamental in relation to the other meanings, the article focuses on the specific characterisation of this category. The first important characteristic is the appraisability, which is born from the usage of the categories; the number of categories has been subject to historical change, reflecting the development of man’s aesthetic approach. Aesthetic approach was mainly defined through the five conditions (sensuousness, direct contact with the concrete object, selflessness, and the appraisal of the object in comparison with the ideal. Analysis of the aesthetic approach in a historical dialectic relation to theoretical, utilitarian and ethical approaches indicates that aesthetical feelings only arose towards the end of the Paleolithic era. Peoples on a lower developmental level didn’t know of aesthetic appraisal, or their aesthetic appraisals were still very closely connected with the utilitaristic. Even though all approaches at times are exhibited in their ‘pure’ forms, Soviet aesthetics generally held to the opinion that they arose simultaneously in daily practice and were intertwined with one another. The societal and practical meanings are what constitute the aesthetic approach – meaning that they define what man will begin to consider beautiful (in its more radical forms, this meant reducing the beauty of an object to

  4. The Sirt6 gene: Does it play a role in tooth development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyang Liao

    Full Text Available Dental Mesenchymal Cells (DMCs are known to play a role in tooth development as well as in the repair and regeneration of dental tissue. A large number of signaling molecules regulate the proliferation and differentiation of DMC, though the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Sirtuin-6 (SIRT6, a key regulator of aging, can exert an impact on embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation. The experimental deletion of Sirt6 in mouse bone marrow cells has been found to have an inhibiting impact on the bone mineral density and the osteogenic differentiation of these cells. The possible role of Sirt6 in tooth development, however, has at present remained largely unexplored. In the present study, we found that SIRT6 had no effect on tooth development before birth. However, Sirt6 gene deletion in knockout mice did have two post-natal impacts: a delay in tooth eruption and sluggishness in the development of dental roots. We propose an explanation of the possible molecular basis of the changes observed in Sirt6-/- mice. SIRT6 is expressed in mouse odontoblasts. Sirt6 deletion enhanced the proliferation of DMCs, as well as their capacity for adipogenic differentiation. On the other hand, it inhibited their capacity for in vitro osteogenic/chondrogenic differentiation. Further studies suggested that other factors may mediate the role of Sirt6 in odontogenesis. These include the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK, extracellular regulated MAP kinase (ERK pathways and the mitochondrial energy. We demonstrated that Sirt6 plays a role in tooth root formation and confirmed that SIRT6 is necessary for DMC differentiation as well as for the development of the tooth root and for eventual tooth eruption. These results establish a new link between SIRT6 and tooth development.

  5. The Sirt6 gene: Does it play a role in tooth development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xueyang; Feng, Bo; Zhang, Demao; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Ruimin; Ye, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Dental Mesenchymal Cells (DMCs) are known to play a role in tooth development as well as in the repair and regeneration of dental tissue. A large number of signaling molecules regulate the proliferation and differentiation of DMC, though the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Sirtuin-6 (SIRT6), a key regulator of aging, can exert an impact on embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation. The experimental deletion of Sirt6 in mouse bone marrow cells has been found to have an inhibiting impact on the bone mineral density and the osteogenic differentiation of these cells. The possible role of Sirt6 in tooth development, however, has at present remained largely unexplored. In the present study, we found that SIRT6 had no effect on tooth development before birth. However, Sirt6 gene deletion in knockout mice did have two post-natal impacts: a delay in tooth eruption and sluggishness in the development of dental roots. We propose an explanation of the possible molecular basis of the changes observed in Sirt6-/- mice. SIRT6 is expressed in mouse odontoblasts. Sirt6 deletion enhanced the proliferation of DMCs, as well as their capacity for adipogenic differentiation. On the other hand, it inhibited their capacity for in vitro osteogenic/chondrogenic differentiation. Further studies suggested that other factors may mediate the role of Sirt6 in odontogenesis. These include the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK), extracellular regulated MAP kinase (ERK) pathways and the mitochondrial energy. We demonstrated that Sirt6 plays a role in tooth root formation and confirmed that SIRT6 is necessary for DMC differentiation as well as for the development of the tooth root and for eventual tooth eruption. These results establish a new link between SIRT6 and tooth development. PMID:28355287

  6. Aesthetic perception and its minimal content: a naturalistic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eXenakis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic perception is one of the most interesting topics for philosophers and scientists who investigate how it influences our interactions with objects and states of affairs. Over the last few years, several studies have attempted to determine how aesthetics is represented in an object, and how a specific feature of an object could evoke the respective feelings during perception. Despite the vast number of approaches and models, we believe that these explanations do not resolve the problem concerning the conditions under which aesthetic perception occurs, and what constitutes the content of these perceptions. Adopting a naturalistic perspective, we here view aesthetic perception as a normative process that enables agents to enhance their interactions with physical and socio-cultural environments. Considering perception as an anticipatory and preparatory process of detection and evaluation of indications of potential interactions (what we call ‘interactive affordances’, we argue that the minimal content of aesthetic perception is an emotionally valued indication of interaction potentiality. Aesthetic perception allows an agent to normatively anticipate interaction potentialities, thus increasing sense making and reducing the uncertainty of interaction. This conception of aesthetic perception is compatible with contemporary evidence from neuroscience, experimental aesthetics, and interaction design. The proposed model overcomes several problems of transcendental, art-centered, and objective aesthetics as it offers an alternative to the idea of aesthetic objects that carry inherent values by explaining ‘the aesthetic’ as emergent in perception within a context of uncertain interaction.

  7. Social Factors in Aesthetics: Social Conformity Pressure and a Sense of Being Watched Affect Aesthetic Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Hecht, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    The present study is a first attempt to experimentally test the impact of two specific social factors, namely social conformity pressure and a sense of being watched, on participants’ judgments of the artistic quality of aesthetic objects. We manipulated conformity pressure with a test form in which a photograph of each stimulus was presented together with unanimously low (downward pressure) or high quality ratings (upward pressure) of three would-be previous raters. Participants’ sense of being watched was manipulated by testing each of them in two settings, one of which contained an eyespots stimulus. Both social factors significantly affected the participants’ judgments—unexpectedly, however, with conformity pressure only working in the downward direction and eyespots leading to an overall downward shift in participants’ judgments. Our findings indicate the relevance of including explicit and implicit social factors in aesthetics research, thus also reminding us of the limitations of overly reductionist approaches to investigating aesthetic perception and experience. PMID:29201336

  8. Towards a Wittgensteinian Aesthetics. Wollheim and the Analysis of Aesthetic Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Matteucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the possibility to develop Wittgenstein's suggestions about aesthetics, this paper will focus on the organic perspective elaborated by Richard Wollheim in «Art and Its Objects». In this regard we will try to emphasize how the concept of art as a "form of live" - explicit in Wollheim - involves the analysis of the practices embodied in the experience of art starting from those of representation. The inception modes of such practices of representation need to be described in the use of specific anthropological abilities related to perception patterns that go beyond the mere statement of facts, in a fusion among aesthetic, cognitive and emotional levels. Deepening the relationships both between lived experience and expression, and expression and understanding, we will try to point out how Wollheim (and Wittgenstein places any rhetoric of the ineffable out of the game, even regarding the analysis of the aesthetic experience.

  9. Social Factors in Aesthetics: Social Conformity Pressure and a Sense of Being Watched Affect Aesthetic Judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesslinger, Vera M; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Hecht, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    The present study is a first attempt to experimentally test the impact of two specific social factors, namely social conformity pressure and a sense of being watched, on participants' judgments of the artistic quality of aesthetic objects. We manipulated conformity pressure with a test form in which a photograph of each stimulus was presented together with unanimously low (downward pressure) or high quality ratings (upward pressure) of three would-be previous raters. Participants' sense of being watched was manipulated by testing each of them in two settings, one of which contained an eyespots stimulus. Both social factors significantly affected the participants' judgments-unexpectedly, however, with conformity pressure only working in the downward direction and eyespots leading to an overall downward shift in participants' judgments. Our findings indicate the relevance of including explicit and implicit social factors in aesthetics research, thus also reminding us of the limitations of overly reductionist approaches to investigating aesthetic perception and experience.

  10. Workplace aesthetics: Impact of environments upon employee health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Elisabet; Theorell, Tores; Saraste, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Associations between self-reported need for aesthetic improvements in the workplace and the need for ergonomic improvement and health factors were investigated to determine the possible impact of aesthetic needs on job performance. The need for aesthetic improvements were compared with the need for ergonomic improvements. All employees at a Swedish broadcasting company were invited to participate in this cross sectional study. Of those who fulfilled the inclusion criteria the participation rate was 74% (1961/2641). Demographic data was obtained from company files and pre-validated questionnaire was used for data collections from the participants. additional questions on needs for improvement were developed, tested for repeatability, and demonstrated to be within acceptable limits. Differences between 'high rank' and 'low rank' aesthetic needs and ergonomic needs were correlated to set ups of demographic, work environmental and organisational and health variables.The perceived needs for aesthetic and ergonomic improvements showed significantly different distributions (pAesthetic needs were more frequently reported than ergonomic needs. There was no significant gender related difference in response distribution of aesthetic or ergonomic needs, whereas differences between occupational groups were shown (0.006 and 0.003). 'High rank' needs for aesthetic improvement were associated to psychologically demanding work, negative work stress, sleep disturbances, problems at work, musculoskeletal pain and lower age. Gender and physical training did not differ between 'high and low rank' responders regarding neither aesthetic nor ergonomic needs. Sick leave was stronger related to ergonomics. The independently tested associations with aesthetic needs were similar to, but fewer than those for ergonomic needs with regard to the variable set ups. Sixteen studied factors out of 24, showed significant difference between 'high and low rank' aesthetic needs, and 21/24 of ergonomic

  11. Evaluation of alternative intra-oral repair techniques for fractured ceramic-fused-to-metal restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M

    Ceramic fractures are serious and costly problems in dentistry. Moreover, they pose an aesthetic and functional dilemma both for the patient and the dentist. This problem has created demand for the development of practical repair options which do not necessitate the removal and remake of the entire

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Human Tooth Pulp: Proteomics of Human Tooth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2014), s. 1961-1966 ISSN 0099-2399 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA MZd(CZ) NT14324 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dentin * human pulp * tandem mass spectrometry * tooth proteome * 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 3.375, year: 2014

  13. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  14. Creating a Single-Visit, Fibre-Reinforced, Composite Resin Bridge by Using a Natural Tooth Pontic: A Viable Alternative to a PFM Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetarpal, Ambica; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-04-01

    The rehabilitation of an anterior tooth space presents a confronting situation. Several modalities are presently available to address the challenge of an immediate replacement of a missing anterior tooth. These include a removable temporary acrylic prosthesis or resin-bonded bridges. Fibre-Reinforced Composite (FRC) bridges are preferable if they are fixed and if a cost-effective tooth replacement is desired. Also, they provide an aesthetic and a conservative treatment choice as the abutment teeth require a minimal or no preparation. This article is describing two cases with an immediate replacement of the maxillary incisor teeth by a single visit technique, with the use of FRC Resin (Ribbond) bridges and natural tooth crowns as pontics. The procedure was completed at the chair side, thereby avoiding the laboratory costs. A two year follow up of the cases has shown a successful outcome. Creating an adhesive FRC bridge by using a natural tooth pontic is a successful treatment option for the direct aesthetic replacement of missing anterior teeth.

  15. Towards tooth friendly soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahi, Jafar; Fazilati, Mohamad; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2009-10-01

    Most soft drinks contain high concentration of simple carbohydrates and have a pH of 3 or even lower. Therefore, they are harmful for tooth structure. A tooth friendly soft drink (T.F.S.D) should have the following characteristics and elements; fluoride (approximately 1 ppm), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (2%), xylitol (4-6g/serving), tea polyphenols (2-4 mg/ml), cranberry extract (250 mg/ml of the flavonoids quercetin and myricetin), sugar free, pH close to 5.5 and super oxygenation (240,000 ppm) vs. carbonation. T.F.S.D can be packaged in a container which gaseous oxygen is dissolved in a liquid in the form of bubbles. However, looking at opportunities for so-called sophisticated soft drinks, T.F.S.D will be an example for a functional and health oriented soft drink.

  16. Pink tooth phenomenon: an enigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapar, Raveena; Choudhry, Swati; Sinha, Anju; Bali, Ruchita; Shukla, Deepika

    2013-10-01

    The appearance of pink teeth is a common phenomenon which has been observed after death in certain circumstances on post-mortem examination. Extra fibrinolytic activity of pulp facilitates rapid breakdown of red blood cells and diffusion of hemoglobin and its derivatives to flow into dentine. We reviewed various studies on pink tooth phenomenon which have stated the various factors that lead to pink tooth formation. Most of the authors have stressed that post-mortem pink teeth must not be considered as a reliable odontological parameter for determining cause of death. No correlation has been found between the occurrence of pink teeth and the cause of death but condition of the surroundings certainly plays an important role in the development of this phenomenon. This paper reviews the factors and conditions responsible for formation of pink teeth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. Delayed tooth replantation in rats: effect of systemic antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin and tetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Weglis Dyanne de Souza; Silva, Cristina Antoniali; Melo, Moriel Evangelista; Silva, Vanessa Ferreira da; Almeida, Melyna Marques de; Pedrini, Denise; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Panzarini, Sônia Regina

    2015-12-01

    Systemic antibiotic therapy (SAT) has usually been recommended after tooth replantation, but its actual value has been questioned. As there are no reports in the literature about its influence on tooth replantation, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of systemic administration of antibiotics (amoxicillin and tetracycline) at the different phases of the repair process (7, 15, 30 days) in delayed rat tooth replantation. Ninety Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) had their maxillary right incisors extracted and bench-dried for 60 min. The dental papilla, enamel organ, pulp tissue, and root surface-adhered periodontal ligament were removed, and the teeth were replanted. The animals received no antibiotics (n = 30) or were medicated systemically with amoxicillin (n = 30) and tetracycline (n = 30), and were euthanized after 7, 15, and 30 days. Regardless of the evaluation period, the acute inflammatory infiltrate was less intense and root resorption presented smaller extent and depth in the group treated with amoxicillin. The results suggest that SAT has a positive influence on the repair process in delayed tooth replantation and that amoxicillin is an excellent treatment option. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A model of visual, aesthetic communication focusing on web sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2002-01-01

    in the eyes of the media producers even though the most outstanding media products often obtained their success due to aesthetic phenomena. The formal aesthetic function and the inexpressible aesthetic function have therefore been prioritised in the model in regard to the construction and analysis of media......Theory books and method books within the field of web design mainly focus on the technical and functional aspects of the construction of web design. There is a lack of a model which weighs the analysis of the visual and aesthetic aspects against the the functional and technical aspects of web...... design. With a point of departure in Roman Jakobson's linguistic communication model, the reader is introduced to a model which covers the communication aspects, the visual aspects, the aesthetic aspects and the net specific aspects of the analysis of media products. The aesthetic aspects rank low...

  19. Art Appreciation and the Method of Aesthetic Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zupančič Tomaž

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The method of aesthetic transfer is a modern teaching method in art education. It emphasizes the pedagogic value of the aesthetic experience. It is a comprehensive method, as it encompasses different parameters of art didactics. It affects lesson time allocation and determines content, methods, and teaching modes. It also affects motivation and final evaluation. The essence of the method of aesthetic transfer lies in transferring aesthetic messages from the artwork to students. The foundation and condition for a successful implementation of the method of aesthetic transfer is a high-quality art appreciation. There are several ways and methods for successfully developing art appreciation, the common objective of all being to allow students to see, perceive, and enjoy a work of art. Thus they enrich their artistic and aesthetic development, and establish a positive attitude towards art, while this method at the same time encourages their own artistic exploration.

  20. Dynamic ideo-spiritual of the aesthetic pedagogical teachers performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Castillo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the dynamic model of the ideo-spiritual aesthetic teachers performance. The model comes from the established relationship between the aesthetic education with teacher performance. The Systematization of aesthetic sensitivity - pedagogical is the axis, that vitalizes the formative processes to improve the culture of the spiritual aesthetics - as a pedagogical model’s intent. The practice of formative aesthetic subjectivity – the educational role in the socio-professional comes as the fast-track to achieve the indicated performance. It reveals the logic of the aesthetic-pedagogical in teacher performance, from the meaning of the sensitivity, as it´s logic that it expresses its epistemological and methodological essence. It distinguishes the importance of a feeling, thinking and acting teachers, according to the requirements of the school context.

  1. Research on the Aesthetic Experiences of Tourists Visiting Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saime Oral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the aesthetic value of tourism products provided by tour operators who are the wholesalers with in the tourism industry as well as revealing the impact of aesthetic valueson customer satisfaction. The research was applied to Far-East tourists who have been visiting Turkey in ever increasing numbersyear by year. Convenience sampling, a non-probability sampling method was used. Zhang (2008’s Aesthetic Value Scale was performed on Far-East tourist groups. Exploratory factor analysis and correlation analysis were applied to the data collected from the Far East tourists visiting Turkey. As aresult of the exploratory factor analysison the aesthetic experiences of the tourists within: asouvenir shop, museum, restaurant, hotel and tour bus aesthetic valueswere apparent throughout. At the end of the research apositive correlation was found between aesthetic value and customer satisfaction

  2. Aesthetic rehabilitation with multiple loop connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a missing tooth along with diastema have limited treatment options to restore the edentulous space. The use of a conventional fixed partial denture (FPD to replace the missing tooth may result in too wide anterior teeth leading to poor esthetics. The diastema resulting from the missing central incisors can be managed with implant-supported prosthesis or FPD with loop connectors. An old lady reported with chief complaints of missing upper anterior teeth due to trauma. Her past dental history revealed that she was having generalized spacing between her upper anterior teeth. Considering her esthetic requirement of maintaining the diastema between 12, 11, 22, and 21, the treatment option of 06 units porcelain fused to metal FPD from canine to canine with intermittent loop connectors between 21, 22, 11, 12 was planned. Connectors basically link different parts of FPDs. The modified FPD with loop connectors enhanced the natural appearance of the restoration, maintained the diastemas and the proper emergence profile, and preserve the remaining tooth structure of abutment teeth. This clinical report discussed a method for fabrication of a modified FPD with loop connectors to restore the wide span created by missing central incisors.

  3. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  4. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reilly, Mary M

    2011-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the commonest inherited neuromuscular disorder affecting at least 1 in 2,500. Over the last two decades, there have been rapid advances in understanding the molecular basis for many forms of CMT with more than 30 causative genes now described. This has made obtaining an accurate genetic diagnosis possible but at times challenging for clinicians. This review aims to provide a simple, pragmatic approach to diagnosing CMT from a clinician\\'s perspective.

  5. Tooth eruption and browridge formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, M D

    1982-05-01

    One of the most reasonable hypotheses regarding the functional significance of the browridge is that the supraorbital torus forms in response to masticatory stress during development. Oyen, Walker, and Rice (1979) have recently proposed a model that tests this hypothesis: if browridges are functionally related to masticatory stresses on the cranial vault, then changes in the biomechanics of the masticatory system ought to be reflected by changes in the browridge. To test their model they attempted to relate biomechanical discontinuities resulting from tooth eruption to episodes of bone deposition on the supraorbital tori of a developmental series of dry Papio crania. This paper reports on a parallel test of the model on a cross-sectional sample of Australian Aboriginal juvenile crania. This sample showed no relation between tooth eruption and the supraorbital surface morphology thought to be indicative of active bone deposition. It is also demonstrated that no significant relationship between tooth eruption and episodes of bone deposition is shown by the Papio sample. It is concluded that the use of small cross-sectional samples of dry crania does not provide a valid test of the model.

  6. Tooth brushing for oral prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruaki Hayasaki, DDS, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of plaque and debris is essential for the prevention of inflammatory periodontal diseases and dental caries, because plaque is the primary etiological factor in the introduction and development of both of these infection-oriented diseases. Plaque removal with a toothbrush is the most frequently used method of oral hygiene. Powered toothbrushes were developed beginning in the 1960s and are now widely used in developed countries. The bristles of a toothbrush should be able to reach and clean efficiently most areas of the mouth, and recently the design of both manual and powered toothbrushes has focused on the ability to reach and clean interproximal tooth surfaces. An individual's tooth brushing behavior, including force, duration, motivation and motion, are also critical to tooth brushing efficacy. Dental floss and the type of toothpaste play additional important roles as auxiliary tools for oral prophylaxis. Dental professionals should help their care-receivers’ meet the requirements of oral hygiene to maintain their QOL. This article reviews these topics.

  7. Sonic morphology: Aesthetic dimensional auditory spatial awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Martha M.

    The sound and ceramic sculpture installation, " Skirting the Edge: Experiences in Sound & Form," is an integration of art and science demonstrating the concept of sonic morphology. "Sonic morphology" is herein defined as aesthetic three-dimensional auditory spatial awareness. The exhibition explicates my empirical phenomenal observations that sound has a three-dimensional form. Composed of ceramic sculptures that allude to different social and physical situations, coupled with sound compositions that enhance and create a three-dimensional auditory and visual aesthetic experience (see accompanying DVD), the exhibition supports the research question, "What is the relationship between sound and form?" Precisely how people aurally experience three-dimensional space involves an integration of spatial properties, auditory perception, individual history, and cultural mores. People also utilize environmental sound events as a guide in social situations and in remembering their personal history, as well as a guide in moving through space. Aesthetically, sound affects the fascination, meaning, and attention one has within a particular space. Sonic morphology brings art forms such as a movie, video, sound composition, and musical performance into the cognitive scope by generating meaning from the link between the visual and auditory senses. This research examined sonic morphology as an extension of musique concrete, sound as object, originating in Pierre Schaeffer's work in the 1940s. Pointing, as John Cage did, to the corporeal three-dimensional experience of "all sound," I composed works that took their total form only through the perceiver-participant's participation in the exhibition. While contemporary artist Alvin Lucier creates artworks that draw attention to making sound visible, "Skirting the Edge" engages the perceiver-participant visually and aurally, leading to recognition of sonic morphology.

  8. Aesthetics in the education of civil and structural engineers

    OpenAIRE

    Songel Gonzalez, Juan María

    2013-01-01

    Civil and structural engineers are responsible for the design of large scale public works, but they hardly receive any training in conceptual design or visual education. The paper raises the need to urge an aesthetic education for engineers, in order to develop their perceptive and creative abilities, and presents the experience of the course on Art and Aesthetics in Civil Engineering held at the Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain). The concept of engineering aesthetics...

  9. Militant training camp and the aesthetics of civil disobedience.

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Martin; Grimwood, Tom

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the current interest in ‘art activism’ (Grindon 2010), and the relationship between artistic expression and civil disobedience. Boris Groys has argued that the lack of political dissidence within contemporary art is not down to the ineffectiveness of the aesthetic, but the far more effective intrusion of the aesthetic by the political (Groys 2008). As such, the political question of civil disobedience is necessarily an aesthetic one. At the same time, this raises problems ...

  10. Deep Cropping via Attention Box Prediction and Aesthetics Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenguan; Shen, Jianbing

    2017-01-01

    We model the photo cropping problem as a cascade of attention box regression and aesthetic quality classification, based on deep learning. A neural network is designed that has two branches for predicting attention bounding box and analyzing aesthetics, respectively. The predicted attention box is treated as an initial crop window where a set of cropping candidates are generated around it, without missing important information. Then, aesthetics assessment is employed to select the final crop ...

  11. Dental aesthetics and self-esteem in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ginna Mabel Muñoz; David Alexander Barrera; Nubia Rocío Sánchez; Edwin Gerardo Luna; Ana Cristina Mafla

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dental aesthetics and self-esteem inadolescents.Methods: The sample was 387 randomly selected high school adolescents between 13 and 16 years of age. A clinicalexamination to evaluate dental aesthetics was conducted using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). Self-esteem was assessedwith the Rosenberg’s Self-esteem Scale. The statistical analysis included a descriptive analysis and means comparison, whichwas made through...

  12. Remarks On Richard Shusterman’s Pragmatist Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkoszewska, Krystyna

    2017-01-01

    Owing largely to his influential work on pragmatist aesthetics and somaesthetics Richard Shusterman is one of the most renowned aestheticians in the world. The release of Pragmatist Aesthetics in 1992 greatly influenced the scholarly landscape; judging by the outpouring of translations, reviews, conference papers, MA and PhD theses written on related topics, indeed, one might say that the book inaugurated a new chapter in aesthetics. Shusterman’s training as an analytic philosopher, and prior...

  13. Thailand, A beauty hub for everyone? : Internationalizing Thai Aesthetic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sinhaneti, Kantara; Pullawan, Jitmanee

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Aesthetic surgery becomes another option of beauty. Interested Patients seeking for choices offered outside their homeland for more benefits. Thailand maybe one of those choices people is now interested in. Thai aesthetic industry may prove to be one of the most wanted destinations because of its expertise and relatively low cost with impressive service. Problem: “How should Thailand improve its Aesthetic service attractiveness to drive its potential to the level of internationa...

  14. Rapid road repair vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  15. Emotions, Aesthetics and Wellbeing in Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellocchi, Alberto; Cassie, Quigley; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    This internationally edited collection on emotions, aesthetics, and wellbeing emerged following an exploratory research workshop held in Luxembourg associated with the journal Cultural Studies of Science Education (CSSE). The workshop was entitled ‘Innovation and collaboration in cultural studies...... of science education: Towards an international research agenda.’ Authors were invited to articulate the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of their research, offering empirical elaborations to illustrate applications of these conceptual and methodological foundations. An outcome...... the background of existing research interest in the field of science education. We then provide an overview of each chapter in the collection....

  16. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Christopher M [SensoriMotor Laboratory, Centre for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience, Centre for Robotics and Neural Systems, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force

  17. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force generators (muscle fibres) and noisy

  18. Aesthetic considerations in algorithmic and generative composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Kerry L.

    Models of chance operations, random equations, stochastic processes, and chaos systems have inspired composers as historical as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. As these models advance and new processes are discovered or defined, composers continue to find new inspirations for musical composition. Yet, the relative artistic merits of some of these works are limited. This paper explores the application of extra-musical processes to the sonic arts and proposes aesthetic considerations from the point of view of the artist. Musical examples demonstrate possibilities for working successfully with algorithmic and generative processes in sound, from formal decisions to synthesis.

  19. Molecular Genetics of Supernumerary Tooth Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Ping; Fan, Jiabing

    2011-01-01

    Summary Despite advances in the knowledge of tooth morphogenesis and differentiation, relatively little is known about the aetiology and molecular mechanisms underlying supernumerary tooth formation. A small number of supernumerary teeth may be a common developmental dental anomaly, while multiple supernumerary teeth usually have a genetic component and they are sometimes thought to represent a partial third dentition in humans. Mice, which are commonly used for studying tooth development, only exhibit one dentition, with very few mouse models exhibiting supernumerary teeth similar to those in humans. Inactivation of Apc or forced activation of Wnt/β(catenin signalling results in multiple supernumerary tooth formation in both humans and in mice, but the key genes in these pathways are not very clear. Analysis of other model systems with continuous tooth replacement or secondary tooth formation, such as fish, snake, lizard, and ferret, is providing insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying succesional tooth development, and will assist in the studies on supernumerary tooth formation in humans. This information, together with the advances in stem cell biology and tissue engineering, will pave ways for the tooth regeneration and tooth bioengineering. PMID:21309064

  20. [Assessment of tooth bleaching efficacy with spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhao; Liu, Chang; Pan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the changes in CIE L*, a*, and b* at cervical, body, and incisal sites after tooth bleaching by using a spectrophotometer. Sixty-seven intact and healthy maxillary central incisors were in-vestigated. These incisors were darker than A3 according to the Vita Classical shade guide. The CIE tooth shade parameters L*, a*, and b* were simultaneously recorded at three tooth areas (cervical, body, and incisal) with a spectrophotometer before and after tooth bleaching (35%H2O2 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating). The shade dif-ferential (DeltaE) was calculated. ANOVA, paired t-test, and Pearson correlation analysis were used for data analysis. The efficacy rates of tooth bleaching were satisfactory, with 86.6%, 86.6%, and 85.1% in the cervical, body, and incisal sites, respectively. The average values of DeltaE were 5.09, 4.44, and 4.40 in the cervical, body, and incisal sites. Tooth bleaching significantly increased L* and significantly decreased a* and b* in all tooth areas (P spectrophotometer could objectively evaluate the whitening effect of tooth bleaching at the different tooth sites. The tooth bleaching system (35%H202 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating) exerts powerful bleaching actions in most of the tooth areas investigated. The order of tooth bleaching effectiveness is cervicalbody>incisal. Yellow coloration is decreased mainly at the cervical site, and brightness was increased mostly at theincisal site. The effectiveness of tooth bleaching increases as the baseline b* value increases.

  1. Everyday aesthetics on staycation as a pathway to restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Marjaana Besson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This multidisciplinary study enforces a suggested link between everyday aesthetic experiences and restoration. The studied phenomenon is staycation, a short-term holiday spent at home or at one’s home region, to identify how people use a (culturally familiar environment for everyday aesthetic enjoyment and how that influences restoration. This focus minimises the potential effect of long-distance travel, novelty and escapism to restoration. Staycation has not been studied before from the perspective of everyday aesthetics and restoration. I explore staycation through a lens of qualitative media analysis; history and empirical research of holiday-making; and theories in everyday aesthetics.

  2. Aesthetic Experience Explained by the Affect-Space Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emery Schubert

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A framework for organizing the semantic structure of aesthetic experience is proposed. The new framework is presented in an 'affect-space' and consists of three sets of dichotomous classifications: (1 internal locus (the felt experience versus external locus (the description of the object, (2 'affect-valence' — the attraction to (positive valence, e.g. preference, awe or repulsion from (negative valence, e.g. hatred, disgust the artwork/object — versus 'emotion-valence' — the character/contemplation of an emotion (happiness-an example of positive valence, sadness-an example of negative valence, and (3 deep versus shallow hedonic tone—e.g. 'awe' is deep, 'preference' is shallow. Deep hedonic tone is proposed as a better index of aesthetic experience (awe, being moved etc. than shallow hedonic tone (preference, pleasure, enjoyment. Deep, internal locus, affect-valence during the contemplation of an object amenable to an aesthetic judgement (beautiful, ugly etc. presents the necessary and sufficient conditions for an aesthetic experience. The framework allows future researchers to consider which aspects of an experience come closest to actual aesthetic experience from an empirical aesthetics perspective. It also highlights the limited value in grouping together so many aesthetic experiences under the rubric of emotion, such as aesthetic emotions, preference, basic emotions and so forth. Our framework paves the way for testing and further development of theory on aesthetic experience.

  3. Aesthetic Leadership (AL): Development and Implementation of Aesthetic Leadership Scale (ALS) of the School Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Soner; Oztoprak-Kavak, Zehra

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to develop a scale for measuring the aesthetic leadership (AL) characteristics of the school directors and to show that it can be applicable. The population of the study is composed of the teachers who are on duty in the elementary, secondary and high schools located in Izmit, Kocaeli. Sample of this descriptive study comprises 400…

  4. Shaping and reshaping the aesthetic brain: Emerging perspectives on the neurobiology of embodied aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Louise P; Urgesi, Cosimo; Cross, Emily S

    2016-03-01

    Less than two decades after its inception, the burgeoning field of neuroaesthetics continues to grow in interest and momentum. Despite the biological and social importance of the human body and the attention people pay to its appearance in daily life, only recently has neuroaesthetic inquiry turned its attention to questions concerning the aesthetic appraisal of the human body. We review evidence illustrating that the complexity of aesthetic experience is reflected by dynamic interplay between brain systems involved in reward, perceptual and motor processing, with a focus on aesthetic perception involving the human body. We then evaluate work demonstrating how these systems are modulated by beholders' expertise or familiarity. Finally, we discuss seminal studies revealing the plasticity of behavioural and neural responses to beauty after perceptual and motor training. This research highlights the rich potential for neuroaesthetic inquiry to extend beyond its typical realm of the fine arts to address important questions regarding the relationship between embodiment, aesthetics and performing arts. We conclude by considering some of the criticisms and limitations of neuroaesthetics, and highlight several outstanding issues for future inquiry. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Cultivating an Aesthetic Sensibility and Activism: Everyday Aesthetics and Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurren, Wanda

    2017-01-01

    The place of activism in environmental education is an ongoing conversation among educators. In this article I highlight an area that has received minimal attention within that conversation: aesthetics and activism. While activism can be enacted at the personal and public levels, I focus on the personal level of activism as I discuss links between…

  6. Aesthetics and Humean Aesthetic Norms in the Novels of Jane Austen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadlez, Eva M.

    2008-01-01

    During the eighteenth century, amateurs as well as philosophers ventured critical commentary on the arts. Talk concerning taste or beauty or the sublime was so much a part of general discourse that even novelists of that era incorporated such subjects in their work. So it would not be surprising to find that perspectives on aesthetics are…

  7. DNA Mismatch Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  8. Visual website aesthetics : the relationship between dimensions of visual website aesthetics, website trust and consumers' intention to visit the website

    OpenAIRE

    Dalen, Mie Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    A review of previous research about visual aesthetics revealed inconsistencies and contradicting views. Due to the important role of visual aesthetics in the online environment, a more thorough understanding of the construct was beneficial. Therefore, the first aim of this thesis was to develop a new structural framework of the dimensions of visual website aesthetics based on a review of previous research findings and theories. This conceptualisation process revealed that visua...

  9. The Conundrum of Modern Art : Prestige-Driven Coevolutionary Aesthetics Trumps Evolutionary Aesthetics among Art Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpooten, Jan; Dewitte, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    Two major mechanisms of aesthetic evolution have been suggested. One focuses on naturally selected preferences (Evolutionary Aesthetics), while the other describes a process of evaluative coevolution whereby preferences coevolve with signals. Signaling theory suggests that expertise moderates these mechanisms. In this article we set out to verify this hypothesis in the domain of art and use it to elucidate Western modern art's deviation from naturally selected preferences. We argue that this deviation is consistent with a Coevolutionary Aesthetics mechanism driven by prestige-biased social learning among art experts. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted two studies in which we assessed the effects on lay and expert appreciation of both the biological relevance of the given artwork's depicted content, viz., facial beauty, and the prestige specific to the artwork's associated context (MoMA). We found that laypeople appreciate artworks based on their depictions of facial beauty, mediated by aesthetic pleasure, which is consistent with previous studies. In contrast, experts appreciate the artworks based on the prestige of the associated context, mediated by admiration for the artist. Moreover, experts appreciate artworks depicting neutral faces to a greater degree than artworks depicting attractive faces. These findings thus corroborate our contention that expertise moderates the Evolutionary and Coevolutionary Aesthetics mechanisms in the art domain. Furthermore, our findings provide initial support for our proposal that prestige-driven coevolution with expert evaluations plays a decisive role in modern art's deviation from naturally selected preferences. After discussing the limitations of our research as well as the relation that our results bear on cultural evolution theory, we provide a number of suggestions for further research into the potential functions of expert appreciation that deviates from naturally selected preferences, on the one hand, and

  10. Color stability evaluation of aesthetic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Adriana Postiglione Bührer; Pereira, Stella Kossatz; Delgado, Leyla Cotrina; Borges, Christiane Phillipini

    2008-01-01

    Color match is one of the most important characteristics of aesthetic restorative materials. Maintenance of color throughout the functional lifetime of restorations is important for the durability of treatment. This characteristic is not constant among dental materials. The purpose of this research was to assess the color stability of five aesthetic restorative materials when immersed in a coffee solution. Seventy-one 17 mm x 1 mm specimens, divided into five groups, were made using one direct composite resin (Tetric Ceram, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G1), three indirect composite resins (Targis, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G2; Resilab Master, Wilcos - G3; belleGlass HP, Kerr - G4) and one porcelain (IPS Empress 2, Ivoclar/Vivadent - G5). The specimens were immersed in a coffee staining media for 15 days and stored under a controlled temperature of 37 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C in the dark. The evaluations were made after 1, 7 and 15 days by means of reflectance spectrophotometry. The data was submitted to two-way ANOVA (p pigmentation, while G5 showed the smallest changes.

  11. Transnational Remakes: Industrial and Aesthetic Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel FERNÁNDEZ LABAYEN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the industrial and aesthetic dynamics of transnational film remakes. If by «transnational remake» we understand that which «consists in making again a film in a different national context from the original one» (Berthier, 2007, p. 338, this research analyses both the production and circulation strategies and the narrative adaptation tactics involved in the remake process from a transnational perspective. In order to do so, we will examine the films ¿Quién mató a Bambi? (Santi Amodeo, 2013, remake of the Mexican film Matando Cabos (Alejandro Lozano, 2004 and Kiki, love to love (Paco León, 2016, a version of the Australian The Little Death (Josh Lawson, 2014. These cases operate as examples of adaptation processes in the Spanish context as well as tokens of remake fluxes beyond Hollywood. Attention to these films allows us to consider the existence of a potential transnational model of producing film remakes, while attending to the complex network of agents at play in buying and selling remake rights. Finally, the article reflects on the importance of industrial and academic uses of concepts such as «auteur», «film genre» or «national cinema», all of them key categories within industrial and aesthetic dynamics of contemporary film remakes.

  12. The Aesthetics of the Ambient Video Experience

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    Jim Bizzocchi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient Video is an emergent cultural phenomenon, with roots that go deeply into the history of experimental film and video art. Ambient Video, like Brian Eno's ambient music, is video that "must be as easy to ignore as notice" [9]. This minimalist description conceals the formidable aesthetic challenge that faces this new form. Ambient video art works will hang on the walls of our living rooms, corporate offices, and public spaces. They will play in the background of our lives, living video paintings framed by the new generation of elegant, high-resolution flat-panel display units. However, they cannot command attention like a film or television show. They will patiently play in the background of our lives, yet they must always be ready to justify our attention in any given moment. In this capacity, ambient video works need to be equally proficient at rewarding a fleeting glance, a more direct look, or a longer contemplative gaze. This paper connects a series of threads that collectively illuminate the aesthetics of this emergent form: its history as a popular culture phenomenon, its more substantive artistic roots in avant-garde cinema and video art, its relationship to new technologies, the analysis of the viewer's conditions of reception, and the work of current artists who practice within this form.

  13. The aesthetic experience of 'contour binding'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casco, Clara; Guzzon, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    To find the diagnostic spatial frequency information in different painting styles (cubism, impressionism and realism), we have compared sensitivity (d') in distinguishing signal (subject of the painting) from noise with normal, high-pass and low-pass filtered images at long (150 ms) and short (30 ms) exposure. We found that for cubist-style images, d' increases with high-pass filtering compared with normal and low-pass filtered images, but decreases with low-pass filtering compared with normal images. These results indicate that channels with high spatial resolution provide the diagnostic information to solve the binding problem. Sensitivity for images in impressionist style was instead reduced by both low- and high-pass filtering. This indicates that both high and low spatial frequency channels play a role in solving the binding problem, suggesting the involvement of large collator units that group the response of small channels tuned to the same orientation. The difference between realism, which shows higher sensitivity for low-frequency filtering at short durations and cubism in which the binding problem is solved by high spatial frequency channels, has a corresponding difference in aesthetic judgment: the probability of judging a painting as 'intriguing' is larger with low-pass filtering than with high-pass filtering in realism, while the opposite is true for cubism. This suggests that the aesthetic experience is available during early processing of an image, and could preferentially influence high-level categorization of the subject of a painting.

  14. Aesthetic value of paintings affects pain thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Sardaro, Michele; Livrea, Paolo

    2008-12-01

    Pain is modulated by cognitive factors, including attention and emotions. In this study we evaluated the distractive effect of aesthetic appreciation on subjectively rated pain (visual analogue scale;VAS) and multi-channel evoked potentials induced by CO(2) laser stimulation of the left hand in twelve healthy volunteers. Subjects were stimulated by laser in the absence of other external stimulation (baseline condition) and while looking at different paintings they had previously rated as beautiful, neutral or ugly. The view of paintings previously appreciated as beautiful produced lower pain scores and a clear inhibition of the P2 wave amplitude, localized in the anterior cingulate cortex; the inhibition of P2 wave amplitude was lesser or not significant during the presentation of the ugly or neutral paintings, respectively. Dipole source localization analysis of the LEP peaks showed significant changes during different conditions, with a shift from the posterior to the anterior right cingulated cortex while looking at paintings previously rated as beautiful. Our results provide evidence that pain may be modulated at cortical level by the aesthetic content of the distracting stimuli.

  15. Concept of aesthetic and unity of mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Aleksandar M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author was investigated questions about subject and a concept of aesthetic in the constellation of a modern philosophy. The question is prepared on a historical view of matter, and in the bordering line of a sense of a essence of things. As a matter of a sense of substance we must have a hermeneutical preparing in a historical dimension, what it is, and after that make a judgment what is not possible to be. Investigations always take us back to the antique period of philosophical researches because there is substance considering without any commas dealing with a strange interests looking from the side of pure philosophy. Beauty, good and a truth still must be a comprehensive values or a super transcendental beings in the sort of lights of a thinking. Thinking is possible if we have adequate ideas on the mind, and that ideas must have a spiritual space for them existing in us, or in the continuing of a life of the history of philosophy as a matter of our aesthetical meanings and a habit of the spirit. By that sign in our awareness mind we take out duty to building self-consciousness, as a personal updating and also take to philosophy that what she asks from us today.

  16. Aesthetic activities and aesthetic attitudes: influences of education, background and personality on interest and involvement in the arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Furnham, A

    2006-11-01

    There have been few studies of why some people are frequently involved in aesthetic activities such as going to the theatre, reading or playing musical instruments, whereas others are less involved. This study assesses the broad roles of education, personality and demographic factors such as social class, age and sex. More aesthetic activity was associated with music and art education, whereas science education had a substantial negative relationship with aesthetic activity, both directly and also indirectly via reduced art education. More aesthetic activity was particularly related to higher scores on the personality factor of openness, and also to lower scores on agreeableness and conscientiousness. Higher parental social class was also associated with more aesthetic activity, as also was lower age. Sex had no relationship to aesthetic activity, as neither did masculinity-femininity. Positive aesthetic attitudes were also related moderately to aesthetic activity, but were particularly strongly related to openness to experience, and somewhat less to extraversion. Class, age and sex had no direct relationship to aesthetic attitudes.

  17. Mechanisms of tooth eruption and orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, G E; King, G J

    2008-05-01

    Teeth move through alveolar bone, whether through the normal process of tooth eruption or by strains generated by orthodontic appliances. Both eruption and orthodontics accomplish this feat through similar fundamental biological processes, osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis, but there are differences that make their mechanisms unique. A better appreciation of the molecular and cellular events that regulate osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis in eruption and orthodontics is not only central to our understanding of how these processes occur, but also is needed for ultimate development of the means to control them. Possible future studies in these areas are also discussed, with particular emphasis on translation of fundamental knowledge to improve dental treatments.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment planning: cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Eric M; Williamson, Anne

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the cracked tooth, one of the five major classifications of longitudinal tooth fractures: 1) craze line; 2) cuspal fracture; 3) cracked tooth; 4) split tooth; and 5) vertical root fracture. The term "longitudinal tooth fracture" was first introduced by Rivera (Personal Communication, Iowa City, IA, 1996) and has two meanings. The first implies distance (length), particularly in the vertical (occlusal-cervical) plane, as illustrated by longitudinal lines on a map. The second indicates that these fractures occur over a period of time. Therefore, the term longitudinal tooth fracture applies to fractures that have both a distance and a time component. Thus, fractures are described that are not related to impact trauma (which occurs primarily in incisors), in which the distance (length) component may be similar, but is immediate instead of over a period of time.

  19. Benefits and disadvantages of tooth-coloured alternatives to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulet, J F

    1997-11-01

    To give the practising dentist scientifically based data to assist him/her in the responsible decision-making process necessary to weigh the options available to the patient if she/he prefers not to have an amalgam placed. Based on the literature and on the research work, which was done in the author's department, the indications and limitations of the known alternatives of amalgam were formulated. DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES TO AMALGAM: With the exception of cast gold restorations, all alternatives require the strict use of adhesive techniques. When compared with similar amalgam restorations, placing composite restorations (if they are indicated) takes approximately 2.5 times longer because complex incremental techniques are needed. Despite all the efforts, direct composite restorations placed in large cavities still show unacceptable amounts of marginal openings. Tooth-coloured inlays are a better alternative for large restorations. These restorations must be inserted with adhesive techniques. With composite inlays it is difficult to achieve a composite-composite bond. Ceramic inlays may be micromechanically bonded to the luting composite. They all show clinically a good marginal behaviour and the use of ultrasonic energy may further simplify the application technique of aesthetic inlays. Papers describing the different techniques were used as a base for the corresponding chapter. To assess and compare the longevity of the different restoration types, literature data were used. We limited ourselves to papers reporting at least 5-year clinical data. Longitudinal, clinically controlled studies were preferred. However, to be more complete, retrospective, cross sectional studies were also included. LONGEVITY OF POSTERIOR RESTORATIONS: Amalgam shows excellent longevity data with studies up to 20 years. The average annual failure rate is 0.3-6.9%. Posterior composites are in the same range (0.5-6.6%), however, the study times are much shorter (max. 10 years). For tooth

  20. Hypospadias repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000158.htm Hypospadias repair - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child had hypospadias repair to fix a birth defect in which ...

  1. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have you: Learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ) Use estrogen cream in your vagina Try ... repair; Urinary incontinence - vaginal wall repair Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  2. Retinal detachment repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... area (the macula). This can help prevent further detachment of the retina. It also will increase the chance of preserving ... buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair Images ... detachment repair - series References Connolly BP, Regillo ...

  3. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  4. Analysis of tooth tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchenko, E.V.; Timchenko, P.E.; Kulabukhova, A.Yu.; Volova, L.T.; Rosenbaum, A.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of healthy tooth tissue and tooth tissues during caries disease are presented. Features of Raman spectrum of tooth tissues during caries disease are obtained: the main changes are detected at wavenumbers 956 cm -1 .1069 cm -1 . corresponding to phosphates. and 1241 cm -1 . 1660 cm -1 . corresponding to collagen III and collagen I. respectively. Were introduced criteria allowing to detect caries and to identify weakening of tooth tissues. preceding the caries. The reliability of research results is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. (paper)

  5. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an ?unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury.? Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, e...

  6. Single-Tooth Morse Taper Connection Implant Placed in Grafted Site of the Anterior Maxilla: Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Guido Mangano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to achieve aesthetically pleasing soft tissue contours in a severely compromised tooth in the anterior region of the maxilla. For a right-maxillary central incisor with localized advanced chronic periodontitis a tooth extraction followed by reconstructive procedures and delayed implant placement was proposed and accepted by the patient. Guided bone regeneration (GBR technique was employed, with a biphasic calcium-phosphate (BCP block graft placed in the extraction socket in conjunction with granules of the same material and a resorbable barrier membrane. After 6 months of healing, an implant was installed. The acrylic provisional restoration remained in situ for 3 months and then was substituted with the definitive crown. This ridge reconstruction technique enabled preserving both hard and soft tissues and counteracting vertical and horizontal bone resorption after tooth extraction and allowed for an ideal three-dimensional implant placement. Localized severe alveolar bone resorption of the anterior maxilla associated with chronic periodontal disease can be successfully treated by means of ridge reconstruction with GBR and delayed implant insertion; the placement of an early-loaded, Morse taper connection implant in the grafted site was effective to create an excellent clinical aesthetic result and to maintain it along time.

  7. Psychosocial aspect of anterior tooth discoloration among adolescents in igbo-ora, southwestern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiyemi, O; Taiwo, J O

    2011-12-01

    Aesthetic problems in adolescence can have a significant effect on their psychosocial development. Abnormalities in tooth color can lead to such problem especially if it affects anterior teeth. This study therefore assessed the effects of anterior tooth discoloration on the psychosocial well-being of adolescents with a view to providing information that will aid the prevention and treatment of this dental problem. This study was a cross-sectional study involving 384 adolescents aged between 10 and 20years in Igboora southwestern Nigeria. Twenty-six item semi-structured questionnaire comprising variables on demographics and psychosocial effects were researcher-administered. Oral examination of the labial surfaces of the anterior permanent teeth was carried by two examiners. Frequencies and mean were generated. Chi-square and Fischer's exact tests were used to test associations between categorical variables at (P≤0.05). The mean age of participants was 14.7±2.3 years. Ninety four (24.5%) participants perceived that their anterior teeth were discolored, 65 (69.1%) of these did not like the discoloration. Sixty two (65.9%), 47 (50.0%) and 38 (40.4%) respectively reported that it prevented them from freely answering questions, smiling and interacting. After oral examination, 120 (31.2%) subjects had one form of anterior tooth discoloration. The cause of tooth discoloration in the majority 64 (16.7%) of the participants was due to extrinsic stains from compounds incorporated into plaque and calculus. Age group, sex, class of participants and presence of tetracycline stained teeth were significantly related with reported psychosocial problems (p≤0.05). About one third of adolescents had anterior tooth discoloration and the majority reported one form of psychosocial problem.

  8. Expression, Imagination, and Organic Unity: John Dewey's Aesthetics and Romanticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, David

    2003-01-01

    We are presently witnessing a renewed interest in the aesthetics of philosopher and educator John Dewey. And it would seem that this interest marks a significant intellectual reorientation and not simply a passing fad. The publications Educational Theory, Studies in Philosophy and Education, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, The Journal of…

  9. Urban routes and commuting bicyclist’s aesthetic experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpa Stefansdottir

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines whether and in what way aesthetic experience is involved in the judged quality of bicyclist’s route which they have chosen to ride between home and work. In this respect it is considered important to distinguish aesthetic experience from experience that is related to the influence of instrumental or functional features. The aesthetic impact is primarily related to features that stimulate emotional well-being when cycling. An online survey was conducted in three Nordic cities, Odense, Trondheim and Reykjavík, concentrating on cycling in different urban surroundings. The interpretation of the meanings and values associated with certain features or characteristics that influenced the commuting cyclists’ aesthetic experience is in this paper based on three theoretical viewpoints: (1 the phenomenology of perception and experience, (2 urban design theory and (3 environmental aesthetic theories and methods. The last theory involves the interpretation of experience from the environment into aesthetic meaning. The results of the survey indicate that aesthetic experience is of value to most of the respondents and is, therefore, of importance in developing the quality of bicycle routes for commuting. Greenery and contact with the natural environment and distance from motorised traffic are the most important influences on pleasurable aesthetic experience.

  10. Aesthetic Relationships and Ethics in "The Oh Fuck Moment"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breel, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the aesthetics and ethics of participatory performance through "The Oh Fuck Moment" by Hannah Jane Walker and Chris Thorpe, a performance that aesthetically explores ethically troubling material and manipulation. Ethical criticism of participatory art in recent years has focused on the way the audience member is…

  11. "Playing Attention": Contemporary Aesthetics and Performing Arts Audience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Monica

    2004-01-01

    This essay draws on the contemporary aesthetic theories of four writers -Hans-Georg Gadamer, Paul Ricoeur, Paul Thom, and James O. Young-who represent both the continental and analytic contemporary philosophical schools of thought. Each writer offers valuable perspectives on issues in aesthetic education pertaining to a key question in my…

  12. Aesthetic Leadership Perceptions of High School Students Regarding Their Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Ejder; Polat, Soner

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the high school students? level of perception related to aesthetic leadership and its sub-dimensions and try to identify the characteristics of aesthetic leadership that have been displayed by their teachers in Kocaeli, Turkey. In this research, mixed research model has been adopted. At the end of the research,…

  13. How to Make Your Relationship Work? Aesthetic Relations with Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, Jeannette

    2017-01-01

    Discussing the workings of technology in care as aesthetic rather than as ethical or epistemological interventions focusses on how technologies engage in and change relations between those involved. Such an aesthetic study opens up a repertoire to address values that are abundant in care, but are as

  14. Activating Aesthetics: Working with Heidegger and Bourdieu for Engaged Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to investigate art in public urban space via a process of activating aesthetics as a way of enhancing pedagogies of engagement. It does this firstly by addressing the question of aesthetics in Enlightenment and twentieth-century frames; then it seeks to understand how artworks may be approached ontologically and…

  15. Dance experience sculpts aesthetic perception and related brain circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirsch, L.P.; Dawson, K.; Cross, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on aesthetic preferences demonstrates that people are more likely to judge a stimulus as pleasing if it is familiar. Although general familiarity and liking are related, it is less clear how motor familiarity, or embodiment, relates to a viewer's aesthetic appraisal. This study

  16. Design and the question of contemporary aesthetic experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard; Jensen, Hans-Christian

    2017-01-01

    The article raises the question of the historical relativism of aesthetic experiences and argues that aesthetic experiences have changed according to new conditions in the contemporary age of globalization, mediatization and consumer culture. In this context, design gains attention as a primary c...

  17. The new aesthetic and art : constellations of the postdigital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contreras-Koterbay, Scott; Mirocha, Łukas; Rasch, M.D.; Roestenburg, N.C.H.F.

    2016-01-01

    The New Aesthetic and Art: Constellations of the Postdigital is an interdisciplinary analysis focusing on new digital phenomena at the intersections of theory and contemporary art. Asserting the unique character of New Aesthetic objects, Contreras-Koterbay and Mirocha trace the origins of the New

  18. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  19. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  20. Aesthetics, Usefulness and Performance in User--Search-Engine Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Adi

    2010-01-01

    Issues of visual appeal have become an integral part of designing interactive systems. Interface aesthetics may form users' attitudes towards computer applications and information technology. Aesthetics can affect user satisfaction, and influence their willingness to buy or adopt a system. This study follows previous studies that found that users…

  1. "The Word I Would Use Is 'Aesthetic'": Reading David Hawkins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Helen; Featherstone, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the life of David Hawkins, one of the most influential educators involved in school reform in the 1960s. Focuses on the aesthetic as the center of Hawkins' vision of schooling. Compares Hawkins' perspective to Dewey's in terms of the aesthetic. (KHR)

  2. Lessons of Solitude: The Awakening of Aesthetic Sensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranfa, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the contextual value of solitude in learning; in so doing, it attempts to suggest an alternative method of instruction that is based on aesthetics as the reciprocal relationship between emotions and intellect, and between action and contemplation. Such an aesthetic education or method seeks to guide the student towards the…

  3. The Aesthetic Actualisation of Learning Potential with Media and ICT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2006-01-01

    The article discusses the possibilities for using aesthetics as a concept for potentialities that are actualised with respect to education and learning with media and IT. In order to realise this, a new understanding of the concept of aesthetics as a reflexive framing of performative choice is pr...

  4. Grace under fire: aesthetic leadership in clinical nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, Judy; Wilkes, Lesley; Daly, John

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an online descriptive survey that sought to determine nurses' perceptions of aesthetic leadership among clinical leaders in nursing. Clinical leadership has been identified as an essential component to ensuring the delivery of safe, high-quality health care. Leadership has been increasingly linked in the literature to aesthetics. However, little consideration has been given to aesthetics in relation to clinical leadership in nursing. A mixed-method, online descriptive survey. Participants were recruited via e-learning platforms and social media. A total of 66 surveys were completed, including 31 written accounts of aesthetic leadership in practice. Aesthetic leadership characteristics in clinical leaders most valued are support, communication and the approach taken to colleagues. Taking risks and challenging processes were least likely to be evident among effective clinical leaders. Aesthetic leadership is multi-dimensional and a style of leadership to positively influence the clinical workplace. Support, effective communication and taking into consideration the feelings of colleagues are important dimensions of aesthetic leadership. Aesthetic leadership represents a way for clinical leaders to create and sustain a calm and positive clinical workplace. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  6. How to make your relationship work? Aesthetic relations with technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, J.

    Discussing the workings of technology in care as aesthetic rather than as ethical or epistemological interventions focusses on how technologies engage in and change relations between those involved. Such an aesthetic study opens up a repertoire to address values that are abundant in care, but are as

  7. From cultural aesthetic to perfor- mance technique: continuities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. A broad-based survey of Malawian dances that I undertook several years ago aimed rather ambitiously to identify persistent regional forms of these dances as well as their governing aesthetic(s). In the course of the field work, a recurrent ~estion emerged: how do we approach dance as cultural performance?

  8. Image aesthetic quality evaluation using convolution neural network embedded learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-xin; Pu, Yuan-yuan; Xu, Dan; Qian, Wen-hua; Wang, Li-peng

    2017-11-01

    A way of embedded learning convolution neural network (ELCNN) based on the image content is proposed to evaluate the image aesthetic quality in this paper. Our approach can not only solve the problem of small-scale data but also score the image aesthetic quality. First, we chose Alexnet and VGG_S to compare for confirming which is more suitable for this image aesthetic quality evaluation task. Second, to further boost the image aesthetic quality classification performance, we employ the image content to train aesthetic quality classification models. But the training samples become smaller and only using once fine-tuning cannot make full use of the small-scale data set. Third, to solve the problem in second step, a way of using twice fine-tuning continually based on the aesthetic quality label and content label respective is proposed, the classification probability of the trained CNN models is used to evaluate the image aesthetic quality. The experiments are carried on the small-scale data set of Photo Quality. The experiment results show that the classification accuracy rates of our approach are higher than the existing image aesthetic quality evaluation approaches.

  9. Aesthetics, Education, the Critical Autonomous Self, and the Culture Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2006-01-01

    The author contends that by reclaiming their own valuable connection to reflective artistic experience and reception, aesthetic theory and art education can contribute to a reconceptualization of autonomy and critique and, perhaps more importantly, to a reorientation of educational practice. Adorno's aesthetics is exceptionally relevant to this…

  10. The Aesthetic Journal: A Creative Tool in Art Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Kathryn L.

    1990-01-01

    Presents the Aesthetic Journal for junior high school art students. Designed to increase aesthetic perception, art history knowledge, and art vocabulary, the journal also helps students independently respond to artworks without peer influence. Outlines journal assignments and guidelines for students and teachers. Includes sample entries from…

  11. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigeti, Kinga; Lupski, James R

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders presenting with the phenotype of a chronic progressive neuropathy affecting both the motor and sensory nerves. During the last decade over two dozen genes have been identified in which mutations cause CMT. The disease illustrates a multitude of genetic principles, including diverse mutational mechanisms from point mutations to copy number variation (CNV), allelic heterogeneity, age-dependent penetrance and variable expressivity. Population based studies have determined the contributions of the various genes to disease burden enabling evidence-based approaches to genetic testing. PMID:19277060

  12. The Role of Hypoxia in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic forces are known to have various effects on the alveolar process, such as cell deformation, inflammation, and circulatory disturbances. Each of these conditions affecting cell differentiation, cell repair, and cell migration, is driven by numerous molecular and inflammatory mediators. As a result, bone remodeling is induced, facilitating orthodontic tooth movement. However, orthodontic forces not only have cellular effects but also induce vascular changes. Orthodontic forces are known to occlude periodontal ligament vessels on the pressure side of the dental root, decreasing the blood perfusion of the tissue. This condition is accompanied by hypoxia, which is known to either affect cell proliferation or induce apoptosis, depending on the oxygen gradient. Because upregulated tissue proliferation rates are often accompanied by angiogenesis, hypoxia may be assumed to fundamentally contribute to bone remodeling processes during orthodontic treatment.

  13. Aesthetic preference in the spatial composition of traditional Chinese paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Gao, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetic psychology has discussed many aspects of aesthetic preferences for spatial composition. However, there have been few empirical explorations of the spatial composition of traditional Chinese paintings. The results of this experiment showed that the shape of the frame had a significant effect on aesthetic preferences. Participants preferred to put two figures at certain relative horizontal distances from each other according to the horizontal shape of the frame but may have difficulty in adapting the relative vertical distance according to the vertical shape of the frame. Furthermore, the unique aesthetic interest of traditional Chinese long-vertical scroll paintings was discussed. This discussion revealed that, in a creative way, ancient Chinese artists followed the same aesthetic principles we observed, and they developed the artistic conception and romantic charm of traditional Chinese paintings.

  14. Aesthetic Qualities of Cross Laminated Timber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejder, Anne Kirkegaard

    in the great importance wood has had as a building material throughout history as a naturally occurring, strong, light and workable construction material with various multi-sensuous qualities and great applicability. Over the last two decades, wood as a building material has gained renewed focus, partly due...... to its sustainable profile. In parallel to this, new production methods and further refined timber products have been developed. Among these are the engineered timber-based product Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) that show enhanced structural properties compared to unrefined timber. However, the question......) the materiality of CLT, and 3) how one can deal with these qualitative aspects in the design process. This leads to: firstly, the development of an explicit model to help structuring the analysis and evaluation of the materiality of CLT, and secondly, a clarification and articulation of the aesthetic qualities...

  15. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face.

  16. Gingival Harmony in Anterior Aesthetic Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalenda Hadyaoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a case of gingival asymmetry with compromising aesthetics. A 25-year-old dental student presented to the department of prosthetic dentistry. She was concerned about the greyish transparency of the crown metal margin through the marginal gingiva. The crown was placed to restore her lateral incisor. A comprehensive examination revealed that this unaesthetic aspect was caused by a non-harmonious gingival architecture in the lateral incisor marked by an unaesthetic gingival Zenith. The treatment plan included a surgical crown lengthening followed by prosthetic therapy consisting in a Zirconia based crown replacing the old prosthesis. Thanks to a well-planned multi-disciplinary approach, the result was esthetically acceptable and the patient was satisfied.

  17. The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    methodology to cultural studies. Throughout, he offers concrete examples to illustrate theoretical points. Folkmann’s philosophically informed account shows design--in all its manifestations, from physical products to principles of organization--to be an essential medium for the articulation...... and the phenomenology of imagination, he seeks to answer fundamental questions about what design is and how it works that are often ignored in academic research. Folkmann considers three conditions in design: the possible, the aesthetic, and the imagination. Imagination is a central formative power behind the creation...... as a structure of meaning within the objects of design, which act as part of our interface with the world. Taking a largely phenomenological perspective that reflects both continental and American pragmatist approaches, Folkmann also makes use of discourses that range from practice-focused accounts of design...

  18. Global aesthetic surgery statistics: a closer look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidekrueger, Paul I; Juran, S; Ehrl, D; Aung, T; Tanna, N; Broer, P Niclas

    2017-08-01

    Obtaining quality global statistics about surgical procedures remains an important yet challenging task. The International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ISAPS) reports the total number of surgical and non-surgical procedures performed worldwide on a yearly basis. While providing valuable insight, ISAPS' statistics leave two important factors unaccounted for: (1) the underlying base population, and (2) the number of surgeons performing the procedures. Statistics of the published ISAPS' 'International Survey on Aesthetic/Cosmetic Surgery' were analysed by country, taking into account the underlying national base population according to the official United Nations population estimates. Further, the number of surgeons per country was used to calculate the number of surgeries performed per surgeon. In 2014, based on ISAPS statistics, national surgical procedures ranked in the following order: 1st USA, 2nd Brazil, 3rd South Korea, 4th Mexico, 5th Japan, 6th Germany, 7th Colombia, and 8th France. When considering the size of the underlying national populations, the demand for surgical procedures per 100,000 people changes the overall ranking substantially. It was also found that the rate of surgical procedures per surgeon shows great variation between the responding countries. While the US and Brazil are often quoted as the countries with the highest demand for plastic surgery, according to the presented analysis, other countries surpass these countries in surgical procedures per capita. While data acquisition and quality should be improved in the future, valuable insight regarding the demand for surgical procedures can be gained by taking specific demographic and geographic factors into consideration.

  19. Urban greening: environmentalism or marketable aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Bowd

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, urban greening has been conceptualized, and subsequently marketed, as a way of making cities more sustainable. Urban greening has been actualized in large global cities, regional centers, and also in many cities in the Global South, where it has been touted as a potential solution to the urban heat island (UHI effect and as a way of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions. This involves planting street trees and installing curbside gardens, bioswales, green walls, green roofs, and the redevelopment of former industrial zones into urban parklands. This paper questions the assumption that this “greening” of the city must necessarily lead to positive environmental impacts. While such infrastructure itself might be constructed with environmental principles in mind, wider questions concerning the production of such landscapes, and the consumption-orientated lifestyles of those who inhabit these urban landscapes, are seldom considered. Moreover, green aesthetics and environmental sustainability are not always as mutually inclusive as the concepts might suggest, as aesthetics are often a dominating influence in the process of planning green urban environments. This review reorients the focus on the way in which the UHI effect and CO2 emissions have been framed by utilizing Foucault's (1980 “regimes of truth,” where environmental issues are contextualized within the “colonised lifeworld” of free-market forces. This review suggests that for sustainability to be achieved in urban contexts, the process of urban greening must move beyond quick techno-fixes through engagement in the co-production of knowledge.

  20. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Checklist: A Safety Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucupira, Eduardo; Matta, Renato; Zuker, Patrícia; Matta, Jorge; Arbeláez, Juan Pablo; Uebel, Carlos O

    2016-10-01

    About one in ten patients experiences iatrogenic events, and more than half of these occur in the perioperative environment. The objective of this study was to develop a complete and functional checklist for aesthetic plastic surgery and test it in patients who would undergo elective plastic surgeries. Patient data were collected from a general hospital and the particular clinic between October 2013 and October 2015, through history, physical examination, diagnosis, laboratory tests, pre-, during, and postoperatively, and complications. An expanded safety checklist was developed and optimized for aesthetic plastic surgery based on the model presented by the WHO in 2009 with reference to the information related to the prevention of more frequent complications in this specialty. The tool was applied to 486 patients, of whom 430 (88 %) were women and 56 (12 %) were men. The most frequently performed procedure was liposuction with 30 % of cases, and the most widely used type of anesthesia (39 %) was local anesthesia + sedation. The greater adherence of professionals to the checklist was the group of residents (98 %). The observed complications were seromas (7 %), other complications unrelated to the wound (3 %), and hematoma (0.2 %) in only one patient who underwent facelift. The use of the checklist in addition to allowing data collection and the identification of potential risks promoted favorable changes in the attitudes of some professionals and generated interest in patient safety and teamwork. This journal requires that the authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  1. Aesthetic Judgement of Orientation in Modern Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mather

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When creating an artwork, the artist makes a decision regarding the orientation at which the work is to be hung based on their aesthetic judgement and the message conveyed by the piece. Is the impact or aesthetic appeal of a work diminished when it is hung at an incorrect orientation? To investigate this question, Experiment 1 asked whether naïve observers can appreciate the correct orientation (as defined by the artist of 40 modern artworks, some of which are entirely abstract. Eighteen participants were shown 40 paintings in a series of trials. Each trial presented all four cardinal orientations on a computer screen, and the participant was asked to select the orientation that was most attractive or meaningful. Results showed that the correct orientation was selected in 48% of trials on average, significantly above the 25% chance level, but well below perfect performance. A second experiment investigated the extent to which the 40 paintings contained recognisable content, which may have mediated orientation judgements. Recognition rates varied from 0% for seven of the paintings to 100% for five paintings. Orientation judgements in Experiment 1 correlated significantly with “meaningful” content judgements in Experiment 2: 42% of the variance in orientation judgements in Experiment 1 was shared with recognition of meaningful content in Experiment 2. For the seven paintings in which no meaningful content at all was detected, 41% of the variance in orientation judgements was shared with variance in a physical measure of image content, Fourier amplitude spectrum slope. For some paintings, orientation judgements were quite consistent, despite a lack of meaningful content. The origin of these orientation judgements remains to be identified.

  2. Aesthetic judgement of orientation in modern art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, George

    2012-01-01

    When creating an artwork, the artist makes a decision regarding the orientation at which the work is to be hung based on their aesthetic judgement and the message conveyed by the piece. Is the impact or aesthetic appeal of a work diminished when it is hung at an incorrect orientation? To investigate this question, Experiment 1 asked whether naïve observers can appreciate the correct orientation (as defined by the artist) of 40 modern artworks, some of which are entirely abstract. Eighteen participants were shown 40 paintings in a series of trials. Each trial presented all four cardinal orientations on a computer screen, and the participant was asked to select the orientation that was most attractive or meaningful. Results showed that the correct orientation was selected in 48% of trials on average, significantly above the 25% chance level, but well below perfect performance. A second experiment investigated the extent to which the 40 paintings contained recognisable content, which may have mediated orientation judgements. Recognition rates varied from 0% for seven of the paintings to 100% for five paintings. Orientation judgements in Experiment 1 correlated significantly with "meaningful" content judgements in Experiment 2: 42% of the variance in orientation judgements in Experiment 1 was shared with recognition of meaningful content in Experiment 2. For the seven paintings in which no meaningful content at all was detected, 41% of the variance in orientation judgements was shared with variance in a physical measure of image content, Fourier amplitude spectrum slope. For some paintings, orientation judgements were quite consistent, despite a lack of meaningful content. The origin of these orientation judgements remains to be identified.

  3. Dieting and body image in aesthetic sports: A comparison of Dutch female gymnasts and non-aesthetic sport participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, A.P.; Oudejans, R.R.D.; Bakker, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between dieting behavior and body image in female aesthetic athletes. Methods: Seventeen elite gymnasts, 51 non-elite gymnasts and a control group of 85 schoolgirls, participating in non-elite, merely recreational non-aesthetic sports, completed self-report

  4. Regenerative endodontic procedure of an infected immature permanent human tooth: an immunohistological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschi, Nastaran; Hilkens, Petra; Lambrichts, Ivo; Van den Eynde, Kathleen; Mavridou, Athina; Strijbos, Olaf; De Ketelaere, Marieke; Van Gorp, Gertrude; Lambrechts, Paul

    2016-05-01

    An immunohistological study of an infected immature permanent human tooth after a regenerative endodontic procedure (REP) was conducted in order to determine the histologic outcome of this procedure. Besides observed signs of angiogenesis and neurogenesis, repair and/or regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex was also investigated. A REP was performed on tooth 45 of a 10-year-old girl. Eleven months post-treatment, the tooth had to be removed for orthodontic reasons. The following investigations were performed: immunohistology and radiographic quantification of root development. After hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, the following immunomarkers were selected: neurofilament (NF), pan cytokeratin (PK), osteocalcin (OC), and CD34. The REP resulted in clinical and radiographic healing of the periradicular lesion and quantifiable root development. The HE staining matches with the medical imaging post-REP: underneath the mineral trioxide aggregate a calcified bridge with cell inclusions, connective pulp-like tissue (PLT) with blood vessels, osteodentin against the root canal walls, on the root surface cementum (Ce), and periodontal ligament (PDL). The PDL was PK(+). The blood vessels in the PLT and PDL were CD34(+). The Ce, osteodentin, and stromal cells in the PLT were OC(+). The neurovascular bundles in the PLT were NF(+). Immunohistologically, REP of this infected immature permanent tooth resulted in an intracanalar connective tissue with a regulated physiology, but not pulp tissue. REP of an immature permanent infected tooth may heal the periapical infection and may result in a combination of regeneration and repair of the pulp-dentin complex.

  5. Towards a Wittgensteinian Aesthetics. Wollheim and the Analysis of Aesthetic Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Matteucci

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the possibility to develop Wittgenstein's suggestions about aesthetics, this paper will focus on the organic perspective elaborated by Richard Wollheim in «Art and Its Objects». In this regard we will try to emphasize how the concept of art as a "form of live" - explicit in Wollheim - involves the analysis of the practices embodied in the experience of art starting from those of representation. The inception modes of such practices of representation need to be describe...

  6. Repair vs replacement of direct composite restorations: a survey of teaching and operative techniques in Oceania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Paul A; Ghazali, Amna; Tarif, Zahidah H; Loch, Carolina; Lynch, Christopher; Wilson, Nairn; Blum, Igor R

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the teaching and operative techniques for the repair and/or replacement of direct resin-based composite restorations (DCRs) in dental schools in Oceania. A 14-item questionnaire was mailed to the heads of operative dentistry in 16 dental schools in Oceania (Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and Papua New Guinea). The survey asked whether the repair of DCRs was taught within the curriculum; the rationale behind the teaching; how techniques were taught, indications for repair, operative techniques, materials used, patient acceptability, expected longevity and recall systems. All 16 schools participated in the study. Thirteen (81%) reported the teaching of composite repairs as an alternative to replacement. Most schools taught the theoretical and practical aspects of repair at a clinical level only. All 13 schools (100%) agreed on tooth substance preservation being the main reason for teaching repair. The main indications for repair were marginal defects (100%), followed by secondary caries (69%). All 13 schools that performed repairs reported high patient acceptability, and considered it a definitive measure. Only three schools (23%) claimed to have a recall system in place following repair of DCRs. Most respondents either did not know or did not answer when asked about the longevity of DCRs. Repair of DCRs seems to be a viable alternative to replacement, which is actively taught within Oceania. Advantages include it being minimally invasive, preserving tooth structure, and time and money saving. However, standardised guidelines need to be developed and further clinical long-term studies need to be carried out. The decision between replacing or repairing a defective composite restoration tends to be based on what clinicians have been taught, tempered by experience and judgement. This study investigated the current status of teaching and operative techniques of repair of direct composite restorations in dental schools in Oceania. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Psychosocial Aspect of Anterior Tooth Discoloration among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty two (65.9%), 47 (50.0%) and 38 (40.4%) respectively reported that it prevented them from freely answering questions, smiling and interacting. After oral examination, 120 (31.2%) subjects had one form of anterior tooth discoloration. The cause of tooth discoloration in the majority 64 (16.7%) of the participants was due ...

  8. psychosocial aspect of anterior tooth discoloration among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    discoloration on the psychosocial well being of adolescents with a view to providing information that will aid the ... Keywords: Psychosocial, Anterior tooth discolouration, Adolescents. Ann Ibd. Pg. Med 2011. Vol.9, No.2 94-99 ... often results in loss of self-esteem and damage to physical and mental health.9,10 Tooth ...

  9. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Posture! Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Men: Looking for a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  10. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  12. Repair of fractured abutment teeth under pre-existing crowns: An alternative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Mascarenhas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a technique for repair of abutment tooth which fractured during removal of a provisional restoration before bisque trial. The technique uses plastic templates to fabricate new composite core foundation for the existing crowns. This technique helps the dentist to rebuild the core in a single appointment.

  13. Mathematical description of tooth flank surface of globoidal worm gear with straight axial tooth profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połowniak, Piotr; Sobolak, Mariusz

    2017-12-01

    In this article, a mathematical description of tooth flank surface of the globoidal worm and worm wheel generated by the hourglass worm hob with straight tooth axial profile is presented. The kinematic system of globoidal worm gear is shown. The equation of globoid helix and tooth axial profile of worm is derived to determine worm tooth surface. Based on the equation of meshing the contact lines are obtained. The mathematical description of globoidal worm wheel tooth flank is performed on the basis of contact lines and generating the tooth side by the extreme cutting edge of worm hob. The presented mathematical model of tooth flank of TA worm and worm wheel can be used e.g. to analyse the contact pattern of the gear.

  14. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: a microleakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Daniela Araújo Veloso; Gonçalves, Fabiana Santos; Magalhães, Cláudia Silami; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Mjör, Ivar A

    2011-01-01

    Total replacement is the most common technique for defective amalgam restorations, and it represents a major part of restorative dental treatment. Repair is an alternative option for amalgam restorations with localized defects. This study compared microleakage of amalgam restorations repaired by bonded amalgam or composite resin. Thirty extracted human pre-molars were prepared and restored with class I amalgam. A simulated defect was prepared that included the cavosurface margin on restorations, and the pre-molars were assigned to two treatment groups (n=15): In group 1, premolars were treated by composite resin (34% Tooth Conditioner Gel + Adper Single Bond 2 + Z100) and in group 2, premolars were repaired by bonded amalgam (34% Tooth Conditioner Gel + Prime and Bond 2.1 + Permite C). The teeth were immersed in a 50% silver nitrate solution, thermocycled, sectioned longitudinally and then observed by three examiners using a stereomicroscope. Microleakage was evaluated using a 0-4 scale for dye penetration, and data was analyzed by Kruskal Wallis and Dunn tests. Neither of the two methods eliminated microleakage completely. Composite resin was significantly the most effective for repair/tooth interface sealing (score 0 = 80.0%; P=0.0317). For the repair/restoration interface, composite resin was also statistically more effective as a sealant (score 0=66%; P=0.0005) when compared to the bonded amalgam technique (score 0=13%; P=0.0005). The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  15. Tooth reattachment: An immediate esthetic restorative procedure for crown root fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu G Singla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crown root fractures in the maxillary anterior region represent an intriguing challenge for clinicians. An interdisciplinary approach based on exposing fractured margins and the definitive prosthetic rehabilitation represent the standard modality of treatment for these conditions to restore the appropriate biologic dimension and esthetics. However, if the margins of the fragment and the tooth show perfect juxtaposition with no interfragmentary space and immediate esthetic replacement is needed, reattachment of the fractured segment using adhesives may be indicated. The aim of this case report is to describe the treatment of a crown root fracture at CEJ of an endodontically treated tooth having porcelain fused to metal crown by means of metal post placement and reattactment of the fragment using Glass ionomer cement with follow up of one year. Conclusion: Reattachment of a tooth fragment is a viable technique that restores function and aesthetics with a very conservative approach in a single visit and can be considered when treating patients with crown/root fractures of the anterior teeth.

  16. Accelerated orthodontic tooth movement: molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hechang; Williams, Ray C; Kyrkanides, Stephanos

    2014-11-01

    Accelerating orthodontic tooth movement can significantly reduce treatment duration and risks of side effects. The rate of orthodontic tooth movement is chiefly determined by the remodeling of tissues surrounding the roots; this in turn is under the control of molecular mechanisms regulating cellular behaviors in the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying accelerated orthodontic tooth movement, and the clinical and experimental methods that accelerate orthodontic tooth movement with possible molecular mechanisms. The review also shows directions for future studies to develop more clinically applicable methods to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of split tooth as an unstudied reason for tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaghae, Ifueko Patience; Azodo, Clement Chinedu

    2014-09-10

    Split tooth is an unstudied reason for tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze split tooth as a reason for extraction in a dental clinic in Benin City. The prospective study was carried out on 669 patients having tooth extraction between May, 2005 and December, 2012. Over the period of the study, diagnosis and tooth extraction were done by three dentists of more five years practice experience. The indications for tooth extraction were noted with specific interest on those diagnosed as split tooth without restoration. Data was entered into Microsoft excel, sorted and transported into SPSS (SPSS version 16.0, Chicago, IL, USA). Split teeth constituted for 39 (5%) of extracted teeth. This 39 extractions were done in 38 patients meaning that two split teeth were extracted on separate occasions from same patient. The majority 23 (61%) of extracted split tooth were done in patients in the fifth decade of life. More of the split tooth extraction were performed in males 28 (72%) than females 11 (28%). Overall mandibular teeth were more affected than the maxillary teeth and the most affected teeth were mandibular second molars 23 (59%) while the least affected were the mandibular first premolars 1 (3%) and the third molars 1 (3%). The reported masticatory accident as aetiology, were biting on stone 21 (53%) or piece of bone 10 (26%) while eating. A few 3 (8%) were suspected bruxists. The majority 25 (65%) visited the dental clinic 3-6 months after the incident and onset of symptoms. Split tooth constitute a reasonable common reason for tooth extraction and this was most common in the fifth decade of life. It is therefore important to improve early diagnosis of a cracked tooth in order to prevent the progression of the crack tooth to split tooth.

  18. Tooth whitening: what we now know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Current research about tooth whitening shows that it is safe and effective when manufacturer's protocol is followed, yet there are risks of which the profession and users should be aware. This update provides a summary of current research and assessment of the safety and efficacy of tooth whitening regimens. Tooth whitening has become one of the most frequently requested dental procedures by the public. The public has come to demand whiter, more perfect smiles and in response many choices for tooth whitening have been made available. These include home-based products such as toothpastes, gels, and films, as well as in-office based systems where products containing highly concentrated bleaching agents are applied under professional supervision. The profession and public have been aware of certain risks related to tooth whitening such as increased tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation. New research has shown that there are other risks such as tooth surface roughening and softening, increased potential for demineralization, degradation of dental restorations, and unacceptable color change of dental restorations. The new research is also focused on optimizing whitening procedures to reduce tooth sensitivity and to increase the persistence of the whitening. Current reports in the literature are reviewed that are related to the use of peroxide based whitening methods. These reports include in vitro studies for method optimization and mechanism as well as clinical studies on effects of various whitening regimens. When manufacturer's instructions are followed, hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide based tooth whitening is safe and effective. Patients should be informed of the risks associated with tooth whitening and instructed on identification of adverse occurrences so that they may seek professional help as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Combining Aesthetic with Ecological Values for Landscape Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dewei; Luo, Tao; Lin, Tao; Qiu, Quanyi; Luo, Yunjian

    2014-01-01

    Humans receive multiple benefits from various landscapes that foster ecological services and aesthetic attractiveness. In this study, a hybrid framework was proposed to evaluate ecological and aesthetic values of five landscape types in Houguanhu Region of central China. Data from the public aesthetic survey and professional ecological assessment were converted into a two-dimensional coordinate system and distribution maps of landscape values. Results showed that natural landscapes (i.e. water body and forest) contributed positively more to both aesthetic and ecological values than semi-natural and human-dominated landscapes (i.e. farmland and non-ecological land). The distribution maps of landscape values indicated that the aesthetic, ecological and integrated landscape values were significantly associated with landscape attributes and human activity intensity. To combine aesthetic preferences with ecological services, the methods (i.e. field survey, landscape value coefficients, normalized method, a two-dimensional coordinate system, and landscape value distribution maps) were employed in landscape assessment. Our results could facilitate to identify the underlying structure-function-value chain, and also improve the understanding of multiple functions in landscape planning. The situation context could also be emphasized to bring ecological and aesthetic goals into better alignment. PMID:25050886

  20. Disparities in Aesthetic Procedures Performed by Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Operative experience in aesthetic surgery is an important issue affecting plastic surgery residents. This study addresses the variability of aesthetic surgery experience during plastic surgery residency. National operative case logs of chief residents in independent/combined and integrated plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Fold differences between the bottom and top 10th percentiles of residents were calculated for each aesthetic procedure category and training model. The number of residents not achieving case minimums was also calculated. Case logs of 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed. There was marked variability in craniofacial (range, 6.0-15.0), breast (range, 2.4-5.9), trunk/extremity (range, 3.0-16.0), and miscellaneous (range, 2.7-22.0) procedure categories. In 2015, the bottom 10th percentile of integrated and independent/combined residents did not achieve case minimums for botulinum toxin and dermal fillers. Case minimums were achieved for the other aesthetic procedure categories for all graduating years. Significant variability persists for many aesthetic procedure categories during plastic surgery residency training. Greater efforts may be needed to improve the aesthetic surgery experience of plastic surgery residents. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com